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1

Transient Neurologic Symptoms After Spinal Anesthesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

- We recently reported several cases consistent with tran- sient radicular irritation after spinal anesthesia with hy- perbaric 5% lidocaine. The present prospective, blind, nonrandomized study was performed to determine the incidence of these transient neurologic symptoms and to identify factors that might be associated with their occurrence. We studied 270 patients scheduled for gy- necologic or obstetric procedures under

Karl F. Hampl; Markus C. Schneider; Wolfgang Ummenhofer; Jurgen Drewe

1995-01-01

2

Does Pregnancy Protect Against Intrathecal Lidocaine-Induced Transient Neurologic Symptoms?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the incidence of transient neurologic symptoms (TNS) after the use of hyperbaric lidocaine as compared with hyperbaric bupivacaine in patients undergoing cesarean delivery under spinal anesthe- sia. Two hundred women scheduled for cesarean de- livery were randomly allocated to receive spinal an- esthesia with 75 mg hyperbaric lidocaine 5% (n 5 100) or 12 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.75%

Marie T. Aouad; Sahar S. Siddik; Maya I. Jalbout; Anis S. Baraka

2001-01-01

3

Neurological symptoms associated with sarcocystosis in adult sheep.  

PubMed Central

Four mature ewes developed mild neurological symptoms. Histological examination revealed a nonsuppurative encephalitis and myelitis associated with protozoan cysts identified as Sarcocystis spp. by immunoperoxidase. The mild clinical signs and apparent recovery of 1 ewe suggest that neurological disease caused by Sarcocystis spp. may be more common than indicated by the infrequency of reports. Images Figure 1. PMID:9056068

Henderson, J M; Dies, K H; Haines, D M; Higgs, G W; Ayroud, M

1997-01-01

4

Does exercise evoke neurological symptoms in healthy subjects?  

PubMed

Concussion is a common injury in collision sports and is evidenced by a variety of signs and symptoms. The recording of neurological symptoms is an important component of screening for a concussion and in return-to-play decisions. However similar symptoms are prevalent in the general population and are reported to be associated with participation in physical activities. The purpose of this study was to document the neurological symptoms reported by healthy individuals following controlled bouts of exercise. A crossover randomised design with 2 levels of exercise intensity, moderate intensity and high intensity, each of 15min duration was used. Participants completed a standardised postconcussion symptom checklist prior to exercise (pre), immediately following exercise (post-1) and again after 15 min of rest (post-2). 60 participants were recruited into the study. A summed symptom score was calculated and analysed with a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA procedure. The intensityxtime interaction (F(2,118)=23.94, p<0.001) demonstrated a significant increase in symptom scores for the high intensity condition immediately following exercise (p<0.001). Although the moderate intensity showed a similar trend this was not significant. These findings suggest that sports medicine professionals need to be aware of the effect of exercise on symptom reporting when assessing and in making return-to-play decisions. PMID:19231284

Alla, Sridhar; Sullivan, S John; McCrory, Paul; Schneiders, Anthony G; Handcock, Phil

2010-01-01

5

Cholinergic therapy for neuropsychiatric symptoms in neurologic disorders.  

PubMed

Acetylcholine is a modulatory central nervous system (CNS) neurotransmitter involved in diverse brain processes. Historically, drugs that increase CNS cholinergic transmission have been investigated primarily for relieving cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer"s disease (AD). Emerging from these efforts are recent findings that several cholinesterase-inhibitor agents also have a beneficial effect on selected noncognitive symptoms in AD, such as apathy, psychosis, and purposeless motor behaviors. The broad psychotropic effects of cholinergic agents observed in AD and other degenerative conditions highlight potential symptom-based therapeutic indications for these drugs across a variety of neurologic disorders. PMID:11122908

Kaufer, D I

1999-10-01

6

Manganese exposure: neuropsychological and neurological symptoms and effects in welders.  

PubMed

Manganese exposure reportedly may have an adverse effect on CNS function and mood. Sixty-two welders with clinical histories of exposure to manganese were compared to 46 matched regional controls chosen at random from a telephone directory. The following tests were given: Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III), Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III), Boston Naming, WRAT-3, Cancellation H, Trail Making Tests A and B, Auditory Consonant Trigrams, Stroop, Rey-Osterreith, Animal Naming, Controlled Oral Word Association (COWAT), Test of Memory Malingering, Rey 15-item, Fingertapping, Grooved Pegboard, Dynamometer, Visual Attention Test, Lanthony d-15 Color Vision, Vistech Contrast Sensitivity, and Schirmer strips. The controls were administered a shorter battery of tests and the Rey-Osterreith, Animal Naming and some of the subtests of the WAIS-III, WMS-III were not administered. Mood tests, given to both groups, included the Symptom Checklist-40, Symptom Checklist-90-R, Profile of Mood Scale, Beck Depression Inventory II, and Beck Anxiety Inventory. Forty-seven welders and 42 controls were retained for statistical analysis after appropriate exclusions. Results showed a high rate of symptom prevalence and pronounced deficits in motor skills, visuomotor tracking speed and information processing, working memory, verbal skills (COWAT), delayed memory, and visuospatial skills. Neurological examinations compared to neuropsychological test results suggest that neuropsychologists obtain significantly more mood symptoms overall. Odds ratios indicate highly elevated risk for neuropsychological and neurological symptomatology of manganism. Mood disturbances including anxiety, depression, confusion, and impaired vision showed very high odds ratios. Neurological exams and neuropsychological tests exhibit complementarity and differences, though neuropsychological methods may be more sensitive in detecting early signs of manganism. The present study corroborates the findings of our previous study in another group of welders. PMID:16343629

Bowler, Rosemarie M; Gysens, Sabine; Diamond, Emily; Nakagawa, Sanae; Drezgic, Marija; Roels, Harry A

2006-05-01

7

A study of neurologic symptoms on exposure to organophosphate pesticides in the children of agricultural workers  

PubMed Central

Pesticides are used extensively throughout the world in agriculture and in pest control as well as for community health purposes. Organophosphate (OP) pesticide self-poisoning is an important clinical problem in rural regions of the developing world that kills an estimated 200,000 people every year. Unintentional poisoning kills far fewer people but is an apparent problem in places where highly toxic OP pesticides are available. Neurologic dysfunction is the best documented health effect of pesticide exposure. High-level exposure has both acute and long-term neurologic signs and symptoms, and adverse effects have been reported in most type of pesticides, including organophosphate (OP), carbamate, organochlorine, and pyrethroid insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and fumigants. Acute OP pesticide exposure can involve in wide range of both central and peripheral neurologic symptoms. Increased neurologic symptom prevalence may provide early evidence of neurologic dysfunctions, before clinically measurable signs are evident. In this study, we analyzed the cross-sectional data on neurologic signs and symptoms from 225 rural children, both males (n = 132) and females (n = 93) who were occupationally and paraoccupationally exposed to methyl OPs (dichlorvos, fenthion, malathion, methyl parathion) and ethyl OPs (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, ethyl parathion) as they belonged to agricultural families handling, mixing, and spraying the OP pesticides. The children completed a specially designed questionnaire (Q16) on neurologic symptoms associated with pesticide exposure with their parental help. A suitable reference group consisting of rural children (n = 50) never involved in pesticide handling (neither outdoor nor indoor) belonging to similar socioeconomic strata included in the study to compare the prevalence of various neurologic symptoms between the two groups. Among all the neurologic self-reported symptoms, headache, watering in eyes, and burning sensation in eye/face were the most important clinical manifestations attributed to OP pesticide exposure. These symptoms could probably be the consequence of chronic effects of most pesticides on the central nervous system. The muscarinic symptoms reported the maximum prevalence of salivation (18.22%), whereas lacrimation was observed in 17.33% cases, followed by diarrhea in 9.33% cases. The nicotinic clinical manifestations of acute OP poisoning revealed excessive sweating in 13.78% cases and tremors in 9.3% cases followed by mydriasis in 8.4% exposed children. The characteristic cholinergic symptoms, such as insomnia, headache, muscle cramps, weakness, and anorexia were also reported by both male and female exposed children. The high frequency of neurologic symptoms observed in the study may be due to parasympathetic hyperactivity due to the accumulated ACh resulting from AChE inhibition. PMID:21120082

Rastogi, S. K.; Tripathi, S.; Ravishanker, D.

2010-01-01

8

Transient isolated brainstem symptoms preceding posterior circulation stroke: a population-based study  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Transient isolated brainstem symptoms (eg, isolated vertigo, dysarthria, diplopia) are not consistently classified as transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and data for prognosis are limited. If some of these transient neurological attacks (TNAs) are due to vertebrobasilar ischaemia, then they should be common during the days and weeks preceding posterior circulation strokes. We aimed to assess the frequency of TNAs before vertebrobasilar ischaemic stroke. Methods We studied all potential ischaemic events during the 90 days preceding an ischaemic stroke in patients ascertained within a prospective, population-based incidence study in Oxfordshire, UK (Oxford Vascular Study; 2002–2010) and compared rates of TNA preceding vertebrobasilar stroke versus carotid stroke. We classified the brainstem symptoms isolated vertigo, vertigo with non-focal symptoms, isolated double vision, transient generalised weakness, and binocular visual disturbance as TNAs in the vertebrobasilar territory; atypical amaurosis fugax and limb-shaking as TNAs in the carotid territory; and isolated slurred speech, migraine variants, transient confusion, and hemisensory tingling symptoms as TNAs in uncertain territory. Findings Of the 1141 patients with ischaemic stroke, vascular territory was categorisable in 1034 (91%) cases, with 275 vertebrobasilar strokes and 759 carotid strokes. Isolated brainstem TNAs were more frequent before a vertebrobasilar stroke (45 of 275 events) than before a carotid stroke (10 of 759; OR 14·7, 95% CI 7·3–29·5, p<0·0001), particularly during the preceding 2 days (22 of 252 before a vertebrobasilar stroke vs two of 751 before a carotid stroke, OR 35·8, 8·4–153·5, p<0·0001). Of all 59 TNAs preceding (median 4 days, IQR 1–30) vertebrobasilar stroke, only five (8%) fulfilled the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) criteria for TIA. The other 54 cases were isolated vertigo (n=23), non-NINDS binocular visual disturbance (n=9), vertigo with other non-focal symptoms (n=10), isolated slurred speech, hemisensory tingling, or diplopia (n=8), and non-focal events (n=4). Only 10 (22%) of the 45 patients with isolated brainstem TNAs sought medical attention before the stroke and a vascular cause was suspected by their physician in only one of these cases. Interpretation In patients with definite vertebrobasilar stroke, preceding transient isolated brainstem symptoms are common, but most symptoms do not satisfy traditional definitions of TIA. More studies of the prognosis of transient isolated brainstem symptoms are required. Funding Wellcome Trust, UK Medical Research Council, Dunhill Medical Trust, Stroke Association, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), Thames Valley Primary Care Research Partnership, and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford. PMID:23206553

Paul, Nicola LM; Simoni, Michela; Rothwell, Peter M

2013-01-01

9

Neurological complications of porphyria.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the importance of neurological complications in patients with a confirmed diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical details are presented for a cohort of 14 patients who presented with one of four categories of symptoms: seizures, polyneuropathy, transient sensory-motor symptoms and cognitive or behavioural abnormalities. Ascertainment of porphyria was often incidental and in many patients neurological complications preceded the definitive biochemical diagnosis. Porphyria is a group of diseases whose clinical picture is often complex and heterogeneous, but neurological complications are not uncommon. When indicated, differential diagnosis of neurological signs and symptoms should include porphyria, as the incidence of the disease is probably underestimated. Part of the clinical picture can be transient and it is often initially disregarded. A family history and recurrence of otherwise unexplained neurological symptoms should alert the clinician to a possible diagnosis of porphyria for patients with neurological presentations. PMID:18187328

Solinas, C; Vajda, F J E

2008-03-01

10

Correspondence between neurological symptoms and outcome of quantitative sensory testing in the hand-arm vibration syndrome.  

PubMed Central

To evaluate neurological symptoms in the vibration syndrome, 55 patients with vascular and neurological symptoms in the hand who had been exposed to vibration were examined. Their exposure to vibration was estimated and neurological vascular symptoms were evaluated according to symptom scales. Temperature thresholds were measured on the right thenar eminence and on the distal volar aspect of the second and third fingers held together on both sides. Vibration thresholds were measured dorsally on the second and fifth metacarpal bones and on the second and fifth fingers proximal to the nail roots. Subjects with advanced neurological symptoms had higher temperature and vibration thresholds than subjects with less advanced symptoms. No such relation was found between vascular symptoms and the outcome of sensory testing. Thus neurological but not vascular symptoms are reflected by the outcome of quantitative sensory testing. In subjects with advanced neurological symptoms the tests gave a high proportion of abnormal results, indicating that these tests may be used for the diagnosis of vibration syndrome on an individual basis. Patients with advanced vascular and neurological symptoms had higher exposure dose scores than patients with less advanced symptoms, indicating a dose response relation between vibration "dose" and neurological and vascular symptoms. PMID:2775677

Ekenvall, L; Gemne, G; Tegner, R

1989-01-01

11

Monoclonal gammopathy with neurological signs and symptoms. A clinical, neurophysiological and muscle biopsy study.  

PubMed

Clinical, neurophysiological and muscle biopsy findings in ten patients with monoclonal gammopathy are reported. Three patients had polyneuropathy, one had hemiparkinsonism, one migraine and radicular symptoms and one paresthesiae and radicular symptoms. Amyloidosis was not found in muscle biopsy specimens. All but one patient with neurological findings also had positive immunofluorescence staining for tissue-bound immunoglobulins in muscle biopsy specimens. The tissue-bound immunoglobulins usually belonged to the same class as the M-component. None of the biopsies of patients without neurological findings were positive. PMID:6819757

Mähönen, M; Partanen, J; Collan, Y; Naukkarinen, A; Sorvari, T; Sivenius, J; Riekkinen, P

1982-12-01

12

Severe thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms and costal fractures: a case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Introduction Only a high-energy force can cause thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation injuries, and such injuries should always be suspected in patients with polytrauma. The injury is usually accompanied by neurological symptoms. There are only a few cases of severe thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms in the literature, and until now, no case of severe thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms and without costal fractures has been reported. Case presentation A 30-year-old Han Chinese man had T6 to T7 vertebral fracture and anterolateral dislocation without neurological symptoms and costal fractures. The three-dimensional reconstruction by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated the injuries in detail. A patient with thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms inclines to further dislocation of the spine and secondary neurological injury; therefore, laminectomy, reduction and internal fixations with rods and screws were done. The outcome was good. Severe spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms should be evaluated in detail, especially with three-dimensional reconstruction by computed tomography. Although treatment is individualized, reduction and internal fixation are advised for the patient if the condition is suitable for operation. Conclusions Severe thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms and costal fractures is frighteningly rare; an operation should be done if the patient's condition permits. PMID:25316002

2014-01-01

13

A rare case of complete C2–C3 dislocation with mild neurological symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors report a rare case of complete C2–C3 dislocation with unexpectedly mild neurological symptoms in a 57 year old\\u000a man involved in a motor vehicle accident, who had previously undergone posterior laminectomy from C3 through C7. A retrospective\\u000a chart analysis and a thorough radiographic review were performed. X-rays and CT of the cervical spine demonstrated a complete\\u000a dislocation at the

Theofilos G. Machinis; Kostas N. Fountas; E. Z. Kapsalaki; I. Kapsalakis; A. A. Grigorian

2006-01-01

14

Neurological symptoms and signs in HTLV-1 patients with overactive bladder syndrome  

PubMed Central

Objective Compare neurological symptoms and signs in Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) asymptomatic carriers and HTLV-1 patients with overactive bladder (OB) syndrome. Methods We studied 102 HTLV-1 positive individuals without HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of OB syndrome. Clinical interview, neurological exam and proviral load was performed in all patients. Results and conclusions Individuals with OB were more commonly female (84.3% vs. 60.8% of asymptomatics, P=0.01). The prevalence of neurological complaints was higher in OB group, especially hand or foot numbness and arm or leg weakness. There was no difference between the groups in neurological strength and reflexes. Weakness complaint remained strongly associated with OB in multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for sex and age [adjusted odds ratio and 95% CI 3.59(1.45–8.88) in arms and 6.68(2.63–16.93) in legs]. Proviral load was also different between the two groups with higher level on OB individuals. PMID:22510736

Tanajura, Davi; Santos, André Muniz; Castro, Néviton; Siqueira, Isadora; de Carvalho, Edgar M.; Glesby, Marshall J.

2013-01-01

15

Organophosphate intermediate syndrome with neurological complications of extrapyramidal symptoms in clinical practice  

PubMed Central

Organophosphates (OPs) are ubiquitous in the world as domestic and industrial agricultural insecticides. Intentional poisoning as suicides attempts are clinical phenomena seen in emergency departments and clinics in agricultural areas. Intermediate syndrome with the neurological complication of extra pyramidal symptoms following acute OP ingestion may occur in pediatric and adult cases. While death is the most serious consequence of toxic OP doses, low levels of exposure and nonfatal doses may disrupt the neurobehavioral development of fetuses and children in addition to bring linked to testicular cancer and male and female infertility. These are disturbing. Chronic and acute toxicity from OPs are barriers to the health of our present and future generations. Symptoms and treatment of acute and chronic OP exposure are briefly referenced with inclusion of the intermediate syndrome. Suggestions for local and systemic reduction of the acute and long term consequences of OP ingestion are opined. PMID:25002781

Detweiler, Mark B.

2014-01-01

16

Transient Neurologic Signs in Infancy and Motor Outcomes at 4 1/2 Years in Children Born Biologically at Risk.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Motor skills were compared in two samples of children born biologically at risk: 19 children who had transient neurologic signs in infancy but were considered "normal" at two years, and 42 children who appeared neurologically normal throughout early childhood. At 4:6 years, the groups differed only on the measure of pencil prehension. (Author/JDD)

Stewart, Katherine B.; And Others

1988-01-01

17

Synaptic mutant huntingtin inhibits synapsin-1 phosphorylation and causes neurological symptoms  

PubMed Central

Many genetic mouse models of Huntington’s disease (HD) have established that mutant huntingtin (htt) accumulates in various subcellular regions to affect a variety of cellular functions, but whether and how synaptic mutant htt directly mediates HD neuropathology remains to be determined. We generated transgenic mice that selectively express mutant htt in the presynaptic terminals. Although it was not overexpressed, synaptic mutant htt caused age-dependent neurological symptoms and early death in mice as well as defects in synaptic neurotransmitter release. Mass spectrometry analysis of synaptic fractions and immunoprecipitation of synapsin-1 from HD CAG150 knockin mouse brains revealed that mutant htt binds to synapsin-1, a protein whose phosphorylation is critical for neurotransmitter release. We found that polyglutamine-expanded exon1 htt binds to the C-terminal region of synapsin-1 to reduce synapsin-1 phosphorylation. Our findings point to a critical role for synaptic htt in the neurological symptoms of HD, providing a new therapeutic target. PMID:24081492

Xu, Qiaoqiao; Huang, Shanshan; Song, Mingke; Wang, Chuan-En; Yan, Sen; Liu, Xudong; Gaertig, Marta A.; Yu, Shan Ping; Li, He

2013-01-01

18

Autistic Traits, ADHD Symptoms, Neurological Soft Signs and Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The resting regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to co-occurring symptoms such as inattention, hyperactivity, neurological soft signs and motor problems have not yet been disclosed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this study thirteen adults with ASD and ten matched neurotypical controls underwent PET. The scores of rating…

Manouilenko, Irina; Pagani, Marco; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Odh, Richard; Brolin, Fredrik; Hatherly, Robert; Jacobsson, Hans; Larsson, Stig A.; Bejerot, Susanne

2013-01-01

19

Stage Progression and Neurological Symptoms in Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense Sleeping Sickness: Role of the CNS Inflammatory Response  

PubMed Central

Background Human African trypanosomiasis progresses from an early (hemolymphatic) stage, through CNS invasion to the late (meningoencephalitic) stage. In experimental infections disease progression is associated with neuroinflammatory responses and neurological symptoms, but this concept requires evaluation in African trypanosomiasis patients, where correct diagnosis of the disease stage is of critical therapeutic importance. Methodology/Principal Findings This was a retrospective study on a cohort of 115 T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients recruited in Eastern Uganda. Paired plasma and CSF samples allowed the measurement of peripheral and CNS immunoglobulin and of CSF cytokine synthesis. Cytokine and immunoglobulin expression were evaluated in relation to disease duration, stage progression and neurological symptoms. Neurological symptoms were not related to stage progression (with the exception of moderate coma). Increases in CNS immunoglobulin, IL-10 and TNF-? synthesis were associated with stage progression and were mirrored by a reduction in TGF-? levels in the CSF. There were no significant associations between CNS immunoglobulin and cytokine production and neurological signs of disease with the exception of moderate coma cases. Within the study group we identified diagnostically early stage cases with no CSF pleocytosis but intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis and diagnostically late stage cases with marginal CSF pleocytosis and no detectable trypanosomes in the CSF. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that there is not a direct linkage between stage progression, neurological signs of infection and neuroinflammatory responses in rhodesiense HAT. Neurological signs are observed in both early and late stages, and while intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis is associated with neurological signs, these are also observed in cases lacking a CNS inflammatory response. While there is an increase in inflammatory cytokine production with stage progression, this is paralleled by increases in CSF IL-10. As stage diagnostics, the CSF immunoglobulins and cytokines studied do not have sufficient sensitivity to be of clinical value. PMID:23145191

MacLean, Lorna; Reiber, Hansotto; Kennedy, Peter G. E.; Sternberg, Jeremy M.

2012-01-01

20

Screening for primary creatine deficiencies in French patients with unexplained neurological symptoms  

PubMed Central

A population of patients with unexplained neurological symptoms from six major French university hospitals was screened over a 28-month period for primary creatine disorder (PCD). Urine guanidinoacetate (GAA) and creatine:creatinine ratios were measured in a cohort of 6,353 subjects to identify PCD patients and compile their clinical, 1H-MRS, biochemical and molecular data. Six GAMT [N-guanidinoacetatemethyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.2)] and 10 X-linked creatine transporter (SLC6A8) but no AGAT (GATM) [L-arginine/glycine amidinotransferase (EC 2.1.4.1)] deficient patients were identified in this manner. Three additional affected sibs were further identified after familial inquiry (1 brother with GAMT deficiency and 2 brothers with SLC6A8 deficiency in two different families). The prevalence of PCD in this population was 0.25% (0.09% and 0.16% for GAMT and SLC6A8 deficiencies, respectively). Seven new PCD-causing mutations were discovered (2 nonsense [c.577C?>?T and c.289C?>?T] and 1 splicing [c.391?+?15G?>?T] mutations for the GAMT gene and, 2 missense [c.1208C?>?A and c.926C?>?A], 1 frameshift [c.930delG] and 1 splicing [c.1393-1G?>?A] mutations for the SLC6A8 gene). No hot spot mutations were observed in these genes, as all the mutations were distributed throughout the entire gene sequences and were essentially patient/family specific. Approximately one fifth of the mutations of SLC6A8, but not GAMT, were attributed to neo-mutation, germinal or somatic mosaicism events. The only SLC6A8-deficient female patient in our series presented with the severe phenotype usually characterizing affected male patients, an observation in agreement with recent evidence that is in support of the fact that this X-linked disorder might be more frequent than expected in the female population with intellectual disability. PMID:23234264

2012-01-01

21

The Cerebro-Morphological Fingerprint of a Progeroid Syndrome: White Matter Changes Correlate with Neurological Symptoms in Xeroderma Pigmentosum  

PubMed Central

Background Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive progeroid syndrome. It has recently been shown that the underlying DNA repair defect plays a central role in the aging process. In addition to skin symptoms, various premature neurological abnormalities have been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings We present the clinical neurological phenotype in 14 XP patients (seven subtypes), in seven of these patients together with conventional and multiparametric advanced MRI data to assess the macrostructural and microstructural cerebral morphology in comparison to controls, including volumetric measurements, MR spectroscopy (1H MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Clinical hallmarks were spinocerebellar ataxia, pyramidal tract signs, and mild cognitive deficits. DTI demonstrated significantly reduced WM directionality in all regions investigated, i.e. the thalamus, the corticospinal tracts and the dorsal corpus callosum. Single patients showed a marked relative hippocampal volume reduction, but the patients were not different from controls in the volumetric measurements of hippocampal and whole brain volumes at group level. However, 1H MRS demonstrated that the hippocampal formation was metabolically altered. Conclusions The most prominent feature was the white matter affectation, as assessed by DTI, with volume and directionality reductions of the fiber projections involving both the craniocaudal fibers and the interhemispheric connections. These findings, although heterogeneous among the study sample, could be correlated with the clinico-neurological symptoms. The imaging findings support the position that myelin structures degrade prematurely in the brain of XP patients. PMID:22363517

Kassubek, Jan; Sperfeld, Anne-Dorte; Pinkhardt, Elmar H.; Unrath, Alexander; Müller, Hans-Peter; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Ludolph, Albert C.; Berneburg, Mark

2012-01-01

22

A somatic cell defect is associated with the onset of neurological symptoms in a lysosomal storage disease  

PubMed Central

Mutations in individuals with the lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) are heterogeneous, not localized to specific protein domains, and not correlated to time of onset or disease severity. We demonstrate direct correlation of the time of neurological symptom onset with the severity of lysosomal defects in NPC1 patient-derived fibroblasts. This is a novel assay for NPC1 individuals that may be predictive of NPC1 disease progression and broadly applicable to other lysosomal disorders. PMID:23850077

Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Larson, Denise M.; Wassif, Christopher A.; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Kirby, Martha R.; Trivedi, Niraj S.; Porter, Forbes D.; Pavan, William J.

2013-01-01

23

Neurological signs and late-life depressive symptoms in a community population: the ESPRIT Study  

E-print Network

's College London (Institute of Psychiatry), London, UK; b Inserm U888, Montpellier, France Address for correspondence: Dr Robert Stewart, Section of Epidemiology (Box 60), Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park-level depression but were more likely to be present in those with a lifetime history of neurological disorder

Boyer, Edmond

24

Assessment of Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Who Complain of Neurologic Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) having neuropathic symptoms, and to investigate the relationship between electrophysiological findings of peripheral neuropathy and clinical findings of RA. Methods Patients with a clinical diagnosis of RA and who had tingling or burning sensation in any extremity were electrophysiologically examined for evidence of peripheral neuropathy. Study parameters, including age, gender, laboratory parameters, duration of RA, and medication, were recorded. The symptoms and signs of neuropathy were quantified with the neuropathy symptom score, and the functional statuses of these patients were assessed. Results Out of a total of 30 RA patients, 10 (33%) had peripheral neuropathy: 2 had bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), 5 had unilateral CTS, 1 had sensory polyneuropathy, and 2 had motor-sensory polyneuropathy. The mean ages of the patients with and without peripheral neuropathy were 69.4 and 56.5 years, respectively (p<0.05). A significant relationship was found between peripheral neuropathy and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody. However, no relationship was found between peripheral neuropathy and the type of medication, RA duration, the patients' functional status, neuropathic symptoms, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein values. Conclusion Neuropathic symptoms are common in RA patients, and it is difficult to distinguish peripheral neuropathy symptoms from those of arthritis. Patients with RA, particularly elderly patients and anti-CCP antibody positive patients who complain of neuropathic symptoms should undergo electrophysiological examination. PMID:24855620

Sim, Mi Kyung; Yoon, Jisun; Park, Dae Hwan; Kim, Yong-Gil

2014-01-01

25

A neurological symptom survey of patients with type I Gaucher disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: Gaucher disease is an inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism resulting from deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase.\\u000a The majority of the patients (with type I disease) do not have primary central nervous system involvement. However, several\\u000a studies have noted that secondary neurological complications may develop as a consequence of nerve root or spinal cord compression\\u000a following vertebral body collapse

G. M. Pastores; N. L. Barnett; P. Bathan; E. H. Kolodny

2003-01-01

26

The Interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) Receptor Inhibitor Reparixin Improves Neurological Deficits and Reduces Long-term Inflammation in Permanent and Transient Cerebral Ischemia in Rats  

PubMed Central

Leukocyte infiltration is viewed as a pharmacological target in cerebral ischemia. We previously reported that reparixin, a CXCL8 receptor blocker that inhibits neutrophil infiltration, and related molecules can reduce infarct size in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The study aims were to compare the effects of reparixin in transient and permanent MCAO using varied treatment schedules and therapeutic windows to evaluate effects on long-term neurological deficits and late inflammatory response. Reparixin, administered for 1 to 3 days, 3.5 to 6 h after MCAO, ameliorates neurological function recovery and inhibits long-term inflammation. The infarct size reduction at 24 h, evaluated by TTC staining, is more pronounced in transient MCAO. MRI analysis identified a decrease in the progression of infarct size by reparixin that was more evident at 48 h in permanent MCAO, and was associated with a significantly improved recovery from long-term neurological deficits. PMID:17592546

Villa, Pia; Triulzi, Sara; Cavalieri, Barbara; Di Bitondo, Rosa; Bertini, Riccardo; Barbera, Sara; Bigini, Paolo; Mennini, Tiziana; Gelosa, Paolo; Tremoli, Elena; Sironi, Luigi; Ghezzi, Pietro

2007-01-01

27

The interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) receptor inhibitor reparixin improves neurological deficits and reduces long-term inflammation in permanent and transient cerebral ischemia in rats.  

PubMed

Leukocyte infiltration is viewed as a pharmacological target in cerebral ischemia. We previously reported that reparixin, a CXCL8 receptor blocker that inhibits neutrophil infiltration, and related molecules can reduce infarct size in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The study aims were to compare the effects of reparixin in transient and permanent MCAO using varied treatment schedules and therapeutic windows to evaluate effects on long-term neurological deficits and late inflammatory response. Reparixin, administered for 1 to 3 days, 3.5 to 6 h after MCAO, ameliorates neurological function recovery and inhibits long-term inflammation. The infarct size reduction at 24 h, evaluated by TTC staining, is more pronounced in transient MCAO. MRI analysis identified a decrease in the progression of infarct size by reparixin that was more evident at 48 h in permanent MCAO, and was associated with a significantly improved recovery from long-term neurological deficits. PMID:17592546

Villa, Pia; Triulzi, Sara; Cavalieri, Barbara; Di Bitondo, Rosa; Bertini, Riccardo; Barbera, Sara; Bigini, Paolo; Mennini, Tiziana; Gelosa, Paolo; Tremoli, Elena; Sironi, Luigi; Ghezzi, Pietro

2007-01-01

28

Could cadmium be responsible for some of the neurological signs and symptoms of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.  

PubMed

According to the World Health Organization, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a neurological disease characterized by widespread inflammation and multi-systemic neuropathology. Aetiology and pathogenesis are unknown, and several agents have been proposed as causative agents or as factors perpetuating the syndrome. Exposure to heavy metals, with particular reference to mercury and gold in dental amalgams, has been considered among the triggers of ME/CFS. Here we hypothesize that cadmium, a widespread occupational and environmental heavy metal pollutant, might be associated with some of the neurological findings described in ME/CFS. In fact, ME/CFS patients show a decrease of the volume of the gray matter in turn associated with objective reduction of physical activity. Cadmium induces neuronal death in cortical neurons through a combined mechanism of apoptosis and necrosis and it could then be hypothesized that cadmium-induced neuronal cell death is responsible for some of the effects of cadmium on the central nervous system, i.e. a decrease in attention level and memory in exposed humans as well as to a diminished ability for training and learning in rats, that are symptoms typical of ME/CFS. This hypothesis can be tested by measuring cadmium exposure in a cohort of ME/CFS patients compared with matched healthy controls, and by measuring gray matter volume in un-exposed healthy controls, exposed non-ME/CFS subjects, un-exposed ME/CFS patients and exposed ME/CFS patients. In addition, we hypothesize that cadmium exposure could be associated with reduced cerebral blood flow in ME/CFS patients because of the disruptive effects of cadmium on angiogenesis. In fact, cadmium inhibits angiogenesis and low global cerebral flow is associated with abnormal brain neuroimaging results and brain dysfunction in the form of reduced cognitive testing scores in ME/CFS patients. This hypothesis can be tested by measuring cerebral cortex blood flow in un-exposed healthy controls, exposed non-ME/CFS subjects, un-exposed ME/CFS patients and exposed ME/CFS patients. If our hypothesis is demonstrated correct, the consequences could affect prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of ME/CFS. Implications in early diagnosis could entail the evaluation of symptoms typical of ME/CFS in cadmium-exposed subjects as well as the search for signs of exposure to cadmium in subjects diagnosed with ME/CFS. Nutritional supplementation of magnesium and zinc could then be considered, since these elements have been proposed in the prophylaxis and therapy of cadmium exposure, and magnesium was demonstrated effective on ME/CFS patients' symptom profiles. PMID:22795611

Pacini, Stefania; Fiore, Maria G; Magherini, Stefano; Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

2012-09-01

29

HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA. III. NEUROLOGICAL SYMPTOMS AND PIN-PRICK MEASURES  

EPA Science Inventory

Health Effects of Chronic Exposure to Arsenic via Drinking Water in Inner Mongolia: III. Neurological Symptoms and Pin-prick Measures Yanhong Li, M.D.,Yajuan.Xia, M.D., Kegong Wu, M.D., Inner Mongolia Center For Endemic Disease Control and Research, Ling Ling He, B.S., Zhi...

30

Int J Geriatr Psychiatry . Author manuscript Neurological signs and late-life depressive symptoms in a community  

E-print Network

Int J Geriatr Psychiatry . Author manuscript Page /1 8 Neurological signs and late-life depressive Portet 2 , Sylvaine Artero 2 , Marie-Laure Ancelin 2 , Karen Ritchie 2 Institute of Psychiatry1 likely to be present in participants with a previous history of neurological disorder. Conclusions We

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

31

Self-reported neurological symptoms in relation to CO emissions due to problem gas appliance installations in London: a cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background Previous research by the authors found evidence that up to 10% of particular household categories may be exposed to elevated carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations from poor quality gas appliance installations. The literature suggests certain neurological symptoms are linked to exposure to low levels of CO. This paper addresses the hypothesis that certain self-reported neurological symptoms experienced by a householder are linked to an estimate of their CO exposure. Methods Between 27 April and 27 June 2006, 597 homes with a mains supply of natural gas were surveyed, mainly in old, urban areas of London. Qualified gas engineers tested all gas appliances (cooker, boiler, gas fire, and water heater) and reported, according to the Gas Industry Unsafe Situations Procedure, appliances considered At Risk (AR), Immediately Dangerous (ID) or Not to Current Standards (NCS). Five exposure risk categories were defined based on measurement of CO emitted by the appliance, its features and its use, with "high or very high" exposure category where occupants were considered likely to be exposed to levels greater than 26 ppm for one hour. The prevalence of symptoms at each level of exposure was compared with that at lowest level of exposure. Results Of the households, 6% were assessed as having a "high or very high" risk of exposure to CO. Of the individuals, 9% reported at least one neurological symptom. There was a statistically significant association between "high or very high" exposure risk to CO and self-reported symptoms compared to "no exposure" likelihood, for households not in receipt of benefit, controlling for "number of residents" and presence of pensioners, OR = 3.23 (95%CI: 1.28, 8.15). Risk ratios across all categories of exposure likelihood indicate a dose-response pattern. Those households in receipt of benefit showed no dose-response pattern. Conclusion This study found an association between risk of CO exposure at low concentration, and prevalence of self-reported neurological symptoms in the community for those households not in receipt of benefit. As health status was self-reported, this association requires further investigation. PMID:18593476

Croxford, Ben; Leonardi, Giovanni S; Kreis, Irene

2008-01-01

32

Genetic screening for Niemann–Pick disease type C in adults with neurological and psychiatric symptoms: findings from the ZOOM study  

PubMed Central

Niemann–Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare, autosomal-recessive, progressive neurological disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 gene (in 95% of cases) or the NPC2 gene. This observational, multicentre genetic screening study evaluated the frequency and phenotypes of NP-C in consecutive adult patients with neurological and psychiatric symptoms. Diagnostic testing for NP-C involved NPC1 and NPC2 exonic gene sequencing and gene dosage analysis. When available, results of filipin staining, plasma cholestane-3?,5?,6?-triol assays and measurements of relevant sphingolipids were also collected. NPC1 and NPC2 gene sequencing was completed in 250/256 patients from 30 psychiatric and neurological reference centres across the EU and USA [median (range) age 38 (18–90) years]. Three patients had a confirmed diagnosis of NP-C; two based on gene sequencing alone (two known causal disease alleles) and one based on gene sequencing and positive filipin staining. A further 12 patients displayed either single mutant NP-C alleles (8 with NPC1 mutations and 3 with NPC2 mutations) or a known causal disease mutation and an unclassified NPC1 allele variant (1 patient). Notably, high plasma cholestane-3?,5?,6?-triol levels were observed for all NP-C cases (n = 3). Overall, the frequency of NP-C patients in this study [1.2% (95% CI; 0.3%, 3.5%)] suggests that there may be an underdiagnosed pool of NP-C patients among adults who share common neurological and psychiatric symptoms. PMID:23773996

Bauer, Peter; Balding, David J.; Klünemann, Hans H.; Linden, David E. J.; Ory, Daniel S.; Pineda, Mercè; Priller, Josef; Sedel, Frederic; Muller, Audrey; Chadha-Boreham, Harbajan; Welford, Richard W. D.; Strasser, Daniel S.; Patterson, Marc C.

2013-01-01

33

Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Wheat Soy Fish Shellfish Other Symptoms Diagnosis & Testing Proven Methods Skin Prick Tests Blood Tests Oral Food ... Wheat Soy Fish Shellfish Other Symptoms Diagnosis & Testing Proven Methods Skin Prick Tests Blood Tests Oral Food ...

34

Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy  

PubMed Central

Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X) was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1) gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation). Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes.

Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Mailankody, Pooja; Isnwara, Pawanraj Palu; Prasad, Chandrajit; Mustare, Veerendrakumar

2015-01-01

35

Delayed diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus infection in a patient with non-specific neurological symptoms and pancytopenia: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Both non-specific presentation and asymptomatic course of human immunodeficiency virus infection lead to undiagnosed long-term persistence of the virus in a patient's organism. Case presentation Here, we present a case of a 31-year-old Caucasian man with non-specific neurological symptoms and pancytopenia, who was referred to an internal medicine ward for further diagnosis. Upon admission to our hospital, he denied any past risky behaviors and refused to have his blood collected for human immunodeficiency virus testing. Later, he eventually provided consent to conduct the human immunodeficiency virus test which turned out to have a positive result. The overall clinical pattern indicated an advanced-stage of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which contrasted with the history he had provided. Conclusions This case report indicates the need to consider human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis in patients with non-specific neurological and hematological disorders. Our report also demonstrates difficulties that can be experienced by the physician while trying to obtain both a clear history and consent to perform human immunodeficiency virus testing. PMID:24666756

2014-01-01

36

Association of Carotid Intraplaque Hemorrhage and Territorial Acute Infarction in Patients with Acute Neurological Symptoms Using Carotid Magnetization-Prepared Rapid Acquisition with Gradient-Echo  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of our study was to assess prevalence of carotid intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH) and associations between territorial acute infarction and IPH on magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient-echo (MPRAGE) in patients with acute neurologic symptoms. Methods 83 patients with suspected acute neurologic symptoms were evaluated with both brain diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and carotid MPRAGE sequences. Carotid plaque with high signal intensity on MPRAGE of >200% that of adjacent muscle was categorized as IPH. We analyzed the prevalence of IPH and its correlation with territorial acute infarction. Results Of 166 arteries, 39 had a carotid artery plaque. Of these arteries, 26 had carotid artery stenosis less than 50%. In all carotid arteries, MR-depicted IPH was found in 7.2% (12/166). High-signal intensity on DWI was found in 17.5% (29/166). Combined lesion with ipsilateral high-signal intensity on DWI and IPH on carotid MPRAGE sequence was found in 6 lesions (6/166, 3.6%). Of patients with carotid artery plaque, MR-predicted IPH was found in 30.8% (12/39) and match lesions with high-signal intensity on DWI and MPRAGE was found in 15.4% (6/39). MR-predicted IPH was significantly higher prevalence in high-grade stenosis group (p=0.010). Relative risk between carotid MPRAGE-positive signal and ipsilateral high-signal intensity on DWI in arteries with carotid artery plaques was 6.8 (p=0.010). Conclusion Carotid MPRAGE-positive signal in patients was associated with an increased risk of territorial acute infarction as detected objectively by brain DWI. The relative risk of stroke was increased in high-grade stenosis categories. PMID:25733989

Park, Jung Soo; Lee, Jong Myong; Koh, Eun Jeong; Chung, Gyung Ho; Hwang, Seung Bae

2015-01-01

37

Premature death of TDP-43 (A315T) transgenic mice due to gastrointestinal complications prior to development of full neurological symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Abnormal distribution, modification and aggregation of transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) are the hallmarks of multiple neurodegenerative diseases, especially frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Transgenic mouse lines overexpressing wild-type or mutant TDP-43 exhibit ALS-like symptom, motor abnormalities and early paralysis followed by death. Reports on lifespan and phenotypic behaviour in Prp-TDP-43 (A315T) vary, and these animals are not fully characterized. Although it has been proposed that the approximate 20% loss of motor neurons at end stage is responsible for the severe weakness and death in TDP-43 mice, this degree of neurologic damage appears insufficient to cause death. Hence we studied these mice to further characterize and determine the reason for the death. Our characterization of TDP-43 transgenic mice showed that these mice develop ALS-like symptoms that later become compounded by gastrointestinal (GI) complications that resulted in death. This is the first report of a set of pathological evidence in the GI track that is strong indicator for the cause of death of Prp-hTDP-43 (A315T) transgenic mice. PMID:23317354

Esmaeili, Mohammad A; Panahi, Marzieh; Yadav, Shilpi; Hennings, Leah; Kiaei, Mahmoud

2013-01-01

38

[Neurologic manifestations of infectious endocarditis].  

PubMed

Thirty out of 287 patients (10.4%) admitted to hospital for infective endocarditis between December 1970 and January 1990 had neurological complications. Twenty-three patients had native valve infectious endocarditis and 7 had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The clinical features were characterized by the frequency of aortic valve involvement (23 out of 30) and other complications, especially cardiac failure (16 cases) and peripheral vascular manifestations (7 cases). The commonest organism was the staphylococcus (53% of identified organisms) but the number of negative blood cultures was high (50% of cases). The neurological complication was often the presenting symptom of the endocarditis (19 cases) but it occurred after bacteriological cure in 4 cases. The complications observed were cerebral ischemia (16 cases), cerebral haemorrhage (11 cases), coma (2 cases), and one peripheral neuropathy causing a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. These complications presented with hemiplegia in 17 cases, a meningeal syndrome in 8 cases, a convulsion in 1 case, a Von Wallenberg syndrome in 1 case, and a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome in 1 case. Twelve patients had a transient or permanent neurological coma. Cerebral CT scan showed ischemic lesions in 7 cases and haemorrhagic lesions in 10 cases. Carotid angiography demonstrated mycotic aneurysms in 6 patients. Twelve patients died: the cause of death was neurological coma (7 cases), low cardiac output (4 cases) and haemorrhagic shock (1 case). Four patients underwent neurosurgery: 3 for clipping a mycotic aneurysm and 1 for drainage of an intracerebral haematoma. Poor prognostic factors were: coma, cardiac failure, cardiac valve prosthesis and, above all, the extent and multiplicity of the neurological lesions. The authors propose the following measures to improve the prognosis: early surgery in cases of large and/or mobile vegetations especially when the infecting organism is a staphylococcus and when a systemic embolism has occurred; routine CT scanning and/or digitised cerebral angiography in all patients with infective endocarditis to detect surgically accessible mycotic aneurysms. PMID:2012489

Hannachi, N; Béard, T; Ben Ismail, M

1991-01-01

39

Vitamin E Dietary Supplementation Improves Neurological Symptoms and Decreases c-Abl/p73 Activation in Niemann-Pick C Mice  

PubMed Central

Niemann-Pick C (NPC) disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in lysosomes. We have previously reported that oxidative stress is the main upstream stimulus activating the proapoptotic c-Abl/p73 pathway in NPC neurons. We have also observed accumulation of vitamin E in NPC lysosomes, which could lead to a potential decrease of its bioavailability. Our aim was to determine if dietary vitamin E supplementation could improve NPC disease in mice. NPC mice received an alpha-tocopherol (?-TOH) supplemented diet and neurological symptoms, survival, Purkinje cell loss, ?-TOH and nitrotyrosine levels, astrogliosis, and the c-Abl/p73 pathway functions were evaluated. In addition, the effect of ?-TOH on the c-Abl/p73 pathway was evaluated in an in vitro NPC neuron model. The ?-TOH rich diet delayed loss of weight, improved coordination and locomotor function and increased the survival of NPC mice. We found increased Purkinje neurons and ?-TOH levels and reduced astrogliosis, nitrotyrosine and phosphorylated p73 in cerebellum. A decrease of c-Abl/p73 activation was also observed in the in vitro NPC neurons treated with ?-TOH. In conclusion, our results show that vitamin E can delay neurodegeneration in NPC mice and suggest that its supplementation in the diet could be useful for the treatment of NPC patients. PMID:25079853

Marín, Tamara; Contreras, Pablo; Castro, Juan Francisco; Chamorro, David; Balboa, Elisa; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Muñoz, Francisco J.; Alvarez, Alejandra R.; Zanlungo, Silvana

2014-01-01

40

Vitamin E dietary supplementation improves neurological symptoms and decreases c-Abl/p73 activation in Niemann-Pick C mice.  

PubMed

Niemann-Pick C (NPC) disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in lysosomes. We have previously reported that oxidative stress is the main upstream stimulus activating the proapoptotic c-Abl/p73 pathway in NPC neurons. We have also observed accumulation of vitamin E in NPC lysosomes, which could lead to a potential decrease of its bioavailability. Our aim was to determine if dietary vitamin E supplementation could improve NPC disease in mice. NPC mice received an alpha-tocopherol (?-TOH) supplemented diet and neurological symptoms, survival, Purkinje cell loss, ?-TOH and nitrotyrosine levels, astrogliosis, and the c-Abl/p73 pathway functions were evaluated. In addition, the effect of ?-TOH on the c-Abl/p73 pathway was evaluated in an in vitro NPC neuron model. The ?-TOH rich diet delayed loss of weight, improved coordination and locomotor function and increased the survival of NPC mice. We found increased Purkinje neurons and ?-TOH levels and reduced astrogliosis, nitrotyrosine and phosphorylated p73 in cerebellum. A decrease of c-Abl/p73 activation was also observed in the in vitro NPC neurons treated with ?-TOH. In conclusion, our results show that vitamin E can delay neurodegeneration in NPC mice and suggest that its supplementation in the diet could be useful for the treatment of NPC patients. PMID:25079853

Marín, Tamara; Contreras, Pablo; Castro, Juan Francisco; Chamorro, David; Balboa, Elisa; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Muñoz, Francisco J; Alvarez, Alejandra R; Zanlungo, Silvana

2014-08-01

41

Molecular characterisation of the 22q13 deletion syndrome supports the role of haploinsufficiency of SHANK3/PROSAP2 in the major neurological symptoms  

PubMed Central

Methods: The 22q13 deletion syndrome (MIM 606232) is characterised by moderate to profound mental retardation, delay/absence of expressive speech, hypotonia, normal to accelerated growth, and mild dysmorphic features. We have determined the deletion size and parent of origin in 56 patients with this syndrome. Results: Similar to other terminal deletion syndromes, there was an overabundance of paternal deletions. The deletions vary widely in size, from 130 kb to over 9 Mb; however all 45 cases that could be specifically tested for the terminal region at the site of SHANK3 were deleted for this gene. The molecular structure of SHANK3 was further characterised. Comparison of clinical features to deletion size showed few correlations. Some measures of developmental assessment did correlate to deletion size; however, all patients showed some degree of mental retardation and severe delay or absence of expressive speech, regardless of deletion size. Conclusion: Our analysis therefore supports haploinsufficiency of the gene SHANK3, which codes for a structural protein of the postsynaptic density, as a major causative factor in the neurological symptoms of 22q13 deletion syndrome. PMID:12920066

Wilson, H; Wong, A; Shaw, S; Tse, W; Stapleton, G; Phelan, M; Hu, S; Marshall, J; McDermid, H

2003-01-01

42

Chapter 38: American neurology.  

