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Sample records for transverse rupture strength

  1. Influence of Diamond Particles Coated with TiO2 Film on Wettability of Vitrified Bond and Transverse Rupture Strength (TRS) of Vitrified Bond Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongdong; Wan, Long; Liu, Xiaopan; Hu, Weida; Li, Jianwei

    2016-06-01

    TiO2 films were prepared on the surface of the diamond particles using a classical sol-gel method. The results showed that the TiO2 covered on the diamond surface as a rough and dense film with anatase phase, and tightly combined with the diamond substrates via the Ti-O-C bond. The initial oxidation temperature and compression strength of diamond were improved to 725 °C and 23.8 N with TiO2 film coated. TiO2 film increased the roughness of the diamond surface, promoted its mutual solubility, and formed the chemical bonding (Ti-O-Si) between the vitrified bond and the diamond. Therefore, the TiO2 film decreased the interface energy of the diamond, and promoted the wetting angle of vitrified bond with diamond to 36.7°. As a result, the TRS of vitrified bond diamond composites was increased to 76.3 MPa.

  2. Stress-rupture strength of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-rupture properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.

  3. In Vitro Study of Transverse Strength of Fiber Reinforced Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mosharraf, R.; Hashemi, Z.; Torkan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Reinforcement with fiber is an effective method for considerable improvement in flexural properties of indirect composite resin restorations. The aim of this in-vitro study was to compare the transverse strength of composite resin bars reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Materials and Methods Thirty six bar type composite resin specimens (3×2×25 mm) were constructed in three groups. The first group was the control group (C) without any fiber reinforcement. The specimens in the second group (P) were reinforced with pre-impregnated fibers and the third group (N) with non-impregnated fibers. These specimens were tested by the three-point bending method to measure primary transverse strength. Data were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests. Results There was a significant difference among the mean primary transverse strength in the three groups (P<0.001). The post-hoc (Tukey) test showed that there was a significant difference between the pre-impregnated and control groups in their primary transverse strength (P<0.001). Regarding deflection, there was also a significant difference among the three groups (P=0.001). There were significant differences among the mean deflection of the control group and two other groups (PC&N<.001 and PC&P=.004), but there was no significant difference between the non-and pre-impregnated groups (PN&P=.813). Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that reinforcement with fiber considerably increased the transverse strength of composite resin specimens, but impregnation of the fiber used implemented no significant difference in the transverse strength of composite resin samples. PMID:22457836

  4. The in situ transverse lamina strength of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaggs, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the work reported in this presentation is to determine the in situ transverse strength of a lamina within a composite laminate. From a fracture mechanics standpoint, in situ strength may be viewed as constrained cracking that has been shown to be a function of both lamina thickness and the stiffness of adjacent plies that serve to constrain the cracking process. From an engineering point of view, however, constrained cracking can be perceived as an apparent increase in lamina strength. With the growing need to design more highly loaded composite structures, the concept of in situ strength may prove to be a viable means of increasing the design allowables of current and future composite material systems. A simplified one dimensional analytical model is presented that is used to predict the strain at onset of transverse cracking. While it is accurate only for the most constrained cases, the model is important in that the predicted failure strain is seen to be a function of a lamina's thickness d and of the extensional stiffness bE theta of the adjacent laminae that constrain crack propagation in the 90 deg laminae.

  5. Stress-rupture strength and microstructural stability of W-HF-C wire reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    W-Hf-C/superalloy composites were found to be potentially useful for turbine blade applications on the basis of stress-rupture strength. The 100-and 1000-hour rupture strengths obtained for 70 volume percent fiber composites tested at 1090 C were 420 and 280 MN/sq m (61,000 and 41,000 psi). The investigation indicated that with better quality fibers, composites having 100- and 1000-hour rupture strengths of 570 and 370 MN/sq m (82,000 and 54,000 psi) may be obtained. Metallographic studies indicated sufficient fiber-matrix compatibility for long time applications at 1090 C for 1000 hours or more.

  6. Prediction of residual tensile strength of transversely impacted composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    The response to low velocity impact of graphite-epoxy T300/5208 composite laminates is discussed. Steel balls of 3/8 inch, 5/8 inch, and 1 inch diameter were the projectiles. Impact energy was limited to 1.2 joules. Impacted specimens were ultrasonically C scanned to determine the impact damaged region. The threshold value of impact energy for impact damage was found to be approximately 0.3 joules. A model was developed to predict the tensile residual strength of impact damaged specimens from fracture mechanics concepts. Impacted specimens were tested in tension to provide a fracture data base. The experimental results agreed well with the predictions from fracture mechanics. In this study, the maximum impact velocity used to simulate the low velocity transverse impact from common objects like tool drops was 10 m/s.

  7. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on Composite Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, configuration, and size on the transverse tension strength of two glass-epoxy materials, and one carbon-epoxy material, loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, arid/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was typically lower for longer span lengths due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law typically over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, this scaling law was not adequate for predicting transverse tension strength of heterogeneous, fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix composites.

  8. Characterisation of Laves phase precipitation and its correlation to creep rupture strength of ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, S.; Yang, M.; Song, X.L.; Tang, S.; Xiang, Z.D.

    2014-12-15

    The Laves phase precipitation process was characterised by means of field emission scanning electron microscopy to demonstrate its effect on creep rupture strength of steels with a fully ferritic matrix. To eliminate the effects of carbide and carbonitride precipitations so that the creep rupture data can be analysed exclusively in relation to the Laves phase precipitation process, an alloy Fe–9Cr–3Co–3W (wt.%) without C and N additions was used for the study. Creep rupture strengths were measured and volume fraction and particle size of Laves phase precipitates in the ruptured specimens were analysed. It was found that the creep rupture strength started to collapse (or decrease more rapidly) long before the Laves phase precipitation reached equilibrium fraction. This was related to the onset of the coarsening of Laves phase particles, which precipitated only on grain boundaries and hence contributed little to precipitation strengthening. Creep deformation had no effect either on the precipitation kinetics or on the growth kinetics of Laves phase particles. - Highlights: • Laves phase precipitation at 650 °C was characterised for Fe–9Cr–3W–3Co alloy. • Laves phase precipitated predominantly on grain boundaries. • Creep deformation had no effect on Laves phase precipitation and growth kinetics. • Creep strength started to collapse long before Laves phase precipitation is ended. • Collapse of creep strength was attributed to the coarsening of Laves phase particles.

  9. Self-healing slip pulses in dynamic rupture models due to velocity-dependent strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Seismological observations of short slip duration on faults (short rise time on seismograms) during earthquakes are not consistent with conventional crack models of dynamic rupture and fault slip. In these models, the leading edge of rupture stops only when a strong region is encountered, and slip at an interior point ceases only when waves from the stopped edge of slip propagate back to that point. In contrast, some seismological evidence suggests that the duration of slip is too short for waves to propagate from the nearest edge of the ruptured surface, perhaps even if the distance used is an asperity size instead of the entire rupture dimension. What controls slip duration, if not dimensions of the fault or of asperities? In this study, dynamic earthquake rupture and slip are represented by a propagating shear crack. For all propagating shear cracks, slip velocity is highest near the rupture front, and at a small distance behind the rupture front, the slip velocity decreases. As pointed out by Heaton (1990), if the crack obeys a negative slip-rate-dependent strength relation, the lower slip velocity behind the rupture front will lead to strengthening that further reduces the velocity, and under certain circumstances, healing of slip can occur. The boundary element method of Hamano (1974) is used in a program adapted from Andrews (1985) for numerical simulations of mode II rupture with two different velocity-dependent strength functions. For the first function, after a slip-weakening displacement, the crack follows an exponential velocity-weakening relation. The characteristic velocity V0 of the exponential determines the magnitude of the velocity-dependence at dynamic velocities. The velocity-dependence at high velocity is essentially zero when V0 is small and the resulting slip velocity distribution is similar to slip weakening. If V0 is larger, rupture propagation initially resembles slip-weakening, but spontaneous healing occurs behind the rupture front. The

  10. Stress-rupture strength and microstructural stability of tungsten-hafnium-carbon-wire reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Tungsten-hafnium-carbon - superalloy composites were found to be potentially useful for turbine blade applications on the basis of stress-rupture strength. The 100- and 1000-hr rupture strengths calculated for 70 vol. % fiber composites based on test data at 1090C (2000F) were 420 and 280 MN/m2 (61,000 and 41,000 psi, respectively). The investigation indicated that, with better quality fibers, composites having 100- and 1000-hr rupture strengths of 570 and 370 MN/m2 (82,000 and 54,000 psi, respectively), may be obtained. Metallographic studies indicated sufficient fiber-matrix compatibility for 1000 hr or more at 1090C (2000F).

  11. Creep rupture strength of activated-TIG welded 316L(N) stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, T.; Vasudevan, M.; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Mathew, M. D.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2011-06-01

    316L(N) stainless steel plates were joined using activated-tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding and conventional TIG welding process. Creep rupture behavior of 316L(N) base metal, and weld joints made by A-TIG and conventional TIG welding process were investigated at 923 K over a stress range of 160-280 MPa. Creep test results showed that the enhancement in creep rupture strength of weld joint fabricated by A-TIG welding process over conventional TIG welding process. Both the weld joints fractured in the weld metal. Microstructural observation showed lower δ-ferrite content, alignment of columnar grain with δ-ferrite along applied stress direction and less strength disparity between columnar and equiaxed grains of weld metal in A-TIG joint than in MP-TIG joint. These had been attributed to initiate less creep cavitation in weld metal of A-TIG joint leading to improvement in creep rupture strength.

  12. Rupture Strength of Several Nickel-base Alloys in Sheet Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dance, James H; Clauss, Francis J

    1957-01-01

    The 100-hour rupture strengths of Inconel X, Inconel 700, Incoloy 901, Refractaloy 26, and R-235 at 1200 and 1350 F. in both the annealed and heat-treated conditions were determined. Inconel 700 had the highest rupture strength at both temperatures; Incoloy 901 was second strongest at 1200 F, and R-235 second strongest at 1350 F. With the exception of Incoloy 901, ductility was low. Photomicrographs show that fractures are through the grain boundaries. Results are compared with published data for other sheet alloys and bar stock.

  13. Comparison of the Tensile, Creep, and Rupture Strength Properties of Stoichiometric SiC Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types of polymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, and Sylramic from Dow Corning. Also included in this study were an earlier version of the SA fiber plus two recent developmental versions of the Sylramic fiber. The tensile strength measurements were made at room temperature on as-received fibers and on fibers after high-temperature inert exposure. The creep-rupture property data were obtained at 1400 deg C in air as well as, argon. Some fiber types showed strong effects of environment on their strength properties. These results are compared and discussed in terms of underlying mechanisms and implications for ceramic composites.

  14. The Inclusion of Arbitrary Load Histories in the Strength Decay Model for Stress Rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Stress rupture is a failure mechanism where failures can occur after a period of time, even though the material has seen no increase in load. Carbon/epoxy composite materials have demonstrated the stress rupture failure mechanism. In a previous work, a model was proposed for stress rupture of composite overwrap pressure vessels (COPVs) and similar composite structures based on strength degradation. However, the original model was limited to constant load periods (holds) at constant load. The model was expanded in this paper to address arbitrary loading histories and specifically the inclusions of ramp loadings up to holds and back down. The broadening of the model allows for failures on loading to be treated as any other failure that may occur during testing instead of having to be treated as a special case. The inclusion of ramps can also influence the length of the "safe period" following proof loading that was previously predicted by the model. No stress rupture failures are predicted in a safe period because time is required for strength to decay from above the proof level to the lower level of loading. Although the model can predict failures during the ramp periods, no closed-form solution for the failure times could be derived. Therefore, two suggested solution techniques were proposed. Finally, the model was used to design an experiment that could detect the difference between the strength decay model and a commonly used model for stress rupture. Although these types of models are necessary to help guide experiments for stress rupture, only experimental evidence will determine how well the model may predict actual material response. If the model can be shown to be accurate, current proof loading requirements may result in predicted safe periods as long as 10(13) years. COPVs design requirements for stress rupture may then be relaxed, allowing more efficient designs, while still maintaining an acceptable level of safety.

  15. Creep and Rupture Strength of an Advanced CVD SiC Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, J. C.; Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the as-produced condition the room temperature strength (approx. 6 GPa) of Textron Specialty Materials' 50 microns CVD SiC fiber represents the highest value thus far obtained for commercially produced polycrystalline SiC fibers. To understand whether this strength can be maintained after composite processing conditions, high temperature studies were performed on the effects of time, stress, and environment on 1400 deg. C tensile creep strain and stress rupture on as-produced, chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers. Creep strain results were consistent, allowing an evaluation of time and stress effects. Test environment had no influence on creep strain but I hour annealing at 1600 deg. C in argon gas significantly reduced the total creep strain and increased the stress dependence. This is attributed to changes in the free carbon morphology and its distribution within the CVD SiC fiber. For the as-produced and annealed fibers, strength at 1400 deg. C was found to decrease from a fast fracture value of 2 GPa to a 100-hr rupture strength value of 0. 8 GPa. In addition a loss of fast fracture strength from 6 GPa is attributed to thermally induced changes in the outer carbon coating and microstructure. Scatter in rupture times made a definitive analysis of environmental and annealing effects on creep strength difficult.

  16. Composite Stress Rupture: A New Reliability Model Based on Strength Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A model is proposed to estimate reliability for stress rupture of composite overwrap pressure vessels (COPVs) and similar composite structures. This new reliability model is generated by assuming a strength degradation (or decay) over time. The model suggests that most of the strength decay occurs late in life. The strength decay model will be shown to predict a response similar to that predicted by a traditional reliability model for stress rupture based on tests at a single stress level. In addition, the model predicts that even though there is strength decay due to proof loading, a significant overall increase in reliability is gained by eliminating any weak vessels, which would fail early. The model predicts that there should be significant periods of safe life following proof loading, because time is required for the strength to decay from the proof stress level to the subsequent loading level. Suggestions for testing the strength decay reliability model have been made. If the strength decay reliability model predictions are shown through testing to be accurate, COPVs may be designed to carry a higher level of stress than is currently allowed, which will enable the production of lighter structures

  17. Copper, Boron, and Cerium Additions in Type 347 Austenitic Steel to Improve Creep Rupture Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Kinkar; Kyono, J.; Shinya, Norio

    2012-04-01

    Type 347 austenitic stainless steel (18Cr-12Ni-Nb) was alloyed with copper (3 wt pct), boron (0.01 to 0.06 wt pct), and cerium (0.01 wt pct) with an aim to increase the creep rupture strength of the steel through the improved deformation and cavitation resistance. Short-term creep rupture strength was found to increase with the addition of copper in the 347 steel, but the long-term strength was inferior. Extensive creep cavitation deprived the steel of the beneficial effect of creep deformation resistance induced by nano-size copper particles. Boron and cerium additions in the copper-containing steel increased its creep rupture strength and ductility, which were more for higher boron content. Creep deformation, grain boundary sliding, and creep cavity nucleation and growth in the steel were found to be suppressed by microalloying the copper-containing steel with boron and cerium, and the suppression was more for higher boron content. An auger electron spectroscopic study revealed the segregation of boron instead of sulfur on the cavity surface of the boron- and cerium-microalloyed steel. Cerium acted as a scavenger for soluble sulfur in the steels through the precipitation of cerium sulfide (CeS). This inhibited the segregation of sulfur and facilitated the segregation of boron on cavity surface. Boron segregation on the nucleated cavity surface reduced its growth rate. Microalloying the copper-containing 347 steel with boron and cerium thus enabled to use the full extent of creep deformation resistance rendered by copper nano-size particle by increase in creep rupture strength and ductility.

  18. Stress-rupture strength and microstructural stability of W-HF-C wire-reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    W-Hf-C superalloy composites were found to be potentially useful for turbine-blade applications on the basis of stress-rupture strength. The 100- and 1000-hour rupture strengths obtained for 70 volume percent fiber composites tested at 1090 C were 420 and 280 MN/sq m. The investigation indicated that with better quality fibers, composites having 100- and 1000-hour rupture strengths of 570 and 370 MN/sq m may be obtained. Metallographic studies indicated sufficient fiber-matrix compatibility for long-term applications at 1090 C for 1000 hours or more.

  19. Transverse tensile and stress rupture properties of gamma/gamma prime-delta directionally solidified eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Tensile and stress rupture properties were determined primarily at 760 C for specimens oriented at various angles (0 deg, 10 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg) from the solidification direction of bars and/or slabs of the Ni-20Cb-6Cr-2.5A (gamma/gamma prime-delta) eutectic. Threaded-head specimens yielded longer rupture lives with significantly less scatter than did tapered-head specimens. Miniature specimens are suitable for determining traverse tensile and rupture properties of 1.2 centimeter diameter bar stock. The 300 hour rupture stress at 760 C for specimens oriented at 10 deg from the solidification direction was reduced from 740 to 460 MPa, and to 230 MPa for material oriented at either 45 deg or 90 deg.

  20. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base.

    PubMed

    Gad, Mohammed; ArRejaie, Aws S; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers. PMID:27366150

  1. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base

    PubMed Central

    ArRejaie, Aws S.; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers. PMID:27366150

  2. Determination of transverse shear strength through torsion testing

    SciTech Connect

    Marcucelli, K.T.; Fish, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    The in-plane characterization of composite materials is, in general, well understood and widely utilized throughout the aerospace industry. However, the use of composites in structural elements such as fuselage frames and rotorcraft flexbeams place large out-of-plane or through-the-thickness stresses for which there is little data. Efforts to determine the interlaminar shear strength of laminated composites have been hampered due to the nonlinear behavior of test specimens and the limitations of current analysis tools. An inexpensive rectangular torsion test specimen was designed to determine the interlaminar shear strength, s{sub 23}, of composite materials. Six different layups were fabricated of AS4/2220-3 carbon/epoxy unidirectional tape and tested in pure torsion. All of the specimens failed abruptly with well-defined shear cracks and exhibited linear load-deflection behavior. A quasi-three-dimensional (Q-3-D) finite element analysis was conducted on each of the specimen configurations to determine the interlaminar shear stress at failure. From this analysis, s{sub 23} was found to be 107 MPa for this material.

  3. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on the Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter of Glass Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, specimen configuration, and specimen size on the transverse tension strength of two glass epoxy materials loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, and/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was sensitive to span length due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, the utility of this scaling law for predicting transverse tension strength is unclear.

  4. Scale effects on the transverse tensile strength of graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of material volume on the transverse tensile strength of AS4/3501-6 graphite epoxy composites was investigated. Tensile tests of 90 degree laminates with 3 different widths and 5 different thicknesses were conducted. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the influence of the grip on the stress distribution in the coupons and explain the tendency for the distribution of failure locations to be skewed toward the grip. Specimens were instrumented with strain gages and extensometers to insure good alignment and to measure failure strains. Data indicated that matrix dominated strength properties varied with the volume of material that was stressed, with the strength decreasing as volume increased. Transverse strength data were used in a volumetric scaling law based on Weibull statistics to predict the strength of 90 degree laminates loaded in three point bending. Comparisons were also made between transverse strength measurements and out-of-plane interlaminar tensile strength measurements from curved beam bending tests. The significance of observed scale effects on the use of tests for material screening, quality assurance, and design allowables is discussed.

  5. Comparisons of 76Hz transverse and radial magnetic field strength components received in Connecticut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, P. R.

    1986-03-01

    Since June 1970, we have made extremely low frequency (ELF) measurements of the transverse horizontal magnetic field strength, H sub phi, received in Connecticut. Occasionally, we also have measured either the vertical electric field strength, E sub v, or the radial horizontal magnetic field strength, H sub rho. The AN/BSR-1 ELF receivers are located at the Naval Underwater Systems Center (NUSC), at New London, CT. The transmission source for these farfield (1.6-Mm range) measurements is the U.S. Navy's ELF Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF), located in the Chequamegon National Forest in north-central Wisconsin. The results of 136 days of radial magnetic field measurements taken from November 1977 through June 1984 are discussed in this report. The main result is that during disturbed propagation conditions, the radial and transverse magnetic field strength daily plots (versus GMT) are usually dissimilar (in both amplitude and relative phase).

  6. Effect of low transverse magnetic field on the confinement strength in a quasi-1D wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Thomas, K. J.; Smith, L. W.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Jones, G. A. C.; Griffiths, J.; Pepper, M.

    2013-12-04

    Transport measurements in a quasi-one dimensional (1D) quantum wire are reported in the presence of low transverse magnetic field. Differential conductance shows weak quantised plateaus when the 2D electrons are squeezed electrostatically. Application of a small transverse magnetic field (0.2T) enhances the overall degree of quantisation due to the formation of magneto-electric subbands. The results show the role of magnetic field to fine tune the confinement strength in low density wires when interaction gives rise to double row formation.

  7. Creep and rupture strength of pearlitic and austenitic steels under active proportional loading in a plane stress state

    SciTech Connect

    Mozharovskaya, T.N.

    1985-04-01

    The authors conducted creep and creep-rupture tests of materials on a modernized DST-5 unit with allowance for the type of stress state. Steel 15Kh2MFA was subjected to creep tests at 823/sup 0/K, as was steel 08Kh18N9. It is shown that the minimum creep rate and rupture strength of materials depend significantly on the type of stress state. A universal relation is established between the minimum creep rate and stress intensity under long-term proportional loading with a plane stress state. A generalized rupture-strength criterion is proposed for plane stress under proportional loading and is substantiated on pearlitic and austenitic steels.

  8. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  9. Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

  10. Weathering effects on tensile and stress rupture strength of glass fiber reinforced vinylester and epoxy thermoset pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizamuddin, Syed

    Glass fiber reinforced vinylester (GFRE) and epoxy (GFRE) pipes have been used for more than three decades to mitigate corrosion problems in oil fields, chemical and industrial plants. In these services, both GFRV and GFRE pipes are exposed to various environmental conditions. Long-term mechanical durability of these pipes after exposure to environmental conditions, which include natural weathering exposure to seasonal temperature variation, sea water, humidity and other corrosive fluids like crude oil, should be well known. Although extensive research has been undertaken, several major issues pertaining to the performance of these pipes under a number of environmental conditions still remain unresolved. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effects of natural weathering, combined natural weathering with seawater and crude oil exposure, for time periods ranging from 3 to 36 months respectively, on the tensile and stress rupture behavior of GFRV and GFRE pipes. Ring specimens are machined from GFRV and GFRE pipes and tested before and after exposure to different weathering conditions prevalent in the eastern region (Dhahran) of Saudi Arabia and present under service conditions. The natural weathering and combined natural weathering with crude oil exposure of GFRV specimens revealed increased tensile strength even after 36 months of exposure when compared with that of the as received samples. However, the combined natural weathering with seawater exposure of GFRV samples revealed better tensile behavior till 24 months of exposure, and after 36 months their tensile strength was seen to be below that of the as received GFRV samples. The stress rupture behavior of natural weather exposed GFRV samples showed an improvement after 12 months of exposure and it decreased after 24 and 36 months of exposure when compared with the as received GFRV samples. The combined natural weathering with crude oil and seawater exposure of GFRV sample revealed improved

  11. Surface ruptures on the transverse Xiaoyudong fault: A significant segment boundary breached during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu-Zeng, Jing; Sun, Jing; Wang, Peng; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Ji, Chen; Zhang, Zhihui; Xu, Qiang; Wen, Li

    2012-12-01

    The ~ 220 km-long rupture of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake breached several km-scale geometric discontinuities along strike, including the previously un-mapped NW-trending Xiaoyudong fault, connecting between the two major, NE-trending rupture planes on the Beichuan and Pengguan Faults. In this paper, we present high-resolution mapping of the 8-km-long surface breaks and sinistral oblique thrusting coseismic slip on the Xiaoyudong fault. Scarp height is the largest at the NW end, reaching 3.5 m, and decreases southward in steps to less than 0.2 m, with an average slip gradient of 6 × 10- 3 at a few tens of meters length scale, but up to 50 × 10- 3 locally. Left-lateral offsets co-vary with the vertical component. The largest sinistral slip vector we observed is 2.2 m. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that the Xiaoyudong fault is likely a ~ 30°SW-dipping lateral ramp that soles into the Pengguan fault, and at its northwestern end intersects with the Beichuan fault, where the latter has a step in the fault plane. Kinematically, the Xiaoyudong fault functions as a tear and conjugate fault and coincides with significant coseismic slip rake rotations on both the Beichuan and Pengguan Faults. Similar correlation of fault bends with sharp changes in faulting style occurs at other steps along the Wenchuan rupture. The Xiaoyudong fault may have played a positive role in linking coseismic slip partitioning between parallel reverse fault planes, facilitating the growth of a longer and more destructive rupture. This highlights the role of tear faults in bridging ruptures between segments, such that reverse-type ruptures can breach steps wider than anticipated from strike-slip fault examples. Transfer faults are common, and perhaps poorly documented features in reverse fault systems and their roles in ruptures may increase the maximum potential earthquake magnitude for fold-and-thrust belts.

