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Sample records for transverse rupture strength

  1. Prediction of creep-rupture life of unidirectional titanium matrix composites subjected to transverse loading

    SciTech Connect

    John, R.; Khobaib, M.; Smith, P.R.

    1996-10-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMCs) incorporating unidirectional fiber reinforcement are considered as enabling materials technology for advanced engines which require high specific strength and elevated temperature capability. The resistance of unidirectional TMCs to deformation under longitudinally applied sustained loading at elevated temperatures has been well documented. Many investigators have shown that the primary weakness of the unidirectional TMC is its susceptibility to failure under very low transverse loads, especially under sustained loading. Hence, a reliable model is required to predict the creep-rupture life of TMCs subjected to different transverse stress levels over a wide range of temperatures. In this article, the authors propose a model to predict the creep-rupture life of unidirectional TMC subjected to transverse loading based on the creep-rupture life of unidirectional TMC subjected to transverse loading based on the creep-rupture behavior of the corresponding fiberless matrix. The model assumes that during transverse loading, the effective load-carrying matrix ligament along a row of fibers controls the creep-rupture strength and the fibers do not contribute to the creep resistance of the composite. The proposed model was verified using data obtained from different TMC fabricated using three matrix compositions, which exhibited distinctly different types of creep behavior. The results show that the creep-rupture life of the transverse TMC decreases linearly with increasing ratio of the fiber diameter to the ply thickness. The creep-rupture life is also predicted to be independent of fiber spacing along the length of the specimen.

  2. Stress-rupture strength of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-rupture properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.

  3. In Vitro Study of Transverse Strength of Fiber Reinforced Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mosharraf, R.; Hashemi, Z.; Torkan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Reinforcement with fiber is an effective method for considerable improvement in flexural properties of indirect composite resin restorations. The aim of this in-vitro study was to compare the transverse strength of composite resin bars reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Materials and Methods Thirty six bar type composite resin specimens (3×2×25 mm) were constructed in three groups. The first group was the control group (C) without any fiber reinforcement. The specimens in the second group (P) were reinforced with pre-impregnated fibers and the third group (N) with non-impregnated fibers. These specimens were tested by the three-point bending method to measure primary transverse strength. Data were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests. Results There was a significant difference among the mean primary transverse strength in the three groups (P<0.001). The post-hoc (Tukey) test showed that there was a significant difference between the pre-impregnated and control groups in their primary transverse strength (P<0.001). Regarding deflection, there was also a significant difference among the three groups (P=0.001). There were significant differences among the mean deflection of the control group and two other groups (PC&N<.001 and PC&P=.004), but there was no significant difference between the non-and pre-impregnated groups (PN&P=.813). Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that reinforcement with fiber considerably increased the transverse strength of composite resin specimens, but impregnation of the fiber used implemented no significant difference in the transverse strength of composite resin samples. PMID:22457836

  4. Prediction of residual tensile strength of transversely impacted composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    The response to low velocity impact of graphite-epoxy T300/5208 composite laminates is discussed. Steel balls of 3/8 inch, 5/8 inch, and 1 inch diameter were the projectiles. Impact energy was limited to 1.2 joules. Impacted specimens were ultrasonically C scanned to determine the impact damaged region. The threshold value of impact energy for impact damage was found to be approximately 0.3 joules. A model was developed to predict the tensile residual strength of impact damaged specimens from fracture mechanics concepts. Impacted specimens were tested in tension to provide a fracture data base. The experimental results agreed well with the predictions from fracture mechanics. In this study, the maximum impact velocity used to simulate the low velocity transverse impact from common objects like tool drops was 10 m/s.

  5. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on Composite Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, configuration, and size on the transverse tension strength of two glass-epoxy materials, and one carbon-epoxy material, loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, arid/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was typically lower for longer span lengths due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law typically over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, this scaling law was not adequate for predicting transverse tension strength of heterogeneous, fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix composites.

  6. Characterisation of Laves phase precipitation and its correlation to creep rupture strength of ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, S.; Yang, M.; Song, X.L.; Tang, S.; Xiang, Z.D.

    2014-12-15

    The Laves phase precipitation process was characterised by means of field emission scanning electron microscopy to demonstrate its effect on creep rupture strength of steels with a fully ferritic matrix. To eliminate the effects of carbide and carbonitride precipitations so that the creep rupture data can be analysed exclusively in relation to the Laves phase precipitation process, an alloy Fe–9Cr–3Co–3W (wt.%) without C and N additions was used for the study. Creep rupture strengths were measured and volume fraction and particle size of Laves phase precipitates in the ruptured specimens were analysed. It was found that the creep rupture strength started to collapse (or decrease more rapidly) long before the Laves phase precipitation reached equilibrium fraction. This was related to the onset of the coarsening of Laves phase particles, which precipitated only on grain boundaries and hence contributed little to precipitation strengthening. Creep deformation had no effect either on the precipitation kinetics or on the growth kinetics of Laves phase particles. - Highlights: • Laves phase precipitation at 650 °C was characterised for Fe–9Cr–3W–3Co alloy. • Laves phase precipitated predominantly on grain boundaries. • Creep deformation had no effect on Laves phase precipitation and growth kinetics. • Creep strength started to collapse long before Laves phase precipitation is ended. • Collapse of creep strength was attributed to the coarsening of Laves phase particles.

  7. Self-healing slip pulses in dynamic rupture models due to velocity-dependent strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Seismological observations of short slip duration on faults (short rise time on seismograms) during earthquakes are not consistent with conventional crack models of dynamic rupture and fault slip. In these models, the leading edge of rupture stops only when a strong region is encountered, and slip at an interior point ceases only when waves from the stopped edge of slip propagate back to that point. In contrast, some seismological evidence suggests that the duration of slip is too short for waves to propagate from the nearest edge of the ruptured surface, perhaps even if the distance used is an asperity size instead of the entire rupture dimension. What controls slip duration, if not dimensions of the fault or of asperities? In this study, dynamic earthquake rupture and slip are represented by a propagating shear crack. For all propagating shear cracks, slip velocity is highest near the rupture front, and at a small distance behind the rupture front, the slip velocity decreases. As pointed out by Heaton (1990), if the crack obeys a negative slip-rate-dependent strength relation, the lower slip velocity behind the rupture front will lead to strengthening that further reduces the velocity, and under certain circumstances, healing of slip can occur. The boundary element method of Hamano (1974) is used in a program adapted from Andrews (1985) for numerical simulations of mode II rupture with two different velocity-dependent strength functions. For the first function, after a slip-weakening displacement, the crack follows an exponential velocity-weakening relation. The characteristic velocity V0 of the exponential determines the magnitude of the velocity-dependence at dynamic velocities. The velocity-dependence at high velocity is essentially zero when V0 is small and the resulting slip velocity distribution is similar to slip weakening. If V0 is larger, rupture propagation initially resembles slip-weakening, but spontaneous healing occurs behind the rupture front. The rise time and rupture propagation velocity depend on the choice of constitutive parameters. The second strength function is a natural log velocity-dependent form similar to constitutive laws that fit experimental rock friction data at lower velocities. Slip pulses also arise with this function. For a reasonable choice of constitutive parameters, slip pulses with this function do not propagate at speeds greater than the Raleighwave velocity. The calculated slip pulses are similar in many aspects to seismic observations of short rise time. In all cases of self-healing slip pulses, the residual stress increases with distance behind the trailing edge of the pulse so that the final stress drop is much less than the dynamic stress drop, in agreement with the model of Brune (1976) and some recent seismological observations of rupture.

  8. Creep rupture strength of activated-TIG welded 316L(N) stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, T.; Vasudevan, M.; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Mathew, M. D.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2011-06-01

    316L(N) stainless steel plates were joined using activated-tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding and conventional TIG welding process. Creep rupture behavior of 316L(N) base metal, and weld joints made by A-TIG and conventional TIG welding process were investigated at 923 K over a stress range of 160-280 MPa. Creep test results showed that the enhancement in creep rupture strength of weld joint fabricated by A-TIG welding process over conventional TIG welding process. Both the weld joints fractured in the weld metal. Microstructural observation showed lower δ-ferrite content, alignment of columnar grain with δ-ferrite along applied stress direction and less strength disparity between columnar and equiaxed grains of weld metal in A-TIG joint than in MP-TIG joint. These had been attributed to initiate less creep cavitation in weld metal of A-TIG joint leading to improvement in creep rupture strength.

  9. Rupture Strength of Several Nickel-base Alloys in Sheet Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dance, James H; Clauss, Francis J

    1957-01-01

    The 100-hour rupture strengths of Inconel X, Inconel 700, Incoloy 901, Refractaloy 26, and R-235 at 1200 and 1350 F. in both the annealed and heat-treated conditions were determined. Inconel 700 had the highest rupture strength at both temperatures; Incoloy 901 was second strongest at 1200 F, and R-235 second strongest at 1350 F. With the exception of Incoloy 901, ductility was low. Photomicrographs show that fractures are through the grain boundaries. Results are compared with published data for other sheet alloys and bar stock.

  10. Comparison of the Tensile, Creep, and Rupture Strength Properties of Stoichiometric SiC Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types of polymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, and Sylramic from Dow Corning. Also included in this study were an earlier version of the SA fiber plus two recent developmental versions of the Sylramic fiber. The tensile strength measurements were made at room temperature on as-received fibers and on fibers after high-temperature inert exposure. The creep-rupture property data were obtained at 1400 deg C in air as well as, argon. Some fiber types showed strong effects of environment on their strength properties. These results are compared and discussed in terms of underlying mechanisms and implications for ceramic composites.

  11. A comparative study of the stress-rupture lifetimes of high-strength carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    Stress-rupture life is the time a composite can survive under load at an assigned risk level. The stress-rupture lifetimes of high-strength PAN-based carbon fibers are important to the development and use of lightweight composite structures such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). To quantify appropriate stress-rupture risk levels based on available models, quantification of single fiber variability and lifetime is necessary to understand the variability observed in larger composite structures. In the present work, three PAN-based carbon fibers commonly used in COPV technology were examined, Hexcel IM9, Toray T700, and Toray T1000. The diameter of each fiber type was quantified by measuring samples in the scanning electron microscope and failure loads were determined by performing tensile tests on single fibers. Weibull statistics were used to describe the results. Fractography was performed on IM9 and T1000 fibers after tensile failure. The fracture surfaces are consistent with crack growth from a volume or surface defect. Stress-rupture testing was completed at two stress levels at each fiber type, 97% and 93% of the mean fiber strength for each of the fiber types. The results indicate that differences in stress-rupture life performance exist between the three fiber types. Differences in stress ratio of between 5 and 10% were observed, which may translate to significant difference in stress-rupture life behavior for larger composite structures. The results indicate that a relationship may exist between strength and stress-rupture life. However, if this relationship exists, it is not a simple one, and the relationship is likely complicated by manufacturing.

  12. The Inclusion of Arbitrary Load Histories in the Strength Decay Model for Stress Rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Stress rupture is a failure mechanism where failures can occur after a period of time, even though the material has seen no increase in load. Carbon/epoxy composite materials have demonstrated the stress rupture failure mechanism. In a previous work, a model was proposed for stress rupture of composite overwrap pressure vessels (COPVs) and similar composite structures based on strength degradation. However, the original model was limited to constant load periods (holds) at constant load. The model was expanded in this paper to address arbitrary loading histories and specifically the inclusions of ramp loadings up to holds and back down. The broadening of the model allows for failures on loading to be treated as any other failure that may occur during testing instead of having to be treated as a special case. The inclusion of ramps can also influence the length of the "safe period" following proof loading that was previously predicted by the model. No stress rupture failures are predicted in a safe period because time is required for strength to decay from above the proof level to the lower level of loading. Although the model can predict failures during the ramp periods, no closed-form solution for the failure times could be derived. Therefore, two suggested solution techniques were proposed. Finally, the model was used to design an experiment that could detect the difference between the strength decay model and a commonly used model for stress rupture. Although these types of models are necessary to help guide experiments for stress rupture, only experimental evidence will determine how well the model may predict actual material response. If the model can be shown to be accurate, current proof loading requirements may result in predicted safe periods as long as 10(13) years. COPVs design requirements for stress rupture may then be relaxed, allowing more efficient designs, while still maintaining an acceptable level of safety.

  13. Creep and Rupture Strength of an Advanced CVD SiC Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, J. C.; Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the as-produced condition the room temperature strength (approx. 6 GPa) of Textron Specialty Materials' 50 microns CVD SiC fiber represents the highest value thus far obtained for commercially produced polycrystalline SiC fibers. To understand whether this strength can be maintained after composite processing conditions, high temperature studies were performed on the effects of time, stress, and environment on 1400 deg. C tensile creep strain and stress rupture on as-produced, chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers. Creep strain results were consistent, allowing an evaluation of time and stress effects. Test environment had no influence on creep strain but I hour annealing at 1600 deg. C in argon gas significantly reduced the total creep strain and increased the stress dependence. This is attributed to changes in the free carbon morphology and its distribution within the CVD SiC fiber. For the as-produced and annealed fibers, strength at 1400 deg. C was found to decrease from a fast fracture value of 2 GPa to a 100-hr rupture strength value of 0. 8 GPa. In addition a loss of fast fracture strength from 6 GPa is attributed to thermally induced changes in the outer carbon coating and microstructure. Scatter in rupture times made a definitive analysis of environmental and annealing effects on creep strength difficult.

  14. Composite Stress Rupture: A New Reliability Model Based on Strength Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A model is proposed to estimate reliability for stress rupture of composite overwrap pressure vessels (COPVs) and similar composite structures. This new reliability model is generated by assuming a strength degradation (or decay) over time. The model suggests that most of the strength decay occurs late in life. The strength decay model will be shown to predict a response similar to that predicted by a traditional reliability model for stress rupture based on tests at a single stress level. In addition, the model predicts that even though there is strength decay due to proof loading, a significant overall increase in reliability is gained by eliminating any weak vessels, which would fail early. The model predicts that there should be significant periods of safe life following proof loading, because time is required for the strength to decay from the proof stress level to the subsequent loading level. Suggestions for testing the strength decay reliability model have been made. If the strength decay reliability model predictions are shown through testing to be accurate, COPVs may be designed to carry a higher level of stress than is currently allowed, which will enable the production of lighter structures

  15. Copper, Boron, and Cerium Additions in Type 347 Austenitic Steel to Improve Creep Rupture Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Kinkar; Kyono, J.; Shinya, Norio

    2012-04-01

    Type 347 austenitic stainless steel (18Cr-12Ni-Nb) was alloyed with copper (3 wt pct), boron (0.01 to 0.06 wt pct), and cerium (0.01 wt pct) with an aim to increase the creep rupture strength of the steel through the improved deformation and cavitation resistance. Short-term creep rupture strength was found to increase with the addition of copper in the 347 steel, but the long-term strength was inferior. Extensive creep cavitation deprived the steel of the beneficial effect of creep deformation resistance induced by nano-size copper particles. Boron and cerium additions in the copper-containing steel increased its creep rupture strength and ductility, which were more for higher boron content. Creep deformation, grain boundary sliding, and creep cavity nucleation and growth in the steel were found to be suppressed by microalloying the copper-containing steel with boron and cerium, and the suppression was more for higher boron content. An auger electron spectroscopic study revealed the segregation of boron instead of sulfur on the cavity surface of the boron- and cerium-microalloyed steel. Cerium acted as a scavenger for soluble sulfur in the steels through the precipitation of cerium sulfide (CeS). This inhibited the segregation of sulfur and facilitated the segregation of boron on cavity surface. Boron segregation on the nucleated cavity surface reduced its growth rate. Microalloying the copper-containing 347 steel with boron and cerium thus enabled to use the full extent of creep deformation resistance rendered by copper nano-size particle by increase in creep rupture strength and ductility.

  16. Transverse tensile and stress rupture properties of gamma/gamma prime-delta directionally solidified eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Tensile and stress rupture properties were determined primarily at 760 C for specimens oriented at various angles (0 deg, 10 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg) from the solidification direction of bars and/or slabs of the Ni-20Cb-6Cr-2.5A (gamma/gamma prime-delta) eutectic. Threaded-head specimens yielded longer rupture lives with significantly less scatter than did tapered-head specimens. Miniature specimens are suitable for determining traverse tensile and rupture properties of 1.2 centimeter diameter bar stock. The 300 hour rupture stress at 760 C for specimens oriented at 10 deg from the solidification direction was reduced from 740 to 460 MPa, and to 230 MPa for material oriented at either 45 deg or 90 deg.

  17. Determination of transverse shear strength through torsion testing

    SciTech Connect

    Marcucelli, K.T.; Fish, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    The in-plane characterization of composite materials is, in general, well understood and widely utilized throughout the aerospace industry. However, the use of composites in structural elements such as fuselage frames and rotorcraft flexbeams place large out-of-plane or through-the-thickness stresses for which there is little data. Efforts to determine the interlaminar shear strength of laminated composites have been hampered due to the nonlinear behavior of test specimens and the limitations of current analysis tools. An inexpensive rectangular torsion test specimen was designed to determine the interlaminar shear strength, s{sub 23}, of composite materials. Six different layups were fabricated of AS4/2220-3 carbon/epoxy unidirectional tape and tested in pure torsion. All of the specimens failed abruptly with well-defined shear cracks and exhibited linear load-deflection behavior. A quasi-three-dimensional (Q-3-D) finite element analysis was conducted on each of the specimen configurations to determine the interlaminar shear stress at failure. From this analysis, s{sub 23} was found to be 107 MPa for this material.

  18. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on the Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter of Glass Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, specimen configuration, and specimen size on the transverse tension strength of two glass epoxy materials loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, and/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was sensitive to span length due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, the utility of this scaling law for predicting transverse tension strength is unclear.

  19. Scale effects on the transverse tensile strength of graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of material volume on the transverse tensile strength of AS4/3501-6 graphite epoxy composites was investigated. Tensile tests of 90 degree laminates with 3 different widths and 5 different thicknesses were conducted. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the influence of the grip on the stress distribution in the coupons and explain the tendency for the distribution of failure locations to be skewed toward the grip. Specimens were instrumented with strain gages and extensometers to insure good alignment and to measure failure strains. Data indicated that matrix dominated strength properties varied with the volume of material that was stressed, with the strength decreasing as volume increased. Transverse strength data were used in a volumetric scaling law based on Weibull statistics to predict the strength of 90 degree laminates loaded in three point bending. Comparisons were also made between transverse strength measurements and out-of-plane interlaminar tensile strength measurements from curved beam bending tests. The significance of observed scale effects on the use of tests for material screening, quality assurance, and design allowables is discussed.

  20. Development of high strength nickel-base cast superalloy with superior creep rupture life

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, X.; Kim, H.; Choi, J.

    1996-10-15

    Elevating the operating temperature is considered to be the most effective for increasing the thermal efficiency of power generators or chemical plants. For this reason, the development of materials exhibiting superior creep strength and corrosion resistance is required. Directionally solidification (DS) and single crystal (SC) superalloys have been developed for advanced commercial and military applications. Owing to the difficulties to produce DS and SC alloys and the high casting cost, it is necessary to develop conventional casting superalloys with excellent properties similar to those of DS and SC alloys. For this purpose, a program to design and develop cast nickel-base superalloys was initiated in this investigation. Some methods, so called PHACOMP-Nv or NEW-PHACOMP-Md, allow one to estimate the phase stability of alloys, and eventually to improve it by modification of the composition. In fact these methods do not have a strong physical basis but are rather based on empirical correlations. In this paper, six compositions were calculated according to the conventional PHACOMP parameter calculation and based on the inventions Ni-Cr-W-Al-Ti-Ta system. Among them an alloy with high strength and superior creep rupture properties was determined. The phase stability was discussed using NEW-PHACOMP-Md concept.

  1. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  2. Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

  3. Techniques for Strength Measurement at High Pressures and Strain-Rates Using Transverse Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Victoria Stolyar

    The study of the strength of a material is relevant to a variety of applications including automobile collisions, armor penetration and inertial confinement fusion. Although dynamic behavior of materials at high pressures and strain-rates has been studied extensively using plate impact experiments, the results provide measurements in one direction only. Material behavior that is dependent on strength is unaccounted for. The research in this study proposes two novel configurations to mitigate this problem. The first configuration introduced is the oblique wedge experiment, which is comprised of a driver material, an angled target of interest and a backing material used to measure in-situ velocities. Upon impact, a shock wave is generated in the driver material. As the shock encounters the angled target, it is reflected back into the driver and transmitted into the target. Due to the angle of obliquity of the incident wave, a transverse wave is generated that allows the target to be subjected to shear while being compressed by the initial longitudinal shock such that the material does not slip. Using numerical simulations, this study shows that a variety of oblique wedge configurations can be used to study the shear response of materials and this can be extended to strength measurement as well. Experiments were performed on an oblique wedge setup with a copper impactor, polymethylmethacrylate driver, aluminum 6061-t6 target, and a lithium fluoride window. Particle velocities were measured using laser interferometry and results agree well with the simulations. The second novel configuration is the y-cut quartz sandwich design, which uses the anisotropic properties of y-cut quartz to generate a shear wave that is transmitted into a thin sample. By using an anvil material to back the thin sample, particle velocities measured at the rear surface of the backing plate can be implemented to calculate the shear stress in the material and subsequently the strength. Numerical simulations were conducted to show that this configuration has the ability to measure the strength for a variety of materials.

  4. Effects on stress rupture life and tensile strength of tin additions to Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W.

    1982-01-01

    Because Inconel 718 represents a major use of columbium and a large potential source of columbium for aerospace alloys could be that of columbium derived from tin slags, the effects of tin additions to Inconel 718 at levels which might be typical of or exceed those anticipated if tin slag derived columbium were used as a melting stock were investigated. Tin was added to 15 pound Inconel 718 heats at levels varying from none added to approximately 10,000 ppm (1 wt%). Limited 1200 F stress rupture testing was performed at stresses from 68,000 to 115,000 psi and a few tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 800 and 1200 F. Additions of tin in excess of 800 ppm were detrimental to ductility and stress rupture life.

  5. High-frequency spectral falloff of earthquakes, fractal dimension of complex rupture, b value, and the scaling of strength on faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.

    1991-01-01

    The high-frequency falloff ??-y of earthquake displacement spectra and the b value of aftershock sequences are attributed to the character of spatially varying strength along fault zones. I assume that the high frequency energy of a main shock is produced by a self-similar distribution of subevents, where the number of subevents with radii greater than R is proportional to R-D, D being the fractal dimension. In the model, an earthquake is composed of a hierarchical set of smaller earthquakes. The static stress drop is parameterized to be proportional to R??, and strength is assumed to be proportional to static stress drop. I find that a distribution of subevents with D = 2 and stress drop independent of seismic moment (?? = 0) produces a main shock with an ??-2 falloff, if the subevent areas fill the rupture area of the main shock. By equating subevents to "islands' of high stress of a random, self-similar stress field on a fault, I relate D to the scaling of strength on a fault, such that D = 2 - ??. Thus D = 2 corresponds to constant stress drop scaling (?? = 0) and scale-invariant fault strength. A self-similar model of aftershock rupture zones on a fault is used to determine the relationship between the b value, the size distribution of aftershock rupture zones, and the scaling of strength on a fault. -from Author

  6. Exciton states and oscillator strengths in a cylindrical quantum wire with finite potential under transverse electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shudong; Tomić, Stanko

    2012-08-01

    The effects of a transverse electric field on the electronic structure, exciton states, and oscillator strengths in a cylindrical quantum wire (QWR) are theoretically investigated. We consider a QWR made of GaAs material surrounded by a barrier of Al0.3Ga0.7As of finite depth potential. The electronic structure of the QWR, at the single electron level of theory, is obtained inside the effective mass approximation using the plane wave method, while the exciton states and transition oscillator strengths are calculated using the variational principle. The results show that the exciton oscillator strength is strongly enhanced due to the excitonic effect. The external electric field lifts the degeneracy of the electron or hole states. The energy levels of the electron and hole, exciton binding energy and exciton oscillator strength decrease with the increasing of the strength of the electric field. The stronger the electric field, the weaker the excitonic effect is. The influence of the electric field on exciton states and oscillator strengths becomes more significant for wide quantum wires. However, in sufficiently narrow wires, the influence of the electric field is also significant at small fields.

  7. Method of Estimating the Long-term Rupture Strength of 11Cr-2W-0.4Mo-1Cu-Nb-V Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Manabu

    2015-05-01

    Long-term rupture data of 11Cr-2W-0.4Mo-1Cu-Nb-V steel were analyzed using an exponential equation for stress regarding time to rupture as a thermal activation process. The fitness was compared with the usually employed method assuming power-law creep. In the exponential method, rupture data are classified into several groups according to the thermal activation process; the activation energy, Q; the activation volume, V; then, the Larson-Miller constant, C, values are calculated, and a regression equation is obtained for each data group. The fitness level of the equation was satisfactorily high for each group. The values of Q, V, and C were unusually small for a data group where an unexpected drop in rupture strength was observed. The critical issue is how to comprehend signs of degradation within the short term. We can observe several signs at a creep time of approximately one-tenth of the times of the degradation events. The small values of Q and V indicate that completely softened regions form and creep locally, which is consistent with previous observations. From both metallurgical considerations and the variations of Q and V, it is suggested that the rate of the unexpected drop in strength is mitigated after further long-term creep.

  8. Temperature Dependence on the Strength and Stress Rupture Behavior of a Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Calomino, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Tensile strengths and stress rupture lives of carbon-fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) specimens were measured at 800 C and are compared to previously reported 1200 C data. All tests were conducted in an environmental chamber containing 1000 ppm of oxygen in argon. The average 800 C tensile strength of 610 MPa is 10% greater than at 1200 C. Average stress rupture lives at 800 C were 2.5 times longer than those obtained at 1200 C. The difference in the 800 and 1200 C lives is related to the oxidation rate of the reinforcing carbon fibers, which is the primary damage mode of C/SiC composites in oxygen-containing environments.

  9. Effect of the fiber-matrix interphase on the transverse tensile strength of the unidirectional composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, H. C.; Arocho, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional fiber-matrix interphase model has been developed and analytical results obtained correlated well with available experimental data. It was found that by including the interphase between the fiber and matrix in the model, much better local stress results were obtained than with the model without the interphase. A more sophisticated two-dimensional micromechanical model, which included the interphase properties was also developed. Both one-dimensional and two-dimensional models were used to study the effect of the interphase properties on the local stresses at the fiber, interphase and matrix. From this study, it was found that interphase modulus and thickness have significant influence on the transverse tensile strength and mode of failure in fiber reinforced composites.

  10. Three-Dimensional Gait Analysis Following Achilles Tendon Rupture With Nonsurgical Treatment Reveals Long-Term Deficiencies in Muscle Strength and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tengman, Tine; Riad, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Background: Precise long-term assessment of movement and physical function following Achilles tendon rupture is required for the development and evaluation of treatment, including different regimens of physical therapy. Purpose: To assess intermediate-term (<10 years by conventional thinking) objective measures of physical function following Achilles tendon rupture treated nonsurgically and to compare these with self-reported measures of physical function. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Two to 5 years after Achilles tendon rupture, 9 women and 43 men (mean age, 49.2 years; range, 26-68 years) were assessed by physical examination, performance of 1-legged jumps, and 3-dimensional gait analysis (including calculation of muscle work). Self-reported scores for foot function (Achilles tendon rupture score) and level of physical activity were collected. Twenty age- and sex-matched controls were assessed in the same manner. Results: Physical examination of patients with the knee extended revealed 11.1° of dorsiflexion on the injured side and 9.2° on the uninjured side (P = .020), indicating gastrocnemius muscle lengthening. The 1-legged jump distance was shorter on the injured side (89.5 vs 96.2 cm; P < .001). Gait analysis showed higher peak dorsiflexion (14.3° vs 13.3°; P = .016) and lower concentric (positive) plantar flexor work (16.6 vs 19.9 J/kg; P = .001) in the ankle on the uninjured side. At the same time, eccentric (negative) dorsiflexor work was higher on the injured side (13.2 vs 11.9 J/kg; P = .010). Self-perceived foot function and physical activity were lower in patients than in healthy controls (mean Achilles tendon rupture score, 78.6 and 99.8, respectively). Conclusion: Nonsurgically treated patients with Achilles tendon rupture showed signs of both anatomic and functional lengthening of the tendon. Attenuated muscle strength and function were present during walking as long as 2 to 5 years after rupture, as determined by 3-dimensional gait analysis. More extensive future studies involving patients having both surgical and nonsurgical treatment could provide additional valuable information. PMID:26535245

  11. Improved concept of lithospheric strength and earthquake activity at shallow depths based upon the fan-head dynamic shear rupture mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris G.; Randolph, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    The typical depth-frequency distribution of earthquake hypocentres (DFDE) demonstrates that, below an upper cutoff, the earthquake frequency increases with depth up to a maximum value and then decreases and ceases at a lower cutoff. Such regular behaviour of earthquakes implies the existence of some fundamental mechanisms responsible for the distribution. Conventional models of lithospheric strength based upon the assumption that the frictional strength along pre-existing faults represents a lower limit on the rock shear strength do not provide any intrinsic logic for the observed DFDE. The paper shows that these models ignore the specific properties of intact hard rocks which can exhibit extremely low transient strength (significantly lower than the frictional strength) during failure under the high confining stresses corresponding to seismogenic depths. The low transient strength is provided by a recently identified fan-head shear rupture mechanism which can be initiated in intact rocks in the proximity of pre-existing faults. The low transient shear strength of intact rock determines the correspondingly low transient strength of the lithosphere, which favours generation of new earthquake faults in the intact rock mass adjoining pre-existing faults in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along these faults. The efficiency of the fan-mechanism within the seismogenic layer is variable, with maximum efficiency at the middle range between the upper and lower cutoffs, thus providing minimum transient strength of the lithosphere and maximum earthquake frequency at that depth. We believe that this intrinsic property of hard rocks is responsible for the observed DFDE. Importantly, the formation of new faults in intact rock generated by the fan-mechanism can be accompanied by very small stress-drops (similar to, or lower than, stress-drops for frictional stick-slip instability) combined with abnormally high energy release. The paper proposes an improved concept of lithospheric strength and earthquake activity at seismogenic depths.

  12. A Comparison of Creep Rupture Strength of Ferritic/Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluations of creep rupture properties of dissimilar weld joints of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels with Alloy 800 at 823 K were carried out. The joints were fabricated by a fusion welding process employing an INCONEL 182 weld electrode. All the joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals, and the strength reduction was greater in the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and less in the 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. Failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with the decrease in stress. At still lower stresses, the failure in the joints occurred at the ferritic/austenitic weld interface. The stress-life variation of the joints showed two-slope behavior and the slope change coincided with the occurrence of ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Preferential creep cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure, whereas creep cavitation at the interfacial particles induced ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Micromechanisms of the type IV failure and the ferritic/austenitic interface cracking in the dissimilar weld joint of the ferritic steels and relative cracking susceptibility of the joints are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing, and finite element analysis (FEA) of the stress state across the joint.

  13. The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anasane, Nayana; Ahirrao, Yogesh; Chitnis, Deepa; Meshram, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 × 10 × 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each), depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round), with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (α= 0.05). Results: Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group (P < 0.001) (88.77 MPa), with exception of round surface design repaired with glass fiber reinforced repair resin (89.92 MPa) which was significantly superior to the other joint surface contours (P < 0.001). Glass fiber reinforced resin significantly improved the repaired denture base resins as compared to the plain repair resin (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Specimens repaired with glass fiber reinforced resin and round surface design exhibited highest transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins. PMID:23946739

  14. Numerical analysis of stress distribution in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes during anvil tests for the evaluation of transverse delamination strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dizon, John Ryan C.; Gorospe, Alking B.; Shin, Hyung-Seop

    2014-05-01

    Rare-earth-Ba-Cu-O (REBCO) based coated conductors (CCs) are now being used for electric device applications. For coil-based applications such as motors, generators and magnets, the CC tape needs to have robust mechanical strength along both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The CC tape in these coils is subjected to transverse tensile stresses during cool-down and operation, which results in delamination within and between constituent layers. In this study, in order to explain the behaviour observed in the evaluation of c-axis delamination strength in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes by anvil tests, numerical analysis of the mechanical stress distribution within the CC tape has been performed. The upper anvil size was varied in the analysis to understand the effect of anvil size on stress distribution within the multilayered CC tape, which is closely related to the delamination strength, delamination mode and delamination sites that were experimentally observed. The numerical simulation results showed that, when an anvil size covering the whole tape width was used, the REBCO coating film was subjected to the largest stress, which could result in low mechanical delamination and electromechanical delamination strengths. Meanwhile, when smaller-sized anvils were used, the copper stabilizer layer would experience the largest stress among all the constituent layers of the CC tape, which could result in higher mechanical and electromechanical delamination strengths, as well as high scattering of both of these delamination strengths. As a whole, the numerical simulation results could explain the damage evolution observed in CC tapes tested under transverse tensile stress, as well as the transverse tensile stress response of the critical current, Ic.

  15. In-vitro Evaluation of Transverse Strength of Repaired Heat Cured Denture Base Resins without Surface Treatment and with Chemical and Mechanical Surface Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Naveen S; Khare, Shilpi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Vyas, Rajesh; Mahajan, Harsh; Chitumalla, Rajkiran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Denture repair involves joining two parts of a fractured denture with a denture repair material. Hence, a substantial repairing system for denture base fracture should be there to elude frequent fracture. Materials and Methods: Surface treatment of conventional heat cure denture base resin with different surface treatments (chemical ethyl acetate, and mechanical roughening with bur), with control group formed without surface treatment. Specimens were repaired with auto polymerizing acrylic resin using sprinkle on technique. The testing of the transverse strength of the repaired specimens was evaluated with three-point bending test on universal testing machine. Results: The study revealed that surface chemical treatment with ethyl acetate improved the transverse strength of repaired heat cure denture base when compared with mechanical and control group. A two-way analysis of variance revealed that there was statistically significant difference in mean strengths of the three groups. Conclusion: Surface chemical treatment with ethyl acetate improved the transverse strength of the repaired heat cure denture base when compared with mechanical roughening with bur and group without surface treatment. PMID:26464547

  16. Densification, microstructure and strength evolution in sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoping

    2000-10-01

    Powder metallurgy has the ability to fabricate high quality, complex components to close tolerances in an economical manner. In many applications, a high sintered density is desirable for an improved performance. However, sintering to a high density demands a large shrinkage, often resulting in difficulties with dimensional control. Recent studies indicate the occurrence of a sufficient densification requires a low in situ strength at high sintering temperatures. On the other hand, the low in situ strength often leads to component's distortion in response to the external forces, such as gravity. Unfortunately, lack of knowledge on strength evolution in sintering has been a major challenge to achieve an optimized combination of densification and shape retention. Therefore, the present study investigates strength evolution in sintering and the effects of processing factors. Experiments are performed on prealloyed bronze and elemental mixture of Fe-2Ni powders. For the bronze, a loose casting method is used to fabricate transverse rupture bars, while bars are injection molded for the Fe-2Ni. The in situ transverse rupture strength is measured using the Penn State Flaming Tensile Tester. Experimental results indicate a dependence of densification and strength on sintering temperature. High temperatures enhance densification and interparticle bonding, resulting in strong sintered structures. However, a low in situ strength at high test temperatures indicates the dominance of thermal softening. A strength model combining sintering theories and microstructural parameters is developed to predict both the in situ strength and the post-sintering strength. The model demonstrates the strength of the sintered materials depends on the inherent material strength, the square of neck size ratio, sintered density, and thermal softening. The model is verified by comparison of model predictions with experimental data of the bronze and Fe-2Ni. Compared to prior strength models, this model has certain advantages. It is a predictive model for both the in situ strength and post-sintering strength, and can be extended to other systems.

  17. Rupture disc

    DOEpatents

    Newton, Robert G.

    1977-01-01

    The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a rupturable member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut in the rupturable member. According to the preferred embodiment of the invention the rupturable member includes a solid head seated in the end of the drain line having a rim extending peripherally therearound, the rim being clamped against the end of the drain line by a clamp ring having an interior shearing edge, the bottom of the rupturable member being convex and extending into the drain line. Means are provided to draw the rupturable member away from the drain line against the shearing edge to clear the drain line for outflow of sodium therethrough.

  18. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and…

  19. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and

  20. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at higher magnetic fields. On the exit side there is mostly moderate to high skin dose increases for 0.2-3 T with the only exception being large positive angles. Exit bolus of 1 cm thickness will have a significant impact on lowering such exit skin dose increases that occur as a result of the ERE.

  1. Transverse Myelitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent and treat this disorder. NIH Patient Recruitment for Transverse Myelitis Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Transverse Myelitis Association 1787 Sutter Parkway ...

  2. Transverse Myelitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle strength, coordination, and range of motion. What therapies are available to help patients left with permanent ... The NINDS also funds researchers who are using animal models of spinal cord injury to study strategies ...

  3. Creep and creep rupture of fiber reinforced polymers: Long term variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Eric M.

    Fiber reinforced polymers continue to be used in ever increasing quantities for large weight critical structures which are designed to be in service for decades. Catastrophic failure of these structures can have dire consequences. Therefore, long term creep and creep rupture predictions are of critical importance. To this end, a multiscale creep rupture model based on the kinetic concept of strength is developed to predict failure. A linkage between damage evolution and the apparent modulus degradation is proposed, which allows for the prediction of creep strain. This combined creep strain and creep rupture model is implemented in a progressive failure user subroutine for finite element software. Model calibration experiments were conducted on Panex 35/M9.7 material system. Combining structural quantification, full field strain measurements and finite element simulations, mechanisms behind material variability and scatter have been identified and modeled resulting in improved life predictions. The material data collected and a video of the two-dimensional strain evolution during a transverse load and unload test have been provided as supplemental materials.

  4. Creep-rupture of polymer-matrix composites. [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An accelerated characterization method for resin matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep rupture analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer matrix composites. Comparisons between creep rupture experiments and analytical models are presented. The time dependent creep rupture process in graphite epoxy laminates is examined as a function of temperature and stress level.

  5. Surgical Treatment of Distal Biceps Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Laura E; Huang, Jerry I

    2016-01-01

    Distal biceps ruptures occur from eccentric loading of a flexed elbow. Patients treated nonoperatively have substantial loss of strength in elbow flexion and forearm supination. Surgical approaches include 1-incision and 2-incision techniques. Advances in surgical technology have facilitated the popularity of single-incision techniques through a small anterior incision. Recently, there is increased focus on the detailed anatomy of the distal biceps insertion and the importance of anatomic repair in restoring forearm supination strength. Excellent outcomes are expected with early repair of the distal biceps, with restoration of strength and endurance to near-normal levels with minimal to no loss of motion. PMID:26614933

  6. Repair of Chronic Tibialis Anterior Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Funk, Shawn S; Gallagher, Bethany; Thomson, A Brian

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a novel technique for repair of chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures. All chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures reviewed were treated with this technique. Patients with chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures presenting to the authors' institution from 2006 to 2012 had preoperative and postoperative Foot and Ankle Ability Measure scores. The average follow-up time was 2.1 years. The average Foot and Ankle Ability Measure score was 66.1% preoperatively and 87.1% postoperatively (P=.002). This technique offers theoretical improved strength and may help avoid the need for tendon graft often required by other techniques. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(2):e386-e390.]. PMID:26966943

  7. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts.

    PubMed

    El-Bahy, K; Kotb, A; Galal, A; El-Hakim, A

    2006-04-01

    Rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts (RICDC) is a rare phenomenon. The mechanism of rupture, pathophysiology of fat in the ventricles and subarachnoid spaces, possible complications, and proper management of such conditions are proposed on the basis of a review of the literature and experience with two cases of ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts (One was in the pineal region, while another was in the fourth ventricle). It is concluded that rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts is usually spontaneous and non-fatal. Persistence of fat in the subarachnoid spaces postoperatively may last asymptomatically for years. Surgery is the only way to deal with these benign lesions. If the capsule is adherent to vital areas, incomplete removal is advised as recurrence and malignant transformation are unlikely to occur. PMID:16437187

  8. Tectonics: Rupture exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    Great Himalayan earthquakes were thought to rarely rupture the surface. Field analyses in Nepal, however, reveal large surface displacements along the main fault bounding India and Asia during at least two historical earthquakes, in 1255 and 1934.

  9. Fault rupture segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Kenneth Michael

    A critical foundation to earthquake study and hazard assessment is the understanding of controls on fault rupture, including segmentation. Key challenges to understanding fault rupture segmentation include, but are not limited to: What determines if a fault segment will rupture in a single great event or multiple moderate events? How is slip along a fault partitioned between seismic and seismic components? How does the seismicity of a fault segment evolve over time? How representative are past events for assessing future seismic hazards? In order to address the difficult questions regarding fault rupture segmentation, new methods must be developed that utilize the information available. Much of the research presented in this study focuses on the development of new methods for attacking the challenges of understanding fault rupture segmentation. Not only do these methods exploit a broader band of information within the waveform than has traditionally been used, but they also lend themselves to the inclusion of even more seismic phases providing deeper understandings. Additionally, these methods are designed to be fast and efficient with large datasets, allowing them to utilize the enormous volume of data available. Key findings from this body of work include demonstration that focus on fundamental earthquake properties on regional scales can provide general understanding of fault rupture segmentation. We present a more modern, waveform-based method that locates events using cross-correlation of the Rayleigh waves. Additionally, cross-correlation values can also be used to calculate precise earthquake magnitudes. Finally, insight regarding earthquake rupture directivity can be easily and quickly exploited using cross-correlation of surface waves.

  10. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  11. Modeling rupture segmentations on the Cascadia megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone has produced a series of large to great earthquakes, most recently in 1700 AD. Paleoseismological studies of submarine turbidites suggest a significant difference in recurrence interval between Northern (~500 year) and Southern (~200-300 year) Cascadia. Whether future large ruptures are segmented is very important for estimating hazard in Pacific Northwest, but remains enigmatic from the interpretations of current locking maps. Our approach is to develop rupture scenarios of Cascadia earthquakes by performing numerical simulations using the finite element software, PyLith. Based on the USGS plate interface model of Cascadia, we have constructed a realistic three-dimensional subduction fault model that stretches from Northern California to Central Vancouver Island. We have performed a number of dynamic rupture simulations using a set of artificial friction parameters and uniform stress distributions on the fault governed by a slip-weakening friction law. Preliminary results show that ruptures have initiated from the nucleation zone with higher shear stress than the ambient fault and have propagated on the realistic three-dimensional fault surface. The increase of dip angle with depth has little effect on the rupture propagation because that is governed mostly by the fault strength. The along-strike bend of the fault beneath Washington state and Vancouver Island has not impeded the rupture propagation given the uniform fault strength. To estimate the possible rupture segmentation, we have converted a slip-deficit rate model derived from GPS data into stress change distributions on the fault assuming the entire slip deficit would be released in the next great earthquake. We are also constructing another initial stress map derived from tidal and leveling data, which shows a significant difference in the locking depth beneath Central Oregon. The other important variable, the spatial variation of frictional parameters, however, has to be determined under certain assumptions. We assume the critical distance, Dc, is proportional to the final slip, thus will be obtained from the slip deficit distribution. By combining the estimated stresses and Dc for the slip-weakening relation, we will investigate how the different interseismic locking profiles could influence possible segmentation for future ruptures on the Cascadia megathrust. This work is supported by FM Global.