PubMed

The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding. PMID:19892141

Freemon, Frank R

2010-01-01

43

Neurology issues in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Schizophrenia ranks among the leading causes of disability worldwide. The presence of neurological signs co-occurring with the psychiatric symptoms is indicative of an organic brain pathology. In the present article, we review the current literature on neurology issues in schizophrenia. Firstly, common neurological signs found in patients with schizophrenia (neurological soft signs and smell abnormalities) and their association with imaging findings are reviewed. Secondly, the significant association of schizophrenia with epilepsy and stroke is described as well as the absent association with other organic brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Thirdly, we discuss the potential role of NMDA receptor antibodies in schizophrenia. Fourthly, neurological side effects of antipsychotic drugs and their treatment are reviewed; and lastly, we discuss neurocognitive deficits in patients with schizophrenia and their treatment. The focus of the review remains on articles with relevance to the clinician. PMID:25773225

Hüfner, Katharina; Frajo-Apor, Beatrice; Hofer, Alex

2015-05-01

44

Enhanced Neurogenesis Following Neurological Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neurological diseases are disorders of the nervous system that have biological origins, and impair one’s ability to live a\\u000a normal life. Neurological diseases originate from neurochemical alterations or the loss of specific cell populations of the\\u000a nervous system. The causes for these disorders remain poorly understood. Their symptoms span from psychiatric to neurological\\u000a to physical impairments. For decades, finding a

Philippe Taupin

45

Neurologic Melioidosis  

PubMed Central

Melioidosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. Diagnosis is best made by isolation of Burkholderia pseudomallei from clinical specimens. A variety of clinical presentations are described, including neurologic disease. The aim of this study was to review admissions with confirmed neurologic melioidosis to a regional hospital in a region to which melioidosis is endemic during 1995–2011. There were 12 culture-confirmed cases of neurologic melioidosis, of which two were detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. Four of these cases were in children. Significant clinical features were fever, headache, and ataxia. Common changes on magnetic resonance imaging T2-weighted scans included ring-enhancing lesions and leptomeningeal enhancement. There were four deaths and an additional four patients had significant long-term neurologic sequelae. When considering the etiology of undifferentiated neurologic disease, an awareness of the possibility of neurologic melioidosis is important in disease-endemic regions. PMID:23836574

Deuble, Martin; Aquilina, Chloe; Norton, Robert

2013-01-01

46

Current neurology  

SciTech Connect

The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases.

Appel, S.H. (Dept. of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (US))

1988-01-01

47

Adverse neurological outcomes in Nigerian children with sickle cell disease.  

PubMed

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is reported to be the most common genetic disorder affecting Nigerians. Children with SCD are at a high risk of neurological morbidity. The main objective of this study was to determine the pattern of adverse neurological outcomes among a cohort of Nigerian children with SCD. All children with SCD seen in the Department of Paediatrics, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, over a period of 2 years were carefully evaluated for symptoms and signs of neurological complications, defined as clinical outcomes referable to the central nervous system. Of the 214 children evaluated, 187 were diagnosed with Hb SS disease and 27 with Hb SC disease. Neurological complications were identified in 78 (36.4 %) of the cases. The most common complications were headache (17.8 %), seizure (9.3 %) and stroke (8.4 %). Other less frequent complications included bacterial meningitis (2.8 %), spontaneous visual loss (1.4 %), paraplegia (0.9 %) and transient ischaemic attacks (0.9 %). Neurological complications occurred more frequently in children with sickle cell anaemia than in those with Hb SC disease (P = 0.002, 95 % CI 1.450-82.870). Adverse neurological events are common in Nigerian children with SCD, with a significantly higher risk in Hb SS than Hb SC disease. Stroke represents a major underlying cause of symptomatic epilepsy in SCD. Institution of primary preventive measures for stroke in SCD will significantly reduce the burden of stroke and epilepsy associated with SCD in Nigeria. PMID:23129067

Lagunju, I A; Brown, B J

2012-12-01

48

Neurologic manifestations of malabsorption syndromes.  

PubMed

Although malabsorption is generally considered to be a gastrointestinal problem, the effects of malabsorption extend far beyond the gastrointestinal tract and can include neurologic dysfunction. Malabsorption may occur by a variety of mechanisms, both genetic and acquired, that interfere with the absorption of basic nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. Disorders that interfere with fat absorption can lead to neurologic dysfunction as a consequence of associated impairment of fat-soluble vitamin absorption. Thus, individuals with genetic vitamin E deficiency and the familial hypocholesterolemias may develop symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, cerebellar ataxia, and other neurologic signs and symptoms. Disease processes that damage the enteric mucosa and produce malabsorption can trigger neurologic dysfunction both by immune-related processes, as in celiac disease, and by impairing absorption of essential vitamins and other nutrients, as in tropical sprue. Deficiencies of water-soluble vitamins, such as thiamine and niacin, can also develop in the setting of malabsorption and lead to neurologic dysfunction. Neurologists are aware of the neurologic damage that copper excess can cause in Wilson's disease, but copper deficiency due to malabsorption can also produce neurologic dysfunction in the form of myelopathy. It is vitally important for neurologists to be aware of the potential for malabsorptive processes to produce neurologic dysfunction, because effective treatment for such disorders is often available. PMID:24365342

Pfeiffer, Ronald F

2014-01-01

49

Anxiety disorders in headache patients in a specialised clinic: prevalence and symptoms in comparison to patients in a general neurological clinic.  

PubMed

Data from several studies indicate an association of headache with anxiety disorders. In this study, we assessed and differentiated anxiety disorders in 100 headache patients by using the PSWQ (Penn State Worry Questionnaire) screening tool for generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and the ACQ (Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire) and BSQ (Body Sensation Questionnaire) for panic disorder (PD). Control groups were constructed: (1) on the basis of epidemiological studies on PD and GAD in the general population and (2) by including neurological patients. 37.0% of headache patients had a GAD. 27% of headache patients met the score for PD in the BSQ, 4.0% in the ACQ. Significant results were obtained in comparison to the general population (p < 0.001) and with regard to GAD in comparison with a sample of neurological patients (p < 0.005). The BSQ significantly correlated with the number of medication days (p < 0.005). The results confirm the increased prevalence of GAD in headache patients. PD seems to increase the risk of medication overuse. PMID:21298462

Mehlsteibl, D; Schankin, C; Hering, P; Sostak, P; Straube, A

2011-06-01

50

Are There More Bowel Symptoms in Children with Autism Compared to Normal Children and Children with Other Developmental and Neurological Disorders?: A Case Control Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is considerable controversy as to whether there is an association between bowel disorders and autism. Using a bowel symptom questionnaire we compared 51 children with autism spectrum disorder with control groups of 35 children from special school and 112 from mainstream school. There was a significant difference in the reporting of certain…

Smith, R. A.; Farnworth, H.; Wright, B.; Allgar, V.

2009-01-01

51

Neurological channelopathies  

PubMed Central

Ion channels are membrane-bound proteins that perform key functions in virtually all human cells. Such channels are critically important for the normal function of the excitable tissues of the nervous system, such as muscle and brain. Until relatively recently it was considered that dysfunction of ion channels in the nervous system would be incompatible with life. However, an increasing number of human diseases associated with dysfunctional ion channels are now recognised. Such neurological channelopathies are frequently genetically determined but may also arise through autoimmune mechanisms. In this article clinical, genetic, immunological, and electrophysiological aspects of this expanding group of neurological disorders are reviewed. Clinical situations in which a neurological channelopathy should enter into the differential diagnosis are highlighted. Some practical guidance on how to investigate and treat this complex group of disorders is also included. PMID:15640425

Graves, T; Hanna, M

2005-01-01

52

Prevalence of stroke and transient ischaemic attack in the elderly population of an Italian rural community  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of stroke and transient ischaemic attack in the elderly population, including the oldest residents, of a rural Italian community. Methods: A door-to-door survey was performed between April and October 2001 in 2390 subjects aged 65 years and over. A symptom questionnaire validated by medical records and neurological examination was employed. Results: Complete information was available

Giovanni Orlandi; Andrea Gelli; Simona Fanucchi; Gloria Tognoni; Giovanni Acerbi; Luigi Murri

2003-01-01

53

[Neurological complications in cancer patients].  

PubMed

Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care. PMID:25146945

Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

2014-08-20

54

Occupational Neurologic Disorders in Korea  

PubMed Central

This article presents a schematic review of the clinical manifestations of occupational neurologic disorders in Korea and discusses the toxicologic implications of these conditions. Vascular encephalopathy, parkinsonism, chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar dysfunction, peripheral neuropathy, and neurodegenerative diseases are common presentations of occupational neurotoxic syndromes in Korea. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomic neurologic syndrome. Detailed neurologic examinations and categorization of the clinical manifestations of neurologic disorders will improve the clinical management of occupational neurologic diseases. Physicians must be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of possible exposure to neurotoxins, and they should also pay attention to less-typical, rather-vague symptoms and signs in workers because the toxicologic characteristics of occupational neurologic diseases in Korea have changed from typical patterns to less-typical or equivocal patterns. This shift is likely to be due to several years of low-dose exposure, perhaps combined with the effects of aging, and new types of possibly toxicant-related neurodegenerative diseases. Close collaboration between neurologists and occupational physicians is needed to determine whether neurologic disorders are work-related. PMID:20607045

Jeong, Kyoung Sook; Yun, Yong-Hun; Oh, Myoung-Soon

2010-01-01

55

Neurology Residency Department of Neurology &  

E-print Network

. Most of the service requirements are performed by a nurse clinician/case manager. During the first 2 combined into a two period block, performed during the PGY3 at the Montreal Neurological Hospital (MNH in treatment in the hospital. The majority of patients suffer from partial seizures and a great many

Shoubridge, Eric

56

Neurology Residency Department of Neurology &  

E-print Network

outpatients clinics located at the adult neurology training hospitals. The overall objective of this rotation in order to review cases with the residents. Residents are expected to dictate consultation notes consultation services with respect to patient care, education and legal opinions. Specific Requirements Provide

Shoubridge, Eric

57

The Angiotensin II Type 1–Receptor Blocker Candesartan Increases Cerebral Blood Flow, Reduces Infarct Size, and Improves Neurologic Outcome After Transient Cerebral Ischemia in Rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the present study was to test the impact of administration time of the angiotensin II type 1–receptor blocker candesartan on cerebral blood flow (CBF), infarct size, and neuroscore in transient cerebral ischemia. Therefore, 1-hour middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was followed by reperfusion. Rats received 0.5-mg\\/kg candesartan intravenously 2 hours before MCAO (pretreatment), 24 hours after MCAO,

Tobias Engelhorn; Sophia Goerike; Arnd Doerfler; Christine Okorn; Michael Forsting; Gerd Heusch; Rainer Schulz

2004-01-01

58

Neurological diseases and pain  

PubMed Central

Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

2012-01-01

59

Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations  

PubMed Central

The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disorders that affect pediatric patients. It is valuable to think about 'endocrine disorder' as a cause of the neurologic manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of hormonal imbalance can rapidly relieve the neurologic symptoms. Better understanding of the interaction between the endocrine system and the nervous system, combined with the knowledge about the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations presented in the endocrine disorders might allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of the endocrine disorders. PMID:25654063

2014-01-01

60

Neurologic Manifestations of Infective Endocarditis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Many previous studies have endeavored to find appropriate means to reduce the occurrence of neu- rologic manifestations in patients with infective endocar- ditis (IE). We evaluated patients with IE-associated neu- rologic complications and compared them with patients with IE who did not have neurologic symptoms. Particu- lar attention was focused on assessing the impact of car- diac surgery and

Maija Heiro; Jukka Nikoskelainen; Erik Engblom; Esa Kotilainen; Reijo Marttila; Pirkko Kotilainen

61

Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases  

PubMed Central

Children with rheumatic disorders may have a wide variety of clinical features ranging from fever or a simple arthritis to complex multisystem autoimmune diseases. Information about the prevalence of neurological manifestations in children with rheumatologic disorders is limited. This review describes the neurologic complications of childhood Rheumatic disease either solely or combined with symptoms of other organs involvement, as a primary manifestation or as a part of other symptoms, additionally. PMID:24665273

SHIARI, Reza

2012-01-01

62

Hughlings Jackson's neurological ideas.  

PubMed

Hughlings Jackson's neurological ideas are scientifically valid and practically useful. He began by emphasizing the focal lesion as the key to analysing patients' symptoms. He proclaimed that 'Epilepsy is the name for occasional, sudden, excessive, rapid, and local discharge of grey matter.' He eliminated any need for a direct appeal to metaphysical agents by asserting that the nervous system is an exclusively sensorimotor machine constrained by the newly discovered conservation laws. In constructing his neurophysiology he accepted the phrenological assumption that the nervous system is composed of a number of physiologically discrete organs, each with a single function accessible to the diagnostician. By observing the march of epileptic seizures he developed the idea of somatotopic representation. He claimed that the nervous system is an evolutionary hierarchy of three levels connected by the process of weighted ordinal representation. His assertion of the Doctrine of Concomitance further separated the concerns, and the institutions, of the neurophysiologist from that of the psychiatrist. He came to reject the idea of the unconscious because he could not observe unequivocally unconscious behaviour at the bedside. Each of these ideas emerged from contemporaneous scientific streams, but Hughlings Jackson was the one to incorporate them into practical medicine. These neurological ideas gave physicians the methods, tools, principles and structures with which to establish a new science of clinical neurology. PMID:21903729

York, George K; Steinberg, David A

2011-10-01

63

Neurologic Manifestations of Leishmania spp. Infection  

PubMed Central

When listing common clinical signs of the spectra of Leishmania-derived diseases, neurologic malfunctions are not commonly included. Despite this, there are multiple reported instances both in human and veterinary medicine where neurologic manifestations, whether central or peripheral, are described. In this review, we describe neurologic manifestations seen during infection with Leishmania spp. with some discussion of the implicit effect of inflammation on the blood brain barrier in both medical and veterinary cases. Taken together, the material discussed here suggests that in patients from Leishmania-endemic areas, when observing neurologic symptoms, causation secondary to infection with Leishmania spp. should be highly considered. PMID:21666756

Petersen, Christine Anne; Greenlee, M. Heather West

2011-01-01

64

Duration of Symptom and ABCD2 Score as Predictors of Risk of Early Recurrent Events after Transient Ischemic Attack: A Hospital-Based Case Series Study  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to refine clinical risk factor stratification and make an optimal intervention plan to prevent ischemic stroke. Material/Methods Clinical data, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings, were collected in a cohort of hospitalized transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients from January 2010 to December 2011. Recurrent cerebrovascular events after TIA, including recurrent TIA, minor stroke, and major stroke, were identified by face-to-face follow-up. A multivariate, ordinal, logistic regression model was used to determine significant predictors of recurrent events. Results Of 106 TIA patients, 24 (22.6%) had recurrent TIA and 20 (18.9%) had a stroke within 7 days. Hypertension, dyslipidemia, a history of ischemic stroke or TIA, and ABCD2 score were significantly associated with the recurrent events after TIA (P<0.001, P=0.02, P<0.001, P=0.02). Hypertension (RR=9.21; 95% CI, 3.07–27.61, P<0.001) and duration of symptom (RR=1.10; 95% CI, 1.02–1.17, P=0.01) as an item of ABCD2 score were highly predictive of the severity of recurrent events, whereas ABCD2 score as a whole (P=0.18) proved to be less strongly predictive. Conclusions A history of hypertension and long duration of symptom independently and significantly predict severe recurrent events after TIA within 7 days, but a high ABCD2 score was less strongly predictive of severe recurrent events. PMID:25604068

Li, Qiang; Zhu, Xiaolong; Feng, Chao; Fang, Min; Liu, Xueyuan

2015-01-01

65

[Vertigo/dizziness and syncope from a neurological perspective].  

PubMed

Vertigo/dizziness and syncope are among the most frequent clinical entities encountered in neurology. In patients with presumed syncope, it is important to distinguish it from neurological and psychiatric diseases causing a transient loss of consciousness due to another etiology. Moreover, central nervous disorders of autonomic blood pressure regulation as well as affections of the peripheral autonomic nerves can be responsible for the onset of real syncope. This is particularly relevant in recurrent syncope. Vertigo occurs in the context of temporary disorders, relatively harmless diseases associated with chronic impairment, as well as in acute life-threatening states. Patient history and clinical examination play an important role in classifying these symptoms. It is of crucial importance in this context, e.g., to establish whether the patient is experiencing an initial manifestation or whether such episodes have been known to occur recurrently over a longer period of time, as well as how long the episodes last. Clinical investigations include a differential examination of the oculomotor system with particular regard to nystagmus. The present article outlines the main underlying neurological diseases associated with syncope and vertigo, their relevant differential diagnoses as well as practical approaches to their treatment. PMID:25502655

Machetanz, J

2015-01-01

66

Neurologic Complications of Lung Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lung cancer frequently causes neurological complications from direct and indirect effects. Brain metastases occur in 41% of\\u000a patients with non-small cell lung cancer and 35% with small cell lung cancer at autopsy. Presenting symptoms can be quite\\u000a protean. MRI continues to be the gold standard of detecting metastases. Biopsy or resection should be considered for patients\\u000a with a single lesion,

Suriya A. Jeyapalan; Anand Mahadevan

67

Venous thromboembolism in neurologic disease.  

PubMed

Patients with neurologic disease are at high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) because of relative immobility. They are also at increased risk due to the presence of a hypercoagulable state. Patients with spinal cord injuries, brain tumors, and strokes are at particularly high risk and extra vigilance is needed in these patients. Because VTE is very common in hospitalized neurologic and neurosurgical patients, mechanical thromboprophylaxis is indicated in virtually all patients. Pharmacologic prophylaxis with either subcutaneous heparin or low molecular heparinoids should be given to all high-risk neurologic and neurosurgical patients provided there are no major contraindications. The major concern would be a risk of bleeding but in some patients alternate drugs must be considered given the risk of thrombosis (i.e., in the context of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia). The immediate or long-term treatment of full dose anticoagulation for VTE may not be appropriate in all patients as VTE therapy represents a balance between the risks of bleeding related to anticoagulant therapy versus the risk of recurrent events. An inferior vena cava (IVC) filter is another option in these patients but may not necessarily be the best choice for most neurologic patients. Given the high risk of VTE in patients with neurologic diseases, early recognition by clinicians of the signs and symptoms of VTE is essential. PMID:24365303

Schneck, Michael J

2014-01-01

68

Neurological complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children, a single center experience.  

PubMed

In this study, we retrospectively examined the data of children who underwent allo-HSCT from HLA-matched family donors. We analyzed the incidence, etiological factors, clinical characteristics, possible reasons, risk factors, and follow-up of neurologic complications. BU-based conditioning regimens were used in most of the cases (n = 62). The median duration of follow-up for the 89 patients was 20 months (range 1-41 months). Eleven percent of transplanted children developed one or more neurological symptoms after HSCT with a median observation time of two months (range -6 days to 18 months). The median age of the four girls and six boys with neurological complication was 13 yr (range 5.3-17.6 yr). Cylosporine A neurotoxicity was diagnosed in five children, four of them were PRES. The rest of complications were BU and lorazepam toxicity, an intracranial hemorrhage, a sinovenous thrombosis, and a transient ischemic attack during extracorpereal photopheresis. No difference was found between groups of neurological complication according to age, gender, diagnosis, hospitalization time, neutrophil and platelet engraftment time, stem cell source, and conditioning regimen, acute and chronic GVHD or VOD. Neurological complication was the cause of death in one patient (1.1%). PMID:24802348

Azik, Fatih; Yazal Erdem, Arzu; Tavil, Betül; Bayram, Cengiz; Tunç, Bahattin; Uçkan, Duygu

2014-06-01

69

Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome in Fallopian Tube Cancer.  

PubMed

We report on a rare case of paraneoplastic syndrome (PS) that was discovered on completion of diagnostic work-up to be an undifferentiated fallopian tube carcinoma. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to neurology with vertigo, gait ataxia and dysarthria, transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke were quickly excluded. Indicative for the further diagnosis of a paraneoplastic syndrome was the identification of onconeuronal antibodies the detection of which can be associated with certain tumour entities. The strongly positive anti-Yo antibody that is formed above all by breast and lung cancers as well as ovarian cancer led to a corresponding staging. The tumour markers CEA, CA 125 and CA 15-3 were in the normal ranges. Mammography and thorax CT were also unremarkable; on transvaginal sonography the internal genitals were inconspicuous except for a follicular cyst on the left. On abdominal CT the only conspicuous finding was a 1.5?cm ovarian cyst. After consensual agreement a bilateral laparoscopic adenexectomy was performed but with unremarkable abdominal findings. The histological examination confirmed a right-sided undifferentiated tubal carcinoma with the provisional classification FIGO IIA. After a stage-related staging operation, the final classification was found to be the FIGO-IIIC stage on account of positive retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Thus adjuvant chemotherapy with 6 cycles of carboplatin and paclitaxel was performed. By means of a timely, guideline-conform therapy for tubal carcinoma, the neurological symptoms and, above all, the dysarthria could be improved after 10 months. PMID:25364036

Maas, E; Skoberne, T; Werner, A; Braun, S; Jackisch, C

2014-10-01

70

Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome in Fallopian Tube Cancer  

PubMed Central

We report on a rare case of paraneoplastic syndrome (PS) that was discovered on completion of diagnostic work-up to be an undifferentiated fallopian tube carcinoma. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to neurology with vertigo, gait ataxia and dysarthria, transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke were quickly excluded. Indicative for the further diagnosis of a paraneoplastic syndrome was the identification of onconeuronal antibodies the detection of which can be associated with certain tumour entities. The strongly positive anti-Yo antibody that is formed above all by breast and lung cancers as well as ovarian cancer led to a corresponding staging. The tumour markers CEA, CA 125 and CA 15-3 were in the normal ranges. Mammography and thorax CT were also unremarkable; on transvaginal sonography the internal genitals were inconspicuous except for a follicular cyst on the left. On abdominal CT the only conspicuous finding was a 1.5?cm ovarian cyst. After consensual agreement a bilateral laparoscopic adenexectomy was performed but with unremarkable abdominal findings. The histological examination confirmed a right-sided undifferentiated tubal carcinoma with the provisional classification FIGO IIA. After a stage-related staging operation, the final classification was found to be the FIGO-IIIC stage on account of positive retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Thus adjuvant chemotherapy with 6 cycles of carboplatin and paclitaxel was performed. By means of a timely, guideline-conform therapy for tubal carcinoma, the neurological symptoms and, above all, the dysarthria could be improved after 10 months. PMID:25364036

Maas, E.; Skoberne, T.; Werner, A.; Braun, S.; Jackisch, C.

2014-01-01

71

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review This review describes relevant advances in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) with emphasis on particular syndromes and the impact of antibodies against surface antigens in their management. Recent findings PNS may present with symptoms that do not raise the suspicion of a paraneoplastic origin. The best example is anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis that in adult women frequently associates with ovarian teratoma. An electroencephalogram pattern described as ‘extreme delta brush’ was recently identified in 30% of patients with this disorder. Isolated myelopathy may have a paraneoplastic origin associated with amphiphysin or CV2 (CRMP5) antibodies. Jaw dystonia and laryngospasm can be the predominant symptom of the brainstem encephalitis associated with Ri antibodies. ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor antibodies are the most common antibodies found in patients with limbic encephalitis and small cell lung cancer, and contactin-associated protein 2 antibodies in patients with Morvan’s syndrome and thymoma. Lastly, a recent study identified delta/notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor (DNER) as the target antigen of Tr antibodies, a marker of cerebellar ataxia and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Summary The number of antibodies relevant to PNS is now expanded to those against surface antigens. These antibodies do not confirm the paraneoplastic origin of the syndrome but predict a better response to immunotherapy. PMID:23041955

Graus, Francesc; Dalmau, Josep

2013-01-01

72

Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice  

PubMed Central

Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

2014-01-01

73

Neurologic complications of multiple endocrine syndromes.  

PubMed

Multiple endocrine syndromes are unusual familial disorders affecting multiple endocrine glands; they result from an autoimmune process, causing progressive inflammatory destruction of glandular tissue, leading to hormonal insufficiency. Neurologic manifestations result from endocrine failure and/or independent autoimmune neurologic disorders. Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) results from oncogene mutations in cells derived from the neural crest with proliferation of neuroectodermal cells within endocrine glands and skin. Although most MEN-associated tumors are histologically benign, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid is invasive and potentially lethal. Neurologic symptoms may be caused by increased hormonal production and by the presence of other peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) tumors. PMID:24365353

Kattah, Jorge C; Kattah, William C

2014-01-01

74

Transient ischaemic attacks: mimics and chameleons  

PubMed Central

Suspected transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is a common diagnostic challenge for physicians in neurology, stroke, general medicine and primary care. It is essential to identify TIAs promptly because of the very high early risk of ischaemic stroke, requiring urgent investigation and preventive treatment. On the other hand, it is also important to identify TIA ‘mimics’, to avoid unnecessary and expensive investigations, incorrect diagnostic labelling and inappropriate long-term prevention treatment. Although the pathophysiology of ischaemic stroke and TIA is identical, and both require rapid and accurate diagnosis, the differential diagnosis differs for TIA owing to the transience of symptoms. For TIA the diagnostic challenge is greater, and the ‘mimic’ rate higher (and more varied), because there is no definitive diagnostic test. TIA heralds a high risk of early ischaemic stroke, and in many cases the stroke can be prevented if the cause is identified, hence the widespread dissemination of guidelines including rapid assessment and risk tools like the ABCD2 score. However, these guidelines do not emphasise the substantial challenges in making the correct diagnosis in patients with transient neurological symptoms. In this article we will mainly consider the common TIA mimics, but also briefly mention the rather less common situations where TIAs can look like something else (‘chameleons’). PMID:24453269

Nadarajan, V; Perry, R J; Johnson, J; Werring, D J

2014-01-01

75

Neurology and neurologic practice in China  

PubMed Central

In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions. PMID:22123780

2011-01-01

76

[Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].  

PubMed

Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test. PMID:24998831

Sonoo, Masahiro

2014-07-01

77

American Academy of Neurology  

MedlinePLUS

... in comparison to placebo decreases vaccination-induced immune responses Neurology ® Clinical Practice Do efforts to decrease door-to-needle time risk increasing stroke mimic treatment rates? Neurology ® Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation Reduction of CD8+ T lymphocytes ...

78

Views & Reviews Cosmetic neurology  

E-print Network

Views & Reviews Cosmetic neurology The controversy over enhancing movement, mentation, and mood these concerns, I argue that major restraints on the development of cosmetic neurology are not likely about its future. While cosmetic neurology certainly includes the use of botulinum toxin to brush away

Chatterjee, Anjan

79

The Neurologic Manifestations of Mitochondrial Disease  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nervous system contains some of the body's most metabolically demanding cells that are highly dependent on ATP produced via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the neurological system is consistently involved in patients with mitochondrial disease. Symptoms differ depending on the part of the nervous system affected. Although almost…

Parikh, Sumit

2010-01-01

80

Neurologic Disorders and Hepatitis E, France, 2010  

PubMed Central

We report meningitis with diffuse neuralgic pain or polyradiculoneuropathy associated with PCR-documented acute hepatitis E in 2 adults. These observations suggest that diagnostic testing for hepatitis E virus should be conducted for patients who have neurologic symptoms and liver cytolysis. PMID:21801637

Despierres, Laura-Anne; Kaphan, Elsa; Attarian, Shahram; Cohen-Bacrie, Stephan; Pelletier, Jean; Pouget, Jean; Motte, Anne; Charrel, Rémi; Gerolami, René

2011-01-01

81

Effect of yoga therapy on anxiety and depressive symptoms and quality-of-life among caregivers of in-patients with neurological disorders at a tertiary care center in India: A randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Context: The concerns of caregivers of patients with neurological disorders have been a felt need for a long time, with many of them experiencing significant psychiatric morbidity. Aims: This study aimed to find the effect of yoga in reducing anxiety and depression, as well as improving quality-of-life in caregivers of patients with neurological disorders. Settings and Design: The study was conducted using a randomized controlled design, with yoga intervention and waitlisted controls. Methodology: Sixty consenting caregivers of inpatients in neurology wards were randomized into two groups: Yoga and control. Demographic variables except years of education and length of caretaking were comparable in the two groups, as also baseline scores of anxiety, depression and quality-of-life. A specific yoga module comprising yog?sanas, pr???y?ma, and chanting was taught to the participants in the yoga group by the researcher. At follow-up 43 patients (yoga n=20 and control group n=23) were available. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test the change from pre-test to post-test scores within and between groups. Analysis of covariance was performed to compare the post-test scores between the groups adjusting for education and length of caretaking. Results: Following one month intervention of yoga therapy, there was a significant (P<0.001) decrease in anxiety and depression scores, as well as improved quality-of-life among the participants in the yoga group as compared with the control group. Conclusion: This study highlights the usefulness of a yoga intervention for caregivers of inpatients with neurological problems. The small sample size and lack of blinding were some of the limitations of this study. PMID:24049204

Umadevi, P.; Ramachandra; Varambally, S.; Philip, M.; Gangadhar, B. N.

2013-01-01

82

ECT IN NEUROLOGICAL COUNDITIONS  

PubMed Central

It is a myth that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) produces greater side effects and worsens the neurological condition when used in neurologically ill patients. With the advancement and sophistication in ECT practice standards and modification procedures, it can be safely administered either to treat selected neurological conditions or the co-morbid psychiatric illnesses without additional risks. However ECT should be administered only after thorough evaluation of risks and benefits in such individuals. PMID:21206577

Girish, K.; Gangadhar, B.N.; Janakiramaiah, N.

2002-01-01

83

Neurology at the airport  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesNeurological problems are reported to be common in air travellers. The authors aimed to study neurological problems which might be associated with air traffic in a systematic way.MethodsThe authors analysed a prospective registry of all the patients referred from Madrid-Barajas International Airport to the emergency department of their tertiary university hospital (Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal), for whom a neurological

Araceli Alonso-Cánovas; Alicia de Felipe-Mimbrera; Jaime González-Valcárcel; Nuria García-Barragán; Iñigo Corral; Jaime Masjuan

2011-01-01

84

The Preoperative Neurological Evaluation  

PubMed Central

Neurological diseases are prevalent in the general population, and the neurohospitalist has an important role to play in the preoperative planning for patients with and at risk for developing neurological disease. The neurohospitalist can provide patients and their families as well as anesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitalists, and other providers guidance in particular to the patient’s neurological disease and those he or she is at risk for. Here we present considerations and guidance for the neurohospitalist providing preoperative consultation for the neurological patient with or at risk of disturbances of consciousness, cerebrovascular and carotid disease, epilepsy, neuromuscular disease, and Parkinson disease. PMID:24198903

Probasco, John; Sahin, Bogachan; Tran, Tung; Chung, Tae Hwan; Rosenthal, Liana Shapiro; Mari, Zoltan; Levy, Michael

2013-01-01

85

Transient cortical blindness as a manifestation of solitary cysticercus granuloma.  

PubMed

Neurocysticercosis is recognised as a significant cause of neurological morbidity in endemic regions. The wide range of pleomorphic and non-specific neurological manifestations of neurocysticercosis must be kept in mind by physicians, as the disease has shown resurgence in developed countries. When an atypical presentation of an unusual tropical disease occurs in non-endemic regions, the diagnosis is often missed. We describe a case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with a history of transient bilateral loss of vision with headache and vomiting. Brain MRI revealed the presence of a single cysticercus granuloma in the occipital lobe. A diagnosis of symptomatic occipital lobe seizure secondary to neurocysticercosis was made. She was given a course of albendazole. There was no recurrence of symptoms at 3 years follow-up. Occipital seizures that are associated with ictal amaurosis closely mimic basilar migraine. Such cases benefit from neuroimaging in order to rule out the underlying structural causes. PMID:23230251

Hussain, Shabbir; Hussain, Kosar; Hussain, Sahar

2012-01-01

86

Chapter 38 American neurology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb

Frank R. Freemon

2009-01-01

87

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for clinical applications in neurological and psychiatric disorders: an overview.  

PubMed

Neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by several disabling symptoms for which effective, mechanism-based treatments remain elusive. Consequently, more advanced non-invasive therapeutic methods are required. A method that may modulate brain activity and be viable for use in clinical practice is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). It is a non-invasive procedure whereby a pulsed magnetic field stimulates electrical activity in the brain. Here, we focus on the basic foundation of rTMS, the main stimulation parametters, the factors that influence individual responses to rTMS and the experimental advances of rTMS that may become a viable clinical application to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. The findings showed that rTMS can improve some symptoms associated with these conditions and might be useful for promoting cortical plasticity in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, these changes are transient and it is premature to propose these applications as realistic therapeutic options, even though the rTMS technique has been evidenced as a potential modulator of sensorimotor integration and neuroplasticity. Functional imaging of the region of interest could highlight the capacity of rTMS to bring about plastic changes of the cortical circuitry and hint at future novel clinical interventions. Thus, we recommend that further studies clearly determine the role of rTMS in the treatment of these conditions. Finally, we must remember that however exciting the neurobiological mechanisms might be, the clinical usefulness of rTMS will be determined by its ability to provide patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders with safe, long-lasting and substantial improvements in quality of life. PMID:25610279

Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flávia; Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

2013-10-01

88

Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Clinical Applications in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders: An Overview  

PubMed Central

Neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by several disabling symptoms for which effective, mechanism-based treatments remain elusive. Consequently, more advanced non-invasive therapeutic methods are required. A method that may modulate brain activity and be viable for use in clinical practice is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). It is a non-invasive procedure whereby a pulsed magnetic field stimulates electrical activity in the brain. Here, we focus on the basic foundation of rTMS, the main stimulation parametters, the factors that influence individual responses to rTMS and the experimental advances of rTMS that may become a viable clinical application to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. The findings showed that rTMS can improve some symptoms associated with these conditions and might be useful for promoting cortical plasticity in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, these changes are transient and it is premature to propose these applications as realistic therapeutic options, even though the rTMS technique has been evidenced as a potential modulator of sensorimotor integration and neuroplasticity. Functional imaging of the region of interest could highlight the capacity of rTMS to bring about plastic changes of the cortical circuitry and hint at future novel clinical interventions. Thus, we recommend that further studies clearly determine the role of rTMS in the treatment of these conditions. Finally, we must remember that however exciting the neurobiological mechanisms might be, the clinical usefulness of rTMS will be determined by its ability to provide patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders with safe, long-lasting and substantial improvements in quality of life. PMID:25610279

Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flávia; Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

2013-01-01

89

Neurology and orthopaedics  

PubMed Central

Neurology encompasses all aspects of medicine and surgery, but is closer to orthopaedic surgery than many other specialities. Both neurological deficits and bone disorders lead to locomotor system abnormalities, joint complications and limb problems. The main neurological conditions that require the attention of an orthopaedic surgeon are disorders that affect the lower motor neurones. The most common disorders in this group include neuromuscular disorders and traumatic peripheral nerve lesions. Upper motor neurone disorders such as cerebral palsy and stroke are also frequently seen and discussed, as are chronic conditions such as poliomyelitis. The management of these neurological problems is often coordinated in the neurology clinic, and this group, probably more than any other, requires a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:17308288

Houlden, Henry; Charlton, Paul; Singh, Dishan

2007-01-01

90

William Shakespeare's neurology.  

PubMed

Many of Shakespeare's plays contain characters who appear to be afflicted by neurological or psychiatric disorders. Shakespeare, in his descriptive analysis of his protagonists, was contributing to the understanding of these disorders. In fact, Charcot frequently used Shakespearean references in his neurological teaching sessions, stressing how acute objective insight is essential to achieving expert clinical diagnosis. Charcot found in Shakespeare the same rigorous observational techniques for which he himself became famous. This chapter describes many of Shakespearean characters suffering from varied neurological disorders, including Parkinsonism, epilepsy, sleeping disturbances, dementia, headache, prion disease, and paralyses. PMID:24290473

Paciaroni, Maurizio; Bogousslavsky, Julien

2013-01-01

91

Astrocytes: The missing link in neurological disease?  

PubMed Central

The central nervous system (CNS) is comprised of numerous cell types that work in concert to facilitate proper function and homeostasis. Disruption of these carefully orchestrated networks results in neuronal dysfunction, manifesting itself in a variety of neurological disorders. While neuronal dysregulation is causative of symptoms manifest in the clinic, the etiology of these disorders is often more complex than simply a loss of neurons or intrinsic dysregulation of their function. In the adult brain, astrocytes comprise the most abundant cell type and play key roles in CNS physiology, therefore it stands to reason that dysregulation of normal astrocyte function contributes to the etiology and progression of varied neurological disorders. We review here some neurological disorders associated with an astrocyte factor and discuss how the related astrocyte dysfunction contributes to the etiology and/or progression of these disorders. PMID:24365571

Lin, Chia-Ching John; Deneen, Benjamin

2013-01-01

92

Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases  

PubMed Central

Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25083051

Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

2014-01-01

93

Neurological Complications of AIDS  

MedlinePLUS

... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Health Disparities Planning Panel on NeuroAIDS in Minority Populations Report of the Health Disparities Planning Panel on NeuroAIDS in Minority Populations meeting ...

94

Neurological Sequelae of Lupus  

MedlinePLUS

... Page Synonym(s): Lupus - Neurological Sequelae, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... health problems and have a normal lifespan with periodic doctor visits and treatments with various drugs. What ...

95

Hereditary Channelopathies in Neurology  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Ion channelopathies are caused by malfunction or altered regulation of ion channel proteins due to hereditary or acquired\\u000a protein changes. In neurology, main phenotypes include certain forms of epilepsy, ataxia, migraine, neuropathic pain, myotonia,\\u000a and muscle weakness including myasthenia and periodic paralyses. The total prevalence of monogenic channelopathies in neurology\\u000a is about 35:100,000. Susceptibility-related mutations further increase the relevance of

Karin Jurkat-Rott; Holger Lerche; Yvonne Weber; Frank Lehmann-Horn

96

Are aluminium potroom workers at increased risk of neurological disorders?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether long term potroom workers in an aluminium smelter are at increased risk of neurological disorders. METHODS: Cross sectional study of 63 current and former aluminium potroom workers first employed before 1970 and with at least 10 years of service. A group of 37 cast house and carbon plant workers with similar durations of employment and starting dates in the same smelter were used as controls. The prevalence of neurological symptoms was ascertained by questionnaire. Objective tests of tremor in both upper and lower limbs, postural stability, reaction time, and vocabulary were conducted. All subjects were examined by a neurologist. RESULTS: No significant differences in age, race, or education were found between the two groups. Although the potroom group had higher prevalences for all but one of the neurological symptoms, only three odds ratios (ORs) were significantly increased; for incoordination (OR 10.6), difficulty buttoning (OR 6.2), and depression (OR 6.2). Tests of arm or hand and leg tremor in both the visible and non-visible frequencies did not show any significant differences between the two groups. Testing of postural stability showed no definitive pattern of neurologically meaningful differences between the groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups in reaction time, vocabulary score, or clinical neurological assessment. CONCLUSIONS: The objective measures of neurological function provided little support for the finding of increased neurological symptom prevalences in the potroom workers, although increased symptoms may be an indicator of early, subtle neurological changes. The results provide no firm basis for concluding that neurological effects among long term potroom workers are related to the working environment, in particular aluminium exposure, in potrooms. These findings should be treated with caution due to the low participation of former workers and the possibility of information bias in the potroom group. PMID:9166127

Sim, M; Dick, R; Russo, J; Bernard, B; Grubb, P; Krieg, E; Mueller, C; McCammon, C

1997-01-01

97

[Diagnosis and care of Wilson disease with neurological revelation].  

PubMed

Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disease that produces a copper accumulation in many organs, initially in the liver, progressing to liver cirrhosis, and in the brain, with different neurologic symptoms. Diagnosis is based on clinical, biochemical, and genetic tests. Different treatments based on chelating agents may help reduce the disease's spontaneous morbidity and mortality. We describe three patients who presented Wilson disease before 18 years of age, with initial neurologic symptoms between 1998 and 2010. After comparison with literature reports, their clinical symptoms, progression, and care allowed us to propose a treatment algorithm. Neurologic symptoms are present in 35% of the patients with Wilson disease such as dystonia, extrapyramidal syndrome, dysarthria, dysphagia, and psychiatric symptoms. The time to diagnosis remains too long and may account for the increased severity of the illness encountered and problems treating these patients. The first treatment choice must be triethylenetetramine, which causes fewer side effects of initial worsening of symptoms compared to D-penicillamine. Zinc therapy is the first treatment for asymptomatic patients or those on maintenance treatment. Finally, liver transplantation is a potential treatment even if the patient presents severe neurological disability because it may improve clinical symptoms. However, further research is warranted on this matter. PMID:22261259

Wagner, S; Brunet, A-S; Bost, M; Lachaux, A; Broussolle, E; Des Portes, V; Lion-François, L

2012-03-01

98

Symptom Management  

Cancer.gov

Symptom Management & Quality of Life Concept Design This video covers a variety of practical considerations for developing a symptom management concept for clinical research.. Co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Symptom Management and Health

99

A Proposed Roadmap for Inpatient Neurology Quality Indicators  

PubMed Central

Background/Purpose: In recent years, there has been increasing pressure to measure and report quality in health care. However, there has been little focus on quality measurement in the field of neurology for conditions other than stroke and transient ischemic attack. As the number of evidence-based treatments for neurological conditions grows, so will the demand to measure the quality of care delivered. The purpose of this study was to review essential components of hospital performance measures for neurological disease and propose potential quality indicators for commonly encountered inpatient neurological diagnoses. Methods: We determined the most common inpatient neurological diagnoses at a major tertiary care medical center by reviewing the billing database. We then searched PubMed and the National Guidelines Clearinghouse to identify treatment guidelines for these conditions. Guideline recommendations with class I/level A evidence were evaluated as possible quality indicators. Results: We found 94 guidelines for 14 inpatient neurological conditions other than stroke and transient ischemic attack. Of these, 36 guidelines contained at least 1 recommendation with class I evidence. Based on these, potential quality indicators for intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pneumococcal meningitis, coma following cardiac arrest, encephalitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo are proposed. Conclusions: There are several inpatient neurological conditions with treatments or diagnostic test routines supported by high levels of evidence that could be used in the future as quality indicators. PMID:23983832

Douglas, Vanja C.; Josephson, S. Andrew

2011-01-01

100

Progesterone and neurology.  

PubMed

Neurological diseases are frequently observed in perimenopausal women and can be characterized by their gender-specific occurrence. These observations raise the question whether sex steroids are also involved in neurological diseases. Epidemiological data have shown that in Austria in 1993, the prescription rate of psychotropics, hypnotics, and analeptics for women aged 50-55 years increased over 300% compared to other age groups. In males of the same age, an increase of the prescription rate was not observed. Molecular pharmacology research over the last ten years has shown that sex steroids may interact with the central nervous system via GABA receptors as well as with the peripheral nervous system. These observations confirm the epidemiological finding that neurological and psychological functions may also be directly influenced by sex steroids and their metabolites. PMID:12227900

Gruber, D M; Sator, M O; Wieser, F; Worda, C; Huber, J C

1999-06-01

101

Creativity and neurological disease.  

PubMed

Although humans have long valued creativity, the generation of such innovation is still incompletely understood. Looking at the healthy brain, researchers have localized certain parts for a basic understanding of these mechanisms. By researching the brain affected by neurological disease, scientists have observed unique manifestations of creativity, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and parkinsonian spectrum disorders, and stroke, which help clarify these creative underpinnings. Incorporating both healthy and disease models of cerebral functioning, neurological and neuroscientific research from recent years has built on established theories and expanded current knowledge. PMID:24938215

Acosta, Lealani Mae Y

2014-08-01

102

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes  

PubMed Central

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are immune-mediated erroneous attacks on the central or peripheral nervous systems, or both, directed originally against the tumour itself. They have been known for more than 40 years, but recently the discovery of new subgroups of paraneoplastic encephalitis syndromes with a remarkably good response to immune therapy has ignited new clinical and scientific interest. Knowledge of these subgroups and their associated autoantibodies is important in therapeutic decision-making. However, the abundance of new autoantibodies and syndromes can be confusing. This review paper summarizes current knowledge and new developments in the field of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, their classification, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:23937626

Leypoldt, F; Wandinger, K-P

2014-01-01

103

Migraine aura or transient ischemic attacks? A five-year follow-up case-control study of women with transient central nervous system disorders in pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Migraine aura may be difficult to differentiate from transient ischemic attacks and other transient neurological disorders in pregnant women. The aims of the present study were to investigate and diagnose all pregnant women with transient neurological disorders of suspected central nervous system origin, and to compare this group with a control group of pregnant women with regard to vascular

Janne Marit Ertresvg; Lars Jacob Stovner; Lene Ekern Kvavik; Hans-Jorgen Johnsen; John-Anker Zwart; Grethe Helde; Gunnar Bovim

2007-01-01

104

Neurology on the internet.  

PubMed

Since the Internet's inception in 1969, neurologists have witnessed a continuous parade of innovative phases. There is tremendous potential for near-instantaneous dissemination of the latest developments in neurologic knowledge, although their value is dependent on the degree of awareness of neurologists and is limited by the reluctance of some sources to make information readily accessible. The encyclopedic nature of the Internet, with its vast resources of online information, may be diminished by issues of access, variable quality and reliability, and a lack of intelligent retrieval systems. A major hindrance, for example, is seen with restrictions on archival, but proprietary, neurologic literature. Neurologic patients and their caregivers use the Internet heavily, but for somewhat different reasons. It is important for neurologists to understand these differences. The emergence of the online Personal Health Record will become increasingly valuable as these sites evolve and more medical providers incorporate electronic applications and medical records into their practices. Online groups for neurologists with similar interests, often referred to as "networks," have the potential to catalyze the natural organizing tendencies among those seeking solutions to shared problems. Networking can function well for neurologists, neurologic patients, and for focused efforts in an area such as advocacy. These considerations are discussed in this article. PMID:20202499

Henson, John W; Jung, Lily K

2010-05-01

105

Neurological Complications of AIDS  

MedlinePLUS

Neurological Complications of AIDS Fact Sheet Feature Federal domestic HIV/AIDS information and resources can be found at www.AIDS.gov See a ... Where can I get more information? What is AIDS? AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is a condition ...