  12. Curing of a silane coupling agent and its effect on the transverse strength of autopolymerizing polymethylmethacrylate-glass fibre composite.

    PubMed

    Vallittu, P K

    1997-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how curing gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (gamma-MPS) to the surface of E-glass fibre affects the transverse strength of autopolymerizing polymethylmethacrylate-glass fibre composite (PMMA-GF). For this purpose, unidirectional glass fibres treated with gamma-MPS solution and cured for various lengths of time at different temperatures (+50 degrees C, +100 degrees C and +150 degrees C) were used as a strengthener of PMMA test specimens (n = 10 per group). The mean concentration of glass fibres in the test specimens was 17 wt%. The unreinforced test specimens and the test specimens reinforced with unsilanized fibres were compared, but no statistical difference in their transverse strengths was found (P = 0.568). The results also revealed that when the curing temperatures of the gamma-MPS were compared, the highest transverse strength (152 MPa) for the PMMA-GF composite was obtained by curing the MPS for 120 min at +100 degrees C; the lowest strength (91 MPa) was obtained by polymerizing the MPS at +150 degrees C (P < 0.001). However, SEM photomicrographs taken from the interface of the glass fibre and PMMA showed that the fibre adhered equally well to the PMMA treated at +100 degrees C or at +150 degrees C. This suggests that reduction in transverse strength of composite test specimens is caused by other factors, for example, by improper impregnation of PMMA into the fibre bundle, rather than by inadequate adhesion. PMID:9061621

  13. Effects on stress rupture life and tensile strength of tin additions to Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W.

    1982-01-01

    Because Inconel 718 represents a major use of columbium and a large potential source of columbium for aerospace alloys could be that of columbium derived from tin slags, the effects of tin additions to Inconel 718 at levels which might be typical of or exceed those anticipated if tin slag derived columbium were used as a melting stock were investigated. Tin was added to 15 pound Inconel 718 heats at levels varying from none added to approximately 10,000 ppm (1 wt%). Limited 1200 F stress rupture testing was performed at stresses from 68,000 to 115,000 psi and a few tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 800 and 1200 F. Additions of tin in excess of 800 ppm were detrimental to ductility and stress rupture life.

  14. The effect of void space and polymerization time on transverse strength of acrylic-glass fibre composite.

    PubMed

    Vallittu, P K

    1995-04-01

    The aim of this study was to establish (i) the causes and effects of void space formation in acrylic-glass fibre composite material; and (ii) to clarify the effect of polymerization time of acrylic resin on the transverse strength of heat-cured acrylic resin test specimens. In study 1, three transverse sections of the continuous glass fibre reinforced test specimens (n = 48) were studied by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the SEM-micrographs were analysed by a computerized picture analyser. The results suggested that the void space inside the test specimens is caused by a lack of the adsorbed monomer liquid in the fibre bundle before polymerization. The correlation coefficient between these two factors was -0.633 (P < 0.001). No correlation was found between the void space of the acrylic-glass fibre composite and the transverse strength of the test specimens (r = 0.000, P = 1.000). The results of study 2 showed that the transverse strengths of test specimens (n = 240, total) subjected to polymerization of different time spans did not vary significantly (P > 0.05). PMID:7769523

  15. [Atlanto-occipital instability due to the transverse atlas ligament rupture. Report of a case with symptoms persisting for 21 years].

    PubMed

    Zapałowicz, Krzysztof; Radek, Andrzej; Gasiński, Piotr; Błaszczyk, Bogdan; Skiba, Piotr

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe a case of a judo sportsman with a cervical spine injury sustained 21 years earlier. The injury initiated characteristic sensations of severe generalized pain with paraesthesias recurring whenever he was hit on the top of the head. In February 2001 the patient fell on his head, which resulted in tetraplegia with a complete sensory loss. The symptoms disappeared after ten minutes. Plain radiography, CT and MRI performed after this episode revealed occipitalization of the atlas and C1-C2 instability due to a rupture of the transverse atlas ligament. The patient underwent surgery by the posterior approach: decompression of the foramen magnum, fixation of the occiput and C-2 (with wiring and a bone graft). At one-year follow-up after the surgery the patient had limited movements of the neck without neurological symptoms. Plain radiograms confirmed stability of the occipitocervical fusion. There was no recurrence of the preoperative symptoms. PMID:15174258

  16. Influence of internal oxidation on the stress-rupture strength of a vanadium-titanium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimovich, G.G.; Eliseeva, O.I.; Kalyandruk, V.I.; Lyutyi, E.M.; Shirokov, V.V.

    1985-05-01

    The alloying of vanadium with substitutional elements of group IVa (Ti, Zr, Hf) significantly increases its high-temperature strength. However, in long service in gaseous media containing oxygen as an impurity, its mechanical properties become poorer as the result of the increase in oxidation rate, the interaction of oxygen with the alloying element, escape of it from the composition of the solid solution, segregation of the oxygen and the reaction products at the grain boundaries, etc. It is possible to eliminate these if in advance a structure with thermodynamically stable oxide particles of the necessary morphology and dispersion is formed by internal oxidation. The purpose of this work was a study of the influence of internal oxidation on the structure and stressrupture strength of vanadium alloyed with titanium.

  17. High-frequency spectral falloff of earthquakes, fractal dimension of complex rupture, b value, and the scaling of strength on faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.

    1991-01-01

    The high-frequency falloff ??-y of earthquake displacement spectra and the b value of aftershock sequences are attributed to the character of spatially varying strength along fault zones. I assume that the high frequency energy of a main shock is produced by a self-similar distribution of subevents, where the number of subevents with radii greater than R is proportional to R-D, D being the fractal dimension. In the model, an earthquake is composed of a hierarchical set of smaller earthquakes. The static stress drop is parameterized to be proportional to R??, and strength is assumed to be proportional to static stress drop. I find that a distribution of subevents with D = 2 and stress drop independent of seismic moment (?? = 0) produces a main shock with an ??-2 falloff, if the subevent areas fill the rupture area of the main shock. By equating subevents to "islands' of high stress of a random, self-similar stress field on a fault, I relate D to the scaling of strength on a fault, such that D = 2 - ??. Thus D = 2 corresponds to constant stress drop scaling (?? = 0) and scale-invariant fault strength. A self-similar model of aftershock rupture zones on a fault is used to determine the relationship between the b value, the size distribution of aftershock rupture zones, and the scaling of strength on a fault. -from Author

  18. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  19. Temperature Dependence on the Strength and Stress Rupture Behavior of a Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Calomino, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Tensile strengths and stress rupture lives of carbon-fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) specimens were measured at 800 C and are compared to previously reported 1200 C data. All tests were conducted in an environmental chamber containing 1000 ppm of oxygen in argon. The average 800 C tensile strength of 610 MPa is 10% greater than at 1200 C. Average stress rupture lives at 800 C were 2.5 times longer than those obtained at 1200 C. The difference in the 800 and 1200 C lives is related to the oxidation rate of the reinforcing carbon fibers, which is the primary damage mode of C/SiC composites in oxygen-containing environments.

  20. Effect of the fiber-matrix interphase on the transverse tensile strength of the unidirectional composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, H. C.; Arocho, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional fiber-matrix interphase model has been developed and analytical results obtained correlated well with available experimental data. It was found that by including the interphase between the fiber and matrix in the model, much better local stress results were obtained than with the model without the interphase. A more sophisticated two-dimensional micromechanical model, which included the interphase properties was also developed. Both one-dimensional and two-dimensional models were used to study the effect of the interphase properties on the local stresses at the fiber, interphase and matrix. From this study, it was found that interphase modulus and thickness have significant influence on the transverse tensile strength and mode of failure in fiber reinforced composites.

  1. Improved concept of lithospheric strength and earthquake activity at shallow depths based upon the fan-head dynamic shear rupture mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris G.; Randolph, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    The typical depth-frequency distribution of earthquake hypocentres (DFDE) demonstrates that, below an upper cutoff, the earthquake frequency increases with depth up to a maximum value and then decreases and ceases at a lower cutoff. Such regular behaviour of earthquakes implies the existence of some fundamental mechanisms responsible for the distribution. Conventional models of lithospheric strength based upon the assumption that the frictional strength along pre-existing faults represents a lower limit on the rock shear strength do not provide any intrinsic logic for the observed DFDE. The paper shows that these models ignore the specific properties of intact hard rocks which can exhibit extremely low transient strength (significantly lower than the frictional strength) during failure under the high confining stresses corresponding to seismogenic depths. The low transient strength is provided by a recently identified fan-head shear rupture mechanism which can be initiated in intact rocks in the proximity of pre-existing faults. The low transient shear strength of intact rock determines the correspondingly low transient strength of the lithosphere, which favours generation of new earthquake faults in the intact rock mass adjoining pre-existing faults in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along these faults. The efficiency of the fan-mechanism within the seismogenic layer is variable, with maximum efficiency at the middle range between the upper and lower cutoffs, thus providing minimum transient strength of the lithosphere and maximum earthquake frequency at that depth. We believe that this intrinsic property of hard rocks is responsible for the observed DFDE. Importantly, the formation of new faults in intact rock generated by the fan-mechanism can be accompanied by very small stress-drops (similar to, or lower than, stress-drops for frictional stick-slip instability) combined with abnormally high energy release. The paper proposes an improved concept

  2. The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anasane, Nayana; Ahirrao, Yogesh; Chitnis, Deepa; Meshram, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 × 10 × 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each), depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round), with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (α= 0.05). Results: Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group (P < 0.001) (88.77 MPa), with exception of round surface design repaired with glass fiber reinforced repair resin (89.92 MPa) which was significantly superior to the other joint surface contours (P < 0.001). Glass fiber reinforced resin significantly improved the repaired denture base resins as compared to the plain repair resin (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Specimens repaired with glass fiber reinforced resin and round surface design exhibited highest transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins. PMID:23946739

  3. A Comparison of Creep Rupture Strength of Ferritic/Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluations of creep rupture properties of dissimilar weld joints of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels with Alloy 800 at 823 K were carried out. The joints were fabricated by a fusion welding process employing an INCONEL 182 weld electrode. All the joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals, and the strength reduction was greater in the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and less in the 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. Failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with the decrease in stress. At still lower stresses, the failure in the joints occurred at the ferritic/austenitic weld interface. The stress-life variation of the joints showed two-slope behavior and the slope change coincided with the occurrence of ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Preferential creep cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure, whereas creep cavitation at the interfacial particles induced ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Micromechanisms of the type IV failure and the ferritic/austenitic interface cracking in the dissimilar weld joint of the ferritic steels and relative cracking susceptibility of the joints are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing, and finite element analysis (FEA) of the stress state across the joint.

  4. Numerical analysis of stress distribution in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes during anvil tests for the evaluation of transverse delamination strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dizon, John Ryan C.; Gorospe, Alking B.; Shin, Hyung-Seop

    2014-05-01

    Rare-earth-Ba-Cu-O (REBCO) based coated conductors (CCs) are now being used for electric device applications. For coil-based applications such as motors, generators and magnets, the CC tape needs to have robust mechanical strength along both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The CC tape in these coils is subjected to transverse tensile stresses during cool-down and operation, which results in delamination within and between constituent layers. In this study, in order to explain the behaviour observed in the evaluation of c-axis delamination strength in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes by anvil tests, numerical analysis of the mechanical stress distribution within the CC tape has been performed. The upper anvil size was varied in the analysis to understand the effect of anvil size on stress distribution within the multilayered CC tape, which is closely related to the delamination strength, delamination mode and delamination sites that were experimentally observed. The numerical simulation results showed that, when an anvil size covering the whole tape width was used, the REBCO coating film was subjected to the largest stress, which could result in low mechanical delamination and electromechanical delamination strengths. Meanwhile, when smaller-sized anvils were used, the copper stabilizer layer would experience the largest stress among all the constituent layers of the CC tape, which could result in higher mechanical and electromechanical delamination strengths, as well as high scattering of both of these delamination strengths. As a whole, the numerical simulation results could explain the damage evolution observed in CC tapes tested under transverse tensile stress, as well as the transverse tensile stress response of the critical current, Ic.

  5. Estimation of mechanical strength of unilamellar and multilamellar AOT/water vesicles and their rupture using micropipet aspiration.

    PubMed

    Sagar, G Hema; Bellare, Jayesh R

    2009-10-22

    Vesicles prepared from surfactant sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) were characterized by micropipet aspiration for determining membrane bending rigidity and area expansion modulus and mechanism of rupture. Unilamellar vesicles (ULV) and multilamellar vesicles (MLV) were studied. The mechanical properties calculated using micropipet aspiration for ULV were found to be 5-10 k(B)T, K(a) = 100 +/- 20 mN/m and for MLV were 8-15 k(B)T, K(a) = 120 +/- 30 mN/m. These properties fall with the range of lipid (PC) membrane measurements (values). However, the membrane rigidity of multilamellar vesicles was found to be approximately 3 times larger than that of unilamellar vesicles. The apparent area expansion moduli of multilamellar vesicles are of the order 1.4 times, sustained far greater areal strain before rupture compared to that of unilamellar vesicles. A dynamic structural change in MLV is demonstrated upon stress by micropipet aspiration. MLV at stress undergoes various stages of deformation. The fluctuation in size and shape of MLV led to separation of bilayers from the stack and decrease in vesicle diameter facilitating in formation of new equilibrium MLV, for it to sustain the specified membrane tension, a new mechanism that is demonstrated experimentally. PMID:19764699

  6. In-vitro Evaluation of Transverse Strength of Repaired Heat Cured Denture Base Resins without Surface Treatment and with Chemical and Mechanical Surface Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Naveen S; Khare, Shilpi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Vyas, Rajesh; Mahajan, Harsh; Chitumalla, Rajkiran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Denture repair involves joining two parts of a fractured denture with a denture repair material. Hence, a substantial repairing system for denture base fracture should be there to elude frequent fracture. Materials and Methods: Surface treatment of conventional heat cure denture base resin with different surface treatments (chemical ethyl acetate, and mechanical roughening with bur), with control group formed without surface treatment. Specimens were repaired with auto polymerizing acrylic resin using sprinkle on technique. The testing of the transverse strength of the repaired specimens was evaluated with three-point bending test on universal testing machine. Results: The study revealed that surface chemical treatment with ethyl acetate improved the transverse strength of repaired heat cure denture base when compared with mechanical and control group. A two-way analysis of variance revealed that there was statistically significant difference in mean strengths of the three groups. Conclusion: Surface chemical treatment with ethyl acetate improved the transverse strength of the repaired heat cure denture base when compared with mechanical roughening with bur and group without surface treatment. PMID:26464547

  7. Ruptured eardrum

    MedlinePlus

    Tympanic membrane perforation; Eardrum - ruptured or perforated; Perforated eardrum ... Buttaravoli P, Leffler SM. Perforated tympanic membrane (ruptured eardrum). ... PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2012:chap 37. Kerschner JE. Otitis ...

  8. Heat-to-Heat Variation in Creep Life and Fundamental Creep Rupture Strength of 18Cr-8Ni, 18Cr-12Ni-Mo, 18Cr-10Ni-Ti, and 18Cr-12Ni-Nb Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Fujio

    2016-06-01

    Metallurgical factors causing the heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture have been investigated for 300 series stainless steels for boiler and heat exchanger seamless tubes, 18Cr-8Ni (JIS SUS 304HTB), 18Cr-12Ni-Mo (JIS SUS 316HTB), 18Cr-10Ni-Ti (JIS SUS321 HTB), and 18Cr-12Ni-Nb (JIS SUS 347HTB), at 873 K to 1023 K (600 °C to 750 °C) using creep rupture data for nine heats of the respective steels in the NIMS Creep Data Sheets. The maximum time to rupture was 222,705.3 hours. The heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture of the 304HTB and 316HTB becomes more significant with longer test durations at times above ~10,000 hours at 973 K (700 °C) and reaches to about an order of magnitude difference between the strongest and weakest heats at 100,000 hours, whereas that of the 321HTB and 347HTB is very large of about an order of magnitude difference from a short time of ~100 hours to long times exceeding 100,000 hours at 873 K to 973 K (600 °C to 700 °C). The heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture is mainly explained by the effect of impurities: Al and Ti for the 304HTB and 316HTB, which reduces the concentration of dissolved nitrogen available for the creep strength by the formation of AlN and TiN during creep, and boron for the 347HTB, which enhances fine distributions of M23C6 carbides along grain boundaries. The heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture of the 321HTB is caused by the heat-to-heat variation in grain size, which is inversely proportional to the concentration of Ti. The fundamental creep rupture strength not influenced by impurities is estimated for the steels. The 100,000 hours-fundamental creep rupture strength of the 347HTB steel is lower than that of 304HTB and 316HTB at 873 K and 923 K (600 °C and 650 °C) because the slope of stress vs time to rupture curves is steeper in the 347HTB than in the 304HTB and 316HTB. The 100,000 hours-fundamental creep rupture strength of the 321HTB exhibits large variation depending on grain size.

  9. Heat-to-Heat Variation in Creep Life and Fundamental Creep Rupture Strength of 18Cr-8Ni, 18Cr-12Ni-Mo, 18Cr-10Ni-Ti, and 18Cr-12Ni-Nb Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Fujio

    2016-09-01

    Metallurgical factors causing the heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture have been investigated for 300 series stainless steels for boiler and heat exchanger seamless tubes, 18Cr-8Ni (JIS SUS 304HTB), 18Cr-12Ni-Mo (JIS SUS 316HTB), 18Cr-10Ni-Ti (JIS SUS321 HTB), and 18Cr-12Ni-Nb (JIS SUS 347HTB), at 873 K to 1023 K (600 °C to 750 °C) using creep rupture data for nine heats of the respective steels in the NIMS Creep Data Sheets. The maximum time to rupture was 222,705.3 hours. The heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture of the 304HTB and 316HTB becomes more significant with longer test durations at times above ~10,000 hours at 973 K (700 °C) and reaches to about an order of magnitude difference between the strongest and weakest heats at 100,000 hours, whereas that of the 321HTB and 347HTB is very large of about an order of magnitude difference from a short time of ~100 hours to long times exceeding 100,000 hours at 873 K to 973 K (600 °C to 700 °C). The heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture is mainly explained by the effect of impurities: Al and Ti for the 304HTB and 316HTB, which reduces the concentration of dissolved nitrogen available for the creep strength by the formation of AlN and TiN during creep, and boron for the 347HTB, which enhances fine distributions of M23C6 carbides along grain boundaries. The heat-to-heat variation in time to rupture of the 321HTB is caused by the heat-to-heat variation in grain size, which is inversely proportional to the concentration of Ti. The fundamental creep rupture strength not influenced by impurities is estimated for the steels. The 100,000 hours-fundamental creep rupture strength of the 347HTB steel is lower than that of 304HTB and 316HTB at 873 K and 923 K (600 °C and 650 °C) because the slope of stress vs time to rupture curves is steeper in the 347HTB than in the 304HTB and 316HTB. The 100,000 hours-fundamental creep rupture strength of the 321HTB exhibits large variation depending on grain size.

  10. Damage Behaviors and Compressive Strength of Toughened CFRP Laminates with Thin Plies Subjected to Transverse Impact Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokozeki, Tomohiro; Aoki, Yuichiro; Ogasawara, Toshio

    It has been recognized that damage resistance and strength properties of CFRP laminates can be improved by using thin-ply prepregs. This study investigates the damage behaviors and compressive strength of CFRP laminates using thin-ply and standard prepregs subjected to out-of-plane impact loadings. CFRP laminates used for the evaluation are prepared using the standard prepregs, thin-ply prepregs, and combinations of the both. Weight-drop impact test and post-impact compression test of quasi-isotropic laminates are performed. It is shown that the damage behaviors are different between the thin-ply and the standard laminates, and the compression-after-impact strength is improved by using thin-ply prepregs. Effects of the use of thin-ply prepregs and the layout of thin-ply layers on the damage behaviors and compression-after-impact properties are discussed based on the experimental results.

  11. Rupture disc

    DOEpatents

    Newton, Robert G.

    1977-01-01

    The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a rupturable member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut in the rupturable member. According to the preferred embodiment of the invention the rupturable member includes a solid head seated in the end of the drain line having a rim extending peripherally therearound, the rim being clamped against the end of the drain line by a clamp ring having an interior shearing edge, the bottom of the rupturable member being convex and extending into the drain line. Means are provided to draw the rupturable member away from the drain line against the shearing edge to clear the drain line for outflow of sodium therethrough.

  12. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and…

  13. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at

  14. The effects of barriers on supershear rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiankuan; Zhang, Zhenguo; Chen, Xiaofei

    2016-07-01

    A barrier may induce a supershear rupture transition in some cases, whereas it may prevent the further propagation of a supershear rupture in other cases. We investigate the effects of a barrier on the supershear rupture propagation on a planar fault in a 3-D half-space. Our results show that the effect of a barrier on supershear is strongly dependent on its size, strength, and location. For larger sizes, shallower buried depths, and relatively higher strengths, the barrier tends to prevent supershear propagation more strongly. When the barrier is located on the free surface and near the critical distance, it prevents the further propagation of supershear rupture. If a barrier is located far from the critical distance, the first supershear daughter crack is slowed down and a new supershear daughter crack is generated after the rupture front passes through the barrier. This mechanism greatly lengthens the supershear transition distance.

  15. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T Christian

    2015-12-01

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach. PMID:26631334

  16. Transversity 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Ratcliffe, Philip G.

    Introduction. Purpose and status of the Italian Transversity Project / F. Bradamante -- Opening lecture. Transversity / M. Anselmino -- Experimental lectures. Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries from polarized and unpolarized hydrogen targets at HERMES / G. Schnell (for the HERMES Collaboration). Collins and Sivers asymmetries on the deuteron from COMPASS data / I. Horn (for the COMPASS Collaboration). First measurement of interference fragmentation on a transversely polarized hydrogen target / P. B. van der Nat (for the HERMES Collaboration). Two-hadron asymmetries at the COMPASS experiment / A. Mielech (for the COMPASS Collaboration). Measurements of chiral-odd fragmentation functions at Belle / R. Seidl ... [et al.]. Lambda asymmetries / A. Ferrero (for the COMPASS Collaboration). Transverse spin at PHENIX: results and prospects / C. Aidala (for the PHENIX Collaboration). Transverse spin and RHIC / L. Bland. Studies of transverse spin effects at JLab / H. Avakian ... [et al.] (for the CLAS Collaboration). Neutron transversity at Jefferson Lab / J. P. Chen ... [et al.] (for the Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration). PAX: polarized antiproton experiments / M. Contalbrigo. Single and double spin N-N interactions at GSI / M. Maggiora (for the ASSIA Collaboration). Spin filtering in storage rings / N. N. Nikolaev & F. F. Pavlov -- Theory lectures. Single-spin asymmetries and transversity in QCD / S. J. Brodsky. The relativistic hydrogen atom: a theoretical laboratory for structure functions / X. Artru & K. Benhizia. GPD's and SSA's / M. Burkardt. Time reversal odd distribution functions in chiral models / A. Drago. Soffer bound and transverse spin densities from lattice QCD / M. Diehl ... [et al.]. Single-spin asymmetries and Qiu-Sterman effect(s) / A. Bacchetta. Sivers function: SIDIS data, fits and predictions / M. Anselmino ... [et al.]. Twist-3 effects in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering / M. Schlegel, K. Goeke & A. Metz. Quark and gluon Sivers functions / I

  17. Premature rupture of membranes

    MedlinePlus

    ... When the water breaks early, it is called premature rupture of membranes (PROM). Most women will go ... th week of pregnancy, it is called preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). The earlier your water ...

  18. Transverse myelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Black, M.J.; Motaghedi, B.; Robitaille, Y.

    1980-05-01

    Transverse myelitis is a known complication of radiation treatment for carcinoma of the heat and neck. In a five year period, 1970 to 1975, 120 patients with head and neck cancer received radiation as part of their treatment in this hospital. A review of the records of these patients showed only two cases of myelitis, an incidence of about 2%. This paper reviews the clinical syndrome; treatment and preventive measures are discussed and a survey of the literature is presented.