  12. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  13. Incomplete Cesarean Scar Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Siahbazi, Shiva; Akhbari, Farnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine rupture at the site of a previous cesarean scar is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of pregnancy, which is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Case Presentation A 30-year old woman at 24th week of gestation and complaint of pain, contractions and spotting was admitted in Royan Institute in Tehran, Iran. She had a past medical history of an EP and a cesarean section delivery, respectively 4 and 2 years before hospitalization. Herniation of an amniotic membrane into the maternal bladder was found on ultrasound examination. Conclusion Risk factors of cesarean scar rupture should be considered in women undergoing subsequent pregnancies as they need extra care. Ultrasonography can be used to evaluate women with previous cesarean section to assess the risks of scar rupture during subsequent pregnancies. PMID:23926561

  14. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Oursin, C; Wetzel, S G; Lyrer, P; Bächli, H; Stock, K W

    1999-09-01

    Intradural dermoids are rare congenital tumors representing approximately 0.05% of all intracranial lesions. These benign tumors have a typical appearance on CT and MR due to their lipid components. The complication caused by rupture are the spillage of the fatty material into the cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of a ruptured dermoid cyst showing fat/fluid levels in both side ventricles and fatty material in the subarachnoid space on CT and MR-imaging and the follow-up over four years after incomplete resection of the tumor. PMID:10817391

  15. Animal models for plaque rupture: a biomechanical assessment.

    PubMed

    van der Heiden, Kim; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Daemen, Mat J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-02-29

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques is the main cause of acute cardiovascular events. Animal models of plaque rupture are rare but essential for testing new imaging modalities to enable diagnosis of the patient at risk. Moreover, they enable the design of new treatment strategies to prevent plaque rupture. Several animal models for the study of atherosclerosis are available. Plaque rupture in these models only occurs following severe surgical or pharmaceutical intervention. In the process of plaque rupture, composition, biology and mechanics each play a role, but the latter has been disregarded in many animal studies. The biomechanical environment for atherosclerotic plaques is comprised of two parts, the pressure-induced stress distribution, mainly - but not exclusively - influenced by plaque composition, and the strength distribution throughout the plaque, largely determined by the inflammatory state. This environment differs considerably between humans and most animals, resulting in suboptimal conditions for plaque rupture. In this review we describe the role of the biomechanical environment in plaque rupture and assess this environment in animal models that present with plaque rupture. PMID:26607378

  16. Creep and creep rupture of strongly reinforced metallic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Binienda, W. K.; Miti-Kavuma, M.

    1990-01-01

    A creep and creep damage theory is presented for metallic composites with strong fibers. Application is to reinforced structures in which the fiber orientation may vary throughout but a distinct fiber direction can be identified locally (local transverse isotropy). The creep deformation model follows earlier work and is based on a flow potential function that depends on invariants reflecting stress and the material symmetry. As the focus is on the interaction of creep and damage, primary creep is ignored. The creep rupture model is an extension of continuum damage mechanics and includes an isochronous damage function that depends on invariants specifying the local maximum transverse tension and the maximum longitudinal shear stress. It is posited that at high temperature and low stress, appropriate to engineering practice, these stress components damage the fiber/matrix interface through diffusion controlled void growth, eventually causing creep rupture. Experiments are outlined for characterizing a composite through creep rupture tests under transverse tension and longitudinal shear. Application is made to a thin-walled pressure vessel with reinforcing fibers at an arbitrary helical angle. The results illustrate the usefulness of the model as a means of achieving optimal designs of composite structures where creep and creep rupture are life limiting.

  17. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture disc is the only pressure relief device on the tank, the rupture disc must— (a) Rupture at a pressure...

  18. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Kathryn Anne

    Carbon fiber is becoming more prevalent in everyday life. As such, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of, not solely general mechanical properties, but of long-term material behavior. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber is very difficult due to high strength and low strain to rupture properties. Past efforts have included testing upon strands, single tows and overwrapped pressure vessels. In this study, 1 inch wide, [0°/90°]s laminated composite specimens were constructed from fabric supplied by T.D. Williamson Inc. Specimen fabrication methods and gripping techniques were investigated and a method was developed to collect long term creep rupture behavior data. An Instron 1321 servo-hydraulic material testing machine was used to execute static strength and short term creep rupture tests. A hanging dead-weight apparatus was designed to perform long-term creep rupture testing. The testing apparatus, specimens, and specimen grips functioned well. Collected data exhibited a power law distribution and therefore, a linear trend upon a log strength-log time plot. Statistical analysis indicated the material exhibited slow degradation behavior, similar to previous studies, and could maintain a 50 year carrying capacity at 62% of static strength, approximately 45.7 ksi.

  19. [Symphysis rupture during partus].

    PubMed

    Nouta, Klaas-Auke; Van Rhee, Marina; Van Langelaan, Evert J

    2011-01-01

    A few hours after the birth of her first child a 36-year-old woman developed anterior pelvic pain. The pain worsened on walking. It proved that during the birth the patient had felt something 'give'. On X-ray a diastasis of 50 mm was seen in the symphysis and symphysis rupture was diagnosed. The patient was treated conservatively with bed rest and pelvic stabilisation. After 17 weeks she was symptom-free. Symphysis rupture during partus is rare. It is characterised by pain around the symphysis and/or the sacro-iliac joints during the first 24 hours post partum. Diagnosis can be made by X-ray. Treatment is predominantly conservative comprising pelvic stabilisation and bed rest. PMID:21426597

  20. Free surface effects on the propagation of dynamic rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Stefan B.

    Dynamic rupture of reverse and normal fault intersecting the surface are investigated. In the case of a normal fault nucleating at depth and propagating upwards, coupling of rupture-radiated stress and free boundary conditions at the surface may induce a shallow secondary nucleation anticipating up to a few seconds the arrival of the main rupture front. Indeed, the free surface induces normal stress fluctuations modifying the fault frictional strength. No significant effect on rupture velocity is observed in the case of reverse faulting. These incidences are explained by a stress analysis and illustrated by some numerical simulations in the case of dynamic normal faulting in a homogeneous half-space. The described effects could explain some observations of high frequency radiation close to the surface in documented shallow earthquakes like in Kalamata, 1986 [Bouin, 1994].

  1. Transversity: Theory and phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alesio, Umberto

    2013-04-15

    The distribution of transversely polarized quarks inside a transversely polarized nucleon, known as transversity, encodes a basic piece of information on the nucleon structure, sharing the same status with the more familiar unpolarized and helicity distributions. I will review its properties and discuss different ways to access it, with highlights and limitations. Recent phenomenological extractions and perspectives are also presented.

  2. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  7. [Achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Thermann, H; Hüfner, T; Tscherne, H

    2000-03-01

    The treatment of acute of Achilles tendon rupture experienced a dynamic development in the last ten years. Decisive for this development was the application of MRI and above all the ultrasonography in the diagnostics of the pathological changes and injuries of tendons. The question of rupture morphology as well as different courses of healing could be now evaluated objectively. These advances led consequently to new modalities in treatment concepts and rehabilitation protocols. The decisive input for improvements of the outcome results and particularly the shortening of the rehabilitation period came with introduction of the early functional treatment in contrast to immobilizing plaster treatment. In a prospective randomized study (1987-1989) at the Trauma Dept. of the Hannover Medical School could show no statistical differences comparing functional non-operative with functional operative therapy with a special therapy boot (Variostabil/Adidas). The crucial criteria for therapy selection results from the sonographically measured position of the tendon stumps in plantar flexion (20 degrees). With complete adaptation of the tendons' ends surgical treatment does not achieve better results than non-operative functional treatment in term of tendon healing and functional outcome. Regarding the current therapeutic standards each method has is advantages and disadvantages. Both, the operative and non-operative functional treatment enable a stable tendon healing with a low risk of re-rupture (1-2%). Meanwhile there is consensus for early functional after-treatment of the operated Achilles' tendons. There seems to be a trend towards non-operative functional treatment in cases of adequate sonographical findings, or to minimal invasive surgical techniques. PMID:10798233

  8. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  9. Spontaneous rupture of renal pelvis.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Bhatia, Anmol; Mavuduru, Ravimohan; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-04-01

    Spontaneous urine extravasation from the pelvicalyceal system into the perinephric space is an uncommon condition. It is most commonly seen in the setting of obstructive ureteric calculus. Other rare causes include neoplasms, trauma, and iatrogenic procedures. Most commonly described phenomenon is forniceal rupture, but renal pelvis rupture without forniceal rupture is extremely rare. We present a short series of 3 cases of spontaneous pelvis rupture, each with a different etiology. Diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography. The follow-up and therapeutic approaches are discussed with a short review of literature. PMID:23380093

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Results from COPV Accelerated Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulsberry, Regor L.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Banks, Curtis E.; Madaras, Eric I.; Waller, Jess M.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-09-01

    To project objective is to develop and demonstrate nondestructive evaluation(NDE) techniques capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation for carbon composite pressure vessels, either in a structural health monitoring(SHM) or periodic inspection mode.

  11. Composite Stress Rupture NDE Research and Development Project (Kevlar[R] and Carbon)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to develop and demonstrate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation for carbon composite pressure vessels, either in a structural health monitoring (SHM) or periodic inspection mode.

  12. Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cyst Associated with Rupture of Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-01-01

    Many tumors have been reported to coexist with cerebral aneurysm. However, intracranial dermoid cysts associated with cerebral aneurysm are very rare. We report a case in which rupture of a cerebral aneurysm resulted in a ruptured dermoid cyst. We present this interesting case and review current literature about the relationship between tumors and aneurysm formation. PMID:22259693

  13. Risk of Uterine Rupture and Placenta Accreta With Prior Uterine Surgery Outside of the Lower Segment

    PubMed Central

    Gyamfi-Bannerman, Cynthia; Gilbert, Sharon; Landon, Mark B.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Varner, Michael W.; Caritis, Steve N.; Meis, Paul J.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Sorokin, Yoram; Carpenter, Marshall; Peaceman, Alan M.; O’Sullivan, Mary J.; Sibai, Baha M.; Thorp, John M.; Ramin, Susan M.; Mercer, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Women with a prior myomectomy or prior classical cesarean delivery are often delivered early by cesarean due to concern for uterine rupture. Although theoretically at increased risk for placenta accreta, this risk has not been well quantified. Our objective was to estimate and compare the risks of uterine rupture and placenta accreta in women with prior uterine surgery. Methods Women with prior myomectomy or prior classical cesarean delivery were compared to women with a prior low transverse cesarean to estimate rates of both uterine rupture and placenta accreta. Results One hundred seventy-six women with a prior myomectomy, 455 with a prior classical cesarean delivery, and 13,273 women with a prior low transverse cesarean were evaluated. Mean gestational age at delivery differed by group (p<0.001), prior myomectomy (37.3 weeks), prior classical cesarean delivery (35.8 weeks), and low transverse cesarean (38.6 weeks). The frequency of uterine rupture in the prior myomectomy group was 0% (95% CI 0-1.98%). The frequency of uterine rupture in the low transverse cesarean group (0.41%) was not statistically different from the risk in the prior myomectomy group (p>0.99) or in the prior classical cesarean delivery group (0.88%, p=0.13). Placenta accreta occurred in 0% (95% CI 0-1.98%) of prior myomectomy compared with 0.19% in the low transverse cesarean group (p>0.99) and 0.88% in the prior classical cesarean delivery group (p=0.01 relative to low transverse cesarean). The adjusted OR for the prior classical cesarean delivery group (relative to low transverse cesarean) was 3.23 (1.11-9.39) for uterine rupture and 2.09 (0.69-6.33) for accreta. The frequency of accreta for those with previa was 11.1% for the prior classical cesarean delivery and 13.6% for low transverse cesarean groups (p>0.99=1.0). Conclusion A prior myomectomy is not associated with higher risks of either uterine rupture or placenta accreta. The absolute risks of uterine rupture and accreta after prior myomectomy are low. PMID:23168757

  14. Stress-rupture behavior of small diameter polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Goldsby, Jon C.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Continuous length polycrystalline alumina fibers are candidates as reinforcement in high temperature composite materials. Interest therefore exists in characterizing the thermomechanical behavior of these materials, obtaining possible insights into underlying mechanisms, and understanding fiber performance under long term use. Results are reported on the time-temperature dependent strength behavior of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Below 1000 C and 100 hours, Nextel 610 with the smaller grain size had a greater fast fracture and rupture strength than Fiber FP. The time exponents for stress-rupture of these fibers were found to decrease from approximately 13 at 900 C to below 3 near 1050 C, suggesting a transition from slow crack growth to creep rupture as the controlling fracture mechanism. For both fiber types, an effective activation energy of 690 kJ/mol was measured for rupture. This allowed stress-rupture predictions to be made for extended times at use temperatures below 1000 C.

  15. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  16. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-06-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  17. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  18. Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of rupture from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method. PMID:24741691

  19. Acute Achilles tendon rupture in badminton players.

    PubMed

    Fahlstrm, M; Bjrnstig, U; Lorentzon, R

    1998-01-01

    All patients with badminton-related acute Achilles tendon ruptures registered during 1990 to 1994 at the University Hospital of Ume were retrospectively followed up using a questionnaire. Thirty-one patients (mean age, 36.0 years), 27 men and 4 women, were included. Thirty patients (97%) described themselves as recreational players or beginners. The majority of the injuries (29 of 31, 94%) happened at the middle or end of the planned game. Previous local symptoms had been noticed by five patients (16%). Long-term results showed that patients treated with surgery had a significantly shorter sick leave absence than patients treated without surgery (50 versus 75 days). There was no obvious selection favoring any treatment modality. None of the surgically treated patients had reruptures, but two reruptures occurred in the nonsurgically treated group. There seemed to be fewer remaining symptoms and a higher sports activity level after the injury in the surgically treated group. Our results indicate that local muscle fatigue may interfere with strength and coordination. Preventive measures such as specific treatment of minor injuries and adequate training of strength, endurance, and coordination are important. Our findings also indicate that surgical treatment and careful postoperative rehabilitation is of great importance among badminton players of any age or sports level with Achilles tendon rupture. PMID:9617415

  20. Effects of heterogeneous frictional properties on spontaneous rupture propagation in the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J.; Duan, B.

    2010-12-01

    Spontaneous rupture propagation along geometrically complex faults is an important topic because geometrical complexities may control rupture extent and path. Most of previous dynamic rupture models assume uniform frictional properties along a complex fault system. In this study, we examine how non-uniform frictional properties affect rupture path and extent. In particular, we take the fault geometry of the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake as an example. We investigate what combinations of heterogeneous static and dynamic frictional coefficients allow the rupture to propagate onto the branched and bent fault system as it did in the 1999 event in a 2D plane-strain framework, with an assumption of a uniform regional stress field. We find that larger static and smaller dynamic frictional coefficients on the northwest and southeast segments, compared with those on the north segment, can allow rupture to propagate onto all segments of the fault system, if the rupture starts on the northwest segment and near the junction with the north segment. This suggests that heterogeneities in fault strength and stress drop can play an important role in controlling rupture path and extent along geometrically complex faults. Response of nearby pre-existing compliant fault zones, including the Calico, Pinto Mountain, Rodman, Landers faults, to the 1999 Hector Mine rupture is under investigation using the advanced spontaneous rupture models.

  1. Using Dynamic Rupture Models to Explore Physical Controls on the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, B.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic and geodetic recordings are routinely used to invert for kinematic source models of large earthquakes, which provide us with detailed images of slip distribution and rupture evolution on causative faults. To gain insight into physical conditions that allow a fault to slip and a rupture to propagate in the way they did, we can resort to dynamic source models that obey physical laws in continuum mechanics and rock friction. Published kinematic models of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake reveal several features of the rupture. These features include 1) high static stress drop with large amounts of slip in a small area, 2) a weak initial phase, down-dip rupture for the first 40 seconds, extensive shallow rupture during 60 to 70 seconds, and continuing deeper rupture lasting more than 100 seconds, and 3) systematically down-dip high-frequency radiation with respect to the hypocenter. In this study, we use spontaneous rupture models to explore what physical conditions, including the initial stress state and friction properties on the subducting fault, can reproduce these features, so that we can gain some physical insights into controls on this megathrust earthquake. Dynamic rupture simulations of this shallow dipping megathrust faulting at reasonable spatial and temporal resolutions require parallel computing on supercomputers. Our newly parallelized finite element method algorithm EQdyna allows us to simulate a large suite of spontaneous rupture models to examine the questions. In model setup, we use depth-dependence principal stresses and take into account variations in pore fluid pressure and frictional properties associated with subducted seafloor features such as seamounts. Our preliminary results suggest followings. First, a high strength and high stress drop patch (probably a subducted seamount or seamout chain) just above the hypocenter on the fault plane can delay up-dip rupture and result in a concentrated large slip area. Second, significantly negative stress drop on the shallow portion of the subducting fault associated with the active accretionary prism is needed to reduce the amplitude of shallow slip and to confine shallow slip in a small area near the trench just up-dip of the region of maximum fault slip. Third, heterogeneities in the seismic strength parameter S down-dip of the hypocenter, probably due to both heterogeneous stresses from previous earthquakes and heterogeneous friction properties at the brittle and ductile transition zone, can produce large amounts of high-frequency radiations.

  2. Transverse gravity versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J.J. E-mail: anton.fernandez@uam.es

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂{sub μ}ξ{sup μ} = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  3. Transverse gravity versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J. J.

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂μξμ = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  4. Strength enhancement process for prealloyed powder superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique involving superplastic processing and high pressure autoclaving was applied to a nickel base prealloyed powder alloy. Tensile strengths as high as 2865 MN/sq m at 480 C were obtained with as-superplastically deformed material. Appropriate treatments yielding materials with high temperature tensile and stress rupture strengths were also devised.

  5. Repair of patellar tendon rupture using suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Brandon D; Tennant, Joshua N; Rubright, James H; Creighton, R Alexander

    2008-04-01

    Acute isolated rupture of the patellar tendon traditionally has been repaired via transpatellar suture tunnels. This retrospective study evaluated the demographics and epidemiology of this injury as well as the effectiveness and complication rates of our suture anchor technique. Between 1993 and 2005, a total of 82 cases of patellar tendon disruption in 71 patients were repaired. Fourteen cases involved basic primary repair with suture anchors of an acute isolated rupture of the patellar tendon and had an average follow-up of 29 months (range: 3-112 months). There were 3 (21%) failures of repair. The remaining 11 patients had excellent range of motion and strength and returned to their preoperative level of function. These results are comparable with other reports in the literature. The suture anchor technique thus represents a viable option for repair of patellar tendon ruptures and should be investigated further with a randomized, controlled trial. PMID:18500063

  6. Shallow dynamic overshoot and energetic deep rupture in the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

    PubMed

    Ide, Satoshi; Baltay, Annemarie; Beroza, Gregory C

    2011-06-17

    Strong spatial variation of rupture characteristics in the moment magnitude (M(w)) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki megathrust earthquake controlled both the strength of shaking and the size of the tsunami that followed. Finite-source imaging reveals that the rupture consisted of a small initial phase, deep rupture for up to 40 seconds, extensive shallow rupture at 60 to 70 seconds, and continuing deep rupture lasting more than 100 seconds. A combination of a shallow dipping fault and a compliant hanging wall may have enabled large shallow slip near the trench. Normal faulting aftershocks in the area of high slip suggest dynamic overshoot on the fault. Despite prodigious total slip, shallower parts of the rupture weakly radiated at high frequencies, whereas deeper parts of the rupture radiated strongly at high frequencies. PMID:21596957

  7. Earthquake in a maze: compressional rupture branching during the 2012 M(w) 8.6 Sumatra earthquake.

    PubMed

    Meng, L; Ampuero, J-P; Stock, J; Duputel, Z; Luo, Y; Tsai, V C

    2012-08-10

    Seismological observations of the 2012 moment magnitude 8.6 Sumatra earthquake reveal unprecedented complexity of dynamic rupture. The surprisingly large magnitude results from the combination of deep extent, high stress drop, and rupture of multiple faults. Back-projection source imaging indicates that the rupture occurred on distinct planes in an orthogonal conjugate fault system, with relatively slow rupture speed. The east-southeast-west-northwest ruptures add a new dimension to the seismotectonics of the Wharton Basin, which was previously thought to be controlled by north-south strike-slip faulting. The rupture turned twice into the compressive quadrant, against the preferred branching direction predicted by dynamic Coulomb stress calculations. Orthogonal faulting and compressional branching indicate that rupture was controlled by a pressure-insensitive strength of the deep oceanic lithosphere. PMID:22821986

  8. Barriers to faulting in the Basin-Range province: evidence from the Sou Hills transverse block

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Transverse structural blocks may inhibit the propagation of fault ruptures in the Basin-Range province. The Sou Hills, between Dixie and Pleasant Valleys, is a block of uplifted Tertiary bedrock transverse to the NNE-SSW trend of the central Nevada seismic belt. Three lines of evidence indicate that offset due to normal faulting is much less in the Sou Hills compared to adjacent segments of the seismic belt. First, estimates of total late Cenozoic offsets of pre-extension basalts show that the total offset is less in the Sou Hills. Second, analyses of landforms that reflect rates of relative uplift show that Quaternary tectonic activity on range-bounding faults declines where faults join the Sou Hills. Third, measurements of late Quaternary fault scarps show that individual rupture segments in the Sou Hills are shorter in length and have smaller displacements compared to the nearly continuous ruptures of several meters offset found along the Tobin and Stillwater Ranges to the north and south. The Sou Hills rupture pattern is distinctive: ruptures are dispersed over a wide zone rather than being concentrated along well-defined range fronts. Normal faulting patterns produced by the 1915 Pleasant Valley, Nevada and the 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquakes indicate that a discontinuous, spatially dispersed faulting style typifies ruptures which die out in transverse bedrock features. These historic analogues support a model for prehistoric faulting in which ruptures have repeatedly died out in the Sou Hills. Transverse blocks such as the Sou Hills appear to present barriers to propagating ruptures.

  9. Transverse Instability of Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parteli, Eric J. R.; Andrade, José S., Jr.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2011-10-01

    The simplest type of dune is the transverse one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations, that transverse dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a transverse dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation.

  10. Transverse instability of dunes.

    PubMed

    Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-10-28

    The simplest type of dune is the transverse one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations, that transverse dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a transverse dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation. PMID:22107675

  11. Complex rupture during the 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, G. P.; Briggs, R. W.; Sladen, A.; Fielding, E. J.; Prentice, C.; Hudnut, K.; Mann, P.; Taylor, F. W.; Crone, A. J.; Gold, R.; Ito, T.; Simons, M.

    2010-11-01

    Initially, the devastating Mw 7.0, 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake seemed to involve straightforward accommodation of oblique relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates along the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone. Here, we combine seismological observations, geologic field data and space geodetic measurements to show that, instead, the rupture process may have involved slip on multiple faults. Primary surface deformation was driven by rupture on blind thrust faults with only minor, deep, lateral slip along or near the main Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone; thus the event only partially relieved centuries of accumulated left-lateral strain on a small part of the plate-boundary system. Together with the predominance of shallow off-fault thrusting, the lack of surface deformation implies that remaining shallow shear strain will be released in future surface-rupturing earthquakes on the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone, as occurred in inferred Holocene and probable historic events. We suggest that the geological signature of this earthquake-broad warping and coastal deformation rather than surface rupture along the main fault zone-will not be easily recognized by standard palaeoseismic studies. We conclude that similarly complex earthquakes in tectonic environments that accommodate both translation and convergence-such as the San Andreas fault through the Transverse Ranges of California-may be missing from the prehistoric earthquake record.

  12. Complex rupture during the 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Briggs, R.W.; Sladen, A.; Fielding, E.J.; Prentice, C.; Hudnut, K.; Mann, P.; Taylor, F.W.; Crone, A.J.; Gold, R.; Ito, T.; Simons, M.

    2010-01-01

    Initially, the devastating Mw 7.0, 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake seemed to involve straightforward accommodation of oblique relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates along the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone. Here, we combine seismological observations, geologic field data and space geodetic measurements to show that, instead, the rupture process may have involved slip on multiple faults. Primary surface deformation was driven by rupture on blind thrust faults with only minor, deep, lateral slip along or near the main Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone; thus the event only partially relieved centuries of accumulated left-lateral strain on a small part of the plate-boundary system. Together with the predominance of shallow off-fault thrusting, the lack of surface deformation implies that remaining shallow shear strain will be released in future surface-rupturing earthquakes on the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone, as occurred in inferred Holocene and probable historic events. We suggest that the geological signature of this earthquakeg-broad warping and coastal deformation rather than surface rupture along the main fault zoneg-will not be easily recognized by standard palaeoseismic studies. We conclude that similarly complex earthquakes in tectonic environments that accommodate both translation and convergenceg-such as the San Andreas fault through the Transverse Ranges of Californiag-may be missing from the prehistoric earthquake record. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  13. Creep and rupture of an ODS alloy with high stress rupture ductility. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalarney, M. E.; Arsons, R. M.; Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Baranow, S.

    1982-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture properties of an oxide (Y2O3) dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy, which also is strengthened by gamma-prime precipitates, was studied at 760 and 1093 C. At both temperatures, the alloy YDNiCrAl exhibits unusually high stress rupture ductility as measured by both elongation and reduction in area. Failure was transgranular, and different modes of failure were observed including crystallographic fracture at intermediate temperatures and tearing or necking almost to a chisel point at higher temperatures. While the rupture ductility was high, the creep strength of the alloy was low relative to conventional gamma prime strengthened superalloys in the intermediate temperature range and to ODS alloys in the higher temperature range. These findings are discussed with respect to the alloy composition; the strengthening oxide phases, which are inhomogeneously dispersed; the grain morphology, which is coarse and elongated and exhibits many included grains; and the second phase inclusion particles occurring at grain boundaries and in the matrix. The creep properties, in particular the high stress dependencies and high creep activation energies measured, are discussed with respect to the resisting stress model of creep in particle strengthened alloys.

  14. Multiarray rupture imaging of the devastating 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Lee, Suzan; Ge, Zengxi

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, robust multiarray backprojection method was applied to image the rupture pattern of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal Mw7.8 main shock and its Mw7.3 aftershock. Backprojected teleseismic P wave trains from three regional seismic arrays in Europe, Australia, and Alaska show that both earthquakes ruptured unilaterally and primarily eastward, with rupture speeds potentially decreasing with depth. The rupture of the main shock first extended ESEward at ˜3.5 km/s over ˜120 km, with later rupture propagation further downdip on the eastern segment at ˜2.1 km/s. The aftershock ruptured the fault SE of the main shock's ruptured plane. It began to rupture updipward for ˜20 km at a speed around 1.2 km/s, then it may have accelerated to 3.5 km/s for the next 50 km. The apparent depth-dependent rupture speeds of the two earthquakes may be caused by along-dip heterogeneities in fault strength, with a higher stress concentration on the updip part of the Nepalese Main Himalayan Thrust.

  15. TRANSVERSE INSTABILITIES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M; Cameron, P; Catalan-Lasheras, N; Dawson, C; Degen, C; Drees, K; Fischer, W; Koropsak, E; Michnoff, R; Montag, C; Roser, T

    2003-05-12

    The beam quality in RHIC can be significantly impacted by a transverse instability which can occur just after transition [1]. Data characterizing the instability are presented and analyzed. Techniques for ameliorating the situation are considered.

  16. [Achilles tendon ruptures and tibialis anterior tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Pagenstert, G; Leumann, A; Frigg, A; Valderrabano, V

    2010-12-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures (ATR) are becoming the most frequent tendon rupture of the lower extremity, whereas less than 100 cases of tibialis anterior tendon ruptures (TATR) have been reported. Common in both tendons are the degenerative causes of ruptures in a susceptible tendon segment, whereas traumatic transections occur at each level. Triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles are responsible for the main sagittal ankle range of motion and ruptures lead to a distinctive functional deficit. However, diagnosis is delayed in up to 25% of ATR and even more frequently in TATR. Early primary repair provides the best functional results. With progressive retraction and muscle atrophy delayed tendon reconstruction has less favourable functional results. But not all patients need full capacity, power and endurance of these muscles and non-surgical treatment should not be forgotten. Inactive patients with significant comorbidities and little disability should be informed that surgical treatment of TATR is complicated by high rates of rerupture and surgical treatment of ATR can result in wound healing problems rarely necessitating some kind of transplantation. PMID:21110002

  17. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  18. Labor Dystocia and the Risk of Uterine Rupture in Women with Prior Cesarean.

    PubMed

    Vachon-Marceau, Chantale; Demers, Suzanne; Goyet, Martine; Gauthier, Robert; Roberge, Stéphanie; Chaillet, Nils; Laroche, Jasmin; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between labor dystocia and uterine rupture. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of a multicenter case-control study that included women with single, prior, low-transverse cesarean section who experienced complete uterine rupture during a trial of labor (TOL). For each case, three women who underwent a TOL without uterine rupture were selected as controls. Data were collected on cervical dilatations from admission to delivery. We evaluated the relationship between uterine rupture and labor dystocia according to several criteria, including the World Health Organization's (WHO's) partogram. Results Data were available for 90 cases and 260 controls. Compared with the controls, uterine rupture was associated with less cervical dilatation on admission, slower cervical dilatation in the first stage of labor and longer second stage of labor (all with p < 0.05). Performing cesarean when the labor curve crossed the ACTION line of WHO's partogram or when the second stage was greater than 2 hours could have (1) prevented up to 56% of uterine rupture and (2) reduced the duration of labor in 57% of women with failed TOL. Conclusion Labor dystocia is a significant risk factor for uterine rupture. Labor progression should be assessed regularly in women with prior cesarean. PMID:26731182

  19. Coupling a geodynamic seismic cycling model to rupture dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; van Dinther, Ylona

    2014-05-01

    The relevance and results of dynamic rupture scenarios are implicitly linked to the geometry and pre-existing stress and strength state on a fault. The absolute stresses stored along faults during interseismic periods, are largely unquantifiable. They are, however, pivotal in defining coseismic rupture styles, near-field ground motion, and macroscopic source properties (Gabriel et al., 2012). Obtaining these in a physically consistent manner requires seismic cycling models, which directly couple long-term deformation processes (over 1000 year periods), the self-consistent development of faults, and the resulting dynamic ruptures. One promising approach to study seismic cycling enables both the generation of spontaneous fault geometries and the development of thermo-mechanically consistent fault stresses. This seismo-thermo-mechanical model has been developed using a methodology similar to that employed to study long-term lithospheric deformation (van Dinther et al., 2013a,b, using I2ELVIS of Gerya and Yuen, 2007). We will innovatively include the absolute stress and strength values along physically consistent evolving non-finite fault zones (regions of strain accumulation) from the geodynamic model into dynamic rupture simulations as an initial condition. The dynamic rupture simulations will be performed using SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) scheme (Pelties et al., 2012). The dynamic rupture models are able to incorporate the large degree of fault geometry complexity arising in naturally evolving geodynamic models. We focus on subduction zone settings with and without a splay fault. Due to the novelty of the coupling, we first focus on methodological challenges, e.g. the synchronization of both methods regarding the nucleation of events, the localization of fault planes, and the incorporation of similar frictional constitutive relations. We then study the importance of physically consistent fault stress, strength, and geometry input for dynamic rupture propagation in terms of rupture path and dynamics. On the other hand, it will provide the opportunity to compare slow earthquake akin events developing in quasi-static geodynamic model to fully dynamic ruptures in terms of coseismic displacements and stress changes. Gabriel, A.-A. (2012), J.-P. Ampuero, L. A. Dalguer, and P. M. Mai, The transition of dynamic rupture modes in elastic media, J. Geophys. Res., 117(B9), 01480227. Gerya, T., and D. Yuen (2007), Robust characteristics method for modelling multiphase visco-elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical problems, Phys. Earth Planet In., 163(1-4), 83-105. Pelties, C. (2012), J. De la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. B. Brietzke, and M. Käser Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture, Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, J. Geophys. Res., 117(B2), B02309. van Dinther, Y. (2013a), T.V. Gerya, L.A. Dalguer, F. Corbi, F. Funiciello, and P.M. Mai, The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: 2. Dynamic implications of geodynamic simulations validated with laboratory models, J. Geophys. Res., 118(4), 1502-1525. van Dinther, Y. (2013b), T.V. Gerya, L.A. Dalguer, P.M. Mai, G. Morra, and D. Giardini, The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: insights from seismo-thermo-mechanical models, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 6183-6202.

  20. Spontaneous splenic rupture in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Elghanmi, Adil; Mohamed, Jou; Khabouz, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Splenic rupture during pregnancy is a rare and can frequently be a misdiagnosed pathology. This rupture is associated with a high maternal and fetal mortality rate. A 26 years old Moroccan woman para II gravida II presented at the third stage of pregnancy with acute onset of severe abdominal pain. She developed immediately a hypovolemic shock. After both a physical and sonographical exam, it was revealed that it was due to a massive hemoperitoneum. Therefore, an emergent laparotomy and cesarean delivery with abdominal exploration were performed; also, an active bleeding was identified at the splenic hilum consistent with splenic rupture. Through this case report, we want to raise awareness of this surgical emergency that requires immediate recognition because any delay can lead to catastrophic consequences PMID:26587160

  1. Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture with contralateral BTB autograft: a case report.

    PubMed

    Milankov, Miroslav Z; Miljkovic, Natasa; Stankovic, Milan

    2007-12-01

    Chronic patellar tendon rupture is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. Many different surgical methods have been reported for the reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon ruptures. We are reporting the use of contralateral bone-tendon-bone (BTB) autograft for chronic patellar tendon rupture reconstruction followed by double-wire loop reinforcement and without postoperative immobilization. One year after the operation, our patient had full knee extension and up to 130 degrees of flexion. He had good quadriceps strength, and isokinetic muscle testing showed no deficit comparing to his right leg. Patient returned to playing basketball in his spare time, without having any limitation. PMID:17579835

  2. Spontaneous Forniceal Rupture in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Upputalla, Roshni; Moore, Robert M.; Jim, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Forniceal rupture is a rare event in pregnancy. We report a case of a 26-year-old primigravid woman who experienced a forniceal rupture at 23 weeks of gestation with no inciting cause except for pregnancy. Pregnancy is associated with ureteral compression due to increase in pelvic vasculature with the right ureter more dilated due to anatomic reasons. Hormones such as prostaglandins and progesterone render the ureter more distensible to allow for pressure build-up and an obstructive picture at the collecting system. We will discuss physiologic changes in pregnancies that predispose to this uncommon phenomenon and the most up-to-date management strategies. PMID:25648411

  3. Ruptures of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed Central

    Ha'eri, G B

    1980-01-01

    Through the use of improved diagnostic techniques, including arthrography and arthroscopy, ruptures of the rotator cuff that previously might not have been recognized are now being identified more frequently. In most cases the symptoms are relatively mild and respond satisfactorily to rest and therapy. Occasionally, however, there is severe, persistent disability despite treatment. These ruptures require surgical repair. In such cases the data obtained from special investigations help the surgeon select the appropriate surgical approach and repair technique. An imaginative program of physiotherapy before and after the operation contributes greatly to a satisfactory result. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:7437980

  4. Enzymatically triggered rupture of polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woo-Sik; Park, Seung Chul; Reed, Ellen H; Dooley, Kevin P; Wheeler, Samuel F; Lee, Daeyeon; Hammer, Daniel A

    2016-01-20

    Polymersomes are robust vesicles made from amphiphilic block co-polymers. Large populations of uniform giant polymersomes with defined, entrapped species can be made by templating of double-emulsions using microfluidics. In the present study, a series of two enzymatic reactions, one inside and the other outside of the polymersome, were designed to induce rupture of polymersomes. We measured how the kinetics of rupture were affected by altering enzyme concentration. These results suggest that protocells with entrapped enzymes can be engineered to secrete contents on cue. PMID:26616557

  5. Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self-energizing and requires low force compared to current pyrotechnic-based burst disk hermetic valves. This is a novel design for producing a single-use, self-rupturing, hermetically sealed valve for isolation of pressurized gas and/or liquids. This design can also be applied for single-use disposable valves for chemical instruments. A welded foil diaphragm is fully supported by two mated surfaces that are machined to micron accuracies using EDM. To open the valve, one of the surfaces is moved relative to the other to (a) remove the support creating an unsupported diaphragm that ruptures due to over pressure, and/or (b) produce tension in the diaphragm and rupture it.

  6. Distal biceps and triceps ruptures.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Ballas, Efstathios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2013-03-01

    Biceps and triceps tendon ruptures are rather uncommon injuries and are most commonly diagnosed clinically. Magnetic resonance imaging can help the clinician to differentiate an incomplete tear and define any degeneration of the tendon. Surgical anatomical repair is typically performed in acute complete ruptures whereas nonoperative treatment can be used for partial ruptures, as well as for patients unfit for surgery. Single incision techniques are associated with a higher rate of nerve injuries, while double incision repairs have a higher prevalence of heterotopic ossification. Although various fixation methods have been applied including bone tunnels, interference screws, suture anchors, cortical button fixation, the current evidence does not support the superiority of one method over the other. A well-planned postoperative rehabilitation programme is essential for a good final outcome. As better fixation devices are being used, more aggressive rehabilitation programmes have been applied. Epidemiology, clinical evaluation, diagnosis, surgical and conservative management of these injuries are presented in this review along with the authors' preferred technique for the anatomical repair of acute complete ruptures. PMID:23352149

  7. Noninterceptive transverse beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlin, D.D.; Minerbo, G.N.; Teel, L.E. Jr.; Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The transverse emittance properties of a high-current linear accelerator may be measured by using TV cameras sensitive to the visible radiation emitted following beam interactions with residual gas. This paper describes the TV system being used to measure emittances for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project.

  8. Deconstructed transverse mass variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Virzi, Joseph S.; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2015-04-01

    Traditional searches for R-parity conserving natural supersymmetry (SUSY) require large transverse mass and missing energy cuts to separate the signal from large backgrounds. SUSY models with compressed spectra inherently produce signal events with small amounts of missing energy that are hard to explore. We use this difficulty to motivate the construction of "deconstructed" transverse mass variables which are designed preserve information on both the norm and direction of the missing momentum. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these variables in searches for the pair production of supersymmetric top-quark partners which subsequently decay into a final state with an isolated lepton, jets and missing energy. We show that the use of deconstructed transverse mass variables extends the accessible compressed spectra parameter space beyond the region probed by traditional methods. The parameter space can further be expanded to neutralino masses that are larger than the difference between the stop and top masses. In addition, we also discuss how these variables allow for novel searches of single stop production, in order to directly probe unconstrained stealth stops in the small stop- and neutralino-mass regime. We also demonstrate the utility of these variables for generic gluino and stop searches in all-hadronic final states. Overall, we demonstrate that deconstructed transverse variables are essential to any search wanting to maximize signal separation from the background when the signal has undetected particles in the final state.

  9. A viscoelastic model for axonal microtubule rupture.

    PubMed

    Shamloo, Amir; Manuchehrfar, Farid; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2015-05-01

    Axon is an important part of the neuronal cells and axonal microtubules are bundles in axons. In axons, microtubules are coated with microtubule-associated protein tau, a natively unfolded filamentous protein in the central nervous system. These proteins are responsible for cross-linking axonal microtubule bundles. Through complimentary dimerization with other tau proteins, bridges are formed between nearby microtubules creating bundles. Formation of bundles of microtubules causes their transverse reinforcement and has been shown to enhance their ability to bear compressive loads. Though microtubules are conventionally regarded as bearing compressive loads, in certain circumstances during traumatic brain injuries, they are placed in tension. In our model, microtubule bundles were formed from a large number of discrete masses. We employed Standard Linear Solid model (SLS), a viscoelastic model, to computationally simulate microtubules. In this study, we investigated the dynamic responses of two dimensional axonal microtubules under suddenly applied end forces by implementing discrete masses connected to their neighboring masses with a Standard Linear Solid unit. We also investigated the effect of the applied force rate and magnitude on the deformation of bundles. Under tension, a microtubule fiber may rupture as a result of a sudden force. Using the developed model, we could predict the critical regions of the axonal microtubule bundles in the presence of varying end forces. We finally analyzed the nature of microtubular failure under varying mechanical stresses. PMID:25835789

  10. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  11. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  12. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  13. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  14. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  15. Dynamic Rupture Segmentation Along The Nankai Trough, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hok, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Hashimoto, C.

    2010-12-01

    In southwest Japan, large devastating earthquakes (Mw>8) occurred along the Nankai subduction zone every 100-200 years (e.g. Ando, 1975, Tectonophys.; Ishibashi, 2004, Ann. Geophys.). Historical records revealed the segmented nature of the 600 km long seismogenic zone, producing Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes to occur separately or jointly at each cycle. The intersegment zone which separates Nankai and Tonankai source areas, near the Kii Peninsula, should have some special physical properties. In this study, we investigate the dynamic linkage of the coseismic slips on the Nankai and Tonankai segments, by modeling the spontaneous rupture propagation on the subduction interface. To conduct a reliable modeling, the parameters’ lateral variations along the place interface are introduced by combining several geophysical observation data sets. First, we use a large-scale 3D geometry for the plate interface, inferred from seismicity; we also integrate the slip deficit distribution (Hashimoto et al., 2009, SSJ meeting) obtained by inversion of GPS data, to constrain the distribution of stress drop on the interface. This distribution is not uniform, and explains the 1st order asperities of the subduction zone: Hyuga, Nankai, Tonankai and Tokai areas appear clearly as loaded regions. In addition, a constitutive friction law is required to link fault slip and stress release. We compiled regional geophysical information relevant to the segmentation, to infer the distribution of the frictional parameters at seismogenic depths. We focused on areas where the rupture is known to have stopped. The barriers seem to be related to upper plate structure (Wells et al. 2003, JGR, Rosenau and Oncken 2009, JGR). Uplifted areas show common characteristics: end of seismogenic segments, underplating in the wedge, and higher density of the upper old wedge (granitic intrusions). Following above review, we introduced 3 barrier regions delimiting 2 asperity regions (Nankai and Tonankai). Inside the barrier, the fracture energy changes in regional scale, via a change of the critical slip distance scaling. The strength remains uniform along the interface. Asperities are produced by the initial stress distribution inferred from slip deficit. Using this model setting, we computed a few different spontaneous rupture scenarios, by changing only the location of rupture initiation. Remarkably, we could reproduce the segmentation of the rupture, as observed during the 1940’s sequence, provided that the rupture initiates close to the Kii peninsula barrier area. However, if the rupture initiate far from the Kii peninsula, close to Tokai or west of Muroto cape for instance, the rupture is more likely to break the full plate interface in a single rupture event, consistently with what has been observed in the past. The rupture segmentation appears to be a consequence of the friction properties off-Kii Peninsula, as well as the rupture initiation position. This work provides a reliable way to enlighten the conditional segmentation process, as a consequence of the earthquake dynamic rupture.

  16. [Uterine rupture. A case of spontaneous rupture in a thirty week primiparous gestation ].

    PubMed

    Bretones, S; Cousin, C; Gualandi, M; Mellier, G

    1997-01-01

    Uterine rupture is one of the major complications of pregnancy. Most spontaneous uterine ruptures occur during labor in parturients with a scarred uterus. Spontaneous rupture where the uterus is unscarred are more rare and occur more frequently in older multiparous patients. Starting from a case of uterine rupture occurring in a 40 year-old primiparous women, we will present a review of the literature concerning cases of rupture in healthy uteri with no obvious cause. PMID:9265057

  17. Forearc Rigidity and Rupture During Great Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, R.; Tassara, A.

    2007-12-01

    Mapping along-strike variations in subduction zone rigidity is useful for understanding great megathrust earthquakes. This is because: 1) the integrated long-term strength of the coupled slab-forearc system, which is reflected in rigidity, should be an important control on earthquake frequency and magnitude distribution; and 2) forearc rigidity is likely to play a role in the generation of great earthquakes through its control on the degree to which the overriding plate can absorb strain accumulated during convergence. Motivated by these factors, we have calculated lithospheric rigidity along circum-Pacific subduction zones using a wavelet-based Bouguer coherence technique. Whilst our results show a general correlation between oceanic plate-age and rigidity -- as expected -- intriguing along-strike rigidity variations are evident. The most interesting along-strike rigidity variations exist in the subduction zones subjected to the four largest recorded earthquakes: the Valdivia (1960, M9.5), Sumatra--Andaman (2004, Mw 9.3), Alaska (1964, 9.2) and Kamchatka (1952, 9.0) earthquakes. For all but the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the extensive rupture associated with these earthquakes tends to initiate in a region of higher rigidity and propagate into regions of lower rigidity. This suggests that rupture dominantly occurs in weakened parts of the plate interface that slip when triggered by rupture in an adjacent area where substantial interseismic strain has accumulated. At least for the Chilean subduction zone, this weakness appears to be linked to the thick sediments that fill the trench. In contrast to the 1960 Valdivia event, maximum slip during the 2004 Sumatra--Andaman earthquake correlates with the most rigid parts of the forearc. In this case, slip is highest where the most inter-seismic strain has accumulated, perhaps where the plate interface is not lubricated by subducting sediments. These results highlight the potential influence of trench sediments on plate coupling in subduction zones, but the influence of other factors (e.g. wedge geometry, forearc elastic properties, thermally induced oceanic plate rigidity variations) also need to be considered.