106

Neurological Complications of Biologic Therapy in Psoriasis  

PubMed Central

Biologic agents have been a significant advancement in the management of psoriasis. Along with significant clinical improvement, there have been concerns for emerging side effects with the use of biologics. Reports have emerged showing the association between efalizumab and the development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and other demyelinating disorders. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors have been associated with various demyelinating disorders. As such, it is imperative for dermatologists to be well informed regarding how to notify patients about the risks of biologic treatment. Dermatologists must be able to identify the signs and symptoms of neurological complications and recognize when to refer patients to neurologists for diagnostic workup, disease confirmation, and any necessary treatment. This review is a compilation of evidence showing the association between biologic therapy and neurological complications, as well as an overview of the clinical presentation and diagnosis of such diseases. PMID:20725577

Sanders, Catherine; Bechtel, Ann

2009-01-01

107

Neurology and detective writing.  

PubMed

When searching for clues to reach a diagnosis, neurologists often empathise with the detective who is trying to solve a case. The premise of this article is that detective stories have been part of the fabric of neurology ever since the time that it evolved into a discrete medical speciality. We will examine how this form of narrative has found expression in detective mystery fiction and popular science publications created by 20th century neurologist physician-writers. We will also investigate the power of the neurologist's alter ego, Sherlock Holmes: his relationship to founders of clinical neuroscience such as Jean-Martin Charcot, William Gowers and Sigmund Freud, and his influences on neurological practice and its literary traditions. PMID:24006370

Kempster, Peter A; Lees, Andrew J

2013-12-01

108

Neurology goes global  

PubMed Central

Summary In recent years, the need for additional neurologists and neurologic expertise in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) has become more apparent. Many organizations are committed to this unmet need, but the scope of the problem remains mostly underappreciated. Neurologists may be skeptical about their value in resource-limited settings, yet we are critically needed and can have a marked effect. International experiences, however, must be carried out in ethical, informed, and sustainable ways in tandem with local health care providers when possible. We present a brief overview of critical issues in global neurology, the importance of focusing on benefits to the LMIC, and options for volunteer opportunities in clinical service, education, research, and disaster relief. Finally, we offer practical pointers and resources for planning these experiences. PMID:25110621

Mateen, Farrah J.

2014-01-01

109

The Neurological Exam  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website features a complete neurological exam with the following elements: 1) cranial nerves, 2) motor exam, 3) sensory exam, 4) stance & gait. Video demonstrations are used for each part of the exam. Text describes the examination technique, expected normal findings and common abnormal findings. A helpful glossary of terms is available in a separate frame at the bottom of the page for reference. A high bandwidth is recommended and a QuickTime player is necessary.Annotated: false

Hohol, Marika

110

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) can be defined as remote effects of cancer that are not caused by the tumor and its metastasis, or by infection, ischemia or metabolic disruptions. PNS are rare, affecting less than 1\\/10,000 patients with cancer. Only the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is relatively frequent, occurring in about 1% of patients with small cell lung cancer. PNS can

Jérôme Honnorat; Jean-Christophe Antoine

2007-01-01

111

Wilderness and recreational neurology.  

PubMed

With increased access to once remote regions of the planet and renewed interest in exploring natural surroundings, previously geographically isolated and rare neurologic conditions can be encountered in any patient population. Rare envenomations and poisonings, once the purview of the tropical neurologist, now can be encountered by travelers to areas where creatures that have developed specialized defenses are endemic. Recognition, therefore, of the potentially neurotoxic fauna and flora in these areas holds value, even for the urban neurologist. PMID:15757797

Malek, Ali R; Hoffmann, Michael

2005-05-01

112

Neurological update: dementia.  

PubMed

Dementia continues to enjoy a high public and political profile, the latter exemplified by the recent G8 summit meeting declaration to develop a cure or treatment by 2025. This is only likely to be achieved by a deeper understanding of the clinical and pathophysiological phenomena of dementia disorders, many examples of which have appeared in the Journal of Neurology in 2013 and which are reviewed here. PMID:24500494

Larner, A J

2014-03-01

113

Pediatric Neurological Emergencies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute encephalopathy in childhood may vary in its presentation, aetiology and imaging compared with the adult population.\\u000a Emergent neuroimaging, while often performed in order to exclude infection or neoplasia as a cause of acute neurological deterioration,\\u000a may reveal imaging findings peculiar to a number of specific conditions. The radiologist may be the first to recognise and\\u000a suggest conditions such as

J. W. J. McCann; E. Phelan

114

Syphilis Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... the infection will move to the next stages. Latent syphilis The latent (hidden) stage of syphilis begins when symptoms of secondary syphilis are over. In early latent syphilis, you might notice that signs and symptoms ...

115

Symptom Management  

MedlinePLUS

... TBI Educational Materials Research DVBIC Locations Press Symptom Management A brain injury can affect a person physically ... Diagnosis and Assessment Treatment and Recovery Caregiving Symptom Management Life After TBI Defense and Veterans Brain Injury ...

116

Endovascular Treatment of Supra-Aortic Extracranial Stenoses in Patients with Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency Symptoms  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. Stenoses and thromboses of vessels feeding the vertebrobasilar territory can evoke serious disturbances including ischemic stroke. We present our experience of endovascular interventions for patients with signs of vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) resulted from subclavian, vertebral and brachiocephalic arterial stenoses. Methods. Twenty-one patients (10 men) aged from 35 to 84 years (mean 64.3 years) with symptoms compatible with VBI underwent balloon angioplasty and stenting of subclavian (SA), innominate (IA) and vertebral (VA) arteries. Procedures were done by radiologists experienced in systematic stenting of the lesions. VBI was manifested by persistent signs in 15 patients, and by transitory ischemic attacks in the posterior circulatory territory in 4 (19%). Two patients (10%) experienced ischemic strokes (in the vertebrobasilar circulation in both cases). In 3 patients (14%) VBI was accompanied by upper limb vascular insufficiency symptoms. All cases were resistant to medical treatment. A neurologist assessed complaints, initial VBI signs and their alteration after intervention in all patients. Outcomes were measured with the 5-point scale suggested by Malek et al.: (1) excellent result (asymptomatic, no neurologic deficits and no symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (2) good (no neurologic deficits, at most one transient episode of vertebrobasilar ischemia over a period of 3 months after treatment); (3) fair (minimal neurologic deficit and at most one transient episode per month of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (4) poor (no improvement compared with neurologic status before treatment and/or persistent symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (5) death (regardless of cause). Endovascular treatment was performed for SA stenosis in 15 patients, for SA occlusion in 2, for IA stenosis in 2, and for VA stenosis in 2. There were 15 cases of atherosclerosis, 2 of aortoarteritis, 4 of proximal SA kinking. SA and IA stenoses ranged from 60% to 100% (mean 74.5%), VA stenoses were 90% in both cases. Results. Initial technical success was achieved in 96% of cases. There were no postprocedural complications or deaths. During 6-36 months (mean 21.3 months) of follow-up all patients showed improvement in VBI symptoms or upper limb ischemia. Within 36 months after the procedure outcomes were estimated as excellent and good in 13 patients (76%) and poor in 2 (12%), the last being attributed to atherosclerosis progression in other vascular areas. Restenosis in the stented area has developed in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions. Balloon angioplasty and stenting of extracranial vertebrobasilar arterial stenoses appeared to be effective in endovascular treatment of medically resistant VBI. Further investigations are required to clarify the role of subclavian artery kinking in VBI development and indications for various methods of its correction.

Zaytsev, A.Y., E-mail: cir-auz@mail.ru; Stoyda, A.Y.; Smirnov, V.E. [I.M. Setchenov Moscow Medical Academy, Department of Angiography and Interventional Radiology (Russian Federation); Scherbyuk, A.N. [I.M. Setchenov Moscow Medical Academy, Department of Vascular Surgery (Russian Federation); Kondrashin, S.A [I.M. Setchenov Moscow Medical Academy, Department of Angiography and Interventional Radiology (Russian Federation); Artukchina, E.G. [I.M. Setchenov Moscow Medical Academy, Department of Vascular Surgery (Russian Federation); Kikevitch, V.A. [N.N. Burdenko Interventional Radiology Center, Department of Angiography and Interventional Radiology (Russian Federation)

2006-10-15

117

Stroke Awareness in Luxemburg: Deficit Concerning Symptoms and Risk Factors  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Awareness of stroke risk factors is important for stroke prevention. Knowledge of stroke symptoms and awareness regarding the necessity of seeking urgent stroke treatment are vital to provide rapid admission to a stroke unit. Data on this specific knowledge in Luxemburg are lacking. METHODS We investigated 420 patients from the Department of Neurology and their relatives using a questionnaire. There were 44% men and 56% women; 25% were immigrants and 75% Luxemburgish nationals; 13% already had had a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA); and the mean age was 55 years ranging from 18 to 87 years. RESULTS A total of 88% of participants knew that a stroke occurs in the head/brain. In all, 10% of participants did not know any symptom of a stroke. The most frequently quoted symptoms (>15%) were paralysis/weakness (36%), speech disorders (32%), cranial nerve deficit (16%), vertigo (15%), and visual disorders (15%). Sensory deficits were mentioned by only 4% of patients. Known risk factors (>15%) were smoking (40%), hypertension (32%), alcohol (32%), poor nutrition (28%), high cholesterol (26%), stress (23%), and lack of exercise (19%). Age (4%), diabetes (6%), carotid stenosis (2%), and heart disease (1%) were less frequently known. In all, 11% of participants did not know any risk factor of a stroke. A total of 89% of participants would correctly call the 112 (emergency phone number). The following groups were better informed: Luxemburgish nationals, younger people, and participants with higher education level. Stroke/TIA patients were better informed concerning stroke symptoms, but unfortunately not concerning how to react in the case of a stroke. There was no relevant gender difference. DISCUSSION Although most of the participants knew what to do in the case of a stroke, they did not know the relevant stroke symptoms and risk factors. Future campaigns should therefore focus on risk factors and symptoms, and should address immigrants, elderly persons, less-educated persons, and patients who had already suffered a stroke/TIA. PMID:25452703

Droste, Dirk W; Safo, Jacqueline; Metz, René J; Osada, Nani

2014-01-01

118

Neurological complications of vascular access.  

PubMed

Neurological problems are common in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Over 60% of patients will suffer from symptoms of underlying polyneuropathy due to uraemia or diabetes. Others will have subclinical disease demonstrable by nerve conduction studies.Nerve injury following haemodialysis access surgery is underreported. However, sensory nerve lesions are probably common after most vascular access procedures but are rarely debilitating.Nerve compression syndromes such as carpal tunnel and ulnar compression syndromes are common, especially in patients who have been on dialysis for some years and at least some of these are related to or exacerbated by the access. Recognition is essential as they are eminently treatable by decompression surgery. Tourniquet use appears to be safe for carpal tunnel or ulnar nerve decompression surgery.Ischaemic monomelic neuropathy (IMN) is rare but follows a period of ischaemia during or as a result of access surgery, most commonly to construct a brachial arteriovenous fistula or graft. It is characterised by intense pain, out of proportion to any ischaemia, involves all of the upper limb nerves and may progress to involve the motor nerves eventually resulting in a useless clawed hand. It requires prompt treatment of any residual ischaemia after access creation, if necessary by access ligation, as in the established syndrome, like the even rarer complication of reflex sympathetic dystrophy, it is very difficult to offer any useful treatment other than symptomatic relief and physiotherapy. PMID:25751556

Gibbons, Christopher P

2015-03-01

119

Neurologic Parasitic Infections in Immigrants and Travelers  

PubMed Central

Infectious diseases are increasingly common in modern clinical practice and the contemporary neurologist must be aware of the clinical manifestations, potential complications, and management of common travel-related infections. The authors provide an approach to patients who present with neurologic symptoms, with a history of travel to or residence in tropical and developing countries. Although many other infections are important in this demographic, they focus on three parasitic infections that neurologists may encounter: cerebral malaria, neuroschistosomiasis, and neurocysticercosis. The epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment are discussed for each infection. PMID:21964842

Thakur, Kiran; Zunt, Joseph

2012-01-01

120

The neurologic manifestations of the acute porphyrias.  

PubMed

The porphyrias are diseases characterised by accumulation of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors owing to enzymatic deficiencies of the haem synthetic pathway. In the acute hepatic porphyrias accumulation of porphyrin precursors, in particular delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA), cause dysfunction of the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. This leads to the characteristic clinical findings of abdominal pain, neuropsychiatric symptoms and neuropathy. The exact pathogenic mechanism is not clear but evidence to date suggests both direct toxic effects of ALA and intracellular metabolic derangement contribute to the neurologic disorders. This review explores the mechanisms of neural dysfunction in the acute porphyrias and the resultant clinical features of an acute attack. PMID:21724399

Simon, Neil G; Herkes, Geoffrey K

2011-09-01

121

Insomnia in Neurological Diseases and Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint. Insomnia is not a disease but a symptom arising from multiple environmental,\\u000a medical, and mental disorders. Insomnia can be transient, short-term, or chronic in its presentation. Degenerative and vascular\\u000a diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS) may impair sleep either as a result of the brain lesion or because of\\u000a illness-related personal discomfort.

Federica Provini; Carolina Lombardi; Elio Lugaresi

122

Neurologic injury in snowmobiling  

PubMed Central

Background: Snowmobiles are increasingly popular recreational, all-terrain utility vehicles that require skill and physical strength to operate given their inherent maneuverability, acceleration, and top speed capabilities. These same characteristics increase the risk of injury with the operation of these vehicles, particularly neurological injury. We characterize our series of 107 patients involved in snowmobiling accidents. Methods: From January 2004 to January 2012, all snowmobiling-related injuries referred to our regional trauma center were reviewed. Information had been recorded in the hospital's trauma registry and medical records were retrospectively reviewed for data pertaining to the injuries, with particular emphasis on neurological injuries and any associated details. Results: A total of 107 patients were identified. Ninety percent of injured riders were male. The mean age was 34.4 years (range 10-70), with 7% younger than age 16. The mean Injury Severity Score was 12.0 ± 0.69 (range 1-34). Although not documented in all patients, alcohol use was found in 7.5% of the patients and drug use found in one patient. Documentation of helmet use was available for only 31 of the patients; of which 13% were not helmeted. Causes included being thrown, flipped, or roll-over (33%), striking a stationary object (27%), being struck by a snowmobile (9%), striking another snowmobile (5.5%) or a car, train, or truck (5.5%), being injured by the machine itself (9%), other (2%) or unspecified (18%). Head injuries occurred in 35% patients, including concussion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, contusion, and facial/skull fracture. Spinal fractures occurred in 21% of the patients. Fractures to the thoracic spine were the most common (50%), followed by the cervical (41%) and lumbar (36%) spine. There were also three brachial plexus injuries, one tibial nerve injury, and one internal carotid artery dissection. Average length of stay was 4.98 ± 0.56 days. Disposition was home (78%), home with services (12%), rehabilitation placement (9%), and one death. Details regarding other systemic injuries will also be reviewed. Conclusions: Snowmobiles are a significant source of multi-trauma, particularly neurological injury. Neurosurgeons can play key roles in advocating for neurological safety in snowmobiling. PMID:25024887

Plog, Benjamin A.; Pierre, Clifford A.; Srinivasan, Vasisht; Srinivasan, Kaushik; Petraglia, Anthony L.; Huang, Jason H.

2014-01-01

123

Neurology and the kidney  

PubMed Central

Renal failure is relatively common, but except in association with spina bifida or paraplegia it is unlikely to occur as a result of disease of the CNS. Renal failure, however, commonly affects the nervous system. The effects of kidney failure on the nervous system are more pronounced when failure is acute. In addition to the important problems related to renal failure there are both acquired and genetically determined diseases which may affect the kidney and the brain. Those acquired diseases include the vasculitides, the paraproteinaemias, and various granulomatous conditions (considered in other chapters of Neurology and Medicine). In two of the most commonly encountered genetically determined diseases, Von Hippel-Lindau disease and polycystic kidney disease, location of pathogenic mutations will provide improved screening programmes and, possibly, allow therapeutic intervention. Uraemia may affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Whereas the clinical features of uraemia are well documented, the pathophysiology is less well understood and probably multifactorial. Uraemic encephalopathy, which classically fluctuates, is associated with problems in cognition and memory and may progress to delirium, convulsions, and coma. The encephalopathy may initially worsen with periods of dialysis and almost certainly relates to altered metabolic states in association with ionic changes and possibly impaired synaptic function. Renal failure may affect the peripheral nervous system, resulting in a neuropathy which shows a predilection for large diameter axons. This may be reversed by dialysis and transplantation. The myopathy seen in renal failure, often associated with bone pain and tenderness, is similar to that encountered in primary hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia.? Dialysis itself is associated with neurological syndromes including the dysequilibrium syndrome, subdural haematoma, and Wernicke's encephalopathy. Dialysis dementia, which was prevalent during the 1970s, has reduced in frequency with the use of aluminium free dialysate. With the introduction of transplantation and the concomitant use of powerful immunosuppressive drugs, the pattern of neurological problems encountered in renal replacement therapy has shifted. Five per cent of patients develop nerve injuries during renal transplantation, and up to 40% of patients experience neurological side effects from cyclosporine. Furthermore, CNS infections, often fungal in type, have been reported in up to 45% of transplant patients coming to postmortem. The nature of the involvement of neurologists with their nephrology colleagues is therefore evolving.?? PMID:9854955

Burn, D; Bates, D

1998-01-01

124

Paraneoplastic Neurologic Syndromes in Children: A Review Article  

PubMed Central

Objective Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) were initially defined as neurological syndromes with unknown etiology that often associate with cancer. This broad definition may lead to misconception that any neurological syndrome, which coincides with a cancer might be considered as PNS. In the last two decades it has been suggested that PNSs are mainly immune-mediated. The detection of onconeural antibodies has been very helpful in indicating the existence of a tumor and defining a given neurological syndrome as paraneoplastic. However, PNS may occur without onconeural antibodies, and the antibodies can occur with no neurological syndrome; thus, their presence should not be the only condition to define a neurological syndrome as paraneoplastic. Diagnosis of paraneoplastic syndromes in children may result in early detection and treatment of the pediatric cancer and can reduce the neurological damage that is the major source of morbidity in children with successfully treated tumors. This study reviews the presenting symptoms, immunology, and management options for paraneoplastic syndromes, focusing on those most commonly reported in children. PMID:24665300

ALAVI, Samin

2013-01-01

125

Medical marijuana in neurology.  

PubMed

Constituents of the Cannabis plant, cannabinoids, may be of therapeutic value in neurologic diseases. The most abundant cannabinoids are ?(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which possesses psychoactive properties, and cannabidiol, which has no intrinsic psychoactive effects, but exhibits neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies. A small number of high-quality clinical trials support the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity of multiple sclerosis, pain refractory to opioids, glaucoma, nausea and vomiting. Lower level clinical evidence indicates that cannabinoids may be useful for dystonia, tics, tremors, epilepsy, migraine and weight loss. Data are also limited in regards to adverse events and safety. Common nonspecific adverse events are similar to those of other CNS 'depressants' and include weakness, mood changes and dizziness. Cannabinoids can have cardiovascular adverse events and, when smoked chronically, may affect pulmonary function. Fatalities are rare even with recreational use. There is a concern about psychological dependence, but physical dependence is less well documented. Cannabis preparations may presently offer an option for compassionate use in severe neurologic diseases, but at this point, only when standard-of-care therapy is ineffective. As more high-quality clinical data are gathered, the therapeutic application of cannabinoids will likely expand. PMID:25427150

Benbadis, Selim R; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Bozorg, Ali; Giarratano, Melissa; Kalidas, Kavita; Katzin, Lara; Robertson, Derrick; Vu, Tuan; Smith, Amanda; Zesiewicz, Theresa

2014-12-01

126

Bridging neuroanatomy, neuroradiology and neurology: three-dimensional interactive atlas of neurological disorders.  

PubMed

Understanding brain pathology along with the underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance in medical education and clinical practice. To facilitate and expedite this understanding, we created a three-dimensional (3D) interactive atlas of neurological disorders providing the correspondence between a brain lesion and the resulting disorder(s). The atlas contains a 3D highly parcellated atlas of normal neuroanatomy along with a brain pathology database. Normal neuroanatomy is divided into about 2,300 components, including the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, arteries, veins, dural sinuses, tracts, cranial nerves (CN), white matter, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, visual system, muscles, glands and cervical vertebrae (C1-C5). The brain pathology database contains 144 focal and distributed synthesized lesions (70 vascular, 36 CN-related, and 38 regional anatomy-related), each lesion labeled with the resulting disorder and associated signs, symptoms, and/or syndromes compiled from materials reported in the literature. The initial view of each lesion was preset in terms of its location and size, surrounding surface and sectional (magnetic resonance) neuroanatomy, and labeling of lesion and neuroanatomy. In addition, a glossary of neurological disorders was compiled and for each disorder materials from textbooks were included to provide neurological description. This atlas of neurological disorders is potentially useful to a wide variety of users ranging from medical students, residents and nurses to general practitioners, neuroanatomists, neuroradiologists and neurologists, as it contains both normal (surface and sectional) brain anatomy and pathology correlated with neurological disorders presented in a visual and interactive way. PMID:23859280

Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

2013-06-01

127

Cerebral metastases from lung carcinoma: neurological and CT correlation: work in progress  

SciTech Connect

To determine the role of brain CT in neurologically asymptomatic lung cancer patients a review was made of the CT and clinical findings in 279 patients. Brain metastases were found in 94.5% of patients with specific abnormal neurological findings, 26.6% of patients with vague neurological signs and symptoms, 11% of patients with oat cell carcinoma and a normal neurological examination, and 40% of patients with adenocarcinoma and a normal neurological examination. Brain metastasis was not seen on CT in the 29 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and a normal neurological examination. It is concluded that brain CT is useful for the detection of occult brain metastases, particularly oat cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, in neurologically asymptomatic lung cancer patients.

Tarver, R.D.; Richmond, B.D.; Klatte, E.C.

1984-12-01

128

Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection with Neurologic Complications  

PubMed Central

Background: Extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infection include encephalitis, optic neuritis, acute psychosis, stroke, cranial nerve palsies, aseptic meningitis and also it may be implicated in immune mediated neurological diseases such as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome and transverse myelitis. Case Presentation: We present five cases with acute neurological diseases after M. pneumoniae infection. The clinical presentations were characterized by encephalitis in 2 patients, Gullain-Barre syndrome in 2 patients, transverse myelitis in 1 patient. M. pneumoniae infection was detected in serum by serological method. Only two patients had respiratory symptoms preceding M. pneumoniae infection. Brain MRI revealed hyperintensities on corpus striatum and mesencephalon in one patient with encephalitis, the other had front parietal coalescent periventricular white matter lesions on T2 images. The patient with transverse myelitis had cervical, dorsal and lumbar scattered hyperintense lesions on T2 images. Two patients were treated with high dose steroid, the other two patients received treatment with intravenous immune globuline. Conclusion: M. pneumoniae may reveal different neurologic complications with different radiologic findings.

Yimenicio?lu, Sevgi; Yakut, Ayten; Ekici, Arzu; Bora Carman, Kursat; Cagr? Dinleyici, Ener

2014-01-01

129

History of neurologic examination books  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word “examination” in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's “Blue Book of Neurology” (“Blue Bible”) was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors). PMID:25829645

2015-01-01

130

Child Neurology Services in Africa  

PubMed Central

The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level. PMID:22019842

Wilmshurst, Jo M.; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Newton, Charles R.

2013-01-01

131

History of neurologic examination books.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors). PMID:25829645

Boes, Christopher J

2015-04-01

132

The Spectrum of Neurological Recovery  

PubMed Central

The equivalence of brain death with death is largely, although not universally accepted. Patients may have suffered insults such as cardiac arrest, vascular catastrophe, poisoning, or head trauma. Early identification of patients at greatest risk of poor neurologic outcome and management in the appropriate critical care setting is the key to maximizing neurological recovery. Recent technological advances and neuroimaging have made it possible to predict neurological reversibility with great accuracy. Significant improvements in therapy such as hypothermia, will improve outcomes in neurological catastrophies, particularly in anoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The clinical spectrum and diagnostic criteria of minimally conscious and vegetative states is reviewed. The current understanding of the differences in prognosis and prediction of meaningful cognitive and functional recovery in each neurological state is described. Establishing an understanding of the ethical principles that guide medical decisions in clinical practice related to different neurological states is evolving into a new field called neuroethics. PMID:23610514

Mir, Tanveer P.

2012-01-01

133

The spectrum of neurological recovery.  

PubMed

The equivalence of brain death with death is largely, although not universally accepted. Patients may have suffered insults such as cardiac arrest, vascular catastrophe, poisoning, or head trauma. Early identification of patients at greatest risk of poor neurologic outcome and management in the appropriate critical care setting is the key to maximizing neurological recovery. Recent technological advances and neuroimaging have made it possible to predict neurological reversibility with great accuracy. Significant improvements in therapy such as hypothermia, will improve outcomes in neurological catastrophies, particularly in anoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The clinical spectrum and diagnostic criteria of minimally conscious and vegetative states is reviewed. The current understanding of the differences in prognosis and prediction of meaningful cognitive and functional recovery in each neurological state is described. Establishing an understanding of the ethical principles that guide medical decisions in clinical practice related to different neurological states is evolving into a new field called neuroethics. PMID:23610514

Mir, Tanveer P

2011-12-01

134

[Neurological aspects in antiphospholipid syndrome].  

PubMed

Antiphospholipid syndrome is considered to be a cause of an acquired hypercoagulable state leading to stroke and transient ischemic attack. Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) comprise a heterogeneous group of autoantibodies. Among them, lupus anticoagulant (LA) and beta 2-glycoprotein I dependent anticardiolipin antibody (beta 2-GPI aCL) are important and commonly measured. Recently, LA has been considered to be closely related to phosphatidylserine anti-prothrombin antibody. APL is an independent risk factor for first-ever ischemic stroke and a prognostic marker of recurrent stroke. The precipitating factors for the occurrence of stroke are the presence of beta 2-GPI-dependent aCL, a GPL aCL level of more than 40, and the simultaneous presence of lupus anticoagulant. Several mechanisms are believed to be involved in the thrombotic process in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies. Human activated protein C functions as a potent anticoagulant in human plasma by inhibiting the activity of coagulation cofactors Va and VIIIa. Activation of protein C is impaired in patients with aPL. Recently, the presence of aPL has been considered to be contributory factor for the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Transgenic mouse lacking the LDL receptor develop accelerated arteriosclerosis upon immunization with beta 2-GPL Several therapeutic options are available for the prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with aPL, such as antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and immunosuppressive therapy. The rate of recurrence in patients undergoing antiplatelet and anticoagulation combination therapy was found to be lower than that in patients receiving other forms of therapy. The WARSS-APASS collaborative study showed that there was no difference in the recurrence rate between aPL patients receiving antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy alone. APL has been investigated in other neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, chorea, migraine and convulsion. The association of aPL with multiple sclerosis remains debatable. APL could be a contributory factor for the development of convulsion, but not for migraine. PMID:15152454

Kitagawa, Yasuhisa

2003-11-01

135

Transient ischemic attack induced by melted solid lipid microparticles protects rat brains from permanent focal ischemia.  

PubMed

This study aims to develop a transient ischemic attack (TIA) model in conscious animals and uses this model to investigate the effect of TIA on subsequent permanent ischemia. TIA was induced by injecting designed temperature-sensitive melted solid lipid microparticles with a melting point around body temperature into male Wistar rats via arterial cannulation. Neurologic deficit was monitored immediately after the injection without anesthesia. According to the clinical definition of TIA, rats were divided into neurologic symptom durations <24-h, 24-48-h and ?48-h groups. The lipid microparticle-induced infarct volumes were small in the <24-h and 24-48-h groups, while the volumes were five times larger in the ?48-h group. Permanent ischemic stroke was induced 3d after the induction of TIA by injecting a different kind of embolic particle manufactured by blending chitin and PLGA. The <24-h group had less severe neurologic deficits and smaller infarct volumes than that of 24-48-h and control (without prior lipid microparticle treatment) rats. Taken together, we successfully develop a TIA animal model which allows us to monitor the neurologic deficit in real-time. By adopting this model, we validate that TIA (<24h) preconditioning protects the brain from subsequent permanent ischemic stroke. PMID:24937754

Tsai, M-J; Kuo, Y-M; Tsai, Y-H

2014-09-01

136

Neurological complications of coeliac disease  

PubMed Central

A variety of neurological disorders have been reported in association with coeliac disease including epilepsy, ataxia, neuropathy, and myelopathy. The nature of this association is unclear and whether a specific neurological complication occurs in coeliac disease remains unproved. Malabsorption may lead to vitamin and trace element deficiencies. Therefore, patients who develop neurological dysfunction should be carefully screened for these. However, malabsorption does not satisfactorily explain the pathophysiology and clinical course of many of the associated neurological disorders. Other mechanisms proposed include altered autoimmunity, heredity, and gluten toxicity. This review attempts to summarise the literature and suggests directions for future research. PMID:12151653

Pengiran, T; Wills, A; Holmes, G

2002-01-01

137

Antisense Therapy in Neurology  

PubMed Central

Antisense therapy is an approach to fighting diseases using short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides. Recently, antisense therapy has emerged as an exciting and promising strategy for the treatment of various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Previous and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided encouraging early results. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), dysferlinopathy (including limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B; LGMD2B, Miyoshi myopathy; MM, and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset; DMAT), and myotonic dystrophy (DM) are all reported to be promising targets for antisense therapy. This paper focuses on the current progress of antisense therapies in neurology. PMID:25562650

Lee, Joshua J.A.; Yokota, Toshifumi

2013-01-01

138

Neuropsychiatric symptoms and celiac disease  

PubMed Central

Background Neuropsychiatric symptoms may represent an atypical manifestation of celiac disease that occur before a gastroenterological diagnosis is made. Some studies suggest that a gluten-free diet is effective in treating the depression, anxiety, and neurological complications associated with celiac disease. Method The article describes the case of a patient suffering from chronic, treatment-resistant symptoms of depression and anxiety. The diagnosis of celiac disease and introduction of an elimination diet caused a significant improvement in mental state and everyday functioning in the presenting patient. Conclusion The presence of persistent anxiety and depressive symptoms, with a poor reaction to pharmacological treatment, indicates a need to identify somatic reasons for the underlying condition. It is important to remember that celiac disease can occur at any age, not only in childhood. The presence of this somatic cause of persistent depressive and anxiety symptoms should be considered in the diagnostic process in adults. PMID:25342904

Urban-Kowalczyk, Ma?gorzata; Œmigielski, Janusz; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

2014-01-01

139

[Neurological disease and facial recognition].  

PubMed

To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system. PMID:22764352

Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

2012-07-01

140

HIV Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Submit Home > HIV/AIDS > What is HIV/AIDS? HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) HIV symptoms Photo courtesy of AIDS.gov Facing AIDS ... and brain Return to top More information on HIV symptoms Explore other publications and websites Basic Information ...

141

Neurological Effects of Pesticide Use among Farmers in China  

PubMed Central

The intensive use of pesticides has attracted great attention from the Chinese government. However, current regulations have had limited influence on their safe use. Although the acute neurologic effects of pesticides have been well documented, little is known about their cumulative effects. Knowledge of the impact of pesticides on health may convince farmers to minimize their use. We conducted a cross-sectional study in three provinces of China to evaluate the relationship between pesticide exposure and neurological dysfunction. Crop farmers were divided into two groups depending on their level of pesticide exposure. A total of 236 participants were assessed by questionnaire and neurological examination for symptoms and signs of neuropathy. Characteristics of neurologic dysfunction following cumulative low-level exposure were assessed with logistic regression analysis. Farmers exposed to high-level pesticide use had greater risk of developing sensations of numbness or prickling (odds ratio (OR) 2.62, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–6.36). After adjusting for recent exposure, the risk of numbness or prickling symptoms (OR 2.55, 95% CI: 1.04–6.25) remained statistically significant. Loss of muscle strength and decreased deep tendon reflexes had OR > 2, however, this did not reach statistical significance. These findings suggest that overuse of pesticides increased risk of neurologic dysfunction among farmers, with somatosensory small fibers most likely affected. Measures that are more efficient should be taken to curb excessive use of pesticides. PMID:24736684

Li, Yifan; Zhang, Chao; Yin, Yanhong; Cui, Fang; Cai, Jinyang; Chen, Zhaohui; Jin, Yanhong; Robson, Mark G.; Li, Mao; Ren, Yuting; Huang, Xusheng; Hu, Ruifa

2014-01-01

142

Genetic Modifiers of Neurological Disease  

PubMed Central

Genetic modifiers make an important contribution to neurological disease phenotypes. Significant progress has been made by studying genetic modifiers in model organisms. The ability to study complex genetic interactions in model systems contributes to our understanding of the genetic factors that influence neurological disease. This will lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies and personalized treatment based on genetic risk. PMID:21251811

Kearney, Jennifer A.

2011-01-01

143

The neurological manifestations of malabsorption.  

PubMed Central

The clinical and pathological findings in patients with neurological disorders in association with disordered function of the small intestine, in particular coeliac disease, are outlined. The possible significance of the abnormalities of pyridoxine, tyrosine and tryptophan metabolism are considered in relation to biopterin derivatives and their relevance to neurological dysfunction. PMID:34144

Cooke, W. T.

1978-01-01

144

Suicidal Behavior and Neurological Illnesses  

PubMed Central

Objective Suicidal ideation and behavior have been associated with a variety of neurological illnesses. Studies are ongoing in combat veterans and other groups to examine possible mechanisms and pathways that account for such associations. Method This article provides a review of the literature on suicide ideation and suicidal behavior in patients with neurological illnesses including publications on veteran’s health and military medicine. Studies of suicide attempts and deaths in people with neurological illnesses are also reviewed. Results The studies summarized in this review indicate that there are important linkages between suicidal ideation and behavior and neurological conditions, including epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Conclusion Additional studies are needed to further clarify why suicide ideation and suicidal behavior are associated with neurological diseases, in order to improve quality of life, alleviate patient distress, and prevent nonfatal and fatal suicide attempts in veteran and non-veteran populations. PMID:24501694

Coughlin, Steven S; Sher, Leo

2013-01-01

145

Plague Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Plague Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics Info ... Clinicians Public Health Officials Veterinarians Prevention History of Plague Resources FAQ Related Links USGS National Wildlife Health ...

146

Norovirus Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prevent ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

147

Glaucoma Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... angle, there are no discernible symptoms until the optic nerve is damaged and side (peripheral) vision is ... eye builds up gradually. At some point, the optic nerve is damaged and side vision (peripheral vision) ...

148

Brain calcifications induce neurological dysfunction that can be reversed by a bone drug  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perivascular calcifications within the brain form in response to a variety of insults. While considered by many to be benign, these calcium phosphate deposits or “brain stones” can become large and are associated with neurological symptoms that range from seizures to parkinsonian symptoms. Here we hypothesize that the high concentrations of calcium in these deposits produce reversible, toxic effects on

Jeffrey A. Loeb; Sayyed A. Sohrab; Mabubul Huq; Darren R. Fuerst

2006-01-01

149

Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology  

PubMed Central

Background ‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. Discussion In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. Summary We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease. Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom. Third, trust research in the medical context lacks empirical behavioral and neuroscientific evidence. Neurologists entering this field of research could profit from the extensive knowledge of the biological foundation of trust that scientists in economically-orientated neurosciences have gained. Fourth, neurologists could contribute significantly to the ethical debate about invasive methods in neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience. Further, neurologists should investigate biological and behavioral reactions of neurological patients to marketing and advertising measures, as they could show special consumer vulnerability and be subject to target marketing. PMID:23383650

2013-01-01

150

Management of neurological complications of infective endocarditis in ICU patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with infective endocarditis (IE) are generally referred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for one or more organ dysfunctions\\u000a caused by complications of IE. Neurologic events are frequent causes of ICU admission in patients with IE. They can arise\\u000a through various mechanisms consisting of stroke or transient ischemic attack, cerebral hemorrhage, mycotic aneurysm, meningitis,\\u000a cerebral abscess, or encephalopathy. Most

Romain Sonneville; Bruno Mourvillier; Lila Bouadma; Michel Wolff

2011-01-01

151

Neurological counterparts of hyponatremia: pathological mechanisms and clinical manifestations.  

PubMed

Hyponatremia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mEq/L, represents the most frequent electrolyte disorder in older hospitalized patients. Early recognition of hyponatremia is mandatory, since it represents an independent risk factor that increases hospital mortality by 40 %. Delayed correction of hyponatremia may worsen brain edema, resulting in different degrees of neural damage. However, an overly rapid correction of serum sodium levels can lead to osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS), a dreadful neurological picture. In recent years, hyponatremia and ODS have received growing attention both in terms of clinical management and pathophysiology, leading to the discovery of new drugs and treatment algorithms. In this review, we recapitulate the pathogenetic background, clinical manifestations, and treatment guidelines of hyponatremia, focusing on the neurological alterations. Neurological symptoms may be neglected when they manifest as early signs of mild hyponatremia, while brain damage can irremediably affect patients' conditions in the context of ODS. PMID:25724319

Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Faravelli, Irene; Cucchiari, David; Reggiani, Francesco; Oldani, Silvia; Fedeli, Carlo; Graziani, Giorgio

2015-04-01

152

Morphological and functional imaging in neurological and non-neurological Wilson's patients.  

PubMed

Wilson's disease causes disturbances of the central nervous system, affecting it both directly through copper toxicity and indirectly subject to a copper-induced hepatopathy, resulting in morphological and physiological changes in brain structures that can be captured by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), (123)I-?-CIT (2?-carbomethoxy-3? (4-iodophenyl)tropane)-SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography), (123)I-IBZM (benzamide)-SPECT and [(18)F]FDG -PET (fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography). MRI can reveal even slight morphological changes in non-neurological Wilson's patients. More marked findings in neurological Wilson's patients become evident in T1- and T2-weighted MRI. T1-weighted MRI predominantly detects atrophic changes, whereas T2-weighted MRI regularly records signal changes in the putamen. With the aid of these three nuclear-medicine examinations, nigrostriatal and metabolic disturbances are identified in neurological Wilson's patients only. Sufficient decoppering therapy prevents progression and even tends to improve symptoms. A correlation between any of the imaging findings in patients with the genetic phenotype and the incidence of the most common mutation H1069Q (homozygote or compound heterozygote) or other mutations could not be substantiated. PMID:24495036

Hermann, Wieland

2014-05-01

153

Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis  

PubMed Central

Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

2014-01-01

154

Neurological disorders of purine and pyrimidine metabolism.  

PubMed

Purines and pyrimidines, regarded for a long time only as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis and intermediates in the transfer of metabolic energy, gained increasing attention since genetically determined aberrations in their metabolism were associated clinically with various degrees of mental retardation and/or unexpected and often devastating neurological dysfunction. In most instances the molecular mechanisms underlying neurological symptoms remain undefined. This suggests that nucleotides and nucleosides play fundamental but still unknown roles in the development and function of several organs, in particular central nervous system. Alterations of purine and pyrimidine metabolism affecting brain function are spread along both synthesis (PRPS, ADSL, ATIC, HPRT, UMPS, dGK, TK), and breakdown pathways (5NT, ADA, PNP, GCH, DPD, DHPA, TP, UP), sometimes also involving pyridine metabolism. Explanations for the pathogenesis of disorders may include both cellular and mitochondrial damage: e.g. deficiency of the purine salvage enzymes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and deoxyguanosine kinase are associated to the most severe pathologies, the former due to an unexplained adverse effect exerted on the development and/or differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, the latter due to impairment of mitochondrial functions. This review gathers the presently known inborn errors of purine and pyrimidine metabolism that manifest neurological syndromes, reporting and commenting on the available hypothesis on the possible link between specific enzymatic alterations and brain damage. Such connection is often not obvious, and though investigated for many years, the molecular basis of most dysfunctions of central nervous system associated to purine and pyrimidine metabolism disorders are still unexplained. PMID:21401501

Micheli, Vanna; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria G; Ipata, Piero L; Sestini, Sylvia; Bertelli, Matteo; Pompucci, Giuseppe

2011-01-01

155

Neurologic sequelae of minor electric burns.  

PubMed

Although neurologic pathology is a well-documented sequela of major electric burns, there are few reports of complications arising from less extensive electrically induced trauma. Two cases of patients with significant disease subsequent to minor electric burns are presented. In one patient with a 2% superficial partial-thickness burn of the right forearm, nerve conduction studies, electromyography, and somatosensory evoked potential studies were consistent with right median mononeuropathy at the wrist and a distal slowing of the right ulnar nerve. The second patient presented with persistent numbness, hyperpathia, and burning in his left hand after an electric shock in a telephone booth. He had a creatine phosphokinase of 2000m mu/mL but no surface burn. A left stellate ganglion block provided complete resolution of his symptoms and established a diagnosis of minor reflex sympathetic dystrophy. PMID:2596967

Rosenberg, D B

1989-12-01

156

Neurological manifestations of the Mendelian-inherited autoinflammatory syndromes.  

PubMed

Autoinflammatory syndromes include an expanding list of conditions characterized by unprovoked recurrent attacks of systemic inflammation with lack of auto-antibodies or autoreactive T cells. Many of these syndromes are genetic diseases with a Mendelian inheritance. Neurological manifestations may be one of the major clinical features and, in some cases, the presenting symptom of these syndromes. The purpose of this review is to increase the recognition among neurologists of the Mendelian-inherited autoinflammatory syndromes by highlighting the neurological manifestations in the context of other symptoms that should lead physicians to suspect these syndromes. Most important for neurologists are the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes that include familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (called chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome in Europe). We also review other syndromes with less common neurological involvement, including familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome. Because these syndromes are often treatable and irreversible damage is prevented if they are treated early, it is important to recognize the features that may result in these syndromes presenting to a neurologist, especially in early childhood. PMID:19563585

Montealegre Sanchez, Gina A; Hashkes, Philip J

2009-06-01

157

[Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in clinical neurology].  

PubMed

To date, various kinds of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) methods have been widely used in clinical neurology. For the clinical examination, single-pulse TMS is generally used, whereas, for the future therapy, repetitive TMS (rTMS) is widely researched. To evaluate the function of corticospinal tract, central motor conduction time (CMCT) is measured using single-pulse TMS. For precise analyses, single-pulse and double-pulse magnetic brainstem stimulation are performed to measure the cortical-brainstem conduction time and brainstem-spinal conduction time. To evaluate corticospinal tract function for leg muscles, cortico-conus motor conduction time (CCCT) is considered to be more accurate than CMCT. Magnetic cerebellar stimulation is effective to distinguish the cerebellar afferent pathway dysfunction from cerebellar efferent or cerebellar cortical dysfunctions. In animal research, rTMS releases the dopamine in monkey's brain and induces functional changes lasting over one week. In fact, as compared to sham-rTMS, high-frequency rTMS (5Hz) over the supplementary motor area has been shown to be significantly effective in the patients with Parkinson's disease. A new patterned rTMS protocol, quadripulse stimulation (QPS), can produce a bidirectional motor cortical plasticity depending on the interval of the pulses within a burst. rTMS including QPS might relieve symptoms in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:21921446

Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

2010-11-01

158

Neurological manifestation of methyl bromide intoxication.  

PubMed

Methyl bromide is a highly toxic gas with poor olfactory warning properties. It is widely used as insecticidal fumigant for dry foodstuffs and can be toxic to central and peripheral nervous systems. Most neurological manifestations of methyl bromide intoxication occur from inhalation. Acute toxicity characterized by headache, dizziness, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and visual disturbances. Tremor, convulsion, unconsciousness and permanent brain damage may occur in severe poisoning. Chronic exposure can cause neuropathy, pyramidal and cerebellar dysfunction, as well as neuropsychiatric disturbances. The first case of methyl bromide intoxication in Thailand has been described. The patient was a 24-year-old man who worked in a warehouse of imported vegetables fumigated with methyl bromide. He presented with unstable gait, vertigo and paresthesia of both feet, for two weeks. He had a history of chronic exposure to methyl bromide for three years. His fourteen co-workers also developed the same symptoms but less in severity. Neurological examination revealed ataxic gait, decreased pain and vibratory sense on both feet, impaired cerebellar signs and hyperactive reflex in all extremities. The serum concentration of methyl bromide was 8.18 mg/dl. Electrophysilogical study was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (MRI) revealed bilateral symmetrical lesion of abnormal hypersignal intensity on T2 and fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences at bilateral dentate nuclei of cerebellum and periventricular area of the fourth ventricle. This incident stresses the need for improvement of worker education and safety precautions during all stages of methyl bromide fumigation. PMID:18575299

Suwanlaong, Kanokrat; Phanthumchinda, Kammant

2008-03-01

159

Neurological manifestations in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome  

PubMed Central

Background Anti-phospholipids syndrome (APS) is considered a non inflammatory auto-immune disease with a significant thrombophilic risk with varied clinical manifestations. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the frequency of thrombotic and non-thrombotic events in patients with APS. Methods In this retrospective study, 102 definite APS subjects were recruited (2007-2011) at Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. The patients were referred to Multiple Sclerosis Clinic with the diagnosis of definite APS according to 2006 Sydney's criteria. Disorders associated with APS such as pregnancy complication, vascular thrombosis and livedo reticularis (LR) were assessed. Neurological signs and symptoms such as cognitive dysfunction were recorded. Data analyses were performed using SPSS software and P < 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Results Our findings showed that majority of female gender, higher rate of ischemic thrombotic stroke and high miscarriage lied in a large number of APS patients. Conclusion Overall recurrent miscarriage is a common complication among (antiphospholidpid antibody) aPL patients. Furthermore, ischemic stroke is the second common neurological manifestations of APS patients. PMID:24250929

Etemadifar, Masoud; Tahani, Soheil; Toghianifar, Nafiseh; Rahaimi, Marzieh; Eskandari, Nahid

2013-01-01

160

Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.  