  19. Transverse Myelitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Later, if patients begin to recover limb control, physical therapy begins to help improve muscle strength, coordination, and ... therapists, vocational therapists, and mental health care professionals. Physical Therapy : Physiatrists and physical therapists treat disabilities that result ...

  20. Open re-rupture of the Achilles tendon after surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2011-09-28

    The rate of re-rupture of Achilles tendon after surgical treatment were reported to 1.7-5.6% previously. Re-rupture of Achilles tendon generally occurs subcutaneously. We experienced two rare cases of the open re-ruptures of Achilles tendon with a transverse wound perpendicular to the primary surgical incision. Re-rupture occurred 4 and 13 weeks after surgical treatment. We suggest that open re-rupture correlates more closely with skin scaring and shortening. Another factor may be adhesion between the subcutaneous scar and the suture of the paratenon and Achilles tendon with post-operative immobilization. PMID:24765375

  1. Open re-rupture of the Achilles tendon after surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2011-01-01

    The rate of re-rupture of Achilles tendon after surgical treatment were reported to 1.7–5.6% previously. Re-rupture of Achilles tendon generally occurs subcutaneously. We experienced two rare cases of the open re-ruptures of Achilles tendon with a transverse wound perpendicular to the primary surgical incision. Re-rupture occurred 4 and 13 weeks after surgical treatment. We suggest that open re-rupture correlates more closely with skin scaring and shortening. Another factor may be adhesion between the subcutaneous scar and the suture of the paratenon and Achilles tendon with post-operative immobilization. PMID:24765375

  2. Rupture of plasma membrane under tension.

    PubMed

    Tan, Samuel Chun Wei; Yang, Tianyi; Gong, Yingxue; Liao, Kin

    2011-04-29

    We present a study on the rupture behavior of single NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts under tension using micropipette aspiration. Membrane rupture was characterized by breaking and formation of an enclosed membrane linked to a tether at the cell apex. Three different rupture modes, namely: single break, initial multiple breaks, and continuous multiple breaks, were observed under similar loading condition. The measured mean tensile strengths of plasma membrane were 3.83 ± 1.94 and 3.98 ± 1.54mN/m for control cells and cells labeled with TubulinTracker, respectively. The tensile strength data was described by Weibull distribution. For the control cells, the Weibull modulus and characteristic strength were 1.86 and 4.40 mN/m, respectively; for cells labeled with TubulinTracker, the Weibull modulus and characteristic strength were 2.68 and 4.48 mN/m, respectively. Based on the experimental data, the estimated average transmembrane proteins-lipid cleavage strength was 2.64 ± 0.64 mN/m. From the random sampling of volume ratio of transmembrane proteins in cell membrane, we concluded that the Weibull characteristic of plasma membrane strength was likely to be originated from the variation in transmembrane proteins-lipid interactions. PMID:21288526

  3. Creep-rupture of polymer-matrix composites. [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An accelerated characterization method for resin matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep rupture analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer matrix composites. Comparisons between creep rupture experiments and analytical models are presented. The time dependent creep rupture process in graphite epoxy laminates is examined as a function of temperature and stress level.

  4. Fan-structure waves in shear ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength), self-sustaining stress intensification in the rupture tip (providing easy formation of new slabs), and self-unbalancing conditions in the fan-head (making the failure process inevitably spontaneous and violent). An important feature of the fan-mechanism is the fact that for the initial formation of the fan-structure an enhanced local shear stress is required, however, after completion of the fan-structure it can propagate as a dynamic wave through intact rock mass at shear stresses below the frictional strength. Paradoxically low shear strength of pristine rocks provided by the fan-mechanism determines the correspondingly low transient strength of the lithosphere, which favours generation of new earthquake faults in the intact rock mass adjoining pre-existing faults in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along these faults. The new approach reveals an alternative role of pre-existing faults in earthquake activity: they represent local stress concentrates in pristine rock adjoining the fault where special conditions for the fan-mechanism nucleation are created, while further dynamic propagation of the new fault (earthquake) occurs at low field stresses even below the frictional strength.

  5. Shear rupture under constant normal stiffness boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewick, R. P.; Kaiser, P. K.; Bawden, W. F.

    2014-11-01

    A grain based Distinct Element Method and its embedded Grain Based Method are used to simulate the fracturing processes leading to shear rupture zone creation in a calibrated massive (non-jointed) brittle rock specimen deformed in direct shear under constant normal stiffness boundary conditions. Under these boundary conditions, shear rupture zone creation relative to the shear stress versus applied horizontal displacement (load-displacement) curve occurs pre-peak, before the maximum peak shear strength is reached. This is found to be the result of a normal stress feedback process caused by the imposed shear displacement which couples increases in normal stress, due to rupture zone dilation, with shear stress, producing a complex normal-shear stress-path that reaches and then follows the rock's yield (strength) envelope. While the yield envelope is followed, the shear strength increases further and shear stress oscillations (repeated stress drops followed by re-strengthening periods) in the load-displacement curves occur due to fracture creation as the rupture zone geometry smoothens. Once the maximum peak strength is reached (after a series of shear stress oscillations) the largest stress drops occur as the ultimate or residual shear strength is approached. The simulation results provide insight into the fracturing process during rupture zone creation and improve the understanding of the shear stress versus applied horizontal displacement response, as well as the stick-slip behaviour of shear rupture zones that are being created under constant normal stiffness boundary conditions.

  6. Creep rupture behavior of unidirectional advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.

    1980-01-01

    A 'material modeling' methodology for predicting the creep rupture behavior of unidirectional advanced composites is proposed. In this approach the parameters (obtained from short-term tests) required to make the predictions are the three principal creep compliance master curves and their corresponding quasi-static strengths tested at room temperature (22 C). Using these parameters in conjunction with a failure criterion, creep rupture envelopes can be generated for any combination of in-plane loading conditions and ambient temperature. The analysis was validated experimentally for one composite system, the T300/934 graphite-epoxy system. This was done by performing short-term creep tests (to generate the principal creep compliance master curves with the time-temperature superposition principle) and relatively long-term creep rupture tensile tests of off-axis specimens at 180 C. Good to reasonable agreement between experimental and analytical results is observed.

  7. Rupture Paths in Kappa-Maps: Quantitative Insights on Heterogeneous Earthquake Ruptures From Energy Arguments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampuero, J.; Ripperger, J.; Mai, M.

    2005-12-01

    Earthquake rupture is a notoriously complex process, at all observable scales. Although heterogeneities of strength and initial stress contribute to this rupture complexity, a systematic approach to quantify their effect has not yet been attempted. For instance, little is known about the relation between the final size of an earthquake and the statistical properties of initial strength excess fields. Canonical cases of dynamic rupture (e.g. uniform initial stress and friction properties), can be characterized by two non-dimensional numbers: the S-parameter (ratio of strength excess to stress drop) and the Kappa-parameter (ratio of static energy release rate to fracture energy, Madariaga and Olsen, 2000). The latter was introduced as a global parameter, involving the fault depth or asperity size as the fundamental scale. However, because faults contain heterogeneities at all scales it is not clear how a single scale-length may be relevant to define Kappa. We define here a scale-dependent Kappa-map, based on classical energy concepts in fracture mechanics. In 2D these maps can be defined exactly, and their efficient computation is implemented as a series of FFT-convolutions, by scaled analytical filters related to stress intensity factor weight functions. For given heterogeneous stress drop and fracture energy, such Kappa-maps are useful to predict nucleation properties and final moment, as we illustrate through increasingly complex examples complemented by dynamic rupture simulations. Other properties that can be derived from the 2D Kappa-maps, with additional assumptions, include radiated energy and rupture directivity. In 3D, the shape of the rupture front is unknown a priori and the energy release rate G might be non-uniform along the front. We therefore propose an approximate definition of Kappa in which G is estimated on circular patches. Comparisons with 3D dynamic rupture simulations on highly heterogeneous initial stress fields show that the final moment can

  8. Fault rupture segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Kenneth Michael

    A critical foundation to earthquake study and hazard assessment is the understanding of controls on fault rupture, including segmentation. Key challenges to understanding fault rupture segmentation include, but are not limited to: What determines if a fault segment will rupture in a single great event or multiple moderate events? How is slip along a fault partitioned between seismic and seismic components? How does the seismicity of a fault segment evolve over time? How representative are past events for assessing future seismic hazards? In order to address the difficult questions regarding fault rupture segmentation, new methods must be developed that utilize the information available. Much of the research presented in this study focuses on the development of new methods for attacking the challenges of understanding fault rupture segmentation. Not only do these methods exploit a broader band of information within the waveform than has traditionally been used, but they also lend themselves to the inclusion of even more seismic phases providing deeper understandings. Additionally, these methods are designed to be fast and efficient with large datasets, allowing them to utilize the enormous volume of data available. Key findings from this body of work include demonstration that focus on fundamental earthquake properties on regional scales can provide general understanding of fault rupture segmentation. We present a more modern, waveform-based method that locates events using cross-correlation of the Rayleigh waves. Additionally, cross-correlation values can also be used to calculate precise earthquake magnitudes. Finally, insight regarding earthquake rupture directivity can be easily and quickly exploited using cross-correlation of surface waves.

  9. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  10. Incomplete Cesarean Scar Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Siahbazi, Shiva; Akhbari, Farnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine rupture at the site of a previous cesarean scar is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of pregnancy, which is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Case Presentation A 30-year old woman at 24th week of gestation and complaint of pain, contractions and spotting was admitted in Royan Institute in Tehran, Iran. She had a past medical history of an EP and a cesarean section delivery, respectively 4 and 2 years before hospitalization. Herniation of an amniotic membrane into the maternal bladder was found on ultrasound examination. Conclusion Risk factors of cesarean scar rupture should be considered in women undergoing subsequent pregnancies as they need extra care. Ultrasonography can be used to evaluate women with previous cesarean section to assess the risks of scar rupture during subsequent pregnancies. PMID:23926561

  11. Arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture.

    PubMed

    Marques, Inês Brás; Vieira Barbosa, José

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are benign congenital cerebrospinal fluid collections, usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally in children or adolescents. They may become symptomatic after enlargement or complications, frequently presenting with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. We report an unusual case of progressive refractory headache in an adult patient due to an arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture. Although clinical improvement occurred with conservative treatment, the subdural hygroma progressively enlarged and surgical treatment was ultimately needed. Spontaneous rupture is a very rare complication of arachnoid cysts. Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation in the subdural space causes sustained intracranial hypertension that may be life-threatening and frequently requires surgical treatment. Patients with arachnoid cysts must be informed on their small vulnerability to cyst rupture and be aware that a sudden and severe headache, especially if starting after minor trauma or a Valsalva manoeuvre, always requires medical evaluation. PMID:24581205

  12. Coupling geodynamic earthquake cycles and dynamic ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zelst, Iris; van Dinther, Ylona; Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Heuret, Arnauld

    2016-04-01

    Studying the seismicity in a subduction zone and its effects on tsunamis requires diverse modelling methods that span spatial and temporal scales. Hundreds of years are necessary to build the stresses and strengths on a fault, while consequent earthquake rupture propagation is determined by both these initial fault conditions and the feedback of seismic waves over periods of seconds up to minutes. This dynamic rupture displaces the sea floor, thereby causing tsunamis. The aim of the ASCETE (Advanced Simulations of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events) project is to study all these aspects and their interactions. Here, we present preliminary results of the first aspects in this modelling chain: the coupling of a seismo-thermo-mechanical (STM) code to the dynamic rupture model SeisSol. STM models of earthquake cycles have the advantage of solving multiple earthquake events in a self-consistent manner concerning stress, strength and geometry. However, the drawback of these models is that they often lack in spatial or temporal resolution and do not include wave propagation. In contrast, dynamic rupture models solve for frictional failure coupled to seismic wave propagation. We use the software package SeisSol (www.seissol.org) based on an ADER-DG discretization allowing high-order accuracy in space and time as well as flexible tetrahedral meshing. However, such simulations require assumptions on the initial fault stresses and strengths and its geometry, which are hard to constrain due to the lack of near-field observations and the complexity of coseismic conditions. By adapting the geometry as well as the stress and strength properties of the self-consistently developing non-finite fault zones from the geodynamic models as initial conditions for the dynamic rupture models, the advantages of both methods are exploited and modelling results may be compared. Our results show that a dynamic rupture can be triggered spontaneously and that the propagating rupture is

  13. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Kathryn Anne

    Carbon fiber is becoming more prevalent in everyday life. As such, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of, not solely general mechanical properties, but of long-term material behavior. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber is very difficult due to high strength and low strain to rupture properties. Past efforts have included testing upon strands, single tows and overwrapped pressure vessels. In this study, 1 inch wide, [0°/90°]s laminated composite specimens were constructed from fabric supplied by T.D. Williamson Inc. Specimen fabrication methods and gripping techniques were investigated and a method was developed to collect long term creep rupture behavior data. An Instron 1321 servo-hydraulic material testing machine was used to execute static strength and short term creep rupture tests. A hanging dead-weight apparatus was designed to perform long-term creep rupture testing. The testing apparatus, specimens, and specimen grips functioned well. Collected data exhibited a power law distribution and therefore, a linear trend upon a log strength-log time plot. Statistical analysis indicated the material exhibited slow degradation behavior, similar to previous studies, and could maintain a 50 year carrying capacity at 62% of static strength, approximately 45.7 ksi.

  14. Spontaneous distal biceps tendon ruptures: are they related to statin administration?

    PubMed

    Savvidou, Christiana; Moreno, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify a possible correlation between statin administration and incidence of spontaneous distal biceps tendon ruptures. We retrospectively reviewed 104 patients with distal biceps tendon rupture that were treated surgically from 2004 to 2010, 102 males and two females with mean age 47 years (range, 22-78). Patients were divided based on the mechanism of injury and statin administration. After statistical analysis, it was found nearly two times more likely to have spontaneous distal biceps tendon rupture with use of statins. Patients in Group 1 (spontaneous tendon rupture) compared to Group 2 (provoked tendon rupture) were older, had weaker postoperative strength but similar postoperative ROM. Patients taking statins compared to those that were not taking statins were older, had same postoperative strength and similar postoperative ROM. Based on the results of our study we conclude that there is a trend of association of spontaneous distal biceps tendon ruptures with statin administration. PMID:22745079

  15. Brittle dynamic damage due to earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Harsha; Thomas, Marion

    2016-04-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990, and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over wide range of strain rates. We then implement this constitutive response to understand the role of dynamic brittle off-fault damage on earthquake ruptures. We show that off-fault damage plays an important role in asymmetry of rupture propagation and is a source of high-frequency ground motion in the near source region.

  16. Blunt cardiac rupture.

    PubMed

    Martin, T D; Flynn, T C; Rowlands, B J; Ward, R E; Fischer, R P

    1984-04-01

    Blunt injury to the heart ranges from contusion to disruption. This report comprises 14 patients seen during a 6-year period with cardiac rupture secondary to blunt trauma. Eight patients were injured in automobile accidents, two patients were injured in auto-pedestrian accidents, two were kicked in the chest by ungulates, and two sustained falls. Cardiac tamponade was suspected in ten patients. Five patients presented with prehospital cardiac arrest or arrested shortly after arrival. All underwent emergency department thoracotomy without survival. Two patients expired in the operating room during attempted cardiac repair; both had significant extracardiac injury. Seven patients survived, three had right atrial injuries, three had right ventricular injuries, and one had a left atrial injury. Cardiopulmonary bypass was not required for repair of the surviving patients. There were no significant complications from the cardiac repair. The history of significant force dispersed over a relatively small area of the precordium as in a kicking injury from an animal or steering wheel impact should alert the physician to possible cardiac rupture. Cardiac rupture should be considered in patients who present with signs of cardiac tamponade or persistent thoracic bleeding after blunt trauma. PMID:6708151

  17. Premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Poma, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The management of patients with premature rupture of membranes has changed markedly in the past several years. The basis for this is a combination of a better understanding of newborn physiology, improved neonatal care, refinements in antibiotic therapy, and the widespread use of maternal and fetal monitoring. The best outcome for both mother and infant undoubtedly reflects data based on a combination of factors, among which are gestational age survival, evidence of fetal distress, presence or absence of labor and sepsis, and of course, the cervical condition as it is related to labor-readiness. An important recent advance is the recognition that an active observation management program is associated with less morbidity and mortality than the classic management course of delivery within 12 hours of membrane rupture. The fact that preterm premature rupture of membranes tends to recur in subsequent pregnancies offers an opportunity for prevention. Moreover, advances in perinatal and neonatal care will continue to improve the outcomes of these women and their children. PMID:8583489

  18. Creep Rupture Properties of Welded Joints of Heat Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki

    In this study, the high-temperature mechanical and creep rupture properties of Grade 91/Grade 91 (Mod. 9Cr-Mo) similar welded joints and Grade 91/Inconel 82/SUS304 dissimilar welded joints were examined. The effects of temperature and stress on the failure location in the joints were also investigated. Creep rupture tests were conducted at 823, 873, and 923 K; the applied stress ranges were 160-240, 80-160, and 40-80 MPa, respectively. The creep rupture strengths of the specimens with welded joints were lower than those of the specimens of the base metal at all temperature levels; in addition, these differences in creep strength increased with temperature. After being subjected to long-term creep rupture tests, the fracture type exhibited by the dissimilar welded joints was transformed from Types V and VII to Type IV. It was estimated that the fracture type exhibited by the dissimilar welded joints after 100,000-h rupture strength tests at 823 K and 873 K was Type IV fracture.

  19. Seismological evidence and dynamic model of reverse rupture propagation during the 2010 M7.2 El Mayor Cucapah earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L.; Ampuero, J. P.; Page, M. T.; Hudnut, K. W.

    2011-12-01

    The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake has produced some unique observations that exemplify the complexity of rupture dynamics. An eyewitness located near the fault when the rupture broke reported signatures of reverse surface rupture (rupture towards the South at a location North from the hypocenter). We report here on seismological evidence of this phenomenon and present dynamic rupture simulations that illustrate a possible mechanism. Reverse rupture propagation is not admissible in traditional source inversions, because of restrictive assumptions about the rupture kinematics adopted to reduce the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. In contrast, source imaging by back-projection of dense array data is free from such assumptions. Recently, we have enhanced the array back-projection technique to achieve higher resolution on rupture evolution. We have also extended this approach to recordings at regional distance, despite the complexity of the regional Pn waveforms. We imaged the source of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake by back-projecting Pn waves recorded by the SIEDCAR array in New Mexico. Our analysis reveals a segment with reverse rupture propagation consistent with the eyewitness reports. Our simulations of dynamic earthquake rupture show that reverse rupture propagation can be caused by delayed rupture of a strong fault region with a negative along-strike gradient of strength excess. In this scenario the rupture front tunnels through (or surrounds) the strong area, then starts breaking the opposite, weaker end of the strong patch, inducing a reverse rupture front.

  20. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  5. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  6. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  7. Oxidation induced stress-rupture of fiber bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, E.

    1997-03-01

    The effect of oxidation on the stress-rupture behavior of fiber bundles was modeled. It is shown that oxidation-induced fiber strength degradation results in the delayed failure of the associated fiber bundle and that the fiber bundle strength decreases with time as t{sup {minus}1/4}. It is also shown that the temperature dependence of the bundle loss of strength reflects the thermal dependence of the mechanism controlling the oxidation of the fibers. The effect of gauge length on the fiber bundle strength was also analyzed. Numerical examples are presented for the special case of Nicalon{trademark} fibers.

  8. Composite Stress Rupture NDE Research and Development Project (Kevlar[R] and Carbon)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to develop and demonstrate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation for carbon composite pressure vessels, either in a structural health monitoring (SHM) or periodic inspection mode.

  9. Ruptured tubal molar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yakasai, I A; Adamu, N; Galadanchi, H S

    2012-01-01

    Molar pregnancies in most instances develop within the uterine cavity, but may occur at any site. Ectopic molar pregnancy is a rare event. The objective of this study was to present a case of ruptured tubal molar gestation, discuss its clinical features and ways to improve diagnostic accuracy. A 35-year-old woman presented with features suggestive of ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy. There was neither any evidence at the time of presentation to suspect a molar gestation, nor β human chorionic gonadotrophin (βhCG) hormone estimation was done, but only a clearview pregnancy test was carried out. She had total left salpingectomy and histological evaluation of the specimen revealed complete hydatidiform mole. The hCG level normalized within 3 weeks of follow-up. Clinical features of ectopic molar pregnancy may be indistinguishable from non-molar ectopic pregnancy. We recommend βhCG estimation as well as histological examination of the surgical specimen for all patients coming with features suggestive of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:23238205

  10. [A case of rupture of the diaphragm caused by the plication for diaphragm eventration].

    PubMed

    Muro, K; Yanagihara, K; Mizuno, H; Kurata, M

    1998-05-01

    A 71-year-old woman, in whom the herniation of right-sided diaphragm was diagnosed, was admitted to our hospital on ambulance car complaining of increasing right-sided chest pain and worsening of dyspnea. She was given emergency laparotomy. The transverse colon and omentum pushed the liver backward. The tight adhesion between transverse colon and diaphragm was released by using thoracotomy additionally. In pleural cavity, there was prolapsing transverse colon which was not covered with peritonium and was caused by the rupture of right-sided diaphragm. The necrotic transverse colon was resected about 30 cm length. We considered that the rupture was caused not by external injury but by inflammation after plication for diaphragm eventration three years and ten months before. PMID:9654933

  11. Stress-rupture behavior of small diameter polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Goldsby, Jon C.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Continuous length polycrystalline alumina fibers are candidates as reinforcement in high temperature composite materials. Interest therefore exists in characterizing the thermomechanical behavior of these materials, obtaining possible insights into underlying mechanisms, and understanding fiber performance under long term use. Results are reported on the time-temperature dependent strength behavior of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Below 1000 C and 100 hours, Nextel 610 with the smaller grain size had a greater fast fracture and rupture strength than Fiber FP. The time exponents for stress-rupture of these fibers were found to decrease from approximately 13 at 900 C to below 3 near 1050 C, suggesting a transition from slow crack growth to creep rupture as the controlling fracture mechanism. For both fiber types, an effective activation energy of 690 kJ/mol was measured for rupture. This allowed stress-rupture predictions to be made for extended times at use temperatures below 1000 C.

  12. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  13. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  14. Short-lived Supershear Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, E.; Xu, S.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Takizawa, S.; Kawakata, H.

    2015-12-01

    Fukuyama and Olsen (2002) computed the supershear rupture initiation, propagation and termination process due to a passage of high stress drop area (called asperity) using a boundary integral equation method. They found that supershear rupture continued to propagate after the passage through high stress drop area but it died after a certain propagation distance, which depends on the elastic energy released at the high stress drop area. Here, we could reproduce a similar phenomenon in the laboratory. We conducted large-scale biaxial friction experiments using a pair of meter-scaled metagabbro rock specimens (VP=6.9km/s, VS=3.6km/s) at the National Research institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). We observed several stick slip rupture events that initiated close to an asperity and immediately became supershear ruptures. But after propagating certain distance they died out and co-existing subshear ruptures became prominent. If we look into details, during the supershear rupture, we could see a sequence of rupture acceleration, its short rest and re-acceleration. This feature reminds us of a sequential breakage of small high stress patches as predicted by Fukuyama and Madariaga (2000). These observations might be interpreted under a concept of energy balance where the energy transmission from strain energy released by the asperity to fracture energy consumed at the crack tip was not instantaneously balanced in space. This could be related to the fact that earthquake rupture velocity is rather smooth reported from the finite fault analysis of large earthquakes with seismic waveforms. References Fukuyama, E. and R. Madariaga (2000) Dynamic propagation and interaction of a rupture front on a planar fault, PAGEOPH, 257, 1959-1979. Fukuyama, E. and K.B. Olsen (2002) A condition for super-shear rupture propagation in a heterogeneous stress field, PAGEOPH, 159, 2047-2056.

  15. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  16. Transverse gravity versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J.J. E-mail: anton.fernandez@uam.es

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂{sub μ}ξ{sup μ} = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  17. Transverse gravity versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J. J.