  18. Forearc Rigidity and Rupture During Great Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, R.; Tassara, A.

    2004-12-01

    Mapping along-strike variations in subduction zone rigidity is useful for understanding great megathrust earthquakes. This is because: 1) the integrated long-term strength of the coupled slab-forearc system, which is reflected in rigidity, should be an important control on earthquake frequency and magnitude distribution; and 2) forearc rigidity is likely to play a role in the generation of great earthquakes through its control on the degree to which the overriding plate can absorb strain accumulated during convergence. Motivated by these factors, we have calculated lithospheric rigidity along circum-Pacific subduction zones using a wavelet-based Bouguer coherence technique. Whilst our results show a general correlation between oceanic plate-age and rigidity -- as expected -- intriguing along-strike rigidity variations are evident. The most interesting along-strike rigidity variations exist in the subduction zones subjected to the four largest recorded earthquakes: the Valdivia (1960, M9.5), Sumatra--Andaman (2004, Mw 9.3), Alaska (1964, 9.2) and Kamchatka (1952, 9.0) earthquakes. For all but the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the extensive rupture associated with these earthquakes tends to initiate in a region of higher rigidity and propagate into regions of lower rigidity. This suggests that rupture dominantly occurs in weakened parts of the plate interface that slip when triggered by rupture in an adjacent area where substantial interseismic strain has accumulated. At least for the Chilean subduction zone, this weakness appears to be linked to the thick sediments that fill the trench. In contrast to the 1960 Valdivia event, maximum slip during the 2004 Sumatra--Andaman earthquake correlates with the most rigid parts of the forearc. In this case, slip is highest where the most inter-seismic strain has accumulated, perhaps where the plate interface is not lubricated by subducting sediments. These results highlight the potential influence of trench sediments on plate coupling in subduction zones, but the influence of other factors (e.g. wedge geometry, forearc elastic properties, thermally induced oceanic plate rigidity variations) also need to be considered.

  19. Prediction of uterine rupture associated with attempted vaginal birth after cesarean delivery

    PubMed Central

    GROBMAN, William A.; LAI, Yinglei; LANDON, Mark B.; SPONG, Catherine Y.; LEVENO, Kenneth J.; ROUSE, Dwight J.; VARNER, Michael W.; MOAWAD, Atef H.; CARITIS, Steve N.; HARPER, Margaret; WAPNER, Ronald J.; SOROKIN, Yoram; MIODOVNIK, Menachem; CARPENTERr, Marshall; O'SULLIVAN, Mary J.; SIBAI, Baha M.; LANGER, Oded; THORP, John M.; RAMIN, Susan M.; MERCER, Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To predict individual-specific risk of uterine rupture during an attempted vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC). Methods Women with one prior low-transverse cesarean delivery who underwent a trial of labor with a term singleton were identified in a multi-center concurrently collected database of deliveries occurring during a four-year period. We analyzed different techniques to develop an accurate prediction model for uterine rupture. Results Of the 11,855 women analyzed, 83 (0.7%) had a uterine rupture. The optimal model, based on a logistic regression,included: any prior vaginal delivery (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.27 – 0.71) and labor induction(OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.11 – 2.69). This model, with a c-statistic of .627, had poor discriminating ability and does not allow the determination of a clinically useful estimate of the probability of uterine rupture for an individual patient. Conclusion Patient-specific factors cannot be used to accurately predict the relatively small proportion of women who will incur a uterine rupture during an attempted VBAC after 36 weeks of gestatation. Condensation Factors available before or at admission for delivery cannot be used to accurately predict uterine rupture during an attempted vaginal birth after cesarean. PMID:18439555

  20. Estimation of Dynamic Rupture Parameters of the 1999 Duzce, Turkey Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanircan, Gulum; Dalguer, Luis; Nur Bekler, Feyza; Meral Ozel, Nurcan

    2010-05-01

    The 1999 Kocaeli(Mw:7.4) and Duzce (Mw:7.1), Turkey Earthquakes have in common a specific rupture characteristic: Ruptures propagated eastward from hypocenters by supershear rupture velocity. Dynamic rupture properties of the Kocaeli Earthquake have been studied by several researchers. In order to better understand propagation characteristics of the northern branch of the NAFZ as well as judging whether or not the supershear propagation is a systematic feature of this fault zone, rupture dynamics of the 1999 Düzce, Turkey Earthquake has been investigated. The parameterization of the dynamic model, that describes the friction law and stress state on the fault, has been constrained with the slip distribution on the fault plane calculated from the kinematic waveform inversion of near field strong motion records. These parameters have been used as input for dynamic code. Dynamic stress drop was calculated by iterative dynamic rupture simulation by assuming an initial stress drop distribution through kinematic inversion results and changing the stress drop distribution until the slip distribution from dynamic model and that of kinematic model match to each other. Strength excess parameter was estimated by a trial and error scheme from a series of dynamic rupture simulation until the total rupture time be equivalent to the total rupture time of kinematic model. Calculation of slip weakening distance and its definition for dynamic simulation is still subject under investigations. Recent investigations showed that Dc varies in rough proportion to the total slip, so it is variable in space. In this sense, critical slip weakening distances is assumed to be between 10- 30% of the total slip of kinematic model and the first time peak slip-velocity of kinematic model correspond to time of the slip-weakening distance. For the calculation a full dynamic rupture simulation code, namely Support Operator Rupture Dynamic Code(SORD) developed by, Ely et.al,( 2008) has been employed. The results of this study will be used for a full dynamic rupture simulation for the generation of low frequency velocity ground motion and are expected to provide important insight into the nature of the rupture-induced directivity and super-shear rupture observed in this earthquake.

  1. Oesophageal rupture masquerading as STEMI.

    PubMed

    Skaug, Brian; Taylor, Kenneth R; Chandrasekaran, Somya

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented to the emergency department, with acute onset of chest pain. Based on ECG changes suggestive of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), he was taken emergently to the cardiac catheterisation laboratory for coronary angiography. There he was found to have only non-obstructive coronary disease. Subsequent physical examination and review of his chest radiograph revealed subcutaneous emphysema, and CT scan revealed a distal oesophageal rupture and pneumomediastinum. After stabilisation in the intensive care unit (ICU), he was taken to the operating room for thoracotomy, chest tube placement and stenting of his oesophagus. He survived the incident and, after several weeks of ICU stay, recovered to a large extent. His case highlights the importance of considering oesophageal rupture in the differential diagnosis for acute onset of chest pain. PMID:27068730

  2. Spontaneous rupture of the ureter

    PubMed Central

    Eken, Alper; Akbas, Tugana; Arpaci, Taner

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the ureter is a very rare condition and usually results from ureteral obstruction by a calculus. Only theoretical mechanisms have been proposed and no possible explanation has yet been reported in the literature. Intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the most informative study with high sensitivity. Treatment should be individualised, and depends on the state of the patient. Minimally invasive endourological procedures with double-J catheter placement and percutaneous drainage offer excellent results. Conservative management with analgesics and antibiotic coverage may be an alternative to surgery. Herein, we present a case of spontaneous rupture of the proximal ureter with no evidence of an underlying pathological condition. PMID:25715862

  3. Spontaneous hepatic rupture in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E W; Archibald, L; Albo, D

    1977-12-01

    Hepatic rupture as a late complication of toxemic pregnancy is a rare yet lethal condition requiring rapid recognition and surgical management. The clinical triad of toxemia, right upper quadrant pain, and sudden hypotension is the diagnostic hallmark of presentation. Most patients present near the time of delivery and are found to have subcapsular hematomas of the right hepatic lobe with free rupture into the peritoneal cavity and resultant exsanguinating hemorrhage. The association of toxemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation with secondary microembolic damage to the liver and other organs has been discussed. Basic surgical principles in the managment of hepatic subcapsular hematomas, and the prolonged postoperative course and frequent complications in these patients have been stressed. PMID:596550

  4. Achilles tendon rupture in badminton.

    PubMed Central

    Kaalund, S; Lass, P; Hgsaa, B; Nhr, M

    1989-01-01

    The typical badminton player with an Achilles tendon rupture is 36 years old and, despite limbering up, is injured at the rear line in a sudden forward movement. He resumes work within three months and has a slight lack of dorsiflexion in the ankle as the main complication. Most patients resume badminton within one year, but some finish their sports career, mainly due to fear of a new injury. The investigation discusses predisposing factors and prophylactic measures. PMID:2605439

  5. Characteristics of thermally-induced transverse cracks in graphite epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. S.; Bowles, D. E.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of thermally induced transverse cracks in T300/5208 graphite-epoxy cross-ply and quasi-isotropic laminates were investigated both experimentally and analytically. The formation of transverse cracks and the subsequent crack spacing present during cool down to -250 F (116K) and thermal cycling between 250 and -250 F (116 and 394K) was investigated. The state of stress in the vicinity of a transverse crack and the influence of transverse cracking on the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was predicted using a generalized plane strain finite element analysis and a modified shear lag analysis. A majority of the cross-ply laminates experienced transverse cracking during the initial cool down to -250 F whereas the quasi-isotropic laminates remained uncracked. The in situ transverse strength of the 90 degree layers was more than 1.9 times greater than the transverse strength of the unidirectional 90 degree material for all laminates investigated.

  6. Rupture of vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Soap films are ephemeral and fragile objects. They tend to thin under gravity, which gives rise to the fascinating variations of colors at their interfaces but leads systematically to rupture. Even a child can create, manipulate and admire soap films and bubbles. Nevertheless, the reason why it suddenly bursts remains a mystery although the soap chosen to stabilize the film as well as the humidity of the air seem very important. One difficulty to study the rupture of vertical soap films is to control the initial solution. To avoid this problem we choose to study the rupture during the generation of the film at a controlled velocity. We have built an experiment, in which we measure the maximum length of the film together with its lifetime. The generation of the film is due to the presence of a gradient of surface concentration of surfactants at the liquid/air interface. This leads to a Marangoni force directed toward the top of the film. The film is expected to burst only when its weight is not balanced anymore by this force. We will show that this leads to the surprising result that the thicker films have shorter lifetimes than the thinner ones. It is thus the ability of the interface to sustain a surface concentration gradient of surfactants which controls its stability.

  7. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  8. Ideas in Transverse Spin Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivers, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Three simple ideas about transverse spin observables are presented for the purpose of stimulating discussion. The manuscript is based on a presentation at the Transversity 2014 Workshop in Torre Chia, Sardinia, Italy on June 9-13, 2014 where approximately sixty experts on transverse spin physics had gathered to share recent results in an atmosphere of sun-drenched intensity.

  9. Thrust-type subduction-zone earthquakes and seamount asperites: A physical model for seismic rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Cloos, M. )

    1992-07-01

    A thrust-type subduction-zone earthquake of M{sub W} 7.6 ruptures an area of {approximately}6,000 km{sup 2}, has a seismic slip of {approximately}1 m, and is nucleated by the rupture of an asperity {approximately}25km across. A model for thrust-type subduction-zone seismicity is proposed in which basaltic seamounts jammed against the base of the overriding plate act as strong asperities that rupture by stick-slip faulting. A M{sub W} 7.6 event would correspond to the near-basal rupture of a {approximately}2-km-tall seamount. The base of the seamount is surrounded by a low shear-strength layer composed of subducting sediment that also deforms between seismic events by distributed strain (viscous flow). Planar faults form in this layer as the seismic rupture propagates out of the seamount at speeds of kilometers per second. The faults in the shear zone are disrupted after the event by aseismic, slow viscous flow of the subducting sediment layer. Consequently, the extent of fault rupture varies for different earthquakes nucleated at the same seamount asperity because new fault surfaces form in the surrounding subducting sediment layer during each fast seismic rupture.

  10. Characteristics of transverse waves in chromospheric mottles

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P.; Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R.; Morton, R. J.; Christian, D. J.

    2013-12-10

    Using data obtained by the high temporal and spatial resolution Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope, we investigate at an unprecedented level of detail transverse oscillations in chromospheric fine structures near the solar disk center. The oscillations are interpreted in terms of propagating and standing magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Wave characteristics including the maximum transverse velocity amplitude and the phase speed are measured as a function of distance along the structure's length. Solar magnetoseismology is applied to these measured parameters to obtain diagnostic information on key plasma parameters (e.g., magnetic field, density, temperature, flow speed) of these localized waveguides. The magnetic field strength of the mottle along the ∼2 Mm length is found to decrease by a factor of 12, while the local plasma density scale height is ∼280 ± 80 km.

  11. Environmental Durability and Stress Rupture of EBC/CMCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on the strength and creep performance of SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems under complex simulated engine environments. Tensile-strength and stress-rupture testing was conducted to illustrate the material properties under isothermal and thermal gradient conditions. To determine material durability, further testing was conducted under exposure to thermal cycling, thermal gradients and simulated combustion environments. Emphasis is placed on experimental techniques as well as implementation of non-destructive evaluation, including modal acoustic emission and electrical resistivity monitoring, to characterize strength degradation and damage mechanisms. Currently, little is known about the behavior of EBC-CMCs under these conditions; consequently, this work will prove invaluable in the development of structural components for use in high temperature applications.

  12. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  13. Transversality for Holomorphic Supercurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-12-01

    Holomorphic supercurves are motivated by supergeometry as a natural generalisation of holomorphic curves. In the characterisation as a tuple consisting of a holomorphic curve and certain sections, we consider a slightly weaker form of the defining equations. This is such that, upon perturbing them to depend on a connection, the corresponding linearised operator is generically surjective. By this transversality result, we show that the resulting moduli spaces are oriented finite dimensional smooth manifolds. Finally, we examine how they depend on the choice of generic data. A companion article establishes compactness results in this context.

  14. Transverse field focused system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1986-01-01

    A transverse field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.

  15. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Samuel Salisbury, S T; Paul Buckley, C; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  16. Influence of initial stress and rupture initiation parameters on forbidden zone rupture propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.

    2015-04-01

    Well established theoretical and numerical results of 2-D ruptures have been accepted for years to limit the speed of mode II cracks to be below the Rayleigh velocity or above the shear wave speed. However, recent work has numerically produced rupture speeds in this so-called `forbidden zone', that is the region of rupture velocities between the Rayleigh wave speed and the shear wave speed, for 3-D simulations. We verify that finding here and further examine the dependence of that behaviour on initial stress and rupture initiation parameters. Using a 3-D finite element model for dynamic rupture propagation, numerical experiments were performed for different initial stress conditions as well as different size initiation patches and forced rupture velocities. It is shown that the initial stress on the fault has a strong influence on the resulting rupture, specifically with regards to the distance at which the rupture transitions to supershear speeds, the maximum rupture velocity attained on the fault, and how rapidly the rupture passes through the forbidden zone. It is also demonstrated that for the same initial stress, increasing the size of the nucleation patch or the speed of forced rupture can artificially increase the gradient of the rupture velocity within the forbidden zone. This suggests that the rupture is uniquely predetermined by the stress state and material properties of the fault and surrounding medium in these models.

  17. Early second trimester uterine scar rupture

    PubMed Central

    Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad; G, Shyamala

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous uterine scar rupture can be lethal in pregnant women. A spontaneous uterine scar rupture in the early mid-trimester is rare and difficult to diagnose. This is a case of a 30-year-old woman (G2P1L1) at 19?weeks of gestation and having undergone a previous caesarean section presented with acute abdomen in shock. Laparotomy revealed a uterine scar rupture, which was resutured after evacuation of products of conception. This case merits that the uterine rupture should be considered as a differential diagnosis in pregnant women presenting with acute abdomen. In this case, although there was uterine rupture in the second trimester and a complete placental separation, fetus was alive which is quite unusual in patients presenting with rupture uterus. PMID:24326433

  18. Early second trimester uterine scar rupture.

    PubMed

    Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad; Shyamala, G

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous uterine scar rupture can be lethal in pregnant women. A spontaneous uterine scar rupture in the early mid-trimester is rare and difficult to diagnose. This is a case of a 30-year-old woman (G2P1L1) at 19 weeks of gestation and having undergone a previous caesarean section presented with acute abdomen in shock. Laparotomy revealed a uterine scar rupture, which was resutured after evacuation of products of conception. This case merits that the uterine rupture should be considered as a differential diagnosis in pregnant women presenting with acute abdomen. In this case, although there was uterine rupture in the second trimester and a complete placental separation, fetus was alive which is quite unusual in patients presenting with rupture uterus. PMID:24326433

  19. Ruptured "giant" supratentorial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D G; Stemper, S J; Withers, T K

    2005-02-01

    Intracranial dermoid and epidermoid cysts are rare lesions formed from the inclusion of ectodermal elements during neural tube closure. Although not entirely consistent, imaging characteristics on CT and MRI can aid differentiation of dermoids and epidermoids, as can age at presentation, location and tendency to rupture. The distinction between dermoid and epidermoid lesions is important prognostically and may impact on surgical management as a subtotally resected dermoid is less likely to recur than its epidermoid counterpart. The distinction of large dermoid lesions as "giant" adds little to information regarding the natural history or prognosis of these lesions and should be abandoned. PMID:15749433

  20. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  1. Complex rupture of the M6.3 March 10, 2015 Bucaramanga earthquake: evidence of strong weakening process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, P.; Prieto, G. A.; Yu, C. Q.; Florez, M.; Agurto-Detzel, H.; Mikesell, T. D.; Chen, G.; Dionicio, V.; Pedraza, P.

    2016-02-01

    We use seismic waves for a magnitude 6.3 intermediate-depth (160 km) earthquake in the Bucaramanga Nest, Colombia, to infer a complex rupture process with 2 distinct stages, characterized by different rupture velocities possibly controlled by the evolution of strength on the fault. Our integrated data processing permitted to precisely characterize the multistage rupture and the presence of a strong weakening event. The resulting seismic radiation is interpreted as resulting from an extreme weakening due to a cascading thermal shear runaway, with an initial inefficient radiation process followed by a fast and dynamic efficient rupture. Our results imply dynamic complexity of the seismic rupture deep inside the Earth, and may help to give some new insights about the physical mechanism of intermediate-depth earthquakes.

  2. Complex rupture of the M6.3 2015 March 10 Bucaramanga earthquake: evidence of strong weakening process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, P.; Prieto, G. A.; Yu, C. Q.; Florez, M.; Agurto-Detzel, H.; Mikesell, T. D.; Chen, G.; Dionicio, V.; Pedraza, P.

    2016-05-01

    We use seismic waves for a magnitude 6.3 intermediate-depth (160 km) earthquake in the Bucaramanga Nest, Colombia, to infer a complex rupture process with two distinct stages, characterized by different rupture velocities possibly controlled by the evolution of strength on the fault. Our integrated data processing permitted to precisely characterize the multistage rupture and the presence of a strong weakening event. The resulting seismic radiation is interpreted as resulting from an extreme weakening due to a cascading thermal shear runaway, with an initial inefficient radiation process followed by a fast and dynamic efficient rupture. Our results imply dynamic complexity of the seismic rupture deep inside the Earth, and may help to give some new insights about the physical mechanism of intermediate-depth earthquakes.

  3. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Rene 41 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.; Weiss, B.

    1972-01-01

    Weld-drawn tubes of Rene 41 with 0.935 centimeter outside diameter and 0.064 centimeter wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1117 to 1233 K and internal helium pressures from 5.5 to 12.4 meganewtons per square meter. Lifetimes ranged from 5 to 2065 hours. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was 50 percent lower than that of unwelded, thick sheet specimens, and 20 percent lower than that of unwelded, thin sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  4. Neck curve polynomials in neck rupture model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul

    2012-06-06

    The Neck Rupture Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of rupture position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck Rupture Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck Rupture Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of {sup 280}X{sub 90} with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.

  5. Tendon Ruptures Associated With Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Alan A.; Horowitz, Bruce G.; Nagel, Donald A.

    1977-01-01

    In five patients, tendon ruptures occurred in association with corticosteroid therapy, either systemic or local infiltration. The chronic nature of the pain in all of these patients suggests that what we often call tendinitis may in fact be early or partial ruptures of tendons. Patients who receive local infiltration of corticosteroids should perhaps be advised of the risk of a ruptured tendon. In addition, particularly when the Achilles tendon is involved, immobilization should be utilized initially for a presumed tendinitis or early rupture, to protect the tendon from further injury. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:919538

  6. Traumatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin; Jung, Tae-Young; Kang, Sam-Suk; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports the first case in which an intracranial dermoid cyst that underwent traumatic rupture was treated surgically and discusses the importance of the preoperative radiological identification and management of the rupture. For adequate management of a ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst, in addition to early surgery, we emphasize the importance of expeditious identification of the rupture with MRI, including an additional fat-suppression sequence, and prompt management of the accompanying chemical meningitis with intravenous steroid therapy beginning from the pre-operative period. PMID:18258431

  7. Rupture dynamics in model polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Borah, Rupam; Debnath, Pallavi

    2016-05-11

    In this paper we explore the rupture dynamics of a model polymer system to capture the microscopic mechanism during relative motion of surfaces at the single polymer level. Our model is similar to the model for friction introduced by Filippov, Klafter, and Urbakh [Filippov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2004, 92, 135503]; but with an important generalization to a flexible transducer (modelled as a bead spring polymer) which is attached to a fixed rigid planar substrate by interconnecting bonds (modelled as harmonic springs), and pulled by a constant force FT. Bonds are allowed to rupture stochastically. The model is simulated, and the results for a certain set of parameters exhibit a sequential rupture mechanism resulting in rupture fronts. A mean field formalism is developed to study these rupture fronts and the possible propagating solutions for the coupled bead and bond dynamics, where the coupling excludes an exact analytical treatment. Numerical solutions to mean field equations are obtained by standard numerical techniques, and they agree well with the simulation results which show sequential rupture. Within a travelling wave formalism based on the Tanh method, we show that the velocity of the rupture front can be obtained in closed form. The derived expression for the rupture front velocity gives good agreement with the stochastic and mean field results, when the rupture is sequential, while propagating solutions for bead and bond dynamics are shown to agree under certain conditions. PMID:27087684

  8. Material Parameters for Creep Rupture of Austenitic Stainless Steel Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, H.; Borhana, A.; Tamin, M. N.

    2014-08-01

    Creep rupture properties of austenitic stainless steel foil, 347SS, used in compact recuperators have been evaluated at 700 °C in the stress range of 54-221 MPa to establish the baseline behavior for its extended use. Creep curves of the foil show that the primary creep stage is brief and creep life is dominated by tertiary creep deformation with rupture lives in the range of 10-2000 h. Results are compared with properties of bulk specimens tested at 98 and 162 MPa. Thin foil 347SS specimens were found to have higher creep rates and higher rupture ductility than their bulk specimen counterparts. Power law relationship was obtained between the minimum creep rate and the applied stress with stress exponent value, n = 5.7. The value of the stress exponent is indicative of the rate-controlling deformation mechanism associated with dislocation creep. Nucleation of voids mainly occurred at second-phase particles (chromium-rich M23C6 carbides) that are present in the metal matrix by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. The improvement in strength is attributed to the precipitation of fine niobium carbides in the matrix that act as obstacles to the movement of dislocations.

  9. Transverse wobbling in ^{135}pr.

    PubMed

    Matta, J T; Garg, U; Li, W; Frauendorf, S; Ayangeakaa, A D; Patel, D; Schlax, K W; Palit, R; Saha, S; Sethi, J; Trivedi, T; Ghugre, S S; Raut, R; Sinha, A K; Janssens, R V F; Zhu, S; Carpenter, M P; Lauritsen, T; Seweryniak, D; Chiara, C J; Kondev, F G; Hartley, D J; Petrache, C M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Lakshmi, D Vijaya; Raju, M Kumar; Madhusudhana Rao, P V; Tandel, S K; Ray, S; Dönau, F

    2015-02-27

    A pair of transverse wobbling bands is observed in the nucleus ^{135}Pr. The wobbling is characterized by ΔI=1, E2 transitions between the bands, and a decrease in the wobbling energy confirms its transverse nature. Additionally, a transition from transverse wobbling to a three-quasiparticle band comprised of strong magnetic dipole transitions is observed. These observations conform well to results from calculations with the tilted axis cranking model and the quasiparticle rotor model. PMID:25768759

  10. Characterization of damage in titanium matrix composites under transverse loads

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Mal, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Since Metal Matrix Composites (MMC`s) are able to retain high stiffness and strength at high temperatures they have been the subject of intensive research for high temperature applications in recent years. MMC`s containing reinforcement by continuous high strength fibers possess the highest strength and stiffness in the direction of the fibers; however, the strength and strain to failure are generally much lower under transverse loading. Understanding of the failure and damage mechanisms in MMC`s under transverse loading is essential for optimizing their damage tolerance. The damage mechanism and failure of metal matrix composites under transverse loading have been studied by many investigators. Unfortunately, none of these studies has succeeded in providing a clear understanding of the mechanics of damage evolution in these materials. One of the major unexplained phenomena is the matrix damage due to plastic deformation observed in SiC/Ti 15-3 composite at extremely low transverse loads. In this paper, a newly developed volume integral equation method is used to determine the stress field in an unidirectional SiC/Ti composite and the possible damage mechanisms including fiber-matrix debonding and matrix yielding are discussed.

  11. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Results from COPV Accelerated Stress Rupture Testing, NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry Regor

    2010-01-01

    Develop and demonstrate NDE techniques for real-time characterization of CPVs and, where possible, identification of NDE capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation and/or making vessel life predictions (structural health monitoring or periodic inspection modes). Secondary: Provide the COPV user and materials community with quality carbon/epoxy (C/Ep) COPV stress rupture progression rate data. Aid in modeling, manufacturing, and application of COPVs for NASA spacecraft.

  12. Uterine Rupture: A Seven Year Review at a Tertiary Care Hospital in New Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Maruti; Gupta, Ridhima; Gupta, Pushpender; Rani, Rekha; Kaur, Ramanjeet; Singh, Rahil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the obstetric risk factors, incidence, and causes of uterine rupture, management modalities, and the associated maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in one of the largest tertiary level women care hospital in Delhi. Materials and Methods: A 7-year retrospective analysis of 47 cases of uterine rupture was done. The charts of these patients were analyzed and the data regarding demographic characteristics, clinical presentation, risk factors, management, operative findings, maternal and fetal outcomes, and postoperative complications was studied. Results: The incidence of rupture was one in 1,633 deliveries (0.061%). The vast majority of patients had prior low transverse cesarean section (84.8%). The clinical presentation of the patients with rupture of the unscarred uterus was more dramatic with extensive tears compared to rupture with scarred uterus. The estimated blood loss ranged from 1,200 to 1,500 cc. Hemoperitoneum was identified in 95.7% of the patient and 83% of the patient underwent repair of rent with or without simultaneous tubal ligation. Subtotal hysterectomy was performed in five cases. There were no maternal deaths in our series. However, there were 32 cases of intrauterine fetal demise and five cases of stillbirths. Conclusions: Uterine rupture is a major contributor to maternal morbidity and neonatal mortality. Four major easily identifiable risk factors including history of prior cesarean section, grand multiparity, obstructed labor, and fetal malpresentations constitute 90% of cases of uterine rupture. Identification of these high risk women, prompt diagnosis, immediate transfer, and optimal management needs to be overemphasized to avoid adverse fetomaternal complications. PMID:26917873

  13. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  14. Progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm towards rupture - refining clinical risk assessment using a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction method

    PubMed Central

    Xenos, Michalis; Labropoulos, Nicos; Rambhia, Suraj; Alemu, Yared; Einav, Shmuel; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is associated with high mortality rates. Risk of rupture is multi-factorial involving AAA geometric configuration, vessel tortuosity, and the presence of intraluminal pathology. Fluid structure interaction (FSI) simulations were conducted in Patient based computed tomography (CT) scans reconstructed geometries in order to monitor aneurysmal disease progression from normal aortas to non-ruptured and contained ruptured AAA (rAAA), and the AAA risk of rupture was assessed. Three groups of 8 subjects each were studied: 8 normal and 16 pathological (8 non-ruptured and 8 ruptured AAA). The AAA anatomical structures segmented included the blood lumen, intraluminal thrombus (ILT), vessel wall, and embedded calcifications. The vessel wall was described with anisotropic material model that was matched to experimental measurements of AAA tissue specimens. A statistical model for estimating the local wall strength distribution was employed to generate a map of a rupture potential index (RPI), representing the ratio between the local stress and local strength distribution. The FSI simulations followed a clear trend of increasing wall stresses from normal to pathological cases. The maximal stresses were observed in the areas where the ILT was not present, indicating a potential protective effect of the ILT. Statistically significant differences was observed between the peak systolic stress (PSS) and the peak stress at the mean arterial pressure (MAP) between the three groups. For the ruptured aneurysms, where the geometry of intact aneurysm was reconstructed, results of the FSI simulations clearly depicted maximum wall stress at the a-priori known location of rupture. The RPI mapping indicated several distinct regions of high RPI coinciding with the actual location of rupture. The FSI methodology demonstrates that the aneurysmal disease can be described by numerical simulations, as indicated by a clear trend of increasing aortic wall stresses in the studied groups, (normal aortas, AAAs and ruptured AAAs). Ultimately, the results demonstrate that FSI wall stress mapping and RPI can be used as a tool for predicting the potential rupture of an AAA by predicting the actual rupture location, complementing current clinical practice by offering a predictive diagnostic tool for deciding whether to intervene surgically or spare the patient from an unnecessary risky operation. PMID:25527320

  15. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, Joe L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  16. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1982-05-28

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  17. Second-Trimester Uterine Rupture: Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    F. ABDULWAHAB, Dalia; ISMAIL, Hamizah; NUSEE, Zalina

    2014-01-01

    Uterine rupture is a rare life-threatening complication. It mainly occurs in the third trimester of pregnancy and is rarely seen during the first or second trimesters. Our centre experienced three important cases of uterine rupture. First case: spontaneous uterine rupture at 14 weeks of pregnancy, which was diagnosed at autopsy. It was misled by the ultrasound finding of an intrauterine pregnancy, and searching for other non-gynaecological causes delayed the urgent obstetric surgical management. Second case: ruptured uterus at 24 weeks following medical termination due to foetal anomaly. It was diagnosed only at laparotomy indicated for failed medical termination and chorioamnionitis. Third case: uterine rupture at 21 weeks of pregnancy in a patient with gastroenterology symptoms. In these reports, we have discussed the various risk factors, presentations, course of events and difficulties in diagnosing uterine rupture. The study concludes that the clinical presentation of uterine ruptures varies. It occurs regardless of gestational age. Ultrasound findings of intrauterine pregnancy with free fluid do not exclude uterine rupture or ectopic pregnancy. Searching for non-gynaecological causes in such clinical presentations might delay crucial surgical intervention, which leads to unnecessary morbidity, mortality or loss of obstetrics function. PMID:25977625

  18. Madelung Deformity and Extensor Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, Gholam Hossain; Peyman, Maryam; Mozafarian, Kamran

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tendon rupture in chronic Madelung deformity, as a result of tendon attrition on the dislocated distal ulna, is a rare occurrence. It is, however, seen more often in rheumatoid arthritis. There are few case reports in the English-language literature on this issue. We report a case of multiple tendon ruptures in a previously undiagnosed Madelung deformity. PMID:26161772

  19. Papillary muscle rupture after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Cordovil, Adriana; Fischer, Claudio H; Rodrigues, Ana Clara T; Lira Filho, Edgar B; Vieira, Marcelo L C; Cury, Alexandre F; Naccarato, Gustavo A F; Valente, Carmen; Brandão, Carlos M; Pommerantzeff, Pablo M; Morhy, Samira S

    2006-04-01

    We report a case of anterolateral papillary muscle rupture in a 22-year-old man who had blunt chest trauma caused by a car accident. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed severe mitral regurgitation caused by the rupture. He successfully underwent emergency mitral valve replacement and was discharged 9 days after the surgical correction. PMID:16581491

  20. Ruptured intracranial dermoids: magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Patkar, D; Krishnan, A; Patankar, T; Prasad, S; Shah, J; Limdi, J

    1999-01-01

    Rupture of intracranial dermoids tumour is rare and carries with it the risk of significant morbidity as well as fatality. Three cases that presented with varying symptoms ranging from headache to chiasmatic compression and suspected to have rupture of dermoid tumour are described. The importance of MR imaging in their diagnosis is discussed. PMID:10734333

  1. Seismic rupture and ground accelerations induced by CO2 injection in the shallow crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, Frédéric; Rutqvist, Jonny

    2012-09-01

    Because of the critically stressed nature of the upper crust, the injection of large volumes of carbon dioxide (CO2) into shallow geological reservoirs can trigger seismicity and induce ground deformations when the injection increases the fluid pressure in the vicinity of potentially seismic faults. The increased fluid pressure reduces the strength against fault slip, allowing the stored elastic energy to be released in seismic events that can produce felt ground accelerations. Here, we seek to explore the likelihood ground motions induced by a CO2 injection using hydromechanical modelling with multiphase fluid flow and dynamic rupture, including fault-frictional weakening. We extend the previous work of Cappa and Rutqvist, in which activation of a normal fault at critical stress may be possible for fast rupture nucleating by localized increase in fluid pressure and large decrease in fault friction. In this paper, we include seismic wave propagation generated by the rupture. For our assumed system and injection rate, simulations show that after a few days of injection, a dynamic fault rupture of few centimetres nucleates at the base of the CO2 reservoir and grows bilaterally, both toward the top of the reservoir and outside. The rupture is asymmetric and affects a larger zone below the reservoir where the rupture is self-propagating (without any further pressure increase) as a result of fault-strength weakening. The acceleration and deceleration of the rupture generate waves and result in ground accelerations (˜0.1-0.6 g) consistent with observed ground motion records. The maximum ground acceleration is obtained near the fault, and horizontal accelerations are generally markedly higher than vertical accelerations.

  2. Probabilistic simulation of uncertainties in composite uniaxial strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Stock, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite strengths. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using composite mechanics with Monte Carlo simulation. The variables for which uncertainties are accounted include constituent strengths and their respective scatter. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to illustrate the procedure and its effectiveness to formally estimate the probable scatter in the composite uniaxial strengths. The results show that ply longitudinal tensile and compressive, transverse compressive and intralaminar shear strengths are not sensitive to single fiber anomalies (breaks, intergacial disbonds, matrix microcracks); however, the ply transverse tensile strength is.

  3. Do buried-rupture earthquakes trigger less landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes for reverse faults?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chong

    2014-07-01

    Gorum et al. (2013, Geomorphology 184, 127-138) carried out a study on inventory compilation and statistical analyses of landslides triggered by the 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake. They revealed that spatial distribution patterns of these landslides were mainly controlled by complex rupture mechanism and topography. They also suggested that blind-rupture earthquakes trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on thrust reverse faults. Although a few lines of evidence indicate that buried-rupture earthquakes might trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on reverse faults, more careful comparisons and analyses indicate that it is not always true. Instead, some cases show that a buried-rupture earthquake can trigger a larger quantity of landslides that are distributed in a larger area, whereas surface-rupture earthquakes can trigger larger but a fewer landslides distributed in a smaller area.

  4. Strength Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... great way to improve strength, endurance, and muscle tone. But remember to start slowly, use proper form, ... week will really pay off — besides better muscle tone and definition, you may find that you have ...

  5. Changes in wall shear stress magnitude after aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Kono, Kenichi; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Yoshimura, Ryo; Terada, Tomoaki

    2013-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies on cerebral aneurysms have attempted to identify surrogate hemodynamic parameters to predict rupture risk. We present a case of bilateral mirror image aneurysms, one of which ruptured soon after imaging. Wall shear stress values of the ruptured aneurysm changed by 20-30% after rupture because of change in the aneurysm shape. Findings from our case suggest that CFD studies comparing unruptured and ruptured aneurysms may not yield valid estimation on aneurysm rupture risk because of changes in aneurysm shape after rupture. Changes in aneurysm shape after rupture should be considered in CFD research. PMID:23715949

  6. Tensile Creep and Stress-rupture Behavior of Polymer Derived Sic Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on polymer derived Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon, and SiC/BN-coated Nicalon SiC fibers. Test conditions were temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C, stresses from 100 to 1600 MPa, stress application times up to 200 hours, and air, argon, and vacuum test environments. For all fibers, creep occurred predominantly in the primary stage. Hi-Nicalon had much higher 0.2 and 1 percent creep strengths than as-produced as well as-coated Nicalon fibers. The stress-rupture strength of Hi-Nicalon up to 100 hours was also higher than that of the coated and as-produced Nicalon fibers. SiC/BN coating on Nicalon increased only the short-term low-temperature rupture strength. Limited testing in argon and vacuum suggests that for all fiber types, creep and rupture resistances are reduced in comparison to the results in air. Possible mechanisms for the observed behavior are discussed.

  7. Aneurysm strength can decrease under calcification.

    PubMed

    Volokh, Konstantin Y; Aboudi, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Aneurysms are abnormal dilatations of vessels in the vascular system that are prone to rupture. Prediction of the aneurysm rupture is a challenging and unsolved problem. Various factors can lead to the aneurysm rupture and, in the present study, we examine the effect of calcification on the aneurysm strength by using micromechanical modeling. The calcified tissue is considered as a composite material in which hard calcium particles are embedded in a hyperelastic soft matrix. Three experimentally calibrated constitutive models incorporating a failure description are used for the matrix representation. Two constitutive models describe the aneurysmal arterial wall and the third one - the intraluminal thrombus. The stiffness and strength of the calcified tissue are simulated in uniaxial tension under the varying amount of calcification, i.e. the relative volume of the hard inclusion within the periodic unit cell. In addition, the triaxiality of the stress state, which can be a trigger for the cavitation instability, is tracked. Results of the micromechanical simulation show an increase of the stiffness and a possible decrease of the strength of the calcified tissue as compared to the non-calcified one. The obtained results suggest that calcification (i.e. the presence of hard particles) can significantly affect the stiffness and strength of soft tissue. The development of refined experimental techniques that will allow for the accurate quantitative assessment of calcification is desirable. PMID:26717251

  8. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen operated in gynecological unit mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst: total splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Eko, Filbert Eko; Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; de Paul, Elanga Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic rupture is always neglected when consulting acute abdominal pains in gynecological emergencies. It constitutes about 1% of all splenic ruptures and can be managed by abstention, surgery or embolization. We present the case of a young lady who was diagnosed of spontaneous rupture during surgery that was mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst and finally treated by total splenectomy. The pre-operative work up was absolute for a rupturred hemorrhagic cyst and secondariy for a ruptured ectopic gestation. PMID:25918564

  9. Formability Studies on Transverse Tailor Welded Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, V. Vijay; Narasimhan, K.

    2005-08-01

    Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) technology is one of the several approaches that have been used to reduce the weight of the automobile body. TWBs are made up of two or more blanks having different/same properties (geometry, material etc.) prior to forming. The formability of these blanks depends on material and geometric parameters like strength ratio and thickness ratio. The study of these blanks can be classified on the basis of the weld orientation chosen viz. transverse weld or longitudinal weld with respect to the major straining direction. This paper studies the formability issues related to transverse TWB by FE simulation. The formability is assessed by analyzing tensile and Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests. The weld region is assumed to be a line in all the simulations. While modeling the tensile test, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation are monitored, and in LDH testing, pole height and maximum load (in near plane strain condition) are monitored. LDH testing shows that as thickness ratio increases, the load bearing capacity and the pole height decreases. There is a contribution from both the thicker and the thinner blank to the overall deforming volume. Failure location analysis shows that there is an abrupt change in the location of the failure from punch nose region to weld line region as the thickness ratio reaches a critical magnitude (1.08). The study of material properties shows that as the yield strength ratio (S ratio) and strain hardening exponent ratio (N ratio) between the blanks increases, the maximum load which the blank can sustain without failure (UTS) increases. This becomes constant and comparable to that of single sheet at higher N and S ratios.

  10. Age at intracranial aneurysm rupture among generations

    PubMed Central

    Woo, D; Hornung, R; Sauerbeck, L; Brown, R; Meissner, I; Huston, J; Foroud, T; Broderick, J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported intracranial aneurysm (IA) occurring at young ages in subsequent generations. These studies did not correct for duration of follow-up. Second-generation members who would have their ruptured IA late in life may not be detected due to shorter follow-up time than the first generation. We examined families in which ruptured IA occurred in two consecutive generations for the hypothesis that the second generation (F1) was more likely to have a rupture at a younger age than the older generation (F0). Methods: The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) Study is a multicenter, international study recruiting families of ruptured and unruptured IA. All available family members are interviewed. Cox proportional hazards regression models and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to examine differences by generation. Results: Although we found that the F1 generation was more likely to have an aneurysm rupture at a younger age than the F0 generation, we found that this was largely because of a lack of follow-up time in the F1 generation. The F1 generation had 50% the rupture rate of the prior generation. When analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves, we found a tendency to have a slightly later rupture rate in the F1 generation once time to follow-up was included in the analysis model. Conclusions: Families of ruptured intracranial aneurysm (IA) do not appear to demonstrate “anticipation.” Our finding suggests that genetic epidemiology of ruptured IA should examine all types of variations such as single base-pair changes, deletions, insertions, and other variations that do not demonstrate anticipation. GLOSSARY FIA = familial intracranial aneurysm; IA = intracranial aneurysm; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:19237697

  11. Effect of Normalization Temperature on Creep Strength of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Totemeier; H. Tian; J.A. Simpson

    2006-05-01

    The effect of normalization temperature from 850 to 1050C on the structure and creep-rupture properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel was studied. Normalization at temperatures less than 925C resulted in structures containing significant polygonized, recovered ferrite. These structures had poor creep-rupture strength; roughly two orders of magnitude increase in minimum creep rate or decrease in rupture life for 850C compared to 1050C normalization at test conditions of 600C and 145 MPa. Room-temperature strength and hardness were also reduced. Normalization at temperatures between 925C and 1000C also resulted in reduced creep strength in comparison with 1050C normalization, even though tempered martensite microstructures were formed and little change in room temperature strength was observedthe reduction was attributed to subtle differences in fine MX precipitates. The effect of reduced normalization temperature was more pronounced for higher temperature, lower stress creep-rupture conditions.

  12. CT diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Moore, A.V. Jr.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1984-08-01

    Abdominal computed tomography was performed in six patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm but in whom an alternate clinical diagnosis was seriously considered. In each patient, a large aortic aneurysm was demonstrated in association with a retroperitoneal accumulation of high-density blood. The retroperitoneal blood was primarily confined to the extracapsular perinephric space. In four of the six patients, a focal area of the aortic wall was indistinct on the side of the retroperitoneal hemorrhage at the presumed site of rupture. Five of the six patients underwent emergency surgery, which confirmed the site of aneurysm, presence of rupture and the location of fresh retroperitoneal blood.

  13. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Rupture Following Transarterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Singh Bhinder, Nimarta; Zangan, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    As the incidence of primary and metastatic liver cancer increases, minimally invasive treatment methods such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) have gained momentum as their efficacy and safety profile have been validated. Complications of TACE are rare and typically well tolerated. A unique complication is tumor rupture with hemorrhage. Reports of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) rupture after TACE are limited. It is critical to recognize this complication and understand the treatment options, which range from conservative to surgical management. This report describes a case of HCC rupture following TACE successfully managed with coil embolization. PMID:25762848

  14. Ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy at sixteen weeks.