PubMed

Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology. PMID:25027011

Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

2014-09-01

161

Functional Problems in the Patient with a Neurological Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bowel dysfunction in patients with neurologic disorders is common. The symptoms of constipation and fecal incontinence have\\u000a a tremendous impact on the quality of life of these patients. In order to successfully manage patients with neurogenic bowel\\u000a dysfunction, one should take into account the unique needs and condition of each patient, along with the patient’s lifestyle,\\u000a level of activity, and

Jeanette Gaw; Walter E. Longo

162

Peripheral Neurological Disturbances, Autonomic Dysfunction, and Antineuronal Antibodies in Adult Celiac Disease Before and After a Gluten-Free Diet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-two consecutive adult celiac disease (CD) patients (pts), complaining of peripheral neuropathy (12 pts), autonomic\\u000a dysfunction (17 pts), or both (3 pts), were evaluated to assess the presence of neurological damage (by clinical neurological\\u000a evaluation and electrophysiological study) and antineuronal antibodies and to assess the effect of a gluten-free diet (GFD)\\u000a on the course of the neurological symptoms and on

Antonio Tursi; Gian Marco Giorgetti; Cesare Iani; Flavio Arciprete; Giovanni Brandimarte; Ambrogio Capria; Luigi Fontana

2006-01-01

163

Surveillance neuroimaging and neurologic examinations affect care for intracerebral hemorrhage  

PubMed Central

Objective: We tested the hypothesis that surveillance neuroimaging and neurologic examinations identified changes requiring emergent surgical interventions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: Patients with primary ICH were enrolled into a prospective registry between December 2006 and July 2012. Patients were managed in a neuroscience intensive care unit with a protocol that included serial neuroimaging at 6, 24, and 48 hours, and hourly neurologic examinations using the Glasgow Coma Scale and NIH Stroke Scale. We evaluated all cases of craniotomy and ventriculostomy to determine whether the procedure was part of the initial management plan or occurred subsequently. For those that occurred subsequently, we determined whether worsening on neurologic examination or worsened neuroimaging findings initiated the process leading to intervention. Results: There were 88 surgical interventions in 84 (35%) of the 239 patients studied, including ventriculostomy in 52 (59%), craniotomy in 21 (24%), and both in 11 (13%). Of the 88 interventions, 24 (27%) occurred subsequently and distinctly from initial management, a median of 15.9 hours (8.9–27.0 hours) after symptom onset. Thirteen (54%) were instigated by findings on neurologic examination and 11 (46%) by neuroimaging. Demographics, severity of hemorrhage, and hemorrhage location were not associated with delayed intervention. Conclusions: More than 25% of surgical interventions performed after ICH were prompted by delayed imaging or clinical findings. Serial neurologic examinations and neuroimaging are important and effective surveillance techniques for monitoring patients with ICH. PMID:23739227

Rosenberg, Neil F.; Kosteva, Adam R.; Bauer, Rebecca M.; Guth, James C.; Liotta, Eric M.; Prabhakaran, Shyam; Naidech, Andrew M.

2013-01-01

164

Occupational Neurological Disorders in Korea  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this article was to provide a literature review of occupational neurological disorders and related research in Korea, focusing on chemical hazards. We reviewed occupational neurological disorders investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute of Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency between 1992 and 2009, categorizing them as neurological disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) or as neurodegenerative disorders. We also examined peer-reviewed journal articles related to neurotoxicology, published from 1984 to 2009. Outbreaks of occupational neurological disorder of the CNS due to inorganic mercury and carbon disulfide poisoning had helped prompt the development of the occupational safety and health system of Korea. Other major neurological disorders of the CNS included methyl bromide intoxication and chronic toxic encephalopathy. Most of the PNS disorders were n-hexane-induced peripheral neuritis, reported from the electronics industry. Reports of manganese-induced Parkinsonism resulted in the introduction of neuroimaging techniques to occupational medicine. Since the late 1990s, the direction of research has been moving toward degenerative disorder and early effect of neurotoxicity. To understand the early effects of neurotoxic chemicals in the preclinical stage, more follow-up studies of a longer duration are necessary. PMID:21258587

Kang, Seong-Kyu

2010-01-01

165

Gross cerebellar paraneoplastic neurological disorder in a patient with an occult breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Paraneoplastic neurological disorders are relatively rare conditions posing both diagnostic as well as therapeutic challenges. A previously fit 66-year-old woman presented with subtle cerebellar symptoms which progressed rapidly over the course of days. Chest x-ray and routine blood tests were unremarkable. CT of the head with contrast showed no abnormality. Lumbar puncture showed no evidence of infection or oligoclonal bands. She was transferred to a neurological centre from a remote and rural setting. Subsequent MRI was reported to be normal as well. Tumour markers were negative but the paraneoplastic anti-Yo antibody was positive. A whole body CT scan revealed a spiculated left breast lesion which turned out to be malignant on fine needle aspiration. She underwent left mastectomy, had plasmapharesis and received high-dose intravenous Ig for her paraneoplastic neurological symptoms. She remained neurologically stable and underwent rehabilitation in her local hospital before getting discharged home. PMID:23595173

Poudel, Chandra K; Achar, K N

2013-01-01

166

Symptoms of Aspergillosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Share Compartir Symptoms of Aspergillosis Symptoms of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) are similar to asthma The different ... cause different symptoms. 1 The symptoms of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) are similar to asthma symptoms, including: ...

167

The neurological basis of occupation.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline. PMID:17623380

Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

2007-01-01

168

Neurologic complications of lightning injuries.  

PubMed Central

Over the past ten years, we have cared for 13 patients who suffered serious neurologic complications after being struck by lightning. The spectrum of neurologic lesions includes the entire neuraxis from the cerebral hemispheres to the peripheral nerves. We describe these various neurologic disorders with regard to the site of the lesion, severity of the deficit, and the outcome. Damage to the nervous system can be a serious problem for patients struck by lightning. Fatalities are associated with hypoxic encephalopathy in patients who suffered cardiac arrests. Patients with spinal cord lesions are likely to have permanent sequelae and paralysis. New technology for detecting lightning with wideband magnetic direction finders is useful in establishing lightning-flash densities in each state. Florida and the Gulf Coast states have the highest densities. Colorado and the Rocky Mountain states have the next highest. Images PMID:7785254

Cherington, M; Yarnell, P R; London, S F

1995-01-01

169

Management of neurological complications of infective endocarditis in ICU patients  

PubMed Central

Patients with infective endocarditis (IE) are generally referred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for one or more organ dysfunctions caused by complications of IE. Neurologic events are frequent causes of ICU admission in patients with IE. They can arise through various mechanisms consisting of stroke or transient ischemic attack, cerebral hemorrhage, mycotic aneurysm, meningitis, cerebral abscess, or encephalopathy. Most complications occur early during the course of IE and are a hallmark of left-sided abnormalities of native or prosthetic valves. Occlusion of cerebral arteries, with stroke or transient ischemic attack, accounts for 40% to 50% of the central nervous system complications of IE. CT scan is the most easily feasible neuroimaging in critically unstable patients. However, magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive and when performed should follow a standardized protocol. In patients with ischemic stroke who are already receiving oral anticoagulant therapy, this treatment should be replaced by unfractionated heparin for at least 2 weeks with a close monitoring of coagulation tests. Mounting evidence shows that, for both complicated left-sided native valve endocarditis and Staphylococcus aureus prosthetic valve endocarditis, valve replacement combined with medical therapy is associated with a better outcome than medical treatment alone. In a recent series, approximately 50% of patients underwent valve replacement during the acute phase of IE before completion of antibiotic treatment. After a neurological event, most patients have at least one indication for cardiac surgery. Recent data from literature suggest that after a stroke, surgery indicated for heart failure, uncontrolled infection, abscess, or persisting high emboli risk should not be delayed, provided that the patient is not comatose or has no severe deficit. Neurologic complications of IE contribute to a severe prognosis in ICU patients. However, patients with only silent or transient stroke had a better prognosis than patients with symptomatic events. In addition, more than neurologic event per se, a better predictor of mortality is neurologic dysfunction, which is associated with location and extension of brain damage. Patients with severe neurological impairment and those with brain hemorrhage have the worse outcome. PMID:21906336

2011-01-01

170

Transient sexual precocity and ovarian cysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nine girls presenting under the age of 7 years with unsustained sexual precocity are described. Large ovarian cysts were detected by ultrasound in three and laparotomy in one. In two girls the symptoms resolved after surgical removal of the cyst; the other seven had spontaneous remission of symptoms, but in two of these transient breast development and bleeding recurred: further

A J Lyon; R De Bruyn; D B Grant

1985-01-01

171

Clinical symptoms and symptom signatures of Alzheimer's disease subgroups.  

PubMed

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial disorder that involves several different mechanisms. Over 99% of AD patients suffer from the sporadic form of the disease. Based on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid-? (A?)(1-42), total tau, and ubiquitin--the markers associated with the histopathological hallmarks of the disease (A? plaques and abnormally hyperphosphorylated neurofibrillary tangles)--previous studies identified five subgroups of AD. Here we report the potential diagnostic predictive value of hallucination, hypokinesia, paranoia, rigidity, and tremors in aged individuals for AD and differences in the prevalence of these symptoms in the CSF marker-based subgroups of the disease. Analysis of 196 clinically diagnosed AD or Alzheimer with Lewy body, and 75 non-AD neurological and non-neurological control cases, all from a single center, showed that the presence of hallucination, hypokinesia, paranoia, rigidity, or tremors individually, or the presence of any of these, could diagnose AD with sensitivities and specificities of 14% and 99%; 30% and 99%; 15% and 99%; 16% and 100%; 16% and 96%; and 47% and 92%, respectively. The pattern of the prevalence of the above symptoms varied from AD subgroup to subgroup. Presence of any of these symptoms, as well as presence of each individual symptom except tremors, significantly differentiated AD subgroups from the predominantly control cluster. These findings encourage the exploration of hallucination, hypokinesia, paranoia, rigidity, and tremors in identifying various subgroups of AD for stratification of patients for clinical trials to develop therapeutic drugs. This study is for the special issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease honoring Inge Grundke-Iqbal who made several seminal contributions in AD research. PMID:24002184

Iqbal, Khalid; Flory, Michael; Soininen, Hilkka

2013-01-01

172

Fly model causes neurological rethink  

PubMed Central

A Drosophila model for a neurological disorder called type 2B Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease reveals that it has its origins in a partial loss of function, rather than a gain of function, which points to the need for a new therapeutic approach. PMID:24336781

Sadanandappa, Madhumala K

2013-01-01

173

HEW and the neurologically handicapped  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some of the neurological disorders and therapeutic devices are considered with which the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) is most concerned. The organization of the Department, because it is a rather complex one with many different agencies involved, is also described.

Huber, W. V.

1974-01-01

174

Addressing Neurological Disorders With Neuromodulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromod- ulation is emerging as a

Chima O. Oluigbo; Ali R. Rezai

2011-01-01

175

A Program for Neurological Organization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program for neurological organization is explained and its purposes are stated. Hints are given for working with both child and parents; and form for evaluating measures of neuromotor fitness is included. Also provided is a checklist for rating motor exploration, including movements performed lying on the back, on the knees, or standing or on…

Bowers, Louis

176

Eye Signs of Neurological Disorders  

PubMed Central

The author discusses common neurologic abnormalities as they involve the visual pathway and the ocular motor system. Mention is also made of the corneal reflex, eyelid closure and the pupillary response. Emphasis is placed on routine examination techniques that would assist the family physician in his office. The importance of early diagnosis is stressed and criteria for referral reviewed. PMID:20469140

Willis, N. R.

1974-01-01

177

Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.  

PubMed

Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:24964115

Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

2014-06-01

178

Neurologic syndrome in 25 workers from an aluminum smelting plant  

SciTech Connect

This article expands on an earlier series of three patients with a neurologic syndrome, who had all worked in an aluminum smelting plant. Twenty-five symptomatic workers from the same plant were referred for a standardized evaluation, including completion of a health questionnaire, neurologic examination, and neuropsychologic evaluation. An exposure index was calculated for each worker based on level and duration of exposure in the potroom, where exposures were the greatest. This index was correlated with symptoms, signs, and neuropsychologic test scores. Twenty-two (88%) of the patients reported frequent loss of balance, and 21 (84%) reported memory loss. Neurologic examination revealed signs of incoordination in 21 (84%) of the patients. Neuropsychologic test results showed preservation in certain spheres of functioning, such as verbal IQ, with substantial impairment in others, particularly memory functioning. On memory tests, 70% to 75% showed mild or greater impairment. The majority (17 of 19 tested, or 89%) showed depression on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. The exposure index was significantly correlated with signs and symptoms of incoordination. This study and others in humans and animals support the existence of a syndrome characterized by incoordination, poor memory, impairment in abstract reasoning, and depression. Aluminum exposure in the potroom seems the most likely cause.

White, D.M.; Longstreth, W.T. Jr.; Rosenstock, L.; Claypoole, K.H.; Brodkin, C.A.; Townes, B.D. (Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle (United States))

1992-07-01

179

Influenza vaccination and treatment in children with neurologic disorders.  

PubMed

Influenza viruses cause substantial morbidity in children each year, especially among children with specific chronic conditions. In particular, neurologic disorders have emerged as a strong risk factor for influenza-related complications. Children with these disorders may be vulnerable due to diminished respiratory muscle strength, decreased muscle tone or impaired mobility, which can compromise pulmonary function and the ability to handle secretions. Although they represent a small fraction of the general pediatric population, children with neurologic disorders make up a disproportionately high number of those children who are hospitalized and die as a result of influenza-associated complications. Annual vaccination is the most effective way to prevent influenza and its complications, and is recommended for all children 6 months through 18 years of age, including children with neurologic disorders. Family members and those who work with these children in institutional, educational and daycare settings should also be vaccinated against influenza annually. However, there have been few studies of influenza vaccination specifically in this population. In addition, vaccine effectiveness may vary from year to year and vaccination will not prevent all infections. Early empiric antiviral treatment should be started promptly in these children if they present to healthcare providers with symptoms suspicious for influenza. This article reviews influenza epidemiology in children with neurologic disorders and what is known about vaccines and other methods of protecting this vulnerable population from influenza-related complications. PMID:24982759

Havers, Fiona; Fry, Alicia; Peacock, Georgina; Finelli, Lyn

2014-07-01

180

Influenza vaccination and treatment in children with neurologic disorders  

PubMed Central

Influenza viruses cause substantial morbidity in children each year, especially among children with specific chronic conditions. In particular, neurologic disorders have emerged as a strong risk factor for influenza-related complications. Children with these disorders may be vulnerable due to diminished respiratory muscle strength, decreased muscle tone or impaired mobility, which can compromise pulmonary function and the ability to handle secretions. Although they represent a small fraction of the general pediatric population, children with neurologic disorders make up a disproportionately high number of those children who are hospitalized and die as a result of influenza-associated complications. Annual vaccination is the most effective way to prevent influenza and its complications, and is recommended for all children 6 months through 18 years of age, including children with neurologic disorders. Family members and those who work with these children in institutional, educational and daycare settings should also be vaccinated against influenza annually. However, there have been few studies of influenza vaccination specifically in this population. In addition, vaccine effectiveness may vary from year to year and vaccination will not prevent all infections. Early empiric antiviral treatment should be started promptly in these children if they present to healthcare providers with symptoms suspicious for influenza. This article reviews influenza epidemiology in children with neurologic disorders and what is known about vaccines and other methods of protecting this vulnerable population from influenza-related complications. PMID:24982759

Fry, Alicia; Peacock, Georgina; Finelli, Lyn

2014-01-01

181

Acquired transient stuttering during a migraine attack.  

PubMed

Stuttering is an abnormality in the fluency of speech, which is characterized by interruption of the normal rhythm due to involuntary repetition and prolongation, or arrest, of uttered letters or syllables. The aphasic syndrome and dysarthria can be associated with classic migraine, but, to our knowledge, no study has so far described stuttering as the only neurological symptom accompanying an attack. PMID:10759918

Perino, M; Famularo, G; Tarroni, P

2000-02-01

182

The Neurological Manifestations of H1N1 Influenza Infection; Diagnostic Challenges and Recommendations  

PubMed Central

Background: World Health Organization declared pandemic phase of human infection with novel influenza A (H1N1) in April 2009. There are very few reports about the neurological complications of H1N1 virus infection in the literature. Occasionally, these complications are severe and even fatal in some individuals. The aims of this study were to report neurological complaints and/or complications associated with H1N1 virus infection. Methods: The medical files of all patients with H1N1 influenza infection admitted to a specified hospital in the city of , from October through November 2009 were reviewed. More information about the patients were obtained by phone calls to the patients or their care givers. All patients had confirmed H1N1 virus infection with real-time PCR assay. Results: Fifty-five patients with H1N1 infection were studied. Twenty-three patients had neurological signs and/or symptoms. Mild neurological complaints may be reported in up to 42% of patients infected by H1N1 virus. Severe neurological complications occurred in 9% of the patients. The most common neurological manifestations were headache, numbness and paresthesia, drowsiness and coma. One patient had a Guillain-Barre syndrome-like illness, and died in a few days. Another patient had focal status epilepticus and encephalopathy. Conclusions: The H1N1 infection seems to have been quite mild with a self-limited course in much of the world, yet there appears to be a subset, which is severely affected. We recommend performing diagnostic tests for H1N1influenza virus in all patients with respiratory illness and neurological signs/symptoms. We also recommend initiating treatment with appropriate antiviral drugs as soon as possible in those with any significant neurological presentation accompanied with respiratory illness and flu-like symptoms. PMID:23365476

Asadi-Pooya, Ali Akbar; Yaghoubi, Ehsan; Nikseresht, Alireza; Moghadami, Mohsen; Honarvar, Behnam

2011-01-01

183

Neurologic complications of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09  

PubMed Central

Objective: We sought to determine the range and extent of neurologic complications due to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 infection (pH1N1?09) in children hospitalized with influenza. Methods: Active hospital-based surveillance in 6 Australian tertiary pediatric referral centers between June 1 and September 30, 2009, for children aged <15 years with laboratory-confirmed pH1N1?09. Results: A total of 506 children with pH1N1?09 were hospitalized, of whom 49 (9.7%) had neurologic complications; median age 4.8 years (range 0.5–12.6 years) compared with 3.7 years (0.01–14.9 years) in those without complications. Approximately one-half (55.1%) of the children with neurologic complications had preexisting medical conditions, and 42.8% had preexisting neurologic conditions. On presentation, only 36.7% had the triad of cough, fever, and coryza/runny nose, whereas 38.7% had only 1 or no respiratory symptoms. Seizure was the most common neurologic complication (7.5%). Others included encephalitis/encephalopathy (1.4%), confusion/disorientation (1.0%), loss of consciousness (1.0%), and paralysis/Guillain-Barré syndrome (0.4%). A total of 30.6% needed intensive care unit (ICU) admission, 24.5% required mechanical ventilation, and 2 (4.1%) died. The mean length of stay in hospital was 6.5 days (median 3 days) and mean ICU stay was 4.4 days (median 1.5 days). Conclusions: Neurologic complications are relatively common among children admitted with influenza, and can be life-threatening. The lack of specific treatment for influenza-related neurologic complications underlines the importance of early diagnosis, use of antivirals, and universal influenza vaccination in children. Clinicians should consider influenza in children with neurologic symptoms even with a paucity of respiratory symptoms. PMID:22993280

Khandaker, Gulam; Zurynski, Yvonne; Buttery, Jim; Marshall, Helen; Richmond, Peter C.; Dale, Russell C.; Royle, Jenny; Gold, Michael; Snelling, Tom; Whitehead, Bruce; Jones, Cheryl; Heron, Leon; McCaskill, Mary; Macartney, Kristine; Elliott, Elizabeth J.

2012-01-01

184

Neurological manifestations of dengue virus infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

AimPaucity of studies on neurological manifestations in dengue virus infection prompted this study. We aim to correlate clinical, radiological and neurophysiological changes in dengue patients with neurological manifestations.

U. K. Misra; J. Kalita; U. K. Syam; T. N. Dhole

2006-01-01

185

Human Neurological Development: Past, Present and Future  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Neurological development is considered as the major human potential. Vision, vestibular function, intelligence, and nutrition are discussed as well as the treatment of neurological disfunctions, coma, and convulsive seizures.

Pelligra, R. (editor)

1978-01-01

186

Schizophrenia and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background: Psychological factors and psychiatric disorders play a role in a variety of gastrointestinal illnesses, including esophageal diseases. Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in patients with schizophrenia in Turkey. Patients and Methods: Ninety-eight patients with schizophrenia and one hundred control individuals were enrolled in the study, which was undertaken at the Manisa State Hospital for Mental Health and Neurological Disorders and Celal Bayar University Gastroenterology Department. Case and control subjects alike underwent 30–45 min oral interviews conducted by a designated study coordinator (E.K.). The coordinator gathered information about demographic characteristics, social habits, and a large variety of symptoms suggestive of reflux disease or other gastrointestinal conditions. Results: In terms of reflux symptoms, cough was the only significant association in schizophrenic patients than controls. Heartburn and regurgitation were more frequent in schizophrenic patients who smoked than in controls who were smokers. However, the prevalence of reflux symptoms in cigarette smokers versus nonsmoker patients with schizophrenia was similar. Heartburn and/or regurgitation occurred more frequently in patients with schizophrenic than controls with alcohol use. Conclusions: Psychiatric disorders might indirectly affect esophageal physiology through increased consumption of alcohol and nicotine. PMID:25657460

Kasap, Elmas; Ayer, Ahmet; Bozo?lan, Hümeyra; Ozen, Cigdem; Eslek, Ilhan; Yüceyar, Hakan

2015-01-01

187

Liver transplantation in neurological Wilson's Disease: is there indication? A case report.  

PubMed

Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by copper overload. In this disease, inadequate hepatic excretion leads to copper accumulation in the liver, brain, kidney, and cornea. Severe neurological symptoms can develop in patients with WD, often in the absence of relevant liver damage: it is unclear whether liver transplantation (LT) could reverse neurological symptoms, and at present LT is not recommended in this setting. We report a case of regression of neurological symptoms in a patient affected by WD with prevalent neurological involvement. A 19-year-old man with disabling neuropsychiatric symptoms from WD that included frontal ataxia, akinesia, dystonia, tremors, and behavioral disorders in the presence of preserved liver function (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score=7; Child-Turcotte-Pugh score=A5) underwent LT in November 2009. At the time of LT, encephalic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated diffuse neurodegenerative alterations involving subtentorial and supratentorial structures; bilateral Kayser-Fleischer ring was present. Four years after LT, laboratory tests show normalized copper metabolism and excellent liver function test results. Encephalic MRI shows a substantial improvement of already-known signal alterations at nuclei thalamus and putamen, mesencephalon, and pons. Kayser-Fleischer ring disappeared from the right eye, but a little remnant is still visible in the left eye. At neurological examination, all of the previous symptoms and signs are no longer present and behavioral disorders are no longer present; psychosocial functions are completely restored. The present case provides some evidence that LT may be a valid therapeutic option for WD patients with marked neurological impairment, particularly in those no longer responsive to chelation therapy. PMID:25242788

Mocchegiani, F; Gemini, S; Vincenzi, P; Montalti, R; Vecchi, A; Nicolini, D; Federici, A; Coletta, M; Pansini, M; Lanari, J; Svegliati Baroni, G; Risaliti, A; Vivarelli, M

2014-09-01

188

[Neurological manifestations of Behçet's disease].  

PubMed

Neurological manifestations of Behçet's disease (BD) occur in 5.3 to more than 50% of patients. They are divided into two major forms: "parenchymal" lesions, which include mainly meningoencephalitis as opposed to "extra-parenchymal" lesions (i.e. cerebral venous thrombosis and arterial aneurysms). Myelitis or peripheral neuropathy is exceptional. The neuro-Behçet syndrome (NBS) should be considered in the setting of neurological manifestations, particularly headache and pyramidal signs, in a young man diagnosed with BD. However, its recognition may be difficult when neurological manifestations are the presenting features of BD (one third of cases), and requires a thorough knowledge of clinical manifestations and morphological lesions. Thus, parenchymal NB lesions classically exhibit inflammatory characteristics on MRI and are located at the meso-diencephalic junction and in the brainstem, rarely with a supratentorial extension. Meningitis is not systematically associated, and may be absent in about 30% of cases. The pathogenesis of these lesions is incompletely understood, but inflammatory infiltrates include mainly neutrophils and activated T cells (mainly Th17). Differential diagnoses include infectious diseases (herpes, listeria, tuberculosis), and inflammatory diseases (i.e. multiple sclerosis and sarcoidosis). A prompt recognition of NBS should lead to initiate adequate therapies in order to limit the risk of sequelae, relapses or death. PMID:24290030

Noel, N; Drier, A; Wechsler, B; Piette, J-C; De Paz, R; Dormont, D; Cacoub, P; Saadoun, D

2014-02-01

189

Italian neurology: past, present and future  

PubMed Central

Summary This short history of the Italian Society of Neurology focuses on its founders and leading personalities. The article also considers the present and the future of Italian neurology, emphasising in particular the scientific impact of Italian neurological research on the main international journals and the activities undertaken to increase the role of neurologists. PMID:21729588

Federico, Antonio

190

Neurologic complications of polycythemia and their impact on therapy  

SciTech Connect

Polycythemia vera, a clonal stem cell disorder, produces neurologic problems in 50-80% of patients. Some symptoms, such as headache and dizziness, are related to hyperviscosity, and respond immediately to reduction of cell counts. Others seem to result from an associated coagulopathy. Patients with polycythemia tend to develop both arterial and venous thrombosis and are prone to hemorrhages. Treatments for polycythemia include phlebotomy, chlorambucil supplemented with phlebotomy, and {sup 32}P plus phlebotomy. Whatever treatment is chosen, the aim of therapy should be to reduce the hematocrit to approximately 40-45%.37 references.

Newton, L.K. (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (USA))

1990-03-01

191

Pathophysiology of Parkinson's Disease: From Clinical Neurology to Basic Neuroscience and Back  

E-print Network

Pathophysiology of Parkinson's Disease: From Clinical Neurology to Basic Neuroscience and Back-Albrechts-Universita¨t, Kiel, Germany Abstract: Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by motor and nonmotor (cognitive symptoms of Parkinson's disease. © 2002 Movement Disorder Society Key words: Parkinsonism; MPTP; human

Friedman, Nir

192

The Effects of Chiropractic Treatment on Students With Learning and Behavioral Impairments Due to Neurological Dysfunction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of chiropractic treatment on children with learning and behavioral problems was investigated with 24 elementary and secondary level students, 12 receiving regular chiropractic treatment and 12 receiving medication. Results indicated that chiropractic treatment was more effective for the wide range symptoms common in the neurological

Walton, E. V.; Brzozowski, Walter T.

193

[Pathogenesis of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes].  

PubMed

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are thought to be caused by autoimmune processes triggered by the cancer and directed against antigens common to both the cancer and the nervous system. There are several clinical phenotypes in combinations with the neurological syndromes, origin of cancer and the specific autoantibodies. PNS with antibodies against channel receptors on the cell surface tend to respond favorably to antibody-depletion therapies; this suggests that the antibodies detected in these PNS groups are closely related to their pathogenesis. PNS having the antibodies against intracellular proteins might be caused by cytotoxic T cell-mediated cell death. This is because the following findings; 1) the prominent mononuclear cells in CSF, 2) the infiltration of inflammatory cells, mainly CD8+ T lymphocytes, in the tumor and the nervous tissue. In addition, T cell receptor usage of infiltrated T lymphocytes in the affected CNS lesions has been shown to be oligoclonal. We observed that the disease model could not be produced using only anti-intracellular antibodies such as anti-Yo or anti-Hu antibodies, but that CTL activity could be induced in CD8+ T cells isolated from the peripheral mononuclear cells obtained from PNS patients with anti-Yo or anti-Hu antibodies. The anti-Yo- or anti-Hu-antibody-positive patients possess common human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I motifs. This implies that in patients with anti-Yo or anti-Hu antibodies, the presentation of the certain antigen peptides on the cell surface could be used to stimulate CD8+ T lymphocytes that could attack their target tissues as effectors. Antigen-specific CTL-mediated cell death has been observed in cancer immunology and PNS appears to be a potential candidates for a future CTL-mediated neurological disease model. PMID:20420170

Tanaka, Keiko

2010-04-01

194

Neurology outside Paris following Charcot.  

PubMed

The Middle Ages saw the development of numerous universities in the different provinces that later became the kingdom of France. In 1794, Napoleon I established 3 medical schools in Paris, Montpellier and Strasbourg, which were transformed into medical faculties in 1808. France had always been a highly centralized country, but during the 19th century, this trend started to change with the creation of medical faculties in Nancy (1872), Lille (1877), Lyon (1878), Bordeaux (1879), Toulouse (1891), Algiers (1910) and Marseille (1930). Following the creation of the 12 foundation courses, specialized chairs were progressively established in Paris, but for a long time this remained restricted to the French capital. However, with the emergence of medicine as an academic discipline in several towns outside Paris, came the development of neurology. This was greatly influenced by former students of Jean-Martin Charcot, local personalities, and the interactions between the two. Leading figures included Albert Pitres in Bordeaux, Léon Ingelrans in Lille, Eugène Devic and Jules Froment in Lyon, Lucien Cornil in Marseille, Joseph Grasset in Montpellier, and Marcel Riser in Toulouse. The interaction between French and Germanic medical communities also developed at this turbulent time under the influence of several great physicians such as Wilhelm Waldeyer, Adolf Kussmaul, and later Jean Alexandre Barré in Strasbourg, and Hippolyte Bernheim in Nancy. There are a number of other university towns outside Paris in which the development of neurology was probably influenced by the same interactions with psychiatry. It would be worth carrying out a thorough analysis of these towns in order to present an exhaustive overview of the development of neurology in France. PMID:20938155

Moulin, Thierry; Clarac, François; Petit, Henri; Broussolle, Emmanuel

2011-01-01

195

Emerging and Reemerging Neurologic Infections  

PubMed Central

The list of emerging and reemerging pathogens that cause neurologic disease is expanding. Various factors, including population growth and a rise in international travel, have contributed to the spread of pathogens to previously nonendemic regions. Recent advances in diagnostic methods have led to the identification of novel pathogens responsible for infections of the central nervous system. Furthermore, new issues have arisen surrounding established infections, particularly in an increasingly immunocompromised population due to advances in the treatment of rheumatologic disease and in transplant medicine. PMID:25360203

Glaser, Carol A.

2014-01-01

196

Neurological Complication After Low-Voltage Electric Injury: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Electrical shock can result in neurological complications, involving both peripheral and central nervous systems, which may present immediately or later on. However, delayed neurological complications caused by low-voltage electric shock are rarely reported. Here, a case of a man suffering from weakness and aphasia due to the delayed-onset of the peripheral nerve injury and ischemic stroke following an electrical shock is presented. Possible mechanisms underlying the neurological complications include thermal injury to perineural tissue, overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, vascular injury, and histological or electrophysiological changes. Moreover, vasospasms caused by low-voltage alternating current may predispose individuals to ischemic stroke. Therefore, clinicians should consider the possibility of neurological complications, even if the onset of the symptoms is delayed, and should perform diagnostic tests, such as electrophysiology or imaging, when patients present with weakness following an electric injury. PMID:24855625

Kim, Ha Min; Ko, Yeong-A; Kim, Joon Sung; Lim, Seong Hoon

2014-01-01

197

[Neurological manifestations in riverine populations from areas exposed to mercury in the Brazilian Amazon].  

PubMed

This study evaluated current levels of mercury exposure and sensory symptoms in adults from three riverine communities in Pará State, Brazil, two of which located in the Tapajós River basin and one in the Tocantins basin. Participants in this study included 78 residents in Barreiras (Tapajós), 30 in São Luiz do Tapajós (Tapajós), and 49 in Furo do Maracujá (Tocantins). Total hair mercury concentrations were quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and neurological evaluation was conducted by routine examination. Mercury concentrations in the Tapajós communities were higher than those in the Tocantins (p < 0.01). Evaluation of neurological changes showed no significant difference between the communities in exposed areas and control areas for the changes observed by conventional neurological examination, except for gait deviation (p < 0.05). The study concludes that despite the mercury exposure levels, there was a low frequency of sensory alterations according to conventional neurological testing. PMID:24233045

Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Costa, Carlos Araújo da; Araújo, Amélia A de; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

2013-11-01

198

Cryptogenic transient ischemic attack after nose blowing: association of huge atrial septal aneurysm with patent foramen ovale as potential cause  

PubMed Central

Association of atrial septal aneurysm (ASA) with patent foramen ovale (PFO) is considered an important risk factor for cardioembolism frequently forwarding paradoxical embolism in patients with cryptogenic or unexplained cerebral ischemic events. We herein describe the case of a 69-year-old male patient reporting uncontrolled movements of the right arm due to a muscle weakness, slurred speech, and paresthesia in the oral region some seconds after he had blown his nose. These neurological symptoms had improved dramatically within a few minutes and were completely regressive at admission to our hospital about two hours later. On transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) a huge ASA associated with PFO was detected. Diagnosis of the large-sized ASA was also confirmed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Due to the early complete recovery from his neurological symptoms, the patient was diagnosed with a transient ischemic attack (TIA). After nine days he was discharged in a good clinical condition under the treatment with oral anticoagulation. It is concluded that in cryptogenic or unexplained stroke or TIA TEE should always be performed to rule out ASA and PFO as potential sources for paradoxical embolism in those inconclusive clinical situations. PMID:23861594

Lotze, Ulrich; Kirsch, Uwe; Ohlow, Marc-Alexander; Scholle, Thorsten; Leonhardi, Jochen; Lauer, Bernward; Oltmanns, Gerhard; Schmidt, Hendrik

2013-01-01

199

Liver cirrhosis in patients newly diagnosed with neurological phenotype of Wilson’s disease  

PubMed Central

Summary Wilson’s disease (WD) can manifest itself in different clinical forms, the neurological and hepatic ones being the most common. It is suggested that neurological signs and psychiatric symptoms develop secondary to liver involvement. The aim of this study was to characterize the liver disease in patients newly diagnosed with the neurological form of WD. Treatment-naive patients diagnosed with WD were classified into three phenotypic groups: hepatic, neurological and pre-symptomatic. Liver involvement was ascertained through surrogate markers: abdominal ultrasound and laboratory parameters. In addition, study participants were screened for esophageal varices. Of 53 consecutively diagnosed WD patients, 23 individuals (43.4%) had a predominantly neurological presentation. In this group, cirrhosis was diagnosed in 11 (47.8%) subjects. Esophageal varices were present in all of them. In every patient with neurological WD, there was at least one sign of hepatic disease on ultrasound examination, indicating universal presence of liver involvement. The prevalence of surrogate signs of cirrhosis was similar in patients with the neurological and in those with the hepatic phenotype. PMID:25014046

Przyby?kowski, Adam; Gromadzka, Gra?yna; Chabik, Grzegorz; Wierzchowska, Agata; Litwin, Tomasz; Cz?onkowska, Anna

2014-01-01

200

Neurologic infections in diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Even at a time when HIV/AIDS and immunosuppressive therapy have increased the number of individuals living with significant immunocompromise, diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major comorbid disorder for several rare but potentially lethal infections, including rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis and malignant external otitis. DM is also a commonly associated condition in patients with nontropical pyomyositis, pyogenic spinal infections, Listeria meningitis, and blastomycosis. As West Nile virus spread to and across North America over a decade ago, DM appeared in many series as a risk factor for death or neuroinvasive disease. More recently, in several large international population-based studies, DM was identified as a risk factor for herpes zoster. The relationships among infection, DM, and the nervous system are multidirectional. Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 DM, while parasitic infections have been hypothesized to protect against autoimmune disorders, including type 1 DM. DM-related neurologic disease can predispose to systemic infection - polyneuropathy is the predominant risk factor for diabetic foot infection. Because prognosis for many neurologic infections depends on timely institution of antimicrobial and sometimes surgical therapy, neurologists caring for diabetic patients should be familiar with the clinical features of the neuroinfectious syndromes associated with DM. PMID:25410222

Jay, Cheryl A; Solbrig, Marylou V

2014-01-01

201

Neurologic complications of craniovertebral dislocation.  

PubMed

Craniovertebral dislocation is uncommon, but its diagnosis is important taking into account the potential severity of the neurologic complications. A number of causes are known; the most common are Down syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Paget's disease, other metabolic bone diseases, and craniocervical trauma. Down's syndrome is a relatively common clinical condition but craniovertebral subluxation is only observed in a small percentage of patients. About half of all cervical spine injuries affect the atlanto-occipital region and C2 vertebra. In rheumatoid arthritis, craniocervical dislocation occurs in up to 40% of patients with severe disease. In Paget's disease, involvement of the craniovertebral region occurs in about 30% of all cases. The clinical neurologic syndrome is characterized by local pain, features of upper spinal cord and medullary compression, positive Lhermitte phenomenon, syncope associated with neck flexion, vertebral artery obstruction or dissection leading to stroke, and asymmetrical lower cranial nerve palsies. Neuroimaging is essential to confirm the clinical diagnosis and to categorize severity. The treatment of this disorder is usually surgical, but traction and external immobilization is relevant in some cases. Specific conditions may require additional treatments such as radiotherapy, antibiotics, or chemotherapy. PMID:24365311

de Carvalho, Mamede; Swash, Michael

2014-01-01

202

Brain biopsy in neurologic decline of unknown etiology.  

PubMed

Brain biopsies have an uncertain role in the diagnosis of patients with dementia or neurologic decline of unknown etiology. They are often performed only after an exhaustive panel of less invasive tests and procedures have failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of brain biopsies in this patient group through the retrospective analysis of 53 brain biopsies performed for neurologic disease of unknown etiology at a single tertiary care institution between December 2001 and December 2011. Patients with known nonlymphomatous neoplasms thought to be associated with the neurologic symptoms or with immunodeficiency were excluded from the study. Furthermore, the clinical presentation, imaging and laboratory tests were compared between diagnostic groups to identify factors more likely to yield a diagnosis. Sixty percent of the biopsies were diagnostic (32 of 53), with the most common histologic diagnosis of central nervous system lymphoma in 14 of 53 patients (26% of total) followed by infarct in four subjects (7.5%). A few patients were found to have rare and unsuspected diseases such as lymphomatosis cerebri, neurosarcoidosis and neuroaxonal leukodystrophy. Complications from biopsy were uncommon and included hemorrhage and infection with abscess formation at the biopsy site. These results suggest that brain biopsies may be useful in difficult cases in which less invasive measures have been unable to yield a definitive diagnosis. PMID:25661242

Magaki, Shino; Gardner, Tracie; Khanlou, Negar; Yong, William H; Salamon, Noriko; Vinters, Harry V

2015-04-01

203

Neurologic and Psychiatric Manifestations of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity  

PubMed Central

Celiac Disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease dependent on gluten (a protein present in wheat, rye or barley) that occurs in about 1% of the population and is generally characterized by gastrointestinal complaints. More recently the understanding and knowledge of gluten sensitivity (GS), has emerged as an illness distinct from celiac disease with an estimated prevalence 6 times that of CD. Gluten sensitive people do not have villous atrophy or antibodies that are present in celiac disease, but rather they can test positive for antibodies to gliadin. Both CD and GS may present with a variety of neurologic and psychiatric co-morbidities, however, extraintestinal symptoms may be the prime presentation in those with GS. However, gluten sensitivity remains undertreated and underrecognized as a contributing factor to psychiatric and neurologic manifestiations. This review focuses on neurologic and psychiatric manifestations implicated with gluten sensitivity, reviews the emergence of gluten sensitivity distinct from celiac disease, and summarizes the potential mechanisms related to this immune reaction. PMID:21877216

Jackson, Jessica R.; Eaton, William W.; Cascella, Nicola G.; Fasano, Alessio

2013-01-01

204

Approaching neurological diseases to reduce mobility limitations in older persons.  

PubMed

The rapidly increasing elderly population poses a major challenge for future health-care systems. Neurological diseases in older persons are particularly common and coexist with other clinical conditions. This is not surprising given that, for example, even patients with Alzheimer Disease (AD) could have relevant extrapyramidal signs at the moment of the diagnosis with motor signs having more negative prognostic value. Longitudinal studies conducted on Parkinson Disease (PD) showed that, after 20 years, dementia is not only present in almost all survivors but is also the main factor influencing nursing home admission. Recently, it has been reported the importance of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA: comprehensive evaluation of cognition, depressive symptoms, mobility and functional assessment) as a tool reducing morbidity in frail older patients admitted to any acute hospital unit. The CGA should be considered as a technological device, for physicians who take care of older persons affected by overlapping neurological diseases. CGA is an extraordinary and cost effective instrument even in patients with advanced neurological diseases where allows to collect valuable information for an effective plan of management. PMID:24050168

Lauretani, Fulvio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Pelliccioni, Pio; Ruffini, Livia; Nardelli, Anna; Cherubini, Antonio; Maggio, Marcello

2014-01-01

205

Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia  

MedlinePLUS

... gov . Fungal Diseases Share Compartir Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia The symptoms of PCP are fever, dry cough, ... Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes Statistics Additional Information Pneumocystis pneumonia Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & ...

206

Neurologic Complications of Plasma Cell Dyscrasias  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plasma cell dyscrasias are an uncommon but important cause of neurologic morbidity. The pathophysiology of these disorders\\u000a is quite varied and ranges from direct effects of cancer on neurologic tissues to remote effects caused by monoclonal antibodies.\\u000a This chapter discusses these hematologic disorders and their neurologic consequences including monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined\\u000a significance, multiple myeloma and its rare variants, osteosclerotic

John J. Kelly

207

The Neurological Examination in Family Practice  

PubMed Central

The family practitioner has the first opportunity and responsibility of making a diagnosis. Since a large portion of his work is concerned with neurological problems, he should be able to do a complete neurological examination. This examination should include evaluation of the gait, mental function, cranial nerves, motor system and sensory system. With practice, a routine neurological examination can be done rapidly and accurately. PMID:20469138

Siemens, Peter

1974-01-01

208

Pteridines and mono-amines: relevance to neurological damage.  

PubMed Central

Patients with phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency show increased concentrations of biopterins and neopterins, and reduced concentrations of serotonin and catecholamines, when phenylalanine concentrations are raised. The pterin rise reflects increased synthesis of dihydroneopterin and tetrahydrobiopterin, and the amine fall a reduction in amine synthesis due to inhibition by phenylalanine of tyrosine and tryptophan transport into neurones. The pterin and amine changes appear to be independent of each other and are present in the central nervous system as well as the periphery; they disappear when phenylalanine concentrations are reduced to normal. Patients with arginase deficiency show a similar amine disturbance but have normal pterin levels. The amine changes probably contribute neurological symptoms but pterin disturbance is not known to affect brain function. Patients with defective biopterin metabolism exhibit severely impaired amine synthesis due to tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency. Pterin concentrations vary with the site of the defect. Symptoms include profound hypokinesis and other features of basal ganglia disease. Neither symptoms nor amine changes are relieved by controlling phenylalanine concentrations. Patients with dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR) deficiency accumulate dihydrobiopterins and develop secondary folate deficiency which resembles that occurring in patients with defective 5,10-methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase activity. The latter disorder is also associated with Parkinsonism and defective amine and pterin turnover in the central nervous system, and a demyelinating illness occurs in both disorders. In DHPR deficiency cerebral calcification may develop in a similar distribution to that seen in congenital folate malabsorption and methotrexate toxicity. Symptoms are ameliorated by therapy with 5-formyltetrahydrofolate but exacerbated by folic acid. PMID:3540926

Smith, I.; Howells, D. W.; Hyland, K.

1986-01-01

209

Unusual cause of acute neurologic deficit in childhood: primary central nervous system vasculitis presenting with basilar arterial occlusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Primary central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis of childhood is a rare disorder. The most common signs and symptoms are acute\\u000a severe headache and focal neurologic deficit. It should be suspected in children who have an acquired neurologic deficit that\\u000a remains unexplained after an initial basic evaluation. Diagnosis usually depends on brain magnetic resonance imaging and conventional\\u000a angiography of cerebral vasculature.

Eren Kale Çekinmez; Nurcan Cengiz; ?lknur Erol; Osman K?z?lk?l?ç; Yasemin Uslu

2009-01-01

210

Neurologic Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript. Neurologic Diseases - Multiple Languages Chinese - Traditional (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Korean (???) ... ???? (Chinese - Traditional) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations French (français) ... EEG (Électroencéphalogramme) - français (French) Bilingual ...

211

Porphyria and its neurologic manifestations.  

PubMed

Porphyrias are rare disorders resulting from a defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. They can produce significant disease of both the peripheral and central nervous systems, in addition to other organ systems, with acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and variegate porphyria as the subtypes associated with neurologic manifestations. The presence of a motor-predominant peripheral neuropathy (axonal predominant), accompanied by gastrointestinal distress and neuropsychiatric manifestations, should be a strong clue to the diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical confirmation can be made through evaluation of urine porphyrins during an exacerbation of disease. While hematin is helpful for acute treatment, long-term effective management requires avoidance of overstimulation of the cytochrome P450 pathway, as well as other risk factor control. PMID:24365356

Tracy, Jennifer A; Dyck, P James B

2014-01-01

212

Neurological problems of jazz legends.  

PubMed

A variety of neurological problems have affected the lives of giants in the jazz genre. Cole Porter courageously remained prolific after severe leg injuries secondary to an equestrian accident, until he succumbed to osteomyelitis, amputations, depression, and phantom limb pain. George Gershwin resisted explanations for uncinate seizures and personality change and herniated from a right temporal lobe brain tumor, which was a benign cystic glioma. Thelonious Monk had erratic moods, reflected in his pianism, and was ultimately mute and withdrawn, succumbing to cerebrovascular events. Charlie Parker dealt with mood lability and drug dependence, the latter emanating from analgesics following an accident, and ultimately lived as hard as he played his famous bebop saxophone lines and arpeggios. Charles Mingus hummed his last compositions into a tape recorder as he died with motor neuron disease. Bud Powell had severe posttraumatic headaches after being struck by a police stick defending Thelonious Monk during a Harlem club raid. PMID:19666887

Pearl, Phillip L

2009-08-01

213

Neurologic complications of vascular surgery.  

PubMed

Technological advances in the management of cardiovascular disorders have resulted in an expansion of eligibility criteria for treatment, as well as an increased demand for improved outcomes. Neurologic complications after coronary artery bypass surgery, particularly stroke and cognitive dysfunction, substantially increase mortality, strain health care resources, and reduce the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. Carotid endarterectomy can be both the optimum stroke preventative strategy as well as a cause of stroke. The trend toward minimally invasive endovascular procedures, which has provided non-surgical options for both coronary and cerebral vascular occlusive lesions, is slowly being compared to conventional surgical and medical therapies. The identification of risk factors and mechanisms of adverse cerebral outcomes of these myriad vascular procedures is essential in improving their clinical effectiveness and patient applicability. PMID:9421538

Sila, C A

1998-02-01

214

Management and neurological outcome of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma.  

PubMed

This study assesses the etiology, clinical management, and outcome of patients with spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). SSEH is an uncommon neurosurgical emergency. We analyzed data from 10 patients (six women, four men) treated for SSEH (mean age, 63.5years). Five patients had bleeding disorders due to anticoagulant therapy at the time of diagnosis. The initial clinical symptom in most patients was severe pain (n=8). Spinal injury was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale, with six Grade A, one Grade C, and three Grade D patients. Lesions were in the cervicothoracic (n=4), thoracic (n=5), and thoracolumbar regions (n=1). Location was dorsal in seven patients and ventral in three. SSEH extension ranged from three to 15 spinal levels (mean, 6.9 levels). ASIA scale outcomes for the entire group were Grade A, n=2; Grade B, n=1; Grade C, n=1; Grade D, n=2; and Grade E, n=4. Outcomes for patients with no bleeding disorders (n=5) were Grade D, n=1; and Grade E, n=4. Outcomes for patients with bleeding disorders (n=5) were Grade A, n=2; Grade B, n=1; Grade C, n=1; and Grade D, n=1. After surgical treatment, patients improved by at least by one ASIA grade. The patients with mild neurological deficit who were treated conservatively also improved. Emergent spinal cord decompression is the only way to preserve spinal cord function in patients with severe deficit. Coagulation disorders were related to poor neurological status at admission and with poor neurological outcome. Conservative treatment was acceptable in patients with minimal neurological deficit. PMID:25677879

Dziedzic, Tomasz; Kunert, Przemys?aw; Krych, Piotr; Marchel, Andrzej

2015-04-01

215

Neurologic decompression sickness following cabin pressure fluctuations at high altitude.  