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂μξμ = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  18. Using Dynamic Rupture Models to Explore Physical Controls on the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, B.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic and geodetic recordings are routinely used to invert for kinematic source models of large earthquakes, which provide us with detailed images of slip distribution and rupture evolution on causative faults. To gain insight into physical conditions that allow a fault to slip and a rupture to propagate in the way they did, we can resort to dynamic source models that obey physical laws in continuum mechanics and rock friction. Published kinematic models of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake reveal several features of the rupture. These features include 1) high static stress drop with large amounts of slip in a small area, 2) a weak initial phase, down-dip rupture for the first 40 seconds, extensive shallow rupture during 60 to 70 seconds, and continuing deeper rupture lasting more than 100 seconds, and 3) systematically down-dip high-frequency radiation with respect to the hypocenter. In this study, we use spontaneous rupture models to explore what physical conditions, including the initial stress state and friction properties on the subducting fault, can reproduce these features, so that we can gain some physical insights into controls on this megathrust earthquake. Dynamic rupture simulations of this shallow dipping megathrust faulting at reasonable spatial and temporal resolutions require parallel computing on supercomputers. Our newly parallelized finite element method algorithm EQdyna allows us to simulate a large suite of spontaneous rupture models to examine the questions. In model setup, we use depth-dependence principal stresses and take into account variations in pore fluid pressure and frictional properties associated with subducted seafloor features such as seamounts. Our preliminary results suggest followings. First, a high strength and high stress drop patch (probably a subducted seamount or seamout chain) just above the hypocenter on the fault plane can delay up-dip rupture and result in a concentrated large slip area. Second, significantly

  19. Strength enhancement process for prealloyed powder superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique involving superplastic processing and high pressure autoclaving was applied to a nickel base prealloyed powder alloy. Tensile strengths as high as 2865 MN/sq m at 480 C were obtained with as-superplastically deformed material. Appropriate treatments yielding materials with high temperature tensile and stress rupture strengths were also devised.

  20. Barriers to faulting in the Basin-Range province: evidence from the Sou Hills transverse block

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Transverse structural blocks may inhibit the propagation of fault ruptures in the Basin-Range province. The Sou Hills, between Dixie and Pleasant Valleys, is a block of uplifted Tertiary bedrock transverse to the NNE-SSW trend of the central Nevada seismic belt. Three lines of evidence indicate that offset due to normal faulting is much less in the Sou Hills compared to adjacent segments of the seismic belt. First, estimates of total late Cenozoic offsets of pre-extension basalts show that the total offset is less in the Sou Hills. Second, analyses of landforms that reflect rates of relative uplift show that Quaternary tectonic activity on range-bounding faults declines where faults join the Sou Hills. Third, measurements of late Quaternary fault scarps show that individual rupture segments in the Sou Hills are shorter in length and have smaller displacements compared to the nearly continuous ruptures of several meters offset found along the Tobin and Stillwater Ranges to the north and south. The Sou Hills rupture pattern is distinctive: ruptures are dispersed over a wide zone rather than being concentrated along well-defined range fronts. Normal faulting patterns produced by the 1915 Pleasant Valley, Nevada and the 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquakes indicate that a discontinuous, spatially dispersed faulting style typifies ruptures which die out in transverse bedrock features. These historic analogues support a model for prehistoric faulting in which ruptures have repeatedly died out in the Sou Hills. Transverse blocks such as the Sou Hills appear to present barriers to propagating ruptures.

  1. Transverse instability of dunes.

    PubMed

    Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-10-28

    The simplest type of dune is the transverse one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations, that transverse dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a transverse dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation. PMID:22107675

  2. Transverse Instability of Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parteli, Eric J. R.; Andrade, José S., Jr.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2011-10-01

    The simplest type of dune is the transverse one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations, that transverse dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a transverse dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation.

  3. Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of ‘rupture’ from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method. PMID:24741691

  4. Strength of Multiple Parallel Biological Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W; Noy, A

    2005-12-07

    Multivalent interactions play a critical role in a variety of biological processes on both molecular and cellular levels. We have used molecular force spectroscopy to investigate the strength of multiple parallel peptide-antibody bonds using a system that allowed us to determine the rupture forces and the number of ruptured bonds independently. In our experiments the interacting molecules were attached to the surfaces of the probe and sample of the atomic force microscope with flexible polymer tethers, and unique mechanical signature of the tethers determined the number of ruptured bonds. We show that the rupture forces increase with the number of interacting molecules and that the measured forces obey the predictions of a Markovian model for the strength of multiple parallel bonds. We also discuss the implications of our results to the interpretation of force spectroscopy measurements in multiple bond systems.

  5. Achilles tendon rupture rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, R. S.; Parsons, N.; Underwood, M.; Costa, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The evidence base to inform the management of Achilles tendon rupture is sparse. The objectives of this research were to establish what current practice is in the United Kingdom and explore clinicians’ views on proposed further research in this area. This study was registered with the ISRCTN (ISRCTN68273773) as part of a larger programme of research. Methods We report an online survey of current practice in the United Kingdom, approved by the British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and completed by 181 of its members. A total of ten of these respondents were invited for a subsequent one-to-one interview to explore clinician views on proposed further research in this area. Results The survey showed wide variations in practice, with patients being managed in plaster cast alone (13%), plaster cast followed by orthoses management (68%), and orthoses alone (19%). Within these categories, further variation existed regarding the individual rehabilitation facets, such as the length of time worn, the foot position within them and weight-bearing status. The subsequent interviews reflected this clinical uncertainty and the pressing need for definitive research. Conclusions The gap in evidence in this area has resulted in practice in the United Kingdom becoming varied and based on individual opinion. Future high-quality randomised trials on this subject are supported by the clinical community. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:65–9 PMID:25868938

  6. Complex rupture during the 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Briggs, R.W.; Sladen, A.; Fielding, E.J.; Prentice, C.; Hudnut, K.; Mann, P.; Taylor, F.W.; Crone, A.J.; Gold, R.; Ito, T.; Simons, M.

    2010-01-01

    Initially, the devastating Mw 7.0, 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake seemed to involve straightforward accommodation of oblique relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates along the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone. Here, we combine seismological observations, geologic field data and space geodetic measurements to show that, instead, the rupture process may have involved slip on multiple faults. Primary surface deformation was driven by rupture on blind thrust faults with only minor, deep, lateral slip along or near the main Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone; thus the event only partially relieved centuries of accumulated left-lateral strain on a small part of the plate-boundary system. Together with the predominance of shallow off-fault thrusting, the lack of surface deformation implies that remaining shallow shear strain will be released in future surface-rupturing earthquakes on the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone, as occurred in inferred Holocene and probable historic events. We suggest that the geological signature of this earthquakeg-broad warping and coastal deformation rather than surface rupture along the main fault zoneg-will not be easily recognized by standard palaeoseismic studies. We conclude that similarly complex earthquakes in tectonic environments that accommodate both translation and convergenceg-such as the San Andreas fault through the Transverse Ranges of Californiag-may be missing from the prehistoric earthquake record. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  7. TRANSVERSE INSTABILITIES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M; Cameron, P; Catalan-Lasheras, N; Dawson, C; Degen, C; Drees, K; Fischer, W; Koropsak, E; Michnoff, R; Montag, C; Roser, T

    2003-05-12

    The beam quality in RHIC can be significantly impacted by a transverse instability which can occur just after transition [1]. Data characterizing the instability are presented and analyzed. Techniques for ameliorating the situation are considered.

  8. Transverse Schwarzschild field

    SciTech Connect

    Belinfante, F.J.

    1982-06-15

    For Schwarzschild's static spherically symmetric external field, a coordinate system is determined in which the metric field is the transverse field satisfying the coordinate conditions of Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner.

  9. The ruptured PIP breast implant.

    PubMed

    Helyar, V; Burke, C; McWilliams, S

    2013-08-01

    Public concern erupted about the safety of Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants when it was revealed in 2011 that they contained an inferior, unlicensed industrial-grade silicone associated with a high rate of rupture. There followed national guidance for UK clinicians, which led to a considerable increase in referrals of asymptomatic women for breast implant assessment. In this review we discuss possible approaches to screening the PIP cohort and the salient characteristics of a ruptured implant. PMID:23622796

  10. Multiarray rupture imaging of the devastating 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Lee, Suzan; Ge, Zengxi

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, robust multiarray backprojection method was applied to image the rupture pattern of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal Mw7.8 main shock and its Mw7.3 aftershock. Backprojected teleseismic P wave trains from three regional seismic arrays in Europe, Australia, and Alaska show that both earthquakes ruptured unilaterally and primarily eastward, with rupture speeds potentially decreasing with depth. The rupture of the main shock first extended ESEward at ˜3.5 km/s over ˜120 km, with later rupture propagation further downdip on the eastern segment at ˜2.1 km/s. The aftershock ruptured the fault SE of the main shock's ruptured plane. It began to rupture updipward for ˜20 km at a speed around 1.2 km/s, then it may have accelerated to 3.5 km/s for the next 50 km. The apparent depth-dependent rupture speeds of the two earthquakes may be caused by along-dip heterogeneities in fault strength, with a higher stress concentration on the updip part of the Nepalese Main Himalayan Thrust.

  11. Creep and rupture of an ODS alloy with high stress rupture ductility. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalarney, M. E.; Arsons, R. M.; Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Baranow, S.

    1982-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture properties of an oxide (Y2O3) dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy, which also is strengthened by gamma-prime precipitates, was studied at 760 and 1093 C. At both temperatures, the alloy YDNiCrAl exhibits unusually high stress rupture ductility as measured by both elongation and reduction in area. Failure was transgranular, and different modes of failure were observed including crystallographic fracture at intermediate temperatures and tearing or necking almost to a chisel point at higher temperatures. While the rupture ductility was high, the creep strength of the alloy was low relative to conventional gamma prime strengthened superalloys in the intermediate temperature range and to ODS alloys in the higher temperature range. These findings are discussed with respect to the alloy composition; the strengthening oxide phases, which are inhomogeneously dispersed; the grain morphology, which is coarse and elongated and exhibits many included grains; and the second phase inclusion particles occurring at grain boundaries and in the matrix. The creep properties, in particular the high stress dependencies and high creep activation energies measured, are discussed with respect to the resisting stress model of creep in particle strengthened alloys.

  12. Modes of Dynamic Rupture Propagation and Rupture Front Speeds in Earthquake Models That Account for Dynamic Weakening Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapusta, N.

    2005-12-01

    Laboratory experiments and theories of how fault materials respond suggest that the constitutive response of faults is far from simple. For slow slip rates, laboratory-derived rate and state friction formulations incorporate small, less than 10%, variations in frictional strength about a representative value which is the product of a typical slow-rate friction coefficient (0.6-0.7 for most rock surfaces and fault-like gouge) times the effective normal stress (which is comparable to overburden minus hydrostatic pore pressure, about 150 MPa at the representative seismic depth of 8 km). One could refer to this slow-rate frictional strength as (high) static fault strength. For fast sliding velocities and large slips, additional weakening mechanisms are activated that result in much lower frictional resistance during dynamic sliding. Hence we need to build earthquake models that would account for both high static strength and low dynamic strength of faults. At first, it seems that the combination of high static strength and low, near-zero, dynamic strength should create static stress drops that are large compared to 1-10 MPa static stress drops typically observed. However, Rice (AGU, 1994) and Lapusta and Rice (AGU, 2003, 2004) proposed a model that avoids that pitfall by incorporating small defect regions that nucleate ruptures while the average stress on the fault is still low compared to its static strength. By simulating earthquake sequences in the framework of a 2D depth-averaged elastic model of a faulted crustal plate, they showed that the fault would then operate with reasonable static stress drops, low shear stress, and low heat generation as follows: Earthquakes nucleate under low shear stress in a defect (weak) and then propagate into strong regions due to significant dynamic weakening. The simulations incorporated truly slow, tectonic-type loading of 35 mm/year and resolved all stages of the simulated earthquakes, including the nucleation process and

  13. Labor Dystocia and the Risk of Uterine Rupture in Women with Prior Cesarean.

    PubMed

    Vachon-Marceau, Chantale; Demers, Suzanne; Goyet, Martine; Gauthier, Robert; Roberge, Stéphanie; Chaillet, Nils; Laroche, Jasmin; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between labor dystocia and uterine rupture. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of a multicenter case-control study that included women with single, prior, low-transverse cesarean section who experienced complete uterine rupture during a trial of labor (TOL). For each case, three women who underwent a TOL without uterine rupture were selected as controls. Data were collected on cervical dilatations from admission to delivery. We evaluated the relationship between uterine rupture and labor dystocia according to several criteria, including the World Health Organization's (WHO's) partogram. Results Data were available for 90 cases and 260 controls. Compared with the controls, uterine rupture was associated with less cervical dilatation on admission, slower cervical dilatation in the first stage of labor and longer second stage of labor (all with p < 0.05). Performing cesarean when the labor curve crossed the ACTION line of WHO's partogram or when the second stage was greater than 2 hours could have (1) prevented up to 56% of uterine rupture and (2) reduced the duration of labor in 57% of women with failed TOL. Conclusion Labor dystocia is a significant risk factor for uterine rupture. Labor progression should be assessed regularly in women with prior cesarean. PMID:26731182

  14. Array Measurements of Earthquake Rupture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Peter

    Accurate measurements of earthquake rupture are an essential step in the development of an understanding of the earthquake source process. In this dissertation new array analysis techniques are developed and used to make the first measurements of two-dimensional earthquake rupture propagation. In order to measure earthquake rupture successfully it is necessary to account for the nonstationary behavior of seismic waves and nonplanar wavefronts due to time delays caused by local heterogeneities. Short time windows are also important because they determine the precision with which it is possible to measure rupture times of earthquake sources. The subarray spatial averaging and seismogram alignment methods were developed for these reasons. The basic algorithm which is used to compute frequency-wavenumber power spectra is the multiple signal characterization (MUSIC) method. Although a variety of methods could be applied with subarray spatial averaging and seismogram alignment, MUSIC is used because it has better resolution of multiple sources than other currently available methods and it provides a unique solution. Power spectra observed at the array are converted into source locations on the fault plane by tracing rays through a layered medium. A dipping layer correction factor is introduced to account for a laterally varying basin structure such as that found beneath the SMART 1 array in Taiwan. A framework is presented that allows for the estimation of precision and resolution of array measurements of source locations and can be used to design an optimum array for a given source. These methods are used to show that the November 14th 1986, M_{L} = 7.0 Hualien, Taiwan earthquake began as a shallow event with unilateral rupture from southwest to northeast. A few seconds later a second, deeper and larger event began rupturing from below the hypocentral region from southwest to northeast slightly down-dip. Energy density estimates indicate larger energy sources at greater

  15. Management of distal biceps and triceps ruptures.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Susan M; Jander, Ryan M; Culp, Randall W

    2006-01-01

    The management of distal biceps and triceps ruptures is reviewed. Epidemiology, clinical presentation, evaluation, surgical management, nonoperative management, and rehabilitation rationale and techniques are presented. Although various surgical repair techniques are used, none has been shown to produce superior clinical outcomes. The literature is lacking information to provide evidence-based decisions regarding rehabilitation strategies. Prospective studies comparing types and timing of repairs and timing and techniques for a postoperative program are needed. As that information is not yet available, the rehabilitation plan outlined in this article is based on timetables for healing tissue, strength of repair, prevention of complications, consideration of patient's medical history and injury history, and review of the literature. Familiarity with the different treatment options assists the surgeon and therapist tailor a therapy program that is optimal for each individual patient. PMID:16713863

  16. Rupture of the tracheobronchial tree.

    PubMed Central

    Roxburgh, J C

    1987-01-01

    Eleven cases of tracheobronchial rupture are described. Nine were the result of external non-penetrating trauma and all but three had other serious injuries. The remaining two were caused by endobronchial intubation. Of the cases caused by external injury, respiratory tract injury was confined to the cervical trachea in three. Two required tracheostomy and repair and the third was managed conservatively; all made satisfactory recoveries. Intrathoracic rupture was recognised on or soon after admission in three cases. One patient died of uncontrollable pulmonary haemorrhage before he could be operated on; immediate repair gave good long term results in the other two. In three cases rupture of the main bronchus was not recognised until complete obstruction developed three, five, and 12 weeks after the accidents. The strictures were resected and the lung re-expanded. Robertshaw endobronchial tubes ruptured the left main bronchus in two patients undergoing oesophageal surgery. Uneventful recovery followed immediate repair. The difficulty of confirming rupture of a major airway is discussed and the importance of conserving the lung when the diagnosis has been missed is emphasised. Images PMID:3317977

  17. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  18. Transverse colon conduit diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.D.; Buchsbaum, H.J.

    1986-05-01

    The versatility and other advantages of the transverse colon conduit for urinary diversion have been described and implemented in 50 patients. Because most patients considered for this procedure will be at high risk because of a history of significant pelvic irradiation, underlying malignancy, poor renal function, fistula, and so forth, the technical details of surgery and patient selection cannot be minimized. The transverse colon segment is indicated for primary supravesical diversion as well as for salvage of problems related to ileal conduits. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is an unlikely long-term complication of this form of diversion because the fecal stream is absent. Now that the transverse colon conduit has been used for more than 10 years, meaningful comparisons with ileal segments should soon be available.

  19. Coupling a geodynamic seismic cycling model to rupture dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; van Dinther, Ylona

    2014-05-01

    The relevance and results of dynamic rupture scenarios are implicitly linked to the geometry and pre-existing stress and strength state on a fault. The absolute stresses stored along faults during interseismic periods, are largely unquantifiable. They are, however, pivotal in defining coseismic rupture styles, near-field ground motion, and macroscopic source properties (Gabriel et al., 2012). Obtaining these in a physically consistent manner requires seismic cycling models, which directly couple long-term deformation processes (over 1000 year periods), the self-consistent development of faults, and the resulting dynamic ruptures. One promising approach to study seismic cycling enables both the generation of spontaneous fault geometries and the development of thermo-mechanically consistent fault stresses. This seismo-thermo-mechanical model has been developed using a methodology similar to that employed to study long-term lithospheric deformation (van Dinther et al., 2013a,b, using I2ELVIS of Gerya and Yuen, 2007). We will innovatively include the absolute stress and strength values along physically consistent evolving non-finite fault zones (regions of strain accumulation) from the geodynamic model into dynamic rupture simulations as an initial condition. The dynamic rupture simulations will be performed using SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) scheme (Pelties et al., 2012). The dynamic rupture models are able to incorporate the large degree of fault geometry complexity arising in naturally evolving geodynamic models. We focus on subduction zone settings with and without a splay fault. Due to the novelty of the coupling, we first focus on methodological challenges, e.g. the synchronization of both methods regarding the nucleation of events, the localization of fault planes, and the incorporation of similar frictional constitutive relations. We then study the importance of physically consistent fault stress, strength, and

  20. Nondiffracting transversally polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wei, S B; Yuan, X-C

    2011-09-01

    Generation of a nondiffracting transversally polarized beam by means of transmitting an azimuthally polarized beam through a multibelt spiral phase hologram and then highly focusing by a high-NA lens is presented. A relatively long depth of focus (∼4.84λ) of the electric field with only radial and azimuthal components is achieved. The polarization of the wavefront near the focal plane is analyzed in detail by calculating the Stokes polarization parameters. It is found that the polarization is spatially varying and entirely transversally polarized, and the polarization singularity disappears at the beam center, which makes the central bright channel possible. PMID:21886250

  1. Predicted Rupture Force of a Single Molecular Bond Becomes Rate Independent at Ultralow Loading Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2014-02-01

    We present for the first time a theoretical model of studying the saturation of the rupture force of a single molecular bond that causes the rupture force to be rate independent under an ultralow loading rate. This saturation will obviously bring challenges to understanding the rupture behavior of the molecular bond using conventional methods. This intriguing feature implies that the molecular bond has a nonzero strength at a vanishing loading rate. We find that the saturation behavior is caused by bond rebinding when the loading rate is lower than a limiting value depending on the loading stiffness.

  2. Rupture-disk-less shock-tube with compression tube driven by free piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, T.; Ogura, E.; Sato, S.; Funabiki, K.

    A new technique is proposed for a shock tube driven by a freely moving piston. In a conventional free-piston-driven shock tube, a rupture disk is employed between the compression tube and the shock generation tube. In the present method, however, the conventional rupture disk is replaced by a newly developed fast action valve which is activated by the compressed gas generated in the compression tube. The present method enables us to generate high Mach number shock waves of arbitrary strength with good reproducibility. The performance of the new method is demonstrated experimentally. This also enables us to be carefree to scattering of fragments of the rupture disk.

  3. Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture with contralateral BTB autograft: a case report.

    PubMed

    Milankov, Miroslav Z; Miljkovic, Natasa; Stankovic, Milan

    2007-12-01

    Chronic patellar tendon rupture is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. Many different surgical methods have been reported for the reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon ruptures. We are reporting the use of contralateral bone-tendon-bone (BTB) autograft for chronic patellar tendon rupture reconstruction followed by double-wire loop reinforcement and without postoperative immobilization. One year after the operation, our patient had full knee extension and up to 130 degrees of flexion. He had good quadriceps strength, and isokinetic muscle testing showed no deficit comparing to his right leg. Patient returned to playing basketball in his spare time, without having any limitation. PMID:17579835

  4. Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self

  5. Deconstructed transverse mass variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Virzi, Joseph S.; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2015-04-01

    Traditional searches for R-parity conserving natural supersymmetry (SUSY) require large transverse mass and missing energy cuts to separate the signal from large backgrounds. SUSY models with compressed spectra inherently produce signal events with small amounts of missing energy that are hard to explore. We use this difficulty to motivate the construction of "deconstructed" transverse mass variables which are designed preserve information on both the norm and direction of the missing momentum. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these variables in searches for the pair production of supersymmetric top-quark partners which subsequently decay into a final state with an isolated lepton, jets and missing energy. We show that the use of deconstructed transverse mass variables extends the accessible compressed spectra parameter space beyond the region probed by traditional methods. The parameter space can further be expanded to neutralino masses that are larger than the difference between the stop and top masses. In addition, we also discuss how these variables allow for novel searches of single stop production, in order to directly probe unconstrained stealth stops in the small stop- and neutralino-mass regime. We also demonstrate the utility of these variables for generic gluino and stop searches in all-hadronic final states. Overall, we demonstrate that deconstructed transverse variables are essential to any search wanting to maximize signal separation from the background when the signal has undetected particles in the final state.

  6. Transverse Spin at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been exciting development in both experimental and theoretical studies of transverse spin asymmetries in polarized p+p and and DIS collisions. As a unique polarized proton-proton collider, Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the novel physics mechanisms that cause the large single spin asymmetry at the forward rapidity. Both PHENIX and STAR experiments have been studying the transverse spin asymmetries with a variety of final state particles in different kinematic regimes since 2006. Especially, recent theoretical development on scattering a polarized probe on the saturated nuclear may provide a unique way to probe the gluon and quark TMDs. RHIC successfully ran polarized p+Au collisions in 2015. We will expect to have new results from polarized d+Au to compare with existing results from p+p collision to extend our understanding of QCD. Further more, In 2015, PHENIX installed MPC-ex calorimeter at very forward region to measure direct photon AN and STAR installed Roman Pots to study the diffractive events in polarized p+p and p+Au collisions. The recent results on transverse polarized p+p and p+Au collisions from both PHENIX and STAR experiments will be presented in this talk. I will also briefly discuss the possibility for the transverse Spin program at future experiments sPHENIX and forward sPHENIX at RHIC. Supported by US Department of Energy and RIKEN Brookhaven Research Center.

  7. Rupture interaction with fault jogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    Propagation of moderate to large earthquake ruptures within major transcurrent fault systems is affected by their large-scale brittle infrastructure, comprising echelon segmentation and curvature of principal slip surfaces (PSS) within typically ˜1 km wide main fault zones. These PSS irregularities are classified into dilational and antidilational fault jogs depending on the tendency for areal increase or reduction, respectively, across the jog structures. High precision microearthquake studies show that the jogs often extend throughout the seismogenic regime to depths of around 10 km. On geomorphic evidence, the larger jogs may persist for periods >105 years. While antidilational jogs form obstacles to both short- and long-term displacements, dilational jogs appear to act as kinetic barriers capable of perturbing or arresting earthquake ruptures, but allowing time-dependent slip transfer. In the case of antidilational jogs slip transfer is accommodated by widespread subsidiary faulting, but for dilational jogs it additionally involves extensional fracture opening localized in the echelon stepover. In fluid-saturated crust, the rapid opening of linking extensional fracture systems to allow passage of earthquake ruptures is opposed by induced suctions which scale with the width of the jog. Rupture arrest at dilational jogs may then be followed by delayed slip transfer as fluid pressures reequilibrate by diffusion. Aftershock distributions associated with the different fault jogs reflect these contrasts in their internal structure and mechanical response.