    PubMed

    Zeqiri, Fehmi; Paçarada, Myrvete; Kongjeli, Niltene; Zeqiri, Vlora; Kongjeli, Gyltene; Krasniqi, Burim

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it ruptures, leading to life -threatening intraperitoneal hemorrhage. A 22-year-old second gravida patient presented at the Emergency Center of the University Clinical Center of Kosova with a 16-week history of amenorrhea and acute onset of severe abdominal pain. She was resuscitated and taken for an emergency laparotomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, there was a massive hemoperitoneum with a ruptured right rudimentary horn Given their rarity, ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancies are of interest. PMID:24591927

  15. Thyroid rupture secondary to blunt neck trauma.

    PubMed

    Sow, Yih-Liang; Aziz, Nora Abdul; Ng, Khoon-Leong

    2013-04-01

    Rupture of the thyroid gland is uncommon in cases of blunt neck trauma. We report a case of thyroid rupture after a motor vehicle accident in a patient without a preexisting goiter. He presented with a painful anterior neck swelling associated with dysphagia and hoarseness of voice. Computed tomographic scans showed lacerations of the right thyroid lobe and isthmus with features suggestive of slow active bleeding. Neck exploration was subsequently performed, and a ruptured right thyroid lobe was found with ongoing venous hemorrhage. A right hemithyroidectomy was performed, and the patient recovered without complications. PMID:23399341

  16. Rupture Following Biceps-to-Triceps Tendon Transfer in Adolescents and Young Adults With Spinal Cord Injury:

    PubMed Central

    Merenda, Lisa A.; Rutter, Laure; Curran, Kimberly; Kozin, Scott H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tendon transfer surgery can restore elbow extension in approximately 70% of persons with tetraplegia and often results in antigravity elbow extension strength. However, we have noted an almost 15% rupture/attenuation rate. Objective: This investigation was conducted to analyze potential causes in adolescents/young adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) who experienced tendon rupture or attenuation after biceps-to-triceps transfer. Methods: Medical charts of young adults with SCI who underwent biceps-to-triceps transfer and experienced tendon rupture or attenuation were reviewed. Data collected by retrospective chart review included general demographics, surgical procedure(s), use and duration of antibiotic treatment, time from tendon transfer surgery to rupture/attenuation, and method of diagnosis. Results: Twelve subjects with tetraplegia (mean age, 19 years) who underwent biceps-to-triceps reconstruction with subsequent tendon rupture or attenuation were evaluated. Mean age at time of tendon transfer was 18 years (range, 14-21 years). A fluoroquinolone was prescribed for 42% (n=5) of subjects. Tendon rupture was noted in 67% (n=8), and attenuation was noted in 33% (n=4). Average length of time from surgery to tendon rupture/attenuation was 5.7 months (range, 3-10 months). Conclusion: Potential contributing causes of tendon rupture/attenuation after transfer include surgical technique, rehabilitation, co-contraction of the transfer, poor patient compliance, and medications. In this cohort, 5 subjects were prescribed fluoroquinolones that have a US Food and Drug Administration black box concerning tendon ruptures. Currently, all candidates for upper extremity tendon transfer reconstruction are counseled on the effects of fluoroquinolones and the potential risk for tendon rupture. PMID:23459326

  17. Intermediate Temperature Stress Rupture of a Woven Hi-Nicalon, BN-Interphase, SiC Matric Composite in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet; Brewer, David

    1999-01-01

    Woven Hi-Nicalon (TM) reinforced melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites were tested under tensile stress-rupture conditions in air at intermediate temperatures. A comprehensive examination of the damage state and the fiber properties at failure was performed. Modal acoustic emission analysis was used to monitor damage during the experiment. Extensive microscopy of the composite fracture surfaces and the individual fiber fracture surfaces was used to determine the mechanisms leading to ultimate failure. The rupture properties of these composites were significantly worse than expected compared to the fiber properties under similar conditions. This was due to the oxidation of the BN interphase. Oxidation occurred through the matrix cracks that intersected the surface or edge of a tensile bar. These oxidation reactions resulted in minor degradation to fiber strength and strong bonding of the fibers to one another at regions of near fiber-to-fiber contact. It was found that two regimes for rupture exist for this material: a high stress regime where rupture occurs at a fast rate and a low stress regime where rupture occurs at a slower rate. For the high stress regime, the matrix damage state consisted of through thickness cracks. The average fracture strength of fibers that were pulled-out (the final fibers to break before ultimate failure) was controlled by the slow-crack growth rupture criterion in the literature for individual Hi-Nicalon (TM) fibers. For the low stress regime, the matrix damage state consisted of microcracks which grew during the rupture test. The average fracture strength of fibers that were pulled-out in this regime was the same as the average fracture strength of individual fibers pulled out in as-produced composites tested at room temperature.

  18. What Does the Transverse Carpal Ligament Contribute to Carpal Stability?

    PubMed Central

    Vanhees, Matthias; Verstreken, Frederik; van Riet, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background?The transverse carpal ligament is well known for its involvement in carpal tunnel syndrome, and sectioning of this ligament remains the definite treatment for this pathology. Some authors believe that the transverse carpal ligament is an important stabilizer of the carpal arch, whereas others do not consider it to be significant. Several studies have been performed, both in vivo and in in vitro. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament does not seem to have any effect on the width of the carpal arch in the unloaded condition. However, patients will load the arch during their activities of daily living. Materials and Methods?A cadaveric study was done with distraction of the carpal bones before and after sectioning the transverse carpal ligament. Results?With the transverse carpal ligament intact, the carpal arch is mobile, with distraction leading up to 50% widening of the arch. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament resulted in a significant widening of the carpal arch by a further 30%. Conclusions?Loading of the carpal arch after sectioning of the transeverse carapal ligament leads to a significant increase in intracarpal mobility. This will inevitably influence carpal kinematics in the patient and might be responsible for some complications after simple carpal tunnel releases, such as pillar pain, palmar tenderness, and loss of grip strength. PMID:25709876

  19. Earthquake Rupturing in Fluid-Overpressured Crust: How Common?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2014-11-01

    Whether or not ruptures nucleate in fluid-overpressured crust ( λ v = P f/ σ v > 0.4) is important because pore-fluids overpressured above hydrostatic lower fault frictional strength and may also vary through the earthquake cycle, acting as an independent variable affecting fault failure. Containment of fluid overpressure is precarious because pressure-dependent activation of faults and fractures allows drainage from overpressured portions of the crust. Discharge of fluids through activated fault-fracture permeability (fault-valve action) decreases overpressure so that subsequent failure depends on the cycling of both overpressure and frictional strength as well as tectonic stress. Geometric and mechanical considerations suggest that fluid overpressures are more likely to develop and be sustained in compressional/transpressional regimes as opposed to extensional/transtensional tectonic settings. On the basis of geophysical observations and force-balance analyses, subduction interface shear zones appear to be strongly but variably overpressured to near-lithostatic levels ( λ v > 0.9) over the full depth range of seismogenic megathrusts. Strong overpressuring at seismogenic depths is also documented in active fold-thrust belts and in areas of ongoing compressional inversion (e.g., northern Honshu) where inherited normal faults are reactivated as steep reverse faults, requiring near-lithostatic overpressures ( λ v → 1.0) at depths of rupture initiation. Evidence for overpressuring around strike-slip faults is less clear but tends to be strongest in areas of transpression. In areas of extensional tectonics coincident with particularly high fluid discharge, there is some evidence of overpressuring concentrated towards the base of the seismogenic zone. In general, because of the limited resolution of geophysical techniques, it is easier to make the case for rupture propagation through overpressured crust than to make a definitive case for the direct involvement of overpressured fluids in rupture nucleation, though in some instances the circumstantial evidence is compelling. An unresolved related issue is the heterogeneity of overpressuring. Do the active fault zones themselves serve as fluid conduits that are locally overpressured with respect to the surrounding crust?

  20. Creep rupture behavior of candidate materials for nuclear process heat applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, F.; te Heesen, E.; Bruch, U.; Cook, R.; Diehl, H.; Ennis, P.J.; Jakobeit, W.; Penkalla, H.J.; Ullrich, G.

    1984-08-01

    Creep and stress rupture properties are determined for the candidate materials to be used in hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) components. The materials and test methods are briefly described based on experimental results of test durations of about20000 h. The medium creep strengths of the alloys Inconel-617, Hastelloy-X, Nimonic-86, Hastelloy-S, Manaurite-36X, IN-519, and Incoloy-800H are compared showing that Inconel-617 has the best creep rupture properties in the temperature range above 800/sup 0/C. The rupture time of welded joints is in the lower range of the scatterband of the parent metal. The properties determined in different simulated HTGR atmospheres are within the scatterband of the properties obtained in air. Extrapolation methods are discussed and a modified minimum commitment method is favored.

  1. Cryogenic insulation strength and bond tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerer, P. H.; Ehl, J. H.; Prasthofer, W. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing the tensile strength and bonding strength of sprayed-on foam insulation attached to metal cryogenic fuel tanks is described. A circular cutter is used to cut the insulation down to the surface of the metal tank to form plugs of the insulation for testing in situ on the tank. The apparatus comprises an electromechanical pulling device powered by a belt battery pack. The pulling device comprises a motor driving a mechanical pulling structure comprising a horizontal shaft connected to two bell cracks which are connected to a central member. When the lower end of member is attached to a fitting, which in turn is bonded to a plug, a pulling force is exerted on the plug sufficient to rupture it. The force necessary to rupture the plug or pull it loose is displayed as a digital read-out.

  2. Transverse correlations in multiphoton entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih Yanhua

    2007-10-15

    We have analyzed the transverse correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N-photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N-photon case.

  3. Achilles tendon rupture in atypical patient populations.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a significant injury, and the likelihood of a good recovery is directly associated with early diagnosis and appropriate referral. Such injuries are commonly assessed and identified by practitioners working in 'minors' areas of emergency departments or urgent care settings. The literature frequently describes rupture of the Achilles tendon as 'typically sport-related' affecting 'middle-aged weekend warriors', but this aetiology accounts for only about 70% of such injuries. Factors such as the natural ageing process, obesity and use of some commonly prescribed medications, can increase the risk of developing a tendinopathy and subsequent rupture, often from a seemingly insignificant incident. However, research suggests that injuries in this patient population are more likely be missed on first examination. This article describes risk factors that should alert clinicians to the possibility of Achilles tendon rupture in 'atypical' patient populations. PMID:26948227

  4. Acute Iliac Artery Rupture: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V. Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2007-04-15

    The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery rupture over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the rupture was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the rupture was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery rupture, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.

  5. The diagnosis of ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, A B; Cummins, B H

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a spontaneous asymptomatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst with CT and MR images. The literature on the subject is reviewed. The potential associated complications are discussed. PMID:2818854

  6. Ruptured celiac artery aneurysm mimicking Boerhaave syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Yu; Yang, Kai-Wei; Chen, Wei-Kung; Huang, Chen-Hsiung

    2013-09-01

    Ruptured celiac artery aneurysm is a rare cause for epigastric pain and is usually detected incidentally. Atypical presentation with postemetic epigastralgia and pleural effusion usually leads physicians to make the diagnosis of Boerhaave syndrome. Herein, we report a 32-year-old woman who was diagnosed with Boerhaave syndrome initially after presenting with acute postemetic epigastralgia and predominant left side pleural effusion. Diagnostic left thoracentesis yielded bloody fluid with similar amylase level to serum. The chest computed tomographic scan showed no evidence of esophageal rupture. However, a ruptured celiac artery aneurysm with retroperitoneal hematoma extending to the posterior mediastinum and bilateral pleural space was found incidentally. Although ruptured celiac artery aneurysm is an uncommon cause for postemetic epigastralgia, acute vascular events such as the previously stated cause should be the first impression rather than Boerhaave syndrome if the patient also presents with isolated pleural effusion containing unelevated amylase. PMID:23773770

  7. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN CHROMOSPHERIC MOTTLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P.; Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R.; Dorrian, G. D.

    2012-05-01

    A number of recent investigations have revealed that transverse waves are ubiquitous in the solar chromosphere. The vast majority of these have been reported in limb spicules and active region fibrils. We investigate long-lived, quiet-Sun, on-disk features such as chromospheric mottles (jet-like features located at the boundaries of supergranular cells) and their transverse motions. The observations were obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope. The data set is comprised of simultaneous imaging in the H{alpha} core, Ca II K, and G band of an on-disk quiet-Sun region. Time-distance techniques are used to study the characteristics of the transverse oscillations. We detect over 40 transverse oscillations in both bright and dark mottles, with periods ranging from 70 to 280 s, with the most frequent occurrence at {approx}165 s. The velocity amplitudes and transverse displacements exhibit characteristics similar to limb spicules. Neighboring mottles oscillating in-phase are also observed. The transverse oscillations of individual mottles are interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Their estimated periods and damping times are consistent with phase mixing and resonant mode conversion.

  8. Dynamic rupture activation of backthrust fault branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiqing; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-01

    We perform dynamic rupture simulations to investigate the possible reactivation of backthrust branches triggered by ruptures along a main thrust fault. Simulations with slip-weakening fault friction and uniform initial stress show that fast propagation speed or long propagation distance of the main rupture promotes reactivation of backthrust over a range of branch angles. The latter condition may occur separately from the former if rupture speed is limited by an increasing slip-weakening distance towards the junction direction. The results suggest a trade-off between the amplitude and duration of the dynamic stress near the main rupture front for backthrust reactivation. Termination of the main rupture by a barrier can provide enhanced loading amplitude and duration along a backthrust rooted near the barrier, facilitating its reactivation especially with a high frictional resistance. The free surface and depth-dependent initial stress can have several additional effects. The sign of the triggered motion along the backthrust can be reversed from thrust to normal if a deeply nucleated main rupture breaks the free surface, while it is preserved as thrust if the main rupture is terminated by a barrier at depth. The numerical results are discussed in relation to several recent megathrust earthquakes in Sumatra, Chile, and Japan, and related topics such as branch feedbacks to the main fault. The dynamic view on backthrust fault branching provided by the study fills a gap not covered by quasi-static models or observations. A specific examined case of antithetic fault branching may be useful for indicating a barrier-like behavior along the main fault.

  9. MR and CT appearance of ruptured intracranial dermoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, T F; Spitzer, R M

    1987-01-01

    Intracranial dermoid tumors have characteristic MR and CT appearances. Rupture of an intracranial dermoid produces a dramatic MR and CT appearance. Two cases of ruptured intracranial dermoid tumors are presented, one with rupture into the subarachnoid space, another with rupture into the ventricles. MR and CT findings are included. PMID:3436130

  10. Subducting plate geology in three great earthquake ruptures of the western Alaska margin, Kodiak to Unimak

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Huene, Roland; Miller, John J.; Weinrebe, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Three destructive earthquakes along the Alaska subduction zone sourced transoceanic tsunamis during the past 70 years. Since it is reasoned that past rupture areas might again source tsunamis in the future, we studied potential asperities and barriers in the subduction zone by examining Quaternary Gulf of Alaska plate history, geophysical data, and morphology. We relate the aftershock areas to subducting lower plate relief and dissimilar materials in the seismogenic zone in the 1964 Kodiak and adjacent 1938 Semidi Islands earthquake segments. In the 1946 Unimak earthquake segment, the exposed lower plate seafloor lacks major relief that might organize great earthquake rupture. However, the upper plate contains a deep transverse-trending basin and basement ridges associated with the Eocene continental Alaska convergent margin transition to the Aleutian island arc. These upper plate features are sufficiently large to have affected rupture propagation. In addition, massive slope failure in the Unimak area may explain the local 42-m-high 1946 tsunami runup. Although Quaternary geologic and tectonic processes included accretion to form a frontal prism, the study of seismic images, samples, and continental slope physiography shows a previous history of tectonic erosion. Implied asperities and barriers in the seismogenic zone could organize future great earthquake rupture.

  11. Yield Stress Effects on Mucus Plug Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, John C.; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2012-11-01

    Mucus plugs can obstruct airways, resulting in lost gas exchange and inflammation. Yield stress, one of the significant rheological properties of mucus, plays a significant role in plug rupture. We use carbopol 940 gels as mucus simulants to study dynamics of mucus plug rupture in experiments. Yield stress increases with gel concentration increasing (0.1% ~0.3%). The yield stress of the 0.2% gel is about 530 dyn/cm2, which can simulate normal mucus. A 2D PDMS channel is used to simulate a collapsed airway of the 12th generation in a human lung. Plug rupture is driven by a pressure drop of 1.6 104 ~ 2.0 104 dyn/cm2. Initial plug length varies from half to two times the half channel width. A micro-PIV technique is used to acquire velocity fields during rupture, from which wall shear stress is derived. Plug shortening velocity increases with the pressure drop, but decreases with yield stress or the initial plug length. Wall shear stress increases with yield stress, which indicates more potential damage may occur to epithelial cells when pathologic mucus has a high yield stress. Near the rupture moment, a wall shear stress peak appears at the front of the film deposited by the plug during rupture. This work is supported by NIH: HL84370 and HL85156.

  12. Prediction of transverse fatigue behavior of unidirectionally reinforced metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    John, R.; Buchanan, D.J.; Larsen, J.M.

    1998-11-03

    Unidirectionally reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are targeted for use in many aerospace applications which require high specific strength and stiffness at elevated temperatures. Such applications include blings and disks. The primary weakness of a component made of unidirectionally reinforced MMC is its susceptibility to transverse loads. The strength of the component in the transverse direction is significantly lower than that in the longitudinal direction under monotonic, sustained and fatigue loading conditions. Hence, replacement of monolithic components with MMC components requires that the transverse strength of the MMC should be predicted accurately. This paper discusses the applicability of a net-section based model to predict the fatigue behavior of [909] MMC under transverse loading.

  13. Application of high-velocity friction experiments to the shear rupture of a fault in an elastic half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zonghu; Reches, Zeev

    2013-04-01

    We developed a physics-based model for earthquake rupture by numerically simulating shear rupture along a 2D vertical fault with the dynamic frictional strength of granite under high slip velocity. Recent experimental observations indicated that the steady-state frictional strength of silica-rich igneous rocks (granite, syenite, diorite) alternate between dynamic-weakening under low velocity (V < 0.03 m/s) and dynamic-strengthening under higher velocities (V > 0.03 m/s). This strength alternation was attributed to powder-lubrication (weakening), and powder dehydration (strengthening) (Sammis et al., 2011). We used the dynamic friction law which was determined on samples of Sierra White granite under experimental velocities approaching 1 m/s (Reches and Lockner, 2010). We converted their observed friction-distance-velocity relations into an empirical friction model referred to as WEST (WEakening - STrengthening). For the simulation calculations, we used the spectral element code of Ampuero (web.gps.caltech.edu/~ampuero/software), which computes the spontaneous rupture propagation along an anti-plane shear (mode III) fracture in an elastic half-space. In the present analysis, the WEST friction model is used as the fault strength while keeping all other parameters (crust properties and stresses) the same as Version 3 of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) benchmark problem (Harris et al., 2004). This approach allows for direct comparison between the WEST rupture and the benchmark rupture with a fault of slip-weakening friction model (Rojas et al., 2008). We found the following differences between the ruptures of the two models: (1) WEST-based rupture occurs earlier at all observation points away from the nucleation zone; (2) WEST-based model has lower (~ 35%) peak velocity and shorter rise-time; and (3) WEST-based rupture shows rich, frequent alteration of slip velocity, and consequently, the simulated rupture is more complex in stress drop, displacements, and friction recovery. We discuss the significant contribution of this experimentally-based friction model to the understanding of rupture models with emphasis on slip-pulse behavior.

  14. Fault barriers favor activation of backthrusts near segment ends of megathrust ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that backthrusts may become active during or after megathrust ruptures in subduction zones, such as in Chile and Sumatra areas (Melnick et al., 2012; Singh et al., 2011). Previous studies on relevant mechanisms mainly focused on the interaction between forethrusts and the megathrust. Here we aim to investigate through dynamic rupture simulations how backthrusts may be activated by megathrust ruptures in subduction zone environment. Assuming a single backthrust branch, our preliminary results show that the activation of backthrust is difficult if the megathrust rupture can easily pass through the fault junction, owing to a quickly established stress shadow zone in the wake of the megathrust rupture front. In contrast, if the megathrust rupture is arrested or delayed around the junction, a resultant backward stress lobe of the type discussed by Xu and Ben-Zion (2013) can load the backthrust over a considerable amount of time and facilitates rupture activation along the backthrust. A number of candidates can serve to arrest or delay megathrust ruptures, such as the velocity-strengthening frictional behavior and off-fault weak materials in the shallow portion of subduction zones, fault bend or ramp, and subducted seamount. Moreover, these features are also found capable of generating backthrusts during the long-term quasi-static process, which provide pre-existing weakness to be reactivated by later dynamic ruptures. Our results agree, from a different point of view, with the study based on the critical taper theory (Cubas et al., 2013) that an increase of friction towards the trench favors the activation of backthrusts near the up-dip limit of megathrust ruptures. The results highlight the role of fault geometric or strength heterogeneities in controlling the strain partitioning on and off the main fault plane. Accordingly, activated backthrusts may be treated as markers that reflect the limits of seismogenic zones, and thus may be used to characterize segmentation of subduction zones. Backthrusts can contribute, like forethrusts, to local tsunami generation, intra-plate seismicity, etc., and should be examined in further detail in future studies.

  15. Dynamic rupture processes on two orthogonal but not conjugate fault segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Y.; Aoi, S.

    2010-12-01

    The 2009 Suruga-bay, Japan, earthquake was supposed to rupture two orthogonal but not conjugate fault segments. The aftershock distribution consisting of two planes, which has the SE- and NE-dipping planes for the southern and northern source areas, respectively, and the hypocenter of the main shock was located at the SE-dipping plane (Aoi et al., 2010, Nature geoscience). The normal vectors of the two planes are almost orthogonal. Using the fault plane model that consists of the SE-dipping fault segment with a hypocenter and the NE-dipping fault segment connecting with the other segment at the point 5 km west of the hypocenter, Aoi et al. (2010) estimated the rupture process using the near-source strong-motion data. The estimated rake angles suggested that the SE-dipping fault segment had right-lateral strike slip, and that the NE-dipping segment had reverse slip. In this study, we investigate a physical possibility of coseismic slip on two orthogonal but not conjugate fault segments, using dynamic rupture simulations. The 3-D finite-difference method of Kase and Kuge (2001, GJI) is modified for an infinite medium. Varying the geometry of two faults and the maximum compressional stress axis, we calculate spontaneous rupture processes on segments, and examine whether a rupture propagating to the joint can jump to the second segment. Assuming coefficients of friction to be uniform on the two faults, we estimate the ranges of azimuth and plunge using rake angle on the first (SE-dipping) segment and stress condition on the second (NE-dipping) segment, respectively. Results of spontaneous rupture simulations show that a rupture triggered on the second segment successfully propagates only when strength excess is smaller and stress drop is larger on the second segment than the first segment. The conditions of the stress and dynamic parameters for successful rupture jump and propagation on the second segment are very limited. When the rupture extends on the both segments, the rupture velocity on the second segment exceeds S-wave speed, and the slip on the second segment is larger than the first segment. The larger slip on the second segment also appeared in the slip distribution of the 2009 Suruga-bay earthquake (Aoi et al., 2010).

  16. Tensile and stress-rupture behavior of hafnium carbide dispersed molybdenum and tungsten base alloy wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Titran, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile strain rate sensitivity and the stress-rupture strength of Mo-base and W-base alloy wires, 380 microns in diameter, were determined over the temperature range from 1200 K to 1600 K. Three molybdenum alloy wires; Mo + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC), Mo + 25w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+25W) and Mo + 45w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+45W), and a W + 0.4w/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) tungsten alloy wire were evaluated. The tensile strength of all wires studied was found to have a positive strain rate sensitivity. The strain rate dependency increased with increasing temperature and is associated with grain broadening of the initial fibrous structures. The hafnium carbide dispersed W-base and Mo-base alloys have superior tensile and stress-rupture properties than those without HfC. On a density compensated basis the MoHfC wires exhibit superior tensile and stress-rupture strengths to the WHfC wires up to approximately 1400 K. Addition of tungsten in the Mo-alloy wires was found to increase the long-term stress rupture strength at temperatures above 1400 K. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength and ductility advantage of the HfC dispersed alloy wires is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  17. Simplified approach for design of raft foundations against fault rupture. Part II: soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulos, I.; Gerolymos, N.; Gazetas, G.; Bransby, M. F.

    2008-06-01

    This is the second paper of two, which describe the results of an integrated research effort to develop a four-step simplified approach for design of raft foundations against dip-slip (normal and thrust) fault rupture. The first two steps dealing with fault rupture propagation in the free-field were presented in the companion paper. This paper develops an approximate analytical method to analyze soil-foundation-structure interaction (SFSI), involving two additional phenomena: (i) fault rupture diversion (Step 3); and (ii) modification of the vertical displacement profile (Step 4). For the first phenomenon (Step 3), an approximate energy-based approach is developed to estimate the diversion of a fault rupture due to presence of a raft foundation. The normalized critical load for complete diversion is shown to be a function of soil strength, coefficient of earth pressure at rest, bedrock depth, and the horizontal position of the foundation relative to the outcropping fault rupture. For the second phenomenon (Step 4), a heuristic approach is proposed, which “scans” through possible equilibrium positions to detect the one that best satisfies force and moment equilibrium. Thus, we account for the strong geometric nonlinearities that govern this interaction, such as uplifting and second order ( P-Δ) effects. Comparisons with centrifuge-validated finite element analyses demonstrate the efficacy of the method. Its simplicity makes possible its utilization for preliminary design.

  18. Condensate bright solitons under transverse confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasnich, L.; Parola, A.; Reatto, L.

    2002-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensate bright solitons made of alkali-metal atoms with negative scattering length and under harmonic confinement in the transverse direction. Contrary to the one-dimensional (1D) case, the 3D bright soliton exists only below a critical attractive interaction that depends on the extent of confinement. Such a behavior is also found in multisoliton condensates with box boundary conditions. We obtain numerical and analytical estimates of the critical strength beyond which the solitons do not exist. By using an effective 1D nonpolynomial nonlinear Schrdinger equation, which accurately takes into account the transverse dynamics of cigarlike condensates, we numerically simulate the dynamics of the ``soliton train'' reported in a recent experiment [Nature (London) 417, 150 (2002)]. Then, analyzing the macroscopic quantum tunneling of the bright soliton on a Gaussian barrier, we find that its interference in the tunneling region is strongly suppressed with respect to nonsolitonic case; moreover, the tunneling through a barrier breaks the shape invariance of the matter wave. Finally, we show that the collapse of the soliton is induced by the scattering on the barrier or by the collision with another matter wave when the density reaches a critical value, for which we derive an accurate analytical formula.

  19. Speed of fast and slow rupture fronts along frictional interfaces.

    PubMed

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Scheibert, Julien; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The transition from stick to slip at a dry frictional interface occurs through the breaking of microjunctions between the two contacting surfaces. Typically, interactions between junctions through the bulk lead to rupture fronts propagating from weak and/or highly stressed regions, whose junctions break first. Experiments find rupture fronts ranging from quasistatic fronts, via fronts much slower than elastic wave speeds, to fronts faster than the shear wave speed. The mechanisms behind and selection between these fronts are still imperfectly understood. Here we perform simulations in an elastic two-dimensional spring-block model where the frictional interaction between each interfacial block and the substrate arises from a set of junctions modeled explicitly. We find that material slip speed and rupture front speed are proportional across the full range of front speeds we observe. We revisit a mechanism for slow slip in the model and demonstrate that fast slip and fast fronts have a different, inertial origin. We highlight the long transients in front speed even along homogeneous interfaces, and we study how both the local shear to normal stress ratio and the local strength are involved in the selection of front type and front speed. Last, we introduce an experimentally accessible integrated measure of block slip history, the Gini coefficient, and demonstrate that in the model it is a good predictor of the history-dependent local static friction coefficient of the interface. These results will contribute both to building a physically based classification of the various types of fronts and to identifying the important mechanisms involved in the selection of their propagation speed. PMID:26274187

  20. Speed of fast and slow rupture fronts along frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Scheibert, Julien; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The transition from stick to slip at a dry frictional interface occurs through the breaking of microjunctions between the two contacting surfaces. Typically, interactions between junctions through the bulk lead to rupture fronts propagating from weak and/or highly stressed regions, whose junctions break first. Experiments find rupture fronts ranging from quasistatic fronts, via fronts much slower than elastic wave speeds, to fronts faster than the shear wave speed. The mechanisms behind and selection between these fronts are still imperfectly understood. Here we perform simulations in an elastic two-dimensional spring-block model where the frictional interaction between each interfacial block and the substrate arises from a set of junctions modeled explicitly. We find that material slip speed and rupture front speed are proportional across the full range of front speeds we observe. We revisit a mechanism for slow slip in the model and demonstrate that fast slip and fast fronts have a different, inertial origin. We highlight the long transients in front speed even along homogeneous interfaces, and we study how both the local shear to normal stress ratio and the local strength are involved in the selection of front type and front speed. Last, we introduce an experimentally accessible integrated measure of block slip history, the Gini coefficient, and demonstrate that in the model it is a good predictor of the history-dependent local static friction coefficient of the interface. These results will contribute both to building a physically based classification of the various types of fronts and to identifying the important mechanisms involved in the selection of their propagation speed.

  1. Effect of pore pressure buildup on slowness of rupture propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ougier-Simonin, A.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Pore fluid pressure is known to play an important role in brittle fracture initiation and propagation, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We conducted triaxial experiments on saturated porous sandstones to investigate effects of pore pressure buildup on the slowness of shear rupture propagation at different confining pressures. At low to intermediate confinements, rocks fail by brittle faulting, and pore pressure buildup causes a reduction in rock's shear strength but does not induce measurable differences in slip behavior. When the confinement is high enough to prohibit dynamic faulting, rocks fail in the brittle-ductile transitional regime. In the transitional regime, pore pressure buildup promotes slip instability on an otherwise stably sliding fracture. Compared to those observed in the brittle regime, the slip rate, stress drop, and energy dissipated during rupture propagation with concurrent pore pressure buildup in the transitional regime are distinctively different. When decreasing confining pressure instead, the slip behavior resembles the ones of the brittle regime, emphasizing how the observed slowness is related to excess pore pressure beyond the effective pressure phenomenon. Analysis of the mechanical data using existing theoretical models confirms these observations. Quantitative microstructural analyses reveal that increasing pore pressure lessens the dilatancy hardening during failure, thus enhances slip along the localized zone in the transitional regime. Our experimental results suggest that pore pressure buildup induces slow slip in the transitional regime, and slip rates along a shear fracture may vary considerably depending on effective stress states.

  2. Surgical Strategies for Acutely Ruptured Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jaime L; Macdonald, R Loch

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are focal neurovascular lesions consisting of abnormal fistulous connections between the arterial and venous systems with no interposed capillaries. This arrangement creates a high-flow circulatory shunt with hemorrhagic risk and hemodynamic abnormalities. While most AVMs are asymptomatic, they may cause severe neurological complications and death. Each AVM carries an annual rupture risk of 2-4%. Intracranial hemorrhage due to AVM rupture is the most common initial manifestation (up to 70% of presentations), and it carries significant morbidity and mortality. This complication is particularly important in the young and otherwise healthy population, in whom AVMs cause up to one-third of all hemorrhagic strokes. A previous rupture is the single most important independent predictor of future hemorrhage. Current treatment modalities for AVM are microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and radiosurgery. In acutely ruptured AVMs, early microsurgical excision is usually avoided. The standard is to wait at least 4 weeks to allow for patient recovery, hematoma liquefaction, and inflammatory reactions to subside. Exceptions to this rule are small, superficial, low-grade AVMs with elucidated angioarchitecture, for which early simultaneous hematoma evacuation and AVM excision is feasible. Emergent hematoma evacuation with delayed AVM excision (unless, as mentioned, the AVM is low grade) is recommended in patients with a decreased level of consciousness due to intracranial hemorrhage, posterior fossa or temporal lobe hematoma of >30 ml, or hemispheric hematoma of >60 ml. The applicability of endovascular techniques for acutely ruptured AVMs is not clear, but feasible options, until a definitive treatment is determined, include occluding intranidal and distal flow-related aneurysms and 'sealing' any rupture site or focal angioarchitectural weakness when one can be clearly identified and safely accessed. Radiosurgery is not performed in acutely ruptured AVMs because its therapeutic effects occur in a delayed fashion. PMID:26587641

  3. Transverse deformations of extreme horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Carmen; Lucietti, James

    2016-04-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining all extreme black hole solutions to the Einstein equations with a prescribed near-horizon geometry. We investigate this problem by considering infinitesimal deformations of the near-horizon geometry along transverse null geodesics. We show that, up to a gauge transformation, the linearised Einstein equations reduce to an elliptic PDE for the extrinsic curvature of a cross-section of the horizon. We deduce that for a given near-horizon geometry there exists a finite dimensional moduli space of infinitesimal transverse deformations. We then establish a uniqueness theorem for transverse deformations of the extreme Kerr horizon. In particular, we prove that the only smooth axisymmetric transverse deformation of the near-horizon geometry of extreme Kerr, such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped surfaces, corresponds to that of the extreme Kerr black hole. Furthermore, we determine all smooth and biaxisymmetric transverse deformations of the near-horizon geometry of the five-dimensional extreme Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta. We find a three parameter family of solutions such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped, which is more general than the known black hole solutions. We discuss the possibility that they correspond to new five-dimensional vacuum black holes.

  4. Tensile stress rupture behavior of a woven ceramic matrix composite in humid environments at intermediate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larochelle, Kevin J.

    This study focused on moisture and intermediate temperature effects on the embrittlement phenomenon and stress rupture life of the ceramic matrix composite (CMC) made of Sylramic(TM) fibers with an in-situ layer of boron nitride (Syl-iBN), boron nitride interphase (BN), and SiC matrix (Syl-iBN/BN/SiC). Stress rupture tests were performed at 550°C or 750°C with moisture contents of 0.0, 0.2, or 0.6 atm partial pressure of water vapor, pH 2O. The CMC stress rupture strengths at 100 hrs at 550°C with 0.0, 0.2, or 0.6 atm pH2O were 75%, 65% and 51% of the monotonic room temperature tensile strength, respectively. At 750°C, the corresponding strengths were 67%, 51%, and 49%, respectively. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) analysis showed that the amount of pesting by glass formations increased with time, temperature, and pH2O leading to embrittlement. Total embrittlement times for 550°C were estimated to be greater than 63 hrs for 0.0 atm pH2O greater than 38 hrs for 0.2 atm pH 2O and between 8 and 71 hrs for 0.6 atm pH2O. Corresponding estimated embrittlement times for the 750°C were greater than 83 hrs, between 13 and 71 hrs, and between 1 and 6 hrs. A time-dependent, phenomenological, Monte Carlo-type simulation of composite failure was developed. The simulated total embrittlement times for the 550°C cases were 300 hrs, 100 hrs, and 25 hrs for 0.0, 0.2, and 0.6 atm pH 2O, respectively. The corresponding embrittlement times for the 750°C cases were 300 hrs, 20 hrs, and 3 hrs. A detailed sensitivity analysis on the variables used in the model was conducted. The model was most sensitive to variation in the ultimate strength of the CMC at room temperature, the ultimate strength of the CMC at elevated temperature, and the reference strength of a fiber and it was least sensitive to variation in the modulus of elasticity of the matrix and fiber. The sensitivity analysis showed that the stress ruptures curves generated by variation in the total embrittlement time simulate the trends in the experimental data. This research showed that the degree of stress rupture strength degradation increases with temperature, moisture content level, and exposure time.

  5. Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-rupture properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C (2000 F) tensile and stress-rupture strength of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C (2000 F). The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-rupture at 1093 C (2000 F). Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C (2000 F). The stress-rupture properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C (2000 F) ultimate tensile strength of the composites.

  6. Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-rupture properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C tensile and stress-rupture strength of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C. The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-rupture at 1093 C. Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C. The stress-rupture properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C ultimate tensile strength of the composites.

  7. Creep-rupture behavior of candidate Stirling engine alloys after long-term aging at 760 deg C in low-pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Nine candidate Stirling automotive engine alloys were aged at 760 C for 3500 hr in low pressure hydrogen or argon to determine the resulting effects on mechanical behavior. Candidate heater head tube alloys were CG-27, W545, 12RN72, INCONEL-718, and HS-188 while candidate cast cylinder-regenerator housing alloys were SA-F11, CRM-6D, XF-818, and HS-31. Aging per se is detrimental to the creep rupture and tensile strengths of the iron base alloys. The presence of hydrogen does not significantly contribute to strength degradation. Based percent highway driving cycle; CG-27 has adequate 3500 hr - 870 C creep rupture strength and SA-Fll, CRM-6D, and XF-818 have adequate 3500 hr - 775 C creep rupture strength.

  8. Creep-rupture behavior of candidate Stirling engine alloys after long-term aging at 760/sup 0/C in low-pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Titran, R.H.

    1984-05-01

    Nine candidate Stirling automotive engine alloys were aged at 760/sup 0/C for 3500 h in low pressure hydrogen or argon to determine the resulting effects on mechanical behavior. Candidate heater head tube alloys were CG-27, W545, 12RN72, INCONEL-718, and HS-188 while candidate cast cylinder-regenerator housing alloys were SA-F11, CRM-6D, XF-818, and HS-31. Aging per se is detrimental to the creep-rupture and tensile strengths of the iron-base alloys. The presence of hydrogen does not significantly contribute to strength degradation. Based on current MOD 1A Stirling engine design criteria of a 55% urban - 45% highway driving cycle; CG-27 has adequate 3500 h - 87/sup 0/C creep-rupture strength and SA-F11, CRM-6D, and XF-818 have adequate 3500 h - 775/sup 0/C creep-rupture strength.

  9. Flutter analysis using transversality theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afolabi, D.

    1993-01-01

    A new method of calculating flutter boundaries of undamped aeronautical structures is presented. The method is an application of the weak transversality theorem used in catastrophe theory. In the first instance, the flutter problem is cast in matrix form using a frequency domain method, leading to an eigenvalue matrix. The characteristic polynomial resulting from this matrix usually has a smooth dependence on the system's parameters. As these parameters change with operating conditions, certain critical values are reached at which flutter sets in. Our approach is to use the transversality theorem in locating such flutter boundaries using this criterion: at a flutter boundary, the characteristic polynomial does not intersect the axis of the abscissa transversally. Formulas for computing the flutter boundaries and flutter frequencies of structures with two degrees of freedom are presented, and extension to multi-degree of freedom systems is indicated. The formulas have obvious applications in, for instance, problems of panel flutter at supersonic Mach numbers.

  10. Transverse wakefields at high dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.

    1992-03-01

    In high energy linear colliders the transverse beam emittance has to be preserved in order to achieve small interaction spots. If the beam is off-center in an accelerating cavity, it excites transverse wakefields, mainly the dipole mode, which deflects the tail of the beam leading to an emittance growth. In a high dispersive region, even a well centered beam can excite wakefields of higher order modes since the energy spread of the beam causes a transverse beam size which is comparable with the beam pipe. During the bunch length compression in the ring-to-linac (RTL) section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), the beam pipe of 75 mm diameter is practically filled in the horizontal plane. Especially, if beam losses start to be involved, the very outer parts of the beam excite wakefields at any pipe irregularities like bellows, diameter steps, etc. Measured evidences, theoretical estimates and comparisons to other effects, like higher order magnet optics, are presented.

  11. Realizing vector meson dominance with transverse charge densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. A.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2011-10-01

    The transverse charge density in a fast-moving nucleon is represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the Dirac form factor in the timelike region (spectral function). At a given transverse distance b the integration effectively extends over energies in a range t≲1/b, with exponential suppression of larger values. The transverse charge density at peripheral distances thus acts as a low-pass filter for the spectral function and allows one to select energy regions dominated by specific t-channel states, corresponding to definite exchange mechanisms in the spacelike form factor. We show that distances b˜0.5-1.5fm in the isovector density are maximally sensitive to the ρ meson region, with only a ˜10% contribution from higher-mass states. Soft-pion exchange governed by chiral dynamics becomes relevant only at larger distances. In the isoscalar density higher-mass states beyond the ω are comparatively more important. The dispersion approach suggests that the positive transverse charge density in the neutron at b˜1fm, found previously in a Fourier analysis of spacelike form factor data, could serve as a sensitive test of the the isoscalar strength in the ˜1GeV mass region. In terms of partonic structure, the transverse densities in the vector meson region b˜1fm support an approximate mean-field picture of the motion of valence quarks in the nucleon.

  12. Realizing vector meson dominance with transverse charge densities

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Miller, Mark Strikman, Christian Weiss

    2011-10-01

    The transverse charge density in a fast-moving nucleon is represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the Dirac form factor in the timelike region (spectral function). At a given transverse distance b the integration effectively extends over energies in a range {radical}t {approx}< 1/b, with exponential suppression of larger values. The transverse charge density at peripheral distances thus acts as a low-pass filter for the spectral function and allows one to select energy regions dominated by specific t-channel states, corresponding to definite exchange mechanisms in the spacelike form factor. We show that distances b {approx} 0.5 - 1.5 fm in the isovector density are maximally sensitive to the {rho} meson region, with only a {approx}10% contribution from higher-mass states. Soft-pion exchange governed by chiral dynamics becomes relevant only at larger distances. In the isoscalar density higher-mass states beyond the {omega} are comparatively more important. The dispersion approach suggests that the positive transverse charge density in the neutron at b {approx} 1 fm, found previously in a Fourier analysis of spacelike form factor data, could serve as a sensitive test of the isoscalar strength in the {approx}1 GeV mass region. In terms of partonic structure, the transverse densities in the vector meson region b {approx} 1 fm support an approximate mean-field picture of the motion of valence quarks in the nucleon.

  13. Rupture Process for Hayward Microearthquakes Inferred from Borehole Seismic Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, T.; Dreger, D. S.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Hayward fault (HF) in the San Francisco Bay Area, California is one of the major strands of the San Andreas fault system, extending for about 70 km. Crustal deformation along the HF is characterized by a wide variety of fault slip behaviors from aseismic creep to stick-slip earthquake including a Mw ~6.8 earthquake in 1868. We here document the high-resolution imaging of the rupture models for the recent M 3+ HF earthquakes by making use of waveforms from the Hayward Fault Network (HFN). The HFN is an array of borehole seismic instrumentation and provides an unprecedented high-resolution coverage of the earthquake source study for HF earthquakes. Using the finite-source rupture inversion with an empirical Green's function approach, we find a variety of rupture propagations including subevents, directivity, and high stress drop. Our finite-source modeling reveals a complex slip distribution for the 2013 Mw 3.2 Orinda earthquake that is characterized by a patch of slip with a maximum slip of 4 cm concentrated near the hypocenter at about 6.6 km depth, with a large secondary patch of slip (peak slip of 2 cm) centered up-dip and southeast from the hypocenter at a distance of about 400 m away. The two subevents release 43% and 23% of the total seismic moment (6.7 x 1013 N m) and the inferred peak stress drops are 18 MPa and 10 MPa. The 2011 Mw 4.0 Berkeley and 2012 Mw 4.0 El Cerrito earthquakes are marked by high stress drop. The inferred peak and mean stress drops are about 130-165 MPa and 45 MPa, respectively, which suggests that there are locally high levels of the fault strength on the HF. Our finite-source modeling suggests that the radiation efficiency determined for these two earthquakes is very low (< 0.1) and implies that majority of energy is dissipated during the earthquake rupture process.

  14. A creep-rupture model of filament-wound spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jan D.; Hackett, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    The creep-rupture model is that of a quasi-isotropic filament-wound spherical pressure vessel, subjected to internal pressurization. The matrix material of the composite system is assumed to be linearly viscoelastic. Internal damage resulting from the relaxation of the matrix and the corresponding increase in microcracks is represented by a functional relationship between circumferential strain and transverse modulus. The numerical solution to this nonlinear problem is an iterative technique, whereby the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle is employed. In the Laplace domain, the associated elastic solution is obtained and this solution is inverted by the multidata method to yield the time-dependent solution.

  15. Tensile and creep rupture properties of (16) uncoated and (2) coated engineering alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, L. J.; Koster, W. P.

    1977-01-01

    Sixteen test materials were supplied by NASA-Lewis Research Center as wrought bar or cast remelt stock. The cast remelt stock was cast into test blanks with two such materials being also evaluated after Jocoat coating was applied. Mechanical properties evaluated included tensile, modulus of elasticity, Poisson's Ratio, creep properties and creep rupture strength. Tests were conducted at temperatures applicable to the service temperature of the various alloys. This range extended from room temperature to 1000 C.