PubMed

Decompression sickness (DCS) occurs in diving, altitude chamber exposures, and unpressurized or depressurized high-altitude flights. Because DCS takes many forms, in-flight cases may be misinterpreted as hypoxia, hyperventilation, or viral illness, with resulting failure to respond appropriately. In this case, a 28-yr-old male pilot of a single-seat, tactical aircraft experienced 12 rapid pressure fluctuations while flying at 43,000 ft above sea level. He had no symptoms and decided to complete the flight, which required an additional 2 h in the air. Approximately 1 h later he began to experience fatigue, lightheadedness, and confusion, which he interpreted as onset of a viral illness. However, symptoms progressed to visual, cognitive, motor, and sensory degradations and it was with some difficulty that he landed safely at his destination. Neurologic DCS was suspected on initial evaluation by flight line medical personnel because of the delayed onset and symptom progression. He was transferred to a local Emergency Department and noted to have altered mental status, asymmetric motor deficits, and non-dermatomal paresthesias of the upper and lower extremities. Approximately 3.5 h after the incident and 2.5 h after the onset of symptoms he began hyperbaric oxygen therapy. He received partial relief at 30 min of the Navy DiveTable 6 and full resolution at 90 min; there were no recurrent symptoms at a 1-yr follow-up. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of in-flight DCS symptoms and landing as soon as possible rather than as soon as practical in all likely scenarios. PMID:20377149

Auten, Jonathan D; Kuhne, Michael A; Walker, Harlan M; Porter, Henry O

2010-04-01

216

Neurologic complications in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: increasing relevance in the era of biologics.  

PubMed

Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can involve almost every organ system. Neurologic complications are not infrequent in patients with IBD, but are poorly recognized and underreported. Pathophysiologically, these may represent immune-mediated phenomenon, nonimmunologic complications due to micronutrient deficiencies, thromboembolism, or be medication-induced. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurologic complication of IBD and may be immune-mediated, or caused by therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) therapy or metronidazole. Multiple sclerosis occurs with a greater frequency in patients with IBD. Anti-TNF-? therapy can cause neurologic disease characterized by central demyelination that mimics multiple sclerosis. Hence, patients with a history of demyelinating diseases or with symptoms of polyneuropathy should be carefully evaluated before initiation of anti-TNF-? therapy. Natalizumab has been associated with fatal progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy due to reactivation of JC virus, and occurs with greater frequency in patients with previous JC virus infection. Stroke secondary to venous or arterial thromboembolism can be seen in patients with active Crohn's disease. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the neurologic complications in patients with IBD. Neurologic symptoms in these patients should be promptly evaluated. PMID:22552994

Singh, Siddharth; Kumar, Neeraj; Loftus, Edward V; Kane, Sunanda V

2013-01-01

217

Movement disorder symptoms associated with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in two manganese (Mn)-exposed communities  

EPA Science Inventory

Objectives: The UPDRS is a commonly used neurological measurement to assess the presence and severity of parkinsonian symptoms. It has also been used to assess symptoms associated with Mn exposure. Objectives: to determine 1) if movement disorder symptoms were associated with UP...

218

Neurological and cognitive impairments detected in older people without a diagnosis of neurological or cognitive disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced age is associated with the finding of abnormalities on neurological and cognitive assessment. This review aims to identify studies that evaluated community samples of patients without a history of neurological disease and attempts to combine these data. While neurological signs were common, they were not universal and should not be considered an inevitable component of ageing. Additionally, they are

Henry J Woodford; James George

2010-01-01

219

Chapter 40 History of neurology in France  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of neurology in France is characterized by the very high degree of centralization in that country where “everything seems to happen in Paris,” and yet the considerable degree of autonomous diversity in the evolution of some other medical schools such as Montpellier and Strasbourg. It could be argued that France saw the birth of clinical neurology as a

François Clarac; François Boller

2009-01-01

220

Hyponatremia in Critically Ill Neurological Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Hyponatremia is the most common and important electrolyte disorder encountered in the neurologic intensive care unit (NICU). Advances in our knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms at play in patients with acute neurologic disease have improved our understanding of this derangement. Review Summary: Evaluation of hyponatremia requires a struc- tured approach beginning with the measurement of serum and urine osmolalities.

Alejandro A. Rabinstein; Eelco F. M. Wijdicks

2003-01-01

221

Neurological complications of surgery and anaesthesia.  

PubMed

Injury to the central and peripheral nervous systems is often permanent. As such, adverse neurological outcomes of surgery and anaesthesia can be devastating for patients and their families. In this article, we review the incidence, risk factors, outcomes, prevention, and treatment of a number of important neurological complications in the perioperative period. PMID:25204699

Mashour, G A; Woodrum, D T; Avidan, M S

2015-02-01

222

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY The University of California, Davis, Department of Neurological Surgery is seeking applicants for three open positions in our faculty://recruit.ucdavis.edu/apply/jpf00122 Peripheral Nerve - Neurosurgery: Requires expertise in spinal surgery and Fellowship training

Leistikow, Bruce N.

223

Neurological complications associated with epidural steroid injections.  

PubMed

Multiple case reports of neurological complications resulting from intraarterial injection of corticosteroids have led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue a warning, requiring label changes, warning of serious neurological events, some resulting in death. The FDA has identified 131 cases of neurological adverse events, including 41 cases of arachnoiditis. A review of the literature reveals an overwhelming proportion of the complications are related to transforaminal epidural injections, of which cervical transforaminal epidural injections constituted the majority of neurological complications. Utilization data of epidural injections in the Medicare population revealed that cervical transforaminal epidural injections constitute only 2.4 % of total epidural injections and <5 % of all transforaminal epidural injections. Multiple theories have been proposed as the cause of neurological injury including particulate steroid, arterial intimal flaps, arterial dissection, dislodgement of plaque causing embolism, arterial muscle spasm, and embolism of a fresh thrombus following disruption of the intima. PMID:25795154

Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

2015-05-01

224

Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation  

PubMed Central

Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

2013-01-01

225

Radiation-induced neurological complications of nasopharyngeal carcinoma Radiation-induced neurological complications of nasopharyngeal carcinoma Radiation-induced neurological complications of nasopharyngeal carcinoma Radiation-induced neurological complications of nasopharyngeal carcinoma Radiation-induced neurological complications of nasopharyngeal carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To review radiation-induced neurological complications of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Materials & Methods: Retrospective review of patients with radiation-induced neurological complications of NPC who presented to the Neurology and Neurosurgery Departments, Tan Tock Seng Hospital in the five-year period from 1994 to 99. Results: Nine patients with 10 neurological complications were seen. Four patients had cranial nerve palsies, of whom

LCS Tan; YY Sitoh; HTL Tjia

1999-01-01

226

American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology  

E-print Network

"Psychotherapy is the treatment, by psychological means, of problems of an emotional nature in which a trained person deliberately establishes a professional relationship with the patient with the object (1) of removing, modifying or retarding existing symptoms, (2) of mediating disturbed patterns of behaviour, and (3) of promoting positive personality growth and development " (Wolberg, 1967). The above is perhaps the most widely accepted definition of psychotherapy. Do all people define psychotherapy in the same way, or are there important differences? As this question may be highly relevant to

unknown authors

227

Indapamide-induced transient myopia with supraciliary effusion: case report  

PubMed Central

Background Ingestion of sulphonamide-derived drugs has been reported to possibly have ocular side-effects. Authors aimed to present a rare case of indapamide-induced transient myopia with ciliary body edema and supraciliary effusion. Case presentation A 39 years old caucasian female patient presented at the Department of Neurology with headache and sudden bilateral loss of distant vision. Neurological assessment and cranial CT scans were unremarkable. For her hypertension, twice a day bisoprolol 2.5 mg and once a day indapamide 1.5 mg tablets were prescribed several days before. At her presenting, ophthalmic findings were as follows: visual acuity 0.08-7.25Dsph?=?1.0 and 0.06-7.25Dsph?=?1.0; IOP 25 mmHg and 24 mmHg, anterior chamber depth (ACD) 2.32 mm and 2.49 mm, lens thickness (L) 4.02 mm and 4.09 mm in the right and the left eye, respectively. By means of ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), thickened (720 / 700 micron) and detached ciliary body, its forward movement (ciliary body-cornea angle 108? / 114?) and forward rotated ciliary processes were seen. Angle opening distance (AOD500) were 300 / 314 microns. By the following days, the myopia gradually diminished, and a week after her first symptoms, her uncorrected visual acuity was 1.0 in both eyes, IOP 13 mmHg and 17 mmHg, ACD 3.68 mm and 3.66 mm, L 3.78 mm and 3.81 mm in the right and the left eye, respectively. Ciliary body edema and detachment disappeared (ciliary body thickness 225 / 230 micron), both of the ciliary body-cornea angle 134? / 140? and the AOD500 (650 / 640 microns) increased. At this point, the patient admitted that she had stopped taking indapamide two days before. Conclusions Our case report is the third one in the literature to present indapamide-induced transient myopia, and the first to employ UBM for describing the characteristics of this rare condition. According to the findings, authors suggest that both ciliary muscle contraction and ciliary body edema may play role in the pathomechanism. UBM seems to be a useful tool in the differential diagnosis of acute myopia. Further, authors wish to draw attention to one of the potential adverse effects of this drug which was not listed by its package insert. PMID:24138779

2013-01-01

228

Approach to Neurometabolic Diseases from a Pediatric Neurological Point of View  

PubMed Central

Objective Neurometabolic disorders are an important group of diseases that mostly are presented in newborns and infants. Neurological manifestations are the prominent signs and symptoms in this group of diseases. Seizures are a common sign and are often refractory to antiepileptic drugs in untreated neurometabolic patients. The onset of symptoms for neurometabolic disorders appears after an interval of normal or near normal growth and development.Additionally, affected children may fare well until a catabolic crisis occurs. Patients with neurometabolic disorders during metabolic decompensation have severe clinical presentation, which include poor feeding, vomiting, lethargy, seizures, and loss of consciousness. This symptom is often fatal but severe neurological insult and regression in neurodevelopmental milestones can result as a prominent sign in patients who survived. Acute symptoms should be immediately treated regardless of the cause. A number of patients with neurometabolic disorders respond favorably and, in some instances, dramatically respond to treatment. Early detection and early intervention is invaluable in some patients to prevent catabolism and normal or near normal neurodevelopmental milestones. This paper discusses neurometabolic disorders, approaches to this group of diseases (from the view of a pediatric neurologist), clinical and neurological manifestations, neuroimaging and electroencephalography findings, early detection, and early treatment. PMID:25767534

KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh

2015-01-01

229

[Cerebral blood flow and CO2 reactivity in patients with transient ischemic attack].  

PubMed

To elucidate the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CO2 reactivity in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA), 10 patients with TIA and 5 healthy adults (controls) underwent two consecutive CBF measurements (i.e. the first measurement during room air inhalation and the second measurement during 5%CO2 inhalation). Hemispheric mean CBF was determined by each CBF measurement using 133Xenon inhalation method. CO2 reactivity was evaluated by analysing delta CBF (= mean CBF during hypercapnea-mean CBF at rest) and delta CBF/delta PaCO2. The resting mean CBF values in the bilateral hemispheres (i.e. both of the affected and unaffected hemispheres) were significantly lower in TIA patients than controls (p less than 0.05). Inhalation of 5%CO2 significantly increased mean CBF in TIA patients bilaterally, however the mean CBF value during hypercapnea was again significantly lower in TIA patients than controls (p less than 0.05). CO2 reactivity in TIA patients was not significantly different from controls (p greater than 0.05). The result demonstrated that TIA patients have a chronic and global cerebral oligemia with normal CO2 reactivity. The chronic and global cerebral oligemia may develop a transient ischemic neurological symptom by being superimposed with local decrease of CBF. PMID:1799519

Yamakami, I; Tanno, H; Isobe, K; Yamaura, A

1991-12-01

230

Linking genes to neurological clinical practice: the genomic basis for neurorehabilitation.  

PubMed

Large-scale genomics projects such as the Human Genome Project and the International HapMap Project promise significant advances in the ability to diagnose and treat many conditions, including those with a neurological basis. A major focus of research has emerged in the neurological sciences to elucidate the molecular and genetic basis of various neurological diseases. Indeed, genetic factors are implicated in susceptibility for many neurological disorders, with family history studies providing strong evidence of familial risk for conditions such as stroke, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. Heritability studies also suggest a strong genetic contribution to the risk for neurological diseases. Genome-wide association studies are also uncovering novel genetic variants associated with neurological disorders. Whole-genome and exome sequencing are likely to provide novel insights into the genetic basis of neurological disorders. Genetic factors are similarly associated with clinical phenotypes such as symptom severity and progression as well as response to treatment. Specifically, disease progression and functional restoration depend, in part, on the capacity for neural plasticity within residual neural tissues. Furthermore, such plasticity may be influenced in part by the presence of polymorphisms in several genes known to orchestrate neural plasticity including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Apolipoprotein E. (APOE). It is important for neurorehabilitation therapist practicing in the "genomic era" to be aware of the potential influence of genetic factors during clinical encounters, as advances in molecular sciences are revealing information of critical relevance to the clinical rehabilitation management of individuals with neurological conditions. Video Abstract available (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A88) for more insights from the authors. PMID:25415554

Goldberg, Allon; Curtis, Catherine L; Kleim, Jeffrey A

2015-01-01

231

Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books.  

PubMed

The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam. PMID:25742584

Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Vincent, Maurice Borges; Silva, Marcos Martins da

2015-02-01

232

[Narrative neurology: access to the patient's experiences].  

PubMed

Could the novel fulfil a role in the neurologist's daily clinical practice? A good book or story can indeed make the neurology patient's experiences clearer, both for the patient and for the doctor. The novel is no longer just an end-product or form of art, but a method for better understanding disease and experiences. Several neurological examples are given, such as migraine, Parkinson's disease and ALS. The narrative opens a perspective on disease 'from the inside'. Neurology lends itself to a narrative approach, because it is primarily a field to which the patient's story is central. PMID:19785900

ter Meulen, Bastiaan C; Haan, Joost; Meulenberg, Frans

2009-01-01

233

Neurological Disorders in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterized by an autoimmune exocrinopathy involving mainly salivary and lacrimal glands. The histopathological hallmark is periductal lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands, resulting in loss of their secretory function. Several systemic manifestations may be found in patients with Sjögren's syndrome including neurological disorders. Neurological involvement ranges from 0 to 70% among various series and may present with central nervous system and/or peripheral nervous system involvement. This paper endeavors to review the main clinical neurological manifestations in Sjögren syndrome, the physiopathology, and their therapeutic response. PMID:22474573

Tobón, Gabriel J.; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Youinou, Pierre

2012-01-01

234

E. coli Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. E. coli Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Symptoms Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) can cause the following symptoms: Nausea Severe ...

235

Listeriosis: Definition and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Dairy Products Recall & Advice to Consumers Case Count Maps Epi Curves Signs & Symptoms Key Resources Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheeses Recall & Advice to Consumers Case Count Maps Epi Curves Signs & Symptoms Key Resources Imported Frescolina ...

236

Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Progress Search form Search Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Signs and Symptoms Partly because there are different types of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) , the exact symptoms vary greatly from person to ...

237

General IC Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

General IC Symptoms Symptoms of interstitial cystitis (IC) differ from person to person and may even vary in the ... with IC pain . Revised January 12, 2010 About IC What is Interstitial Cystitis? 4 to 12 Million ...

238

[Mental pain: is it a symptom?].  

PubMed

The psychiatrist is confronted by a variety of emotional states, ranging from sadness to exaltation. The term "psychache "has been used to describe depression with melancholic features. But can such mental pain be defined without reference to visible lesions or precise physical symptoms? We report pathophysiological evidence supporting this concept and show that it has implications for both treatment and prognosis. Cognitive studies have shown that the neurological substrate of physical pain is also activated by mental pain. Mental pain is associated with a risk of suicide and can be improved by analgesics, including opiates and ketamine. PMID:21171250

Gaillard, Raphaël; Loo, Henry; Olie, Jean-Pierre

2010-03-01

239

A systematic review of the influence of occupational organophosphate pesticides exposure on neurological impairment  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the published literature and to estimate whether or not there is a causal relationship between occupational exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and either neurological impairment or depressive symptoms. Data sources EMBASE, MEDLINE, Global Health and PsycINFO (1980 to April 2014). Setting Observational studies (cross-sectional, cohort and case–control studies) with exposed and unexposed groups. Participants People who occupationally use OPs for more than 1?month and their family. Primary outcome Results of neurological core test batteries or depressive symptoms such as headaches, anxiety and dizziness. Study appraisal and synthesis methods After an extensive search of various literature databases, one author screened titles and abstracts, searched the relevant publications manually and conducted data extraction. All extracted data from the selected articles were synthesised for analysis. Quality appraisal was conducted using the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. Results Of the 1024 articles retrieved by database search, 24 studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected for analysis. Of the selected studies, 17 were cross-sectional and the remaining 7 were cohort and nested case–control studies. The geographical areas included in the studies were the USA (10 studies), the UK (4 studies), Africa (4 studies), Asia (3 studies), Europe (2 studies) and South America (1 study). Each of the included studies used different exposure and outcome assessments such as neurological scores and depressive symptoms, making it difficult to compare the results exactly. Most studies showed that exposed groups had poorer results than unexposed groups; however, owing to the inconsistent neurological test batteries, there was not enough pooling evidence to conduct a meta-analysis. Conclusions The findings of this literature review indicate that it is necessary to standardise the neurological or neuropsychological test battery and methods of measuring exposure to OPs. PMID:24961715

Takahashi, Noriko; Hashizume, Masahiro

2014-01-01

240

Atypical neurological complications of ipilimumab therapy in patients with metastatic melanoma  

PubMed Central

Background Ipilimumab is a novel FDA-approved recombinant human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 and has been used to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Immune-related neurological adverse effects include inflammatory myopathy, aseptic meningitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myasthenia gravis–type syndrome, sensorimotor neuropathy, and inflammatory enteric neuropathy. To date, there is no report for ipilimumab-induced chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), transverse myelitis (TM), or concurrent myositis and myasthenia gravis–type syndrome. Our objective is to raise early recognition of atypical neurological adverse events and to share our therapeutic approach. Methods We report 3 cases of metastatic melanoma treated with ipilimumab in which the patients developed CIDP, TM, and concurrent myositis and myasthenia gravis–type syndrome, respectively, at the MD Anderson Cancer Center between July 2012 and June 2013. Patients consented to release of medical information for publication/educational purposes. Results Our 3 cases of metastatic melanoma treated with ipilimumab developed CIDP, TM, and concurrent myositis and myasthenia gravis–type syndrome, respectively. The median time to onset of immune-related adverse events following ipilimumab treatment ranged from 1 to 2 weeks. Ipilimumab was discontinued due to the severe neurological symptoms. Plasmapheresis was initiated in the patients with CIDP and concurrent myositis and myasthenia gravis–type syndrome; high-dose intravenous steroids were given to the patient with TM, and significant clinical response was demonstrated. Conclusions Ipilimumab could induce a wide spectrum of neurological adverse effects. Our findings support the standard treatment of withholding or discontinuing ipilimumab. Plasmapheresis or high-dose intravenous steroids may be considered as the initial choice of treatment for severe ipilimumab-related neurological adverse events. Improvement of neurological symptoms may be seen within 2 weeks. PMID:24482447

Liao, Bing; Shroff, Sheetal; Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Tummala, Sudhakar

2014-01-01

241

Neurologic manifestations of pediatric chikungunya infection.  

PubMed

Chikungunya virus, a mosquito-borne arbovirus, was responsible for a massive epidemic in La Réunion Island during 2005 to 2006. The disease is usually benign, but neurologic involvement, with sometimes fatal outcome, has been described. We report a retrospective hospital-based pediatric series of 30 children (23 boys and 7 girls) who presented neurologic manifestations of chikungunya such as encephalitis (n = 12), febrile seizures (n = 10), meningeal syndrome (n = 4), and acute encephalopathy (n = 4). Cerebrospinal fluid biological and cytological analyses (n = 23) were unremarkable except for 1 case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. The presence of viral genome in cerebrospinal fluid was inconstantly positive. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans (n = 14) were abnormal in 5 cases. Electroencephalography was nonspecific. Two patients died. At discharge and 6 months later, 5 children had neurologic sequelae. Patients with initial severe neurologic presentation and having pathological brain MRI had more sequelae or fatal disease. PMID:18287573

Robin, Stéphanie; Ramful, Duksha; Le Seach', Florence; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine; Rigou, Gérald; Alessandri, Jean-Luc

2008-09-01

242

21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES...light source used to view the inside of the ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

2011-04-01

243

21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES...light source used to view the inside of the ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

2013-04-01

244

21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES...light source used to view the inside of the ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

2012-04-01

245

21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES...light source used to view the inside of the ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

2010-04-01

246

21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES...light source used to view the inside of the ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

2014-04-01

247

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke  

MedlinePLUS

... or Condition of Interest ADHD AIDS - Neurological Complications Absence of the Septum Pellucidum Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia Acute ... Shy-Drager Syndrome Sjogren's Syndrome Sleep Apnea Sleeping Sickness Soto's Syndrome Spasticity Spina Bifida Spinal Cord Infarction ...

248

Hepatitis E virus and neurologic disorders.  

PubMed

Information about the spectrum of disease caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 is emerging. During 2004-2009, at 2 hospitals in the United Kingdom and France, among 126 patients with locally acquired acute and chronic HEV genotype 3 infection, neurologic complications developed in 7 (5.5%): inflammatory polyradiculopathy (n = 3), Guillain-Barre syndrome (n = 1), bilateral brachial neuritis (n = 1), encephalitis (n = 1), and ataxia/proximal myopathy (n = 1). Three cases occurred in nonimmunocompromised patients with acute HEV infection, and 4 were in immunocompromised patients with chronic HEV infection. HEV RNA was detected in cerebrospinal fluid of all 4 patients with chronic HEV infection but not in that of 2 patients with acute HEV infection. Neurologic outcomes were complete resolution (n = 3), improvement with residual neurologic deficit (n = 3), and no improvement (n = 1). Neurologic disorders are an emerging extrahepatic manifestation of HEV infection. PMID:21291585

Kamar, Nassim; Bendall, Richard P; Peron, Jean Marie; Cintas, Pascal; Prudhomme, Laurent; Mansuy, Jean Michel; Rostaing, Lionel; Keane, Frances; Ijaz, Samreen; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R

2011-02-01

249

Neurological status predicts response to alpha-blockers in men with voiding dysfunction and Parkinson's disease  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate predictors of the response to doxazosin, a selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist, when used for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms in men with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: In a prospective study, 33 consecutive men (mean age 59.2±7.0 years) with Parkinson's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms were evaluated. Neurological dysfunction was assessed with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Urological assessment was performed at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment with 4 mg/day of extended-release doxazosin, including symptom evaluation with the International Continence Society male short-form questionnaire, an assessment of the impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on quality of life and urodynamics. Clinical and urodynamic predictors of response were specifically evaluated. RESULTS: Compared with the score at baseline, the total International Continence Society male short-form score was reduced after doxazosin administration, from 17.4±7.5 to 11.1±6.9 (p<0.001). The impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on quality of life was also significantly reduced, from 1.8±1.1 to 1.0±1.0 (p<0.001) and the maximum urinary flow varied from 9.3±4.4 to 11.2±4.6 ml/s (p?=?0.025). The severity of neurological impairment was the only predictor of the clinical response. Additionally, patients with a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score lower than 70 had a significantly higher chance of clinical improvement with doxazosin treatment than those with higher Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores did (RR?=?3.10, 95% CI?=?[1.15 to 5.37], p?=?0.011). CONCLUSIONS: Doxazosin resulted in the improvement of lower urinary tract symptoms and the maximum flow rate and was well tolerated in men with Parkinson's disease. The response to treatment is dependent on the severity of neurological disability. PMID:25627993

Gomes, Cristiano M; Sammour, Zein M; de Bessa Junior, Jose; Barbosa, Egberto R; Lopes, Roberto I; Sallem, Flávio S; Trigo-Rocha, Flavio E; Bruschini, Homero; Nitti, Victor W; Srougi, Miguel

2014-01-01

250

Newer insights to the neurological diseases among biblical characters of old testament  

PubMed Central

Many people over the years have studied the Bible from a medical point of view offering diagnoses for the symptoms and signs that appear to have afflicted numerous individuals in the Bible. We review the biblical characters in the Old Testament and offer newer insights to their neurological diseases. We first look at the battle between Goliath and David. Interestingly, Goliath probably suffered from acromegaly. We propose autism as a diagnosis for Samson which would precede the first known case of autism by centuries. Isaac was a diabetic, and he probably had autonomic neuropathy. Few verses from the books of I Samuel, Psalms, and Ezekiel reveal symptoms suggestive of stroke. Jacob suffered from sciatica, and the child of the Shunnamite woman in II Kings had a subarachnoid hemorrhage. These instances among others found in the Old Testament of the Bible offer newer insights on the history of current neurological diseases. PMID:21085524

Mathew, Stephen K.; Pandian, Jeyaraj D.

2010-01-01

251

Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome as initial presentation of pulmonary adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are defined as remote effects of cancer that are not caused by the tumour and its metastasis, or by infection, ischaemia or metabolic disruptions. The author reports a 63-year-old Caucasian woman presenting with slowly progressing cognitive deficits. Initial workup failed to reveal any obvious cause of her cognitive deficits. Retrospective medical data review revealed a pulmonary nodule, which on further evaluation revealed pulmonary adenocarcinoma with metastatic spread to liver and spine. MRI of the brain did not reveal any metastatic lesion. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed the presence of anti-Hu antibody and a diagnosis of limbic encephalitis was made. Limbic encephalitis is an inflammatory process localised to structures of the limbic system that produces cognitive impairment along with other neuropsychiatric symptoms. This case highlights the importance of considering paraneoplastic syndromes in patients presenting with cognitive deficits. PMID:22761221

Shahani, Lokesh

2012-01-01

252

Neurologic complications of disorders of the adrenal glands.  

PubMed

Disorders of the adrenal glands frequently have secondary neurological manifestations, while some diseases that involve the central nervous system are accompanied by adrenal gland dysfunction. Excessive corticosteroid secretions in primary or secondary Cushing's syndrome causes muscle weakness and behavioral disturbances, such as emotional lability and sometimes depression, while adrenal insufficiency may cause fatigue, weakness, and depression. Adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenoneuromyelopathy are X-linked recessive disorders of the metabolism of very long chain fatty acids that manifest with white matter abnormalities of the brain, myelopathy and/or neuropathy, as well as adrenal insufficiency. Other disorders of the adrenal glands include hyperaldosteroidism, which may cause weakness from hypokalemia. Dysfunction of the adrenal medulla causes excessive or deficient secretion of catecholamines, primarily causing cardiovascular symptoms. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations and diagnostic aspects and treatment of the various disorders of the adrenal glands. Some of the congenital adrenal diseases are also discussed. PMID:24365350

Bertorini, Tulio E; Perez, Angel

2014-01-01

253

Time Course of Sleep-relatedBreathing Disorders in First-Ever Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate the prevalence and behavior of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) associated with a first-ever stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), we prospectively studied 161 consecutive patients admitted to our stroke unit. Complete neurological assessment was performed to determine parenchymatous and vascular localization of the neurological lesion. Stroke subtype was categorized as TIA, ischemic (IS), or hemorrhagic (HS). A portable

Olga Parra; Adriá Arboix; Siraj Bechich; Luis García-eroles; Josep M. Montserrat; Josep Antoni López; Eugeni Ballester; Josep M. Guerra; Juan José Sopeña

254

[Management of a symptomatic acute severe hyponatremia recovered by its neurological sequelae. A case report].  

PubMed

Hyponatremia is a common condition in hospitalized patients, with an incidence rate of about 30%. Acute severe hyponatremia is frequently acquired in hospital, due to surgery or an injudicious use of fluid infusions, or the use of nephrotoxic drugs or those stimulating excessive natruresis. A 59 year old male was hospitalized under emergency conditions in General Surgery for abdominal pain. The patient's anamnesis included: hypertension, diabetes, suspected Crohn's disease all in pharmacological treatment. During the recovery rehydration and antibiotic therapy (imipenem+cilastatin and metronidazole) was made and beclomethasone was suspended. On the seventh day from the recovery, the patient had a symptomatic acute severe hyponatremia with neurological severe symptoms (loss of consciousness, seizures). After the immediate diagnosis of the severe sodium loss, the patient underwent to an aggressive intravenous therapy for the electrolytic disorder during the first 24 hours, followed by a target-guided therapy until the level of serum sodium was in the normal values range. The patient, despite the neurological symptoms due to hyponatremia and the rapid and aggressive electrolytic therapy, had no neurological damage with a complete "restitutio ad integrum" of his neurological activity. PMID:24999577

Pezzolla, A; Lattarulo, S; Mancusi Materi, G; Labellarte, C; Madaro, A; Spinelli, S; Corciulo, R

2014-01-01

255

Immediate neurological recovery following perispinal etanercept years after brain injury.  

PubMed

Positron emission tomographic brain imaging and pathological examination have revealed that a chronic, intracerebral neuroinflammatory response lasting for years after a single brain injury may occur in humans. Evidence suggests the immune signaling molecule, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), is centrally involved in this pathology through its modulation of microglial activation, role in synaptic dysfunction, and induction of depressive symptoms and neuropathic pain. Etanercept is a recombinant TNF receptor fusion protein and potent TNF inhibitor that has been found to reduce microglial activation and neuropathic pain in multiple experimental models. We report that a single dose of perispinal etanercept produced an immediate, profound, and sustained improvement in expressive aphasia, speech apraxia, and left hemiparesis in a patient with chronic, intractable, debilitating neurological dysfunction present for more than 3 years after acute brain injury. These results indicate that acute brain injury-induced pathologic levels of TNF may provide a therapeutic target that can be addressed years after injury. Perispinal administration of etanercept is capable of producing immediate relief from brain injury-mediated neurological dysfunction. PMID:24647830

Tobinick, Edward; Rodriguez-Romanacce, Helen; Levine, Arthur; Ignatowski, Tracey A; Spengler, Robert N

2014-05-01

256

The clinical syndrome of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction.  

PubMed

Clinicians have hypothesized a spectrum of minor neurologic manifestations, consistent with neuroanatomical reports and collectively termed as a "syndrome of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND)," which can occur in the absence of classical kernicterus. The current review builds on these initial reports with a focus on clinical signs and symptoms that are assessed by standardized tools and manifest from neonatal age to childhood. These clinical manifestations are characterized by the following domains: (i) neuromotor signs; (ii) muscle tone abnormalities; (iii) hyperexcitable neonatal reflexes; (iv) variety of neurobehavior manifestations; (v) speech and language abnormalities; and (vi) evolving array of central processing abnormalities, such as sensorineural audiology and visuomotor dysfunctions. Concerns remain that the most vulnerable infants are likely to acquire BIND, either because their exposure to bilirubin is not identified as severe enough to need treatment or is prolonged but slightly below current threshold levels for intervention. Knowing that a total serum/plasma bilirubin (TB) level is not the most precise indicator of neurotoxicity, the role of expanded biomarkers or a "bilirubin panel" has yet to be validated in prospective studies. Future studies that correlate early "toxic" bilirubin exposure to long-term academic potential of children are needed to explore new insights into bilirubin's effect on the structural and functional maturation of an infant's neural network topology. PMID:25577653

Bhutani, Vinod K; Johnson-Hamerman, Lois

2015-02-01

257

Neurological features of epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, tubulopathy syndrome  

PubMed Central

AIM Recently, we reported a previously unrecognized symptom constellation comprising epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and tubulopathy (EAST syndrome) associated with recessive mutations in the KCNJ10 gene. Here, we provide a detailed characterization of the clinical features of the syndrome to aid patient management with respect to diagnosis, prognostic counselling, and identification of best treatment modalities. METHOD We conducted a retrospective review of the detailed neurological and neuroradiological features of nine children (four females, five males; age range at last examination 6–20y) with genetically proven EAST syndrome. RESULTS All children presented with tonic–clonic seizures in infancy. Later, non-progressive, cerebellar ataxia and hearing loss were noted. Whilst seizures mostly responded well to treatment, ataxia proved to be the most debilitating feature, with three patients non-ambulant. All available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed subtle symmetrical signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei. Moreover, four patients had a small corpus callosum and brainstem hypoplasia, and three had a small spinal cord. Regional quantitative volumetric analysis of the images confirmed the corpus callosum and brainstem hypoplasia and showed further patterns of variation from the norm. INTERPRETATION The neurological features of EAST syndrome appear to be non-progressive, which is important for prognostic counselling. The spectrum of EAST syndrome includes consistent abnormalities on brain MRI, which may aid diagnosis. Further longitudinal documentation is required to determine the true natural history of the disorder. PMID:23924083

Cross, J Helen; Arora, Ruchi; Heckemann, Rolf A; Gunny, Roxana; Chong, Kling; Carr, Lucinda; Baldeweg, Torsten; Differ, Ann-Marie; Lench, Nicholas; Varadkar, Sophie; Sirimanna, Tony; Wassmer, Evangeline; Hulton, Sally A; Ognjanovic, Milos; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Feather, Sally; Kleta, Robert; Hammers, Alexander; Bockenhauer, Detlef

2013-01-01

258

Transient Global Amnesia: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Transient global amnesia is a syndrome of temporary and reversible disruption of short-term memory accompanied by repetitive questioning. Although the etiology is unknown, the prognosis usually benign, and no particular treatment is required, it is important for all involved clinicians to recognize the diagnosis and possess knowledge about the evaluation of these affected patients. Case Presentation A middle-aged Caucasian woman presented for neurologic evaluation for acute forgetfulness. Neurologic examination disclosed repetitive questioning with preserved orientation and no focal motor, speech, sensory, coordination, or cranial nerve deficits. Neurologic investigations did not reveal any pathologic findings. Her memory improved and reverted to normal baseline over the course of a 24-hour hospital stay. Conclusion Transient global amnesia is an interesting syndrome of reversible anterograde amnesia associated with repetitive questioning that occurs with an unclear etiology in middle-aged and elderly individuals. Due clinical diligence is required in the investigation of these patients. Treatment is generally not required, and the condition usually does not recur. Clinicians, including neurologists, internists, family practice physicians, and psychiatrists, need awareness of this condition. PMID:22949910

Rison, Richard Alan; Rosenheck, Rachel Ellen

2012-01-01

259

Neurological damage in MSUD: the role of oxidative stress.  

PubMed

Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a metabolic disease caused by a deficiency in the branched-chain ?-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, leading to the accumulation of branched-chain keto acids and their corresponding branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in patients. Treatment involves protein-restricted diet and the supplementation with a specific formula containing essential amino acids (except BCAA) and micronutrients, in order to avoid the appearance of neurological symptoms. Although the accumulation of toxic metabolites is associated to appearance of symptoms, the mechanisms underlying the brain damage in MSUD remain unclear, and new evidence has emerged indicating that oxidative stress contributes to this damage. In this context, this review addresses some of the recent findings obtained from cells lines, animal studies, and from patients indicating that oxidative stress is an important determinant of the pathophysiology of MSUD. Recent works have shown that the metabolites accumulated in the disease induce morphological alterations in C6 glioma cells through nitrogen reactive species generation. In addition, several works demonstrated that the levels of important antioxidants decrease in animal models and also in MSUD patients (what have been attributed to protein-restricted diets). Also, markers of lipid, protein, and DNA oxidative damage have been reported in MSUD, probably secondary to the high production of free radicals. Considering these findings, it is well-established that oxidative stress contributes to brain damage in MSUD, and this review offers new perspectives for the prevention of the neurological damage in MSUD, which may include the use of appropriate antioxidants as a novel adjuvant therapy for patients. PMID:24220995

Sitta, Angela; Ribas, Graziela S; Mescka, Caroline P; Barschak, Alethéa G; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen R

2014-03-01

260

Persistence of neurological damage induced by dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case is reported of a 14 month old boy with severe dietary vitamin B-12 deficiency caused by his mother’s vegan diet. Cinical, electroencephalography (EEG), and haematological findings are described. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed severe frontal and frontoparietal cranial atrophy. Vitamin B-12 supplements led to a rapid improvement of haematological and neurological symptoms. Serum vitamin B-12 and urinary

Ursula von Schenck; Christine Bender-Götze; Berthold Koletzko

1997-01-01

261

Transient hyperammonemia in a neonate.  

PubMed

Neonatal hyperammonemia is a medical emergency requiring a multidisciplinary teamwork for early recognition and early treatment. The causes of neonatal hyperammonemia vary. The transient hyperammonemia of the neonate (THAN) occurs mostly in premature babies, and the prognosis is usually better than for urea cycle disorders. Here we present a near-term premature male infant with THAN. He exhibited the symptoms during the first 36 hours of life and survived after continuous arteriovenous hemodiafiltration (CAVHD). Nutritional support and sodium benzoate were also given. The diagnosis was based on laboratory tests. Long-term follow-up of neurodevelopment was suggested. PMID:16302587

Chung, Mei-Yung; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Li-Tung; Ko, Tan-Yung; Lin, Ying-Jui

2005-01-01

262

DOI: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000196643.35395.5f 2006;66;390-395Neurology  

E-print Network

. Apter and J. Attias neuroaudiologic abnormalities Hyperacusis in Williams syndrome: Characteristics.neurology.orgDownloaded from #12;Hyperacusis in Williams syndrome Characteristics and associated neuroaudiologic abnormalities--Background: Hyperacusis and phonophobia are common, debilitating symptoms in Williams syndrome (WS), yet little is known

263

Designing and implementing a longitudinal study of children with neurological, genetic or metabolic conditions: charting the territory  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Children with progressive metabolic, neurological, or chromosomal conditions and their families anticipate an unknown lifespan, endure unstable and often painful symptoms, and cope with erratic emotional and spiritual crises as the condition progresses along an uncertain trajectory towards death. Much is known about the genetics and pathophysiology of these diseases, but very little has been documented about the trajectory

Harold Siden; Rose Steele; Rollin Brant; Susan Cadell; Betty Davies; Lynn Straatman; Kimberley Widger; Gail S. Andrews

2010-01-01

264

NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS IN DEPRESSION  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Negative symptoms have been assessed in 34 cases of major depression (ROC) using the scale for assessment of negative symptoms. Negative symptoms were found to be quite frequently observed in these cases; common negative symptoms were inability to enjoy recreational interests and activities (76%), feelings of anhedonia (64.7%) and physical anergia (55.9%). Poverty of speech was found to be more in younger patients (P < .001). Avolition was seen more frequently in unmarried (P < .05) patients. No other signiticant correlation was noticed between demographic variables and negative symptoms. The implications of evaluating negative symptoms systematically in depressives are for future research especially for prognostication, treatment responses and classification of depression based on such symptoms. PMID:21927088

Chaturvedi, Santosh K.; Sarmukaddam, Sanjeev

1985-01-01

265

Traumatic retropharyngeal pseudomeningocele with atlanto-occipital dislocation in a neurologically intact patient.  

PubMed

Traumatic retropharyngeal pseudomeningoceles occur rarely, are associated with severe trauma, and have been reported in patients with significant neurologic deficits at presentation. We report the rare occurrence of a pseudomeningocele following a high-speed motor vehicle accident. Neurological examination showed the patient to be briskly following commands, with intact cranial nerve, motor, and sensory function. CT/MR imaging showed subarachnoid hemorrhage involving the interpeduncular cistern, a clivus fracture, a right occipital condyle fracture, an atlanto-occipital subluxation, aortic arch transection (stable and contained on CT angiogram), multiple rib fractures on the right side with associated pneumothorax, hemothorax and pulmonary contusions. His cervical spine was stabilized in a halo. He was subsequently managed in the intensive care unit and remained neurologically intact. A repeat MRI showed the interval development of a 2×1.5 cm pseudomeningocele at the craniocervical junction medial to the left occipital condyle communicating with the left anterolateral aspect of the spinal canal. Traumatic pseudomeningoceles are associated with large deceleration forces at the time of injury and are usually associated with significant neurologic deficits at presentation. However, they can arise and give rise to symptoms in a delayed fashion in trauma patients who are neurologically intact at initial presentation. PMID:24300004

Mathews, M S; Owen, C M; Hasso, A N; Binder, D K

2007-12-31

266

Psychiatric signs and symptoms in treatable inborn errors of metabolism.  

PubMed

Possible underlying organic causes of psychiatric symptoms can be overlooked in the clinical setting. It is important to increase awareness amongst psychiatric and neurological professionals with regard to certain inborn errors of metabolism as, in some cases, disease-specific therapies are available that can, for instance, treat underlying metabolic causes. The following article describes the basic pathophysiology, clinical and neurological features, and available diagnostic procedures of six treatable metabolic diseases that are associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms: Wilson's disease, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, porphyrias, homocysteinemia, urea cycle disorders, and Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C). NP-C is taken as a particularly relevant example because, while it is traditionally considered to be a condition that presents with severe neurological and systemic manifestations in children, an increasing number of patients are being detected who have the adolescent- or adult-onset form, which is frequently associated with neuropsychiatric signs. A notable proportion of adult-onset cases have been reported where NP-C has mistakenly been diagnosed and treated as a psychiatric condition, usually based on patients' initial presentation with psychotic or schizophrenia-like symptoms. Underlying organic causes of psychiatric disorders such as psychosis should be considered among patients with atypical symptoms and/or resistance to standard therapy. Alongside improved frameworks for additional multidisciplinary diagnostic work in patients with suspected organic disease, the development of convenient and affordable biochemical screening and/or diagnostic methods has enabled new ways to narrow down differential diagnoses. PMID:25145892

Nia, S

2014-09-01

267

Eleven years of experience with the neurologic complications in Korean patients with acute aortic dissection: a retrospective study  

PubMed Central

Background This study attempts to explore the clinical features, possible mechanisms and prognosis of the neurologic complications in patients with acute aortic dissection (AD). Methods Medical records of 278 consecutive patients with AD (165 with type A and 113 with type B dissection) over 11.5 years were retrospectively analyzed for clinical history, CT findings, neurologic complications and outcome. Neurologic complications were classified into early-onset or delayed-onset complications. Independent t-test or Chi-square test (or Fisher exact test) was used for comparing the different groups. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the independent association between variables. Results The mean age of the included patients (145 male and 133 female) was 59.4 years (range 19–91 years). 41 patients (14.7%) had a neurologic complication, which included 21 with early-onset complication and 23 with delayed-onset complication, including 3 with both. Advanced age and classic type of dissection were independently associated with the neurologic complication in patients with type A dissection. The most frequent manifestation was ischemic stroke (26 patients, 9.4%), followed by hypoxic encephalopathy (9, 3.2%), ischemic neuropathy (5, 1.8%), spinal cord ischemia (5, 1.8%), seizure (2, 0.7%), hoarseness (1, 0.4%) and septic encephalopathy (1, 0.4%). Overall in-hospital mortality was 10.1%, whereas the complicated group had a mortality rate of 43.9%. Renal impairment, pulse deficit, neurologic complication and nonsurgical treatment were independent variables for determining in-hospital mortality in patients with type A dissection. Conclusions The dominance of neurologic symptom in the early stage of AD may make its early diagnosis difficult. Besides chest pain and widened mediastinum in chest x-ray, variable neurologic symptoms including left hemiparesis with asymmetric pulse and hypotension may suggest underlying AD. PMID:23692963

2013-01-01

268

Standards in neurological rehabilitation, June 1997.  

PubMed

The European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) Scientific Panel on Neurorehabilitation established a Task Force on standards in neurological rehabilitation in June 1996. The remit for the Task Force was to: (1) produce a report on the state of neurological rehabilitation across Europe; and (2) recommend standards for the provision of neurological services for disabled people. The main conclusions of the Task Force were as follows:(1) A questionnaire circulated to each European member country has indicated a significant lack of adequate neurological rehabilitation facilities across Europe. Very few countries have any established network of neurological rehabilitation centres. Few countries have adequately trained neurological rehabilitation physicians, therapists or nurses. Such poor facilities should be seen in the context of the large numbers and increasing prevalence of people with neurological disabilities.(2) The Task Force has summarized the significant benefits that can follow from the establishment of a dedicated and cost effective neurological rehabilitation service including functional improvement, reduction of unnecessary complications, better coordination and use of limited resources, improved opportunities for education, training and research and a clear point of contact for the disabled person.(3) The Task Force recommends minimum standards for the prevention of neurological disability including access to health education, genetic counselling and emergency resources. The Task Force also encourages governments to invest in improved legislation for accident prevention.(4) The Task Force has outlined some minimum standards for the staffing of a neurological rehabilitation service including improved training both for neurologists and rehabilitation physicians. Such training could include a cross-national training programme both for physicians and other health care staff.(5) The Task Force supports a two-tier system of neurological services. We believe that disabled individuals should have access to a regional specialist service as well as a local community service. The regional specialist service would cater for people with more complicated and severe disabilities, including spinal injury and severe brain injury. The regional centres would provide specialist expertise for wheelchairs and special seating, orthotics, continence and urological services, aids and equipment including communication aids and environmental controls, prosthetics and driving assessment. The Task Force additionally endorses the development of local and community based rehabilitation teams with clear links to the regional centre.(6) The Task Force recognizes the limited amount of rehabilitation research and encourages individuals, universities and governments to invest more in rehabilitation research. Such investment should produce benefits for disabled people and their carers and in the long term benefits for the national economy.(7) The Task Force realizes that neurological rehabilitation is poorly developed both in Europe and the world as a whole. We firmly endorse international co-operation in this field and are happy to co-operate with any international organization in order to develop such links for clinical, educational or research initiatives.(8) The Task Force encourages individual countries to produce a document summarizing their own situation with regard to these standards and to produce a timetable for action to improve their situation. The EFNS Task Force would be pleased to assist in the publication of such deliberations or to act as a focus for international education and research or for sharing of examples of good practice. PMID:24486743

European Federation Of Neurological Societies Task Force

1997-01-01

269

Neurology in the United Kingdom. I: Historical development.  