  8. High-strength iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; Marrero-Santos, Y.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1995-06-01

    Past studies have shown that binary Fe{sub 3}Al possesses low creep-rupture strength compared to many other alloys, with creep-rupture lives of less than 5 h being reported for tests conducted at 593{degrees}C and 207 MPa. The combination of poor creep resistance and low room-temperature tensile density due to a susceptibility to environmentally-induced dynamic hydrogen embrittlement has limited use of these alloys for structural applications, despite their excellent corrosion properties. Improvements in room temperature tensile ductility have been realized mainly through alloying effects, changes in thermomechanical processing to control microstructure, and by control of the specimen`s surface condition. Ductilities of 10-20% and tensile yield strengths as high as 500 MPa have been reported. In terms of creep-rupture strength, small additions of Mo, Nb, and Zr have produced significant improvements, but at the expense of weldability and room-temperature tensile ductility. Recently an alloy containing these additions, designated FA-180, was shown to exhibit a creep-rupture life of over 2000 h after a heat treatment of 1 h at 1150{degrees}C. This study presents the results of creep-rupture tests at various test temperatures and stresses and discusses the results as part of our effort to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved with heat treatment at 1150{degrees}C.

  9. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  10. [Proximal and distal ruptures of the biceps brachii tendon].

    PubMed

    Klonz, A; Loitz, D; Reilmann, H

    2003-09-01

    Proximal ruptures. Ruptures of the long head of the M. biceps humeri are commonly caused by degenerative changes within the tendon. Non-operative treatment gives good results, the loss of power regarding elbow flexion and supination amounts to only 8-21%. Refixation may be indicated for cosmetic reasons and offers a small but evident improvement of flexion and supination power. Deformity of the slipped muscle can be corrected effectively. Residual complaints after conservative treatment often result from associated subacromial problems. Distal ruptures. Ruptures of the distal tendon should be treated operatively. The loss of power after conservative treatment is evident (30-40% for flexion, >50% for supination). Extra-anatomical tenodesis to the brachialis muscle or anatomical fixation to the radial tuberosity can be applied. Flexion power and cosmesis can be addressed by both techniques. If supination strength is to be restored, the tendon has to be fixed anatomically. Preparation of the tuberosity bears the risk of heterotopic ossification or nerve damage. Mini-open techniques, using only a limited anterior approach, may decrease risks. PMID:14959750

  11. Mechanics of Multifault Earthquake Ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. M.; Oskin, M. E.; Teran, O.

    2015-12-01

    The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of magnitude Mw 7.2 produced the most complex rupture ever documented on the Pacific-North American plate margin, and the network of high- and low-angle faults activated in the event record systematic changes in kinematics with fault orientation. Individual faults have a broad and continuous spectrum of slip sense ranging from endmember dextral strike slip to normal slip, and even faults with thrust sense of dip slip were commonly observed in the aftershock sequence. Patterns of coseismic slip are consistent with three-dimensional constrictional strain and show that integrated transtensional shearing can be accommodated in a single earthquake. Stress inversions of coseismic surface rupture and aftershock focal mechanisms define two coaxial, but permuted stress states. The maximum (σ1) and intermediate (σ2) principal stresses are close in magnitude, but flip orientations due to topography- and density-controlled gradients in lithostatic load along the length of the rupture. Although most large earthquakes throughout the world activate slip on multiple faults, the mechanical conditions of their genesis remain poorly understood. Our work attempts to answer several key questions. 1) Why do complex fault systems exist? They must do something that simple, optimally-oriented fault systems cannot because the two types of faults are commonly located in close proximity. 2) How are faults with diverse orientations and slip senses prepared throughout the interseismic period to fail spontaneously together in a single earthquake? 3) Can a single stress state produce multi-fault failure? 4) Are variations in pore pressure, friction and cohesion required to produce simultaneous rupture? 5) How is the fabric of surface rupture affected by variations in orientation, kinematics, total geologic slip and fault zone architecture?

  12. A Retrospective Analysis of Ruptured Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Woo Yeol; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Rupture is an important complication of breast implants. Before cohesive gel silicone implants, rupture rates of both saline and silicone breast implants were over 10%. Through an analysis of ruptured implants, we can determine the various factors related to ruptured implants. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 72 implants that were removed for implant rupture between 2005 and 2014 at a single institution. The following data were collected: type of implants (saline or silicone), duration of implantation, type of implant shell, degree of capsular contracture, associated symptoms, cause of rupture, diagnostic tools, and management. Results Forty-five Saline implants and 27 silicone implants were used. Rupture was diagnosed at a mean of 5.6 and 12 years after insertion of saline and silicone implants, respectively. There was no association between shell type and risk of rupture. Spontaneous was the most common reason for the rupture. Rupture management was implant change (39 case), microfat graft (2 case), removal only (14 case), and follow-up loss (17 case). Conclusions Saline implants have a shorter average duration of rupture, but diagnosis is easier and safer, leading to fewer complications. Previous-generation silicone implants required frequent follow-up observation, and it is recommended that they be changed to a cohesive gel implant before hidden rupture occurs. PMID:25396188

  13. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  14. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  15. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  16. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  17. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  18. Extracellular matrix dynamics and fetal membrane rupture.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Jerome F

    2013-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in determining cell and organ function: (1) it is an organizing substrate that provides tissue tensile strength; (2) it anchors cells and influences cell morphology and function via interaction with cell surface receptors; and (3) it is a reservoir for growth factors. Alterations in the content and the composition of the ECM determine its physical and biological properties, including strength and susceptibility to degradation. The ECM components themselves also harbor cryptic matrikines, which when exposed by conformational change or proteolysis have potent effects on cell function, including stimulating the production of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Collectively, these properties of the ECM reflect a dynamic tissue component that influences both tissue form and function. This review illustrates how defects in ECM synthesis and metabolism and the physiological process of ECM turnover contribute to changes in the fetal membranes that precede normal parturition and contribute to the pathological events leading to preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). PMID:22267536

  19. Bulkhead rupture disc for solid propellant missiles

    SciTech Connect

    Hibler, D.R. Sr.; Sigle, S.P. Jr.

    1988-04-19

    A missile bulkhead rupture disc assembly for disposition between a first stage of propellant and a second stage of propellant and for enabling release of the second stage of propellant subsequent to release of the first stage of propellant is described comprising: a generally circular element comprised of a frangible material and having a first burst pattern with a line of weakness completely circumscribing a central portion of the element. The central portion of the element having structure defines an aperture. The element has a second burst pattern comprising lines of weakness each extending in a substantially radial direction outwardly from the line of weakness of the first burst pattern. Each adjacent pair of the lines of weakness of the second burst pattern is spaced from each other and defines generally sector-shaped segments of the elements. The frangible material of the element has a tensile strength of a certain, first value in the vicinity of the line of weakness of the first burst pattern, and the frangible material of the element has a tensile strength in the vicinity of the lines of weakness of the second burst pattern of a second value which is higher than the first certain value.

  20. Extracellular Matrix Dynamics and Fetal Membrane Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Strauss,, Jerome F.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in determining cell and organ function: (1) it is an organizing substrate that provides tissue tensile strength; (2) it anchors cells and influences cell morphology and function via interaction with cell surface receptors; and (3) it is a reservoir for growth factors. Alterations in the content and the composition of the ECM determine its physical and biological properties, including strength and susceptibility to degradation. The ECM components themselves also harbor cryptic matrikines, which when exposed by conformational change or proteolysis have potent effects on cell function, including stimulating the production of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Collectively, these properties of the ECM reflect a dynamic tissue component that influences both tissue form and function. This review illustrates how defects in ECM synthesis and metabolism and the physiological process of ECM turnover contribute to changes in the fetal membranes that precede normal parturition and contribute to the pathological events leading to preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). PMID:22267536

  1. Dissipative Landau-Zener quantum dynamics with transversal and longitudinal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanbakht, S.; Nalbach, P.; Thorwart, M.

    2015-05-01

    We determine the Landau-Zener transition probability in a dissipative environment including both longitudinal as well as transversal quantum-mechanical noise originating from a single noise source. For this, we use the numerically exact quasiadiabatic path integral, as well as the approximative nonequilibrium Bloch equations. We find that transversal quantum noise in general influences the Landau-Zener probability much more strongly than longitudinal quantum noise does at a given temperature and system-bath coupling strength. In other words, transversal noise contributions become important even when the coupling strength of transversal noise is smaller than that of longitudinal noise. We furthermore reveal that transversal noise renormalizes the tunnel coupling independent of temperature. Finally, we show that the effect of mixed longitudinal and transversal noise originating from a single bath cannot be obtained from an incoherent sum of purely longitudinal and purely transversal noise.

  2. Characteristics of thermally-induced transverse cracks in graphite epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. S.; Bowles, D. E.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of thermally induced transverse cracks in T300/5208 graphite-epoxy cross-ply and quasi-isotropic laminates were investigated both experimentally and analytically. The formation of transverse cracks and the subsequent crack spacing present during cool down to -250 F (116K) and thermal cycling between 250 and -250 F (116 and 394K) was investigated. The state of stress in the vicinity of a transverse crack and the influence of transverse cracking on the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was predicted using a generalized plane strain finite element analysis and a modified shear lag analysis. A majority of the cross-ply laminates experienced transverse cracking during the initial cool down to -250 F whereas the quasi-isotropic laminates remained uncracked. The in situ transverse strength of the 90 degree layers was more than 1.9 times greater than the transverse strength of the unidirectional 90 degree material for all laminates investigated.

  3. Partonic Transverse Momentum Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2010-08-04

    In recent years parton distributions have been generalized to account also for transverse degrees of freedom and new sets of more general distributions, Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) parton distributions and fragmentation functions were introduced. Different experiments worldwide (HERMES, COMPASS, CLAS, JLab-Hall A) have measurements of TMDs in semi-inclusive DIS processes as one of their main focuses of research. TMD studies are also an important part of the present and future Drell-Yan experiments at RICH and JPARC and GSI, respectively, Studies of TMDs are also one of the main driving forces of the Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV upgrade project. Progress in phenomenology and theory is flourishing as well. In this talk an overview of the latest developments in studies of TMDs will be given and newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as planned near term and future measurements will be discussed.

  4. Transverse testicular ectopia.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Abdullah; Yiğiter, Murat; Oral, Akgün; Bakan, Vedat

    2014-02-01

    Described herein are six cases of transverse testicular ectopia. All patients who underwent orchidopexy at the one pediatric surgical unit between October 2001 and January 2008 were evaluated. The medical records of all patients diagnosed with transverse testicular ectopia were evaluated retrospectively. Five patients (84%) were admitted with a symptomatic right inguinal hernia and empty scrotum on the left side. Only one child (16%) had left-sided hernia and right non-palpable testis (age ranged from 1 month to 3 years). Four patients (66%) were diagnosed in the operating theatre and the last two (33%) on inguinal ultrasound preoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in the last patient. Herniorrhaphy with fixation of the ectopic gonad to the opposite hemiscrotum through a transseptal incision was performed in all patients. Postoperative complications were not observed. PMID:24548194

  5. Dynamic Rupture Segmentation Along The Nankai Trough, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hok, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Hashimoto, C.

    2010-12-01

    ). Inside the barrier, the fracture energy changes in regional scale, via a change of the critical slip distance scaling. The strength remains uniform along the interface. Asperities are produced by the initial stress distribution inferred from slip deficit. Using this model setting, we computed a few different spontaneous rupture scenarios, by changing only the location of rupture initiation. Remarkably, we could reproduce the segmentation of the rupture, as observed during the 1940’s sequence, provided that the rupture initiates close to the Kii peninsula barrier area. However, if the rupture initiate far from the Kii peninsula, close to Tokai or west of Muroto cape for instance, the rupture is more likely to break the full plate interface in a single rupture event, consistently with what has been observed in the past. The rupture segmentation appears to be a consequence of the friction properties off-Kii Peninsula, as well as the rupture initiation position. This work provides a reliable way to enlighten the conditional segmentation process, as a consequence of the earthquake dynamic rupture.

  6. [Ettore Majoran's transversal epistemology].

    PubMed

    Bontems, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    « Il valore delle leggi statistiche nella fisica e nelle scienze sociali » is Ettore Majorana's only work on science. It offers a critique of classical determinism, establishing an analogy between the laws of quantum mechanics and social science and arguing that both are intrinsically linked to probability. This article first studies this argument from the standpoing of metaphysics, physics, and sociology, and then assesses the significance of this transversal epistemology. PMID:23636783

  7. Implications of Style-of-Faulting and Loading Characteristics on the Dynamic Rupture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalguer, L. A.; Mai, M.

    2008-12-01

    Assuming that shear failure on pre-existing faults of shallow earthquakes is governed by Coulomb friction, the mode of faulting and the loading history in compressional and extensional tectonic regimes play an important role in determining the absolute value of frictional strength (e.g. Sibson, 1991) and the initial stress on the fault prior to rupture. Considering for example a fault system under confining pressure equivalent to the gravitational load, then the tectonic loading in a compressional regime accumulates shear stress on the fault while simultaneously frictional strength is expected to increase due to increasing normal stress. In contrast, the loading in an extensional regime results in a reduction of the shear strength due to decreasing normal stress. In this case, the resulting strength of the fault would not be able to maintain large shear stresses because the normal stress at shallow depth is limited to the gravitational loading. We examine the implications of these loading regimes for the dynamic rupture process by developing a variety of dynamic models on thrust, normal and vertical strike-slip faults. For each class of model we combine stochastic irregularities in initial stress, compatible with seismological observations and findings from previous dynamic rupture simulations, with the external tectonic loading. Due to the nature of the fault systems described above, the normal stress is depth dependent, consequently the frictional strength (static and dynamic sliding strength) is also depth dependent. Our tectonic loading scheme generates uniformly increasing shear stress on the fault plane until a nucleation criterion is met (Ripperger et al 2007). Assuming that the fault rupture is governed by linear slip-weakening friction, we perform spontaneous dynamic rupture simulations to examine the rupture complexity and specific characteristics of these classes of models.

  8. [Uterine rupture. A case of spontaneous rupture in a thirty week primiparous gestation ].

    PubMed

    Bretones, S; Cousin, C; Gualandi, M; Mellier, G

    1997-01-01

    Uterine rupture is one of the major complications of pregnancy. Most spontaneous uterine ruptures occur during labor in parturients with a scarred uterus. Spontaneous rupture where the uterus is unscarred are more rare and occur more frequently in older multiparous patients. Starting from a case of uterine rupture occurring in a 40 year-old primiparous women, we will present a review of the literature concerning cases of rupture in healthy uteri with no obvious cause. PMID:9265057

  9. Predicting the endpoints of earthquake ruptures.

    PubMed

    Wesnousky, Steven G

    2006-11-16

    The active fault traces on which earthquakes occur are generally not continuous, and are commonly composed of segments that are separated by discontinuities that appear as steps in map-view. Stress concentrations resulting from slip at such discontinuities may slow or stop rupture propagation and hence play a controlling role in limiting the length of earthquake rupture. Here I examine the mapped surface rupture traces of 22 historical strike-slip earthquakes with rupture lengths ranging between 10 and 420 km. I show that about two-thirds of the endpoints of strike-slip earthquake ruptures are associated with fault steps or the termini of active fault traces, and that there exists a limiting dimension of fault step (3-4 km) above which earthquake ruptures do not propagate and below which rupture propagation ceases only about 40 per cent of the time. The results are of practical importance to seismic hazard analysis where effort is spent attempting to place limits on the probable length of future earthquakes on mapped active faults. Physical insight to the dynamics of the earthquake rupture process is further gained with the observation that the limiting dimension appears to be largely independent of the earthquake rupture length. It follows that the magnitude of stress changes and the volume affected by those stress changes at the driving edge of laterally propagating ruptures are largely similar and invariable during the rupture process regardless of the distance an event has propagated or will propagate. PMID:17108963

  10. Strong Transverse Coupling in the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, Michael

    2004-05-01

    During the 20 years since it was first commissioned, the Fermilab Tevatron has developed strong coupling between the two transverse degrees of freedom. A distributed zeroth harmonic skew quadrupole circuit has traditionally been used to correct for transverse coupling, and the strength required of this circuit has increased since 1983 by more than an order of magnitude. In recent years changes to the Tevatron for colliding beams operation have altered the skew quadrupole corrector distribution and strong local coupling has become evident, often encumbering routine operation. In February 2003 it was discovered that the superconducting coils within the main bending magnets of the Tevatron had become vertically displaced within their iron yokes relative to their measured positions in the early 1980's during construction. The ensuing systematic skew quadrupole field introduced by this displacement accounts for the required corrector settings and observed beam behavior. Beam observations, explanations, and remedial measures are presented.

  11. Characteristics of transverse waves in chromospheric mottles

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P.; Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R.; Morton, R. J.; Christian, D. J.

    2013-12-10

    Using data obtained by the high temporal and spatial resolution Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope, we investigate at an unprecedented level of detail transverse oscillations in chromospheric fine structures near the solar disk center. The oscillations are interpreted in terms of propagating and standing magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Wave characteristics including the maximum transverse velocity amplitude and the phase speed are measured as a function of distance along the structure's length. Solar magnetoseismology is applied to these measured parameters to obtain diagnostic information on key plasma parameters (e.g., magnetic field, density, temperature, flow speed) of these localized waveguides. The magnetic field strength of the mottle along the ∼2 Mm length is found to decrease by a factor of 12, while the local plasma density scale height is ∼280 ± 80 km.

  12. Renal failure after ruptured aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Abbott, W M; Abel, R M; Beck, C H; Fischer, J E

    1975-09-01

    The effectiveness of an intravenous nutritional program plus aggressive dialysis was studied in 32 patients with renal failure following ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Each patient was managed postoperatively with a renal failure fluid regimen, consisting of the eight essential amino acids plus dextrose in conjunction with peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. This regimen induced salutary metabolic effects temporarily improving the patient's condition in most instances. No technical or septic complications associated with the intravenous dietary therapy occurred. However, the incidence of recovery of renal function was low, and the overall patient survival was only 12.5%. The experience indicates that although this program has been shown to be efficacious in some patients with acute renal failure, it seems of little benefit in those whose renal failure follows ruptured aortic aneurysm. PMID:808197

  13. Oesophageal rupture masquerading as STEMI.

    PubMed

    Skaug, Brian; Taylor, Kenneth R; Chandrasekaran, Somya

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented to the emergency department, with acute onset of chest pain. Based on ECG changes suggestive of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), he was taken emergently to the cardiac catheterisation laboratory for coronary angiography. There he was found to have only non-obstructive coronary disease. Subsequent physical examination and review of his chest radiograph revealed subcutaneous emphysema, and CT scan revealed a distal oesophageal rupture and pneumomediastinum. After stabilisation in the intensive care unit (ICU), he was taken to the operating room for thoracotomy, chest tube placement and stenting of his oesophagus. He survived the incident and, after several weeks of ICU stay, recovered to a large extent. His case highlights the importance of considering oesophageal rupture in the differential diagnosis for acute onset of chest pain. PMID:27068730

  14. Strength enhancement process for prealloyed powder superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique involving superplastic processing and high-pressure autoclaving was applied to a nickel-base prealloyed powder alloy. Tensile strengths as high as 2865 MN/sq m (415 ksi) at 480 C (900 F) were obtained with as-superplastically deformed material. Appropriate treatments yielding materials with high-temperature tensile and stress-rupture strengths (980 C (1800 F)) were also devised.

  15. Unusual clinical presentation of a partial tibialis anterior rupture.

    PubMed

    Jellad, A; Salah, S; Bouaziz, M A; Bouzaouache, H; Ben Salah, Z

    2012-02-01

    Subcutaneous rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon is rare. Diagnosis is usually clear. The essential clinical symptoms are progressively: footdrop gait, loss of ankle flexion strength, ankle foot pain and claw toes. But the occurrence of an asymptomatic time period between the injury and the onset of clinical signs can make the diagnosis more difficult. MRI is the gold standard examination for tendons injuries and associated bone and joints damages. Surgical exploration confirms MRI findings. It constitutes the treatment of choice for tibialis anterior tendon rupture. Surgical or functional techniques used have an impact on the design of the rehabilitation program, essential step in the care management of these injuries. It avoids postoperative tendon adhesions and their functional consequences. We report here a case of a man presenting with footdrop gait as the only clinical symptom. PMID:22154067

  16. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  17. Spontaneous mid-oesophageal rupture.

    PubMed

    Holt, S; Millar, J W; Heading, R C; Charles, R G

    1978-08-01

    The clinical presentation and management of spontaneous rupture of the middle third of the oesophagus is described in two patients. Early presentation and treatment in one case led to uncomplicated recovery. In the other patient late presentation and diagnosis resulted in delayed surgical intervention with an unsuccessful outcome. The nature of this rare lesion is discussed and nine previously described cases are reviewed. PMID:733690

  18. Rupture of vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Soap films are ephemeral and fragile objects. They tend to thin under gravity, which gives rise to the fascinating variations of colors at their interfaces but leads systematically to rupture. Even a child can create, manipulate and admire soap films and bubbles. Nevertheless, the reason why it suddenly bursts remains a mystery although the soap chosen to stabilize the film as well as the humidity of the air seem very important. One difficulty to study the rupture of vertical soap films is to control the initial solution. To avoid this problem we choose to study the rupture during the generation of the film at a controlled velocity. We have built an experiment, in which we measure the maximum length of the film together with its lifetime. The generation of the film is due to the presence of a gradient of surface concentration of surfactants at the liquid/air interface. This leads to a Marangoni force directed toward the top of the film. The film is expected to burst only when its weight is not balanced anymore by this force. We will show that this leads to the surprising result that the thicker films have shorter lifetimes than the thinner ones. It is thus the ability of the interface to sustain a surface concentration gradient of surfactants which controls its stability.

  19. Thrust-type subduction-zone earthquakes and seamount asperites: A physical model for seismic rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Cloos, M. )

    1992-07-01

    A thrust-type subduction-zone earthquake of M{sub W} 7.6 ruptures an area of {approximately}6,000 km{sup 2}, has a seismic slip of {approximately}1 m, and is nucleated by the rupture of an asperity {approximately}25km across. A model for thrust-type subduction-zone seismicity is proposed in which basaltic seamounts jammed against the base of the overriding plate act as strong asperities that rupture by stick-slip faulting. A M{sub W} 7.6 event would correspond to the near-basal rupture of a {approximately}2-km-tall seamount. The base of the seamount is surrounded by a low shear-strength layer composed of subducting sediment that also deforms between seismic events by distributed strain (viscous flow). Planar faults form in this layer as the seismic rupture propagates out of the seamount at speeds of kilometers per second. The faults in the shear zone are disrupted after the event by aseismic, slow viscous flow of the subducting sediment layer. Consequently, the extent of fault rupture varies for different earthquakes nucleated at the same seamount asperity because new fault surfaces form in the surrounding subducting sediment layer during each fast seismic rupture.

  20. Greater fear of re-injury and increased tibial translation in patients who later sustain an ACL graft rupture or a contralateral ACL rupture: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tagesson, Sofi; Kvist, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to compare fear of re-injury, patient reported function, static and dynamic tibial translation and muscle strength assessed before and 5 weeks after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction between individuals who sustained a subsequent ACL graft rupture or a contralateral ACL injury within 5 years after the reconstruction, and individuals with no subsequent injury. Nineteen patients were investigated before, and 5 weeks after an ACL reconstruction with a quadruple hamstring tendon graft. At 5 years follow up, 3 patients had sustained an ACL graft rupture and 2 patients had sustained a contralateral ACL rupture. Fear of re-injury, confidence with the knee, patient reported function, activity level, static and dynamic tibial translation and muscle strength were assessed. The re-injured group reported greater fear of re-injury and had greater static tibial translation in both knees before the ACL reconstruction compared to those who did not sustain another ACL injury. There were no other differences between groups. In conclusion, fear of re-injury and static tibial translation before the index ACL reconstruction were greater in patients who later on suffered an ACL graft rupture or a contralateral ACL rupture. These factors may predict a subsequent ACL injury. PMID:25894209

  1. Transverse field focused system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1986-01-01

    A transverse field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.

  2. Environmental Durability and Stress Rupture of EBC/CMCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on the strength and creep performance of SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems under complex simulated engine environments. Tensile-strength and stress-rupture testing was conducted to illustrate the material properties under isothermal and thermal gradient conditions. To determine material durability, further testing was conducted under exposure to thermal cycling, thermal gradients and simulated combustion environments. Emphasis is placed on experimental techniques as well as implementation of non-destructive evaluation, including modal acoustic emission and electrical resistivity monitoring, to characterize strength degradation and damage mechanisms. Currently, little is known about the behavior of EBC-CMCs under these conditions; consequently, this work will prove invaluable in the development of structural components for use in high temperature applications.