  16. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Hastelloy-X tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.; Colantino, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Hastelloy-X tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1400 to 1650 F and internal helium pressures from 800 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 58 to 3600 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was from 20 to 40 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  17. Ceramic Composite Intermediate Temperature Stress-Rupture Properties Improved Significantly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet B.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) composites are considered to be potential materials for future aircraft engine parts such as combustor liners. It is envisioned that on the hot side (inner surface) of the combustor liner, composites will have to withstand temperatures in excess of 1200 C for thousands of hours in oxidizing environments. This is a severe condition; however, an equally severe, if not more detrimental, condition exists on the cold side (outer surface) of the combustor liner. Here, the temperatures are expected to be on the order of 800 to 1000 C under high tensile stress because of thermal gradients and attachment of the combustor liner to the engine frame (the hot side will be under compressive stress, a less severe stress-state for ceramics). Since these composites are not oxides, they oxidize. The worst form of oxidation for strength reduction occurs at these intermediate temperatures, where the boron nitride (BN) interphase oxidizes first, which causes the formation of a glass layer that strongly bonds the fibers to the matrix. When the fibers strongly bond to the matrix or to one another, the composite loses toughness and strength and becomes brittle. To increase the intermediate temperature stress-rupture properties, researchers must modify the BN interphase. With the support of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, significant improvements were made as state-of-the-art SiC/SiC composites were developed during the Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program. Three approaches were found to improve the intermediate-temperature stress-rupture properties: fiber-spreading, high-temperature silicon- (Si) doped boron nitride (BN), and outside-debonding BN.

  18. Effect of simulated medium-Btu coal gasifier atmospheres on the biaxial stress rupture behavior of four candidate coal gasifier alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.M.; Smolik, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine whether the biaxial stress rupture behavior of four alloys was adversely affected by exposure to four simulated medium-Btu coal gasifier atmospheres. The results of exposures up to approximately 500 h at temperatures between 649 and 982/sup 0/C are presented. Exposure to these atmospheres at temperatures below 900/sup 0/C did not significantly reduce the rupture properties from those measured in air. Only at 982/sup 0/C were the rupture strength and life in the simulated coal gasifier atmospheres lower than those measured in air at atmospheric pressure. Possible reasons for this reduction in strength/life are discussed. The results of detailed examination of specimen ruptures are also presented.

  19. Dynamic rupture simulation with an experimentally-determined friction law leads to slip-pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Reches, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the dynamic rupture along a vertical, strike-slip fault in an elastic half-space. The fault has frictional properties that were determined in high-velocity, rotary shear apparatus Sierra-White granite. The experimental fault was abruptly loaded by a massive flywheel, which is assumed to simulate the loading of a fault patch during an earthquake, and termed Earthquake-Like-Slip Event (ELSE) (Chang et al., 2012). The experiments revealed systematic alteration between slip-weakening and slip-strengthening (Fig. 1A), and were considered as proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of M = 4-8. We used the friction-distance relations of these experiments to form an empirical slip-dependent friction model, ELSE-model (Fig. 1B). For the dynamic rupture simulation, we used the program of Ampuero (2002) (2D spectral boundary integral elements) designed for anti-plane (mode III) shear fracturing. To compare with published works, the calculations used a crust with mechanical properties and stress state of Version 3 benchmark of SCEC (Harris et al., 2004). The calculations with a fault of ELSE-model friction revealed: (1) Rupture propagation in a slip-pulse style with slip cessation behind the pulse; (2) Systematic decrease of slip distance away from the nucleation zone; and (3) Spontaneous arrest of the dynamic rupture without a barrier. These features suggest a rupture of a self-healing slip-pulse mode (Fig. 1C), in contrast to rupturing of a fault with linear slip-weakening friction (Fig. 1B) (Rojas et al., 2008) in crack-like mode and no spontaneous arrest. We deduce that the slip-pulse in our simulation results from the fast recovery of shear strength as observed in ELSE experiments, and argue that incorporating this experimentally-based friction model to rupture modeling produces realistic propagation style of earthquake rupture. Figure 1 Fault patch behavior during an earthquake. (A) Experimental evolution of frictional stress, slip velocity, and displacement in ELSE (Chang et al., 2012). (B) Friction laws of ELSE-model and linear slip-weakening model. (C) Conceptual evolution of shear stress, slip velocity and displacement during a slip-pulse rupture (adapted from Heaton, 1990).

  20. Dynamic Rupture Simulations of 11 March 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdon, J. E.; Dunham, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    There is strong observational evidence that the 11 March 2011 Tohoku earthquake rupture reached the seafloor. This was unexpected because the shallow portion of the plate interface is believed to be frictionally stable and thus not capable of sustaining coseismic rupture. In order to explore this seeming inconsistency we have developed a two-dimensional dynamic rupture model of the Tohoku earthquake. The model uses a complex fault, seafloor, and material interface structure as derived from seismic surveys. We use a rate-and-state friction model with steady state shear strength depending logarithmically on slip velocity, i.e., there is no dynamic weakening in the model. The frictional parameters are depth dependent with the shallowest portions of the fault beneath the accretionary prism being velocity strengthening. The total normal stress on the fault is taken to be lithostatic and the pore pressure is hydrostatic until a maximum effective normal stress is reached (40 MPa in our preferred model) after which point the pore pressure follows the lithostatic gradient. We also account for poroelastic buffering of effective normal stress changes on the fault. The off-fault response is linear elastic. Using this model we find that large stress changes are dynamically transmitted to the shallowest portions of the fault by waves released by deep slip that are reflected off the seafloor. These stress changes are significant enough to drive the rupture through a velocity strengthening region that is tens of kilometers long. Rupture to the trench is therefore consistent with standard assumptions about depth-dependence of subduction zone properties, and does not require extreme dynamic weakening, shallow high stress drop asperities, or other exceptional processes. We also make direct comparisons with measured seafloor deformation and onshore 1-Hz GPS data from the Tohoku earthquake. Through these comparisons we are able to determine the sensitivity of these data to several dynamic source parameters (prestress, seismogenic depth, and the extent and frictional properties of the shallow plate interface). We find that there is a trade-off between the near-trench frictional properties and effective normal stress, particularly for onshore measurements. That is, the data can be equally well fit by either a velocity strengthening or velocity weakening near-trench fault segment, provided that compensating adjustments are also made to the maximum effective normal stress on the fault. On the other hand, the seismogenic depth is fairly well constrained from the static displacement field, independent of effective normal stress and near-trench properties. Finally, we show that a water layer (modeled as an isotropic linear acoustic material) has a negligible effect on the rupture process. That said, the inclusion of a water layer allows us to make important predictions concerning hydroacoustic signals that were observed by ocean bottom pressure sensors.

  1. Subpatch roughness in earthquake rupture investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Mai, P. M.

    2016-03-01

    Fault geometric complexities exhibit fractal characteristics over a wide range of spatial scales (<µm to > km) and strongly affect the rupture process at corresponding scales. Numerical rupture simulations provide a framework to quantitatively investigate the relationship between a fault's roughness and its seismic characteristics. Fault discretization, however, introduces an artificial lower limit to roughness. Individual fault patches are planar and subpatch roughness—roughness at spatial scales below fault patch size—is not incorporated. Does negligence of subpatch roughness measurably affect the outcome of earthquake rupture simulations? We approach this question with a numerical parameter space investigation and demonstrate that subpatch roughness significantly modifies the slip-strain relationship—a fundamental aspect of dislocation theory. Faults with subpatch roughness induce less strain than their planar-fault equivalents at distances beyond the length of a slipping fault. We further provide regression functions that characterize the stochastic effect subpatch roughness.

  2. Postmyomectomic Uterine Rupture Despite Cesarean Section.

    PubMed

    Kacperczyk, Joanna; Bartnik, Paweł; Romejko-Wolniewicz, Ewa; Dobrowolska-Redo, Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are benign smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. Fibroids can develop anywhere within the muscular wall. Leiomyomas may be associated with infertility. Laparoscopic myomectomy is often used to remove symptomatic intramural or subserosal fibroids. Advantages of the procedure include short recovery time and minimal perioperative morbidity. At the same time, the multilayer suture technique is more complicated during laparoscopy. A rare but serious complication of laparoscopic myomectomies is uterine rupture. A brief review of the literature and a clinical example of a 33-year-old woman with history of infertility, laparoscopic myomectomies and uterine rupture followed by peripartum hemorrhage is presented. The treatment of leiomyomas is a challenge not only because of possible recurrence but also due to long-term consequences following successful myomectomy. Management of patients with uterine scars should include careful planning of the route of delivery, as the risk of rupture may be increased. PMID:26976991

  3. [Characteristics of duodenal ruptures depending on topographical and anatomical properties of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Dubrovin, I A; Chirkov, R N; Dubrovina, I A; Khachaturian, B S; Mosoian, A S; Dallakian, V F

    2013-01-01

    We have studied specific morphological properties of duodenal rupture depending on the topographic and anatomical features of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma suffered in a car crash (with the victim found in the passenger compartment or involved in an automobile-pedestrian accident) and a railway crash (a train-pedestrian accident) or resulting from a blunt-force trauma, a fall from height, a fall on the stomach, and traumatic compression of the body. We took into consideration the anatomical peculiarities of the duodenal rupture, such as its circular, horseshoe, and loop-like shape. The study has demonstrated that the frequency of duodenal injury associated with a blunt abdominal trauma shows a stronger dependence on the topographical and anatomical peculiarities of duodenum than on the circumstances of the case. Specifically, the circular duodenum and especially its descending portion are more readily subjected to the damage than the organs of a different shape. The position of the break with respect to the duodenal axis is an important diagnostic signs allowing to clarify circumstances of the blunt injury. Transverse ruptures are typical of strong impacts associated with the short-term interaction between the damaging object and the affected part of the body whereas longitudinal ruptures more commonly occur as a result the long-term traumatic impact. Bile imbibition of paraduodenal and peripancreatic retroperitoneal adipose tissue may be used as an additional diagnostic sign of duodenal rupture. PMID:24428049

  4. Creep rupture of brittle matrix composites reinforced with time dependent fibers: Scalings and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibnabdeljalil, M'hamed; Phoenix, S. Leigh

    1995-06-01

    This paper addresses statistical aspects of the lifetime in creep rupture of unidirectional composites having brittle matrices reinforced with brittle fibers. Time dependence enters through the fibers, which fail following a probability model due to Coleman, involving power law dependence on stress level, Weibull shape and a memory integral of the load history. The creep rupture model has many features similar to the model for composite strength of earlier work, which involves quasiperiodic cracking of the matrix, frictional sliding of fibers in fiber break zones, and fiber bridging of matrix cracks in a global load-sharing framework. No time dependence is assumed at the fiber-matrix interface, though progressive slippage does occur in time as fibers fail and load is redistributed. Starting from an "equivalent" short term strength model we identify characteristic strength and length scales which depend on strain rate and other model parameters. We are then able to identify a characteristic length for the composite for purpose of developing a scaling analysis relating parameters of strength to creep-rupture lifetime. Through Monte Carlo simulation we are able to establish key parametric relationships and distributional forms not accessible through analysis. The power law scaling that allows us to write the lifetime of a single fiber in terms of the ratio of the load level to the short term strength is preserved remarkably well in the composite, though with a different power law exponent. An interesting and unexpected result is the emergence of an asymptotic log-normal distribution for the lifetime of a composite of characteristic length in contrast to the asymptotic normal distribution for strength. We also study through analysis and simulation the size effect relating composite lifetime distribution and its median to overall composite volume.

  5. In situ ply strengths - An initial assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The in situ ply strengths in several composites were calculated using a computational procedure developed for this purpose. Laminate fracture data for appropriate low modulus and high modulus fiber composites were used in the laminate analysis in conjunction with the method of least squares. The laminate fracture data were obtained from tests on Modmor-I graphite/epoxy, AS-graphite/epoxy, boron/epoxy and E-glass/epoxy. The results obtained show that the calculated in situ ply strengths can be considerably different from those measured in unidirectional composites, especially the transverse strengths and those in angleplied laminates with transply cracks.

  6. Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant rupture.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E; Walker, Eric A

    2015-08-01

    Imaging findings of breast silicone implant rupture are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular rupture, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of rupture of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular rupture with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant rupture and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition. PMID:25577259

  7. Effect of simulated medium-Btu coal-gasifier atmospheres on the biaxial stress-rupture behavior of four candidate coal-gasifier alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.M.

    1981-12-01

    Tests of four candidate alloys for internal use in coal gasifiers (Type 310 stainless steel, Incoloy 800H, Haynes 188, and IN-657) were conducted in four simulated coal gasifier atmospheres up to approximately 500 h, to determine whether their biaxial stress rupture strength and life were adversely affected. Exposure to these atmospheres at temperatures below 1172/sup 0/K did not decrease these rupture properties below those measured in air. Only at 1255/sup 0/K were the rupture properties in the various CGA atmospheres consistently below those measured in air at atmospheric pressure.

  8. Effect of four simulated coal gasifier atmospheres on the biaxial stress rupture behavior of four candidate coal gasifier alloys. [Inconel 657

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.M.

    1980-08-22

    Tests were conducted on four alloys (Type 310 stainless steel, Incoloy 800H, Haynes 188, and IN-657) which are candidates for use in coal gasifiers to determine whether their hundred-hour biaxial stress rupture strength and life were adversely affected by exposure to four simulated coal gasifier atmospheres (CGA). Exposure to these atmospheres at temperatures below 1172/sup 0/K did not decrease these rupture properties below those measured in air. Only at 1255/sup 0/K were the rupture properties in the various CGA atmospheres consistently below those measured in air at atmospheric pressure.

  9. Gastric rupture after bag-mask-ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Stephan; Filipovic, Miodrag; Schoch, Otto; Mauermann, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A 42 year old woman underwent bronchoscopy with procedural propofol sedation. During the procedure, the patient suffered respiratory arrest, and bag-mask ventilation was initiated. During forced mask ventilation, abdominal distention occurred. Even after correct placement of an endotracheal and a nasogastric tube, high inspiratory pressures persisted. The abdominal CT scan revealed a high amount of intraperitoneal free air. An emergent laparotomy confirmed a stomach rupture. Immediately after opening of the peritoneal cavity, peak ventilatory pressures decreased. In this case forceful bag-mask ventilation led to air insufflation into the stomach, increasing gastric pressure, and consecutive stomach rupture. PMID:26744639

  10. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Alajoulin, Omar A; Alsbou, Mohammed S; Ja'afreh, Somayya O; Kalbouneh, Heba M

    2015-12-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  11. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Jaafreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  12. COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Macheret

    2000-06-12

    The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep rupture correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep rupture correlations.

  13. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx. PMID:22883898

  14. Ruptured rudimentary horn at 22 weeks.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Hansa

    2012-07-01

    Rudimentary horn is a developmental anomaly of the uterus. Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it ruptures. A case of undiagnosed rudimentary horn pregnancy at 22 weeks presented to Nizwa regional referral hospital in shock with features of acute abdomen. Chances of rupture in first or second trimester are increased with catastrophic haemorrhage leading to increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Management of such cases is a challenge till today due to diagnostic dilemma. Expertise in ultrasonography and early resort to surgical management is life saving in such cases. PMID:23293421

  15. Crack growth resistance and dynamic rupture arrest under slip dependent friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisin, C.; Ionescu, I.; Campillo, M.

    2002-08-01

    The slip-strengthening behavior observed in fracture and friction experiments is considered as a possible candidate for crack growth resistance and dynamic rupture arrest. The peak shear stress τp and the strengthening slip Ds play a role in the crack growth resistance. Depending on this resistance, the rupture may be stopped by a strengthening barrier. In such a case, we show that the residual shear stress at the end of the dynamic process is not grid-size dependent, suggesting that the static shear stress will not exhibit any singularity at the crack tip. Hence, rupture arrest by a strengthening barrier is compatible with a criterion based on finite shear stress threshold. Considering a finite weak zone bounded by two strengthening barriers, we investigate the modalities of the rupture arrest. Despite the presence of the barriers, the size of the rupture event is not controlled a priori but rather depends on both the strength of the barrier and the seismic energy released in the weak zone. Depending on the parameters of the strengthening, two mechanisms are possible for the rupture arrest. The first one is associated with a negative stress drop inside the resisting zone. This mechanism is independent from the size of the weak zone. The second mechanism is associated with a positive stress drop inside the resisting zone, and is crack-size dependent. In both cases, we show the existence of a crack-arrest zone characterized by small amount of slip and shear stress concentration and associated with a self-healing slip pulse. This model, with weak zones and resisting zones is consistent with recent strong motion inversions and offers a possible mechanism for the fault length increase over geological times through progressive barrier damaging.

  16. Earthquake Stress Drop in Rupture Patches and Rupture Barriers on Gofar Transform Fault, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, P. A.; Boettcher, M. S.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The largest earthquakes on mid-ocean ridge transform faults (RTFs) exhibit the most systematic behaviors known in seismology. On the fast slipping Gofar transform fault on the East Pacific Rise (EPR), Mw ~6.0 earthquakes occur every ~5 years and repeatedly rupture the same asperities (fault patches), suggesting that the intervening fault segments (rupture barriers) stop the propagation of the largest earthquakes. In 2008, an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) deployment captured the end of a seismic cycle on Gofar transform fault [McGuire et al., 2012]. We determine stress drop for earthquakes recorded during this experiment to investigate how the source properties of moderate sized earthquakes (3.0 < Mw < 5.5) differ between the rupture patch and rupture barrier fault segments. The OBS experiment on Gofar transform fault recorded an extensive foreshock sequence localized within a 10 km rupture barrier, the Mw 6.0 mainshock and its aftershocks that occurred in a ~10 km rupture patch, and an earthquake swarm that was located in a second rupture barrier adjacent to the ridge-transform intersection. Using waveforms recorded with a sample rate of 50 Hz on the OBS accelerometers, we calculate stress drop using the Madariaga [1976] circular crack model, with the corner frequency derived from an empirical Green's function (EGF) method, and seismic moment obtained by fitting an omega-squared source model to the low frequency amplitude of individual event spectra. Results for ~300 earthquakes in the foreshock, aftershock, and swarm zones have a range of stress drops from 0.2 to 50 MPa. Values for the best constrained 10% of earthquakes show a weighted average stress drop in the aftershock zone that is more than twice the weighted average stress drop in the foreshock zone (3.5 MPa and 1.1 MPa, respectively). These variations in earthquake stress drop reflect systematic differences in along strike fault zone properties between rupture patches and rupture barriers on Gofar transform fault.

  17. Dynamic fault rupture model of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake, Japan; Role of rupture velocity changes on extreme ground motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido Hernandez, N. E.; Dalguer Gudiel, L. A.; Aoi, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake, a reverse earthquake occurred in the southern Iwate prefecture Japan (2008/6/14), produced the largest peak ground acceleration recorded to date (4g) (Aoi et al. 2008), at the West Ichinoseki (IWTH25), KiK-net strong motion station of NIED. This station which is equipped with surface and borehole accelerometers (GL-260), also recorded very high peak accelerations up to 1g at the borehole level, despite being located in a rock site. From comparison of spectrograms of the observed surface and borehole records at IWTH25, Pulido et. al (2008) identified two high frequency (HF) ground motion events located at 4.5s and 6.3s originating at the source, which likely derived in the extreme observed accelerations of 3.9g and 3.5g at IWTH25. In order to understand the generation mechanism of these HF events we performed a dynamic fault rupture model of the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake by using the Support Operator Rupture Dynamics (SORD) code, (Ely et al., 2009). SORD solves the elastodynamic equation using a generalized finite difference method that can utilize meshes of arbitrary structure and is capable of handling geometries appropriate to thrust earthquakes. Our spontaneous dynamic rupture model of the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake is governed by the simple slip weakening friction law. The dynamic parameters, stress drop, strength excess and critical slip weakening distance are estimated following the procedure described in Pulido and Dalguer (2009) [PD09]. These parameters develop earthquake rupture consistent with the final slip obtained by kinematic source inversion of near source strong ground motion recordings. The dislocation model of this earthquake is characterized by a patch of large slip located ~7 km south of the hypocenter (Suzuki et al. 2009). Our results for the calculation of stress drop follow a similar pattern. Using the rupture times obtained from the dynamic model of the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake we estimated the rupture velocity as well as rupture velocity changes distribution across the fault plane based on the procedure proposed by PD09. Our results show that rupture velocity has strong variations concentrated in small patches within large slip areas (asperities). Using this dynamic model we performed the strong motion simulation at the IWTH25 borehole. We obtained that this model is able to reproduce the two HF events observed in the strong motion data. Our preliminary results suggest that the extreme acceleration pulses were induced by two strong rupture velocity acceleration events at the rupture front. References Aoi, S., T. Kunugi, and H. Fujiwara, 2008, Science, 322, 727-730. Ely, G. P., S. M. Day, and J.-B. Minster (2009), Geophys. J. Int., 177(3), 1140-1150. Pulido, N., S. Aoi, and W. Suzuki (2008), AGU Fall meeting, S33C-02. Pulido, N., and L.A. Dalguer, (2009). Estimation of the high-frequency radiation of the 2000 Tottori (Japan) earthquake based on a dynamic model of fault rupture: Application to the strong ground motion simulation, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am. 99(4), 2305-2322. Suzuki, W., S. Aoi, and H. Sekiguchi, (2009), Bull. Seism. Soc. Am. (Accepted).

  18. Hitherto unknown shear rupture mechanism as a source of instability in intact hard rocks at highly confined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris G.

    2014-05-01

    Today, frictional shear resistance along pre-existing faults is considered to be the lower limit on rock shear strength for confined conditions corresponding to the seismogenic layer. This paper introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. In the new mechanism, the rock failure associated with consecutive creation of small slabs (known as ‘domino-blocks') from the intact rock in the rupture tip is driven by a fan-shaped domino structure representing the rupture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance, self-sustaining stress intensification, and self-unbalancing conditions. Due to this the failure process caused by the mechanism is very dynamic and violent. This makes it impossible to directly observe and study the mechanism and can explain why the mechanism has not been detected before. This paper provides physical motivation for the mechanism, based upon side effects accompanying the failure process. Physical and mathematical models of the mechanism presented in the paper explain unique and paradoxical features of the mechanism. The new shear rupture mechanism allows a novel point of view for understanding the nature of spontaneous failure processes in hard rocks including earthquakes.

  19. Creep and rupture properties of virgin 1-1/4Cr-1/2Mo plate and submerged arc weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, F.V.; Lin, Y.C.; Tordonato, S.

    1995-12-01

    The submerged arc welding process was used to join 19mm thick 1-1/4Cr-1/2Mo steel plate material. Following welding, the weldment was given a renormalizing and tempering heat treatment. Chemical analysis, metallurgical examination, tensile testing and creep rupture testing were performed. For the weld metal, the carbon content was 0.069% and the oxygen content was 0.081%. The measured tensile properties for the base material were within the scatter band for virgin plate material. Creep rupture testing was performed at stresses from 41.4 MPa to 137 MPa and temperatures from 600 C to 680 C. The measured rupture time for the renormalized and tempered SAW weldment was approximately equal to that for minimum strength unexposed base metal. The failure path was the weld metal remote from the fusion interface. The measured rupture strength for the base material was above average compared to that for unexposed base metal. The minimum creep rate and 0.2% offset tertiary time and strain data were determined. Power law, exponential and rational polynomial primary plus steady state creep equations were fit to the data. The minimum creep rate was correlated using a Dorn parameter and the primary creep coefficients were correlated with the minimum creep rate and rupture time. Tertiary creep was described using the exponential strain softening creep equation.

  20. The transverse mechanical behaviour of glass fibre reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Garry Michael

    The importance of transverse cracking in composites technology is highlighted by the use of classical lamination theory to predict the sequential damage process in cross-plied laminates. The literature on transverse fibre carposite behaviour is comprehensively reviewed, with particular emphasis on papers which present quantitative theoretical models. No work reviewed has measured the full range of mechanical properties on a single material necessary to allow a complete assessment of all the models of transverse failure. A resin system, based on epoxy/urethane blends, has been identified which allows production of high quality unidirectional composites with a systematic variation in flexibility. A preliminary experimental programme has identified those test specimens which can provide the necessary stress/strain and toughness properties of the range of flexibilised materials and thereby allow a validation of the theoretical models reviewed. In the preliminary experimental programme, transverse cracks are shown to extend with an increasing fracture toughness due to the formation of a 'tied zone' of fracture face bridging 'stringers' behind the crack tip. The influence of this effect on crack stability is discussed. By modelling the balance between fracture and strain energies, the equilibrium state of individual stringers is predicted. Direct observations of equilibrium stringer angles are seen to correspond with these predictions. A quite general model is developed which predicts, with reasonble accuracy, the observed increase of fracture toughness with crack extension and the geometry dependence of this increase. The literature models of stiffness, strength and failure strain are seen to display a dissappointing lack of agreement with the experimental results over the full range of material flexibilities. The influence of matrix Poisson constraint on these properties is discussed. Fracture toughness results indicate that very large critical defects control transverse strength. It is suggested that such defects develop by sub-critical debond or microcrack coalescence.

  1. Large-Scale Weibull Analysis of H-451 Nuclear- Grade Graphite Specimen Rupture Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Walker, Andrew; Baker, Eric H.; Murthy, Pappu L.; Bratton, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    A Weibull analysis was performed of the strength distribution and size effects for 2000 specimens of H-451 nuclear-grade graphite. The data, generated elsewhere, measured the tensile and four-point-flexure room-temperature rupture strength of specimens excised from a single extruded graphite log. Strength variation was compared with specimen location, size, and orientation relative to the parent body. In our study, data were progressively and extensively pooled into larger data sets to discriminate overall trends from local variations and to investigate the strength distribution. The CARES/Life and WeibPar codes were used to investigate issues regarding the size effect, Weibull parameter consistency, and nonlinear stress-strain response. Overall, the Weibull distribution described the behavior of the pooled data very well. However, the issue regarding the smaller-than-expected size effect remained. This exercise illustrated that a conservative approach using a two-parameter Weibull distribution is best for designing graphite components with low probability of failure for the in-core structures in the proposed Generation IV (Gen IV) high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. This exercise also demonstrated the continuing need to better understand the mechanisms driving stochastic strength response. Extensive appendixes are provided with this report to show all aspects of the rupture data and analytical results.

  2. Validation of the rupture properties of the 2001 Kunlun, China (Ms = 8.1), earthquake from seismological and geological observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wen, Y.-Y.; Ma, K.-F.; Song, T.R.-A.; Mooney, W.D.

    2009-01-01

    We determine the finite-fault slip distribution of the 2001 Kunlun earthquake (Ms = 8.1) by inverting teleseismic waveforms, as constrained by geological and remote sensing field observations. The spatial slip distribution along the 400-km-long fault was divided into five segments in accordance with geological observations. Forward modelling of regional surface waves was performed to estimate the variation of the speed of rupture propagation during faulting. For our modelling, the regional 1-D velocity structure was carefully constructed for each of six regional seismic stations using three events with magnitudes of 5.1-5.4 distributed along the ruptured portion of the Kunlun fault. Our result shows that the average rupture velocity is about 3.6 km s-1, consistent with teleseismic long period wave modelling. The initial rupture was almost purely strike-slip with a rupture velocity of 1.9 km s-1, increasing to 3.5 km s-1 in the second fault segment, and reaching a rupture velocity of about 6 km s-1 in the third segment and the fourth segment, where the maximum surface offset, with a broad fault zone, was observed. The rupture velocity decelerated to a value of 3.3 km s-1 in the fifth and final segment. Coseismic slip on the fault was concentrated between the surface and a depth of about 10 km. We infer that significant variations in rupture velocity and the observed fault segmentation are indicative of variations in strength along the interface of the Kunlun fault, as well as variations in fault geometry. ?? 2009 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2009 RAS.

  3. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data. PMID:23897295

  4. In vitro analysis of localized aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Romo, Aaron; Badel, Pierre; Duprey, Ambroise; Favre, Jean-Pierre; Avril, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    In this study, bulge inflation tests were used to characterize the failure response of 15 layers of human ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAA). Full field displacement data were collected during each of the mechanical tests using a digital image stereo-correlation (DIS-C) system. Using the collected displacement data, the local stress fields at burst were derived and the thickness evolution was estimated during the inflation tests. It was shown that rupture of the ATAA does not systematically occur at the location of maximum stress, but in a weakened zone of the tissue where the measured fields show strain localization and localized thinning of the wall. Our results are the first to show the existence of weakened zones in the aneurysmal tissue when rupture is imminent. An understanding these local rupture mechanics is necessary to improve clinical assessments of aneurysm rupture risk. Further studies must be performed to determine if these weakened zones can be detected in vivo using non-invasive techniques. PMID:24406100

  5. Primary obstructive megaureter with ruptured kidney.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Sun, Hsu-Dong; Yang, Den-Kai; Liao, Chun-Hou

    2009-01-01

    A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department for severe left flank pain and gross hematuria 1 hour after playing basketball without significant collision. Laboratory tests showed normal renal function and massive hematuria. Abdominal computed tomography scan disclosed a primary megaureter with ruptured kidney. We successfully treated him with ureteral stenting followed by endoscopic ureterotomy and ureteroneocystostomy. PMID:19041564

  6. Surface Rupture in Northwest Saudi Arabia

    Wendy McCausland of the USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program and Hani Zahran of the Saudi Geological Survey view the southern end of the surface fault rupture caused by a M5.4 earthquake in the Saudi Arabian desert on May 19, 2009. The ground displacements in the soft sediments of the foreground...

  7. Laparoscopic splenectomy for atraumatic splenic rupture.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Ugo; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Amato, Gerardo; Mazzari, Andrea; Tomaiuolo, Pasquina M C; Cavicchioni, Camillo; Bellantone, Rocco

    2011-01-01

    A traumatic splenic rupture (ASR) is a rare clinical entity. Several underlying benign and malignant conditions have been described as a leading cause. We report on a case of ASR in a 41-year-old man treated with laparoscopic splenectomy. Considering ASR as a life-threatening condition, a prompt diagnosis can be life saving. PMID:21675627

  8. CT and MRI of ruptured intracranial dermoids.

    PubMed

    Wilms, G; Casselman, J; Demaerel, P; Plets, C; De Haene, I; Baert, A L

    1991-01-01

    Two patients with ruptured intracranial dermoids, examined with both CT and MRI are reported. Clinical presentation was transient cerebral ischemia in one patient and acute meningeal signs in the other. CT scan showed typical fat density of the tumor and the subarachnoid space. On MRI both the tumor and the subarachnoid fat, were strongly hyperintense on T1-weighted images. PMID:2046900

  9. [Ruptured intracranial dermoid as an incidental finding].

    PubMed

    Funke, M

    1995-07-01

    This report presents a case of a ruptured intracranial dermoid accidentally found in a 51-year old patient. The tumour appears as a large lesion located in the posterior fossa. The CT and MRI studies identify fatty material into the CSF spaces providing intraventricular fat-fluid levels. These characteristic findings are indicative of the diagnosis. PMID:7548248

  10. Bond-rupture immunosensors--a review.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Evan R; Yuan, Yong J; Xu, W L; Bronlund, J E

    2008-07-15

    It has long been the goal of researchers to develop fast and reliable point-of-care alternatives to existing lab-based tests. A viable point-of-care biosensor is fast, reliable, simple, cost-effective, and detects low concentrations of the target analyte. The target of biosensors is biological such as bacteria or virus and as such, the antibody-antigen bond derived from the real immune response is used. Biosensor applications include lab-based tests for the purposes of diagnostics, drug discovery, and research. Additional applications include environmental, food, and agricultural monitoring. The main merits of the bond-rupture method are quick, simple, and capable of discriminating between specific and non-specific interactions. The separation of specific and non-specific bonds is important for working in real-life complex serums such as blood. The bond-rupture technique can provide both qualitative results, the detection of a target, and quantitative results, the concentration of target. Bond-rupture achieves this by a label-free method requiring no pre-processing of the analyte. A piezoelectric transducer such as the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) shakes the bound particles free from the surface. Other transducers such as Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) are also considered. The rupture of the bonds is detected as electronic noise. This review article links diverse research areas to build a picture of a field still in development. PMID:18343101

  11. [Splenic rupture--a skateboard accident].

    PubMed

    Kruse, P

    1990-03-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with persisting abdominal pain after a skateboard accident. Primary clinical and laboratory findings disclosed no signs of intra abdominal bleeding. Ultrasound scanning indicated rupture of the spleen which was confirmed by acute exploratory laparotomy. PMID:2321288

  12. Primary gastric rupture in 47 horses (1995–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, Laramie S.; Dechant, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case-control study was to identify factors associated with primary gastric rupture and to investigate if there were differences between etiologies of primary gastric rupture. Compared to the general colic population, Quarter horses were under-represented and Friesians and draft breeds were over-represented in 47 cases of primary gastric ruptures. Horses with primary gastric rupture typically presented with severe clinical and clinicopathological derangements. There were 24 idiopathic gastric ruptures, 20 gastric impaction associated ruptures, and 3 perforating gastric ulcers. Thoroughbred horses were over-represented in the idiopathic gastric rupture group compared to other breeds and etiologies. This study suggests the presence of important breed predispositions for development of gastric rupture. Further study is necessary to identify if these predispositions are associated with management factors or breed-specific disorders. PMID:26345205

  13. Source rupture process of the 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake: how did the two subparallel faults rupture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Miho; Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Kubo, Hisahiko

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake (MW 6.6) occurred about a month after the 2011 Great Tohoku earthquake (MW 9.0), and it is thought to have been induced by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. After the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, two subparallel faults (the Itozawa and Yunodake faults) were identified by field surveys. The hypocenter was located nearby the Itozawa fault, and it is probable that the Itozawa fault ruptured before the Yunodake fault rupture. Here, we estimated the source rupture process of the 2011 Hamadori earthquake using a model with two subparallel faults based on strong motion data. The rupture starting point and rupture delay time of the Yunodake fault were determined based on Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC). The results show that the Yunodake fault started to rupture from the northern deep point 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to rupture. The estimated slip distribution in the shallow part is consistent with the surface slip distribution identified by field surveys. Time-dependent Coulomb failure function changes (ΔCFF) were calculated using the stress change from the Itozawa fault rupture in order to evaluate the effect of the rupture on the Yunodake fault. The ΔCFF is positive at the rupture starting point of the Yunodake fault 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to rupture; therefore, it is concluded that during the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, the Yunodake fault rupture was triggered by the Itozawa fault rupture.

  14. Photo-piezometric study of supershear rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. B.; Schubnel, A. J.; Taddeucci, J.; Vinciguerra, S.; Rao, S.

    2009-12-01

    We combine acoustic emission acquisition and high speed photography in order to characterize the radiation from spontaneous dynamic rupture propagation on laboratory faults in a transparent, hard resin slab. A number of previous photographic experiments document fracture propagation at supershear velocity and the radiation of a mach cone wavefront. Supershear rupture propagation has been also inferred in several large natural earthquakes. However, failure to observe any strong shock wave in the natural events has fired a debate on the amplitude and attenuation expected for the mach wavefront. Here we attempt to characterize the mach front experimentally. In our spontaneously nucleating laboratory faults, transducers detect the wavefield both close and at a distance from the fault, allowing to characterize the amplitude and the decay of (1) mach wavefronts radiated from the supershear fractures and (2) diffractions emitted by stop-and-go jerks in fracture propagation. In the relatively low frequency range, piezoelectric transducers behave essentially like accelerometers. In the high frequency range, the passage of the rupture front (both sub- and supershear) strongly dominates the acoustic emission in the immediate vicinity of the fault, as expected from the theoretically predicted strain fields in 1/√r close to the fracture tip. Thus simple piezoelectric transducers can be used both to track the passage of the rupture front and as miniature accelerometers. By correlating the fracture photographic sequences to the piezograms recorded at some distance from the fault, we find that the signature of the mach wavefront is visible but not dominant. Our interpretation is that the supershear rupture front is weakely coherent in events, as in our case, where fracture is spontaneously nucleated.

  15. Transverse shape of the electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Paul; Kurki, Samu

    2010-01-01

    We study the charge density, form factors and spin distributions of the electron induced by its |eγ⟩ light-front Fock state in impact parameter space. Only transversally compact Fock states contribute to the leading behavior of the Dirac and Pauli form factors as the momentum transfer tends to infinity. Power suppressed contributions are not compact, and distributions weighted by the transverse size have endpoint contributions. The Fock state conserves the spin of the parent electron locally, but the separate contributions of the electron, photon, and orbital angular momentum depend on longitudinal momentum and impact parameter. The sign of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron may be understood intuitively from the density distribution, addressing a challenge by Feynman.

  16. Surgical treatment of ruptures of the Achilles tendon: a review of long-term results.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Scherzer, S

    1995-01-01

    The rupture of the Achilles tendon is frequently sports-related. In the time from 1 January, 1978 until 31 December, 1988, we treated 358 men and 54 women with such an injury at the Staatliche Orthopaedische Klinik in Munich. The average age of these patients was 43 years. The site of the rupture was generally located between 3-5 cm proximal of the distal insertion of the tendon. In the follow-up examination of 122 patients with surgical treatment of tendo calcaneus ruptures 85% showed 'good' to 'very good' subjective results. Of the operated patients 97% would choose the same treatment under similar circumstances. The isokinetic studies demonstrated a loss of static and dynamic strength in plantar flexion of the ankle joint of 9.1%, and 16.7% respectively, when compared to the healthy contralateral side. The ultrasound examination revealed a thickening of the tendon and of the dorsal paratenon with changes in the internal structure of the injured Achilles tendon. In spite of these favourable results, the high complication rate of 15.1% shows the need for new and extensive studies regarding the various alternative treatment forms, such as functional, non-operative options, to finally resolve the debate about the optimal treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7551757

  17. Effect of Overheating on Creep-rupture Properties of S-816 Alloy at 1,500 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    The effects of overheats to temperatures of 1650, 1800, 1900, and 2000 F were evaluated in terms of the changes in creep-rupture characteristics at 1500 F of S-816 alloy under stresses within the range of rupture strengths of the alloy for 100 to 1000 hours. Overheat periods were predominantly of 2-minute duration and were applied cyclically at approximately 5- or 12-hour intervals. The possible damage from overheating was believed to include internal metal structure changes induced by exposure to the higher temperatures and loss of life by creep if stress was present during the overheats.

  18. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Creep and Stress-Rupture Behavior of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers at 1200 and 1400 C in argon and air. Examined were as-received fibers as well as fibers annealed from 1400 to 1800 C for 1 hour in argon before testing. The creep and rupture results for these annealed fibers were compared to those of the as-received fibers to determine the effects of annealing temperature, test temperature, and test environment. Argon anneals up to 1500 C degrade room temperature strength of Hi-Nicalon fibers, but improve fiber creep resistance in argon or air by as much as 100% with no significant degradation in rupture strength. Argon anneals above 1500 C continue to improve fiber creep resistance when tested in argon, but significantly degrade creep resistance and rupture strength when tested in air. Decrease in creep resistance in air is greater at 1200 C than at 1400 C. Mechanisms are suggested for the observed behavior.

  19. Ruptured rectal duplication with urogenital abnormality: Unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Shankar, Gowri; Santhanakrishnan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Rectal duplication (RD) accounts for 5% of alimentary tract duplication. A varied presentation and associated anomalies have been described in the literature. Antenatal rupture of the RD is very rare. We present an unusual case of a ruptured RD associated with urogenital abnormalities in newborn male. We are discussing diagnosis, embryology, management and literature review of ruptured RD. PMID:25552833

  20. Creep rupture of the joint of a solid oxide fuel cell glass-ceramic sealant with metallic interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Kuang; Lin, Kun-Liang; Yeh, Jing-Hong; Wu, Si-Han; Lee, Ruey-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Creep properties of sandwich joint specimens made of a newly developed BaO-B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glass-ceramic sealant (GC-9) and a ferritic-stainless-steel interconnect (Crofer 22 H) for planar solid oxide fuel cells (pSOFCs) are investigated at 800 °C under constant shear and tensile loadings. The creep rupture time of Crofer 22 H/GC-9/Crofer 22 H joint specimens is increased with a decrease in applied load for both shear and tensile loading modes. The given metal/sealant/metal joint has a greater degradation of joint strength at 800 °C under prolonged, constant tensile loading as compared to shear loading. The tensile creep strength at a rupture time of 1000 h is about 9% of the average tensile joint strength, while the shear creep strength at 1000 h is about 23% of the average shear joint strength. Failure patterns of both shear and tensile joint specimens are similar regardless of the creep rupture time. In general, creep cracks initiate at the interface between the (Cr,Mn)3O4 spinel layer and the BaCrO4 chromate layer, penetrate through the BaCrO4 layer, and propagate along the interface between the chromate layer and glass-ceramic substrate until final fracture. Final, fast fracture occasionally takes place within the glass-ceramic layer.

  1. Time/Temperature Dependent Tensile Strength of SiC and Al2O3-Based Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand and model the thermomechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced composites, stress-rupture, fast-fracture, and warm-up rupture studies were conducted on various advanced SiC and Al2O3-based fibers in the,temperature range from 20 to 1400 C in air as well as in inert environments. The measured stress-rupture, fast fracture, and warm-up rupture strengths were correlated into a single master time/temperature-dependent strength plot for each fiber type using thermal activation and slow crack growth theories. It is shown that these plots are useful for comparing and selecting fibers for CMC and MMC reinforcement and that, in comparison to stress rupture tests, the fast-fracture and warm-up tests can be used for rapid generation of these plots.

  2. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Dutheil, Y.; Huang, H.; Meot, F.; Ranjbar, V.

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  3. Mechanical properties of high-strength concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtarzadeh, Alireza

    This report summarizes an experimental program conducted to investigate production techniques and mechanical properties of high strength concrete in general and to provide recommendations for using these concretes in manufacturing precast/prestressed bridge girders. Test variables included total amount and composition of cementitious material (portland cement, fly ash, and silica fume), type and brand of cement, type of silica fume (dry densified and slurry), type and brand of high-range water-reducing admixture, type of aggregate, aggregate gradation, maximum aggregate size, and curing. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of these variables on changes in compressive strength and modulus of elasticity over time, splitting tensile strength, modulus of rupture, creep, shrinkage, and absorption potential (as an indirect indicator of permeability). Also investigated were the effects of test parameters such as mold size, mold material, and end condition. Over 6,300 specimens were cast from approximately 140 mixes over a period of 3 years.

  4. High-strength austenitic stainless steel tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    Developmental steels were investigated that were basically 14%Cr- 16%Ni-2%Mo-Fe with V, Ti, and Nb additions. Commercial steels of current interest include Esshete 1250 (1), 17-14CuMo (2), Sumitomo St3Cu{reg sign} (3-4), and Sandvik 12R72HV{reg sign}, which is similar to Din 1.4970 (5). The investigation included fabricability, creep- and stress-rupture strength, and exploratory tests regarding creep-crack growth, fatigue, and weldability. Testing temperatures were in the range of 600 to 800{degree}C, and times extended to 50,000 h. Excellent strength and ductility were observed under all loading conditions. High creep strength was due to the formation of an ultrafine precipitate distribution on dislocations produced by warm or cold work. Microstructural examination indicated that the alloys were resistant to creep cavity formation, and microstructures were stable for long times.

  5. High-strength austenitic stainless steel tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    Developmental steels were investigated that were basically 14%Cr- 16%Ni-2%Mo-Fe with V, Ti, and Nb additions. Commercial steels of current interest include Esshete 1250 [1], 17-14CuMo [2], Sumitomo St3Cu{reg_sign} [3-4], and Sandvik 12R72HV{reg_sign}, which is similar to Din 1.4970 [5]. The investigation included fabricability, creep- and stress-rupture strength, and exploratory tests regarding creep-crack growth, fatigue, and weldability. Testing temperatures were in the range of 600 to 800{degree}C, and times extended to 50,000 h. Excellent strength and ductility were observed under all loading conditions. High creep strength was due to the formation of an ultrafine precipitate distribution on dislocations produced by warm or cold work. Microstructural examination indicated that the alloys were resistant to creep cavity formation, and microstructures were stable for long times.