PubMed Central

International comparisons suggest that British neurological services are underdeveloped. Historical factors which have contributed to the current state of neurological services in the United Kingdom are described. Key issues include the dominance of London and the concept of specialised hospitals in the early history of neurology; the subsequent recognition of the needs of other parts of the United Kingdom, of district general hospitals, and of patients with chronic neurological disabilities not necessarily included within the traditional bounds of neurology; and the relationship between neurology and general medicine. The paper concludes with some suggestions as to how neurology services might develop in the future. PMID:1564501

Langton Hewer, R; Wood, V A

1992-01-01

270

Neurological adverse events in patients receiving anti-TNF therapy: a prospective imaging and electrophysiological study  

PubMed Central

Introduction The aim was to investigate the frequency of neurological adverse events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondylarthropathies (SpA) treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ? antagonists. Methods Seventy-seven patients eligible for anti-TNF? therapy were evaluated. There were 36 patients with RA, 41 with SpA [24 psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and 17 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS)]. All patients had a complete physical and neurological examination. Brain and cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurophysiological tests were performed in all patients before the initiation of anti-TNF? therapy and after a mean of 18 months or when clinical symptoms and signs indicated a neurological disease. Exclusion criteria included hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, heart arrhythmias, atherothrombotic events, vitamin B12 and iron deficiency, head and neck trauma and neurological surgeries. Results Two patients did not receive anti-TNF? therapy because brain MRIs at baseline revealed lesions compatible with demyelinating diseases. Thus, 75 patients received anti-TNF? (38 infliximab, 19 adalimumab and 18 etanercept). Three patients developed neurological adverse events. A 35-year-old man with PsA after 8 months of infliximab therapy presented with paresis of the left facial nerve and brain MRI showed demyelinating lesions. Infliximab was discontinued and he was treated with pulses of corticosteroids recovering completely after two months. The second patient was a 45-year-old woman with RA who after 6 months of adalimumab therapy presented with optic neuritis. The third patient was a 50-year-old woman with AS, whom after 25 months of infliximab therapy, presented with tingling and numbness of the lower extremities and neurophysiological tests revealed peripheral neuropathy. In both patients anti-TNF were discontinued and they improved without treatment after 2 months. The rest of our patients showed no symptoms and MRIs showed no abnormalities. The estimated rate of neurological adverse events in patients treated with anti-TNF therapy is 4% (3/75). Conclusions Neurological adverse events after anti-TNF? therapy were observed in our patient. Brain MRI and neurophysiological tests are essential tools to discriminate neurological diseases. PMID:24938855

2014-01-01

271

Neurological Soft Signs in Schizophrenia: A Meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background: Neurological soft signs (NSS) are hypothesized as candidate endophenotypes for schizophrenia, but their prevalence and relations with clinical and demographic data are unknown. The authors undertook a quantification (meta-analysis) of the published literature on NSS in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. A systematic search was conducted for published articles reporting NSS and related data using standard measures in schizophrenia and healthy comparison groups. Method: A systematic search was conducted for published articles reporting data on the prevalence of NSS in schizophrenia using standard clinical rating scales and healthy comparison groups. Meta-analyses were performed using the Comprehensive Meta-analysis software package. Effect sizes (Cohen d) indexing the difference between schizophrenic patients and the healthy controls were calculated on the basis of reported statistics. Potential moderator variables evaluated included age of patient samples, level of education, sample sex proportions, medication doses, and negative and positive symptoms. Results: A total of 33 articles met inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. A large and reliable group difference (Cohen d) indicated that, on average, a majority of patients (73%) perform outside the range of healthy subjects on aggregate NSS measures. Cognitive performance and positive and negative symptoms share 2%–10% of their variance with NSS. Conclusions: NSS occur in a majority of the schizophrenia patient population and are largely distinct from symptomatic and cognitive features of the illness. PMID:19377058

Chan, Raymond C. K.; Xu, Ting; Heinrichs, R. Walter; Yu, Yue; Wang, Ya

2010-01-01

272

Neurological consequences of vitamin B12 deficiency and its treatment.  

PubMed

In developed countries, the vitamin B12 deficiency usually occurs in children exclusively breast-fed, whose mothers are vegetarians, causing low stores of vitamin B12. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency appear during the second trimester of life and include failure to thrive, lethargy, hypotonia, and arrest or regression of developmental skills. A megaloblastic anemia can be present. One half of the infants exhibit abnormal movements before the start of treatment with intramuscular cobalamin, which disappear 1 or 2 days after. More rarely, movement disorders appear a few days after treatment, whereas neurological symptoms are improving. These abnormal movements can last for 2 to 6 weeks. If not treated, vitamin B12 deficiency can cause lasting neurodisability. Therefore, efforts should be directed to preventing deficiency in pregnant and breast-feeding women on vegan diets and their infants by giving them vitamin B12 supplements. When preventive supplementation has failed, one should recognize and treat quickly an infant presenting with failure to thrive and delayed development. PMID:18708898

Chalouhi, Christel; Faesch, Sabine; Anthoine-Milhomme, Marie-Constance; Fulla, Yvonne; Dulac, Olivier; Chéron, Gérard

2008-08-01

273

Somatization or psychosomatic symptoms?  

PubMed

The author describes some problems emerging from the approach to and comprehension of somatization symptoms, discussing ambiguities regarding somatization seen in the current classification manuals (ICD-10 and DSM-IV). Then the author presents a case report of a man who presented with a bizarre symptom of feminization that was successfully treated with psychotherapy. The author ends with a discussion of the relationship between meaning and symptom. PMID:16508030

Avila, Lazslo Antonio

2006-01-01

274

Kwashiorkor symptoms (image)  

MedlinePLUS

... resulting from inadequate protein intake. Early symptoms include fatigue, irritability, and lethargy. As protein deprivation continues, one sees growth failure, loss of muscle mass, generalized swelling (edema), and ...

275

Neurological findings in early treated phenylketonuria.  

PubMed

Twenty early treated, normal intelligent patients (IQ: mean 101.4, SD 10.0; age: mean 10.11, SD 1.3 years) with classical phenylketonuria and 20 age-, sex- and IQ-matched healthy controls were investigated for neurological outcome, especially with regard to fine motor ability using the motor performance task ("Motorische Leistungsserie"). No pathological findings were seen on clinical neurological examination. The patient group had significantly poorer results in a concentration task (Test-d-2) as well as in some subtests of the motor performance task. Patients had difficulties in tasks which needed speed and precision of arm-hand-finger movements. High serum phenylalanine concentrations were significantly correlated with these deficiencies in fine motor ability. Our data demonstrated mild neurological impairment even in early and relatively strictly treated patients with phenylketonuria. PMID:7795351

Weglage, J; Pietsch, M; Fünders, B; Koch, H G; Ullrich, K

1995-04-01

276

[Advance of genetics and genomics in neurology].  

PubMed

Studies of genomic background of neurological disorders are very actual in view of their high population prevalence, severe course, serious impact on patients' disability and progressive mental and physical de-adaptation. In the paper, problems of genetic heterogeneity of hereditary neurological disorders and character of the respective genetic burden in the regions of Russian Federation are discussed in detail, a 'dynamic' type of mutations (increase in number of microsatellite repeats copies) attributable to many neurodegenerative diseases is analyzed, and achievements of Russian researchers in the identification of genes for hereditary neurological disorders and in the realization of pilot protocols of gene therapy are presented. Problems related to studies of genetic predisposition to common multifactorial diseases of the nervous system are discussed. PMID:23166984

Ginter, E K; Illarioshkin, S N

2012-01-01

277

Cotard syndrome in neurological and psychiatric patients.  

PubMed

The authors describe the frequency and characteristics of Cotard syndrome among neurological and psychiatric inpatients at a tertiary referral center. All inpatients from the National Institute of Neurology of Mexico (March 2007-May 2009) requiring neuropsychiatric consultation were reviewed. Among 1,321 inpatient consultations, 63.7% had neurological disease and one (0.11%) had viral encephalitis and Cotard syndrome. Of inpatients, 36.2% had pure psychiatric disorders and three (0.62%) had Cotard syndrome, associated with psychotic depression, depersonalization, and penile retraction (koro syndrome). This review discusses potential mechanisms for Cotard syndrome, including the role of a perceptual-emotional dissociation in self-misattribution in the deliré des negations. PMID:21037126

Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Aguilar-Venegas, Luis C; Crail-Melendez, Daniel; Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Nente, Francisco; Mendez, Mario F

2010-01-01

278

Mitochondria in Neuroplasticity and Neurological Disorders  

PubMed Central

Mitochondrial electron transport generates the ATP that is essential for the excitability and survival of neurons, and the protein phosphorylation reactions that mediate synaptic signaling and related long-term changes in neuronal structure and function. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that divide, fuse and move purposefully within axons and dendrites. An Major functions of mitochondria in neurons include the regulation of Ca2+ and redox signaling, developmental and synaptic plasticity, and the arbitration of cell survival and death. The importance of mitochondria in neurons is evident in the neurological phenotypes in rare diseases caused by mutations in mitochondrial genes. Mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, perturbed Ca2+ homeostasis and apoptosis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of prominent neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, stroke, ALS and psychiatric disorders. Advances in understanding the molecular and cell biology of mitochondria are leading to novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:19081372

Mattson, Mark P.; Gleichmann, Marc; Cheng, Aiwu

2009-01-01

279

The History of Reimbursements in Neurology  

PubMed Central

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) addresses consumer protection, employer-provided insurance coverage, as well as the government’s role in providing health care access to the most vulnerable populations. Within the practice of neurology, the PPACA has the challenging goal of reconciling the needs of the growing elderly population with the financial barriers to costly yet available health care services. To bridge that gap, all health care professionals working in the field of neurology must reflect on the effect previous Medicare reimbursement policies have had on the current practice of neurology, and utilize lessons learned in recent years. The test of time will tell whether the PPACA will achieve the goal of decreasing in health care spending while ensuring quality universal healthcare services. PMID:24223566

Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Ebied, Amr M.; Tepper, Deborah; Nguyen, Truc

2013-01-01

280

DNA Repair Deficiency and Neurological Disease  

PubMed Central

Preface Responding to genotoxic stress is a prerequisite for development of the nervous system. Mutations in a variety of DNA repair factors can lead to human diseases that are characterized by pronounced neuropathology. In many of these syndromes the neurological component is amongst the most deleterious aspects of the disease. The nervous system poses a particular challenge in terms of clinical intervention, as the neuropathology often arises during nervous system development, and can be fully penetrant by childhood. Understanding how DNA repair deficiency impacts the nervous system will provide a rationale basis for therapies targeted at ameliorating the neurological problems in these syndromes. PMID:19145234

McKinnon, Peter J.

2011-01-01

281

Neurologic aspects of cobalamin (B12) deficiency.  

PubMed

Optimal functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system is dependent on a constant supply of appropriate nutrients. Particularly important for optimal functioning of the nervous system is cobalamin (vitamin B12). Cobalamin deficiency is particularly common in the elderly and after gastric surgery. Many patients with clinically expressed cobalamin deficiency have intrinsic factor-related malabsorption such as that seen in pernicious anemia. The commonly recognized neurological manifestations of cobalamin deficiency include a myelopathy with or without an associated neuropathy. This review deals with neurological aspects of vitamin B12 deficiency and attempts to highlight recent developments. PMID:24365360

Kumar, Neeraj

2014-01-01

282

TRPC Channels and their Implications for Neurological Diseases  

PubMed Central

Calcium is an essential intracellular messenger and serves critical cellular functions in both excitable and non-excitable cells. Most of the physiological functions in these cells are uniquely regulated by changes in cytosolic Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i), which are achieved via various mechanisms. One of these mechanism(s) is activated by the release of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), followed by Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane (PM). Activation of PM Ca2+ channels is essential for not only refilling of the ER Ca2+ stores, but is also critical for maintaining [Ca2+]i that regulates biological functions, such as neurosecretion, sensation, long term potentiation, synaptic plasticity, gene regulation, as well as cellular growth and differentiation. Alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis have been suggested in the onset/progression of neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, bipolar disorder, and Huntington's diseases. Available data on transient receptor potential conical (TRPC) protein indicate that these proteins initiate Ca2+ entry pathways and are essential in maintaining cytosolic, ER, and mitochondrial Ca2+ levels. A number of biological functions have been assigned to these TRPC proteins. Silencing of TRPC1 and TRPC3 has been shown to inhibit neuronal proliferation and loss of TRPC1 is implicated in neurodegeneration. Thus, TRPC channels not only contribute towards normal physiological processes, but are also implicated in several human pathological conditions. Overall, it is suggested that these channels could be used as potential therapeutic targets for many of these neurological diseases. Thus, in this review we have focused on the functional implication of TRPC channels in neuronal cells along with the elucidation of their role in neurodegeneration. PMID:20201820

Selvaraj, Senthil; Sun, Yuyang; Singh, Brij B.

2010-01-01

283

Intraspinal neuroblastoma: Treatment options and neurological outcome of spinal cord compression  

PubMed Central

Malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) is a common complication of cancer. Paraspinal neuroblastoma (NB) in the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions may extend into the neural foramina causing compression of nerve roots and even the spinal cord. The prompt initiation of specific treatment can improve the neurological outcome. The aim of the present study was to review the clinical features, the management received and the factors that may affect the outcome of patients with MSCC caused by paraspinal NB. During a period between July 2007 and December 2012, a total of 576 NB patients were treated at the Children’s Cancer Hospital (Cairo, Egypt). Intraspinal disease extension was present in 51 patients (9%). The children with intraspinal disease extension were reviewed for disease pattern, neurological manifestations and treatment outcome. Children with intraspinal disease extension had an equal male to female ratio (1:1), and approximately two-thirds of patients (34/51) had a clinically manifested cord compression. The duration of neurological manifestations was >4 weeks in 58.8% (20/34) of symptomatic patients and ?4 weeks in 41.2% (14/34). Subsequent to starting treatment, neurological manifestations showed a complete recovery in 16 patients (47.1%), partial in 11 (32.4%), and stationary course was found in 7 (20.6%). Manifestations of ?4 weeks in duration carried an improved outcome compared with longer time compression, with a complete recovery in 78.6%, versus 25% for patients with a longer symptom duration (P=0.008). The upfront treatment, patient age and site of the primary tumor did not significantly affect the neurological outcome. Spinal cord compression in NB can be effectively managed with upfront chemotherapy. Initial surgical decompression should be reserved for benign variants only, including ganglioneuroma. Neurological manifestations of <4 weeks duration upon presentation are usually reversible. PMID:25624912

FAWZY, MOHAMED; EL-BELTAGY, MOHAMED; SHAFEI, MAGED EL; ZAGHLOUL, MOHAMED SAAD; KINAAI, NAGLAA AL; REFAAT, AMAL; AZMY, SARAH

2015-01-01

284

The Neurology Quality of Life Measurement Initiative  

PubMed Central

Objective The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) commissioned the Neurology Quality of Life (Neuro-QOL) project to develop a bilingual (English/Spanish), clinically relevant and psychometrically robust HRQL assessment tool. This paper describes the development and calibration of these banks and scales. Design Classical and modern test construction methodologies were used, including input from essential stakeholder groups. Setting An online patient panel testing service and eleven academic medical centers and clinics from across the United States and Puerto Rico that treat major neurological disorders. Participants Adult and pediatric patients representing different neurological disorders specified in this study, proxy respondents for select conditions (stroke and pediatric conditions), and English and Spanish speaking participants from the general population. Main Outcome Measures Multiple generic and condition specific measures used to provide construct validity evidence to new Neuro-QOL tool. Results Neuro-QOL has developed 14 generic item banks and 8 targeted scales to assess HRQL in five adult (stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and two pediatric conditions (epilepsy and muscular dystrophies). Conclusions The Neuro-QOL system will continue to evolve, with validation efforts in clinical populations, and new bank development in health domains not currently included. The potential for Neuro-QOL measures in rehabilitation research and clinical settings is discussed. PMID:21958920

Cella, David; Nowinski, Cindy; Peterman, Amy; Victorson, David; Miller, Deborah; Lai, Jin-Shei; Moy, Claudia

2011-01-01

285

Capnography in patients with severe neurological impairment.  

PubMed

Respiratory disease is a common reason for hospitalization and mortality in persons with severe intellectual and developmental disability. Capnography is the measurement and numerical display of end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2). This was a prospective, case controlled, cross sectional study to assess differences of baseline EtCO2 values between neurologically impaired patients and healthy individuals. 86 neurologically impaired patients were evaluated in the study group. Their mean age ± SD was 25.65 ± 10.48 years with 41% males. 53 healthy children and young adults were evaluated in the control group. Their mean age ± SD was 21.95 ± 10.38 years with 54.7% males. Patients with severe neurological impairment had higher baseline EtCO2 values than healthy individuals. Kyphoscoliosis and the use of antipsychotic drugs were the major factors to increase EtCO2 levels. Knowing the patient's baseline EtCO2 value, as well as baseline oximetry, could guide treatment decisions, when assessing the patient's oxygenation and ventilation during acute respiratory illness, and can potentially prevent unnecessary laboratory and imaging investigations as well as over treatment. Future research can shed light on the utility of capnometry and clinical implications of higher baseline EtCO2 values among neurologically impaired patients. PMID:24685942

Jacob, Ron; Nelkenbaum, Annette; Merrick, Joav; Brik, Riva

2014-06-01

286

The changing face of neurological rehabilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Neurological rehabilitation and the contribution of physical therapy have changed considerably over the past decades as scientific and technological developments have enabled greater understanding of brain reorganization and the mechanisms of motor control, motor performance, impairments and adaptations. Objective: This paper presents a historical perspective covering the last half-century. Discussion: Current scientific research, and the subsequent reevaluation of the

JH Carr; RB Shepherd

2006-01-01

287

Prenatal Antecedents of Newborn Neurological Maturation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fetal neurobehavioral development was modeled longitudinally using data collected at weekly intervals from 24 to 38 weeks gestation in a sample of 112 healthy pregnancies. Predictive associations between 3 measures of fetal neurobehavioral functioning and their developmental trajectories to neurological maturation in the first weeks after birth…

DiPietro, Janet A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Rubin, Suzanne E.; Shiffler, Dorothy E.; Henderson, Janice L.; Pillion, Joseph P.

2010-01-01

288

Permanent neurological sequelae following accidental podophyllin ingestion.  

PubMed

Accidental podophyllin poisoning is rare, but it can be associated with high morbidity and mortality. The authors describe severe encephalopathy and cerebral atrophy caused by accidental podophyllin ingestion in a 3-year-old boy. This case illustrates the permanent neurological damage in a developmentally normal child from a preventable cause. PMID:21911415

Kumar, Manish; Shanmugham, Arumugasamy; Prabha, Sivaprakasam; Adhisivam, Bethou; Narayanan, Parameswaran; Biswal, Niranjan

2012-02-01

289

BRAINA JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY BOOK REVIEW  

E-print Network

BRAINA JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY BOOK REVIEW Ingredients for a brain In thinking about components of the brain that are important for mental function, there are several obvious things to consider. The brain.g. lattice). Studies of the brain's wiring diagram also suggest the presence of regions that act as hubs

Rolls, Edmund T.

290

Classroom Correlates of Neurological "Soft Signs".  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relationships between 19 neurological abnormalities in school children and measures of school performance in reading, math, and nonacademic classroom behaviors. The sample of 45 children was given a standardized achievement test and the Draw-a-Person instrument to obtain academic variables. Nonacademic behaviors…

Hartlage, Patricia L.; Hartlage, Lawrence C.

291

Faculty Position, Neurology Department of Clinical Sciences  

E-print Network

with state-of-the-art facilities to support neurology and neurosurgery including digital radiology, MRI and PET-CT imaging, stereotactic radiation therapy, and large operating room with neuronavigation and C, Ophthalmology, Radiology, Radiation Therapy, Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, and Sports Medicine

292

Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

Brook, Itzhak

1995-01-01

293

The Transformation: Monarch Institute for Neurological Differences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Those utilizing the Monarch Institute and its powerful website include educational and mental health professionals looking for training, or employers seeking qualified workers who happen to have neurological differences. Most are students and their parents who are worried and in pain because they have a problem. The young person is not progressing…

Reclaiming Children and Youth, 2013

2013-01-01

294

Neurological Vision Rehabilitation: Description and Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have been notable for the high rates of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that have been incurred by the troops. Visual impairments often occur following TBI and present new challenges for rehabilitation. We describe a neurological vision rehabilitation therapy that addresses the unique needs of patients with vision…

Kingston, John; Katsaros, Jennifer; Vu, Yurika; Goodrich, Gregory L.

2010-01-01

295

[Cinema and neurology: early educational applications].  

PubMed

INTRODUCTION. Since its earliest days, cinema has been used in the teaching of neurology both to illustrate the professor's explanations and to make learning easier for students. AIM. To analyse some of the first applications of cinema to the teaching and learning of neurology. DEVELOPMENT. Shortly after the birth of the film projector it became apparent that it could be a valuable aid in teaching medicine, and especially neurology. Initially, actual recordings made by doctors themselves were used, and later documentaries, short films and feature films were employed as means of showing diagnostic and therapeutic methods, as well as different pathological signs, such as movement disorders. The intention was not to replace other methodologies but instead to complement them and to make the process of acquiring knowledge easier. CONCLUSIONS. Applying cinema in teaching is a useful way to portray the contents of different subjects, especially in the field of neurology, and to favour the acquisition of both specific and cross-disciplinary competences, with very positive results being obtained among students. PMID:25710693

Collado-Vazquez, S; Carrillo, J M

2015-03-01

296

Neurological manifestations of organophosphorous insecticide poisoning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neurological findings are described in 200 consecutive cases of suicidal ingestion of organophosphorous insecticides. Miosis is almost universal. We found impairment of consciousness in 10%, fasciculations in 27%, convulsions in 1%, toxic delirium in 50%, and paralysis in 26%. Toxic delirium was attributed to treatment with atropine. Paralytic signs were divided into type 1 signs (present on admission) and type

R. S. Wadia; C. Sadagopan; R. B. Amin; H. V. Sardesai

1974-01-01

297

International Scholarly Research Network ISRN Neurology  

E-print Network

International Scholarly Research Network ISRN Neurology Volume 2012, Article ID 702986, 9 pages doi. Simos Copyright © 2012 Maritza Rivera-Gaxiola et al. This is an open access article distributed under sounds as well as the acoustically salient (aspiration) foreign contrast. The study showed

298

A critical review of computational neurological models  

E-print Network

A critical review of computational neurological models Samantha Zarate ­ slzarate of possiblities, especially with the influx of data biologists are currently ob- taining through improved experimental methods. The objective of this paper is to provide a critical review of computational models

Bejerano, Gill

299

Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases  

PubMed Central

The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS’s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. “Epigenetics”, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and beta hydroxybutyrate (?-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics and neurological disorders. PMID:25774124

Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

2015-01-01

300

Severe neurologic manifestations in acute intermittent porphyria developed after spine surgery under general anesthesia: a case report.  

PubMed

Porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders resulting from a specific enzyme defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias are induced by various precipitants. Clinical features include abdominal pain, neurologic manifestations, autonomic neuropathy, and mental disturbance. Diagnosis may be delayed because of variable symptoms that mimic other diseases and because of the rarity of of porphyrias. Although most patients with known porphyria can complete anesthesia and surgery safely, undiagnosed porphyric patients are in danger of porphyric crisis due to inadvertent exposure to precipitating drugs and environment. We report a case of a patient who experienced delayed emergence with neurological disturbance after general anesthesia, ultimately diagnosed as acute intermittent porphyria. PMID:25302100

Park, Eun Young; Kim, Yi Seul; Lim, Kyung-Jee; Lee, Hye Kyoung; Lee, Soo Kyung; Choi, Hyun; Kang, Mae-Hwa

2014-09-01

301

Severe neurologic manifestations in acute intermittent porphyria developed after spine surgery under general anesthesia: a case report  

PubMed Central

Porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders resulting from a specific enzyme defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias are induced by various precipitants. Clinical features include abdominal pain, neurologic manifestations, autonomic neuropathy, and mental disturbance. Diagnosis may be delayed because of variable symptoms that mimic other diseases and because of the rarity of of porphyrias. Although most patients with known porphyria can complete anesthesia and surgery safely, undiagnosed porphyric patients are in danger of porphyric crisis due to inadvertent exposure to precipitating drugs and environment. We report a case of a patient who experienced delayed emergence with neurological disturbance after general anesthesia, ultimately diagnosed as acute intermittent porphyria. PMID:25302100

Park, Eun Young; Kim, Yi Seul; Lim, Kyung-Jee; Lee, Hye Kyoung; Lee, Soo Kyung; Choi, Hyun

2014-01-01

302

Symptom clusters: the new frontier in symptom management research.  

PubMed

The majority of clinical studies on pain, fatigue, and depression associated with cancer are focused on one symptom. Although this approach has led to some advances in our understanding of a particular symptom, patients rarely present with a single symptom. Therefore, even though research focused on single symptoms needs to continue, it is imperative that symptom management research begins to focus on evaluating multiple symptoms, using cross-sectional and longitudinal study designs. In addition, research needs to focus on evaluating the relationships among multiple symptoms, specific interventions, and patient outcomes. One of the initial challenges in research regarding multiple symptoms is the terminology that should be used to describe the concept (e.g., symptom cluster, symptom constellation). Another significant area related to this aspect of symptom management research is determining the nature of clinically significant clusters of symptoms and their associated prevalence rates. Equally important is the need to determine what types of tools/instruments will provide the most valid and reliable data for the assessment of symptom clusters. Other areas that need to be considered as related to the assessment of symptom clusters include the establishment of cut points for symptom severity that would qualify a symptom for inclusion in a cluster; the focus of the assessment; and the choice of the outcome measures that will be used to judge the effect of a symptom cluster on the patient. In the area of intervention studies for symptom clusters, research will need to build on the limited number of clinical trials with single symptoms. Additional considerations related to research on symptom clusters include the determination of the mechanisms underlying the development of symptom clusters; the timing of the measurements for symptom clusters; and statistical challenges in the evaluation of symptom clusters. Research on symptom clusters in patients with cancer is cutting-edge science and a new frontier in symptom management research, and it needs to be done in tandem with research on single symptoms. PMID:15263036

Miaskowski, Christine; Dodd, Marylin; Lee, Kathryn

2004-01-01

303

[Neurological soft signs as a candidate for endophenotype of schizophrenia].  

PubMed

A concept of an endophenotype, also termed as an internal endophenotype, is used in genetic studies on psychiatric disorders. Neurological soft signs are also considered candidates for endophenotypes of schizophrenia. Neurological soft signs are, objectively measured, non-localizing abnormalities, not related to impairment of a specific brain region, reflecting improper cortical-subcorical and intercortical connections. This paper presents the main domains of NSS, methods of measurement of NSS, their neuroanatomical substrate, association of NSS with schizophrenia symptoms the and analysis of the literature in order to check whether NSS meet the criteria of the phenotype. A marker can be considered a phenotype if it meets the following criteria: 1) association with a disease in a population, 2) heritability, 3) state-independence, 4) familial association (the endophenotype is more prevalent in the affected individuals, their affected and non-affected family members in comparison to the normal population), 5) co-segregation (the endophenotype is more prevalent among ill family members of ill probands compared with healthy relatives). Currently, there is an ample evidence that the NSS, especially these representing impaired motor coordination, meet certain criteria of an endophenotype. However, there are still several unresolved questions concerning NSS: studies on relatives of schizophrenic patients included small groups of subjects, many of the studies included individuals with schizophrenia, as well as schizophrenia spectrum disorders, the available date-base of twins (schizophrenia-concordant and schizophrenia non -concordant) is not sufficiently large, there are too few studies evaluating the relationship of NSS and individual genes, there are no objective and quantitative methods of measurement of NSS. Therefore, NSS still represent only candidates for an endophenotype of schizophrenia. Finding correlations of selected NSS with other endophenotypes and their genetic correlates also needs further investigation and may provide a definitive answer to the question of the usefulness of NSS as the endophenotype of schizophrenia. PMID:24946431

Ka?uzy?ska, Olga; Rabe-Jab?o?ska, Jolanta

2014-01-01

304

Transient plasma ignition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents images of transient plasma applied in varied circumstances to fuel ignition and subsequent combustion. The transient plasma occurs during the formative phase of an arc discharge, and persists for ?50 ns. The results demonstrate that transient plasma ignition initiates combustion efficiently, produces excited species distinct from traditional spark ignition, and that for some applications, including reduced delays

Jianbang Liu; Fei Wang; Guoqiang Li; Andras Kuthi; Ephraim J. Gutmark; Paul D. Ronney; Martin A. Gundersen

2005-01-01

305

Transient protection devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid state components in control, communication and avionics equipment are highly susceptible to lightning surges or other forms of electromagnetic disturbances. To protect these components, transient protectors with low breakdown voltage and short response time are needed. This paper examines the operation and the characteristics of gas discharge transient protectors (glow lamps, and gas-filled spark gaps), semiconductor breakdown diode transient

C.-L. Chen

1975-01-01

306

Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder and Down Syndrome  

PubMed Central

An extremely premature male neonate presented with an unusual multisystem dysfunction within the first 24 to 48 hours of life. The unfolding of clinical events and investigations revealed a transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD). TMD was the main indication for karyotyping of this premature infant without clinical symptoms of Down syndrome. The awareness of TMD in a newborn warrants karyotype analysis to look for trisomy 21 and a close surveillance because of its potential progression to true leukaemia. PMID:23275848

Reyes, Zenaida S.; Bashir, Wafa; Pathare, Anil

2012-01-01

307

Commonalities and challenges in the development of clinical trial measures in neurology.  

PubMed

As neurologists and neuroscientists, we are trained to evaluate disorders of the nervous system by thinking systematically. Clinically, we think in terms of cognition, behavior, motor function, sensation, balance and co-ordination, and autonomic system function. But when we assess symptoms of neurological disorders for the purpose of drug development, we tend to create disease-specific outcome measures, often using a variety of methods to assess the same types of dysfunction in overlapping, related disorders. To begin to explore the potential to simplify and harmonize the assessment of dysfunction across neurological disorders, a symposium, entitled, "Commonalities in the Development of Outcome Measures in Neurology" was held at the 16th annual meeting of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics (ASENT), in February 2014. This paper summarizes the presentations at the symposium. The authors hope that readers will begin to view Clinical Outcome Assessment (COA) development in a new light. We hope that in presenting this material, we will stimulate discussions and collaborations across disease areas to develop common concepts of neurological COA development and construction. PMID:25384682

Cedarbaum, Jesse M; Stephenson, Diane; Rudick, Richard; Carrillo, Maria C; Stebbins, Glenn; Kerr, Douglas; Heemskerk, Jill; Galpern, Wendy R; Kaufmann, Petra; Cella, David; Isaac, Maria; Walton, Marc K

2015-01-01

308

Application of Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Pediatric Neurologic Diseases  

PubMed Central

Purpose Array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a technique used to analyze quantitative increase or decrease of chromosomes by competitive DNA hybridization of patients and controls. This study aimed to evaluate the benefits and yield of array-CGH in comparison with conventional karyotyping in pediatric neurology patients. Materials and Methods We included 87 patients from the pediatric neurology clinic with at least one of the following features: developmental delay, mental retardation, dysmorphic face, or epilepsy. DNA extracted from patients and controls was hybridized on the Roche NimbleGen 135K oligonucleotide array and compared with G-band karyotyping. The results were analyzed with findings reported in recent publications and internet databases. Results Chromosome imbalances, including 9 cases detected also by G-band karyotyping, were found in 28 patients (32.2%), and at least 19 of them seemed to be causally related to the abnormal phenotypes. Regarding each clinical symptom, 26.2% of 42 developmental delay patients, 44.4% of 18 mental retardation patients, 42.9% of 28 dysmorphic face patients, and 34.6% of 26 epilepsy patients showed abnormal array results. Conclusion Although there were relatively small number of tests in patients with pediatric neurologic disease, this study demonstrated that array-CGH is a very useful tool for clinical diagnosis of unknown genome abnormalities performed in pediatric neurology clinics. PMID:24339284

Byeon, Jung Hye; Shin, Eunsim; Kim, Gun-Ha; Lee, Kyungok; Hong, Young Sook; Lee, Joo Won

2014-01-01

309

The neurologic profile of children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease.  

PubMed

In recent years, there has been an increasing incidence of inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents. Neurologic involvement has been mainly reported in adults, and information in pediatrics is based primarily on individual case reports. In this study, we explored the prevalence and spectrum of neurologic manifestations of 50 children with inflammatory bowel disease in comparison to healthy controls. Based on clinical reports and neurologic evaluation, 34 patients (68%) exhibited neurologic manifestations compared with 10 children (23.8%) in the control group (P < .001). The main symptoms associated with inflammatory bowel disease in comparison to the control subjects were headache: 46% vs 3% (P < 0.001), dizziness: 26% vs none (P < .001), hypotonia: 10% vs none (P = .06), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): 28% vs 7.1% (P < .001), tics and sensory complaints: 16% vs 2.4% (P = .036). Seizures and neuropsychiatric disorders were less characteristic. A larger-scale prospective study is required to further clarify this association. PMID:24700662

Ben-Or, Orly; Zelnik, Nathanel; Shaoul, Ron; Pacht, Avi; Lerner, Aaron

2015-04-01

310

14 CFR 67.209 - Neurologic.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause; or (3) A transient...

2011-01-01

311

14 CFR 67.209 - Neurologic.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause; or (3) A transient...

2012-01-01

312

14 CFR 67.209 - Neurologic.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause; or (3) A transient...

2013-01-01

313

14 CFR 67.309 - Neurologic.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause; or (3) A transient...

2012-01-01

314

14 CFR 67.209 - Neurologic.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause; or (3) A transient loss of control of nervous system function(s) without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause; (b) No other seizure disorder,...

2010-01-01

315

14 CFR 67.109 - Neurologic.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause; or (3) A transient loss of control of nervous system function(s) without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause. (b) No other seizure disorder,...

2014-01-01

316

14 CFR 67.109 - Neurologic.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause; or (3) A transient loss of control of nervous system function(s) without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause. (b) No other seizure disorder,...

2010-01-01

317

Neurologic function among termiticide applicators exposed to chlorpyrifos.  

PubMed Central

Chlorpyrifos is a moderately toxic organophosphate pesticide. Houses and lawns in the United States receive a total of approximately 20 million annual chlorpyrifos treatments, and 82% of U.S. adults have detectable levels of a chlorpyrifos metabolite (3,5, 6-trichloro-2-pyridinol; TCP) in the urine. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that there are 5,000 yearly reported cases of accidental chlorpyrifos poisoning, and approximately one-fourth of these cases exhibit symptoms. Organophosphates affect the nervous system, but there are few epidemiologic data on chlorpyrifos neurotoxicity. We studied neurologic function in 191 current and former termiticide applicators who had an average of 2.4 years applying chlorpyrifos and 2.5 years applying other pesticides, and we compared them to 189 nonexposed controls. The average urinary TCP level for 65 recently exposed applicators was 629.5 microg/L, as compared to 4.5 microg/L for the general U.S. population. The exposed group did not differ significantly from the nonexposed group for any test in the clinical examination. Few significant differences were found in nerve conduction velocity, arm/hand tremor, vibrotactile sensitivity, vision, smell, visual/motor skills, or neurobehavioral skills. The exposed group did not perform as well as the nonexposed group in pegboard turning tests and some postural sway tests. The exposed subjects also reported significantly more symptoms, including memory problems, emotional states, fatigue, and loss of muscle strength; our more quantitative tests may not have been adequate to detect these symptoms. Eight men who reported past chlorpyrifos poisoning had a pattern of low performance on a number of tests, which is consistent with prior reports of chronic effects of organophosphate poisoning. Overall, the lack of exposure effects on the clinical examination was reassuring. The findings for self-reported symptoms raise some concern, as does the finding of low performance for those reporting prior poisoning. Although this was a relatively large study based on a well-defined target population, the workers we studied may not be representative of all exposed workers, and caution should be exercised in generalizing our results. PMID:10753086

Steenland, K; Dick, R B; Howell, R J; Chrislip, D W; Hines, C J; Reid, T M; Lehman, E; Laber, P; Krieg, E F; Knott, C

2000-01-01

318

Module 3 – Symptoms  

Cancer.gov

Module three of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version presents approaches to and management of commonly encountered symptoms and syndromes of cancer patients.

319

Frontotemporal Disorders: Common Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... business meeting or laugh at a funeral. Compulsive eating —Gorging on food, especially starchy foods like bread ... a call. Language Symptoms Aphasia —A language disorder in which the ability to use or understand words ...

320

Initial Symptoms of ALS  

MedlinePLUS

Home About ALS About Us Our Research In Your Community Advocate Help fight ALS Donate About ALS What is ALS? Facts You Should Know Who does ALS affect? Diagnosing ALS Symptoms Forms of ALS Genetic ...

321

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... biotherapy or immunotherapy. Watchful waiting is closely monitoring a patient's condition without giving any treatment until symptoms appear or change. Summer 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number 3 Page 11

322

Coping with Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

323

Mitochondrial Disease: Possible Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Disease Possible Symptoms Getting a Diagnosis Treatments & Therapies Replacement Therapy EPI-743 Other Diseases Linked to Mitochondrial Disease ... Coordinators Ambassador Program NAMDC RDCRN Medical/Scientific Meetings Replacement Therapy EPI-743 Research Grants Grand Rounds National Symposium ...

324

Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... syncope), irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias), or sudden cardiac death. Children with cardiomyopathies of a metabolic nature may have additional symptoms of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), excessive acidity in the blood (metabolic acidosis) ...

325

Transient familial hyperbilirubinemia  

MedlinePLUS

... Babies with this disorder are born with severe jaundice. ... The newborn may have: Yellow skin (jaundice) Yellow eyes (icterus) Lethargy If untreated, seizures and neurologic problems (kernicterus) may develop.

326

Postgraduate Fellowship-Vascular Neurology Nurse Practitioner Sample Program Sequence  

E-print Network

Postgraduate Fellowship- Vascular Neurology Nurse Practitioner Sample Program Sequence I. Clinical Vascular Neurology for 4 weeks II. Stroke Code Call Responsibilities Nurse Practitioner Fellows Months of the fellowship year. Call Responsibilities for This Time Period Will Be Approximately Every

327

Special Section: Neuroethics Cosmetic Neurology and Cosmetic Surgery  

E-print Network

Special Section: Neuroethics Cosmetic Neurology and Cosmetic Surgery: Parallels, Predictions, cosmetic surgery. Cos- metic surgery also enhances healthy people and, despite many critics? Will bioethicists influence the shape of cosmetic neurology? But first, how did cosmetic surgery become common

Chatterjee, Anjan

328

A mouse Mecp2-null mutation causes neurological symptoms that mimic Rett syndrome   

E-print Network

Rett syndrome (RTT) is an inherited neurodevelopmental disorder of females that occurs once in 10,000–15,000 births1,2. Affected females develop normally for 6–18 months, but then lose voluntary movements, including ...

Guy, Jacky; Hendrich, Brian; Holmes, Megan; Martin, Joanne E; Bird, Adrian P

329

[Neurological soft signs in schizophrenia: correlations with age, sex, educational status and psychopathology].  

PubMed

Though the pathobiology of schizophrenia can be examined in multiple levels, the organic notion of brain disease suggests that neurological features will be present. One straightforward, inexpensive method of investigating brain dysfunction in schizophrenia is thought the bedside assessment of neurological abnormalities with a standard neurological examination. Neurological abnormalities are traditionally classified as "hard signs" (impairments in basic motor, sensory, and reflex behaviors, which do not appear to be affected in schizophrenia) and "soft signs", which refer to more complex phenomena such as abnormalities in motor control, integrative sensory function, sensorimotor integration, and cerebral laterality. Additionally, neurological soft signs (NSS) are minor motor and sensory abnormalities that are considered to be normal in the course of early development but abnormal when elicited in later life or persist beyond childhood. Soft signs also, have no definitive localizing significance but are indicative of subtle brain dysfunction. Most authors believe that they are a reflection not only of deficient integration between the sensory and motor systems, but also of dysfunctional neuronal circuits linking subcortical brain structures such as the basal ganglia, the brain stem, and the limbic system. Throughout the last four decades, studies have consistently shown that NSS are more frequently present in patients with schizophrenia than in normal subjects and non-psychotic psychiatric patients. However, the functional relevance of NSS remains unclear and their specificity has often been challenged, even though there is indication for a relative specificity with regard to diagnosis, or symptomatology. Many studies have considered soft signs as categorical variables thus hampering the evaluation of fluctuation with symptomatology and/or treatment, whereas other studies included insufficient number of assessed signs, or lacked a comprehensive assessment of extrapyramidal symptomatology. Factors such as sex, age or family history of schizophrenia, are said to influence the performance of neurological examination, whereas relative few studies have provided longitudinal follow-up data on neurological soft signs in a sufficient number of patients, in order to address a possible deterioration of neurological functions. Finally, one additional difficulty when analyzing the NSS literature lies in the diversity of symptoms that are evaluated in the studies and/or non-standardized procedures or scoring. We will review some basic issues concerning recurrent difficulties in the measurement and definition of soft signs, as well as controversies on the significance of these signs with respect to clinical subtyping of schizophrenia, and social and demographic variables. PMID:24486976

Panagiotidis, P; Kaprinis, G; Iacovides, A; Fountoulakis, K

2013-01-01

330

Negative symptoms in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Clinical heterogeneity is a confound common to all of schizophrenia research. Deficit schizophrenia has been proposed as a homogeneous disease entity within the schizophrenia syndrome. Utilizing the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome (SDS) has allowed the definition of a subgroup dominated by persistent clusters of negative symptoms. While a number of studies have appeared over the years examining the electrophysiological correlates of the cluster of negative symptoms in schizophrenia, only a few studies have actually focused on the deficit syndrome (DS). PubMed as well as MEDLINE were searched for all reports indexed for "negative symptoms" or "deficit syndrome" and one of the following electrophysiology assessment tools: electroencephalography (EEG), evoked potentials (EPs), or polysomnography (PSG). While this line of research is evidently in its infancy, two significant trends emerge. First, spectral EEG studies link increased slow wave activity during wakefulness to the prevalence of negative symptoms. Secondly, sleep studies point to an association between decrease in slow wave sleep and prevalence of negative symptoms. Several studies also indicate a relationship of negative symptoms with reduced alpha activity. A host of other abnormalities--including sensory gating and P300 attenuation--are less consistently reported. Two studies specifically addressed electrophysiology of the DS. Both studies provided evidence suggesting that the DS may be a separate disease entity and not simply a severe form of schizophrenia. PMID:23428787

Boutros, Nash N; Mucci, Armida; Diwadkar, Vaibhav; Tandon, Rajiv

2014-04-01

331

Current perspectives on deep brain stimulation for severe neurological and psychiatric disorders  

PubMed Central

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a well-accepted therapy to treat movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Long-term follow-up studies have demonstrated sustained improvement in motor symptoms and quality of life. DBS offers the opportunity to selectively modulate the targeted brain regions and related networks. Moreover, stimulation can be adjusted according to individual patients’ demands, and stimulation is reversible. This has led to the introduction of DBS as a treatment for further neurological and psychiatric disorders and many clinical studies investigating the efficacy of stimulating various brain regions in order to alleviate severe neurological or psychiatric disorders including epilepsy, major depression, and obsessive–compulsive disorder. In this review, we provide an overview of accepted and experimental indications for DBS therapy and the corresponding anatomical targets.

Kocabicak, Ersoy; Temel, Yasin; Höllig, Anke; Falkenburger, Björn; Tan, Sonny KH

2015-01-01

332

Sensitivity and specificity of MMPI-2 neurologic correction factors: receiver operating characteristic analysis.  

PubMed

A number of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) items have been hypothesized to reflect neurologic symptomatology, rather than psychopathology, among closed-head-injury (CHI) patients. Some investigators have proposed a correction factor interpretive approach, which involves the deletion of such items from the MMPI-2 profile, as a method of reducing the probability of artificial clinical scale elevations due to the symptoms of CHI. The present study employed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of three correction factors. All three factors demonstrated strong sensitivity when discriminating CHI patients from normal individuals but demonstrated poor specificity when discriminating CHI patients from psychiatric patients. These findings suggest that caution should be applied in using MMPI-2 neurologic correction factors, particularly with patients who might have comorbid psychiatric conditions. PMID:14503653

Glassmire, David M; Kinney, Dominique I; Greene, Roger L; Stolberg, Ronald A; Berry, David T R; Cripe, Lloyd

2003-09-01

333

Emergency neurological care of strokes and bleeds  

PubMed Central

Ischemic stroke and brain hemorrhage are common and challenging problems faced by emergency physicians. In this article, important details in the diagnosis and clinical management of these neurological emergencies are presented with the following goals: 1) To provide a more comprehensive understanding of the approach to the identification and management of patients who have sustained ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes; 2) to explain the importance and application of commonly used national stroke scoring and outcome scales; 3) to improve the ability to recognize important aspects in the approach and comprehensive treatment of ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms; and 4) to demonstrate the difficulties in the neurological, neurosurgical, and endovascular treatment of these catastrophic diseases. PMID:20165722

Birenbaum, Dale

2010-01-01

334

Recognition and treatment of neurologic Wilson's disease.  

PubMed

As Wilson's disease is both preventable and treatable, the diagnosis must not be missed. Despite this, it is usually misdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis and delay in treatment are clinically relevant because if left untreated, Wilson's disease progresses to hepatic failure or severe neurologic disability, and death. Those adequately treated have a normal life span. Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene. Mutations in ATP7B result in abnormal copper metabolism and subsequent toxic accumulation of copper. The clinical manifestations of neurologic Wilson's disease include variable combinations of dysarthria, dystonia, tremor, parkinsonism, ataxia, and choreoathetosis. Once the possibility of Wilson's disease is considered, diagnosis is straight forward. Currently available treatments, including zinc acetate and trientine, are generally well tolerated and effective. PMID:23677665

Lorincz, Matthew T

2012-11-01

335

Visuocortical bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction.  

PubMed

This review addresses the question whether elevated levels of total serum/plasma bilirubin (TB) cause measurable neurological effects, specifically to visuocortical functioning. Past research in the area of vision and its relation to jaundice has taken advantage of flash visual-evoked potentials (VEPs). Using a steady state VEP, we developed preliminary data suggesting that children who had jaundice with TB levels between 10 and 25mg/dL, but who did not have kernicterus, have measurable changes in visual function, when compared to control infants who did not have jaundice. This non-invasive test offers information about vision thresholds, signal amplitudes, and suprathreshold changes after brain exposure to bilirubin. Here, we review this novel tool, the steady state VEP, and data suggesting that neurological changes occur in infants with moderately elevated TB levels. PMID:25577655

Good, William V; Hou, Chuan

2015-02-01

336

[Peripheral neurological changes in chronic Chagas' disease].  

PubMed

The authors review the literature about the cronic nervous form of Chagas' disease, directing their attention toward peripheral neurological aspects. Specifically, they analyse the results obtained from a "bind" research realized in a small community in the countryside of the state of Bahia, Brazil, where a high frequency of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi is reported. From 99 individuals examined, 50 showed a positive sorological test for Chagas' disease. The most frequent neurological findings in the total of 99 individuals were sensory loss and impairment of the deep reflexes. Among those with abolition of deep reflexes, there were 18 cases carrying a positive sorology for Chagas' disease, being that 15 from these 18 cases additionally presented a mild sensory deficit, characterizing a polyneuritic syndrome. In conclusion, they suggest that there is a neuritic form, as subdivision of a nervous form of Chagas' disease, particularly identified as a mixed polyneuritis. PMID:6773510

Fortes-Rêgo, J; Macedo, V O; Prata, A

1980-03-01

337

Catastrophic neurologic syndrome with dramatic ECG changes?  

PubMed Central

Cerebrogenic ECG abnormalities, especially prominent T wave inversions and prolongation of the QT(U) interval, are well-described. Brady- and tachyarrhythmias, including polymorphic VT, have been also described in the setting of neurologic injury. We report an unusual case of a 22-year-old man who presented with idiopathic acute encephalopathy. His hospital course was complicated by persistent fevers, along with refractory seizures treated with propofol. Serial ECG findings included marked ventricular repolarization prolongation with bursts of torsade de pointes, diffuse ST elevations simulating extensive myocardial ischemia or infarction, as well as a Brugada-like pattern. To our knowledge, this case is the first reported with the combination of such findings in a patient with a catastrophic neurologic syndrome. PMID:23973089

Goldberger, Zachary D.; Creutzfeldt, Claire J.; Goldberger, Ary L.