  3. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Samuel Salisbury, S T; Paul Buckley, C; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  4. Ground motion hazard from supershear rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    An idealized rupture, propagating smoothly near a terminal rupture velocity, radiates energy that is focused into a beam. For rupture velocity less than the S-wave speed, radiated energy is concentrated in a beam of intense fault-normal velocity near the projection of the rupture trace. Although confined to a narrow range of azimuths, this beam diverges and attenuates. For rupture velocity greater than the S-wave speed, radiated energy is concentrated in Mach waves forming a pair of beams propagating obliquely away from the fault. These beams do not attenuate until diffraction becomes effective at large distance. Events with supershear and sub-Rayleigh rupture velocity are compared in 2D plane-strain calculations with equal stress drop, fracture energy, and rupture length; only static friction is changed to determine the rupture velocity. Peak velocity in the sub-Rayleigh case near the termination of rupture is larger than peak velocity in the Mach wave in the supershear case. The occurrence of supershear rupture propagation reduces the most intense peak ground velocity near the fault, but it increases peak velocity within a beam at greater distances. ?? 2010.

  5. Complex rupture of the M6.3 2015 March 10 Bucaramanga earthquake: evidence of strong weakening process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, P.; Prieto, G. A.; Yu, C. Q.; Florez, M.; Agurto-Detzel, H.; Mikesell, T. D.; Chen, G.; Dionicio, V.; Pedraza, P.

    2016-05-01

    We use seismic waves for a magnitude 6.3 intermediate-depth (160 km) earthquake in the Bucaramanga Nest, Colombia, to infer a complex rupture process with two distinct stages, characterized by different rupture velocities possibly controlled by the evolution of strength on the fault. Our integrated data processing permitted to precisely characterize the multistage rupture and the presence of a strong weakening event. The resulting seismic radiation is interpreted as resulting from an extreme weakening due to a cascading thermal shear runaway, with an initial inefficient radiation process followed by a fast and dynamic efficient rupture. Our results imply dynamic complexity of the seismic rupture deep inside the Earth, and may help to give some new insights about the physical mechanism of intermediate-depth earthquakes.

  6. Complex rupture of the M6.3 March 10, 2015 Bucaramanga earthquake: evidence of strong weakening process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, P.; Prieto, G. A.; Yu, C. Q.; Florez, M.; Agurto-Detzel, H.; Mikesell, T. D.; Chen, G.; Dionicio, V.; Pedraza, P.

    2016-02-01

    We use seismic waves for a magnitude 6.3 intermediate-depth (160 km) earthquake in the Bucaramanga Nest, Colombia, to infer a complex rupture process with 2 distinct stages, characterized by different rupture velocities possibly controlled by the evolution of strength on the fault. Our integrated data processing permitted to precisely characterize the multistage rupture and the presence of a strong weakening event. The resulting seismic radiation is interpreted as resulting from an extreme weakening due to a cascading thermal shear runaway, with an initial inefficient radiation process followed by a fast and dynamic efficient rupture. Our results imply dynamic complexity of the seismic rupture deep inside the Earth, and may help to give some new insights about the physical mechanism of intermediate-depth earthquakes.

  7. Spontaneous rupture of a splenotic nodule.

    PubMed Central

    Lanigan, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    A case is presented of spontaneous rupture of splenic tissue occurring 14 years after a splenectomy was carried out for trauma. Spontaneous rupture of a splenotic nodule has not previously been described and it may be added to the list of causes of spontaneous haemoperitoneum. The incidence and function of residual splenic tissue are briefly discussed and other causes of splenic rupture are outlined. PMID:2267217

  8. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  9. Transverse Spin Effects at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Wollny, H.

    2009-08-04

    The measurement of transverse spin effects in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) is an important part of the COMPASS physics program. In the years 2002-2004 data was taken by scattering a 160 GeV/c muon beam off a transversely polarized deuteron target. In 2007, additional data was collected on a transversely polarized proton target. New preliminary results for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries from the analysis of the proton data are presented.

  10. Transverse wobbling in ^{135}pr.

    PubMed

    Matta, J T; Garg, U; Li, W; Frauendorf, S; Ayangeakaa, A D; Patel, D; Schlax, K W; Palit, R; Saha, S; Sethi, J; Trivedi, T; Ghugre, S S; Raut, R; Sinha, A K; Janssens, R V F; Zhu, S; Carpenter, M P; Lauritsen, T; Seweryniak, D; Chiara, C J; Kondev, F G; Hartley, D J; Petrache, C M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Lakshmi, D Vijaya; Raju, M Kumar; Madhusudhana Rao, P V; Tandel, S K; Ray, S; Dönau, F

    2015-02-27

    A pair of transverse wobbling bands is observed in the nucleus ^{135}Pr. The wobbling is characterized by ΔI=1, E2 transitions between the bands, and a decrease in the wobbling energy confirms its transverse nature. Additionally, a transition from transverse wobbling to a three-quasiparticle band comprised of strong magnetic dipole transitions is observed. These observations conform well to results from calculations with the tilted axis cranking model and the quasiparticle rotor model. PMID:25768759

  11. Pediatric transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Absoud, Michael; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Lim, Ming; Lotze, Tim; Thomas, Terrence; Deiva, Kumaran

    2016-08-30

    Pediatric acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is an immune-mediated CNS disorder and contributes to 20% of children experiencing a first acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS). ATM must be differentiated from other presentations of myelopathy and may be the first presentation of relapsing ADS such as neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or multiple sclerosis (MS). The tenets of the diagnostic criteria for ATM established by the Transverse Myelitis Consortium Working Group can generally be applied in children; however, a clear sensory level may not be evident in some. MRI lesions are often centrally located with high T2 signal intensity involving gray and neighboring white matter. Longitudinally extensive ATM occurs in the majority. Asymptomatic lesions on brain MRI are seen in more than one-third and predict MS or NMO. The role of antibodies such as myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in monophasic and relapsing ATM and their significance in therapeutic approaches remain unclear. ATM is a potentially devastating condition with variable outcome and presents significant cumulative demands on health and social care resources. Children generally have a better outcome than adults, with one-half making a complete recovery by 2 years. There is need for standardization of clinical assessment and investigation protocols to enable international collaborative studies to delineate prognostic factors for disability and relapse. There are no robust controlled trials in children or adults to inform optimal treatment of ATM, with one study currently open to recruitment. This review provides an overview of current knowledge of clinical features, investigative workup, pathogenesis, and management of ATM and suggests future directions. PMID:27572861

  12. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Rene 41 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.; Weiss, B.

    1972-01-01

    Weld-drawn tubes of Rene 41 with 0.935 centimeter outside diameter and 0.064 centimeter wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1117 to 1233 K and internal helium pressures from 5.5 to 12.4 meganewtons per square meter. Lifetimes ranged from 5 to 2065 hours. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was 50 percent lower than that of unwelded, thick sheet specimens, and 20 percent lower than that of unwelded, thin sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  13. Spontaneous rupture of uterine leiomyoma during labour

    PubMed Central

    Ramskill, Nikki; Hameed, Aisha; Beebeejaun, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    Uterine rupture in labour requires an emergency caesarean section. In women with a uterine scar, either from gynaecological surgery or from a previous caesarean section, it is well documented that the risk of rupture is higher than in those without. Spontaneous uterine rupture in a uterus with fibroids during pregnancy or labour is extremely rare. We present a case of a 33-year-old, unbooked pregnant woman from Nigeria who had a uterine rupture secondary to fibroids. She required an emergency caesarean section in labour. The fibroids were not removed. Her baby was born alive and in good condition and she made an uneventful recovery. PMID:25199188

  14. Tendon Ruptures Associated With Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Alan A.; Horowitz, Bruce G.; Nagel, Donald A.

    1977-01-01

    In five patients, tendon ruptures occurred in association with corticosteroid therapy, either systemic or local infiltration. The chronic nature of the pain in all of these patients suggests that what we often call tendinitis may in fact be early or partial ruptures of tendons. Patients who receive local infiltration of corticosteroids should perhaps be advised of the risk of a ruptured tendon. In addition, particularly when the Achilles tendon is involved, immobilization should be utilized initially for a presumed tendinitis or early rupture, to protect the tendon from further injury. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:919538

  15. Acute Pectoralis Major Rupture Captured on Video

    PubMed Central

    Valencia Mora, María

    2016-01-01

    Pectoralis major (PM) ruptures are uncommon injuries, although they are becoming more frequent. We report a case of a PM rupture in a young male who presented with axillar pain and absence of the anterior axillary fold after he perceived a snap while lifting 200 kg in the bench press. Diagnosis of PM rupture was suspected clinically and confirmed with imaging studies. The patient was treated surgically, reinserting the tendon to the humerus with suture anchors. One-year follow-up showed excellent results. The patient was recording his training on video, so we can observe in detail the most common mechanism of injury of PM rupture. PMID:27595030

  16. Rupture dynamics in model polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Borah, Rupam; Debnath, Pallavi

    2016-05-11

    In this paper we explore the rupture dynamics of a model polymer system to capture the microscopic mechanism during relative motion of surfaces at the single polymer level. Our model is similar to the model for friction introduced by Filippov, Klafter, and Urbakh [Filippov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2004, 92, 135503]; but with an important generalization to a flexible transducer (modelled as a bead spring polymer) which is attached to a fixed rigid planar substrate by interconnecting bonds (modelled as harmonic springs), and pulled by a constant force FT. Bonds are allowed to rupture stochastically. The model is simulated, and the results for a certain set of parameters exhibit a sequential rupture mechanism resulting in rupture fronts. A mean field formalism is developed to study these rupture fronts and the possible propagating solutions for the coupled bead and bond dynamics, where the coupling excludes an exact analytical treatment. Numerical solutions to mean field equations are obtained by standard numerical techniques, and they agree well with the simulation results which show sequential rupture. Within a travelling wave formalism based on the Tanh method, we show that the velocity of the rupture front can be obtained in closed form. The derived expression for the rupture front velocity gives good agreement with the stochastic and mean field results, when the rupture is sequential, while propagating solutions for bead and bond dynamics are shown to agree under certain conditions. PMID:27087684

  17. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  18. Material Parameters for Creep Rupture of Austenitic Stainless Steel Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, H.; Borhana, A.; Tamin, M. N.

    2014-08-01

    Creep rupture properties of austenitic stainless steel foil, 347SS, used in compact recuperators have been evaluated at 700 °C in the stress range of 54-221 MPa to establish the baseline behavior for its extended use. Creep curves of the foil show that the primary creep stage is brief and creep life is dominated by tertiary creep deformation with rupture lives in the range of 10-2000 h. Results are compared with properties of bulk specimens tested at 98 and 162 MPa. Thin foil 347SS specimens were found to have higher creep rates and higher rupture ductility than their bulk specimen counterparts. Power law relationship was obtained between the minimum creep rate and the applied stress with stress exponent value, n = 5.7. The value of the stress exponent is indicative of the rate-controlling deformation mechanism associated with dislocation creep. Nucleation of voids mainly occurred at second-phase particles (chromium-rich M23C6 carbides) that are present in the metal matrix by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. The improvement in strength is attributed to the precipitation of fine niobium carbides in the matrix that act as obstacles to the movement of dislocations.

  19. Proximal humerus shaft fracture after pectoralis major tendon rupture repair.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Jeff A; Goldberg, Ben; Wolin, Preston

    2011-06-01

    Surgical repair of a complete pectoralis major tendon rupture at the humeral insertion has superior results compared to nonoperative treatment. To our knowledge, a proximal humerus shaft fracture occurring at the site of the bone trough and cortical drill holes after a pectoralis major tendon rupture repair has not been reported in the literature.A 45-year-old man sustained an acute left pectoralis major tendon rupture at the humeral insertion while performing a bench press maneuver. He underwent acute surgical repair. Approximately 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient fell from a standing height and sustained a proximal humerus shaft fracture through the repair site at the bone trough. Three days after the fracture, the patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation of the proximal humerus shaft fracture and exploration of the pectoralis major tendon repair. The fracture was found to be at the level of the repair site, and the pectoralis major tendon was completely intact to the distal fragment. The fracture healed uneventfully, and the patient regained full motion and strength of his extremity with no limitations.Any type of surgical fixation that creates a hole in the humerus or decreases the cross-sectional area such as a bone trough creates a stress riser. Patients undergoing pectoralis tendon repair that involves violating the humerus with a bone trough or hole have a slight risk of postoperative humerus fracture, especially if sustaining an early traumatic event such as a fall. PMID:21667914

  20. Probabilistic simulation of uncertainties in composite uniaxial strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Stock, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite strengths. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using composite mechanics with Monte Carlo simulation. The variables for which uncertainties are accounted include constituent strengths and their respective scatter. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to illustrate the procedure and its effectiveness to formally estimate the probable scatter in the composite uniaxial strengths. The results show that ply longitudinal tensile and compressive, transverse compressive and intralaminar shear strengths are not sensitive to single fiber anomalies (breaks, intergacial disbonds, matrix microcracks); however, the ply transverse tensile strength is.

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Results from COPV Accelerated Stress Rupture Testing, NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry Regor

    2010-01-01

    Develop and demonstrate NDE techniques for real-time characterization of CPVs and, where possible, identification of NDE capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation and/or making vessel life predictions (structural health monitoring or periodic inspection modes). Secondary: Provide the COPV user and materials community with quality carbon/epoxy (C/Ep) COPV stress rupture progression rate data. Aid in modeling, manufacturing, and application of COPVs for NASA spacecraft.

  2. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, Joe L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  3. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1982-05-28

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  4. Breaking of a single asperity: Rupture process and seismic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Kostrov, B. V.

    1983-05-01

    The problem of spontaneous shear rupture of a single circular asperity on an infinite fault plane is studied. Initially, the fault plane is broken everywhere except at a circular asperity. An applied displacement at infinity results in a stress concentration along the bounding edge of the asperity. The frictional stress on the broken part of the fault plane is taken to be a constant. Once a point on the asperity breaks, the stress there drops to the same value as on the `main' fault surface. The rupture is started by relaxing the shear stress at a point on the asperity edge and is then allowed to propagate spontaneously, using a critical stress level fracture criterion. The rupture process is calculated numerically. It is found that for asperities of constant strength, the rupture first propagates around the edge of the asperity and then inward, a phenomenon best described by the well-known term of classic military maneuver: `the double encircling pincer movement.' In the appendix, the expressions for the far-field seismic radiation due to the rupture of such an asperity are derived. It is shown that the nth Cartesian component of the far-field displacement at (x, t) for P, SV, and SH waves, using the notation of Aki and Richards (1980), is given by un(x, t) = (Dni/4πρc2R)∫∫s0τi3{ξ, t - [(R - ξ · γ)/c]} dS(ξ). Thus the far-field pulses can be directly found from the stress drops on the fault plane. This formula is also true for `crack' or `dislocation' problems. The directivity function Dni for displacement for the asperity problem is found to be that for the double couple, modified by some factor. In particular, the fault plane is a nodal plane for SV waves. For the rupturing of asperities on a finite fault, these directivity functions are applicable only to the initial part of observed pulses at a receiver, provided the receiver is not located on the fault plane outside the broken part of the main crack edge, in which case it is inapplicable for all

  5. Fan-head shear rupture mechanism as a source of off-fault tensile cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation discusses the role of a recently identified fan-head shear rupture mechanism [1] in the creation of off-fault tensile cracks observed in earthquake laboratory experiments conducted on brittle photoelastic specimens [2,3]. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength) and self-sustaining tensile stress intensification along one side of the interface. The variation of tensile stress within the fan-head zone is like this: it increases with distance from the fracture tip up to a maximum value and then decreases. For the initial formation of the fan-head high local stresses corresponding to the fracture strength should be applied in a small area, however after completions of the fan-head it can propagate dynamically through the material at low shear stresses (even below the frictional strength). The fan-mechanism allows explaining all unique features associated with the off-fault cracking process observed in photoelastic experiments [2,3]. In these experiments spontaneous shear ruptures were nucleated in a bonded, precut, inclined and pre-stressed interface by producing a local pressure pulse in a small area. Isochromatic fringe patterns around a shear rupture propagating along bonded interface indicate the following features of the off-fault tensile crack development: tensile cracks nucleate and grow periodically along one side of the interface at a roughly constant angle (about 80 degrees) relative to the shear rupture interface; the tensile crack nucleation takes place some distance behind the rupture tip; with distance from the point of nucleation tensile cracks grow up to a certain length within the rupture head zone

  6. Fracture toughness and strength of 96% alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.B.; Chinn, R.E.; McNerney, K.R.; Brog, T.K.; Kim, C.Y.; Krutyholowa, M.W.; Chen, N.W.; Haun, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    There exists a need to understand the controlling factors that simultaneously impact strength and toughness in 96% alumina. The enhancement of both strength and toughness enables designers to extend the use limits and reliability for structural ceramics. This article presents mechanical property results from a group study examining the use of different alkaline-earth aluminosilicate intergranular compositions containing magnesium, calcium and strontium oxides (RO) in 96% alumina. Principal results address trends in indentation strength toughness and modulus of rupture. Trends in the data are presented relative to existing theories of thermal expansion mismatch toughening, grain-bridging crack-wake effect and crack deflection mechanisms. Strength is addressed in terms of strength after indentation, crack growth of indentation flaws and Weibull characterization for the strength distribution.

  7. Rupture characterization of the 2014 Napa Valley earthquake from 3 different perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedric, T.; Adams, M.; Ji, C.; Archuleta, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The extensive strong-ground motion data of the August 24 Mw 6.1 Napa Valley earthquake exhibits an interesting pattern of the strong ground motion. Although the slip models based on seismic and geodetic data revealed mainly north-north-west rupture propagation, the largest ground acceleration of 0.94g was observed at a station south of the hypocenter, presumably associated with the initiation stage of this earthquake. Here, the kinematic and dynamic rupture process of this earthquake is studied using the strong-ground motion data in the vicinity (< 40 km) of the epicentre of the Napa Valley earthquake. Three inversion algorithms are applied. First, a conventional non-linear finite fault inversion is conducted to constrain the overall slip history using relatively long period (> 1 s) seismic data. Second, a dynamic finite fault inversion, which approximates the rupture as multiple elliptical cracks, is carried out to understand what are the stress and strength conditions on the fault that produces a rupture history that is compatible with the observed data. Finally, an iterative Landweber back-projection algorithm is used to constrain the finer spatio-temporal rupture history associating with the high frequency radiation. The efforts particularly focus on the initiation stage of the fault rupture.

  8. Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendons rupture.

    PubMed

    Celik, Evrim Coşkun; Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Ofluoglu, Demet; Demircay, Emre

    2012-07-01

    Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and some medications. We report a case of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture that may be related to the long-term use of a statin. PMID:22561379

  9. Myocardial infarction complicated by ventricular septal rupture.

    PubMed

    Sahjian, Michael; Ventriglia, Rich; Bolton, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Transporting patients with an ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a fairly common practice for most critical care transport teams. When a STEMI is complicated by ventricular septal rupture, the care can become more challenging, especially if the rupture is not yet diagnosed. This article describes such a transport and reviews the pathophysiology of the process along with treatment options. PMID:22225564

  10. Fractal avalanche ruptures in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gözen, Irep; Dommersnes, Paul; Czolkos, Ilja; Jesorka, Aldo; Lobovkina, Tatsiana; Orwar, Owe

    2010-11-01

    Bilayer membranes envelope cells as well as organelles, and constitute the most ubiquitous biological material found in all branches of the phylogenetic tree. Cell membrane rupture is an important biological process, and substantial rupture rates are found in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells under a mechanical load. Rupture can also be induced by processes such as cell death, and active cell membrane repair mechanisms are essential to preserve cell integrity. Pore formation in cell membranes is also at the heart of many biomedical applications such as in drug, gene and short interfering RNA delivery. Membrane rupture dynamics has been studied in bilayer vesicles under tensile stress, which consistently produce circular pores. We observed very different rupture mechanics in bilayer membranes spreading on solid supports: in one instance fingering instabilities were seen resulting in floral-like pores and in another, the rupture proceeded in a series of rapid avalanches causing fractal membrane fragmentation. The intermittent character of rupture evolution and the broad distribution in avalanche sizes is consistent with crackling-noise dynamics. Such noisy dynamics appear in fracture of solid disordered materials, in dislocation avalanches in plastic deformations and domain wall magnetization avalanches. We also observed similar fractal rupture mechanics in spreading cell membranes.

  11. Second-Trimester Uterine Rupture: Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    F. ABDULWAHAB, Dalia; ISMAIL, Hamizah; NUSEE, Zalina

    2014-01-01

    Uterine rupture is a rare life-threatening complication. It mainly occurs in the third trimester of pregnancy and is rarely seen during the first or second trimesters. Our centre experienced three important cases of uterine rupture. First case: spontaneous uterine rupture at 14 weeks of pregnancy, which was diagnosed at autopsy. It was misled by the ultrasound finding of an intrauterine pregnancy, and searching for other non-gynaecological causes delayed the urgent obstetric surgical management. Second case: ruptured uterus at 24 weeks following medical termination due to foetal anomaly. It was diagnosed only at laparotomy indicated for failed medical termination and chorioamnionitis. Third case: uterine rupture at 21 weeks of pregnancy in a patient with gastroenterology symptoms. In these reports, we have discussed the various risk factors, presentations, course of events and difficulties in diagnosing uterine rupture. The study concludes that the clinical presentation of uterine ruptures varies. It occurs regardless of gestational age. Ultrasound findings of intrauterine pregnancy with free fluid do not exclude uterine rupture or ectopic pregnancy. Searching for non-gynaecological causes in such clinical presentations might delay crucial surgical intervention, which leads to unnecessary morbidity, mortality or loss of obstetrics function. PMID:25977625

  12. [Bilateral bronchial rupture: problems of respiratory management].

    PubMed

    Sztark, F; Thicoïpé, M; Favarel-Garrigues, J F; Velly, J F; Lassié, P

    1995-01-01

    The authors report the case of bilateral bronchial rupture in a 39-year-old multiple trauma patient. During the thoracotomy for right main bronchus repair, a partial left bronchial rupture was recognized because of severe hypoxaemia after left selective intubation. PMID:7486281

  13. Madelung Deformity and Extensor Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, Gholam Hossain; Peyman, Maryam; Mozafarian, Kamran

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tendon rupture in chronic Madelung deformity, as a result of tendon attrition on the dislocated distal ulna, is a rare occurrence. It is, however, seen more often in rheumatoid arthritis. There are few case reports in the English-language literature on this issue. We report a case of multiple tendon ruptures in a previously undiagnosed Madelung deformity. PMID:26161772

  14. Do buried-rupture earthquakes trigger less landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes for reverse faults?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chong

    2014-07-01

    Gorum et al. (2013, Geomorphology 184, 127-138) carried out a study on inventory compilation and statistical analyses of landslides triggered by the 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake. They revealed that spatial distribution patterns of these landslides were mainly controlled by complex rupture mechanism and topography. They also suggested that blind-rupture earthquakes trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on thrust reverse faults. Although a few lines of evidence indicate that buried-rupture earthquakes might trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on reverse faults, more careful comparisons and analyses indicate that it is not always true. Instead, some cases show that a buried-rupture earthquake can trigger a larger quantity of landslides that are distributed in a larger area, whereas surface-rupture earthquakes can trigger larger but a fewer landslides distributed in a smaller area.