  6. QCD Evolution of Helicity and Transversity TMDs

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  7. Isolated Total Rupture of Extraocular Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Kang, Ying; Deng, Daming; Shen, Tao; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Total rupture of extraocular muscles is an infrequent clinical finding. Here we conducted this retrospective study to evaluate their causes of injury, clinical features, imaging, surgical management, and final outcomes in cases of isolated extraocular muscle rupture at a tertiary center in China. Thirty-six patients were identified (24 men and 12 women). Mean age was 34 years (range 2–60). The right eye was involved in 21 patients and the left 1 in 15. A sharp object or metal hook was the cause of this lesion in 16 patients, sinus surgery in 14 patients, traffic accident in 3 patients, orbital surgery in 2 patients, and conjunctive tumor surgery in 1 patient. The most commonly involved muscles were medial (18 patients) and inferior rectus muscles (13 patients). The function of the ruptured muscles revealed a scale of −3 to −4 defect of ocular motility and the amount of deviation in primary position varied from 10 to 140 PD (prism diopter). Computerized tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of ruptured muscles. An end-to-end muscle anastomosis was performed and 3 to 5 mm of muscle was resected in 23 patients. When the posterior border of the injured muscle could not be identified (13 patients), a partial tendon transposition was performed, together with recession of the antagonist in most patients, whereas a recession of the antagonist muscle plus a resection of the involved muscle with or without nasal periosteal fixation was performed in the remaining patients. After an average of 16.42 months of follow-up an excellent result was achieved in 23 patients and results of 13 patients were considered as a failure. In most patients, the posterior border of the ruptured muscle can be identified and an early surgery can be performed to restore function. Alternatively, a partial tendon transposition should be performed. When muscular rupture is suspected, an early orbital CT is required to confirm this possibility, which can then verify the necessity for an early surgical intervention. PMID:26426604

  8. Megathrust Properties and Large Earthquake Rupture Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, T.; Ye, L.; Kanamori, H.

    2014-12-01

    Constraining physical controls on seismic rupture of plate boundary megathrust faults is challenging due to observational limitations, but seismic, geodetic, tsunami, electromagnetic, geologic and hydrologic studies are steadily accumulating data that hold potential of advancing our understanding of subduction fault zones. Very shallow (< 15 km deep) megathrust earthquakes are rare, but intermittently occur as large tsunami earthquakes such as the 2010 Mentawai Mw 7.8 event. This rupture occurred up-dip of prior large interplate ruptures in the Sumatra subduction zone in 2007, and rupture extended all the way to the trench, but with patchy large-slip regions that can only be confidently resolved using tsunami observations. The seismic wave radiation from tsunami earthquakes is now established to be distinct from that of ruptures deeper on the megathrust, but the controlling factors are not well-resolved. Smaller events at shallow depths tend to have diverse rupture processes, but some are also anomalously depleted in short-period radiation, suggesting that the shallow environment has variable scale-lengths of frictional heterogeneity. At the other end of the megathrust, large events deeper than about 35 km tend to have modest enhancement of short-period seismic wave radiation, with somewhat lower slope to their short-period source spectra than typical of shallower events. The controlling process are also not well-resolved for this behavior. These depth-variations of megathrust earthquake source spectra are one class of observations that may relate to pressure- and temperature-dependent evolution of the megathrust from the trench to decoupling depths near 45-50 km. Other attributes of seismic sources, such as static stress drop and moment-scaled radiated energy have large variability, but do not show systematic variations with depth on the megathrust, so some attributes of earthquake processes are not strongly influenced by evolving conditions of the plate boundary. We explore these issues based on a recent seismological study of all large interplate earthquakes from 1990-2014 combined with detailed investigations of several recent large and great earthquakes for which we have unprecedented geophysical data sets.

  9. Dynamic Rupture Processes during Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelègue, F. X.; Schubnel, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Bhat Suresh, H.; Madariaga, R. I.

    2014-12-01

    Since the proposal by Brace and Byerlee [1966] that the mechanism of stick-slip is similar to earthquakes, many experimental studies have been conducted in order to improve the understanding of rupture mechanics. Here, we report the results of macroscopic stick-slip events in saw-cut samples deformed under controlled upper crustal stress conditions in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted under triaxial laoding (σ1>σ2=σ3) at confining pressures ranging from 10 to 100 MPa. Usual a dual gain system, a high frequency monitoring array recorded the microseismicity during stick-slip sequences and the particle accelerations during macroscopic instabilities. While strain, stress and axial shortening were measured until 10 Hz sampling rate, we also recorded for the first time the dynamic stress changes during macroscopic rupture using dynamic strain gages located close to the fault plane (10 MHz sampling rate). We show that increasing the normal stress acting on the fault plane (i) increases the intensity of foreshock activity prior to the main rupture, (ii) increases the friction along the fault plane, (iii) increases the seismic slip, and (iv) induces the transition from sub-Rayleigh to supershear ruptures [Passelègue et al., 2013]. In addition, after demonstrating that our stick-slip instabilities exhibit a purely slip weakening behavior, we estimated the rupture processes parameters including the size of the breakdown zone (R), the slip-weakening distance (Dc), the energy rate (F) and the fracture energy (G). We compare our results with linear elastic fracture mechanics and previous experimental studies. Finally, the dynamic stress drop is almost complete at high normal stresses with dynamic friction drop ranging from 0.4 to 0.6. These results are consistent with the onset of melting, which was confirmed by our post mortem microstructural analysis (XRD, SEM, TEM). These results show that weakening mechanisms are activated after only 80 μm of slip, suggesting that, at least at the scale of asperities, the resulting dynamic stress drop could be much larger than current seismological estimates. In addition, we demonstrate that the radiation efficiency decreases with the dynamic friction coefficient, suggesting that rupture processes become more dispersive under high normal stress conditions.

  10. Creep-rupture behavior of seven iron-base alloys after long term aging at 760 deg in low pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.; Stephens, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Seven candidate iron-base alloys for heater tube application in the Stirling automotive engine were aged for 3500 hours at 760 C in argon and hydrogen. Aging degraded the tensile and creep-rupture properties. The presence of hydrogen during aging caused additional degradiation of the rupture strength in fine grain alloys. Based on current design criteria for the Mod 1 Stirling engine, N-155 and 19-9DL are considered the only alloys in this study with strengths adequate for heater tube service at 760 C.

  11. Lifetimes statistics for single Kevlar 49 aramid filaments in creep-rupture at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    Kevlar 49 fibrous composites are routinely fabricated to have strengths above 1.5 GPa(200 ksi), but in many applications one would like to sustain such stresses for long time periods, sometimes at elevated temperatures. Thus the temperature dependence of the creep-rupture process in the fibers is of interest. Experimental data are presented for the lifetime of single Kevlar 49 filaments under constant stress at elevated temperatures. The goal of this research was to fully characterize the statistical strength and lifetime behavior of single filaments in order to separate fiber effects from fiber/matrix interactions in the creep-rupture lifetime of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites as described for example in Phoenix and Wu (1983). First we conducted experiments to determine distributions for the strength of filaments from the two distinct spools as a function of temperature. As expected, the data could generally be fitted by a two-parameter Weibull distribution. Lifetime experiments at 80 and 130/sup 0/C were conducted at several stress levels chosen as suitable fractions of the Weibull scale parameter for short-term strength for that temperature. The lifetime data were well modelled by a two-parameter Weibull distribution with large variability.

  12. Micromechanics-based strength and lifetime prediction of polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandorawalla, Tozer Jamshed

    With the increasing use of composite materials for diverse applications ranging from civil infrastructure to offshore oil exploration, the durability of these materials is an important issue. Practical and accurate models for lifetime will enable engineers to push the boundaries of design and make the most efficient use of composite materials, while at the same time maintaining the utmost standards of safety. The work described in this dissertation is an effort to predict the strength and rupture lifetime of a unidirectional carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite using micromechanical techniques. Sources of material variability are incorporated into these models to predict probabilistic distributions for strength and lifetime. This approach is best suited to calculate material reliability for a desired lifetime under a given set of external conditions. A systematic procedure, with experimental verification at each important step, is followed to develop the predictive models in this dissertation. The work begins with an experimental and theoretical understanding of micromechanical stress redistribution due to fiber fractures in unidirectional composite materials. In-situ measurements of fiber stress redistribution are made in macromodel composites where the fibers are large enough that strain gauges can be mounted directly onto the fibers. The measurements are used to justify and develop a new form of load sharing where the load of the broken fiber is redistributed only onto the nearest adjacent neighbors. The experimentally verified quasi-static load sharing is incorporated into a Monte Carlo simulation for tensile strength modeling. Very good agreement is shown between the predicted and experimental strength distribution of a unidirectional composite. For the stress-rupture models a time and temperature dependent load-sharing analysis is developed to compute stresses due to an arbitrary sequence of fiber fractures. The load sharing is incorporated into a simulation for stress rupture lifetime. The model can be used to help understand and predict the role of temperature in accelerated measurement of stress-rupture lifetimes. It is suggested that damage in the gripped section of purely unidirectional specimens often leads to inaccurate measurements of rupture lifetime. Hence, rupture lifetimes are measured for [90/03]s carbon fiber/polymer matrix specimens where surface 90° plies protect the 0° plies from damage. Encouraging comparisons are made between the experimental and predicted lifetimes of the [90/03]s laminate. Finally, it is shown that the strength-life equal rank assumption is erroneous because of fundamental differences between quasi-static and stress-rupture failure behaviors in unidirectional polymer composites.

  13. A method of repair for quadriceps tendon or patellar ligament (tendon) ruptures without cast immobilization. Preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Goldstein, J; Rosner, M

    1987-05-01

    The quadriceps tendon and patellar tendon (ligament) were repaired with a Dacron vascular graft used as a tension suture material. In cases of quadriceps tendon ruptures, the Dacron graft is passed transversely through the patellar ligament just below the patella and crossed transversely at the level of the musculotendinous junction with two loops applying tension to the tendon, which brings the tendon ends together by creating a solid structure. In cases of patellar ligament ruptures, the Dacron graft is passed through a hole in the tibia posteriorly to the tibial tuberosity instead of through the patellar ligament below the patella. This technique enables early mobilization on the first day after surgery. The technique was first tested on six dogs with severed quadriceps tendons and patellar ligaments that were repaired with this suture method. All of the animals recovered from surgery and walked and ran normally on the repaired legs within 27 days and with only mild limping after 17 days. The technique was then used on six patients, four with complete quadriceps tendon rupture and two with complete tear (avulsion) of the patellar ligament (tendon). In all of the patients, excellent surgical results were obtained and leg immobilization was virtually eliminated. Physical therapy was prescribed the first day after surgery. The rehabilitation period was significantly reduced. PMID:2952384

  14. Proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture, subscapularis tendon rupture, and medial dislocation of the long head of the biceps tendon in an adult after traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Bryan M.; Harris, Joshua D.; Forsythe, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the coracobrachialis is a rare entity, in isolation or in combination with other muscular or tendinous structures. When described, it is often a result of direct trauma to the anatomic area resulting in rupture of the muscle belly. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old female who suffered a proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture from its origin at the coracoid process, with concomitant subscapularis tear and medial dislocation of the long head of biceps tendon after first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Two weeks after injury, magnetic resonance imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed during combined arthroscopic and open technique. Soft-tissue tenodesis of coracobrachialis to the intact short head of the biceps, tenodesis of the long head of biceps to the intertubercular groove, and double-row anatomic repair of the subscapularis were performed. The patient did well postoperatively, and ultimately at 6 months follow-up, she was without pain, and obtained 160° of active forward elevation, 45° of external rotation, internal rotation to T8, 5/5 subscapularis and biceps strength. Scoring scales had improved from the following preoperative to final follow-up: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 53.33-98.33; constant, 10-100; visual analogue scale-pain, 4-0. DASH score was 5. PMID:25937715

  15. Rupture Process During the 2015 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: Zigzag-Along-Dip Rupture Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Aránguiz, Rafael; González, Juan; González, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    We constructed a seismic source model for the 2015 M W 8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquake, which was carried out with the kinematic waveform inversion method adopting a novel inversion formulation that takes into account the uncertainty in the Green's function, together with the hybrid backprojection method enabling us to track the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.3-2.0 Hz) sources at high resolution by using globally observed teleseismic P-waveforms. A maximum slip amounted to 10.4 m in the shallow part of the seismic source region centered 72 km northwest of the epicenter and generated a following tsunami inundated along the coast. In a gross sense, the rupture front propagated almost unilaterally to northward from the hypocenter at <2 km/s, however, in detail the spatiotemporal slip distribution also showed a complex rupture propagation pattern: two up-dip rupture propagation episodes, and a secondary rupture episode may have been triggered by the strong high-frequency radiation event at the down-dip edge of the seismic source region. High-frequency sources tends to be distributed at deeper parts of the slip area, a pattern also documented in other subduction zone megathrust earthquakes that may reflect the heterogeneous distribution of fracture energy or stress drop along the fault. The weak excitation of high-frequency radiation at the termination of rupture may represent the gradual deceleration of rupture velocity at the transition zone of frictional property or stress state between the megathrust rupture zone and the swarm area.

  16. Rupture Process During the 2015 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: Zigzag-Along-Dip Rupture Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Aránguiz, Rafael; González, Juan; González, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    We constructed a seismic source model for the 2015 M W 8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquake, which was carried out with the kinematic waveform inversion method adopting a novel inversion formulation that takes into account the uncertainty in the Green's function, together with the hybrid backprojection method enabling us to track the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.3-2.0 Hz) sources at high resolution by using globally observed teleseismic P-waveforms. A maximum slip amounted to 10.4 m in the shallow part of the seismic source region centered 72 km northwest of the epicenter and generated a following tsunami inundated along the coast. In a gross sense, the rupture front propagated almost unilaterally to northward from the hypocenter at <2 km/s, however, in detail the spatiotemporal slip distribution also showed a complex rupture propagation pattern: two up-dip rupture propagation episodes, and a secondary rupture episode may have been triggered by the strong high-frequency radiation event at the down-dip edge of the seismic source region. High-frequency sources tends to be distributed at deeper parts of the slip area, a pattern also documented in other subduction zone megathrust earthquakes that may reflect the heterogeneous distribution of fracture energy or stress drop along the fault. The weak excitation of high-frequency radiation at the termination of rupture may represent the gradual deceleration of rupture velocity at the transition zone of frictional property or stress state between the megathrust rupture zone and the swarm area.

  17. Physically Based Failure Criteria for Transverse Matrix Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.

    2003-01-01

    A criterion for matrix failure of laminated composite plies in transverse tension and in-plane shear is developed by examining the mechanics of transverse matrix crack growth. Matrix cracks are assumed to initiate from manufacturing defects and can propagate within planes parallel to the fiber direction and normal to the ply mid-plane. Fracture mechanics models of cracks in unidirectional laminates, embedded plies and outer plies are developed to determine the onset and direction of propagation for unstable crack growth. The models for each ply configuration relate ply thickness and ply toughness to the corresponding in-situ ply strength. Calculated results for several materials are shown to correlate well with experimental results.

  18. Suppression of microbunching instability via a transverse gradient undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao; Huang, Dazhang; Deng, Haixiao; Gu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhentang

    2015-07-01

    The microbunching instability in the linear accelerator (linac) of a free-electron laser facility has always been a problem that degrades the electron beam quality. In this paper, a quite simple and inexpensive technique is proposed to smooth the electron beam current profile to suppress the instability. By directly adding a short undulator with a transverse gradient field right after the injector to couple the transverse spread into the longitudinal direction, additional density mixing in the electron beam is introduced to smooth the current profile, which results in the reduction of the gain of the microbunching instability. The magnitude of the density mixing can be easily controlled by varying the strength of the undulator magnetic field. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations demonstrate the capability of the proposed technique in the accelerator of an x-ray free-electron laser.

  19. A review on delayed presentation of diaphragmatic rupture

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Farhan; Chakrabarty, Mallicka M; Singh, Rajeev; Iftikhar, Syed Y

    2009-01-01

    Diaphragmatic rupture is a life-threatening condition. Diaphragmatic injuries are quite uncommon and often result from either blunt or penetrating trauma. Diaphragmatic ruptures are usually associated with abdominal trauma however, it can occur in isolation. Acute traumatic rupture of the diaphragm may go unnoticed and there is often a delay between the injury and the diagnosis. A comprehensive literature search was performed using the terms "delayed presentation of post traumatic diaphragmatic rupture" and "delayed diaphragmatic rupture". The diagnostic and management challenges encountered are discussed, together with strategies for dealing with them. We have focussed on mechanism of injury, duration, presentation and site of injury, visceral herniation, investigations and different approaches for repair. We intend to stress on the importance of delay in presentation of diaphragmatic rupture and to provide a review on the available investigations and treatment methods. The enclosed case report also emphasizes on the delayed presentation, diagnostic challenges and the advantages of laparoscopic repair of delayed diaphragmatic rupture. PMID:19698091

  20. Detection of supershear rupture in 2013 Craig, Alaska, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Seismic ruptures are akin to opening a zipper—a gap in the crust starts in one location and travels along the fault in a particular direction. When a strained fault ruptures in an earthquake, seismic waves also spread out from the epicenter. In some cases, the waves' passage can trigger the initiation of a new rupture ahead of the initial expanding rupture in locked portions of the fault. If the triggered rupture grows successfully, the overall rupture front can then outpace the passage of the shear waves, secondary seismic waves that travel slowly after the earthquake begins and are responsible for the bulk of violent shaking. These earthquakes display what is known as supershear rupture; only seven such earthquakes have previously been recorded.

  1. Spontaneous splenic rupture in Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Min; Bae, Byung Koo

    2014-01-01

    Malaria can present with various clinical symptoms and complications. While a tertian malaria form that is especially prevalent in Korea is characterized by mild clinical progression, occasional splenic complications are known to occur. A 26-year-old Korean male soldier without prior medical history visited The Armed Forces Capital Hospital with left upper quadrant abdominal pain one day ago. Hemostasis under laparoscopic approach was attempted. The operation was converted into laparotomy due to friable splenic tissue and consequently poor hemostasis. Splenectomy was performed. The patient was discharged at postoperative day 17 without complication. While numerous diseases can result in splenic complications, such as splenic rupture, malarial infection is known as the most common cause. The incidence of malarial infection in Korea is increasing annually, and there are occasional reports of splenic rupture due to the infection, which requires attention. PMID:25025027

  2. Liquid salt environment stress-rupture testing

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Weiju; Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-03-22

    Disclosed herein are systems, devices and methods for stress-rupture testing selected materials within a high-temperature liquid salt environment. Exemplary testing systems include a load train for holding a test specimen within a heated inert gas vessel. A thermal break included in the load train can thermally insulate a load cell positioned along the load train within the inert gas vessel. The test specimen can include a cylindrical gage portion having an internal void filled with a molten salt during stress-rupture testing. The gage portion can have an inner surface area to volume ratio of greater than 20 to maximize the corrosive effect of the molten salt on the specimen material during testing. Also disclosed are methods of making a salt ingot for placement within the test specimen.

  3. Spontaneous rupture of renal angiomyolipoma during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Mariana Mouraz Lopes; Proena, Sara Marques Soares; Reis, Maria Ins Nunes Pereira de Almeida; Viana, Rui Miguel Almeida Lopes; Martins, Lusa Maria Bernardo; Colao, Joo Manuel dos Reis; Nunes, Filomena Maria Pinheiro

    2014-08-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumor, composed of adipocytes, smooth muscle cells and blood vessels. The association with pregnancy is rare and related with an increased risk of complications, including rupture with massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage. The follow-up is controversial because of the lack of known cases, but the priorities are: timely diagnosis in urgent cases and a conservative treatment when possible. The mode of delivery is not consensual and should be individualized to each case. We report a case of a pregnant woman with 18 weeks of gestation admitted in the emergency room with an acute right low back pain with no other symptoms. The diagnosis of rupture of renal angiomyolipoma was established by ultrasound and, due to hemodynamically stability, conservative treatment with imaging and clinical monitoring was chosen. At 35 weeks of gestation, it was performed elective cesarean section without complications for both mother and fetus. PMID:25184352

  4. [Spontaneous rupture of an intracerebral dermoid cyst].

    PubMed

    el Quessar, A; Chakir, N; Bouyaakoub, F; el Hassani, M R; Jiddane, M; Boukhrissi, N

    1996-01-01

    Dermoid and epidermoid cysts are rare benign tumors arising from ectopic epiblastic inclusions. Dermoid cyst accounts for 0.4 to 1.5% of all tumors. We report the case of a 43-year-old man, who presented with a 6-month history of disturbances of balance and behavioral disorders. X-ray showed two fat-fluid levels in the ventricles. CT scan showed a left frontal mass with fat density, communicating with the left frontal horn. Histological examination after surgical excision confirmed the diagnosis of dermoid cyst. The diagnosis of ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst is based on the finding of an intraventricular and/or subarachnoid space fat-fluid level. MRI and CT scan facilitates the diagnosis of ruptured intracranial dermoid. PMID:9687621

  5. Computational model of retinal photocoagulation and rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    In patterned scanning laser photocoagulation, shorter duration (< 20 ms) pulses help reduce thermal damage beyond the photoreceptor layer, decrease treatment time and minimize pain. However, safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of rupture threshold power to that of light coagulation) decreases for shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of thermal damage in the retina, and maximize the therapeutic window, we developed a computational model of retinal photocoagulation and rupture. Model parameters were adjusted to match measured thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Computed lesion width agreed with histological measurements in a wide range of pulse durations and power. Application of ring-shaped beam profile was predicted to double the therapeutic window width for exposures in the range of 1 - 10 ms.

  6. Recurrent spontaneous scleral rupture in Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turaga, Kiranmaye; Senthil, Sirisha; Jalali, Subhadra

    2016-01-01

    The ocular manifestations of Marfan's syndrome (MS) range from ectopia lentis, microspherophakia, myopia, glaucoma and retinal detachment. Spontaneous scleral rupture is a rare complication and recurrent scleral perforation is extremely rare. We report a rare case of a 26-year-old male with MS who had sequential recurrent spontaneous scleral rupture which required surgical repair. He suffered from a similar problem 4 years later in both eyes in a different location, with overlying thin cystic blebs and hypotony maculopathy. Surgical repair with preserved scleral donor patch graft and conjunctival autograft in one eye, and conjunctival advancement in the other eye was performed. This helped stabilise the eyes, and resulted in complete visual recovery in both eyes. PMID:27199441

  7. An unusual diagnosis of splenic rupture.

    PubMed

    Roche, Matthew; Maloku, Fatmir; Abdel-Aziz, Tarek Ezzat

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of worsening epigastric pain, non-productive cough and vomiting. On examination she was pale and had abdominal tenderness predominant in the right upper quadrant. Abdominal ultrasound excluded the presence of gall stones, but was unable to rule out free fluid in the abdomen. CT demonstrated extensive high-density ascites; however, no source of bleeding could be demonstrated. Clinically the patient's condition deteriorated, and an exploratory laparotomy was performed. In theatre the splenic capsule was found to have detached from the splenic body and emergency splenectomy was performed. Virology serology later demonstrated acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, although tissue microscopy and CMV staining were negative. No other cause of rupture was found. The interesting aspects of this case include the poor correlation between initial presenting symptoms and subsequent diagnosis, the difficulty encountered in making a firm diagnosis and the atypical cause of rupture. PMID:25293683

  8. [A surgical treatment of ruptured arch aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Sakai, H; Nakayama, Y; Naitoh, K; Hotta, K; Ueno, T; Minato, N; Natsuaki, M; Itoh, T; Kuchiki, H

    1994-04-01

    A 83-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of back pain and shock. Her chest X-ray and CT scan demonstrated a large arch aneurysm and hemothorax, suggesting ruptured aortic arch aneurysm. The ruptured aortic arch aneurysm was replaced with a woven Dacron graft under selective cerebral perfusion (SCP). Her postoperative course was uneventful without any neurological deficits. For the past three years, we have utilized SCP in 12 cases of arch aneurysms. There were three early deaths in this series. The cause of death were bleeding in one patient and cerebral accident in two patients. The latter two patients had severe atheromatous changes in the aortic wall. The SCP technique was a useful method of cerebral protection, especially for elderly patient with aortic arch aneurysm. PMID:8152170

  9. A Transversely Isotropic Thermoelastic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    A continuum theory is presented for representing the thermoelastic behavior of composites that can be idealized as transversely isotropic. This theory is consistent with anisotropic viscoplastic theories being developed presently at NASA Lewis Research Center. A multiaxial statement of the theory is presented, as well as plane stress and plane strain reductions. Experimental determination of the required material parameters and their theoretical constraints are discussed. Simple homogeneously stressed elements are examined to illustrate the effect of fiber orientation on the resulting strain distribution. Finally, the multiaxial stress-strain relations are expressed in matrix form to simplify and accelerate implementation of the theory into structural analysis codes.

  10. Optical Isolators With Transverse Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Yuan X.; Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    New design for isolator includes zigzag, forward-and-backward-pass beam path and use of transverse rather than longitudinal magnetic field. Design choices produce isolator with as large an aperture as desired using low-Verdet-constant glass rather than more expensive crystals. Uses commercially available permanent magnets in Faraday rotator. More compact and less expensive. Designed to transmit rectangular beam. Square cross section of beam extended to rectangular shape by increasing one dimension of glass without having to increase magnetic field. Potentially useful in laser systems involving slab lasers and amplifiers. Has applications to study of very-high-power lasers for fusion research.

  11. Transverse Echo Measurements in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Wolfram

    2006-03-20

    Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular we examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.

  12. TRANSVERSE ECHO MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.

    2005-09-18

    Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular they examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.

  13. Wrapped Wire Detects Rupture Of Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after rupture or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.

  14. Functional orthosis post pectoralis muscle rupture.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    This author described her success at fabricating a chest compression orthosis for a patient who underwent repair of a pectoralis major muscle rupture. The repair occurred nine months prior to orthotic fabrication, but the patient continued to experience weakness and pain which limited motion. The design of the orthotic allowed him increased mobility and functional use. - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26043967

  15. Unsuspected paperboard-endophthalmitis in ruptured eye.

    PubMed

    Wolter, J R; Pavilack, M A

    1990-05-01

    The eye of a 3-year-old boy was directly exposed to the explosion of an M-80 firecracker which he had been holding in his hand. The cornea and lens were ruptured. Although not evident on an initial CT scan, pathologic examination revealed a paperboard foreign body lodged in the vitreous. This paperboard, rather than the burnt powder, was likely the central focus of the subacute endophthalmitis that developed. PMID:2381660

  16. Cyclophilin A in Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Lee, Kwo-Whei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Kuo, Chen-Ling; Huang, Ching-Shan; Tseng, Wan-Min; Liu, Chin-San; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cyclophilin A (CyPA), an oxidative stress-induced factor, was found to play an important role in the aneurysm formation. Our working hypothesis was that the plasma level of CyPA in ruptured intracranial aneurysm could predict the neurological outcome. From 2011 to 2013, a total of 36 patients with ruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm were recruited in our study. Before coil embolization, we draw blood samples at the orifice of a culprit aneurysm and in the remote peripheral vein for measurements of the CyPA levels. We utilized the modified Rankin scale 30 days after aneurysm rupture as the outcome measure. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios of the poor neurological outcome given the presence of high plasma level of CyPA. The aneurysmal and venous CyPA levels were significantly associated with the initial clinical severity (P = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively) and 30-day outcome (P = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). The aneurysmal CyPA levels modestly correlated with age and high Fisher grade (ρ = 0.39 and 0.41; P = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). The aneurysmal CyPA levels strongly correlated with the venous counterpart (ρ = 0.89; P < 0.001). Patients with high levels of aneurysmal CyPA were 15.66 times (95% CI, 1.48–166.24; P = 0.02) more likely to have worse neurological outcome than those with the low levels after adjustment of the age, gender, and the documented confounding factors. High plasma level of CyPA is a significant prognostic biomarker for poor neurological outcome in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysm. PMID:26426668

  17. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  18. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  19. Slip-pulse rupture behavior on a 2 m granite fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-09-01

    We describe observations of dynamic rupture events that spontaneously arise on meter-scale laboratory earthquake experiments. While low-frequency slip of the granite sample occurs in a relatively uniform and crack-like manner, instruments capable of detecting high-frequency motions show that some parts of the fault slip abruptly (velocity > 100 mm s-1, acceleration > 20 km s-2) while the majority of the fault slips more slowly. Abruptly slipping regions propagate along the fault at nearly the shear wave speed. We propose that the dramatic reduction in frictional strength implied by this pulse-like rupture behavior has a common mechanism to the weakening reported in high-velocity friction experiments performed on rotary machines. The slip pulses can also be identified as migrating sources of high-frequency seismic waves. As observations from large earthquakes show similar propagating high-frequency sources, the pulses described here may have relevance to the mechanics of larger earthquakes.

  20. Rupture directivity of moderate earthquakes in northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seekins, Linda C.; Boatwright, John

    2010-01-01

    We invert peak ground velocity and acceleration (PGV and PGA) to estimate rupture direction and rupture velocity for 47 moderate earthquakes (3.5≥M≥5.4) in northern California. We correct sets of PGAs and PGVs recorded at stations less than 55–125 km, depending on source depth, for site amplification and source–receiver distance, then fit the residual peak motions to the unilateral directivity function of Ben-Menahem (1961). We independently invert PGA and PGV. The rupture direction can be determined using as few as seven peak motions if the station distribution is sufficient. The rupture velocity is unstable, however, if there are no takeoff angles within 30° of the rupture direction. Rupture velocities are generally subsonic (0.5β–0.9β); for stability, we limit the rupture velocity at v=0.92β, the Rayleigh wave speed. For 73 of 94 inversions, the rupture direction clearly identifies one of the nodal planes as the fault plane. The 35 strike-slip earthquakes have rupture directions that range from nearly horizontal (6 events) to directly updip (5 events); the other 24 rupture partly along strike and partly updip. Two strike-slip earthquakes rupture updip in one inversion and downdip in the other. All but 1 of the 11 thrust earthquakes rupture predominantly updip. We compare the rupture directions for 10 M≥4.0 earthquakes to the relative location of the mainshock and the first two weeks of aftershocks. Spatial distributions of 8 of 10 aftershock sequences agree well with the rupture directivity calculated for the mainshock.

  1. Incorporating Undrained Pore Fuid Pressurization Into Analyses of Off-Fault Plasticity During Dynamic Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Templeton, E. L.; Rice, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    When considering dynamic fault rupture in fluid-saturated elastic-plastic materials, it is sensible to assume locally undrained behavior everywhere except in small diffusive boundary layers along the rupture surface. To evaluate undrained pore pressure changes, we consider here not just the linear poroelastic effect expressed in terms of the Skempton coefficient B, like in our previous work [Viesca et al., AGU Fall 2006], but also include plastic dilatancy, which, when positive, induces a fluid suction. We work in the context of Mohr-Coulomb-like plasticity, but with a Drucker-Prager type model. Plastic parts of strain increments are controlled by the Terzaghi effective stress, elastic parts by the Biot stress combination. Following earlier work of Rudnicki, the incremental elastic-plastic constitutive relation for undrained deformation has precisely the same form as for drained deformation, so long as we change the drained constitutive parameters into new undrained ones under transformation rules that we present. Spontaneous slip-weakening fault rupture is analyzed using the dynamic finite element procedures with ABAQUS Explicit, and undrained elastic-plastic properties. Results are shown for plastic zones and effects on rupture propagation, and how they are influenced by such parameters as B and ratio β of dilatant to shear plastic strains, for a range of principal orientations and magnitudes (relative to yield) of the pre-stress state. The undrained approximation must fail in diffusive boundary layers along the slip surface [Rudnicki and Rice, JGR 2006; Dunham and Rice, AGU Fall 2006] because the predicted pore pressures will be discontinuous at the fault. We show how to extend the Rudnicki and Rice calculation of the actual pore pressure on the fault in terms of the undrained predictions to the two sides. However, because of difficulties thus far in representing this within the ABAQUS program, all results obtained as of the time of writing neglect effects of such pore pressure changes on the fault slip-weakening strength during rupture.

  2. [Muscular rupture of the extensor pollicis longus].

    PubMed

    Towfigh, H

    1984-12-01

    Closed ruptures of the extensor pollicis longus tendon usually appear as a consequence of fractures of the wrist joint or the carpal bones or ensue from polyarthritic changes or result from a process of degeneration. Mechanical injury of the tendon is quite rare but can be observed after direct trauma or after operative treatment of a distal fracture of the radius. Closed traumatic ruptures of the extensor pollicis longus tendon in the absence of pathological changes are--in spite of the frequency of rotation injuries of the forearm--very rare. The patient in the case described is a 45-year-old locksmith whose forearm and hand had been caught in a lathe. This led to sudden, extreme rotation and pronation of the hand. Clinically distinct signs of a rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon could be seen. During operation a tear of the muscular portion of the long extensor tendon of the thumb was found. The function of extension was restored by transfer of the extensor indicis tendon. PMID:6392038

  3. Gas pipeline rupture detection and control

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, E.B.; Morrow, T.B.; Sparks, C.R.; Gregor, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Automatic and remotely controlled main line valves are used in natural gas transmission pipelines to provide early shutoff of gas flow in the event of a pipeline rupture. Operating experience, however, shows that these valves and their associated rupture detection and valve operator systems are not always reliable in sensing a line break and in achieving valve closure. Under sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute (GRI), a technology assessment program was conducted by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to define the present state of the art of automatic and remotely controlled main line valves, to evaluate their effectiveness in achieving isolation of a ruptured line, and to identify technology improvements that are needed to improve valve reliability. This study was based on a survey of the US natural gas industry`s experience with line break control equipment, and upon computational modeling of typical pipeline systems to simulate the generation and propagation of pressure and flow transients created by a line break. Line break transients were also compared to the transient levels generated by normal pipeline operations (start-up and shutdown of compressors, branch load changes, etc.). Also during this study, a semi-empirical computer mode was developed to calculate pipeline blowdown time as a function of break size, pipeline configuration, and operating conditions, even in cases where valve closure is delayed for some period after the line break occurs. This information can be of value to pipeline engineers and emergency response planners.

  4. Transient gravity perturbations induced by earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, J.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Barsuglia, M.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Montagner, J.-P.; Somala, S. N.; Whiting, B. F.

    2015-06-01

    The static and transient deformations produced by earthquakes cause density perturbations which, in turn, generate immediate, long-range perturbations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, an analytical solution is derived for gravity perturbations produced by a point double-couple source in homogeneous, infinite, non-self-gravitating elastic media. The solution features transient gravity perturbations that occur at any distance from the source between the rupture onset time and the arrival time of seismic P waves, which are of potential interest for real-time earthquake source studies and early warning. An analytical solution for such prompt gravity perturbations is presented in compact form. We show that it approximates adequately the prompt gravity perturbations generated by strike-slip and dip-slip finite fault ruptures in a half-space obtained by numerical simulations based on the spectral element method. Based on the analytical solution, we estimate that the observability of prompt gravity perturbations within 10 s after rupture onset by current instruments is severely challenged by the background microseism noise but may be achieved by high-precision gravity strainmeters currently under development. Our analytical results facilitate parametric studies of the expected prompt gravity signals that could be recorded by gravity strainmeters.

  5. Operative intra-aortic balloon rupture.

    PubMed

    Finegan, B A; Comm, D G

    1988-05-01

    Rupture of an intra-aortic balloon (IAB), inserted to assist in weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass, occurred during attempted intra-aortic administration of protamine in a 71-year-old male who later died. Intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (IABC) is most commonly utilized to assist in weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) or to augment low-flow states following CPB. In-hospital survival following IAB insertion in these circumstances in patients with coronary artery disease is approximately 60 per cent. Patients with valvular disease have a lower in-hospital survival rate (50 per cent). Complications of IABC are usually of vascular or infectious origin. Balloon rupture is a rare though potentially lethal complication. The effects of balloon rupture may be compounded by the use of helium as a driving gas to inflate the balloon. Intra-aortic administration of protamine has not been shown to be superior to peripheral administration and should be avoided if an IAB is in place. PMID:3383321

  6. Intersonic and Supersonic ruptures in a model of dynamic rupture in a layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Elbanna, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    The velocity structure in the lithosphere is quite complex and is rarely homogeneous. Wave reflection, transmission, and diffraction from the boundaries of the different layers and inclusions are expected to lead to a rich dynamic response and significantly affect rupture propagation on embedded faults. Here, we report our work on modeling dynamic rupture in an elastic domain with an embedded soft (stiff) layer as a first step towards modeling rupture propagation in realistic velocity structures. We use the Finite Element method (Pylith) to simulate rupture on a 2D in-plane fault embedded in an elastic full space. The simulated domain is 30 km wide and 100km long. Absorbing boundary conditions are used around the edges of the domain to simulate an infinite extension in all directions. The fault operates under linear slip-weakening friction law. We initiate the rupture by artificially overstressing a localized region near the left edge of the fault. We consider embedded soft/stiff layers with 20% to 60% reduction/increase of wave velocity respectively. The embedded layers are placed at different distances from the fault surface. We observed that the existence of a soft layer significantly shortens the transition length to supershear propagation through the Burridge-Andrews mechanism. The higher the material contrast, the shorter the transition length to supershear propagation becomes. We also observe that supershear rupture could be generated at pretress values that are lower than what is theoretically predicted for a homogeneous medium. We find that the distance from the lower boundary of the soft layer to the fault surface has a stronger influence on the supershear transition length as opposed to the thickness of the soft layer. In the existence of an embedded stiffer layer we found that rupture could propagate faster than the fault zone P-wave speed. In this case, the propagating rupture generate two Mach cones; one is associated with the shear wave, and the other is associated with the local P-wave speed. This is a signature of supersonic crack tips. We also noted a smooth transition into supershear, with the rupture speed increasing continuously through the so-called 'energetically forbidden zone' (between Rayleigh wave speed and shear wave speed) corresponding to the wave speeds of the background medium.

  7. Intermediate Temperature Strength Degradation in SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Cawley, James D.; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Woven silicon carbide fiber-reinforced, silicon carbide matrix composites are leading candidate materials for an advanced jet engine combustor liner application. Although the use temperature in the hot region for this application is expected to exceed 1200 C, a potential life-limiting concern for this composite system exists at intermediate temperatures (800 +/- 200 C), where significant time-dependent strength degradation has been observed under stress-rupture loading. A number of factors control the degree of stress-rupture strength degradation, the major factor being the nature of the interphase separating the fiber and the matrix. BN interphases are superior to carbon interphases due to the slower oxidation kinetics of BN. A model for the intermediate temperature stress-rupture of SiC/BN/SiC composites is presented based on the observed mechanistic process that leads to strength degradation for the simple case of through-thickness matrix cracks. The approach taken has much in common with that used by Curtin and coworkers, for two different composite systems. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with the rupture data for stress-rupture of both precracked and as-produced composites. Also, three approaches that dramatically improve the intermediate temperature stress-rupture properties are described: Si-doped BN, fiber spreading, and 'outside debonding'.

  8. Liver Hydatid Cyst with Transdiaphragmatic Rupture and Lung Hydatid Cyst Ruptured into Bronchi and Pleural Space

    SciTech Connect

    Ar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas, Bilgin Kadri Dingil, Guerbuez; Koeroglu, Mert; Uenguel, Uemit; Zaral Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Aliye Ceylan

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this case study is to present effectiveness of percutaneous drainage as a treatment option of ruptured lung and liver hydatid cysts. A 65-year-old male patient was admitted with complicated liver and lung hydatid cysts. A liver hydatid cyst had ruptured transdiaphragmatically, and a lung hydatid cyst had ruptured both into bronchi and pleural space. The patient could not undergo surgery because of decreased respiratory function. Both cysts were drained percutaneously using oral albendazole. Povidone-iodine was used to treat the liver cyst after closure of the diaphragmatic rupture. The drainage was considered successful, and the patient had no recurrence of signs and symptoms. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic recovery was observed during 2.5 months of catheterization. The patient was asymptomatic after catheter drainage. No recurrence was detected during 86 months of follow-up. For inoperable patients with ruptured liver and lung hydatid cysts, percutaneous drainage with oral albendazole is an alternative treatment option to surgery. The percutaneous approach can be life-saving in such cases.

  9. Design prediction for long term stress rupture service of composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Ernest Y.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive stress rupture studies on glass composites and Kevlar composites were conducted by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory beginning in the late 1960's and extending to about 8 years in some cases. Some of the data from these studies published over the years were incomplete or were tainted by spurious failures, such as grip slippage. Updated data sets were defined for both fiberglass and Kevlar composite stand test specimens. These updated data are analyzed in this report by a convenient form of the bivariate Weibull distribution, to establish a consistent set of design prediction charts that may be used as a conservative basis for predicting the stress rupture life of composite pressure vessels. The updated glass composite data exhibit an invariant Weibull modulus with lifetime. The data are analyzed in terms of homologous service load (referenced to the observed median strength). The equations relating life, homologous load, and probability are given, and corresponding design prediction charts are presented. A similar approach is taken for Kevlar composites, where the updated stand data do show a turndown tendency at long life accompanied by a corresponding change (increase) of the Weibull modulus. The turndown characteristic is not present in stress rupture test data of Kevlar pressure vessels. A modification of the stress rupture equations is presented to incorporate a latent, but limited, strength drop, and design prediction charts are presented that incorporate such behavior. The methods presented utilize Cartesian plots of the probability distributions (which are a more natural display for the design engineer), based on median normalized data that are independent of statistical parameters and are readily defined for any set of test data.

  10. [Rupture of the pes anserinus superficialis and partial rupture of the patellar ligament. Rare concomitant injures in complex knee injuries].

    PubMed

    Pointinger, H; Munk, P; Poeschl, G P

    1999-01-01

    We present a rare case of combined knee joint lesions in a 25 year old patient. Besides the commonly reported injuries of the knee joint due to directly applied valgus force, forceful quadriceps muscle contraction, external rotation at flexed knee causing combined lesions such as rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament, rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament and rupture of the medial collateral ligament, a rare combination of the above mentioned lesions and a rupture of the lateral meniscus, an osteochondral fracture of the lateral femur condylus, a rupture of the medial patellofemoral retinacula as well as a complete rupture of the superficial pes anserinus and a partial rupture of the patellar ligament was encountered. PMID:10095409

  11. Transverse excitations in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, S.; Munejiri, S.; Inui, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Shimojo, F.; Hoshino, K.

    2013-02-01

    The transverse acoustic excitation modes were detected by inelastic x-ray scattering in liquid Ga, Cu and Fe in the Q range around 10 nm-1 using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8, although these liquid metals are mostly described by a simple hard-sphere liquid. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations clearly support this finding for liquid Ga. From the detailed analyses for the S(Q,ω) spectra with good statistic qualities, the lifetime of less than 1 ps and the propagating length of less than 1 nm can be estimated for the transverse acoustic phonon modes, which correspond to the lifetime and size of cages formed instantaneously in these liquid metals. The microscopic Poisson's ratio estimated from the dynamic velocities of sound is 0.42 for liquid Ga and about -0.2 for liquid transition metals, indicating a rubber-like soft and extremely hard elastic properties of the cage clusters, respectively. The origin of these microscopic elastic properties is discussed in detail.

  12. Solving the dynamic rupture problem with different numerical approaches and constitutive laws

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bizzarri, A.; Cocco, M.; Andrews, D.J.; Boschi, Enzo

    2001-01-01

    We study the dynamic initiation, propagation and arrest of a 2-D in-plane shear rupture by solving the elastodynamic equation by using both a boundary integral equation method and a finite difference approach. For both methods we adopt different constitutive laws: a slip-weakening (SW) law, with constant weakening rate, and rate- and state-dependent friction laws (Dieterich-Ruina). Our numerical procedures allow the use of heterogeneous distributions of constitutive parameters along the fault for both formulations. We first compare the two solution methods with an SW law, emphasizing the required stability conditions to achieve a good resolution of the cohesive zone and to avoid artificial complexity in the solutions. Our modelling results show that the two methods provide very similar time histories of dynamic source parameters. We point out that, if a careful control of resolution and stability is performed, the two methods yield identical solutions. We have also compared the rupture evolution resulting from an SW and a rate- and state-dependent friction law. This comparison shows that despite the different constitutive formulations, a similar behaviour is simulated during the rupture propagation and arrest. We also observe a crack tip bifurcation and a jump in rupture velocity (approaching the P-wave speed) with the Dieterich-Ruina (DR) law. The rupture arrest at a barrier (high strength zone) and the barrier-healing mechanism are also reproduced by this law. However, this constitutive formulation allows the simulation of a more general and complex variety of rupture behaviours. By assuming different heterogeneous distributions of the initial constitutive parameters, we are able to model a barrier-healing as well as a self-healing process. This result suggests that if the heterogeneity of the constitutive parameters is taken into account, the different healing mechanisms can be simulated. We also study the nucleation phase duration Tn, defined as the time necessary for the crack to reach the half-length Ic. We compare the Tn values resulting from distinct simulations calculated using different constitutive laws and different sets of constitutive parameters. Our results confirm that the DR law provides a different description of the nucleation process than the SW law adopted in this study. We emphasize that the DR law yields a complete description of the rupture process, which includes the most prominent features of SW.