2014-01-01

338

Symptom Management Concept Design Webinar  

Cancer.gov

Objectives Describe the review process for a symptom management concept Identify the required elements included in a symptom management concept Identify key statistical considerations for a symptom management concept Describe issues to consider

339

Contact Dermatitis: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... treatments A - D Contact dermatitis Signs and symptoms Contact dermatitis: Signs and symptoms Allergic contact dermatitis : Testing ... these symptoms, you need immediate medical care. Allergic contact dermatitis This skin condition occurs when you have ...

340

Chapter 40: history of neurology in France.  

PubMed

The history of neurology in France is characterized by the very high degree of centralization in that country where "everything seems to happen in Paris," and yet the considerable degree of autonomous diversity in the evolution of some other medical schools such as Montpellier and Strasbourg. It could be argued that France saw the birth of clinical neurology as a separate discipline since Jean Martin Charcot at the Salpêtrière Hospital obtained a chair of diseases of the nervous system in 1892, a first in the history of the academic world. The chapter shows, however, that the work of Charcot was preceded by a long evolution in medical thinking, which culminated with the introduction of experimental medicine developed by Claude Bernard and François Magendie, and by the study of aphasia by Paul Broca and its localization of language in a specific area of the brain. Many of the great neurologists of France like Duchenne de Boulogne, Gilles de la Tourette, Joseph Babinski and Pierre Marie gravitated around Charcot while others like Charles-Edward Brown-Sequard and Jules Dejerine developed their talents independently. The history of Sainte-Anne Hospital further illustrates this independence. It also shows the relation between neurology and psychiatry with Henri Ey, Jean Delay and Pierre Deniker, who collaborated with Henri Laborit in the clinical development of chlorpromazine. Sainte Anne also saw the birth of modern neuropsychology with Henry Hécaen. Jean Talairach and his group developed human stereotaxic neurosurgery and a 3-dimensional brain atlas that is used around the world. The chapter also mentions institutions (the CNRS and INSERM) that have contributed to developments partially independently from medical schools. It concludes with a presentation of schools located outside of Paris that have played a significant role in the development of neurology. Six of the most important ones are described: Montpellier, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Strasbourg, Lyon, and Marseilles. PMID:19892143

Clarac, François; Boller, François

2010-01-01

341

Trends in neurological complications of endocarditis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Abstract\\u000a   Neurological complications (NCs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with infectious endocarditis (IE).\\u000a The frequency of these complications has been found to remain constant since the preantibiotic era despite profound epidemiological\\u000a changes and therapeutic advances. We have reviewed retrospectively all the cases of IE attended at a single institution between\\u000a 1985 and 2003, aiming to

Iñigo Corral; Pilar Martín-Dávila; Jesús Fortún; Enrique Navas; Tomasa Centella; José Luis Moya; Javier Cobo; Carmen Quereda; Vicente Pintado; Santiago Moreno

2007-01-01

342

Neurologic uses of botulinum neurotoxin type A  

PubMed Central

This article reviews the current and most neurologic uses of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A), beginning with relevant historical data, neurochemical mechanism at the neuromuscular junction. Current commercial preparations of BoNT-A are reviewed, as are immunologic issues relating to secondary failure of BoNT-A therapy. Clinical uses are summarized with an emphasis on controlled clinical trials (as appropriate), including facial movement disorders, focal neck and limb dystonias, spasticity, hypersecretory syndromes, and pain. PMID:19300614

Ney, John P; Joseph, Kevin R

2007-01-01

343

AIDS: neurological opportunist infections in central London.  

PubMed Central

Twenty six (41%) of 64 central London cases of AIDS with nervous system involvement during the course of the illness had neurological opportunist infection. Cytomegalovirus and Toxoplasma gondii were the commonest agents in 22 cases with central nervous system (CNS) infection. Eight cases had herpes zoster radiculopathy. Other infections included those caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and papova JC virus. Prognosis was generally poor, irrespective of whether the opportunist infection was treatable. PMID:2547063

Guiloff, R J

1989-01-01

344

Neurologic manifestations of varicella zoster virus infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes acute viral exanthema in childhood, becomes latent, and can reactivate years later to\\u000a produce neurologic disease. Primary VZV infection is associated with acute cerebellitis and stroke, particularly in childhood.\\u000a VZV reactivation may result in neuropathy, myelitis, stroke, and encephalitis, the latter two syndromes the result of small\\u000a and large vessel vasculopathy. Prompt diagnosis and treatment

Catherine Amlie-Lefond; Burk Jubelt

2009-01-01

345

Gene expression profiling in neurological disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neurological disease arises when a sufficient number of neural cells stop performing their normal functions, lose their ability\\u000a to respond to local environment, and die. In the last decade, a major technological leap led to the development of efficient\\u000a and cost-effective high-throughput methods for determining gene expression. This, in turn, resulted in the rapid accumulation\\u000a of data describing gene expression

Sergio E. Baranzini

2004-01-01

346

[Craniospinal electromagnetic therapy in the neurological practice].  

PubMed

Effectiveness of a new method for treating neurological disorders based on the use of trans-cranial electro- and magnetic stimulation in patients with vascular, vertebral and traumatic pathology of the nervous system is presented. Different frequency parameters of transcranial electrical stimulation and superposition methods of the magnetic generator are proposed taking into account the specific features of neurodynamics and pathogenesis of diseases. The effect of craniospinal electromagnetic therapy on the autonomic nervous system is demonstrated. PMID:18427454

Voropaev, A A; Troshin, V D; Mochalov, A D

2007-01-01

347

Insomnia as a Presenting Symptom of Sleep-Related Movement Disorders, Hypersomnias and Parasomnias  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Insomnia can be considered as a symptom and as a diagnosis. A number of sleep disorders have insomnia as a principle presenting\\u000a symptom. A careful history is needed to assess for the presence of coexisting sleep disorders in patients complaining of poor\\u000a sleep quality. In this chapter, we will explore the clinical features of three common neurologically based sleep disorders

Keith J. Nagle

348

Relation of Dieting in College and High School Students to Symptoms Associated with Semistarvation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dieting and concern with weight were found to be associated with psychological and neurological symptoms observed in cases of severe semi-starvation. College students of both sexes (n 292) and high school females (n121) rated themselves on dietary restraint and psychological and physical symptoms that were prevalent in men after 24 weeks in the Minnesota semi-starvation experiment of 1944–5. Apprehension, irritability,

Mary M. Hagan; Joseph Tomaka; Donald E. Moss

2000-01-01

349

Cerebral complications after coronary artery bypass and heart valve surgery: Risk factors and onset of symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Cerebral complications continue to be a major cause of morbidity after cardiac surgery. Earlier studies have mainly focused on intraoperative events, but symptoms may also occur later in the postoperative period. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of focal neurologic complications and timing of cerebral symptoms.Design: A retrospective study.Setting: Linköping University Hospital.Participants:

Ewa Ahlgren; Claes Arén

1998-01-01

350

Progress in gene therapy for neurological disorders  

PubMed Central

Diseases of the nervous system have devastating effects and are widely distributed among the population, being especially prevalent in the elderly. These diseases are often caused by inherited genetic mutations that result in abnormal nervous system development, neurodegeneration, or impaired neuronal function. Other causes of neurological diseases include genetic and epigenetic changes induced by environmental insults, injury, disease-related events or inflammatory processes. Standard medical and surgical practice has not proved effective in curing or treating these diseases, and appropriate pharmaceuticals do not exist or are insufficient to slow disease progression. Gene therapy is emerging as a powerful approach with potential to treat and even cure some of the most common diseases of the nervous system. Gene therapy for neurological diseases has been made possible through progress in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms, particularly those involving sensory neurons, and also by improvement of gene vector design, therapeutic gene selection, and methods of delivery. Progress in the field has renewed our optimism for gene therapy as a treatment modality that can be used by neurologists, ophthalmologists and neurosurgeons. In this Review, we describe the promising gene therapy strategies that have the potential to treat patients with neurological diseases and discuss prospects for future development of gene therapy. PMID:23609618

Simonato, Michele; Bennett, Jean; Boulis, Nicholas M.; Castro, Maria G.; Fink, David J.; Goins, William F.; Gray, Steven J.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Wilson, Thomas J.; Wolfe, John H.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

2013-01-01

351

Segmental immune disorders resulting from neurologic injuries.  

PubMed

The immunocompromised cutaneous district (ICD) is a novel pathogenic concept that refers to the occurrence of opportunistic skin disorders (such as infections, malignancies, and immune diseases) at a cutaneous site previously marked by a damaging event, usually involving the local lymph network or peripheral sensory nerves. In addition to herpetic infections, which are notoriously harmful for sensory nerve fibers and therefore already included among the potential causes of ICD, there are a large and variegate group of further neurologic diseases, both peripheral (carpal tunnel syndrome, facial nerve palsy, and trigeminal trophic syndrome) and central (poliomyelitis and brain stroke), which may be added to the wide and expanding spectrum of injuring events resulting in an ICD. The neural compartment of skin immunity plays a key role in immune homeostasis, and this assertion is confirmed by the fact that any neurologic injury, whatever the origin (peripheral or central) or the cause (infection, trauma, ischemia), can give rise to immune destabilization of the innervated area, which becomes a site prone to the occurrence of opportunistic skin disorders. A neural-driven process may be responsible for the cutaneous immune dysregulation ensuing from some neurologic diseases. PMID:25160104

Piccolo, Vincenzo; Russo, Teresa; Bove, Domenico; Baroni, Adone

2014-01-01

352

Sparring and Neurological Function in Professional Boxers  

PubMed Central

Despite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury, limited research has been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., training under the tutelage of an experienced boxing coach for the purpose of improving skills and/or fitness) and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n?=?237) who competed in Maryland between 2003 and 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index, CSI) and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test, SDMT) and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test, SRT). Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure) were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT) and balance (SRT). A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer’s physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety. PMID:25101253

Stiller, John W.; Yu, Steven S.; Brenner, Lisa A.; Langenberg, Patricia; Scrofani, Phillip; Pannella, Patrick; Hsu, Edbert B.; Roberts, Darryl W.; Monsell, Ray M. T.; Binks, Sidney W.; Guzman, Alvaro; Postolache, Teodor T.

2014-01-01

353

Neurologic complications of valvular heart disease.  

PubMed

Valvular heart disease (VHD) is frequently associated with neurologic complications; cerebral embolism is the most common of these since thrombus formation results from the abnormalities in the valvular surfaces or from the anatomic and physiologic changes associated with valve dysfunction, such as atrial or ventricular enlargement, intracardiac thrombi, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Prosthetic heart valves, particularly mechanical valves, are very thrombogenic, which explains the high risk of thromboembolism and the need for anticoagulation for the prevention of embolism. Infective endocarditis is a disease process with protean manifestations that include not only cerebral embolism but also intracranial hemorrhage, mycotic aneurysms, and systemic manifestations such as fever and encephalopathy. Other neurologic complications include nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, a process associated with systemic diseases such as cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus. For many of these conditions, anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment to prevent cerebral embolism, therefore it is the potential complications of anticoagulation that can explain other neurologic complications in patients with VHD. The prevention and management of these complications requires an understanding of their natural history in order to balance the risks posed by valvular disease itself against the risks and benefits associated with treatment. PMID:24365289

Cruz-Flores, Salvador

2014-01-01

354

The Neurological Sequelae of Electrical Injury  

PubMed Central

Electricity is a potentially very dangerous commodity. Community safeguards, however, result in remarkably efficient control of this hazard. Mortality figures appear to be small and constant. No satisfactory morbidity figures are available with regard to general and neurological complications in non-fatal cases. Study of relevant features of such electrical phenomena as voltage level, resistance factors, current pathway, current diffusion and grounding reveals many difficulties in reconstruction of the sequence of events involved in these injuries. These features underline our frequent inability to understand the mechanisms of initiation of unconsciousness and even of differentiation between death by cardiac arrest and death by respiratory paralysis. Fourteen cases of electrical injury with a variety of neurological complications and sequelae are discussed, and the findings in these cases are compared with those of other observers. An attempt is made to present a comprehensive picture of immediate, secondary and late neurological effects, and to illustrate some of the pathological findings in electrocution material. ImagesFigs. 1 and 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Figs. 6 and 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:14179536

Silversides, John

1964-01-01

355

Caval variations in neurologically diseased patients  

PubMed Central

Background The import of the cavum variation and its prevalence rate in healthy individuals is still not clear, likewise in neurologically diseased patients. Purpose To evaluate the frequency and pattern of caval variations in neurologically diseased patients. Material and Methods The presence or absence of the cavum septum pellucidum (CSP), cavum vergae (CV), or cavum velum interpositum (CVI) was reviewed from successive cranial computerized tomography (CT) images of patients who were aged 6 months and above. Two hundred and seventeen cranial CT images were reviewed. Results At least a cavum variation was noted in 130 (59.9%) of the CT scan images reviewed. The CV, CVI, and CSP were noted in 86 (39.6%), 53 (24.4%), and 50 images (23%), respectively. Caval multiplicity was noted in 102 patients (47%). There was no significant difference in the rate of occurrence of cavum variations in patients with congenital brain diseases and acquired brain conditions (P?=?0.484), neither was there a significant difference in the frequency of cavum variation in children aged older than 6 months compared to adults (P?=?0.101). Conclusion Cava variations are relatively common in neurological brain diseases. Patients with congenital brain diseases did not have a higher frequency of cava variation when compared with those that had acquired lesions. The most common type of cavum variation noted in this study was the vergae variety, while the CSP is the rarest. PMID:25298867

Akinola, Rachael A; Nelson-Paseda, Adedolapo O

2014-01-01

356

Sparring and neurological function in professional boxers.  

PubMed

Despite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury, limited research has been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., training under the tutelage of an experienced boxing coach for the purpose of improving skills and/or fitness) and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n?=?237) who competed in Maryland between 2003 and 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index, CSI) and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test, SDMT) and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test, SRT). Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure) were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT) and balance (SRT). A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer's physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety. PMID:25101253

Stiller, John W; Yu, Steven S; Brenner, Lisa A; Langenberg, Patricia; Scrofani, Phillip; Pannella, Patrick; Hsu, Edbert B; Roberts, Darryl W; Monsell, Ray M T; Binks, Sidney W; Guzman, Alvaro; Postolache, Teodor T

2014-01-01

357

Clinical neurological examination of infants and children.  

PubMed

A thorough but focused history and neurological examination remain the most important initial elements of neurological diagnosis at all ages. Advances over the past two decades in clinical neurophysiology, neuroimaging, genetics, and neuropathological examination of tissue have at times appeared to predominate over traditional history and physical exam, but no laboratory studies can provide the focus and clues to diagnosis that clinical findings offer. History taking and the techniques of neurological examination are skills to be learned by the student, refined by the resident, and practiced and perfected throughout the career of a pediatric neurologist. Examination must be specifically modified to correspond to age and with the expectation of developmental skills achieved at various ages, in addition to the localizing value of particular signs that may apply at all ages. Hypotonia, extensor plantar responses, and lack of visual fixation may be normal in a preterm infant but abnormal at several months of age. "Primitive" reflexes disappear at a certain age, but really are only suppressed or inhibited and may become re-expressed with disinhibition many decades later. Finally, the pediatric neurologist needs to have a firm foundation in normal development, neuroembryology, and changes in the expression of diseases at various stages of maturation of the nervous system. PMID:23622147

Haslam, Robert H A

2013-01-01

358

Radiopharmaceutical Stem Cell Tracking for Neurological Diseases  

PubMed Central

Although neurological ailments continue to be some of the main causes of disease burden in the world, current therapies such as pharmacological agents have limited potential in the restoration of neural functions. Cell therapies, firstly applied to treat different hematological diseases, are now being investigated in preclinical and clinical studies for neurological illnesses. However, the potential applications and mechanisms for such treatments are still poorly comprehended and are the focus of permanent research. In this setting, noninvasive in vivo imaging allows better understanding of several aspects of stem cell therapies. Amongst the various methods available, radioisotope cell labeling has become one of the most promising since it permits tracking of cells after injection by different routes to investigate their biodistribution. A significant increase in the number of studies utilizing this method has occurred in the last years. Here, we review the different radiopharmaceuticals, imaging techniques, and findings of the preclinical and clinical reports published up to now. Moreover, we discuss the limitations and future applications of radioisotope cell labeling in the field of cell transplantation for neurological diseases. PMID:24982880

Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo Henrique; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro Moreno; Gutfilen, Bianca; Lopes de Souza, Sergio Augusto; de Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Barbosa da Fonseca, Lea Mirian

2014-01-01

359

Dysregulation of gene expression as a cause of Cockayne syndrome neurological disease.  

PubMed

Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder with severe neurological symptoms. The majority of CS patients carry mutations in Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), best known for its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Indeed, because various repair pathways are compromised in patient cells, CS is widely considered a genome instability syndrome. Here, we investigate the connection between the neuropathology of CS and dysregulation of gene expression. Transcriptome analysis of human fibroblasts revealed that even in the absence of DNA damage, CSB affects the expression of thousands of genes, many of which are neuronal genes. CSB is present in a significant subset of these genes, suggesting that regulation is direct, at the level of transcription. Importantly, reprogramming of CS fibroblasts to neuron-like cells is defective unless an exogenous CSB gene is introduced. Moreover, neuroblastoma cells from which CSB is depleted show defects in gene expression programs required for neuronal differentiation, and fail to differentiate and extend neurites. Likewise, neuron-like cells cannot be maintained without CSB. Finally, a number of disease symptoms may be explained by marked gene expression changes in the brain of patients with CS. Together, these data point to dysregulation of gene regulatory networks as a cause of the neurological symptoms in CS. PMID:25249633

Wang, Yuming; Chakravarty, Probir; Ranes, Michael; Kelly, Gavin; Brooks, Philip J; Neilan, Edward; Stewart, Aengus; Schiavo, Giampietro; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

2014-10-01

360

Chapter 39 An historical overview of British neurology  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the UK, neurology stemmed from general (internal) medicine rather than psychiatry. In 1886 the Neurological Society of London was founded, with Hughlings Jackson as its first President. After World War I, Kinnier Wilson was made Physician in Charge of the first independent department of neurology, which was at Westminster Hospital in London.Although before the 17th century there were British

F. Clifford Rose

2009-01-01

361

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Strategic Priorities  

E-print Network

-computer interfaces and prosthetic devices offer exciting opportunities to restore neurological and motor functionsNational Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Strategic Priorities and Principles June substantial progress toward our mission--to reduce the burden of neurological diseases through research. Brain

362

Neurologic Complications of Infective Endocarditis: Retrospective Review of 100 Cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

† Background : Neurological syndromes often complicate the management of infective endocarditis. Methods : We reviewed the neurological complications in 100 patients with infective endocarditis in a tertiary care hospital. Results : Neurological complications occurred in 25 patients (25%). Ischemic infarctions occurred in 15 patients, hemorrhagic infarctions in 5, intracerebral hemorrhages in 12, subarachnoid hemorrhages in 4, and subdural hemorrhages

Sung Hun Kim; Jaseong Koo; Byung-Woo Yoon; Eulji Hospital

2001-01-01

363

158 Emotion Elicitation Emotion Elicitation With Neurological Patients  

E-print Network

158 Emotion Elicitation 10 Emotion Elicitation With Neurological Patients Robert W. Levenson 158 This chapter presents a set of issues and methods related to studying emotional functioning in neurological to inform research using the other abound. Patient Studies Studies of neurological patients have been

Levenson, Robert W.

364

Dynamic diseases in neurology and psychiatry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thirty-two (32) periodic diseases of the nervous system are identified in which symptoms and/or signs recur. In 10/32, the recurrence of a symptom complex is one of the defining features of the illness, whereas in 22/32 oscillatory signs occur in the setting of an ongoing nervous system disorder. We discuss the possibility that these disorders may be dynamic diseases.

Milton, John; Black, Deborah

1995-03-01

365

Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus: An under-recognized cause of neurologic disease in the fetus, child, and adult  

PubMed Central

Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is an important cause of neurologic disease in humans. Carried and secreted principally by wild mice, LCMV covers a large geographic range and infects great numbers of people. Humans acquire LCMV disease when they come into contact with the secretions of infected mice. Because it has a strong neurotropism, the clinical signs and symptoms of LCMV infection are mostly neurologic. When the virus is acquired postnatally by children or adults, the clinical manifestations are usually those of aseptic meningitis. Most people who acquire LCMV infection during childhood or adulthood are moderately symptomatic for several weeks, but have a full recovery. A much more severe disease ensues when the infection occurs prenatally. LCMV can infect the fetal brain and retina, where it leads to substantial injury and permanent dysfunction. The possibility of LCMV infection should be considered in all babies with evidence of congenital infection, especially those with prominent neurologic signs, such as microencephaly, periventricular calcifications, and hydrocephalus. PMID:22889536

Bonthius, Daniel J.

2014-01-01

366

Association of Pesticide Exposure with Neurologic Dysfunction and Disease  

PubMed Central

Poisoning by acute high-level exposure to certain pesticides has well-known neurotoxic effects, but whether chronic exposure to moderate levels of pesticides is also neurotoxic is more controversial. Most studies of moderate pesticide exposure have found increased prevalence of neurologic symptoms and changes in neurobehavioral performance, reflecting cognitive and psychomotor dysfunction. There is less evidence that moderate exposure is related to deficits in sensory or motor function or peripheral nerve conduction, but fewer studies have considered these outcomes. It is possible that the most sensitive manifestation of pesticide neurotoxicity is a general malaise lacking in specificity and related to mild cognitive dysfunction, similar to that described for Gulf War syndrome. Most studies have focused on organophosphate insecticides, but some found neuro-toxic effects from other pesticides, including fungicides, fumigants, and organochlorine and carbamate insecticides. Pesticide exposure may also be associated with increased risk of Parkinson disease; several classes of pesticides, including insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides, have been implicated. Studies of other neurodegenerative diseases are limited and inconclusive. Future studies will need to improve assessment of pesticide exposure in individuals and consider the role of genetic susceptibility. More studies of pesticides other than organophosphates are needed. Major unresolved issues include the relative importance of acute and chronic exposure, the effect of moderate exposure in the absence of poisoning, and the relationship of pesticide-related neurotoxicity to neurodegenerative disease. PMID:15198914

Kamel, Freya; Hoppin, Jane A.

2004-01-01

367

Infectious and non-infectious neurologic complications in heart transplant recipients.  

PubMed

Neurologic complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in heart transplant (HT) recipients. New immunomodulating agents have improved survival rates, although some have been associated with a high rate of neurologic complications (infectious and non-infectious). We conducted this study to analyze the frequency of these complications, before and after the use of daclizumab induction therapy. We reviewed all neurologic complications in our HT cohort, comparing infectious with non-infectious complications over 2 periods of time in which different induction therapies were used (316 patients with OKT3 or antithymocyte globulin from 1988 to 2002, and 68 patients with daclizumab from 2003 to 2006). Neurologic complications were found in 75/384 patients (19.5%) with a total of 78 episodes. Non-infectious complications accounted for 68% of the 78 episodes of neurologic complications. A total of 51 patients and 53 episodes were detailed as follows: 25 episodes of stroke (25 of 78 total episodes, 32%; 19 ischemic, 6 hemorrhagic); 7 neuropathies; 6 seizures; 4 episodes of transient ischemic attack (TIA); 3 anoxic encephalopathy; 2 each brachial plexus palsy and metabolic encephalopathy; and 1 each myoclonia, central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma, subdural hematoma, and Cotard syndrome. Mean time to presentation of stroke, TIA, and encephalopathy was 1 day (range, 1-19 d) posttransplant. Mortality rate among non-infectious complications was 12/53 (22.6%). Infectious complications accounted for 32% of the 78 total episodes. We found 25 episodes in 24 patients: 17 herpes zoster (median, 268 d after HT), 3 CNS aspergillosis (median, 90 d after HT), 1 CNS toxoplasmosis and tuberculosis (51 d after HT), 1 pneumococcal meningitis (402 d after HT), and 2 Listeria meningitis (median, 108 d after HT). The 3 patients with CNS aspergillosis died. The mortality rate among patients with infectious neurologic complications was 12% (42.8% if the CNS was involved). When we compared the OKT3-ATG and daclizumab groups, we found that the incidence of non-infectious complications was 15.1% vs. 7.3%, respectively, and the incidence of infectious complications was 7.5% vs. 1.4%, respectively. All but 1 opportunistic infection occurred in the OKT3-ATG time period. In conclusion, a wide variety of neurologic complications affected 19.5% of HT recipients. Non-infectious causes clearly predominated, but infections still accounted for 32% of the episodes. New monoclonal induction therapies have contributed to diminished CNS opportunistic infections in our program. PMID:20453603

Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; Palomo, Jesús; Fernández-Yáñez, Juan; Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Guinea, Jesús; Bouza, Emilio

2010-05-01

368

Alzheimer's Disease Patients' Cognitive Status and Course Years Prior to Symptom Recognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a prospective examination of the cognitive performance and cognitive course of persons in an asymptomatic “preclinical” phase who eventually developed Alzheimer's disease (AD). We compared performances on the Mayo Cognitive Factor Scales (MCFS) of 20 persons in a neurologically normal cohort who subsequently developed AD to the performances of 60 persons who remained free of dementia symptoms. For

Jane H. Cerhan; Robert J. Ivnik; Glenn E. Smith; Mary M. Machulda; Bradley F. Boeve; David S. Knopman; Ronald C. Petersen; Eric G. Tangalos

2007-01-01

369

Associations between marine phytoplankton and symptoms of illness among recreational beachgoers in Puerto Rico, 2009  

EPA Science Inventory

While phytoplankton generally have crucial roles in marine ecosystems, a small subset can release toxins and produce harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs can be a threat to human health as symptoms from exposure range from neurological impairment to gastrointestinal (GI), dermal, a...

370

Symptoms and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases Following Palliative Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine prospectively patient self-rated symptoms and quality of life (QOL) indicators in patients with brain metastases following whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with brain metastases referred for WBRT were approached for this study. Patients were asked to rate their symptoms and QOL using the Spitzer Quality of Life Index questionnaire. Follow-up was at 1, 2, and 3 months following WBRT. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the change in symptom severity over time. Results: Between August 2005 to October 2007, 129 patients with brain metastases were enrolled. The majority of patients (88%) received 20 Gy in five fractions. Median age was 64 years, and median Karnofsky Performance Status at baseline was 70. The most commonly experienced symptoms at baseline were headaches, weakness, balance problems, and fatigue. Thirty-five percent of patients rated neurological functional (NF) status as 1, indicating moderate neurological symptoms and need for assistance. Forty-three percent of patients had stable or decreased fatigue, and 47% had a stable or improved NF status over time (p = 0.0040). Although certain QOL domains improved over time, all other QOL domains and symptom items did not change significantly following WBRT. Conclusion: WBRT may have contributed to symptom stabilization in our study. An alternative goal of WBRT may be the prevention of symptom progression and QOL deterioration. Further research is required to select the most appropriate group of patients with brain metastases who would benefit most from WBRT.

Wong, Jennifer; Hird, Amanda; Zhang Liying; Tsao, May; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth; Danjoux, Cyril [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.c [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto (Canada)

2009-11-15

371

2004;62;494-497Neurology U. Oh, R. Gupta, J. W. Krakauer, A. G. Khandji, S. S. Chin and M. S.V. Elkind  

E-print Network

angiopathy (CAA). Rapid progression of neurologic symptoms was followed by dramatic clinical and radiographic abnormalities. Cases. Patient 1. A 70-year-old man, with no prior headache or dementia, noted increasing with no prior dementia or headache was confused and developed expressive aphasia. MRI revealed white matter

372

Table 3.10 Medical Examination Participation Rates Among Vietnam and Non-Vletnll n Veterans Who Had Telephone Interviews, by Selected Neurological and I~uscular  

E-print Network

Table 3.10 Medical Examination Participation Rates Among Vietnam and Non-Vletnll n Veterans Who of eligible veterans interviewed by telephone who underwent examination. d Number of veterans-Reported Neurological and Muscular SymptomsB Ani )ng Vietnam and Non-Vietnam Veterans Selected for Medical Examination

373

Gene Therapy for Neurologic Manifestations of Mucopolysaccharidoses  

PubMed Central

Introduction Mucopolysaccharidoses are a family of lysosomal disorders caused by mutations in genes that encode enzymes involved in the catabolism of glycoaminoglycans. These mutations affect multiple organ systems and can be particularly deleterious to the nervous system. At the present time, enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem-cell therapy are used to treat patients with different forms of these disorders. However, to a great extent the nervous system is not adequately responsive to current therapeutic approaches. Areas Covered Recent advances in gene therapy show great promise for treating mucopolysaccharidoses. This article reviews the current state of the art for routes of delivery in developing genetic therapies for treating the neurologic manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses. Expert Opinion Gene therapy for treating neurological manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses can be achieved by intraventricular, intrathecal, intranasal, and systemic administration. The intraventricular route of administration appears to provide the most wide-spread distribution of gene therapy vectors to the brain. The intrathecal route of delivery results in predominant distribution to the caudal areas of the brain while the intranasal route of delivery results in good distribution to the rostral areas of brain. The systemic route of delivery via intravenous delivery can also achieve wide spread delivery to the CNS, however, the distribution to the brain is greatly dependent on the vector system. Intravenous delivery using lentiviral vectors appear to be less effective than adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Moreover, some subtypes of AAV vectors are more effective than others in crossing the blood-brain-barrier. In summary, the recent advances in gene vector technology and routes of delivery to the CNS will facilitate the clinical translation of gene therapy for the treatment of the neurological manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses. PMID:25510418

Wolf, Daniel A.; Banerjee, Sharbani; Hackett, Perry B.; Whitley, Chester B.; McIvor, R. Scott; Low, Walter C.

2015-01-01

374

The neurology of folic acid deficiency.  

PubMed

The metabolism of folic acid and the metabolism of vitamin B12 are intimately linked such that deficiency of either vitamin leads to an identical megaloblastic anemia. The neurologic manifestations of folate deficiency overlap with those of vitamin B12 deficiency and include cognitive impairment, dementia, depression, and, less commonly, peripheral neuropathy and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. In both deficiency states there is often dissociation between the neuropsychiatric and the hematologic complications. There is a similar overlap and dissociation between neurologic and hematologic manifestations of inborn errors of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism. Low folate and raised homocysteine levels are risk factors for dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, and depression. Even when folate deficiency is secondary to psychiatric illness due to apathy or poor diet it may eventually aggravate the underlying disorder in a vicious circle effect. Clinical responses to treatment with folates are usually slow over weeks and months, probably due to the efficient blood-brain barrier mechanism for the vitamin, perhaps in turn related to the experimentally demonstrated excitatory properties of folate derivatives. The inappropriate administration of folic acid in the presence of vitamin B12 deficiency may lead to both neurologic and, later, hematologic relapse. Impaired maternal folate intake and status increases the risk of neural tube defects. Periconceptual prophylactic administration of the vitamin reduces, but does not eliminate the risk of neural tube defects even in the absence of folate deficiency. Folates and vitamin B12 have fundamental roles in central nervous system function at all ages, especially in purine, thymidine, neucleotide, and DNA synthesis, genomic and nongenomic methylation and, therefore, in tissue growth, differentiation and repair. There is interest in the potential role of both vitamins in the prevention of disorders of central nervous system development, mood, dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, and aging. PMID:24365361

Reynolds, E H

2014-01-01

375

Metabolic disturbances in diseases with neurological involvement.  

PubMed

Degeneration of specific neuronal populations and progressive nervous system dysfunction characterize neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. These findings are also reported in inherited diseases such as phenylketonuria and glutaric aciduria type I. The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in these diseases was reported, elicited by genetic alterations, exogenous toxins or buildup of toxic metabolites. In this review we shall discuss some metabolic alterations related to the pathophysiology of diseases with neurological involvement and aging process. These findings may help identifying early disease biomarkers and lead to more effective therapies to improve the quality of life of the patients affected by these devastating illnesses. PMID:25110608

Duarte, João M N; Schuck, Patrícia F; Wenk, Gary L; Ferreira, Gustavo C

2014-08-01

376

"The choice for death" and neurology.  

PubMed

In the last decade, "end-of-life" issues have gained prominence in political and social debates in many countries. The deliberate ending of the life of a patient upon his/her own request has become a hotly contested topic. This paper discusses the implications of this debate and of corresponding policy and legal developments for neurology. We discuss the nomenclature of the "choices for death", euthanasia, doctor-assisted suicide and palliative care as well as the social dynamics underlying these developments. We suggest that we need a more nuanced and empirically based understanding of the process of the "choice for death and its implications for medical practice." PMID:20393857

Durnová, Anna; Gottweis, Herbert

2010-07-01

377

Genome-wide association studies in neurology  

PubMed Central

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful tool for understanding the genetic underpinnings of human disease. In this article, we briefly review the role and findings of GWAS in common neurological diseases, including Stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, migraine, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, restless legs syndrome, intracranial aneurysm, human prion diseases and moyamoya disease. We then discuss the present and future implications of these findings with regards to disease prediction, uncovering basic biology, and the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:25568877

Tan, Meng-Shan; Jiang, Teng

2014-01-01

378

Somatic mutation, genomic variation, and neurological disease.  

PubMed

Genetic mutations causing human disease are conventionally thought to be inherited through the germ line from one's parents and present in all somatic (body) cells, except for most cancer mutations, which arise somatically. Increasingly, somatic mutations are being identified in diseases other than cancer, including neurodevelopmental diseases. Somatic mutations can arise during the course of prenatal brain development and cause neurological disease-even when present at low levels of mosaicism, for example-resulting in brain malformations associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Novel, highly sensitive technologies will allow more accurate evaluation of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and during normal brain development. PMID:23828942

Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D; Cai, Xuyu; Walsh, Christopher A

2013-07-01

379

Neurological complications of progressive facial hemiatrophy  

PubMed Central

Progressive left facial hemiatrophy began in a boy at the age of 5 years. Over the next 20 years, he developed wasting of the left shoulder and arm muscles, ptosis of the eyelids, ophthalmoplegia, convergence nystagmus, pupillary dilatation, hemiparesis, seizures, and dysarthria. A pneumoencephalogram showed cerebellar hemiatrophy. Biopsy of the cerebellum revealed loss of and degenerative changes in Purkinje cells. A deltoid muscle biopsy studied by histochemical and enzymatic procedures was normal. There are many neurological and ophthalmological complications of progressive facial hemiatrophy. Seizures, ophthalmoparesis, and pupillary abnormalities are the most common. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the disease are unknown. The possibility that this is a `slow virus' disease is suggested. Images

Wolf, Sheldon Mark; Verity, M. Anthony

1974-01-01

380

Somatic Mutation, Genomic Variation, and Neurological Disease  

PubMed Central

Genetic mutations causing human disease are conventionally thought to be inherited through the germ line from one’s parents and present in all somatic (body) cells, except for most cancer mutations, which arise somatically. Increasingly, somatic mutations are being identified in diseases other than cancer, including neurodevelopmental diseases. Somatic mutations can arise during the course of prenatal brain development and cause neurological disease—even when present at low levels of mosaicism, for example—resulting in brain malformations associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Novel, highly sensitive technologies will allow more accurate evaluation of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and during normal brain development. PMID:23828942

Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D.; Cai, Xuyu; Walsh, Christopher A.

2014-01-01

381

The relationship between subconcussive impacts and concussion history on clinical measures of neurologic function in collegiate football players.  

PubMed

Concussions sustained during college and professional football careers have been associated with both acute and chronic neurologic impairment. The contribution of subconcussive impacts to this impairment has not been adequately studied. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between subconcussive impacts and concussion history on clinical measures of neurologic function. Forty-six collegiate football players completed five clinical measures of neurologic function commonly employed in the evaluation of concussion before and after a single season. These tests included the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics, Sensory Organization Test, Standardized Assessment of Concussion, Balance Error Scoring System, and Graded Symptom Checklist. The Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) System recorded head impact data including the frequency, magnitude, and location of impacts. College football players sustain approximately 1,000 subconcussive impacts to the head over the course of a season, but for the most part, do not demonstrate any clinically meaningful changes from preseason to postseason on measures of neurologic function. Changes in performance were mostly independent of prior concussion history, and the total number, magnitude and location of sustained impacts over one season as observed R(2) values ranged between 0.30 and 0.35. Repetitive subconcussive head impacts over a single season do not appear to result in short-term neurologic impairment, but these relationships should be further investigated for a potential dose-response over a player's career. PMID:21994067

Gysland, Sonia M; Mihalik, Jason P; Register-Mihalik, Johna K; Trulock, Scott C; Shields, Edgar W; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

2012-01-01

382

[Muscular hypertrophy in clinical neurology (author's transl)].  

PubMed

The authors begin this general review with the pseudohypertrophies due either to an underlying extramuscular process, or to a focal lesion within the muscle, or else to miscellaneous interstitial infiltrates such as those found in cysticercosis, sarcoidosis, amylosis. True hypertrophy is most often observed in the course of muscular dystrophy. It is an usual finding in myopathies, and the prominent symptom of Thomsen disease ; it is the only symptom of hypertrophia musculorum vera and masseters hypertrophy ; it is associated with a peculiar deficit in the "Hereditary Distal Myopathy with Onset in Infancy"; it is a classical symptom of some endocrine myopathies (hypothyroidism and acromegaly). Paradoxically, true hypertrophy may, though very rarely, be encountered in the course of nervous system diseases, most often of the neuritic type : sciatica, hypertrophic neuritis, progressive spinal muscular atrophy. The mechanism of this very unusual muscular reaction remains unknown. PMID:7223356

Verret, J M; Lapresle, J

1981-01-01

383

Melanoma: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... from the rest or is changing in size, shape, or color. If you see a mole or new spot ... ugly duckling). Non-uniform mole (has an odd shape, uneven or uncertain border, different colors). Symptoms of melanoma In the early stages, melanoma ...

384

Bullying and PTSD Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n = 963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that…

Idsoe, Thormod; Dyregrov, Atle; Idsoe, Ella Cosmovici

2012-01-01

385

Quantitative Evaluation of the Use of Actigraphy for Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders  

PubMed Central

Quantitative and objective evaluation of disease severity and/or drug effect is necessary in clinical practice. Wearable accelerometers such as an actigraph enable long-term recording of a patient's movement during activities and they can be used for quantitative assessment of symptoms due to various diseases. We reviewed some applications of actigraphy with analytical methods that are sufficiently sensitive and reliable to determine the severity of diseases and disorders such as motor and nonmotor disorders like Parkinson's disease, sleep disorders, depression, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) for vascular dementia (VD), seasonal affective disorder (SAD), and stroke, as well as the effects of drugs used to treat them. We believe it is possible to develop analytical methods to assess more neurological or psychopathic disorders using actigraphy records. PMID:25214709

Song, Yu; Kwak, Shin; Yoshida, Sohei; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

2014-01-01

386

Influence of patients' emotional state on the recovery processes after a transient global amnesia  

E-print Network

and one year after the attack. In a second experiment, we examined the impact of patients' emotional state. In the second experiment, we showed these mild memory disorders could be detected several months after TGA,version1-16Dec2011 #12;4 1. Introduction Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a neurological syndrome

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

387

Prevalence of Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack in Three Elderly Populations of Central Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Our aim was to assess prevalence rates of cerebrovascular disease (CVD; stroke and transient ischemic attacks) according to age and gender in three populations in central Spain using data from the Neurological Disorders in Central Spain (NEDICES) study, a population-based survey of elderly participants. Methods: Individuals from one suburban municipality of Greater Madrid (Las Margaritas neighborhood, Getafe), one urban

J. Díaz-Guzmán; F. Bermejo-Pareja; J. Benito-León; S. Vega; R. Gabriel; M. J. Medrano

2008-01-01

388

Nanomedicine based nanoparticles for neurological disorders.  

PubMed

Human health is severely hampered by a majority of the neurological disorders such as the brain tumors, degenerative Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and those involving inflammatory component. Owing to the stringent protection offered by the blood brain barrier, conventional therapeutics gain limited access and therefore, are therapeutically suboptimal. Hence, research has now focused to develop the novel drug delivery systems with a prime motto of maintaining therapeutic drug levels inside the brain, avoiding non-specific tissue distribution. The introduction of nanotechnology has addressed few of these objectives and opened up new avenues for even more improvization. To some extent, nanodelivery systems were successful in crossing the blood brain barrier and accessing the remote areas of the brain. They also have shown tremendous potential in delivering the therapeutic and diagnostic aids following systemic administration. What revolutionised the nano applications is the development of "smart" nanosystems, whose surface is tailor made for the effective theranostic delivery. However, a detailed understanding of the long term nanoformulation toxicities, along with the neuropathology, is the critical future question to be addressed. In this review, a brief introduction of the prominent neurological disorders and detailed applications of nanotechnology are discussed. PMID:25039778

Sriramoju, Bhasker; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

2014-01-01

389

Integrating cognitive psychology, neurology and neuroimaging.  

PubMed

In the last decade, there has been a dramatic increase in research effectively integrating cognitive psychology, functional neuroimaging, and behavioral neurology. This new work is typically conducting basic research into aspects of the human mind and brain. The present review features as examples of such integrations two series of studies by the author and his colleagues. One series, employing object recognition, mental motor imagery, and mental rotation paradigms, clarifies the nature of a cognitive process, imagined spatial transformations used in shape recognition. Among other implications, it suggests that when recognizing a hand's handedness, imagining one's body movement depends on cerebrally lateralized sensory-motor structures and deciding upon handedness depends on exact match shape confirmation. The other series, using cutaneous, tactile, and auditory pitch discrimination paradigms, elucidates the function of a brain structure, the cerebellum. It suggests that the cerebellum has non-motor sensory support functions upon which optimally fine sensory discriminations depend. In addition, six key issues for this integrative approach are reviewed. These include arguments for the value and greater use of: rigorous quantitative meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies; stereotactic coordinate-based data, as opposed to surface landmark-based data; standardized vocabularies capturing the elementary component operations of cognitive and behavioral tasks; functional hypotheses about brain areas that are consistent with underlying microcircuitry; an awareness that not all brain areas implicated by neuroimaging or neurology are necessarily directly involved in the associated cognitive or behavioral task; and systematic approaches to integrations of this kind. PMID:11388134

Parsons, L M

2001-04-01

390

Fluctuation phenomena in neurological local field potentials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of noise and fluctuations has proven useful in a wide variety of disordered systems, from disordered condensed matter systems to noisy biological systems. Neurological signals termed local field potentials are characterized by apparently random fluctuations interspersed with periods of clear oscillatory activity. Numerous mathematical theories have been developed that describe the power spectrum that results from different fluctuation phenomena. Several of these theories are presented with discussions of how they may apply to local field potentials in the brain. Experiments and simulations are proposed that could help to clarify specific aspects of the fluctuation origins of local field potentials. Given long time series of neurological voltage fluctuations, it can be difficult to detect the occurrence of oscillatory activity. An analytical method is presented to identify the presence of oscillations within a signal. This method is verified through simulations and experiments on signals with known oscillations. Using this method, a previously unknown oscillation is detected, termed gamma50, that is recorded in the striatum of awake, behaving rats. The gamma50 signal is characterized by short bursts of coherent 50 Hz oscillations, and is found to be correlated with the initiation of movement. Preliminary experiments were conducted to identify the origin of gamma50 events. Data from these experiments is discussed along with remaining open research questions and future directions.

Masimore, Beth

2008-10-01

391

Neurological caricatures since the 15th century.  

PubMed

During the Renaissance, different artists began to draw medical illustrations from various viewpoints. Leonardo da Vinci was among those who sought to portray the emotional as well as the physical qualities of man. Other European artists described caricatural aspects of medical activities. In Northern Europe, Albrecht Durer, Hieronymus Bosch, and Pieter Brueghel were also famous for drawing caricatures. Later English artists, notably William Hogarth, Thomas Rowlandson, James Gillray, and the Cruikshanks, satirized life in general and the medical profession in particular. In Spain, Francisco Goya's works became increasingly macabre and satirical following his own mysterious illness and, in France, Honore Daumier used satire and humor to expose medical quackery. Also physicians such as Charles Bell and Jean-Martin Charcot were talented caricaturists. Their own personal artistic styles reflected their approach and gave a different "image" of neurology. Caricatures were popular portraits of developments in science and medicine and were frequently used whenever scientific language was too difficult to disseminate, in particular in the field of neurology. PMID:18629699

Lorusso, Lorenzo

2008-01-01

392

Premature ovarian insufficiency and neurological function.  

PubMed

Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) involves loss of ovarian function before age 40. POI has been associated with neurological dysfunction and an increased risk of dementia, perhaps due to depletion in estrogen levels. The present review discusses the effects of POI caused by genetic disorder, natural premature menopause, surgical menopause, breast cancer treatment and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist treatment. Overall, data suggest an increased risk of neurological disorder where POI is due to premature menopause or induced from surgery. This increased risk appears to be most apparent on domains of global cognitive and verbal memory tests. Where POI is caused by genetic disorder, observed cognitive deficiencies may be more likely to have a genetic basis rather than being due to the effects of sex steroids on the brain. Findings related to loss of cognitive function after chemotherapy or GnRH treatments are mixed. There are also discrepant data related to use of hormone therapy after POI (particularly after surgical menopause). After surgery, hormone treatment appears to be most beneficial if initiated close to the average natural age of menopause. PMID:24942013

Soni, M; Hogervorst, E

2014-09-01

393

Heat-shock proteins in clinical neurology.  

PubMed

Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are antigen-presenting protein-aggregation-preventing chaperones, induced by cellular stress in eukaryotic cells. In this review, we focus on recent HSP advances in neurological disorders. In myasthenia gravis, patients responding to immunosuppressive therapy have reduced serum HSP-71 antibodies. Generalized and ocular myasthenia gravis patients have elevated serum HSP-70 antibodies, indicating common pathogenic mechanisms. In Guillain-Barré syndrome, HSP-70 antibodies are elevated in serum and cerebrospinal fluid, and serum levels are higher than in myasthenia gravis and multiple sclerosis. In multiple sclerosis, serum HSP-27 antibodies are elevated during relapses providing disease activation marker, while ?,?-crystallin expression in brain lesions indicates remission phase initiation. In acute stroke, serum HSP-27 antibodies are elevated irrespective of stroke type and duration. In epilepsy, HSP-27 is induced in patients' astrocytes and cerebral blood vessel walls, and ?,?-crystallin is expressed in epileptic foci. In neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer dementia and Parkinson's disease, HSPs are upregulated in brain tissue, and ?,?-crystallin modulates superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) tissue accumulation in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. HSPs play an important role in antigen-presentation and tolerance development. Antibody-mediated interference with their function alters immune responses causing neuropathology. The role of HSPs in clinical neurology should be the subject of future investigation. PMID:21757921

Romi, Fredrik; Helgeland, Geir; Gilhus, Nils Erik

2011-01-01

394

Signs and symptoms of carbamazepine overdose.  