  15. Aneurysm strength can decrease under calcification.

    PubMed

    Volokh, Konstantin Y; Aboudi, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Aneurysms are abnormal dilatations of vessels in the vascular system that are prone to rupture. Prediction of the aneurysm rupture is a challenging and unsolved problem. Various factors can lead to the aneurysm rupture and, in the present study, we examine the effect of calcification on the aneurysm strength by using micromechanical modeling. The calcified tissue is considered as a composite material in which hard calcium particles are embedded in a hyperelastic soft matrix. Three experimentally calibrated constitutive models incorporating a failure description are used for the matrix representation. Two constitutive models describe the aneurysmal arterial wall and the third one - the intraluminal thrombus. The stiffness and strength of the calcified tissue are simulated in uniaxial tension under the varying amount of calcification, i.e. the relative volume of the hard inclusion within the periodic unit cell. In addition, the triaxiality of the stress state, which can be a trigger for the cavitation instability, is tracked. Results of the micromechanical simulation show an increase of the stiffness and a possible decrease of the strength of the calcified tissue as compared to the non-calcified one. The obtained results suggest that calcification (i.e. the presence of hard particles) can significantly affect the stiffness and strength of soft tissue. The development of refined experimental techniques that will allow for the accurate quantitative assessment of calcification is desirable. PMID:26717251

  16. Genetic basis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Baird, Arabella Elizabeth Gardiner; Carter, Stuart D; Innes, John F; Ollier, William E; Short, Andrea D

    2014-08-01

    Cranial Cruciate Ligament rupture (CCLR) is one of the most common forms of lameness in dogs and is analogous to rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament in humans, for which it can serve as a model. As there is a strong breed-related predisposition to CCLR in dogs, a study was undertaken to consider putative genetic components in susceptible dog breeds. A candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping approach using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (Sequenom Ltd) was designed to investigate several CCLR-susceptible dog breeds and identify CCLR-associated genes/gene regions that may confer susceptibility or resistance. A meta-analysis was performed using the breed case/control candidate gene data to identify SNP associations that were common to the whole cohort of susceptible dogs. We identified SNPs in key genes involved in ligament strength, stability and extracellular matrix formation (COL5A1, COL5A2, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL11A1, COL24A1, FBN1, LOX, LTBP2) which were significantly associated with CCLR susceptibility across the dog breeds used in this study. These SNPs could have an involvement in CCLR due to a detrimental effect on ligament structure and strength. This is the first published candidate gene study that has revealed significant genetic associations with canine CCLR. PMID:24684544

  17. Formability Studies on Transverse Tailor Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskar, V. Vijay; Narasimhan, K.

    2005-08-05

    Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) technology is one of the several approaches that have been used to reduce the weight of the automobile body. TWBs are made up of two or more blanks having different/same properties (geometry, material etc.) prior to forming. The formability of these blanks depends on material and geometric parameters like strength ratio and thickness ratio. The study of these blanks can be classified on the basis of the weld orientation chosen viz. transverse weld or longitudinal weld with respect to the major straining direction.This paper studies the formability issues related to transverse TWB by FE simulation. The formability is assessed by analyzing tensile and Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests. The weld region is assumed to be a line in all the simulations. While modeling the tensile test, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation are monitored, and in LDH testing, pole height and maximum load (in near plane strain condition) are monitored. LDH testing shows that as thickness ratio increases, the load bearing capacity and the pole height decreases. There is a contribution from both the thicker and the thinner blank to the overall deforming volume. Failure location analysis shows that there is an abrupt change in the location of the failure from punch nose region to weld line region as the thickness ratio reaches a critical magnitude (1.08).The study of material properties shows that as the yield strength ratio (S ratio) and strain hardening exponent ratio (N ratio) between the blanks increases, the maximum load which the blank can sustain without failure (UTS) increases. This becomes constant and comparable to that of single sheet at higher N and S ratios.

  18. Kinesthetic Transverse Wave Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantidos, Panagiotis; Patapis, Stamatis

    2005-09-01

    This is a variation on the String and Sticky Tape demonstration "The Wave Game," suggested by Ron Edge. A group of students stand side by side, each one holding a card chest high with both hands. The teacher cues the first student to begin raising and lowering his card. When he starts lowering his card, the next student begins to raise his. As succeeding students move their cards up and down, a wave such as that shown in the figure is produced. To facilitate the process, students' motions were synchronized with the ticks of a metronome (without such synchronization it was nearly impossible to generate a satisfactory wave). Our waves typically had a frequency of about 1 Hz and a wavelength of around 3 m. We videotaped the activity so that the students could analyze the motions. The (17-year-old) students had not received any prior instruction regarding wave motion and did not know beforehand the nature of the exercise they were about to carry out. During the activity they were asked what a transverse wave is. Most of them quickly realized, without teacher input, that while the wave propagated horizontally, the only motion of the transmitting medium (them) was vertical. They located the equilibrium points of the oscillations, the crests and troughs of the waves, and identified the wavelength. The teacher defined for them the period of the oscillations of the motion of a card to be the total time for one cycle. The students measured this time and then several asserted that it was the same as the wave period. Knowing the length of the waves and the number of waves per second, the next step can easily be to find the wave speed.

  19. What Does the Transverse Carpal Ligament Contribute to Carpal Stability?

    PubMed Central

    Vanhees, Matthias; Verstreken, Frederik; van Riet, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background The transverse carpal ligament is well known for its involvement in carpal tunnel syndrome, and sectioning of this ligament remains the definite treatment for this pathology. Some authors believe that the transverse carpal ligament is an important stabilizer of the carpal arch, whereas others do not consider it to be significant. Several studies have been performed, both in vivo and in in vitro. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament does not seem to have any effect on the width of the carpal arch in the unloaded condition. However, patients will load the arch during their activities of daily living. Materials and Methods A cadaveric study was done with distraction of the carpal bones before and after sectioning the transverse carpal ligament. Results With the transverse carpal ligament intact, the carpal arch is mobile, with distraction leading up to 50% widening of the arch. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament resulted in a significant widening of the carpal arch by a further 30%. Conclusions Loading of the carpal arch after sectioning of the transeverse carapal ligament leads to a significant increase in intracarpal mobility. This will inevitably influence carpal kinematics in the patient and might be responsible for some complications after simple carpal tunnel releases, such as pillar pain, palmar tenderness, and loss of grip strength. PMID:25709876

  20. Tensile Creep and Stress-rupture Behavior of Polymer Derived Sic Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on polymer derived Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon, and SiC/BN-coated Nicalon SiC fibers. Test conditions were temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C, stresses from 100 to 1600 MPa, stress application times up to 200 hours, and air, argon, and vacuum test environments. For all fibers, creep occurred predominantly in the primary stage. Hi-Nicalon had much higher 0.2 and 1 percent creep strengths than as-produced as well as-coated Nicalon fibers. The stress-rupture strength of Hi-Nicalon up to 100 hours was also higher than that of the coated and as-produced Nicalon fibers. SiC/BN coating on Nicalon increased only the short-term low-temperature rupture strength. Limited testing in argon and vacuum suggests that for all fiber types, creep and rupture resistances are reduced in comparison to the results in air. Possible mechanisms for the observed behavior are discussed.

  1. Transverse Spin Physics at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Marco, Contalbrigo

    2009-08-04

    HERMES results on azimuthal single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive leptoproduction of pions and charged kaons from a transversely polarised hydrogen target are presented. Preliminary results for both Collins and Sivers Fourier amplitudes are extracted with a much higher statistical significance than the evidence firstly published by HERMES for charged pions in 2005. The first evidence for a correlation between the transverse target polarization and the azimuthal orientation of the plane containing a pair of produced pions is also observed. It is expected to be related to the product of the transversity and an as-yet unmeasured dihadron fragmentation function.

  2. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen operated in gynecological unit mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst: total splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Eko, Filbert Eko; Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; de Paul, Elanga Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic rupture is always neglected when consulting acute abdominal pains in gynecological emergencies. It constitutes about 1% of all splenic ruptures and can be managed by abstention, surgery or embolization. We present the case of a young lady who was diagnosed of spontaneous rupture during surgery that was mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst and finally treated by total splenectomy. The pre-operative work up was absolute for a rupturred hemorrhagic cyst and secondariy for a ruptured ectopic gestation. PMID:25918564

  3. Fracture toughness of calcium-modified ultrahigh-strength 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Yoshiyuki

    1990-10-01

    Commercial and low-sulfur 4340 steels have been studied to determine the effect of calcium treatment on modifying the morphology of nonmetallic inclusions and plane-strain fracture toughness ( K IC ) of the ultrahigh-strength, low-alloy steels at commercial heat level. The significant conclusions are as follows: (1) for the low-sulfur 4340 steel, the addition of calcium in the molten steel gave rise to the formation of finely distributed, spherical, calcium-sulfide (CaS) inclusions with a mean diameter of 1.3 μm; (2) in comparing the calcium-modified 4340 steel with commercial 4340 steel, the calcium-modified steel not only had an improved K IC by about 25 MPa•m1/2 in the longitudinal (L) orientation and by about 30 MPa • m1/2 in the transverse (T) orientation, but also had increased fracture ductility and Charpy impact energy at similar strength levels; and (3) for the commercial 4340 steel, the calcium treatment was not very effective in modifying the morphology of the inclusions on improving the mechanical properties of the steel. The beneficial effect of calcium modification coupled with low sulfur content on the K Ic is briefly discussed in terms of a crack extension model involving the formation of voids at the inclusion sites and their growth and eventual linking-up through the rupture of the intervening ligaments by localized shear.

  4. Rupture Following Biceps-to-Triceps Tendon Transfer in Adolescents and Young Adults With Spinal Cord Injury:

    PubMed Central

    Merenda, Lisa A.; Rutter, Laure; Curran, Kimberly; Kozin, Scott H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tendon transfer surgery can restore elbow extension in approximately 70% of persons with tetraplegia and often results in antigravity elbow extension strength. However, we have noted an almost 15% rupture/attenuation rate. Objective: This investigation was conducted to analyze potential causes in adolescents/young adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) who experienced tendon rupture or attenuation after biceps-to-triceps transfer. Methods: Medical charts of young adults with SCI who underwent biceps-to-triceps transfer and experienced tendon rupture or attenuation were reviewed. Data collected by retrospective chart review included general demographics, surgical procedure(s), use and duration of antibiotic treatment, time from tendon transfer surgery to rupture/attenuation, and method of diagnosis. Results: Twelve subjects with tetraplegia (mean age, 19 years) who underwent biceps-to-triceps reconstruction with subsequent tendon rupture or attenuation were evaluated. Mean age at time of tendon transfer was 18 years (range, 14-21 years). A fluoroquinolone was prescribed for 42% (n=5) of subjects. Tendon rupture was noted in 67% (n=8), and attenuation was noted in 33% (n=4). Average length of time from surgery to tendon rupture/attenuation was 5.7 months (range, 3-10 months). Conclusion: Potential contributing causes of tendon rupture/attenuation after transfer include surgical technique, rehabilitation, co-contraction of the transfer, poor patient compliance, and medications. In this cohort, 5 subjects were prescribed fluoroquinolones that have a US Food and Drug Administration black box concerning tendon ruptures. Currently, all candidates for upper extremity tendon transfer reconstruction are counseled on the effects of fluoroquinolones and the potential risk for tendon rupture. PMID:23459326

  5. High-strength iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-06-01

    Past studies have shown that binary Fe{sub 3}Al possesses low creep-rupture strength compared to many other alloys, with creep-rupture lives of less than 5 h being reported for tests conducted at 593{degrees}C and 207 MPa. The combination of poor creep resistance and low room-temperature tensile ductility due to a susceptibility to environmentally-induced dynamic hydrogen embrittlement has limited use of these alloys for structural applications despite their excellent corrosion properties. With regard to the ductility problem, alloy development efforts have produced significant improvements, with ductilities of 10-20% and tensile yield strengths as high as 500 MPa being reported. Likewise, initial improvements in creep resistance have been realized through small additions of Mo, Nb, and Zr.

  6. Cryogenic insulation strength and bond tester

    SciTech Connect

    Schuerer, P. H.; Ehl, J. H.; Prasthofer, W. P.

    1985-10-22

    A method and apparatus for testing the tensile strength and bonding strength of sprayed-on foam insulation attached to metal cryogenic fuel tanks. A circular cutter is used to cut the insulation down to the surface of the metal tank to form plugs of the insulation for testing ''in situ'' on the tank. The apparatus comprises an electro-mechanical pulling device powered by a belt battery pack. The pulling device comprises a motor driving a mechanical pulling structure comprising a horizontal shaft connected to two bell cranks which are connected to a central member. When the lower end of member is attached to fitting, which in turn is bonded to plug, a pulling force is exerted on plug sufficient to rupture it. The force necessary to rupture the plug or pull it loose is displayed as a digital read-out on screen.

  7. Cryogenic insulation strength and bond tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerer, P. H.; Ehl, J. H.; Prasthofer, W. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing the tensile strength and bonding strength of sprayed-on foam insulation attached to metal cryogenic fuel tanks is described. A circular cutter is used to cut the insulation down to the surface of the metal tank to form plugs of the insulation for testing in situ on the tank. The apparatus comprises an electromechanical pulling device powered by a belt battery pack. The pulling device comprises a motor driving a mechanical pulling structure comprising a horizontal shaft connected to two bell cracks which are connected to a central member. When the lower end of member is attached to a fitting, which in turn is bonded to a plug, a pulling force is exerted on the plug sufficient to rupture it. The force necessary to rupture the plug or pull it loose is displayed as a digital read-out.

  8. Ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy at sixteen weeks.

    PubMed

    Zeqiri, Fehmi; Paçarada, Myrvete; Kongjeli, Niltene; Zeqiri, Vlora; Kongjeli, Gyltene; Krasniqi, Burim

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it ruptures, leading to life -threatening intraperitoneal hemorrhage. A 22-year-old second gravida patient presented at the Emergency Center of the University Clinical Center of Kosova with a 16-week history of amenorrhea and acute onset of severe abdominal pain. She was resuscitated and taken for an emergency laparotomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, there was a massive hemoperitoneum with a ruptured right rudimentary horn Given their rarity, ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancies are of interest. PMID:24591927

  9. Chronic rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Thomas; Thomas, Kotsis; Tympa, Aliki; Aliki, Tympa; Kalinis, Aris; Aris, Kalinis; Vasilopoulos, Ioannis; Ioannis, Vasilopoulos; Theodoraki, Kassiani; Kassiani, Theodoraki

    2011-10-01

    Although the mortality rate after abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture approximates 90% despite the urgent management, a few cases of chronic rupture and delayed repair have been reported in the world literature; anatomic and hemodynamic reasons occasionally allow for the fortunate course of these patients. We report in this article the case of 76-year-old man with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm who was transferred to our facility 4 weeks after his initial hospitalization in a district institution and who finally had a successful open repair. PMID:21620664

  10. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours. PMID:27122690

  11. Intermediate Temperature Stress Rupture of a Woven Hi-Nicalon, BN-Interphase, SiC Matric Composite in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet; Brewer, David

    1999-01-01

    Woven Hi-Nicalon (TM) reinforced melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites were tested under tensile stress-rupture conditions in air at intermediate temperatures. A comprehensive examination of the damage state and the fiber properties at failure was performed. Modal acoustic emission analysis was used to monitor damage during the experiment. Extensive microscopy of the composite fracture surfaces and the individual fiber fracture surfaces was used to determine the mechanisms leading to ultimate failure. The rupture properties of these composites were significantly worse than expected compared to the fiber properties under similar conditions. This was due to the oxidation of the BN interphase. Oxidation occurred through the matrix cracks that intersected the surface or edge of a tensile bar. These oxidation reactions resulted in minor degradation to fiber strength and strong bonding of the fibers to one another at regions of near fiber-to-fiber contact. It was found that two regimes for rupture exist for this material: a high stress regime where rupture occurs at a fast rate and a low stress regime where rupture occurs at a slower rate. For the high stress regime, the matrix damage state consisted of through thickness cracks. The average fracture strength of fibers that were pulled-out (the final fibers to break before ultimate failure) was controlled by the slow-crack growth rupture criterion in the literature for individual Hi-Nicalon (TM) fibers. For the low stress regime, the matrix damage state consisted of microcracks which grew during the rupture test. The average fracture strength of fibers that were pulled-out in this regime was the same as the average fracture strength of individual fibers pulled out in as-produced composites tested at room temperature.

  12. Earthquake Rupturing in Fluid-Overpressured Crust: How Common?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2014-11-01

    Whether or not ruptures nucleate in fluid-overpressured crust ( λ v = P f/ σ v > 0.4) is important because pore-fluids overpressured above hydrostatic lower fault frictional strength and may also vary through the earthquake cycle, acting as an independent variable affecting fault failure. Containment of fluid overpressure is precarious because pressure-dependent activation of faults and fractures allows drainage from overpressured portions of the crust. Discharge of fluids through activated fault-fracture permeability (fault-valve action) decreases overpressure so that subsequent failure depends on the cycling of both overpressure and frictional strength as well as tectonic stress. Geometric and mechanical considerations suggest that fluid overpressures are more likely to develop and be sustained in compressional/transpressional regimes as opposed to extensional/transtensional tectonic settings. On the basis of geophysical observations and force-balance analyses, subduction interface shear zones appear to be strongly but variably overpressured to near-lithostatic levels ( λ v > 0.9) over the full depth range of seismogenic megathrusts. Strong overpressuring at seismogenic depths is also documented in active fold-thrust belts and in areas of ongoing compressional inversion (e.g., northern Honshu) where inherited normal faults are reactivated as steep reverse faults, requiring near-lithostatic overpressures ( λ v → 1.0) at depths of rupture initiation. Evidence for overpressuring around strike-slip faults is less clear but tends to be strongest in areas of transpression. In areas of extensional tectonics coincident with particularly high fluid discharge, there is some evidence of overpressuring concentrated towards the base of the seismogenic zone. In general, because of the limited resolution of geophysical techniques, it is easier to make the case for rupture propagation through overpressured crust than to make a definitive case for the direct involvement of

  13. Surgical treatment of the adductor longus muscle's distal tendon total rupture in a soccer player.

    PubMed

    Masionis, P; Popov, K; Kurtinaitis, J; Uvarovas, V; Porvaneckas, N

    2016-09-01

    Only a few cases of adductor longus tendon ruptures have been reported in the literature and - there are no clear criteria for conservative or surgical treatment. A case of traumatic rupture of the right distal adductor longus tendon is presented in an elite soccer player, which was surgically repaired. The condition was managed conservatively primarily. However, after 2 months, a palpable mass remained on the medial side of the thigh, and the patient had pain after moderate everyday load and insufficient strength of the right leg during physical exercise. It was decided to explore ruptured tendon surgically and reattach to the femur. Full function of the right leg was achieved at 3 months after surgical repair. At 6 months postoperatively, the patient had returned to soccer at the same level. PMID:27132783

  14. In-reactor creep rupture properties of 20% CW modified 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Mizuta, S.; Kaito, T.; Okada, H.

    2000-02-01

    The in-reactor creep rupture tests of 20% cold worked modified 316 stainless steel were conducted in the temperature range from 878 to 1023 K using MOTA of FFTF, and were compared with the out-of-reactor tests. In-reactor creep rupture, lives become shorter than those of the out-of-reactor tests. In-reactor creep strain rate was significantly accelerated, and sufficient ductility appears to be maintained even under the irradiation. Considering 0.2% proof strength after neutron irradiation, sodium exposure or aging, the degraded rupture lives of in-reactor creep are ascribed to the enhanced dislocation recovery due to the neutron irradiation as well as to the solute elements dissolution into sodium under the sodium exposure environment.

  15. Subducting plate geology in three great earthquake ruptures of the western Alaska margin, Kodiak to Unimak

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Huene, Roland; Miller, John J.; Weinrebe, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Three destructive earthquakes along the Alaska subduction zone sourced transoceanic tsunamis during the past 70 years. Since it is reasoned that past rupture areas might again source tsunamis in the future, we studied potential asperities and barriers in the subduction zone by examining Quaternary Gulf of Alaska plate history, geophysical data, and morphology. We relate the aftershock areas to subducting lower plate relief and dissimilar materials in the seismogenic zone in the 1964 Kodiak and adjacent 1938 Semidi Islands earthquake segments. In the 1946 Unimak earthquake segment, the exposed lower plate seafloor lacks major relief that might organize great earthquake rupture. However, the upper plate contains a deep transverse-trending basin and basement ridges associated with the Eocene continental Alaska convergent margin transition to the Aleutian island arc. These upper plate features are sufficiently large to have affected rupture propagation. In addition, massive slope failure in the Unimak area may explain the local 42-m-high 1946 tsunami runup. Although Quaternary geologic and tectonic processes included accretion to form a frontal prism, the study of seismic images, samples, and continental slope physiography shows a previous history of tectonic erosion. Implied asperities and barriers in the seismogenic zone could organize future great earthquake rupture.

  16. Spontaneous rupture of ovarian cystadenocarcinoma: pre- and post-rupture computed tomography evaluation*

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Bomfim, Lucas Novais; von Atzingen, Augusto Castelli; D’Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian tumors are the most common malignant ovarian neoplasms and, in most cases, eventual rupture of such tumors is associated with a surgical procedure. The authors report the case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with spontaneous rupture of ovarian cystadenocarcinoma documented by computed tomography, both before and after the event. In such cases, a post-rupture staging tends to be less favorable, compromising the prognosis. PMID:26543286

  17. Spontaneous rupture of ovarian cystadenocarcinoma: pre- and post-rupture computed tomography evaluation.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Bomfim, Lucas Novais; von Atzingen, Augusto Castelli; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian tumors are the most common malignant ovarian neoplasms and, in most cases, eventual rupture of such tumors is associated with a surgical procedure. The authors report the case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with spontaneous rupture of ovarian cystadenocarcinoma documented by computed tomography, both before and after the event. In such cases, a post-rupture staging tends to be less favorable, compromising the prognosis. PMID:26543286

  18. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  19. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  20. Dynamic rupture activation of backthrust fault branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiqing; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-01

    We perform dynamic rupture simulations to investigate the possible reactivation of backthrust branches triggered by ruptures along a main thrust fault. Simulations with slip-weakening fault friction and uniform initial stress show that fast propagation speed or long propagation distance of the main rupture promotes reactivation of backthrust over a range of branch angles. The latter condition may occur separately from the former if rupture speed is limited by an increasing slip-weakening distance towards the junction direction. The results suggest a trade-off between the amplitude and duration of the dynamic stress near the main rupture front for backthrust reactivation. Termination of the main rupture by a barrier can provide enhanced loading amplitude and duration along a backthrust rooted near the barrier, facilitating its reactivation especially with a high frictional resistance. The free surface and depth-dependent initial stress can have several additional effects. The sign of the triggered motion along the backthrust can be reversed from thrust to normal if a deeply nucleated main rupture breaks the free surface, while it is preserved as thrust if the main rupture is terminated by a barrier at depth. The numerical results are discussed in relation to several recent megathrust earthquakes in Sumatra, Chile, and Japan, and related topics such as branch feedbacks to the main fault. The dynamic view on backthrust fault branching provided by the study fills a gap not covered by quasi-static models or observations. A specific examined case of antithetic fault branching may be useful for indicating a barrier-like behavior along the main fault.

  1. [Centralisation of treatment of ruptured aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Akkersdijk, Willem L; Akkersdijk, George J M; Akkersdijk, George P

    2014-01-01

    In the future, patients with a ruptured aneurysm will be treated at fewer hospitals in the Netherlands. Although there is a search for scientific support for this, the reason for centralisation is obvious: reduction of costs and reduction of workload for vascular surgeons during night and weekend shifts. Already there are a number of examples of regionally organised vascular surgeons who treat their patients with a ruptured aneurysm with great satisfaction and with good results. PMID:25563776

  2. Off-fault tensile cracks: A link between geological fault observations, experiments and earthquake rupture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, D.; Huang, Y.; Rosakis, A.; Griffith, W. A.; Pollard, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by the occurrence of high-angle pseudotachylite injection veins along exhumed faults, we use optical experiments and high-speed photography to interpret the origins of tensile fractures that form during dynamic shear rupture in laboratory experiments. Sub-Rayleigh (slower than the Rayleigh wave speed) shear ruptures in Homalite-100 produce damage zones consisting of a periodic array of tensile cracks. These cracks nucleate and grow within cohesive zones behind the tips of shear ruptures that propagate dynamically along interfaces with frictional and cohesive strength. The tensile cracks are produced only along one side of the interface where transient, fault-parallel, tensile stress perturbations are associated with the growing shear rupture tip. We use an analytical, linear velocity weakening, rupture model to examine the local nature of the dynamic stress field in the vicinity of the tip of the main shear rupture which grows along a weak plane (fault) with sub-Rayleigh speed. It is this stress field which is responsible for driving the off-fault mode-I microcracks that grow during the experiments. We show that (1) the orientation of the cracks can be explained by this analytical model; and (2) the cracks can be used to simultaneously constrain the constitutive behavior of the shear rupture tip. In addition, we propose an extension of this model to explain damage structures observed along exhumed faults. Results of this study represent an important bridge between geological observations of structures preserved along exhumed faults, laboratory experiments and theoretical models of earthquake propagation, potentially leading to diagnostic criteria for interpreting velocity, directivity, and static pre-stress state associated with past earthquakes on exhumed faults.