  13. Development of an extended BIEM and its application to the analysis of earthquake dynamic rupture interacting with a medium interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, T.; Kame, N.

    2013-12-01

    An extended boundary integral equation method (XBIEM) has been recently proposed for the analysis of dynamic crack growth (=dynamic earthquake rupture model) in an inhomogeneous medium consisting of homogeneous sub-regions. Originally XBIEM is applicable to non-planar geometry of cracks and medium interfaces, but it has been demonstrated only for a simple planar crack along a bimaterial interface. Here we developed a code to analyse non-planar rupture with non-planar interfaces in a mode III problem, and applied it to a dynamic rupture problem across a planar bimaterial interface to investigate the effect of medium inhomogeneity. For this purpose, we firstly derived all the displacement and displacement velocity kernels in a unified analytic discretized form, in addition to the stress kernels already derived, necessary for versatile geometry of boundaries (i.e., cracks and interfaces) and checked all the kernel components in the simulation of wave propagation across a non-planar interface cutting a homogeneous medium. Then we validated our code in a wave reflection-transmission problem across a planar bimaterial interface. Secondly, in order to realize the analysis of dynamic rupture crossing a bimaterial interface we introduced a new implicit time-stepping scheme for instantaneously interacting boundary elements on the crack and medium interface. Such interactions only appear in the crack's crossing the interface. Otherwise we can use the explicit scheme as employed for BIEM in a homogeneous medium. We validated our numerical code for the crack growth in a homogeneous medium cut with a planar interface and found that our new scheme worked well. Finally, we tackled dynamic rupture propagation on a planar fault embedded normal to the planar interface of a bimaterial. Spontaneous rupture was allowed not only on the planar main fault but also on the interfacial fault and it is controlled by different slip-weakening laws on each of them: each peak strength is individually chosen and its ratio ζ=τ(interface)/τ(main) is chosen as one of controlling parameters. Another parameter η is chosen as a ratio of the shear wave velocities of the bimaterial, η=β(+)/β(-). Simulations were conducted for hundres of parameter sets of (η, ζ). Our results showed two distinct rupture processes: a) one is to propagate rupture just on the prescribed fault, and b) another is to activate the subsidiary interfacial rupture, which finally results in arresting rupture on the main planar fault. Two processes were found to be clearly divided by a line in the parameter plane (η, ζ). With increasing ζ, rupture tends to stay on the main fault with less significant activation of subsidiary interfacial rupture and it agrees with our physical anticipation. With increasing η from 0.7 to 1.4 (one corresponds to homogeneous), the rupture processes shift from (a) to (b). This dependency may be understandable in terms of two extreme cases: rupture approaching a free surface and rupture approaching a fixed boundary. In the former case, the traction approaches zero in the vicinity of free surface, and thus stress does not concentrate along the interface, and vice versa.

  14. Dynamic strength of molecular adhesion bonds.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1997-01-01

    In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material strength and strength of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond strength, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction kinetics in liquids to bond dissociation under force and tested the predictions by smart Monte Carlo (Brownian dynamics) simulations of bond rupture. By definition, bond strength is the force that produces the most frequent failure in repeated tests of breakage, i.e., the peak in the distribution of rupture forces. As verified by the simulations, theory shows that bond strength progresses through three dynamic regimes of loading rate. First, bond strength emerges at a critical rate of loading (> or = 0) at which spontaneous dissociation is just frequent enough to keep the distribution peak at zero force. In the slow-loading regime immediately above the critical rate, strength grows as a weak power of loading rate and reflects initial coupling of force to the bonding potential. At higher rates, there is crossover to a fast regime in which strength continues to increase as the logarithm of the loading rate over many decades independent of the type of attraction. Finally, at ultrafast loading rates approaching the domain of molecular dynamics simulations, the bonding potential is quickly overwhelmed by the rapidly increasing force, so that only naked frictional drag on the structure remains to retard separation. Hence, to expose the energy landscape that governs bond strength, molecular adhesion forces must be examined over an enormous span of time scales. However, a significant gap exists between the time domain of force measurements in the laboratory and the extremely fast scale of molecular motions. Using results from a simulation of biotin-avidin bonds (Izrailev, S., S. Stepaniants, M. Balsera, Y. Oono, and K. Schulten. 1997. Molecular dynamics study of unbinding of the avidin-biotin complex. Biophys. J., this issue), we describe how Brownian dynamics can help bridge the gap between molecular dynamics and probe tests. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9083660

  15. Application of Strength Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Dugan, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the various strength qualities (maximum strength, high- and low-load speed strength, reactive strength, rate of force development, and skill performance), noting why a training program design based on strength diagnosis can lead to greater efficacy and better performance gains for the athlete. Examples of tests used to assess strength…

  16. Strong transverse coupling in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, G; Carson, J; Edwards, Don; Gelfand, N; Harding, D; Johnson, T; Johnstone, J; Martens, M; Sen, T; Syphers, Mike

    2003-03-01

    The Tevatron was designed with an extensive set of correction and adjustment magnets built into the spool pieces in recognition of the circumstance that a superconducting synchrotron was not as easy to modify as its conventional forebearers. Recently, concern has mounted at the high excitation of the skew quadrupole correctors. The purpose of this note is to account for this situation. When slow extraction was attempted from the Main Ring in the summer of 1970 horizontal-vertical coupling prevented adequate transverse oscillation growth for efficient slow spill. This situation was corrected by an 8 mrad roll of each of twelve equi-spaced quadrupoles [1]. In order to avoid a repetition of this problem in the Tevatron, an extremely strong skew quadrupole circuit was built in at the outset. When the Tevatron was commissioned only 4$ of the capability of this circuit was required. Now, 20 years later, the excitation of this skew quadrupole circuit is approximately 60%. Other skew quadrupole correctors were installed in the neighborhood of the long straight sections, and for a variety of reasons the number of elements in the strong circuit was reduced from 48 to 42. These are relatively minor changes in the present context. Recall that in the normal Tevatron tuning process the skew quad circuits are adjusted to minimize the difference between the horizontal and vertical tunes to the level of {Delta}{nu}{sub min} {approx} 0.003. Normally the horizontal-vertical coupling is not observed directly by orbit measurements during this procedure. it was recognized that the strength of the skew quadrupole settings would imply an uncorrected minimum tune difference of 0.2 units. Clearly, with the skew quad circuit turned off the coupling of the orbital motion should be easily observable. In the following sections, the authors describe the recent Tevatron studies that exhibit the transverse coupling and the analyses that link these observations to the long term development of a skew quadrupole coefficient in the Tevatron dipoles. In brief, their conclusion is that a{sub 1} at the level of one of the traditional units will account for the coupling and is consistent with physical examination of a selection of dipoles in the tunnel.

  17. The Energy Budget of Earthquake Rupture: a View From Spontaneous Rupture Modeling and Finite-Source Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, P.; Guatteri, M.

    2003-12-01

    It is a common and frustrating experience of many dynamic modelers to initiate spontaneous rupture calculations that subsequently abort before rupturing to the desired earthquake size [Nielsen and Olsen, 2000; Oglesby and Day, 2002]. Source parameters in such dynamic source models are strongly correlated, but stress drop is the main factor affecting the distribution of the other dynamic rupture parameters. Additionally, the position of the hypocenter exerts a strong influence on the dynamic properties of the earthquake, and certain hypocenter positions are not plausible as those would not lead to spontaneous rupture propagation. To further investigate this last statement, we analyze the energy budget during earthquake rupture using spontaneous dynamic rupture calculations and finite-source rupture models. In describing the energy budget during earthquake rupture, we follow Favreau and Archuleta [2003]. Each point on the fault contributes to the radiated seismic energy Ers = Eel - Efr - Erx, where Eel denotes the elasto-static energy and Efr the fracture energy. In this study we neglect for simplicity the relaxation work Erx spent during the stopping of the earthquake. A rupture can be characterized by locally negative seismic energy density values, but its integral over the fault plane must be positive. The fundamental condition for rupture growth is therefore that the integral of Ers on the rupture area remains always positive during rupture propagation. Based on a simple energy budget calculation, we focus on identifying those target slip/stress distribution in dynamic rupture modeling that for a given hypocenter location fail to rupture spontaneously. Additionally, we study the energy budget of finite-source rupture models by analyzing the integrated seismic energy for the inferred slip maps using also hypocenter positions other than the network location. These results indicate how rupture was promoted for the true hypocenter while randomized hypocenters may not have been able to sustain a large earthquake. Our approach helped us both to speed up the computation of successful spontaneous rupture models, as well as to construct dynamically consistent rupture models for strong motion prediction.

  18. Transverse Laplacians for Substitution Tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Antoine; Savinien, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Pearson and Bellissard recently built a spectral triple - the data of Riemannian noncommutative geometry - for ultrametric Cantor sets. They derived a family of Laplace-Beltrami like operators on those sets. Motivated by the applications to specific examples, we revisit their work for the transversals of tiling spaces, which are particular self-similar Cantor sets. We use Bratteli diagrams to encode the self-similarity, and Cuntz-Krieger algebras to implement it. We show that the abscissa of convergence of the ζ-function of the spectral triple gives indications on the exponent of complexity of the tiling. We determine completely the spectrum of the Laplace-Beltrami operators, give an explicit method of calculation for their eigenvalues, compute their Weyl asymptotics, and a Seeley equivalent for their heat kernels.

  19. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    DOEpatents

    Kuhl, David E.; Edwards, Roy Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

  20. Transverse-longitudinal integrated resonator

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Simpson, John T.

    2003-03-11

    A transverse-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.

  1. Ultraviolet behavior of transverse gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J. J.

    2008-10-01

    The structure of the divergences for transverse theories of gravity is studied to one-loop order. These theories are invariant only under those diffeomorphisms that enjoy unit Jacobian determinant (TDiff), so that the determinant of the metric transforms as a true scalar instead of a density. Generically, the models include an additional scalar degree of freedom contained in the metric besides the usual spin two component. When the cosmological constant is fine tuned to zero, there are only two theories which are on shell finite, namely the one in which the symmetry is enhanced to the full group of diffeomorphisms, i.e. Einstein's gravity, and another one denoted by WTDiff which enjoys local Weyl invariance. Both of them are free from the additional scalar.

  2. Transverse shear stiffness of laminated anisotropic shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    Equations are derived for the transverse shear stiffness of laminated anisotropic shells. Without making assumptions for thickness distribution for either transverse shear stresses or strains, constitutive equations for the transverse shear deformation theory of anisotropic heterogeneous shells are found. The equations are based on Taylor series expansions about a generic point for stress resultants and couples, identically satisfying plate equilibrium equations. These equations are used to find statically correct expressions for in-surface stresses, transverse shear stresses, and the area density of transverse shear strain energy, in terms of transverse shear stress resultants and redundants. The application of Castigliano's theorem of least work minimizes shear strain energy with respect to the redundants. Examples are presented for several laminated walls. Good agreement is found between the results and those of exact three-dimensional elasticity solutions for the cylindrical bending of a plate.

  3. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Marie C.; Singh, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  4. Missed Iatrogenic Bladder Rupture Following Normal Vaginal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Baheti, Vidyasagar H; Wagaskar, Vinayak G; Patwardhan, Sujata K

    2015-10-01

    Bladder rupture following caesarian section is well documented complications. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture following normal vaginal delivery is very rare. Hereby, we present a case report of intraperitoneal bladder rupture presented late following normal vaginal delivery. We report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal urinary bladder rupture following uneventful outlet forceps delivery in a 22-year-old primi gravid woman with gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia who presented with large urinary ascites, anuria and renal failure. Emergent exploratory laparotomy with repair of the intraperitoneal bladder rupture helped to prevent its potential complications. Postpartum patients who undergo episiotomy or perineal repair may land up in unnoticed urinary retention which may rarely terminate in spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. Awareness of its manifestations amongst emergency physician would help to initiate appropriate timely management. PMID:26557563

  5. Missed Iatrogenic Bladder Rupture Following Normal Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Baheti, Vidyasagar H; Patwardhan, Sujata K

    2015-01-01

    Bladder rupture following caesarian section is well documented complications. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture following normal vaginal delivery is very rare. Hereby, we present a case report of intraperitoneal bladder rupture presented late following normal vaginal delivery. We report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal urinary bladder rupture following uneventful outlet forceps delivery in a 22-year-old primi gravid woman with gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia who presented with large urinary ascites, anuria and renal failure. Emergent exploratory laparotomy with repair of the intraperitoneal bladder rupture helped to prevent its potential complications. Postpartum patients who undergo episiotomy or perineal repair may land up in unnoticed urinary retention which may rarely terminate in spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. Awareness of its manifestations amongst emergency physician would help to initiate appropriate timely management. PMID:26557563

  6. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Marie C; Singh, Vinay K

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  7. Dynamic Rupture along a Material Interface: Background, Implications, and Recent Seismological Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Y.; McGuire, J.

    2003-04-01

    Natural fault systems have interfaces that separate different media. There are fundamental differences between in-plane ruptures on planar faults that separate similar and dissimilar elastic solids. In a linear isotropic homogeneous solid, slip does not change the normal stress on the rupture plane. However, if the fault separates different materials in-plane slip can produce strong variations of normal stress on the fault. The interaction between slip and normal stress along a material interface can reduce dynamically the frictional strength, making material interfaces mechanically favored surfaces for rupture propagation. Analytical and numerical works (Weertman, 1980; Adams, 1995; Andrews and Ben-Zion, 1997; Ben-Zion and Andrews, 1998) have shown that rupture along a material interface occurs as a narrow wrinkle-like pulse propagating spontaneously only in one direction, that of slip in the more compliant medium. Characteristic features of the wrinkle-like pulse include: (1) Strong correlation between variations of normal stress and slip. (2) Asymmetric motion on different sides of the fault. (3) Preferred direction of rupture propagation. (4) Self-sharpening and divergent behavior with propagation distance. These characteristics can be important to a number of fundamental issues, including trapping of rupture in structures with material interfaces, the heat flow paradox, short rise-time of earthquake slip, possible existence of tensile component of rupture, and spatial distribution of seismic shaking. Rubin and Gillard (2000), Rubin (2002) and McGuire et al. (2002) presented some seismological evidence that rupture propagation along the San Andreas and other large faults is predominantly unidirectional. Features (1)-(4) are consistent with observations from lab sliding and fracture experiments (Anooshehpoor and Brune, 1999; Schallamach, 1971; Samudrala and Rosakis, 2000). Cochard and Rice (2000) performed calculations of rupture along a material interface governed by a regularized friction having a gradual response of strength to an abrupt variation of normal stress. Their calculations confirmed features (1)-(3) and showed hints of feature (4). The latter was not fully developed in their results because the calculations did not extend long enough in time. Ben-Zion and Huang (2002) simulated dynamic rupture on an interface governed by the regularized friction between a low velocity layer and a surrounding host rock. The results show that the self-sharpening and divergent behavior exists also with the regularized friction for large enough propagation distance. The simulations of Ben-Zion and Huang suggest that in fault structures having a low velocity layer, rupture initiated by failing of an asperity with size not larger than the layer width can become a self-sustaining wrinkle-like pulse. However, if the initial asperity is much larger than the layer width, the rupture will not propagate as a self-sustaining pulse (unless there is also an overall contrast across the fault). The Bear Valley section of the San Andreas Fault separates high velocity block on the SW from a low-velocity material on the NE. This contrast is expected to generate a preference for rupture to the SE and fault zone head-waves on the NE block. Using seismograms from a high density temporary array (Thurber et al., 1997), we measured differential travel-times of head-waves along with the geometrical distribution of the stations at which they arrive prior to the direct P-wave. The travel-time data and spatial distribution of events and stations associated with headwave first arrivals are compatible with the theoretical results of Ben-Zion (1989). We are now modeling waveforms to obtain high resolution image of the fault-zone structure. To test the prediction of unidirectional rupture propagation, we estimate the space-time variances of the moment-release distribution of magnitude 2.5-3.0 events using a variation of the Empirical Green's Function technique. Initial results for a few small events indicate rupture propagation in both directions. We are developing a catalog that will hopefully be large enough to provide clear results on this issue.

  8. Transverse Reinforcement in Reinforced Concrete Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramblička, Štefan; Veróny, Peter

    2013-11-01

    In the article we are dealing with the influence of transverse reinforcement to the resistance of a cross-section of the reinforced concrete columns and also with the effective detailing of the column reinforcement. We are verifying the correctness of design guides for detailing of transverse reinforcement. We are also taking into account the diameter of stirrups and its influence over transverse deformation of column.

  9. Dynamic rupture processes and seismic radiation in models of earthquake faults separating similar and dissimilar solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheqiang

    This thesis examines dynamic ruptures along frictional interfaces and seismic radiation in models of earthquake faults separating similar and dissimilar solids with the goal of advancing the understanding of earthquake physics. The dynamics of Mode-II rupture along an interface governed by slip-weakening friction between dissimilar solids are investigated. The results show that the wrinkle-like rupture along such interfaces evolves to unilateral propagation in the slip direction of the compliant side for a broad range of conditions, and the closer the initial shear stress is to the static friction the smaller degree of material contrast is needed for this evolution to occur. Transition of the wrinkle-like pulse to crack-like rupture occurs when the reduction of friction coefficient is sufficiently large. Energy partition associated with various rupture modes along an interface governed by rate- and state-dependent friction between identical solids is investigated. The rupture mode changes with varying velocity dependence of friction, strength excess parameter and length of the nucleation zone. High initial shear stress and weak velocity dependence of friction favor crack-like ruptures, while the opposite conditions favor the pulse-like mode. The rupture mode can switch from a subshear single pulse to a supershear train of pulses when the width of the nucleation zone is increased. The elastic strain energy released over the same propagation distance by the different rupture modes has the order: supershear crack, subshear crack, supershear train-of-pulses and subshear single-pulse. General considerations and observations suggest that the subshear pulse and supershear crack are, respectively, the most and least common modes of earthquake ruptures. The effect of plasticity and interface elasticity on dynamic frictional sliding along an interface induced by edge impact loading between two identical elastic-viscoplastic solids is analyzed. The material on each side is isotropically strain-hardening. The interface is characterized as having an elastic response together with an inelastic response characterized by rate- and state-dependent friction. The results show that bulk material plasticity tends to smooth out oscillations. Larger impact velocity induces more extensive plastic dissipation and larger effect on slip mode and energy partition. Also larger values of the interface shear stiffness tend to favor crack-like mode of sliding. The last part of we examine the characteristics of seismic radiation from localized fault-opening and shear motions and the effect of having dissimilar solids across the fault on seismic radiation by employing calculations of synthetic seismograms generated at various receiver locations by shear and tensile dislocation sources. The existence of a velocity contrast across the fault produces complexities that mask somewhat the polarity and amplitude signals of body waves characteristic of the tensile dislocation. The recording and analysis of the discussed signals for regular earthquakes that are dominated by shear motion will require high-resolution receivers located very close to the fault.

  10. Dynamic stress changes during earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, S.M.; Yu, G.; Wald, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    We assess two competing dynamic interpretations that have been proposed for the short slip durations characteristic of kinematic earthquake models derived by inversion of earthquake waveform and geodetic data. The first interpretation would require a fault constitutive relationship in which rapid dynamic restrengthening of the fault surface occurs after passage of the rupture front, a hypothesized mechanical behavior that has been referred to as "self-healing." The second interpretation would require sufficient spatial heterogeneity of stress drop to permit rapid equilibration of elastic stresses with the residual dynamic friction level, a condition we refer to as "geometrical constraint." These interpretations imply contrasting predictions for the time dependence of the fault-plane shear stresses. We compare these predictions with dynamic shear stress changes for the 1992 Landers (M 7.3), 1994 Northridge (M 6.7), and 1995 Kobe (M 6.9) earthquakes. Stress changes are computed from kinematic slip models of these earthquakes, using a finite-difference method. For each event, static stress drop is highly variable spatially, with high stress-drop patches embedded in a background of low, and largely negative, stress drop. The time histories of stress change show predominantly monotonic stress change after passage of the rupture front, settling to a residual level, without significant evidence for dynamic restrengthening. The stress change at the rupture front is usually gradual rather than abrupt, probably reflecting the limited resolution inherent in the underlying kinematic inversions. On the basis of this analysis, as well as recent similar results obtained independently for the Kobe and Morgan Hill earthquakes, we conclude that, at the present time, the self-healing hypothesis is unnecessary to explain earthquake kinematics.

  11. Isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling

    2014-05-01

    Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its rupture. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament rupture is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment. PMID:24679079

  12. Complex earthquake rupture and local tsunamis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and rupture complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that rupture complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of rupture complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a factor of 3 or more. These results indicate that there is substantially more variation in the local tsunami wave field derived from the inherent complexity subduction zone earthquakes than predicted by a simple elastic dislocation model. Probabilistic methods that take into account variability in earthquake rupture processes are likely to yield more accurate assessments of tsunami hazards.

  13. Aortic aneurysm rupture in infantile Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knirsch, W; Hillebrand, D; Horke, A; Lewin, M A; Rein, J; Uhlemann, F

    2001-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with early rupture of an aortic aneurysm due to infantile Marfan's syndrome is presented. In an emergency operation we prepared a composite graft using a 17-mm St. Jude prosthesis with an 18-mm vascular conduit. The postoperative period was complicated by pneumothoraces, transient bilateral phrenic nerve paralysis, cerebral convulsion, and supraventricular tachycardia. Four months postop the composite graft was replaced with an aortic homograft due to severe stenosis. His condition after 12 months is excellent. PMID:11178676

  14. TRANSVERSE POLARIZATION DISTRIBUTION AND FRAGMENTATION FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2000-04-11

    The authors discuss transverse polarization distribution and fragmentation functions, in particular, T-odd functions with transverse momentum dependence, which might be relevant for the description of single transverse spin asymmetries. The role of intrinsic transverse momentum in the expansion in inverse powers of the hard scale is elaborated upon. The sin {phi} single spin asymmetry in the process e {rvec p} {r_arrow} e{prime} {pi}{sup +} X as recently reported by the HERMES Collaboration is investigated, in particular, by using the bag model.

  15. Transverse stimulated Raman scattering in KDP

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, C.E.; Sacks, R.A.; Wonterghem, B.M. Van; Caird, J.A.; Murray, J.R.; Campbell, J.H.; Kyle, K.; Ehrlich, R.E.; Nielsen, N.D.

    1995-09-12

    Optical components of large-aperture, high irradiance and high fluence lasers can experience significant levels of stimulated scattering along their transverse dimensions. The authors have observed transverse stimulated Raman scattering in large aperture KDP crystals, and have measured the stimulated gain coefficient. With sufficiently high gain, transverse stimulated scattering can lead to energy loss from the main beam and, more importantly, optical damage in the components in which this scattering occurs. Thus transverse stimulated,scattering is of concern in large aperture fusion lasers such as Nova and Beamlet, which is a single-aperture, full-scale scientific prototype of the laser driver for the proposed National Ignition Facility.

  16. Fiber Orientation of the Transverse Carpal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Prantil, Ryan K; Xiu, Kaihua; Kim, Kwang E; Gaitan, Diana M; Sacks, Michael S; Woo, Savio L-Y.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament is the volar roof of the carpal tunnel. Gross observation shows that the ligament appears to have fibers that roughly orient in the transverse direction. A closer anatomical examination shows that the ligament also has oblique fibers. Knowledge of the fiber orientation of the transverse carpal ligament is valuable for further understanding the ligament's role in regulating the structural function of the carpal tunnel. The purpose of this study is to quantify collagen fiber orientation within the transverse carpal ligament using the small angle light scattering technique. Eight transverse carpal ligament samples from cadaver hands were used in this study. Individual 20 ?m sections were cut evenly along the thickness of the transverse carpal ligament. Sections of three thickness levels (25%, 50%, and 75% from the volar surface) were collected for each transverse carpal ligament. Fibers were grouped in the following orientation ranges: transverse, longitudinal, oblique in the pisiform-trapezium (PT), and oblique in the scaphoid-hamate (SH) directions. In analyzing the fiber percentages, the orientation types for the different thickness levels of the ligament showed that the transverse fibers were the most prominent (>60.7%) followed by the PT oblique (18.6%), SH oblique (13.0%), and longitudinal (8.6%) fibers. PMID:22488997

  17. Cohesive Zone Length of Gabbro at Supershear Rupture Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, E.; Xu, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Yamashita, F.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the shear strain field ahead of a supershear rupture. The strain data was obtained during large-scale biaxial friction experiments conducted at NIED in March 2013. We conducted friction experiments using a pair of meter-scale gabbro rock specimens whose simulated fault area was 1.5m x 0.1m. We applied 2.6MPa normal stress and loading velocity of 0.1mm/s. At the long side of the fault edge, which is parallel to the slip direction, 32 2-component semi-conductor strain gauges were installed at an interval of 50mm and 10mm off the fault. The data are conditioned by high frequency strain amplifiers (<0.5MHz) and continuously recorded at an interval of 1MHz with 16-bit resolution. Many stick slip events were observed and a unilateral rupture event was chosen in this analysis that propagated with supershear rupture velocity. One of the reasons for this selection was that the strain field ahead of the supershear rupture was not contaminated by elastic waves. Focusing on the rupture front, stress concentration was observed and sharp stress drop occurred immediately inside the rupture. We found that the stress concentration becomes mild as the rupture propagates and length of the stress concentration area becomes longer. This observation is quite interesting because in this experiment the rupture propagated at a constant speed close to root two times the shear wave velocity and thus a longer stress concentration region suggests more energy dissipation. We could speculate that such longer stress concentration area suggests longer plastic region ahead of the rupture (or longer cohesive distance). I.e. the cohesive zone length becomes longer as the rupture propagates to maintain constant rupture velocity propagation. We empirically obtained the relation Lc = 1.8x10^-5 L for 0.1ruptured length.

  18. Ruptured spinal dermoid cyst with disseminated intracranial fat droplets.

    PubMed

    Cha, J G; Paik, S-H; Park, J-S; Park, S-J; Kim, D-H; Lee, H-K

    2006-02-01

    Fat droplets in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a well-known complication of ruptured intracranial dermoid tumours. We report an unusual case of a ruptured spinal dermoid tumour. MR images showed a tethered spinal cord and an intramedullary fat-containing mass. Fat droplets were revealed in the ventricles and the cisternal spaces on brain CT and brain MR. In the English literature, a ruptured spinal dermoid tumour accompanying a tethered spinal cord is extremely rare. PMID:16489200

  19. Spontaneous Tricuspid Valve Chordal Rupture in Idiopathic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana Clara Tude; Afonso, Jos E; Cordovil, Adriana; Monaco, Claudia; Piveta, Rafael; Cordovil, Rodrigo; Fischer, Claudio H; Vieira, Marcelo; Lira-Filho, Edgar; Morhy, Samira S

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of tricuspid valve is unusual, occurring mainly in the setting of blunt trauma or endomyocardial biopsy. Spontaneous tricuspid valve chordal rupture is particularly rare. We report herein a case of a patient with severe pulmonary hypertension, on the lung transplantation waiting list, who presented with spontaneous chordal rupture, exacerbation of tricuspid insufficiency and worsening of clinical status. Diagnosis and treatment, along with possible mechanisms for this complication, are discussed. PMID:26660848

  20. A Rare Case of Adductor Longus Muscle Rupture

    PubMed Central

    van de Kimmenade, R. J. L. L.; van Bergen, C. J. A.; van Deurzen, P. J. E.; Verhagen, R. A. W.

    2015-01-01

    An adductor longus muscle rupture is a rare injury. This case report describes a 32-year-old patient with an adductor longus rupture. The trauma mechanism was a hyperabduction movement during a soccer game. Nonoperative treatment was initiated. After a follow-up of 4 years, the patient was without pain but a small swelling was still visible. This report describes the anatomy, pathophysiology, and evidence-based treatment of adductor longus rupture. PMID:25918663

  1. Rupture of non-communicating rudimentary uterine horn pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Hansa

    2008-01-01

    Unicornuate uterus with rudimentary horn is a rare type of uterine malformation associated with obstetrical complications. Rupture of pregnant rudimentary horn is the usual presentation resulting in severe haemoperitoneum with increased maternal morbidity, and at times, mortality. A case of ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy in a 24-year-old, second gravida, is reported. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy of 14 weeks gestation with haemoperitoneum. Excision of the rudimentary horn was done and an uneventful recovery followed. PMID:18452672

  2. Surgical repair of a rupture of the pectoralis major muscle.

    PubMed

    Pochini, Alberto De Castro; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Muscle rupture is rarely treated surgically. Few reports of good outcomes after muscular suture have been published. Usually, muscular lesions or partial ruptures heal with few side effects or result in total recovery. We report a case of an athlete who was treated surgically to repair a total muscular rupture in the pectoralis major muscle. After 6 months, the athlete returned to competitive practice. After a 2-year follow-up, the athlete still competes in skateboard championships. PMID:25716033

  3. Intermediate Temperature Stress Rupture of Woven SiC Fiber, BN Interphase, SiC Matrix Composites in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tensile stress-rupture experiments were performed on woven Hi-Nicalon reinforced SiC matrix composites with BN interphases in air. Modal acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the damage accumulation in the composites during the tests and microstructural analysis was performed to determine the amount of matrix cracking that occurred for each sample. Fiber fractograph), was also performed for individual fiber failures at the specimen fracture surface to determine the strengths at which fibers failed. The rupture strengths were significantly worse than what would have been expected front the inherent degradation of the fibers themselves when subjected to similar rupture conditions. At higher applied stresses the rate of rupture "?as larger than at lower applied stresses. It was observed that the change in rupture rate corresponded to the onset of through-thickness cracking in the composites themselves. The primary cause of the sen,ere degradation was the ease with which fibers would bond to one another at their closest separation distances, less than 100 nanometers, when exposed to the environment. The near fiber-to-fiber contact in the woven tows enabled premature fiber failure over large areas of matrix cracks due to the stress-concentrations created b), fibers bonded to one another after one or a few fibers fail. i.e. the loss of global load sharing. An@, improvement in fiber-to-fiber separation of this composite system should result in improved stress- rupture properties. A model was den,eloped in order to predict the rupture life-time for these composites based on the probabilistic nature of indin,idual fiber failure at temperature. the matrix cracking state during the rupture test, and the rate of oxidation into a matrix crack. Also incorporated into the model were estimates of the stress-concentration that would occur between the outer rim of fibers in a load-bearing bundle and the unbridged region of a matrix crack after Xia et al. For the lower stresses, this source of stress-concentration was the likely cause for initial fiber failure that would trigger catastrophic failure of the composite.

  4. Transverse flux induction heating of aluminum alloy strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggott, R.; Walker, D. J.; Gibson, R. C.; Johnson, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    Transverse flux induction heating, an efficient electrical technique particularly suited to the continuous heat treatment of metal strip, is explained. Also described is a 1MW transverse flux inductor designed and built at the Electricity Council Research Centre, Capenhurst, and installed in a tension leveller line at Alcan Plate Ltd., Birmingham, UK. It has been successfully used for the continuous heat treatment of wide (1200-1250 mm) aluminum alloy strip, involving full and partial annealing at line speeds up to 2/ms as well as the solution treatment of certain high strength aluminum alloys. The advantages of this form of induction heating are compactness, controllability, hence ease of automation, and high efficiency. As a consequence, compared with existing batch and continuous heat treatment equipment, major economies in plant operation result due to reduced energy consumption as well as reduced capital and labor costs. The compactness of the technique allows the possibility of introducing transverse flux induction heat treatment furnaces into existing process lines.

  5. Asymptomatic rupture of the uterus: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Alper, M. M.; Dudley, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    Rupture of the gravid uterus is a serious obstetric emergency that threatens maternal and fetal life. In certain cases the classic clinical picture may be absent. Most asymptomatic ruptures are in the lower segment and of minor extent or are really dehiscences of scars. This paper presents a case of massive spontaneous rupture involving the entire corpus diagnosed at elective postpartum sterilization. This unusual event stimulated a review of the causes and clinical presentations of uterine rupture. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:6692194

  6. The prognostic value of ventricular rupture in cerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Constantinovici, A; Savu, C; Ciubotaru, V; Simionescu, N; Carp, N

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of 41 cerebral hemorrhage cases associated or not with intraparenchymatous hematoma and ventricular rupture shows the role played by these associated phenomena in the evaluation and prognosis of these patients. The death rate was 56.25% in simple cerebral hemorrhage, 100% in hemorrhage associated with hematoma, 30.76% in hemorrhage associated with ventricular rupture and 80% in hemorrhage associated with hematoma and ventricular rupture. The authors point out that the mere presence of ventricular rupture is not a really aggravating factor. A particular severity resulting from association of hemorrhage with hematoma seems to be due to the extension of the cerebral lesion produced by the two conditions associated. PMID:2781234

  7. The effect of electron beam welding on the creep rupture properties of a Nb-Zr-C alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Titran, R. H.; Grobstein, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    Creep rupture tests of electron beam welded PWC-11 sheet were conducted at 1350 K. Full penetration, single pass welds were oriented transverse to the testing direction in 1 mm thick sheet. With this orientation, stress was imposed equally on the base metal, weld metal, and heat-affected zone. Tests were conducted in both the postweld annealed and aged conditions. Unwelded specimens with similar heat treatments were tested for comparative purposes. It was found that the weld region is stronger than the base metal for both the annealed and aged conditions and that the PWC-11 material is stronger in the annealed condition than in the aged condition.

  8. Transverse yielding, creep and matrix flow past the fibers in metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Z.Z.; McMeeking, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) reinforced by continuous fibers are used for engineering applications at both low and high temperature environments. Many structural components such as turbine rings or elements with joints may be subjected to nonuniform transverse stress states, such as in a circumferential ring subjected to radial turbine blade loads and centrifugal inertial loads. These components are circumiferentially reinforced and transverse stress gradients will develop in them. This will cause the matrix to yield, creep and perhaps to flow past the fibers. The fibers will be constrained by elastic straining and therefore, unless they break, they will be anchored in place relative to a matrix which can flow past. To maintain structural integrity, metal matrix composites must have reasonable transverse strength and transverse stiffness as well as good longitudinal properties. It is therefore essential to understand the overall mechanical behavior and to develop a set of mechanical constitutive equations -that adequately describe the material response of metal matrix composites in the transverse direction. In the present work, cell models are used to analyze the effect of stress gradients on the transverse behavior of the metal matrix composites. Systematic results are given for the influence of the fiber volume fraction, fiber arrangement and stress gradients. The yield surface in terms of mean stress and stress gradient is calculated from this analysis. It is found that the transverse limit strengths are sensitive to the transverse stress gradient across the cell. In addition, a constitutive relationship accounting for matrix plastic training, creep and matrix flow past the fibers is developed.

  9. Teleseismic inversion of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake rupture process using complete Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko

    2014-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in coseismic slip distribution are often obtained by rupture process analyses using teleseismic body waves. Many analyses using teleseismic body waves were based on the ray theory because of the very efficiently computable direct P-, S-, and major reflected waves near the source. The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake was one of the largest earthquakes recorded in history, and the data that are required for the entire rupture process analysis include later phases such as PP waves and a very long period phase called a W phase. However, calculating these later phases using the conventional ray theoretical method is difficult. Here we investigate the rupture process of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake using complete Green's functions, including all later phases such as PP waves and W phase. We use the direct solution method, which computes complete synthetic seismograms up to 2 Hz for transversely isotropic spherically symmetric media, to calculate the Green's functions. The obtained synthetic seismograms generated fit the observed seismograms quite well from a short period to a long period. The estimated slip distribution consists of four large slip areas: the largest slip occurred in the shallow part off the Sumatra west coast with a maximum slip of approximately 29 m, the second and third largest slips occurred in the shallow and deep parts of the Nicobar region with maximum slips of approximately 8 m and 7 m, respectively, and the fourth slip occurred in the middle Andaman region with a maximum slip of approximately 6 m. The estimated average rupture velocity is 2.8 km/s, but the rupture may have slowed between the Sumatra and the shallow Nicobar slip areas, and between the Nicobar and the middle Andaman slip areas. The delayed initiation of the shallow slips in the Nicobar region may possibly have been triggered by the deeper slip in the Nicobar region. There were no distinct depth-varying properties for the shallow and deep slips in the Nicobar region, as were reported for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki and 2010 Chile earthquake.

  10. Rupture force of cell adhesion ligand tethers modulates biological activities of a cell-laden hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Kyung; Park, Jooyeon; Wang, Xuefeng; Roein-Peikar, Mehdi; Ko, Eunkyung; Qin, Ellen; Lee, Jonghwi; Ha, Taekjip; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2016-04-01

    Recent efforts to design a synthetic extracellular matrix for cell culture, engineering, and therapies greatly contributed to addressing biological roles of types and spatial organization of cell adhesion ligands. It is often suggested that ligand-matrix bond strength is another path to regulate cell adhesion and activities; however tools are lacking. To this end, this study demonstrates that a hydrogel coupled with integrin-binding deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) tethers with pre-defined rupture forces can modulate cell adhesion, differentiation, and secretion activities due to the changes in the number and, likely, force of cells adhered to a gel. The rupture force of DNA tethers was tuned by altering the spatial arrangement of matrix-binding biotin groups. The DNA tethers were immobilized on a hydrogel of alginate grafted with biotin using avidin. Mesenchymal stem cells showed enhanced adhesion, neural differentiation, and paracrine secretion when cultured on the gel coupled with DNA tethers with higher rupture forces. Such innovative cell-matrix interface engineering would be broadly useful for a series of materials used for fundamental and applied studies on biological cells. PMID:26912186

  11. Chronic rupture of a patellar tendon: a technique for reconstruction with Achilles allograft.

    PubMed

    Falconiero, R P; Pallis, M P

    1996-10-01

    Chronic ruptures of the patellar tendon fortunately are an uncommon event. These ruptures are often difficult to repair because they are generally accompanied by quadriceps muscle contracture and a great deal of scar tissue formation. We report the case of a repair of a chronic patellar tendon rupture. The patient's right patellar tendon was reconstructed approximately 10 months after the injury using quadricepsplasty and an Achilles tendon allograft with a suprapatellar wire for tension release. Four weeks postoperatively, he had attained 60 degrees of flexion and full active extension. At 8 weeks, the suprapatellar wire was removed allowing the distribution of stresses on the reconstructed patellar tendon. At 6 months, the patient had 130 degrees of flexion and full extension, but showed a persistent 40% deficit in right quad strength. The technique accomplished the preoperative goals of restoring quadriceps function, restoring the anatomic position of the patella, and allowing early mobilization after surgery. Although the use of a suprapatellar wire to reduce tension on the reconstructed tendon required a second operation for removal, it allowed early mobilization and better healing of the repair. PMID:8902139

  12. A Critique of a Phenomenological Fiber Breakage Model for Stress Rupture of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Stress rupture is not a critical failure mode for most composite structures, but there are a few applications where it can be critical. One application where stress rupture can be a critical design issue is in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV's), where the composite material is highly and uniformly loaded for long periods of time and where very high reliability is required. COPV's are normally required to be proof loaded before being put into service to insure strength, but it is feared that the proof load may cause damage that reduces the stress rupture reliability. Recently, a fiber breakage model was proposed specifically to estimate a reduced reliability due to proof loading. The fiber breakage model attempts to model physics believed to occur at the microscopic scale, but validation of the model has not occurred. In this paper, the fiber breakage model is re-derived while highlighting assumptions that were made during the derivation. Some of the assumptions are examined to assess their effect on the final predicted reliability.

  13. Laser welding of ruptured intestinal tissue using plasmonic polypeptide nanocomposite solders.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huang-Chiao; Walker, Candace Rae; Nanda, Alisha; Rege, Kaushal

    2013-04-23

    Approximately 1.5 million people suffer from colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease in the United States. Occurrence of leakage following standard surgical anastomosis in intestinal and colorectal surgery is common and can cause infection leading to life-threatening consequences. In this report, we demonstrate that plasmonic nanocomposites, generated from elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) cross-linked with gold nanorods, can be used to weld ruptured intestinal tissue upon exposure to near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. Mechanical properties of these nanocomposites can be modulated based on the concentration of gold nanorods embedded within the ELP matrix. We employed photostable, NIR-absorbing cellularized and noncellularized GNR-ELP nanocomposites for ex vivo laser welding of ruptured porcine small intestines. Laser welding using the nanocomposites significantly enhanced the tensile strength, leakage pressure, and bursting pressure of ruptured intestinal tissue. This, in turn, provided a liquid-tight seal against leakage of luminal liquid from the intestine and resulting bacterial infection. This study demonstrates the utility of laser tissue welding using plasmonic polypeptide nanocomposites and indicates the translational potential of these materials in intestinal and colorectal repair. PMID:23530530

  14. A generic model for creep rupture lifetime estimation on fibrous ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Tze-Jer

    1992-01-01

    Because of their high strength and toughness at elevated temperatures, fiber reinforced ceramic composites such as SiC(f)/SiC and SiC(f)/Si3N4 have become candidates for next-generation turbine engine materials. A generic model is proposed for assessing the lifetime of this class of materials when subjected to long-term creep rupture conditions. This 2D model consists of interfacial cracks growing between square grains and rectangular fibers in the direction normal to the principal tensile stress axis. Neglecting transient effects, the total lifetime is derived based on the criterion that rupture is due to coalescence of adjacent cracks. Lifetime is inversely proportional to crack growth rate, volume fraction, and aspect ratio of the fibers; but extremely sensitive to the applied stress, due to the high power of the V-K(I) law. This lifetime estimation seems to be in fair agreement with the creep rupture data of SiC(w)/Si3N4 composite with 0 and 30 vol percent reinforcement tested at 1250 C in air. TEM performed on the postcrept specimens revealed that creep damage is predominantly in the form of microcracks at matrix/matrix as well as fiber/matrix interfaces, approximately in accord with the model simulation.

  15. Rupture process for micro-earthquakes inferred from borehole seismic recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Dreger, Douglas S.; Nadeau, Robert M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the spatial extent of rupture and variability in fault slip for micro-earthquakes by inverting seismic moment rate functions derived from empirical Green's function deconvolution. By using waveforms from an array of borehole seismometers, we determine the spatial distributions of fault slip for M 3+ earthquakes that occurred along the Hayward fault in central California and identify a variety of slip behaviors including subevents, directivity, and high stress drop. The 2013 M w 3.2 Orinda earthquake exhibits a complex rupture process involving two subevents with northwest and up-dip directivity. The two subevents release 43 and 18 % of the total seismic moment (6.7 × 1013 N m), and their inferred peak stress drops are 18 and 8 MPa. The 2011 M w 4.0 Berkeley and 2012 M w 4.0 El Cerrito earthquakes are marked by high stress drop. The inferred peak and mean stress drops are about 100-130 and 40 MPa, respectively, which suggests that there are locally high levels of fault strength on the Hayward fault. Our finite-source modeling suggests that the radiation efficiency determined for these two earthquakes is very low (<0.1) and implies that most energy is dissipated during the earthquake rupture process.