PubMed

Carbamazepine (CBZ) has been successfully employed in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. The side-effects of CBZ treatment have been extensively studied. As little is known about the symptoms and prognosis of CBZ overdose, our objective was to identify the factors relevant to its prognosis. In a retrospective study of 427 cases, we analysed the distribution of age, sex, total CBZ dose, CBZ plasma level, frequency of symptoms and their association with outcome. In those patients who recovered, coma, somnolence, cerebellar syndrome and epileptic seizures were the most common manifestations of CBZ overdose. In fatal courses coma, epileptic seizures, respiratory depression and respiratory arrest ranked highest. Cardiac arrhythmias and other cardiovascular complications were rare. In 41 of 307 patients (13%) in whom outcome was reported, intoxication was fatal. The occurrence of seizures and CBZ doses exceeding 24 g proved to be important indicators of a fatal outcome. The course of intoxication seems to be more benign in patients aged below 15 years. PMID:7751861

Schmidt, S; Schmitz-Buhl, M

1995-02-01

395

Figures and institutions of the neurological sciences in Paris from 1800 to 1950. Part III: neurology.  

PubMed

We present a short historical review of the major figures, their administrative functions and their works that contributed to make Paris a renowned centre of physiology and neurology during the xixth and the first half of the xxth century. We purposely chose to focus on the period 1800-1950, as 1800 corresponds to the actual beginning of neurosciences, and 1950 marks their exponential rise. Our presentation is divided into four chapters, matching the main disciplines which have progressed and contributed the most to the knowledge we have of the brain sciences: anatomy, physiology, neurology, and psychiatry-psychology. The present article is the third of four parts of this review, and deals with neurology. A special credit should be given to Jean-Martin Charcot who founded the Salpêtrière School of neurology and became one of the world's most important neurologists of the xixth century. We provide below the biographical sketches of Armand Trousseau, Guillaume Benjamin Amand Duchenne, Jean-Martin Charcot, Alfred Vulpian, Désiré-Magloire Bourneville, Paul Richer, Henri Parinaud, Albert Pitres, Jules Joseph Dejerine, Mrs. Augusta Dejerine-Klumpke, Édouard Brissaud, Pierre Marie, Georges Édouard Brutus Gilles de la Tourette, Joseph Babinski, André Thomas, Georges Marinesco, Achille Alexandre Souques, Georges Guillain and Charles Foix. PMID:22387204

Broussolle, E; Poirier, J; Clarac, F; Barbara, J-G

2012-04-01

396

Long term visual and neurological prognosis in patients with treated and untreated cavernous sinus aneurysms  

PubMed Central

Objective: To determine the long term visual and neurological outcome of patients diagnosed with cavernous sinus aneurysms (CCAs). Methods: Prospective follow up for at least five years or until death of 31 retrospectively recruited patients (27 women, 4 men) with treated and untreated CCAs. Results: There were 40 aneurysms in all. Mean age at diagnosis was 60.4 years (range 25 to 86; median 64). The most common symptoms were diplopia (61%), headache (53%), and facial or orbital pain (32%). Fifteen patients (48%) were diagnosed after they developed cranial nerve pareses, four (13%) after they developed carotid–cavernous sinus fistulas (CCFs), and 12 (39%) by neuroimaging studies done for unrelated symptoms. Twenty one patients (68%) had treatment to exclude the aneurysm from circulation, 10 shortly after diagnosis and 11 after worsening symptoms. Immediate complications of treatment occurred in six patients and included neurological impairment, acute ophthalmoparesis, and visual loss. Ten patients (32%) were observed without intervention. Over a mean (SD) follow up period of 11.8 (7.7) years, eight had improvement in symptoms, five remained stable, and eight deteriorated. Among the 10 patients followed without intervention, none improved spontaneously, three remained stable, and seven worsened. Conclusions: Most treated patients in this series improved or remained stable after treatment, but none improved without treatment. The long term prognosis for treated cases is relatively good, with most complications occurring immediately after the procedure. Endovascular surgery has decreased the morbidity and mortality of treatment so should be considered for any patient with a CCA. PMID:15146001

Goldenberg-Cohen, N; Curry, C; Miller, N; Tamargo, R; Murphy, K

2004-01-01

397

Non-myeloablative bone marrow transplant and platelet infusion can transiently improve the clinical outcome of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy: a case report.  

PubMed

Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) is caused by deficiency in thymidine phosphorylase (TP), that regulates thymidine (dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd). Toxic levels of dThd and dUrd can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction by impairing mitochondrial DNA replication, causing GI and neurologic deterioration. We studied the impact of bone marrow transplant (BMT) and platelets, as a source of TP on the clinical outcome of MNGIE. We report a case of MNGIE, who presented with severe vomiting. Over time, he was non-ambulatory and his GI symptoms got progressively worse with severe dysphagia, abdominal pain episodes, persistent vomiting and diarrhea. Being unfit for intense conditioning regimen, he received a mini BMT, with mild conditioning regimen. Bone marrow was obtained from his HLA fully matched brother. One month after transplantation, donor chimerism in peripheral blood was 33%. Excellent clinical responses were achieved 3 months after transplantation and circulating donor cell chimerism decreased to 24% with a significant increase in platelet TP activity. Ten months post transplant the patient's symptoms recurred and fresh single donor platelets were infused, with a significant increase in platelet TP activity. Mini BMT and platelet transfusion can transiently increase circulating TP activity and might prevent progress of this fatal disease. PMID:23410918

Hussein, Eiman

2013-10-01

398

Congenital Basilar Impression: Correlated Neurological Syndromes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of 8 cases operated on for symptomatic basilar impression associated with occipitalization of the atlas is reported (with or without atlantoaxial dislocation). Symptoms of onset (such as the frequent association between nuchal pain and vertigo) are emphasized and analyzed in relation to the pathogenetic mechanism that underlies the multiform symptomatology of the basilar impression. The diagnostic workup for

Pietro Bassi; Claudio Corona; Patrizia Contri; Andrea Paiocchi; Mario Loiero; Alfonso Mangoni

1992-01-01

399

The Tablet Device in Hospital Neurology and in Neurology Graduate Medical Education  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose: There is limited literature on tablet devices for neurohospitalists and in neurological graduate medical education. This study evaluated utilization, benefits, and limitations of customized tablets on inpatient neurology practice and resident education. The hypothesis was the perception of the tablet would be positive, given their portability, convenience to accessing point-of-care reference, and accessibility to the electronic medical record. Methods: Second-generation iPads with neurology-specific applications and literature were provided to our in-hospital general, stroke, and consult neurology teams. After 1 year, residents on these teams were surveyed on demographic data, familiarity, and utilization of the iPad and their perceptions of the device. Results: All 27 residents responded to the survey. Most participants (23 of 27) used a tablet while on inpatient service. Twelve regularly utilized the neurology-specific apps and/or accessed scientific articles. Technologically savvy residents felt significantly more comfortable using tablets and were more quickly acquainted with the features. Thirteen respondents wanted a formal orientation on the advanced features of the tablet independent of their familiarity with the device or level of technological comfort. Conclusion: Overall, the perception was that the tablet was beneficial for inpatient clinical care and as an educational reference. Participants became easily familiarized with the device features quickly, regardless of whether they owned one previously or not. Most physicians indicated interest in advanced features of tablets; however, a formal orientation may be beneficial for optimal utilization. A reliable network connection is essential to in-hospital use of tablet devices. Additional research pertaining to patient outcomes, objective educational benefit, and cost-effectiveness is necessary. PMID:25553224

Newey, Christopher R.; Bhimraj, Adarsh

2015-01-01

400

Idiosyncratic quinoline central nervous system toxicity: Historical insights into the chronic neurological sequelae of mefloquine?  

PubMed Central

Mefloquine is a quinoline derivative antimalarial which demonstrates promise for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Traditionally employed in prophylaxis and treatment of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria, recent changes to the approved European and U.S. product labeling for mefloquine now warn of a risk of permanent and irreversible neurological sequelae including vertigo, loss of balance and symptoms of polyneuropathy. The newly described permanent nature of certain of these neurological effects challenges the conventional belief that they are due merely to the long half-life of mefloquine and its continued presence in the body, and raises new considerations for the rational use of the drug against parasitic disease. In this opinion, it is proposed that many of the reported lasting adverse neurological effects of mefloquine are consistent with the chronic sequelae of a well characterized but idiosyncratic central nervous system (CNS) toxicity syndrome (or toxidrome) common to certain historical antimalarial and antiparasitic quinolines and associated with a risk of permanent neuronal degeneration within specific CNS regions including the brainstem. Issues in the development and licensing of mefloquine are then considered in the context of historical awareness of the idiosyncratic CNS toxicity of related quinoline drugs. It is anticipated that the information presented in this opinion will aid in the future clinical recognition of the mefloquine toxidrome and its chronic sequelae, and in informing improved regulatory evaluation of mefloquine and related quinoline drugs as they are explored for expanded antiparasitic use and for other indications. PMID:25057461

Nevin, Remington L.

2014-01-01

401

Stem cell transplantation in neurological diseases: improving effectiveness in animal models  

PubMed Central

Neurological diseases afflict a growing proportion of the human population. There are two reasons for this: first, the average age of the population (especially in the industrialized world) is increasing, and second, the diagnostic tools to detect these pathologies are now more sophisticated and can be used on a higher percentage of the population. In many cases, neurological disease has a pharmacological treatment which, as in the case of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy, and Multiple Sclerosis can reduce the symptoms and slow down the course of the disease but cannot reverse its effects or heal the patient. In the last two decades the transplantation approach, by means of stem cells of different origin, has been suggested for the treatment of neurological diseases. The choice of slightly different animal models and the differences in methods of stem cell preparation make it difficult to compare the results of transplantation experiments. Moreover, the translation of these results into clinical trials with human subjects is difficult and has so far met with little success. This review seeks to discuss the reasons for these difficulties by considering the differences between human and animal cells (including isolation, handling and transplantation) and between the human disease model and the animal disease model. PMID:25364724

Adami, Raffaella; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bottai, Daniele

2014-01-01

402

Serum A? is Predictive for Short-Term Neurological Deficits After Acute Ischemic Stroke.  

PubMed

Mounting evidence suggests that ischemic stroke (IS) is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). IS and vascular risk factors increase the risk for AD. However, whether AD pathologies exist in IS and the effects of these pathologies on stroke remain unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the alterations of serum A? after acute IS (AIS), and its correlations with the neurological deficits, infarction volume, and site after stroke. AIS patients (n = 35) were recruited within 24 h of symptom onset. Age- and gender-matched AD patients (n = 48) and cognitively normal controls (NC, n = 37) were also enrolled. Serum A?40 and A?42 and the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale Score (NIHSS) were measured on day 1, 3, and 7 after stroke onset. We found that serum A?40 and A?42 levels were increased at day 1 and reached peak levels at day 3, and decreased to pre-stroke levels at day 7. Serum A?40 levels at day 1 were correlated with the NIHSS scores and infarction volume of AIS patients. Serum A?42 levels at day 1 were significantly higher in IS patients with dominant gray matter infarction. Serum A?40 levels at day 1 were predictive for NIHSS at day 7. Our results indicate that AIS can induce the generation of A? in the brain, which may in turn be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological deficits after stroke. Serum A? might be predictive for the short-term neurological deficits after AIS. PMID:25612546

Liu, Yu-Hui; Cao, Hong-Yuan; Wang, Ye-Ran; Jiao, Shu-Sheng; Bu, Xian-Le; Zeng, Fan; Wang, Qing-Hua; Li, Jing; Deng, Juan; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Wang, Yan-Jiang

2015-04-01

403

The long-term effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on neurologic development.  

PubMed

A large body of documented evidence has found that smoking during pregnancy is harmful to both the mother and the fetus. Prenatal exposure to nicotine in various forms alters neurologic development in experimental animals and may increase the risk for neurologic conditions in humans. There is a positive association between maternal smoking and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS); however, the connection between nicotine addiction, depression, attention disorders, and learning and behavior problems in humans is not straightforward. Nicotine's action on the production and function of neurotransmitters makes it a prime suspect in the pathology of these diseases. Nicotine accentuates neurotransmitter function in adults but desensitizes these functions in prenatally exposed infants and children. This desensitization causes an abnormal response throughout the lifespan. Furthermore, nicotine use by adolescents and adults can alleviate some of the symptoms caused by these neurotransmitter problems while they increase the risk for nicotine addiction. Although nicotine replacement drugs are used by pregnant women, there is no clear indication that they improve outcomes during pregnancy, and they may add to the damage that occurs to the developing neurologic system in the fetus. Understanding the effects of nicotine exposure is important in providing safe care for pregnant women, children, and families and for developing appropriate smoking cessation programs during pregnancy. PMID:20189133

Blood-Siegfried, Jane; Rende, Elizabeth K

2010-01-01

404

Stem cell transplantation in neurological diseases: improving effectiveness in animal models.  

PubMed

Neurological diseases afflict a growing proportion of the human population. There are two reasons for this: first, the average age of the population (especially in the industrialized world) is increasing, and second, the diagnostic tools to detect these pathologies are now more sophisticated and can be used on a higher percentage of the population. In many cases, neurological disease has a pharmacological treatment which, as in the case of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy, and Multiple Sclerosis can reduce the symptoms and slow down the course of the disease but cannot reverse its effects or heal the patient. In the last two decades the transplantation approach, by means of stem cells of different origin, has been suggested for the treatment of neurological diseases. The choice of slightly different animal models and the differences in methods of stem cell preparation make it difficult to compare the results of transplantation experiments. Moreover, the translation of these results into clinical trials with human subjects is difficult and has so far met with little success. This review seeks to discuss the reasons for these difficulties by considering the differences between human and animal cells (including isolation, handling and transplantation) and between the human disease model and the animal disease model. PMID:25364724

Adami, Raffaella; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bottai, Daniele

2014-01-01

405

Bartonella spp. bacteremia and rheumatic symptoms in patients from Lyme disease-endemic region.  

PubMed

Bartonella spp. infection has been reported in association with an expanding spectrum of symptoms and lesions. Among 296 patients examined by a rheumatologist, prevalence of antibodies against Bartonella henselae, B. koehlerae, or B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii (185 [62%]) and Bartonella spp. bacteremia (122 [41.1%]) was high. Conditions diagnosed before referral included Lyme disease (46.6%), arthralgia/arthritis (20.6%), chronic fatigue (19.6%), and fibromyalgia (6.1%). B. henselae bacteremia was significantly associated with prior referral to a neurologist, most often for blurred vision, subcortical neurologic deficits, or numbness in the extremities, whereas B. koehlerae bacteremia was associated with examination by an infectious disease physician. This cross-sectional study cannot establish a causal link between Bartonella spp. infection and the high frequency of neurologic symptoms, myalgia, joint pain, or progressive arthropathy in this population; however, the contribution of Bartonella spp. infection, if any, to these symptoms should be systematically investigated. PMID:22516098

Maggi, Ricardo G; Mozayeni, B Robert; Pultorak, Elizabeth L; Hegarty, Barbara C; Bradley, Julie M; Correa, Maria; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

2012-05-01

406

Jean-Martin Charcot at the birth of Russian neurology.  

PubMed

Russian neurology was virtually nonexistent in the middle of the 19th century which made a traineeship abroad an absolute necessity. Charcot and his school did not just offer professional training, but created the best minds, which would determine the direction of neurology and psychiatry in Russia for many decades. After returning home, young Russian doctors not only implemented everything they had learned in Western Europe, but proceeded to make their own original contributions. The most talented pupils of Charcot, including such prominent names as Kozhevnikov, Korsakov, Minor, Bekhterev and Darkshevich, became the founders of neurological schools in Russia. They laid the basis for the further development of neurology and psychiatry. Remarkably, though trained by the same teachers, each of these future 'founding fathers' of these neurological and psychiatric schools followed his own individual path which resulted in an undeniable diversity in Russian neurology and psychiatry during the period of their formation. PMID:21252555

Vein, Alla A

2011-01-01

407

The beginnings of the southern child/pediatric neurology society.  

PubMed

The founding and early development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society was in many ways parallel to that of the Child Neurology Society. The organization started out as the Southern Child Neurology Society but the name was changed at the time of incorporation so as to avoid confusion of identity and purpose with the larger Child Neurology Society. Although there are archives of early days and the later development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society, the details have never been set down in a narrative explaining the events that led to the development of the organization. In this paper, we try to produce a written record of the history of the founding and early development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society. PMID:24646505

Dyken, Paul Richard; Bodensteiner, John B

2015-04-01

408

Autism and gastrointestinal symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autism is a collection of behavioral symptoms characterized by dysfunction in social interaction and communication in affected\\u000a children. It is typically associated with restrictive, repetitive, and stereotypic behavior and manifests within the first\\u000a 3 years of life. The cause of this disorder is not known. Over the past decade, a significant upswing in research has occurred\\u000a to examine the biologic

Karoly Horvath; Jay A. Perman

2002-01-01

409

Hysterical symptoms in ophthalmology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ophthalmologic symptoms are often not sufficiently accounted for by organic pathology. The complaints of these patients have been labeled hysterical, psychogenic, non-organic, or functional. The psychiatric nosology in this area may be the most confusing in the whole field of clinical medicine. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III-R) offers a classification designed to reduce non-empirical concepts and

Michael Weller; Peter Wiedemann

1989-01-01

410

Subliminal unconscious conflict alpha power inhibits supraliminal conscious symptom experience  

PubMed Central

Our approach is based on a tri-partite method of integrating psychodynamic hypotheses, cognitive subliminal processes, and psychophysiological alpha power measures. We present ten social phobic subjects with three individually selected groups of words representing unconscious conflict, conscious symptom experience, and Osgood Semantic negative valence words used as a control word group. The unconscious conflict and conscious symptom words, presented subliminally and supraliminally, act as primes preceding the conscious symptom and control words presented as supraliminal targets. With alpha power as a marker of inhibitory brain activity, we show that unconscious conflict primes, only when presented subliminally, have a unique inhibitory effect on conscious symptom targets. This effect is absent when the unconscious conflict primes are presented supraliminally, or when the target is the control words. Unconscious conflict prime effects were found to correlate with a measure of repressiveness in a similar previous study (Shevrin et al., 1992, 1996). Conscious symptom primes have no inhibitory effect when presented subliminally. Inhibitory effects with conscious symptom primes are present, but only when the primes are supraliminal, and they did not correlate with repressiveness in a previous study (Shevrin et al., 1992, 1996). We conclude that while the inhibition following supraliminal conscious symptom primes is due to conscious threat bias, the inhibition following subliminal unconscious conflict primes provides a neurological blueprint for dynamic repression: it is only activated subliminally by an individual's unconscious conflict and has an inhibitory effect specific only to the conscious symptom. These novel findings constitute neuroscientific evidence for the psychoanalytic concepts of unconscious conflict and repression, while extending neuroscience theory and methods into the realm of personal, psychological meaning. PMID:24046743

Shevrin, Howard; Snodgrass, Michael; Brakel, Linda A. W.; Kushwaha, Ramesh; Kalaida, Natalia L.; Bazan, Ariane

2013-01-01

411

[The practical use of acupuncture and moxibustion treatment cooperated with neurological practice].  

PubMed

The greatest number of patients in our department are those referred from the Department of Neurology. These patients usually present symptoms or conditions such as peripheral facial paralysis, primary headache, or cerebrovascular disorders; acupuncture and moxibustion treatment have resulted in an overall favorable effect. Regarding the effect of acupuncture and moxibustion treatment on the prevention of migraine attacks, a two-month course of acupuncture has been shown to decrease the number of days with a slight or moderate headache. Furthermore, we have seen a relation between the alleviation of headache and that of muscular tenderness in the neck-shoulder region and masticatory muscles. The results of Arterial Spin-Labeling MRI, by which we determine changes in cerebral blood flow before and after acupuncture stimulation in patients with migraine, have revealed that acupuncture stimulation induces an increase of blood flow in the thalamus and hypothalamus, opercular part, cingulate gyrus, and islet. This differs from the response obtained in healthy individuals. It has been shown that acupuncture and moxibustion for tension headache is highly effective and the action mechanism of acupuncture and moxibustion is associated with relaxation of masticatory muscles hypertonicity in the neck-shoulder region and normalization of circulation dynamics, contributing thereby to the alleviation of headache. Moreover, the automatic nervous system has been found to be related to such analgesic mechanism. Based on our experience, we consider that traditional medicine based on acupuncture and moxibustion is highly effective in patients with neurological symptoms. PMID:23196594

Yamaguchi, Satoru; Araki, Nobuo

2012-01-01

412

Transient ischemic attack  

MedlinePLUS

... TIA) occurs when blood flow to a part of the brain stops for a brief time. A person will have stroke-like symptoms for ... Often, the symptoms and signs of a TIA will have gone away by the time ... exam to check for heart and blood vessel problems, as well ...

413

The Zwicky Transient Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) is a synoptic survey for high-cadence optical time-domain astronomy. Building upon the experience and infrastructure of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), ZTF will use a new 45 square degree camera to survey more than an order of magnitude faster than PTF in sky area and volume in order to identify rare, fast-varying sources. Major science programs will include searches for young supernovae, rare fast-declining transients, potentially hazardous asteroids, and gravitational-wave counterparts. I will discuss the scientific motivation for the survey and development efforts to date.

Bellm, E.

414

Transient nucleation in glasses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nucleation rates in condensed systems are frequently not at their steady state values. Such time dependent (or transient) nucleation is most clearly observed in devitrification studies of metallic and silicate glasses. The origin of transient nucleation and its role in the formation and stability of desired phases and microstructures are discussed. Numerical models of nucleation in isothermal and nonisothermal situations, based on the coupled differential equations describing cluster evolution within the classical theory, are presented. The importance of transient nucleation in glass formation and crystallization is discussed.

Kelton, K. F.

1991-01-01

415

Early neurologic abnormalities associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection in a cohort of Peruvian children  

PubMed Central

Objective Because human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) may occur in some children infected with HTLV-1-infected, we sought to determine the prevalence of neurologic abnormalities and any associations with infective dermatitis in these children. Study design We enrolled 58 children infected with HTLV-1 and 42 uninfected children (ages 3-17) of mothers infected with HTLV-1 in a family study in Lima, Peru. We obtained medical and developmental histories, surveyed current neurologic symptoms, and conducted a standardized neurologic examination without prior knowledge of HTLV-1 status. Results HTLV-1 infection was associated with reported symptoms of lower extremity weakness/fatigue (OR=6.1, CI:0.7–281), lumbar pain (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]:0.4–8), and paresthesia/dysesthesia (OR=2.6, CI:0.6–15.8). HTLV-1 infection was associated with lower-extremity hyperreflexia (OR=3.1, CI:0.8–14.2), ankle clonus (OR=5.0, CI:1.0–48.3), and extensor plantar reflex (OR undefined; p = 0.2). Among children infected HTLV-1, a history of infective dermatitis was associated with weakness (OR=2.7, CI:0.3–33), lumbar pain (OR=1.3, CI:0.2–8), paresthesia/dysesthesia (OR=2.9, CI:0.5–20), and urinary disturbances (OR=5.7, CI:0.5–290). Conclusions Abnormal neurologic findings were common in Peruvian children infected with HTLV-1, and several findings were co-prevalent with infective dermatitis. Pediatricians should monitor children infected with HTLV-1 for neurologic abnormalities. PMID:19628219

Kendall, Emily A.; González, Elsa; Espinoza, Iván; Tipismana, Martín; Verdonck, Kristien; Clark, Daniel; Vermund, Sten H.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

2009-01-01

416

Neurology of microgravity and space travel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exposure to microgravity and space travel produce several neurologic changes, including SAS, ataxia, postural disturbances, perceptual illusions, neuromuscular weakness, and fatigue. Inflight SAS, perceptual illusions, and ocular changes are of more importance. After landing, however, ataxia, perceptual illusions, neuromuscular weakness, and fatigue play greater roles in astronaut health and readaptation to a terrestrial environment. Cardiovascular adjustments to microgravity, bone demineralization, and possible decompression sickness and excessive radiation exposure contribute further to medical problems of astronauts in space. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which microgravity adversely affects the nervous system and more effective treatments will provide healthier, happier, and longer stays in space on the space station Freedom and during the mission to Mars.

Fujii, M. D.; Patten, B. M.

1992-01-01

417

Robotics, motor learning, and neurologic recovery.  

PubMed

Robotic devices are helping shed light on human motor control in health and injury. By using robots to apply novel force fields to the arm, investigators are gaining insight into how the nervous system models its external dynamic environment. The nervous system builds internal models gradually by experience and uses them in combination with impedance and feedback control strategies. Internal models are robust to environmental and neural noise, generalized across space, implemented in multiple brain regions, and developed in childhood. Robots are also being used to assist in repetitive movement practice following neurologic injury, providing insight into movement recovery. Robots can haptically assess sensorimotor performance, administer training, quantify amount of training, and improve motor recovery. In addition to providing insight into motor control, robotic paradigms may eventually enhance motor learning and rehabilitation beyond the levels possible with conventional training techniques. PMID:15255778

Reinkensmeyer, David J; Emken, Jeremy L; Cramer, Steven C

2004-01-01

418

Clinical features and neurologic progression of hyperargininemia.  

PubMed

Hyperargininemia is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of enzyme arginase I. It is a rare pan-ethnic disease with a clinical presentation distinct from that of other urea cycle disorders, and hyperammonemic encephalopathy is not usually observed. Hyperargininemia is one of the few treatable causes of pediatric spastic paraparesis, and can be confused with cerebral palsy. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical onset, neurologic manifestations, progression of abnormalities, electroencephalographic abnormalities, and laboratory findings of 16 Brazilian patients with hyperargininemia. Relevant data about the clinical spectrum and natural history of hyperargininemia are detailed. Progressive spastic diplegia constituted the key clinical abnormality in this group, but variability in clinical presentation and progression were evident in our series. Seizures in hyperargininemia may be more common than reported in previous studies. Features distinguishing hyperargininemia from cerebral palsy and hereditary spastic paraplegia are emphasized in this large series of patients. PMID:22633632

Carvalho, Daniel R; Brum, Jaime M; Speck-Martins, Carlos E; Ventura, Fabrício D; Navarro, Mônica M M; Coelho, Kátia E F A; Portugal, Dalton; Pratesi, Riccardo

2012-06-01

419

Neurologic Aspects of Infections in International Travelers  

PubMed Central

Background As international travel for business and pleasure becomes part of contemporary lifestyle, the clinician today is confronted with an increasing number of travelers returning ill with unfamiliar syndromes. The physician will encounter a myriad of patients with exotic infections, emerging infectious diseases, or resurgent Old-World infections. Review Summary This review article will discuss salient points of important infectious diseases associated with overseas travel, provide a syndromic approach to the traveler who returns with neurologic manifestations, and list resources for additional diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive information. Conclusions As many of infections acquired in other countries can directly or indirectly affect the nervous system, the care of the ill traveler often falls into the hands of neurologists. The contemporary neurologist should therefore be knowledgeable of the clinical manifestations, potential complications, and appropriate management of region-specific infections. PMID:15631642

Han, May H.; Zunt, Joseph R.

2009-01-01

420

Neurologic manifestations of chronic methamphetamine abuse  

PubMed Central

Summary Chronic methamphetamine abuse has devastating effects on the central nervous system. The degree to which addicts will tolerate the dysfunction in the way they think, feel, move, and even look, is a powerful testimony to the addictive properties of this drug. While the mechanisms behind these disorders are complex, at their heart they involve the recurring increase in the concentrations of central monoamines with subsequent dysfunction in dopaminergic neurotransmission. The mainstay of treatment for the problems associated with chronic methamphetamine abuse is abstinence. However, by recognizing the manifestations of chronic abuse, clinicians will be better able to help their patients get treatment for their addiction and to deal with the neurologic complications related to chronic abuse. PMID:21803215

Rusyniak, Daniel E.

2011-01-01

421

Neurological comorbidity and epilepsy: implications for treatment.  

PubMed

Epilepsy is a chronic condition that may be associated with several other diseases. In these cases, we should consider the following points: (1) antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment may positively or negatively affect comorbid disease, (2) drugs used for treatment of co-morbid disease may influence seizure threshold, (3) AED toxicity can be affected by a comorbid condition and (4) co-administration of AEDs with drugs used for treatment of comorbid conditions can be associated with clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. In this article, we discuss problems that are usually encountered when an appropriate AED treatment has to be selected in newly diagnosed epileptic patients who also have (an)other neurological disease(s). Comorbidity of epilepsy with cerebrovascular diseases, dementias, mental retardation, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, brain tumours, infections of the CNS, migraine, sleep disturbances (obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome), substance abuse and multiple sclerosis is discussed. PMID:19527225

Zaccara, G

2009-07-01

422

Automatisms: bridging clinical neurology with criminal law.  

PubMed

The law, like neurology, grapples with the relationship between disease states and behavior. Sometimes, the two disciplines share the same terminology, such as automatism. In law, the "automatism defense" is a claim that action was involuntary or performed while unconscious. Someone charged with a serious crime can acknowledge committing the act and yet may go free if, relying on the expert testimony of clinicians, the court determines that the act of crime was committed in a state of automatism. In this review, we explore the relationship between the use of automatism in the legal and clinical literature. We close by addressing several issues raised by the automatism defense: semantic ambiguity surrounding the term automatism, the presence or absence of consciousness during automatisms, and the methodological obstacles that have hindered the study of cognition during automatisms. PMID:21145287

Rolnick, Joshua; Parvizi, Josef

2011-03-01

423

Transient renal dysfunction with reversible splenial lesion.  

PubMed

We report the case of a 6-month-old boy with transient renal dysfunction who had an intensified signal in the splenium of the corpus callosum on magnetic resonance imaging. He presented to hospital with fever and sudden disturbance of consciousness. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis did not show pleocytosis. The mild consciousness disturbance disappeared after 30 min, but the splenial signal persisted even after 8 days. Further, renal glucosuria, increased excretion of select amino acids, and abnormal fractional excretion of electrolytes were observed, indicating renal tubular dysfunction. The abnormal urinary findings spontaneously resolved by day 9 of hospitalization. The splenial lesion took 21 days to normalize. There were no signs of neurological complications 2 months later. This case suggests the possibility of renal involvement in splenial lesions. PMID:25336014

Watanabe, Toru; Matsuda, Tomoka; Kitagata, Ryoichi; Tajima, Iwao; Ono, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Keiko; Shirai, Masami; Endoh, Akira; Hongo, Teruaki

2014-10-01

424

The pathology of transient regional osteoporosis.  

PubMed Central

Biopsy specimens from 19 patients with transient regional osteoporosis were studied. All patients presented with pain. There were nine patients with transient osteoporosis of the hip. Six of these specimens were therapeutic core biopsies, and three were femoral heads removed during total hip replacement. The other patients with osteoporosis in different locations had biopsies to rule out infection or neoplasm. Five of these patients had transient osteoporosis of the knee. Three had ankle involvement and two had involvement of the tibial shaft. Plain radiographs were available for study in all cases, and either a bone scan or an MRI was studied in each case. Except for one patient who was lost to follow-up, all had resolution of symptoms and radiographic changes. The histologic changes in the biopsies were distinctive, although they were present in varying degrees. There was edema and reactive bone formation in the marrow spaces. In addition, osteoclastic bone resorption was active in 14 of the 19 cases. Although lipid cysts were sometimes found in the marrow spaces, there was no evidence of fat necrosis or bone necrosis. The high bone turnover and absence of fat necrosis suggests that this disorder is a vasomotor response rather than an early stage of osteonecrosis. Awareness of these characteristic histologic changes should enable the pathologist to make a specific diagnosis of transient regional osteoporosis when a biopsy is required. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:9807706

McCarthy, E. F.

1998-01-01

425

7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Neurology.  

PubMed

Immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy has been used and studied as a treatment for a variety of neurological conditions for decades. In some of these disorders Ig therapy has a significant role as a first-line treatment. This session explores the use of Ig therapy in immune-mediated peripheral neuropathies and various central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Informative practice points relating to the management and treatment of these diseases are discussed. Potential future neurological indications for Ig therapy, as well as data on efficacy and possible mechanisms of action, are also presented. In peripheral immune-mediated neuropathies, data show good response rates to Ig therapy and it is often used as a first-line treatment. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) are both well tolerated, but dose and dosing frequency should be based on individual clinical responses. In Alzheimer's disease, although clinical data show no significant differences between IVIg and placebo, biomarker studies indicate that plasma-derived antibodies may be involved in clearance of amyloid aggregates from the brain. Data suggest that the use of high IVIg doses in early-stage Alzheimer's treatment may warrant further investigation. Ig therapy is considered a valuable option for autoimmune encephalitis, an antibody-mediated CNS disease. Combination treatment with IVIg and corticosteroids shows promising results and is proposed as a first-line treatment in these disorders. Until recently, very little was understood about the pathogenesis of chronic pain disorders. Data now indicate that perpetuation of the pain response may be underpinned by central immune activation. Some data suggest that Ig therapy may mitigate this effect, with good response rates in a number of studies, but these data need confirmation. PMID:25546749

Nobile-Orazio, E; Lewis, R A

2014-12-01

426

[Phenylketonuria with adult-onset neurological manifestation].  

PubMed

We report a male patient with phenylketonuria (PKU) who developed multisystem neurological manifestation in his fourth decade. He was born in 1957 when a neonatal mass screening had not been available. His neuropsychological development was entirely normal and he was a good athlete during his high school days. He was in good health until the age of 32, when his vision was blurred. In four months his gait progressively deteriorated to bind him to a wheel chair. On physical examination he had red hair and gray eyes. IQ was 68. Visual field showed concentric narrowing and his visual acuity was 0.2/0.3 (2.0/2.0). The limbs were spastic and weakened. He complained of pain in the extremities. He suffered from pollakisuria. Routine blood tests and CSF findings were normal. He was also found to be normal in peripheral nerve conduction studies and central conduction studies of SEP and VEP. EEG showed diffuse slowing in background activities. T2-weighted MRI of the head revealed widespread high-intensity areas in the deep white matter especially in bilateral occipital lobes. Serum aminogram disclosed the remarkably elevated phenylalanine (Phe) level to 1663 nmol/ml (normal range 50-90) and reduced tyrosine. Urinary secretion of endogenous tetrahydroxy-biopterin (BH4; coenzyme of Phe hydroxylase) remained in a normal range, and oral administration of 100 mg/kg of BH4 failed to normalize the serum Phe level. Despite a strict dietary control (oral intake of Phe less than 0.5 g/day), the serum Phe level remained high around 500 nmol/ml and his neurological deficits still deteriorated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8299276

Ishimaru, K; Tamasawa, N; Baba, M; Matsunaga, M; Takebe, K

1993-09-01

427

Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases  

PubMed Central

Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4) in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current) in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation, and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials, and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic, and physiopathological aspects. PMID:25805968

DiFrancesco, Jacopo C.; DiFrancesco, Dario

2015-01-01

428

The neurology of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata  

PubMed Central

Background To describe the neurologic profiles of Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP); a peroxisomal disorder clinically characterized by skeletal abnormalities, congenital cataracts, severe growth and developmental impairments and immobility of joints. Defective plasmalogen biosynthesis is the main biochemical feature. Methods Observational study including review of clinical and biochemical abnormalities, genotype, presence of seizures and neurophysiological studies of a cohort of 16 patients with RCDP. Results Patients with the severe phenotype nearly failed to achieve any motor or cognitive skills, whereas patients with the milder phenotype had profound intellectual disability but were able to walk and had verbal communication skills. Eighty-eight percent of patients developed epileptic seizures. The age of onset paralleled the severity of the clinical and biochemical phenotype. Myoclonic jerks, followed by atypical absences were most frequently observed. All patients with clinical seizures had interictal encephalographic evidence of epilepsy. Visual evoked (VEP) and brain auditory potential (BAEP) studies showed initial normal latency times in 93% of patients. Deterioration of VEP occurred in a minority in both the severe and the milder phenotype. BAEP and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) were more likely to become abnormal in the severe phenotype. Plasmalogens were deficient in all patients. In the milder phenotype levels of plasmalogens were significantly higher in erythrocytes than in the severe phenotype. Phytanic acid levels ranged from normal to severely increased, but had no relation with the neurological phenotype. Conclusion Neurodevelopmental deficits and age-related occurrence of seizures are characteristic of RCDP and are related to the rest-activity in plasmalogen biosynthesis. Evoked potential studies are more likely to become abnormal in the severe phenotype, but are of no predictive value in single cases of RCDP. PMID:24172221

2013-01-01

429

Sex and relationship dysfunction in neurological disability  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—(1) to ascertain how many people with neurological disability experience sexual or relationship problems; (2) to examine the interplay of neurological disability and sexual function within the context of the dyadic relationship; (3) to consider the implications of the results for service provision.?METHODS—A survey of outpatients attending Hunters Moor Regional Rehabilitation Centre, Newcastle upon Tyne over a 6 month period. Standardised measures of sexual function and concern, relationship satisfaction, disability, and mental health were used.?RESULTS—Seventy people were interviewed (18% of the potential study population). Prevalence figures therefore refer to this self selected sample. Fifty one per cent had experienced a change in sexual function and 27% were concerned about this change. Of those in cohabiting relationships 25% were experiencing difficulties. Gender was significantly associated with concern about sexual function, men being more concerned. A high score on the marital adjustment scale indicating relationship dissatisfaction was the best predictor of change in and concern about sexual function. Change in sexual function and duration of illness were the most powerful predictors of relationship dissatisfaction.?CONCLUSION—If concern is taken as an indication of a desire for help more than one in four of this sample required help for sexual dysfunction. Sexual and relationship functioning were very closely associated and dysfunction in either of these areas was the best predictor of dysfunction in the other area. The dyadic relationship is an important institution in the management of disability. Sexual dysfunction can be predictive of difficulties within a relationship. Any service designed to address sexual health should also address relationship issues.?? PMID:9854964

Chandler, B; Brown, S

1998-01-01

430

Neurological Disease Rises from Ocean to Bring Model for Human Epilepsy to Life  

PubMed Central

Domoic acid of macroalgal origin was used for traditional and medicinal purposes in Japan and largely forgotten until its rediscovery in diatoms that poisoned 107 people after consumption of contaminated mussels. The more severely poisoned victims had seizures and/or amnesia and four died; however, one survivor unexpectedly developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) a year after the event. Nearly a decade later, several thousand sea lions have stranded on California beaches with neurological symptoms. Analysis of the animals stranded over an eight year period indicated five clusters of acute neurological poisoning; however, nearly a quarter have stranded individually outside these events with clinical signs of a chronic neurological syndrome similar to TLE. These poisonings are not limited to sea lions, which serve as readily observed sentinels for other marine animals that strand during domoic acid poisoning events, including several species of dolphin and whales. Acute domoic acid poisoning is five-times more prominent in adult female sea lions as a result of the proximity of their year-round breeding grounds to major domoic acid bloom events. The chronic neurological syndrome, on the other hand, is more prevalent in young animals, with many potentially poisoned in utero. The sea lion rookeries of the Channel Islands are at the crossroads of domoic acid producing harmful algal blooms and a huge industrial discharge site for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs). Studies in experimental animals suggest that chronic poisoning observed in immature sea lions may result from a spatial and temporal coincidence of DDTs and domoic acid during early life stages. Emergence of an epilepsy syndrome from the ocean brings a human epilepsy model to life and provides unexpected insights into interaction with legacy contaminants and expression of disease at different life stages. PMID:22069654

Ramsdell, John S.

2010-01-01

431

Neurological manifestations of oculodentodigital dysplasia: a Cx43 channelopathy of the central nervous system?  

PubMed Central

The coordination of tissue function is mediated by gap junctions (GJs) that enable direct cell–cell transfer of metabolic and electric signals. GJs are formed by connexins of which Cx43 is most widespread in the human body. In the brain, Cx43 GJs are mostly found in astroglia where they coordinate the propagation of Ca2+ waves, spatial K+ buffering, and distribution of glucose. Beyond its role in direct intercellular communication, Cx43 also forms unapposed, non-junctional hemichannels in the plasma membrane of glial cells. These allow the passage of several neuro- and gliotransmitters that may, combined with downstream paracrine signaling, complement direct GJ communication among glial cells and sustain glial-neuronal signaling. Mutations in the GJA1 gene encoding Cx43 have been identified in a rare, mostly autosomal dominant syndrome called oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD). ODDD patients display a pleiotropic phenotype reflected by eye, hand, teeth, and foot abnormalities, as well as craniofacial and bone malformations. Remarkably, neurological symptoms such as dysarthria, neurogenic bladder (manifested as urinary incontinence), spasticity or muscle weakness, ataxia, and epilepsy are other prominent features observed in ODDD patients. Over 10 mutations detected in patients diagnosed with neurological disorders are associated with altered functionality of Cx43 GJs/hemichannels, but the link between ODDD-related abnormal channel activities and neurologic phenotype is still elusive. Here, we present an overview on the nature of the mutants conveying structural and functional changes of Cx43 channels and discuss available evidence for aberrant Cx43 GJ and hemichannel function. In a final step, we examine the possibilities of how channel dysfunction may lead to some of the neurological manifestations of ODDD. PMID:24133447

De Bock, Marijke; Kerrebrouck, Marianne; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc

2013-01-01

432

Neurological disease rises from ocean to bring model for human epilepsy to life.  

PubMed

Domoic acid of macroalgal origin was used for traditional and medicinal purposes in Japan and largely forgotten until its rediscovery in diatoms that poisoned 107 people after consumption of contaminated mussels. The more severely poisoned victims had seizures and/or amnesia and four died; however, one survivor unexpectedly developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) a year after the event. Nearly a decade later, several thousand sea lions have stranded on California beaches with neurological symptoms. Analysis of the animals stranded over an eight year period indicated five clusters of acute neurological poisoning; however, nearly a quarter have stranded individually outside these events with clinical signs of a chronic neurological syndrome similar to TLE. These poisonings are not limited to sea lions, which serve as readily observed sentinels for other marine animals that strand during domoic acid poisoning events, including several species of dolphin and whales. Acute domoic acid poisoning is five-times more prominent in adult female sea lions as a result of the proximity of their year-round breeding grounds to major domoic acid bloom events. The chronic neurological syndrome, on the other hand, is more prevalent in young animals, with many potentially poisoned in utero. The sea lion rookeries of the Channel Islands are at the crossroads of domoic acid producing harmful algal blooms and a huge industrial discharge site for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs). Studies in experimental animals suggest that chronic poisoning observed in immature sea lions may result from a spatial and temporal coincidence of DDTs and domoic acid during early life stages. Emergence of an epilepsy syndrome from the ocean brings a human epilepsy model to life and provides unexpected insights into interaction with legacy contaminants and expression of disease at different life stages. PMID:22069654

Ramsdell, John S

2010-07-01

433

Atopic Dermatitis: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment Tips Bedbugs Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment Tips ... 2015 American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission.

434

Skin Cancer: Signs and Symptoms  

MedlinePLUS

... treatments Q - T Skin cancer Signs, symptoms Skin cancer: Signs and symptoms The most common warning sign ... appears in many ways. Learn more about skin cancer: Skin cancer Skin cancer: Who gets and causes ...

435

Symptomatic management for gastroparesis: antiemetics, analgesics, and symptom modulators.  

PubMed

Although prokinetic agents typically are used for gastroparesis, antiemetic, analgesic, and neuromodulatory medications may help manage nausea, vomiting, pain, or discomfort. Antiemetic benefits are supported by few case reports. An open series reported symptom reductions with transdermal granisetron in gastroparesis. Opiates are not advocated in gastroparesis because they worsen nausea and delay emptying. Neuromodulators have theoretical utility, but the tricyclic agent nortriptyline showed no benefits over placebo in an idiopathic gastroparesis study raising doubts about this strategy. Neurologic and cardiac toxicities of these medications are recognized. Additional controlled study is warranted to define antiemetic, analgesic, and neuromodulator usefulness in gastroparesis. PMID:25667027

Hasler, William L

2015-03-01

436

Endocrine symptoms as the initial manifestation of Wilson's disease.  

PubMed

Wilson's disease is a rare genetic disorder of copper metabolism. The difference in copper tissue accumulation is responsible for the various clinical manifestations of this disorder. If left untreated, Wilson's disease progresses to hepatic failure, severe neurological disability, and even death. Due to the complex clinical picture of Wilson's disease, its diagnosis relies on a high index of suspicion. In our paper, we present endocrine symptoms suggesting the presence of insulinoma and hyperprolactinemia as the initial clinical manifestation of Wilson's disease in a young female. Zinc acetate treatment resulted in the disappearance of hypoglycemia, galactorrhea, and menstrual abnormalities. PMID:22737053

Krysiak, Robert; Handzlik-Orlik, Gabriela; Okopien, Boguslaw

2012-06-01

437

The LOFAR Transients Pipeline  

E-print Network

Current and future astronomical survey facilities provide a remarkably rich opportunity for transient astronomy, combining unprecedented fields of view with high sensitivity and the ability to access previously unexplored wavelength regimes. This is particularly true of LOFAR, a recently-commissioned, low-frequency radio interferometer, based in the Netherlands and with stations across Europe. The identification of and response to transients is one of LOFAR's key science goals. However, the large data volumes which LOFAR produces, combined with the scientific requirement for rapid response, make automation essential. To support this, we have developed the LOFAR Transients Pipeline, or TraP. The TraP ingests multi-frequency image data from LOFAR or other instruments and searches it for transients and variables, providing automatic alerts of significant detections and populating a lightcurve database for further analysis by astronomers. Here, we discuss the scientific goals of the TraP and how it has been desig...

Swinbank, John D; Molenaar, Gijs J; Rol, Evert; Rowlinson, Antonia; Scheers, Bart; Spreeuw, Hanno; Bell, Martin E; Broderick, Jess W; Carbone, Dario; van der Horst, Alexander J; Law, Casey J; Wise, Michael; Breton, Rene P; Cendes, Yvette; Corbel, Stéphane; Eislöffel, Jochen; Falcke, Heino; Fender, Rob; Greißmeier, Jean-Mathias; Hessels, Jason W T; Stappers, Benjamin W; Stewart, Adam J; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Wijnands, Rudy; Zarka, Philippe

2015-01-01

438

Transient infrared emission spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transient infrared emission spectroscopy (TIRES) is a new method that produces analytically useful emission spectra from optically thick, solid samples by greatly reducing self-absorption of emitted radiation. The method reduces self-absorption by creating a thin, short-lived, heated layer at the sample surface and collecting the transient emission from this layer. The technique requires no sample preparation and may be applied

J. F. McClelland

1989-01-01

439

Gamma ray transients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

Cline, Thomas L.

1987-01-01

440

Somatic symptoms and depressive symptoms among older adult Korean immigrants.  

PubMed

Given the lack of understanding of how Korean immigrants express depressive symptoms, the purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to describe somatic symptoms and depressive symptoms and examine the relationship between them, as reported by older adult Korean immigrants. Purposive sampling was used in this study of 160 older adult (ages 65 to 91) Korean immigrants. Most of these participants immigrated to the United States at an older age. They reported a high level of depressive symptoms, and these symptoms were closely associated with somatic symptoms, a finding that coincides with previous studies differentiating Korean individuals from individuals of other cultures. The findings from this study highlight the need for health care providers to be aware of and recognize cultural differences in how patients express depressive symptoms somatically when assessing and treating depression within the older adult Korean immigrant population. PMID:24971586

Lee, Young Me

2015-01-01