  3. Dynamic rupture processes on two orthogonal but not conjugate fault segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Y.; Aoi, S.

    2010-12-01

    The 2009 Suruga-bay, Japan, earthquake was supposed to rupture two orthogonal but not conjugate fault segments. The aftershock distribution consisting of two planes, which has the SE- and NE-dipping planes for the southern and northern source areas, respectively, and the hypocenter of the main shock was located at the SE-dipping plane (Aoi et al., 2010, Nature geoscience). The normal vectors of the two planes are almost orthogonal. Using the fault plane model that consists of the SE-dipping fault segment with a hypocenter and the NE-dipping fault segment connecting with the other segment at the point 5 km west of the hypocenter, Aoi et al. (2010) estimated the rupture process using the near-source strong-motion data. The estimated rake angles suggested that the SE-dipping fault segment had right-lateral strike slip, and that the NE-dipping segment had reverse slip. In this study, we investigate a physical possibility of coseismic slip on two orthogonal but not conjugate fault segments, using dynamic rupture simulations. The 3-D finite-difference method of Kase and Kuge (2001, GJI) is modified for an infinite medium. Varying the geometry of two faults and the maximum compressional stress axis, we calculate spontaneous rupture processes on segments, and examine whether a rupture propagating to the joint can jump to the second segment. Assuming coefficients of friction to be uniform on the two faults, we estimate the ranges of azimuth and plunge using rake angle on the first (SE-dipping) segment and stress condition on the second (NE-dipping) segment, respectively. Results of spontaneous rupture simulations show that a rupture triggered on the second segment successfully propagates only when strength excess is smaller and stress drop is larger on the second segment than the first segment. The conditions of the stress and dynamic parameters for successful rupture jump and propagation on the second segment are very limited. When the rupture extends on the both segments

  4. Fault barriers favor activation of backthrusts near segment ends of megathrust ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that backthrusts may become active during or after megathrust ruptures in subduction zones, such as in Chile and Sumatra areas (Melnick et al., 2012; Singh et al., 2011). Previous studies on relevant mechanisms mainly focused on the interaction between forethrusts and the megathrust. Here we aim to investigate through dynamic rupture simulations how backthrusts may be activated by megathrust ruptures in subduction zone environment. Assuming a single backthrust branch, our preliminary results show that the activation of backthrust is difficult if the megathrust rupture can easily pass through the fault junction, owing to a quickly established stress shadow zone in the wake of the megathrust rupture front. In contrast, if the megathrust rupture is arrested or delayed around the junction, a resultant backward stress lobe of the type discussed by Xu and Ben-Zion (2013) can load the backthrust over a considerable amount of time and facilitates rupture activation along the backthrust. A number of candidates can serve to arrest or delay megathrust ruptures, such as the velocity-strengthening frictional behavior and off-fault weak materials in the shallow portion of subduction zones, fault bend or ramp, and subducted seamount. Moreover, these features are also found capable of generating backthrusts during the long-term quasi-static process, which provide pre-existing weakness to be reactivated by later dynamic ruptures. Our results agree, from a different point of view, with the study based on the critical taper theory (Cubas et al., 2013) that an increase of friction towards the trench favors the activation of backthrusts near the up-dip limit of megathrust ruptures. The results highlight the role of fault geometric or strength heterogeneities in controlling the strain partitioning on and off the main fault plane. Accordingly, activated backthrusts may be treated as markers that reflect the limits of seismogenic zones, and thus may be used

  5. Rupture Propagation for Stochastic Fault Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favreau, P.; Lavallee, D.; Archuleta, R.

    2003-12-01

    The inversion of strong motion data of large earhquakes give the spatial distribution of pre-stress on the ruptured faults and it can be partially reproduced by stochastic models, but a fundamental question remains: how rupture propagates, constrained by the presence of spatial heterogeneity? For this purpose we investigate how the underlying random variables, that control the pre-stress spatial variability, condition the propagation of the rupture. Two stochastic models of prestress distributions are considered, respectively based on Cauchy and Gaussian random variables. The parameters of the two stochastic models have values corresponding to the slip distribution of the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake. We use a finite difference code to simulate the spontaneous propagation of shear rupture on a flat fault in a 3D continuum elastic body. The friction law is the slip dependent friction law. The simulations show that the propagation of the rupture front is more complex, incoherent or snake-like for a prestress distribution based on Cauchy random variables. This may be related to the presence of a higher number of asperities in this case. These simulations suggest that directivity is stronger in the Cauchy scenario, compared to the smoother rupture of the Gauss scenario.

  6. Tensile and stress-rupture behavior of hafnium carbide dispersed molybdenum and tungsten base alloy wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Titran, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile strain rate sensitivity and the stress-rupture strength of Mo-base and W-base alloy wires, 380 microns in diameter, were determined over the temperature range from 1200 K to 1600 K. Three molybdenum alloy wires; Mo + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC), Mo + 25w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+25W) and Mo + 45w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+45W), and a W + 0.4w/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) tungsten alloy wire were evaluated. The tensile strength of all wires studied was found to have a positive strain rate sensitivity. The strain rate dependency increased with increasing temperature and is associated with grain broadening of the initial fibrous structures. The hafnium carbide dispersed W-base and Mo-base alloys have superior tensile and stress-rupture properties than those without HfC. On a density compensated basis the MoHfC wires exhibit superior tensile and stress-rupture strengths to the WHfC wires up to approximately 1400 K. Addition of tungsten in the Mo-alloy wires was found to increase the long-term stress rupture strength at temperatures above 1400 K. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength and ductility advantage of the HfC dispersed alloy wires is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  7. Transverse deformations of extreme horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Carmen; Lucietti, James

    2016-04-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining all extreme black hole solutions to the Einstein equations with a prescribed near-horizon geometry. We investigate this problem by considering infinitesimal deformations of the near-horizon geometry along transverse null geodesics. We show that, up to a gauge transformation, the linearised Einstein equations reduce to an elliptic PDE for the extrinsic curvature of a cross-section of the horizon. We deduce that for a given near-horizon geometry there exists a finite dimensional moduli space of infinitesimal transverse deformations. We then establish a uniqueness theorem for transverse deformations of the extreme Kerr horizon. In particular, we prove that the only smooth axisymmetric transverse deformation of the near-horizon geometry of extreme Kerr, such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped surfaces, corresponds to that of the extreme Kerr black hole. Furthermore, we determine all smooth and biaxisymmetric transverse deformations of the near-horizon geometry of the five-dimensional extreme Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta. We find a three parameter family of solutions such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped, which is more general than the known black hole solutions. We discuss the possibility that they correspond to new five-dimensional vacuum black holes.

  8. Speed of fast and slow rupture fronts along frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Scheibert, Julien; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The transition from stick to slip at a dry frictional interface occurs through the breaking of microjunctions between the two contacting surfaces. Typically, interactions between junctions through the bulk lead to rupture fronts propagating from weak and/or highly stressed regions, whose junctions break first. Experiments find rupture fronts ranging from quasistatic fronts, via fronts much slower than elastic wave speeds, to fronts faster than the shear wave speed. The mechanisms behind and selection between these fronts are still imperfectly understood. Here we perform simulations in an elastic two-dimensional spring-block model where the frictional interaction between each interfacial block and the substrate arises from a set of junctions modeled explicitly. We find that material slip speed and rupture front speed are proportional across the full range of front speeds we observe. We revisit a mechanism for slow slip in the model and demonstrate that fast slip and fast fronts have a different, inertial origin. We highlight the long transients in front speed even along homogeneous interfaces, and we study how both the local shear to normal stress ratio and the local strength are involved in the selection of front type and front speed. Last, we introduce an experimentally accessible integrated measure of block slip history, the Gini coefficient, and demonstrate that in the model it is a good predictor of the history-dependent local static friction coefficient of the interface. These results will contribute both to building a physically based classification of the various types of fronts and to identifying the important mechanisms involved in the selection of their propagation speed.

  9. Realizing vector meson dominance with transverse charge densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. A.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2011-10-01

    The transverse charge density in a fast-moving nucleon is represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the Dirac form factor in the timelike region (spectral function). At a given transverse distance b the integration effectively extends over energies in a range t≲1/b, with exponential suppression of larger values. The transverse charge density at peripheral distances thus acts as a low-pass filter for the spectral function and allows one to select energy regions dominated by specific t-channel states, corresponding to definite exchange mechanisms in the spacelike form factor. We show that distances b˜0.5-1.5fm in the isovector density are maximally sensitive to the ρ meson region, with only a ˜10% contribution from higher-mass states. Soft-pion exchange governed by chiral dynamics becomes relevant only at larger distances. In the isoscalar density higher-mass states beyond the ω are comparatively more important. The dispersion approach suggests that the positive transverse charge density in the neutron at b˜1fm, found previously in a Fourier analysis of spacelike form factor data, could serve as a sensitive test of the the isoscalar strength in the ˜1GeV mass region. In terms of partonic structure, the transverse densities in the vector meson region b˜1fm support an approximate mean-field picture of the motion of valence quarks in the nucleon.

  10. Realizing vector meson dominance with transverse charge densities

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Miller, Mark Strikman, Christian Weiss

    2011-10-01

    The transverse charge density in a fast-moving nucleon is represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the Dirac form factor in the timelike region (spectral function). At a given transverse distance b the integration effectively extends over energies in a range {radical}t {approx}< 1/b, with exponential suppression of larger values. The transverse charge density at peripheral distances thus acts as a low-pass filter for the spectral function and allows one to select energy regions dominated by specific t-channel states, corresponding to definite exchange mechanisms in the spacelike form factor. We show that distances b {approx} 0.5 - 1.5 fm in the isovector density are maximally sensitive to the {rho} meson region, with only a {approx}10% contribution from higher-mass states. Soft-pion exchange governed by chiral dynamics becomes relevant only at larger distances. In the isoscalar density higher-mass states beyond the {omega} are comparatively more important. The dispersion approach suggests that the positive transverse charge density in the neutron at b {approx} 1 fm, found previously in a Fourier analysis of spacelike form factor data, could serve as a sensitive test of the isoscalar strength in the {approx}1 GeV mass region. In terms of partonic structure, the transverse densities in the vector meson region b {approx} 1 fm support an approximate mean-field picture of the motion of valence quarks in the nucleon.

  11. Transversely isotropic elasticity imaging of cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Shore, Spencer W; Barbone, Paul E; Oberai, Assad A; Morgan, Elise F

    2011-06-01

    , the effects of noise on reconstruction quality is demonstrated and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 40 dB is identified as a reasonable threshold for obtaining accurate reconstructions from experimental data. This study demonstrates that given an appropriate set of displacement fields, level of regularization, and signal strength, the transversely isotropic method can recover the relative magnitudes of all five elastic parameters without an independent measurement of stress. The quality of the reconstructions improves with increasing contrast, magnitude of deformation, and asymmetry in the distributions of material properties, indicating that elasticity imaging of cancellous bone could be a useful tool in laboratory studies to monitor the progression of damage and disease in this tissue. PMID:21744922

  12. Flutter analysis using transversality theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afolabi, D.

    1993-01-01

    A new method of calculating flutter boundaries of undamped aeronautical structures is presented. The method is an application of the weak transversality theorem used in catastrophe theory. In the first instance, the flutter problem is cast in matrix form using a frequency domain method, leading to an eigenvalue matrix. The characteristic polynomial resulting from this matrix usually has a smooth dependence on the system's parameters. As these parameters change with operating conditions, certain critical values are reached at which flutter sets in. Our approach is to use the transversality theorem in locating such flutter boundaries using this criterion: at a flutter boundary, the characteristic polynomial does not intersect the axis of the abscissa transversally. Formulas for computing the flutter boundaries and flutter frequencies of structures with two degrees of freedom are presented, and extension to multi-degree of freedom systems is indicated. The formulas have obvious applications in, for instance, problems of panel flutter at supersonic Mach numbers.

  13. Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-rupture properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C tensile and stress-rupture strength of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C. The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-rupture at 1093 C. Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C. The stress-rupture properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C ultimate tensile strength of the composites.

  14. Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-rupture properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C (2000 F) tensile and stress-rupture strength of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C (2000 F). The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-rupture at 1093 C (2000 F). Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C (2000 F). The stress-rupture properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C (2000 F) ultimate tensile strength of the composites.

  15. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:25705591

  16. A creep-rupture model of filament-wound spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jan D.; Hackett, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    The creep-rupture model is that of a quasi-isotropic filament-wound spherical pressure vessel, subjected to internal pressurization. The matrix material of the composite system is assumed to be linearly viscoelastic. Internal damage resulting from the relaxation of the matrix and the corresponding increase in microcracks is represented by a functional relationship between circumferential strain and transverse modulus. The numerical solution to this nonlinear problem is an iterative technique, whereby the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle is employed. In the Laplace domain, the associated elastic solution is obtained and this solution is inverted by the multidata method to yield the time-dependent solution.

  17. Creep-rupture behavior of candidate Stirling engine alloys after long-term aging at 760 deg C in low-pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Nine candidate Stirling automotive engine alloys were aged at 760 C for 3500 hr in low pressure hydrogen or argon to determine the resulting effects on mechanical behavior. Candidate heater head tube alloys were CG-27, W545, 12RN72, INCONEL-718, and HS-188 while candidate cast cylinder-regenerator housing alloys were SA-F11, CRM-6D, XF-818, and HS-31. Aging per se is detrimental to the creep rupture and tensile strengths of the iron base alloys. The presence of hydrogen does not significantly contribute to strength degradation. Based percent highway driving cycle; CG-27 has adequate 3500 hr - 870 C creep rupture strength and SA-Fll, CRM-6D, and XF-818 have adequate 3500 hr - 775 C creep rupture strength.

  18. In situ ply strengths - An initial assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The in situ ply strengths in several composites were calculated using a computational procedure developed for this purpose. Laminate fracture data for appropriate low modulus and high modulus fiber composites were used in the laminate analysis in conjunction with the method of least squares. The laminate fracture data were obtained from tests on Modmor-I graphite/epoxy, AS-graphite/epoxy, boron/epoxy and E-glass/epoxy. The results obtained show that the calculated in situ ply strengths can be considerably different from those measured in unidirectional composites, especially the transverse strengths and those in angleplied laminates with transply cracks.

  19. A Rare Case of Simultaneous Acute Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Unilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Wei Yee; Gheorghiu, Daniel; Rao, Janardhan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: There have been multiple reported cases of bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures (QTR) in the literature. These injuries frequently associated with delayed diagnosis, which results in delayed surgical treatment. In very unusual cases, bilateral QTRs can be associated with other simultaneous tendon ruptures. Case Report: We present a rare case of bilateral QTR with a simultaneous Achilles Tendon Rupture involving a 31 years old Caucasian man who is a semi-professional body builder taking anabolic steroids. To date bilateral QTR with additional TA rupture has only been reported once in the literature and to our knowledge this is the first reported case of bilateral QTR and simultaneous TA rupture in a young, fit and healthy individual. Conclusion: The diagnosis of bilateral QTR alone can sometimes be challenging and the possibility of even further tendon injuries should be carefully assessed. A delay in diagnosis could result in delay in treatment and potentially worse outcome for the patient. PMID:27298913

  20. Spontaneous rupture of unscarred uterus in a primigravida with preterm prelabour rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Wael Sayed; Bersano, Debbra J; Greenspan, Peter B; Harper, Diane Medved

    2015-01-01

    Intrapartum uterine rupture is a true obstetrical emergency. Uterine rupture is associated with severe maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. It is rare in the unscarred uterus of a primigravida. A 23-year-old primigravida with an unscarred uterus was admitted with preterm prelabour rupture of membranes at 36(+4) weeks of gestation. Abnormal fetal heart monitoring, associated with acute onset of severe abdominopelvic pain, developed on admission. Rupture occurred prior to onset of regular uterine contractions and in the absence of any interventional oxytocin. The neonate had evidence of severe acidosis despite emergency caesarean delivery. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for uterine rupture, even in the unlikely setting of a primigravida with an unscarred uterus. PMID:26055584

  1. Dynamic rupture processes inferred from laboratory microearthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelègue, François. X.; Schubnel, Alexandre; Nielsen, Stefan; Bhat, Harsha S.; Deldicque, Damien; Madariaga, Raúl

    2016-06-01

    We report macroscopic stick-slip events in saw-cut Westerly granite samples deformed under controlled upper crustal stress conditions in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted under triaxial loading (σ1>σ2=σ3) at confining pressures (σ3) ranging from 10 to 100 MPa. A high-frequency acoustic monitoring array recorded particle acceleration during macroscopic stick-slip events allowing us to estimate rupture speed. In addition, we record the stress drop dynamically and we show that the dynamic stress drop measured locally close to the fault plane is almost total in the breakdown zone (for normal stress >75 MPa), while the friction f recovers to values of f > 0.4 within only a few hundred microseconds. Enhanced dynamic weakening is observed to be linked to the melting of asperities which can be well explained by flash heating theory in agreement with our postmortem microstructural analysis. Relationships between initial state of stress, rupture velocities, stress drop, and energy budget suggest that at high normal stress (leading to supershear rupture velocities), the rupture processes are more dissipative. Our observations question the current dichotomy between the fracture energy and the frictional energy in terms of rupture processes. A power law scaling of the fracture energy with final slip is observed over 8 orders of magnitude in slip, from a few microns to tens of meters.

  2. Tensile and creep rupture properties of (16) uncoated and (2) coated engineering alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, L. J.; Koster, W. P.

    1977-01-01

    Sixteen test materials were supplied by NASA-Lewis Research Center as wrought bar or cast remelt stock. The cast remelt stock was cast into test blanks with two such materials being also evaluated after Jocoat coating was applied. Mechanical properties evaluated included tensile, modulus of elasticity, Poisson's Ratio, creep properties and creep rupture strength. Tests were conducted at temperatures applicable to the service temperature of the various alloys. This range extended from room temperature to 1000 C.

  3. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Hastelloy-X tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.; Colantino, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Hastelloy-X tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1400 to 1650 F and internal helium pressures from 800 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 58 to 3600 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was from 20 to 40 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  4. An Alternative Bundle-to-Bundle Suturing Technique for Repairing Fresh Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Bin; Xie, Ming; Huang, Ruokun; Xiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The main concern about conventional Achilles tendon repair surgical techniques is how to maintain the initial strength of the ruptured Achilles tendon through complicated suturing methods. The primary surgical problem lies in the properties of the soft tissue; the deterioration of the Achilles tendon, especially in its elasticity; and the surface lubricity of the local tissues. In the present study, we describe an innovative bundle-to-bundle suturing method that addresses these potential problems. PMID:26970908

  5. [Characteristics of duodenal ruptures depending on topographical and anatomical properties of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Dubrovin, I A; Chirkov, R N; Dubrovina, I A; Khachaturian, B S; Mosoian, A S; Dallakian, V F

    2013-01-01

    We have studied specific morphological properties of duodenal rupture depending on the topographic and anatomical features of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma suffered in a car crash (with the victim found in the passenger compartment or involved in an automobile-pedestrian accident) and a railway crash (a train-pedestrian accident) or resulting from a blunt-force trauma, a fall from height, a fall on the stomach, and traumatic compression of the body. We took into consideration the anatomical peculiarities of the duodenal rupture, such as its circular, horseshoe, and loop-like shape. The study has demonstrated that the frequency of duodenal injury associated with a blunt abdominal trauma shows a stronger dependence on the topographical and anatomical peculiarities of duodenum than on the circumstances of the case. Specifically, the circular duodenum and especially its descending portion are more readily subjected to the damage than the organs of a different shape. The position of the break with respect to the duodenal axis is an important diagnostic signs allowing to clarify circumstances of the blunt injury. Transverse ruptures are typical of strong impacts associated with the short-term interaction between the damaging object and the affected part of the body whereas longitudinal ruptures more commonly occur as a result the long-term traumatic impact. Bile imbibition of paraduodenal and peripancreatic retroperitoneal adipose tissue may be used as an additional diagnostic sign of duodenal rupture. PMID:24428049

  6. Transverse Magnetic Field Propellant Isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2000-01-01

    An alternative high voltage isolator for electric propulsion and ground-based ion source applications has been designed and tested. This design employs a transverse magnetic field that increases the breakdown voltage. The design can greatly enhance the operating range of laboratory isolators used for high voltage applications.

  7. Transverse effects in UV FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Small, D.W.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    In an ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL), the electron beam size can be approximately the same as the optical mode size. The performance of a UV FEL is studied including the effect of emittance, betatron focusing, and external focusing of the electron beam on the transverse optical mode. The results are applied to the Industrial Laser Consortium`s UV FEL.

  8. Ceramic Composite Intermediate Temperature Stress-Rupture Properties Improved Significantly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet B.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) composites are considered to be potential materials for future aircraft engine parts such as combustor liners. It is envisioned that on the hot side (inner surface) of the combustor liner, composites will have to withstand temperatures in excess of 1200 C for thousands of hours in oxidizing environments. This is a severe condition; however, an equally severe, if not more detrimental, condition exists on the cold side (outer surface) of the combustor liner. Here, the temperatures are expected to be on the order of 800 to 1000 C under high tensile stress because of thermal gradients and attachment of the combustor liner to the engine frame (the hot side will be under compressive stress, a less severe stress-state for ceramics). Since these composites are not oxides, they oxidize. The worst form of oxidation for strength reduction occurs at these intermediate temperatures, where the boron nitride (BN) interphase oxidizes first, which causes the formation of a glass layer that strongly bonds the fibers to the matrix. When the fibers strongly bond to the matrix or to one another, the composite loses toughness and strength and becomes brittle. To increase the intermediate temperature stress-rupture properties, researchers must modify the BN interphase. With the support of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, significant improvements were made as state-of-the-art SiC/SiC composites were developed during the Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program. Three approaches were found to improve the intermediate-temperature stress-rupture properties: fiber-spreading, high-temperature silicon- (Si) doped boron nitride (BN), and outside-debonding BN.

  9. Dynamic rupture simulation with an experimentally-determined friction law leads to slip-pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Reches, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the dynamic rupture along a vertical, strike-slip fault in an elastic half-space. The fault has frictional properties that were determined in high-velocity, rotary shear apparatus Sierra-White granite. The experimental fault was abruptly loaded by a massive flywheel, which is assumed to simulate the loading of a fault patch during an earthquake, and termed Earthquake-Like-Slip Event (ELSE) (Chang et al., 2012). The experiments revealed systematic alteration between slip-weakening and slip-strengthening (Fig. 1A), and were considered as proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of M = 4-8. We used the friction-distance relations of these experiments to form an empirical slip-dependent friction model, ELSE-model (Fig. 1B). For the dynamic rupture simulation, we used the program of Ampuero (2002) (2D spectral boundary integral elements) designed for anti-plane (mode III) shear fracturing. To compare with published works, the calculations used a crust with mechanical properties and stress state of Version 3 benchmark of SCEC (Harris et al., 2004). The calculations with a fault of ELSE-model friction revealed: (1) Rupture propagation in a slip-pulse style with slip cessation behind the pulse; (2) Systematic decrease of slip distance away from the nucleation zone; and (3) Spontaneous arrest of the dynamic rupture without a barrier. These features suggest a rupture of a self-healing slip-pulse mode (Fig. 1C), in contrast to rupturing of a fault with linear slip-weakening friction (Fig. 1B) (Rojas et al., 2008) in crack-like mode and no spontaneous arrest. We deduce that the slip-pulse in our simulation results from the fast recovery of shear strength as observed in ELSE experiments, and argue that incorporating this experimentally-based friction model to rupture modeling produces realistic propagation style of earthquake rupture. Figure 1 Fault patch behavior during an earthquake. (A) Experimental evolution of frictional stress, slip velocity, and

  10. Rupture history of 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake inferred from near-fault strong motion data and its impact to the practice of ground strong motion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chen; Archuleta, Ralph J.; Twardzik, Cedric

    2015-04-01

    The spatiotemporal rupture history of the 2014 South Napa earthquake is constrained using near-fault strong motion records. An aggressive source parameterization with 1372 subfaults is adopted to match the signals in the transverse components up to 4 Hz. The result reveals that the rupture of the Napa earthquake initiated at a depth of 9.84 km and propagated mainly to north-northwest (NNW) and updip on a 13 km long fault patch. A gradual increase in average rise time when the rupture propagates to shallower depth is observed. However, it is the rupture of a small (Mw 4.9), isolated, and high stress drop fault patch that excited the largest ground acceleration at stations south of the epicenter. Such fine-scale rupture heterogeneity shall be considered during seismic hazard analysis.