  16. Analysis of tear film rupture: effect of non-Newtonian rheology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong Liang; Matar, Omar K; Craster, Richard V

    2003-06-01

    We investigate the rupture mechanism of a precorneal thin mucus coating sandwiched between the aqueous tear film and the corneal epithelial surface with a monolayer of surfactant overlying the aqueous layer. The Ostwald constitutive relation is employed to model mucus and a linear equation of state describing the relationship between surface tension and surfactant concentration is adopted. Three nonlinear coupled evolution equations governing the transport of surfactant, mucus, and total liquid layer thicknesses, based on lubrication theory and a perturbation expansion technique, have been derived. The resulting equations are solved numerically in order to explore the influence of the rheological properties of mucus, aqueous-mucus thickness ratio, aqueous-mucus interfacial tension, Marangoni number, and surfactant concentration on both the onset of instability and tear film evolution in the presence of van der Waals interactions, which could rupture the tear film. Our results reveal that the influence of rheological properties, aqueous-mucus thickness ratio, and interfacial tension on the time required for film rupture can be significant and varies considerably, depending on the magnitude of the Hamaker constants governing the strength of the van der Waals forces. PMID:16256590

  17. Shear rupture of a directionally solidified eutectic gamma/gamma prime - alpha (Mo) alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1978-01-01

    Directionally solidified Mo alloys are evaluated to determine the shear rupture strength and to possibly improve it by microstructural and heat treatment variations. Bars of the alloy containing nominally 5.7% Al and 33.5% Mo by weight with balance Ni were directionally solidified at rates between 10 and 100 mm per hour in furnaces with thermal gradients at the liquid-solid interface of 250 or 100 C per cm. A limited number of longitudinal shear rupture tests were conducted at 760 C and 207 MPa in the as - solidified and in several heat treated conditions. It is shown that shear rupture failures are partly transgranular and that resistance to failure is prompted by good fiber alignment and a matrix structure consisting mainly of gamma prime. Well aligned as - solidified specimens sustained the shear stress for an average of 81 hours. A simulated coating heat treatment appeared to increase the transformation of gamma to gamma prime and raised the average shear life of aligned specimens to 111 hours. However, heat treatments at 1245 C and especially at 1190 C appeared to be detrimental by causing partial solutioning of the gamma prime, and reducing lives to 47 and 10 hours, respectively.

  18. [Aneurysmal rupture complicating aortitis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yannoutsos, A; Mercier, O; Messas, E; Safar, M E; Blacher, J

    2014-05-01

    Tropical aortitis is a rare and poorly described aortic disease, sometimes confounded with Takayasu's disease, mainly in people from Africa. In this case report, the panaortic aneurysmal disease in a young woman from Haiti, first diagnosed after a work-up on renovascular hypertension, would appear to approach this particular arterial disease with no clinical, radiological or biological argument for an infectious etiology. The initially suspected diagnosis of Takayasu's disease had to be rethought because of the presence of several saccular aneurysms extending from the aortic arch to the infrarenal aorta, rarely described in Takayasu's aortitis. Expert opinions from vascular surgeons and clinicians tagged this aortic disease as similar to tropical aortitis which remained asymptomatic for more than a decade. Hypertension was managed with successful balloon angioplasty of the left renal artery stenosis and anti-hypertensive combination therapy. Surgical management of the extended aortic aneurysms was not proposed because of the stability and asymptomatic nature of the aneurysmal disease and the high risk of surgical morbidity and mortality. More than ten years after diagnosis, the course was marked with inaugural and sudden-onset chest pain concomitant with contained rupture of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. This case report underlines the persistent risk of aneurysmal rupture and the importance of an anatomopathological study for the diagnosis of complex aortic disease. PMID:24637031

  19. The repetition of large-earthquake ruptures.

    PubMed Central

    Sieh, K

    1996-01-01

    This survey of well-documented repeated fault rupture confirms that some faults have exhibited a "characteristic" behavior during repeated large earthquakes--that is, the magnitude, distribution, and style of slip on the fault has repeated during two or more consecutive events. In two cases faults exhibit slip functions that vary little from earthquake to earthquake. In one other well-documented case, however, fault lengths contrast markedly for two consecutive ruptures, but the amount of offset at individual sites was similar. Adjacent individual patches, 10 km or more in length, failed singly during one event and in tandem during the other. More complex cases of repetition may also represent the failure of several distinct patches. The faults of the 1992 Landers earthquake provide an instructive example of such complexity. Together, these examples suggest that large earthquakes commonly result from the failure of one or more patches, each characterized by a slip function that is roughly invariant through consecutive earthquake cycles. The persistence of these slip-patches through two or more large earthquakes indicates that some quasi-invariant physical property controls the pattern and magnitude of slip. These data seem incompatible with theoretical models that produce slip distributions that are highly variable in consecutive large events. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 7 Fig. 9 PMID:11607662

  20. Ruptured aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Jeyamalar, R; Kannan, P

    1991-12-01

    Aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva are uncommon disorders and are usually congenital in origin. When these aneurysms rupture into an intracardiac chamber, they may be silent initially but later give rise to progressive heart failure due to left or right shunting and aortic regurgitation. The mortality and morbidity in untreated cases is high. We report 13 patients with ruptured aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva who underwent surgical repair. There were seven males and six females with a mean age of 24.5 years. Three patients were asymptomatic and five were in congestive cardiac failure. The majority of patients (61.5%) had insidious onset of symptoms, only 2 cases presenting acutely. The connection was between the right aortic sinus and the right ventricle in 11 cases and the non coronary sinus and the right ventricle in 2 cases. Associated cardiac anomalies included a ventricular septal defect (8 patients) and aortic regurgitation (6 patients). There was 1 post operative death and 1 patient required re-operation three months later for a recurrence of the fistula. All 6 patients with aortic regurgitation required aortic valve replacement. All patients remained well and asymptomatic during follow up ranging from 2 to 19 years. PMID:1840448

  1. Shear rupture of a directionally solidified eutectic gamma/gamma-prime - alpha /Mo/ alloy. [for aircraft engine turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1978-01-01

    Directionally solidified gamma/gamma-prime - alpha (Mo) eutectic alloys are being evaluated for application as advanced aircraft engine turbine blades. Their excellent high-temperature strength is partly due to their directionally aligned microstructure. However, alloys with such directional structures may display low shear strength at 760 C, the operating temperature of advanced blade roots. The objective of this investigation was to determine the shear rupture strength of the gamma/gamma-prime - alpha eutectic alloy and possibly to improve it by microstructural and heat-treatment variations. Bars of gamma/gamma-prime - alpha alloy containing nominally 5.7% Al and 33.5% Mo by weight with balance Ni were directionally solidified at rates between 10 and 100 mm per hour. Materials were solidified in furnaces with thermal gradients at the liquid-solid interface of 250 or 100 C per cm. A limited number of longitudinal shear rupture tests were conducted at 760 C and 207 MPa in the as-solidified and in several heat-treated conditions. It was found that the shear rupture failures are partly transgranular and that resistance to failure is promoted by good fiber alignment and a matrix structure consisting mainly of gamma-prime. Well-aligned as-solidified specimens sustained the shear stress for an average of 81 hours, while cellular material failed in one hour or less.

  2. Time/temperature dependent tensile strength of SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    In order to understand and model the thermomechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced composites, stress-rupture, fast-fracture, and warm-up rupture studies were conducted on various advanced SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based fibers in the temperature range from 20 to 1400 C in air as well as in inert environments. The measured stress-rupture, fast fracture, and warm-up rupture strengths were correlated into a single master time/temperature-dependent strength plot for each fiber type using thermal activation and slow crack growth theories. It is shown that these plots are useful for comparing and selecting fibers for CMC and MMC reinforcement and that, in comparison to stress rupture tests, the fast-fracture and warm-up tests can be used for rapid generation of these plots.

  3. Evolution of the helicity and transversity Transverse-Momentum-Dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexey; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  4. Evolution of the helicity and transversity Transverse-Momentum-Dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  5. Clinical outcomes after repair of quadriceps tendon rupture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, Vincenzo; Gudipati, Suribabu; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Soucacos, P N; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2012-11-01

    The existing evidence regarding the management of quadriceps tendon rupture remains obscure. The aim of the current review is to investigate the characteristics, the different techniques employed and to analyse the clinical outcomes following surgical repair of quadriceps tendon rupture. An Internet based search of the English literature of the last 25 years was carried out. Case reports and non-clinical studies were excluded. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Coleman Methodology Score. All data regarding mechanism and site of rupture, type of treatment, time elapsed between diagnosis and repair, patients' satisfaction, clinical outcome, return to pre-injury activities, complications and recurrence rates were extracted and analysed. Out of 474 studies identified, 12 met the inclusion criteria. The average of Coleman Methodology Score was 50.46/100. In total 319 patients were analysed with a mean age of 57 years (16-85). The mean time of follow-up was 47.5 months (3 months to 24 years). The most common mechanism of injury was simple fall (61.5%). Spontaneous ruptures were reported in 3.2% of cases. The most common sites of tear were noted between 1cm and 2 cm of the superior pole of the patella and, in the older people, at the osseotendinous junction. The most frequently used repair technique was patella drill holes (50% of patients). Simple sutures were used in mid-substance ruptures. Several reinforcement techniques were employed in case of poor quality or retraction of the torn ends of tendon. The affected limb was immobilised in a cast for a period of 3-10 weeks. Quadriceps muscular atrophy and muscle strength deficit were present in most of the cases. Worst results were noted in delayed repairs. Reported complications included heterotopic ossifications in 6.9% of patients, deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in 2.5%, superficial infection in 1.2% and deep infection in 1.1%. It appears that the type of surgical repair does not influence the clinical results. The majority of the studies reported good or excellent ROM and return to the pre-injury activities. The overall rate of re-rupture was 2%. PMID:22959496

  6. Investigating Earthquake Rupture Processes in a Deep South African Gold Mine (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, J. B.; Boettcher, M. S.; Heesakkers, V.; Johnston, M. J.; Reches, Z.

    2010-12-01

    A primary objective of the NELSAM (Natural Earthquake Laboratory in South African Mines) Project was to record the rupture processes in the near field of a mining-induced earthquake of M>3. When this project was initiated, it seemed likely that an earthquake this large would rupture the ancient Pretorius fault where it intersected the gold-bearing reef at a depth of 3600 m, near the bottom of TauTona Mine. To prepare, a small-scale network of borehole seismic and strain instrumentation was installed. Also, much effort was expended in geologic investigations in the immediate environs of the portion of the Pretorius fault where earthquake rupture was expected. Contrary to expectations, the M>3, earthquake never occurred, at least as of this writing. Nonetheless, this project has provided many insights regarding earthquake ruptures because of an opportunity that came up during the initial field investigations of the Pretorius fault. That is, a M2.2 earthquake ruptured the Pretorius fault in December 2004, before the NELSAM borehole instrumentation was installed. This earthquake was, however, well recorded by the mine-wide seismic network and so these seismograms, together with the extensive mapping of the rupture within the Pretorius fault zone, have enhanced considerably our understanding of earthquake source processes and the conditions causing an earthquake. The initial field studies revealed that the Pretorius fault is about 10 km long and dips nearly vertically, on average, with oblique slip up to 200 m. This slip occurred more than 2 billion years ago during the Archean. In the meantime, the Pretorius fault has been inactive until affected by mining operations. This extensive period of inactivity has allowed the fault zone material to recover much of its initial strength; thus, rupture across this fault is probably more like fresh rock fracture than frictional slip. After the M2.2 earthquake in December 2004, a comprehensive study of its effects on the Pretorius fault revealed oblique-normal slip across four non-parallel segments of the fault zone, with a maximum observed slip of 25 mm. The ambient state of stress measured in the environs of this study area is extensional with a vertically oriented, maximum principal stress due to the overburden that is about twice the minimum horizontal principal stress. These ambient stresses were altered substantially by the nearby mining so as to induce this M2.2 earthquake. Analysis of the ground motion data from the mine-wide seismic network indicated a seismic moment tensor with a shear component of 2.3e12 N-m as well as an implosive component, associated with coseismic collapse of the nearby mine stopes. Laboratory rock mechanics results were used to interpret the seismic moment and the maximum slip to infer a failure stress in the seismogenic zone of about 120 MPa. This high failure stress is consistent with the strength of the Pretorius fault zone material measured in the laboratory as well as with the radiated energy, 5.4e8 J, which is quite high for an earthquake of M2.2. In short, the rupture zone of this well-recorded earthquake was studied in detail to reveal many important insights concerning the source mechanics of earthquakes.

  7. Transverse mode coupling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Raka, E.

    1990-02-21

    In the Proceedings of the Workshop on the RHIC Performance, it was stated that the transverse mode coupling instability, posed a potential intensity limitation for protons. This was based on the expression I{sub b} = 4(E{sub t}/qe) Q{sub s} 4 {radical}{pi} {sigma} {ell}/(Im (Z{sub {perpendicular}}) < {beta}{sub {perpendicular}} > R 3) where E{sub t} is the total energy, q the charge state, Q{sub s} the synchrotron tune, < {beta}{sub {perpendicular}} > the average beta function, R the machine radius, and {sigma}{sub {ell}} the rms bunch length of a Gaussian distribution in longitudinal phase space. For a < {beta}{sub {perpendicular}} > of 55 m and 10{sup 11} protons/bunch, the allowed impedance Z{sub {perpendicular}} for protons at injection, where Q{sub s} = 0.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}, would be less than 1.2 M{Omega}/m. The purpose of this report is to discuss the consequences of two factors that were omitted in this equation, which comes from the ZAP program, to RHIC. These are the space charge impedance and the incoherent tune spread of the beam.

  8. Visualization of transverse annular jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Philipp; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Vaughan, David A.; Shephard, Joseph E.; Damazo, Jason

    2009-11-01

    Transverse injection of fluid into an annular jet is a mechanism resulting in good mixing and is therefore utilized in engineering applications such as pintle rocket engines. Vigorous mixing occurs between the two jets. However, much of what we know about the flow behavior of such devices has been learned empirically with very limited studies exploring the fluid dynamics. The geometry under investigation is an axisymmetric radial jet of variable width impinging a fixed annular jet. The main capability of the current facility is to reproduce start-up and quasi-steady flow conditions through the use of a fast acting valve which opens a pressurized reservoir. The flow is then observed using a schlieren system which shows the shock wave from the start-up and the subsequent mixing between the jets. The main parameters under investigation were the reservoir pressure and the area ratio between the axial and radial jet. The effect of these parameters on the qualitative flow behavior is discussed. This effort was carried out in conjunction with modeling efforts at JPL.

  9. Dynamics of transversely isotropic cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Subrata K.; Vendhan, Chiruvai P.

    2001-05-01

    Studies on wave propagation in cylinders have a long history [M. J. Berliner and R. Solecki, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99, 1841-1853 (1996)]. Onoe et al. [J. Appl. Mech. 29, 729-734 (1962)] studied the attenuating and propagating modes of an isotropic cylindrical rod. Mirsky [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 37, 106-1021 (1965)] presented the solution for harmonic wave propagation in a transversely isotropic (TI) cylinder in vacuo. Sinha et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 1132-1143 (1992)] studied isotropic cylinders in contact with fluids employing the complex wave number solution. Bhattacharyya [Ph.D. thesis, Dept. of Ocean Eng., I.I.T. Madras (1989)] generalized Mirsky's work to study a TI cylinder in contact with fluids. Berliner and Solecki (cited above) also presented a similar solution and applied it to strongly TI cylinders. The present article is concerned with the vibration of a TI cylinder under prescribed harmonic end loading. The problem may be viewed as the dynamic analog of the Saint-Venant problem. The forced vibration solution is facilitated by an orthogonality relation among the radial eigenfunctions corresponding to the real and complex roots of the dispersion relation [W. B. Fraser, J. Sound Vib. 43, 568-571 (1975)]. This approach can be used for the rigorous solution of finite cylinders.

  10. Transverse impedance localization using intensity dependent optics

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Arduini, G.; Metral, E.; Papotti, G.; Quatraro, D.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Tomas, R.

    2009-05-04

    Measurements of transverse impedance in the SPS to track the evolution over the last few years show discrepancies compared to the analytical estimates of the major contributors. Recent measurements to localize the major sources of the transverse impedance using intensity dependent optics are presented. Some simulations using HEADTAIL to understand the limitations of the reconstruction and related numerical aspects are also discussed.

  11. Acute transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Bucknall, R C

    1989-01-01

    A sixteen year old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus developed acute transverse myelopathy. She was treated with high dose steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange and regained partial neurological function. Previous descriptions of transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus are reviewed, with particular reference to the efficacy of high dose steroid treatment. PMID:2662918

  12. Cladding For Transversely-Pumped Laser Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Tso Yee

    1989-01-01

    Combination of suitable dimensioning and cladding of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet of similar solid-state laser provides for more efficient utilization of transversely-incident pump light from diode lasers. New design overcomes some of limitations of longitudinal- and older transverse-pumping concepts and promotes operation at higher output powers in TEM00 mode.

  13. Transverse instability at the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    Sporadic transverse instabilities have been observed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring leading to increase in transverse emittances and beam loss. The driving source of these instabilities has been attributed to the resistive-wall impedance with space-charge playing an important role in suppressing Landau damping. Growth rates of the instabilities are computed. Remaining problems are discussed.

  14. Transverse Spin Effects in SIDIS at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Joosten, Rainer

    2009-12-17

    The measurement of single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) on a transversely polarized target is an important part of the COMPASS physics program. It allows us to investigate the transversity distribution functions as well as transverse momentum dependent distribution functions by measuring azimuthal asymmetries in the hadron production. After COMPASS took data in the years 2002-2004 by scattering a 160 GeV/c muon beam off a transversely polarized deuteron ({sup 6}LiD) target, in 2007 additional data was collected on a transversely polarized proton (NH{sub 3}) target. In this contribution, the latest results on the Collins and Sivers asymmetries in single hadron production as well as two-hadron asymmetries from the analysis of the proton data are presented and compared with existing model predictions.

  15. Recent COMPASS Results on Transverse Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Takahiro; Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2011-12-14

    The investigation of transverse spin and transverse momentum dependent effects in deep inelastic scattering of muons off nucleons is one of the key physics programs of the COMPASS collaboration at CERN. We have investigated the effects from the data obtained with a polarized proton target. In order to access the transversity distribution function, following channels have been analyzed: The azimuthal distribution of single hadrons, the azimuthal dependence of the plane containing hadron pairs, and the measurement of the transverse polarization of lambda hyperons in the final state. The Sivers distribution function which is one of the transverse momentum dependent functions has been investigated also from the azimuthal distribution of single hadrons. Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized deep inelastic scattering give important information on the inner structure of the nucleon to access the so-far unmeasured Boer-Mulders function. We have measured these asymmetries using spin-averaged {sup 6}L{sub i}D.

  16. Material properties for modeling traumatic aortic rupture.

    PubMed

    Bass, C R; Darvish, K; Bush, B; Crandall, J R; Srinivasan, S C; Tribble, C; Fiser, S; Tourret, L; Evans, J C; Patrie, J; Wang, C

    2001-11-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is a significant cause of fatalities in frontal automobile crashes. However, such ruptures are difficult to reproduce experimentally in cadaveric surrogates, and it is difficult to observe dynamic aortic response in situ. So, the aortic injury mechanism or mechanisms remains in dispute. This study is a staged investigation of the physical parameters and mechanisms of human aortic rupture. The investigation includes both experimental study of local and global viscoelastic properties and failure properties of aortas using aortic tissue samples, excised aortas in vitro, and whole human aortas in situ in cadaver thoraxes. This study is the first phase in a staged programme to develop a finite element computer model of aorta injury to examine the mechanisms of aorta injury in automobile crashes. The high-rate local biaxial properties of porcine aorta tissue are determined from samples taken from the isthmus region, the most common area of failure in traumatic aorta injury. Using porcine aortas, similar in structure and physical characteristics to human aortic tissue, biaxial oscillatory response is determined at large strains and high strain rates. From this data, a hyperelastic material model with a failure threshold is developed that is in good agreement with local property data determined from oscillatory tests at 20 Hz and 65 Hz. Further, whole aorta tests are performed using pressure application with aortic pressure time histories similar in onset rate to those seen in cadaveric sled testing. These tests establish the ultimate stretch ratio and strain to failure for human aorta specimens. The specimens show no significant difference in response between the in situ tests and the in vitro tests. This indicates either that the internal thoracic boundary conditions may not be important in the stress and strain level of aorta failure or that the number of in situ tests (3) was too small to establish a difference. A Weibull survival analysis of the whole aorta failure tests shows significant dependence of aortic ultimate stretch ratio on age. A 50% risk of failure is 852 kPa in the circumferential direction and 426 kPa in the longitudinal direction. For pressure, the 50% risk of failure for all the tests is approximately 101 kPa. This increases to greater than 120 kPa for subjects below 68 years. PMID:17458743

  17. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture while playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Jooma, N

    2002-04-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome. PMID:11916903

  18. Ruptured intradiploic dermoid cyst overlying the torcular herophili.

    PubMed

    Gulsen, Salih; Yilmaz, Cem; Serhat, Comert; Altinors, Nur

    2010-01-01

    We present a 22-month-old boy with a ruptured dermoid cyst overlying the torcular herophili. The cyst had caused scalp erosion and a lytic bone lesion and was successfully excised surgically. The general features of these cysts are discussed, along with the surgical procedure and implications of cyst rupture. PMID:20625968

  19. Isolated rupture of teres major in a goalkeeper.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Rafael Almeida; Zogaib, Rodrigo Kallas; Pochini, Alberto De Castro; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    A complete rupture of the teres major is an extremely rare injury and rarely described in the literature. We report the first case of an isolated rupture of the teres major in a professional football goalkeeper. The diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion and complementation by image examinations. Conservative treatment has a high success rate with early return to sport. PMID:26701915

  20. Ruptured bicornuate uterus mimicking ectopic pregnancy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nisha; Singh, Uma; Verma, Manju Lata

    2013-01-01

    Ruptured uterus presenting in first trimester of pregnancy is extremely uncommon and should raise the suspicion of uterine malformations. We report a case of a 24-year-old primigravida with 10 weeks of gestation presenting with acute abdomen and hemoperitoneum. Laparotomy revealed bicornuate uterus with ruptured rudimentary horn. The incidence, diagnosis and management of such cases is discussed. PMID:22691311

  1. Rupture of the quadriceps tendon. A case report in a young dog.

    PubMed

    Arnault, F; Dembour, T; Gallois Bride, H; Chancrin, J L

    2009-01-01

    A five-month-old, male, 16 kg, mixed breed dog was presented for an acute non-weight bearing lameness of the right hind limb. A subtotal avulsion of the quadriceps tendon at its patellar insertion was diagnosed through radiography and ultrasonography. Two nylon sutures secured with a stainless steel crimp were placed in a locking loop pattern in the quadriceps tendon and through a transverse 2.7 mm drill-hole in the patella. No external coaptation was used postoperatively. A full functional recovery was observed, and was followed for one year postoperatively. Quadriceps tendon rupture has not been described in the veterinary literature to our knowledge; in humans, quadriceps tendon rupture is a well known entity, often due to systemic disease resulting in weakening of the tendinous structures. In the case presented herein, the dog's history, young age and location, without underlying biochemical abnormalities, led us to believe that the observed lesion was of traumatic origin. The surgical treatment performed was based on that performed in humans and also that which has been investigated experimentally in the dog. PMID:19151876

  2. Extraperitoneally Ruptured, Everted, and Prolapsed Bladder: A Very Rare Complication of Pelvic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ojewola, Rufus Wale; Tijani, Kehinde Habeeb; Badmus, Olakunle Olaleke; Oliyide, Abisola Ekundayo; Osegbe, Chukwudi Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic rupture of the bladder with eversion and protrusion via the perineum is a rare complication of pelvic injury. We present a 36-year-old lady who sustained severe pelvic injury with a bleeding right-sided deep perineal laceration. She had closed reduction of pelvic fracture with pelvic banding and primary closure of perineal laceration at a private hospital. She subsequently had dehiscence of repaired perineal laceration with protrusion of fleshy mass from vulva and leakage of urine per perineum five weeks later. Examination revealed a fleshy mucosa-like mass protruding anteriorly with a bridge of tissue between it and right anterolateral vaginal wall. Upward pressure on this mass revealed the bladder neck and ureteric orifices. She had perineal and pelvic exploration with findings of prolapsed, completely everted bladder wall through a transverse anterior bladder wall rent via the perineum, and an unstable B1 pelvic disruption. She had repair of the ruptured, everted, and prolapsed bladder, double-plate and screw fixation of disrupted pelvis and repair of the pelvic/perineal defect. She commenced physiotherapy and ambulation a week after surgery. Patient now walks normally and is continent of urine. We conclude that the intrinsic urethral continent mechanism plays a significant role in maintaining continence in females. PMID:26417472

  3. Do All Large Strike-slip Earthquakes Have Supershear Ruptures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Mori, J. J.; Koketsu, K.

    2013-12-01

    Studying the rupture speeds of earthquakes is of broad interesting for earthquake research because it has a large effect on the strong near-field shaking that causes damage during earthquakes. Also rupture speed is a key observation for understanding the controlling stresses and friction during an earthquake, yet the speed and its variations are usually difficult to determine. Using only far-field seismic waveforms, which is the only data available for many large earthquakes, there are problems for estimating the rupture speed with standard waveform inversions, due to trade-off between the rupture speed and the slip location. Here we applied a back projection method to estimate the rupture speeds of Mw ≥ 7.5 strike-slip earthquakes since 2001 which could be analyzed using Hi-net in Japan. We found that all events had very fast average rupture speeds of 3.0-6.0 km/s, which are near or greater than the local shear wave velocity (supershear). These values are faster than for thrust and normal faulting earthquakes that generally rupture with speeds of 1.0-3.0 km/s. Considering the depth-dependent shear-wave velocity, the average propagation speeds for all of the strike-slip events are closer to or greater than the shear wave velocity (Figure 1). For large strike-slip events, transition from subshear to supershear usually occurs within distances of 15 to 30 km from the initiation, which is probably the reason for the scarcity of observed supershear earthquakes for smaller magnitudes. Earthquakes with supershear ruptures can cause more damage than events with subshear ruptures because of the concentration of energy in the forward direction of the rupture. Numerical modeling shows strong focusing and other effects of energy at the rupture front which can intensify the ground motions. A recent example is the April 13, 2010 Qinghai, China earthquake (Mw 6.9), where a moderate-size event caused extensive damage in the Yushu region at the southeastern end of the fault. Careful evaluation of long and straight strike-slip faults should be emphasized for predicting strong ground motions due to supershear rupture. a: Average rupture speeds for Mw ≥ 7.5 strike-slip earthquakes. For comparison, dip-slip earthquakes are also shown. The blue dashed line presents the S wave velocity model of PREM for comparison. b: Rupture velocities are shown as ratio to the local S wave velocity, as a function of depth.

  4. A Three Year Clinicopathological Study of Cases of Rupture Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Setu; Swain, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rupture uterus is a life threatening obstetric complication with serious maternal and fetal side-effects. We report a 3 year (2010-2013) retrospective clinical study of pregnancy with rupture uterus cases attending a tertiary care hospital. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of rupture uterus, incidence as per age, parity, clinical presentations, risk factors, complications and management. Materials and Methods Retrospective data of 74 cases of rupture uterus in SCB Medical college, Cuttack was collected from case records of 26,547 deliveries during a 3 year span (2010-2013). Parameters like cause of rupture, type, site of rupture and outcome were recorded. The collected data was analysed by SPSS software v19. Results Out of 26,547 deliveries during the three year period, there were 74 cases of rupture uterus with an incidence of rupture 1 in 359 (0.28%). The mean age of rupture uterus was 27.4 years. 95.8% were multigravida and majority were referred cases from low socioeconomic status. Only 40.5% had the required minimum of four antenatal visits as recommended by WHO (World Health Organisation). A total of 48.6% of cases with rupture uterus had history of previous Caesarean section. Prolonged labour was present in 75.6% of the cases. Only 12.2% of the cases had history of oxytocin use whereas 9.5% had undergone an operative vaginal delivery. Obstructed labour was the cause in 24.3% of cases, 85.1% had complete rupture. Majority had a rupture in the anterior wall (69%) and 81.1% had rupture in lower segment of uterus. Only 17.6% had broad ligament haematoma, 10.8% colporrhexis and 6.8% had associated bladder injury. Repair was possible in only 39.2% of cases, whereas majority landed up in hysterectomy. Internal iliac ligation was done in 2.7% of cases. Perinatal mortality was 90.5% whereas maternal death was seen in 13.5% cases. One patient developed VVF (vesicovaginal fistula). Duration of hospital stay was upto 14 days in 81.1% cases. Conclusion Education and proper care especially of high risk patients like previous caesarean by competent personnal, proper use of oxytocin and early referral may help to reduce the incidence of “rupture uterus”. PMID:26673858

  5. Relaxing Segmentation: Does It Improve Characterization of Fault Rupture Behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Most faults have not ruptured once historically, let alone repeatedly. Estimating future rupture length of an earthquake source has been a challenge since the 1970s when concepts of full and half fault lengths were employed. In the 1980s paleoseismic event timing and observations of slip, coupled with geometric and other physical fault changes, led to concepts of fault segmentation and it's modeling for hazard. The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast 3 (UCERF 3, Field et al., 2014) relaxed segmentation, guided by rules in which a separation distance of ≤5km and orientation to Coulomb stress changes at fault junctions are prime factors for allowing fault-to-fault jumps. A set of ~350 fault sections produced ~250K ruptures ranging in length from 15 km-1200 km. An inversion provided the rates of these, which range from 102-108 years. Many of the long ruptures have exceedingly low individual rates within the UCERF 3 geologic model but are sufficient in number to release cumulative moment that brings the long-term (Myr) and historical (since 1850) MFDs for the California region into close agreement. Does UCERF 3 have too many multi-fault ruptures? Since 1850 there have been ~260 surface ruptures worldwide in shallow continental crust. 77% are 0-49km; 6% exceed 150km, and the longest is 1906 San Francisco (435-470 km). In California since 1857 there have been 31 surface ruptures. 77% are shorter than 49 km. The longest are 1906, 1857 Fort Tejon (297km), and 1872 Owens Valley (108 km). Most long historical strike-slip ruptures are continuous and geomorphically well-defined traces with limited geometric changes. In contrast, UCERF3 modeling of the south Hayward, as an example, allows it to participate in ruptures that extend to the south ends of the San Andreas or San Jacinto faults (900 km). These include branching (Hayward-Calaveras, San Andreas-San Jacinto) and jumps (Calaveras-San Andreas) on creeping sections of these faults. 5km is the connectivity threshold in UCERF 3 but only 40% of historical ruptures have negotiated this distance. There are other controls of rupture propagation: frictional properties, rupture dynamics, creep, and, as shown by the 2002 Denali-Totschunda rupture, the timing of the prior event and level of stress accumulation on adjacent fault sections. Time will be the tester.

  6. Rupture of the posterior tibial tendon: CT and surgical findings.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Z S; Jahss, M H; Noto, A M; Shereff, M J; Cheung, Y; Frey, C C; Norman, A

    1988-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 42 patients with 49 clinically suspected tears of the posterior tibial tendon. Twenty-eight of the 49 suspected tears were subsequently surgically explored and repaired. Three patterns of tendon abnormalities were recognized on CT scans: type I-intact, hypertrophied, heterogeneous tendon; type II-attenuated tendon; and type III-absence of a portion of a tendon. Types I and II correlated with partial rupture seen during surgery, and type III correlated with complete rupture of the tendon. CT findings were accurate in 96% of the patients who underwent surgery. In four cases (14%), tendon rupture was seen on CT scans, but the extent of the injury was underestimated and the rupture was misclassified. Reactive periostitis of the distal tibia was seen in 71% of diseased tendons and may represent an important factor in the diagnosis of tendon rupture. PMID:3357960

  7. Material contrast does not predict earthquake rupture propagation direction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Day, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Earthquakes often occur on faults that juxtapose different rocks. The result is rupture behavior that differs from that of an earthquake occurring on a fault in a homogeneous material. Previous 2D numerical simulations have studied simple cases of earthquake rupture propagation where there is a material contrast across a fault and have come to two different conclusions: 1) earthquake rupture propagation direction can be predicted from the material contrast, and 2) earthquake rupture propagation direction cannot be predicted from the material contrast. In this paper we provide observational evidence from 70 years of earthquakes at Parkfield, CA, and new 3D numerical simulations. Both the observations and the numerical simulations demonstrate that earthquake rupture propagation direction is unlikely to be predictable on the basis of a material contrast. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Unresponsive primipara after rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Johanna; Berset, Andreas; Lehmann, Michael A; Lapaire, Olav

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism, also called anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy, is a rare but severe problem in obstetrics. It occurs in 8/100,000 births and the maternal mortality is up to 90%. We report the case of a patient with amniotic fluid embolism who was transferred to our hospital. The initial presentation was an unresponsive patient after spontaneous rupture of the membranes. The massive hypotension and coagulopathy as well as fetal bradycardia of 60 bpm led, after stabilisation of the mother, to an emergency caesarean section. The neonate expired hours later, despite neonatological intensive care. During the operation, we had to deal with massive bleeding due to the coagulopathy. Through interdisciplinary teamwork including Bakri postpartum balloon insertion through the obstetrics team, uterine artery embolism by the interventional radiologists and transfusion of blood products, the maternal life was saved and the patient was discharged 9 days after admission. PMID:25883261

  9. Imaging Atherosclerosis and Risk of Plaque Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Eric A; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis imaging strategies can delineate characteristics of plaques at risk of rupture and thrombosis. Structural plaque imaging identifies high-risk plaque features including lipid pools, thin fibrous caps, and intraplaque hemorrhage, among others. New molecular imaging techniques complement structural imaging approaches by illuminating important features of plaque biology, with a prominent focus on detecting inflammation as a high-risk phenotype. As we unravel the molecular and structural characteristics underlying thrombosis-prone plaques, there is significant promise for eventual early identification and prediction of atherosclerotic plaque complications before they occur. Here we focus on recent imaging insights into high-risk arterial plaques, the etiologic agent of acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and sudden cardiac death. PMID:23982263

  10. Multifractal scaling of thermally activated rupture processes.

    PubMed

    Sornette, D; Ouillon, G

    2005-01-28

    We propose a "multifractal stress activation" model combining thermally activated rupture and long memory stress relaxation, which predicts that seismic decay rates after mainshocks follow the Omori law approximately 1/t(p) with exponents p linearly increasing with the magnitude M(L) of the mainshock. We carefully test this prediction on earthquake sequences in the Southern California earthquake catalog: we find power law relaxations of seismic sequences triggered by mainshocks with exponents p increasing with the mainshock magnitude by approximately 0.1-0.15 for each magnitude unit increase, from p(M(L) = 3) approximately 0.6 to p(M(L) = 7) approximately 1.1, in good agreement with the prediction of the multifractal model. PMID:15698332

  11. Uterine rupture during pregnancy after laparoscopic myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Dubuisson, J B; Chavet, X; Chapron, C; Gregorakis, S S; Morice, P

    1995-06-01

    A 31 year old patient presenting with primary infertility underwent an operative laparoscopy for the treatment of bilateral hydrosalpinges, during which a myomectomy was also performed. The uterus was repaired using interrupted sutures. At follow-up laparoscopy seven weeks later, a uterine fistula was diagnosed and was oversewn using a single 'figure of eight' suture. One year later the patient became pregnant through in-vitro fertilization. At 34 weeks gestation, she required an emergency laparotomy for acute abdominal pain and the presence of fetal bradycardia. The operative findings revealed a uterine rupture at the site of the previous myomectomy scar. This was then enlarged with a scalpel and a live baby was delivered. The uterus was repaired in two layers. The postoperative period for both mother and baby was satisfactory. This complication raises the problem of the quality of uterine repair following laparoscopic myomectomy, together with the question of how to prevent this type of life-threatening situation. PMID:7593518

  12. Acute coronary syndromes without coronary plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Siddak S; Stone, Gregg W; Singh, Mandeep; Virmani, Renu; Olin, Jeffrey; Akasaka, Takashi; Narula, Jagat

    2016-05-01

    The latest advances in plaque imaging have provided clinicians with opportunities to treat acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and provide individualized treatment recommendations based not only on clinical manifestations, angiographic characteristics, and biomarker data, but also on the findings of plaque morphology. Although a substantial proportion of ACS events originate from plaques with an intact fibrous cap (IFC), clinicians predominantly equate ACS with plaque rupture arising from thin-cap fibroatheromas. In this Review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of plaque morphology in ACS with IFC, reviewing contemporary data from intravascular imaging. We also explore whether use of such imaging might provide a roadmap for more effective management of patients with ACS. PMID:26911330

  13. Surgical management of acute distal biceps tendon rupture associated with contralateral radial palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ennaciri, Badr; Beaudouin, Emmanuel; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; Montbarbon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Acute distal biceps tendon rupture constitute a rare lesion of biceps injuries, typically, easy to diagnosis after lifting a heavy object. Treatment is controversial, nonoperative for sedentary and elderly patients; surgical for young and active individuals. Many operative techniques are described, they all aim to restore an excellent strength of flexion and supination. We opted for one-incision method and fixation using trans-osseous anchoring for our patient, because we are convinced that is a simpler and safer technique. Postoperative rehabilitation, after a period of elbow immobilization, must be operated for returning to full activity. Biceps tendon repair has permitted to our patient who suffer from right upper limb handicap due to radial nerve palsy, recuperating the lost strength and force in his dominant limb and maintaining some quality of life. PMID:26958121

  14. Bacterial DNA findings in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Pyysalo, Mikko J; Pyysalo, Liisa M; Pessi, Tanja; Karhunen, Pekka J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Oksala, Niku; Öhman, Juha E

    2016-05-01

    Objective Chronic inflammation has earlier been detected in ruptured intracranial aneurysms. A previous study detected both dental bacterial DNA and bacterial-driven inflammation in ruptured intracranial aneurysm walls. The aim of this study was to compare the presence of oral and pharyngeal bacterial DNA in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The hypothesis was that oral bacterial DNA findings would be more common and the amount of bacterial DNA would be higher in ruptured aneurysm walls than in unruptured aneurysm walls. Materials and methods A total of 70 ruptured (n = 42) and unruptured (n = 28) intracranial aneurysm specimens were obtained perioperatively in aneurysm clipping operations. Aneurysmal sac tissue was analysed using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect bacterial DNA from several oral species. Both histologically non-atherosclerotic healthy vessel wall obtained from cardiac by-pass operations (LITA) and arterial blood samples obtained from each aneurysm patient were used as control samples. Results Bacterial DNA was detected in 49/70 (70%) of the specimens. A total of 29/42 (69%) of the ruptured and 20/28 (71%) of the unruptured aneurysm samples contained bacterial DNA of oral origin. Both ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue samples contained significantly more bacterial DNA than the LITA control samples (p-values 0.003 and 0.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the amount of bacterial DNA between the ruptured and unruptured samples. Conclusion Dental bacterial DNA can be found using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction in both ruptured and unruptured aneurysm walls, suggesting that bacterial DNA plays a role in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysms in general, rather than only in ruptured aneurysms. PMID:26777430

  15. Macroscopic Source Properties from Dynamic Rupture Styles in Plastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Mai, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    High stress concentrations at earthquake rupture fronts may generate an inelastic off-fault response at the rupture tip, leading to increased energy absorption in the damage zone. Furthermore, the induced asymmetric plastic strain field in in-plane rupture modes may produce bimaterial interfaces that can increase radiation efficiency and reduce frictional dissipation. Off-fault inelasticity thus plays an important role for realistic predictions of near-fault ground motion. Guided by our previous studies in the 2D elastic case, we perform rupture dynamics simulations including rate-and-state friction and off-fault plasticity to investigate the effects on the rupture properties. We quantitatively analyze macroscopic source properties for different rupture styles, ranging from cracks to pulses and subshear to supershear ruptures, and their transitional mechanisms. The energy dissipation due to off-fault inelasticity modifies the conditions to obtain each rupture style and alters macroscopic source properties. We examine apparent fracture energy, rupture and healing front speed, peak slip and peak slip velocity, dynamic stress drop and size of the process and plastic zones, slip and plastic seismic moment, and their connection to ground motion. This presentation focuses on the effects of rupture style and off-fault plasticity on the resulting ground motion patterns, especially on characteristic slip velocity function signatures and resulting seismic moments. We aim at developing scaling rules for equivalent elastic models, as function of background stress and frictional parameters, that may lead to improved "pseudo-dynamic" source parameterizations for ground-motion calculation. Moreover, our simulations provide quantitative relations between off-fault energy dissipation and macroscopic source properties. These relations might provide a self-consistent theoretical framework for the study of the earthquake energy balance based on observable earthquake source parameters.

  16. Tensile Stress Rupture Behavior of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite in Humid Environments at Intermediate Temperature — Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larochelle, K. J.; Morscher, G. N.

    2006-05-01

    The stress rupture strength of the SYL-iBN/BN/SiC composite was evaluated at 550 and 750 °C with moisture content levels of 0.0, 0.2, and 0.6 atm partial pressure of water vapor, pH2O. The stress rupture strengths decreased with respect to time with the rate of decrease related to the temperature and the amount of moisture content. In all cases the degradation was more severe initially and then approached a run-out threshold level. The thresholds were reached at approximately 100+, 60, 80 h for the 550 °C with 0.0, 0.2, and 0.6 pH2O, respectively. The thresholds were reached at approximately 40, 20, and 10 h for the 750 °C cases. The interpolated stress rupture strengths at 100 h for 0.0, 0.2, and 0.6 pH2O at 550 °C were 82%, 68%, and 51% of the room temperature monotonic tensile strength. At 750 °C these strengths were 67%, 51%, and 50%. Analysis of Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy images showed evidence of embrittlement of the fiber/matrix interphase. Little to no embrittlement was observed at both temperatures with 0.0 pH2O. At both 550 and 750 °C with 0.2 and 0.6 pH2O, evidence of embrittlement increased with temperature and test duration with the most extensive embrittlement observed at 750 °C with 0.6 pH2O.

  17. TRANSVERSE SPIN AT PHENIX AND FUTURE PLANS.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.

    2005-01-28

    The PHENIX experiment took data with transversely polarized proton beams in 2001-2002 and measured the transverse single spin asymmetries in inclusive neutral pion and non-identified charge hadrons at midrapidity and {radical} s = 200 GeV. The data near X{sub F} {approx} 0 cover a transverse momentum range from 0.5 to 5.0 GeV/c. The observed asymmetries are consistent with zero with good statistical accuracy. This paper presents the current work in light of earlier measurements at lower energies in this kinematic region and the future plans of the PHENIX detector.

  18. Transverse Colon Diverticulitis with Calcified Fecalith

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Solak, Ilhami; Genç, Berhan; Sahin, Neslin; Yalaz, Seyhan

    2013-01-01

    Left colonic diverticula are common in Western populations, whereas right colonic diverticulosis primarily occurs in Oriental populations. Diverticulitis of the transverse colon is very rare, with very few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of transverse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone in a 69-year-old female. This was a solitary diverticulum. The signs and symptoms of the disease are similar to acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings of a patient with trans-verse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone. PMID:25610254

  19. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  20. Experimental Method of In-pile Creep Rupture Behavior of ODS Cladding Materials in the Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Chikara; Kagota, Eiichi; Aoyama, Takafumi

    An in-pile creep rupture experiment was conducted in the experimental fast reactor Joyo to evaluate the creep rupture strength of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel under neutron irradiation. ODS has been developed as a most promising fuel cladding material for the next generation fast reactor because of its high temperature resistance and low swelling properties. The irradiation test device MAterial testing RIg with temperature COntrol (MARICO) was developed for the in-pile experiment in Joyo with a temperature control precision of ±4°C. Twenty four ODS specimens with no fuel were pressurized by helium gas up to 22 MPa to accelerate the creep rupture testing. The specimen temperature in the MARICO is controlled by changing the ratio of argon and helium fill gases, which changes the gas gap thermal conductivity between the double walled capsule containing the specimen. The experiment was carried out in the Joyo MK-III core from April 2006 until May 2007. Each creep rupture event was successfully detected by the temperature change at the exit of the capsule and by gamma-ray spectrometry of the reactor cover gas when the filled gas was released from the specimen. The specimen was then identified by analyzing the tag gas isotopic ratio using laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS).

  1. High strength nickel-chromium-iron austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, Robert C.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1980-01-01

    A solid solution strengthened Ni-Cr-Fe alloy capable of retaining its strength at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 42 to 48% nickel, 11 to 13% chromium, 2.6 to 3.4% niobium, 0.2 to 1.2% silicon, 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium, 2.6 to 3.4% molybdenum, 0.1 to 0.3% aluminum, 0.1 to 0.3% titanium, 0.02 to 0.05% carbon, 0.002 to 0.015% boron, up to 0.06 zirconium, and the balance iron. After solution annealing at 1038.degree. C. for one hour, the alloy, when heated to a temperature of 650.degree. C., has a 2% yield strength of 307 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength of 513 MPa and a rupture strength of as high as 400 MPa after 100 hours.

  2. The effect of fiber reinforcement type and water storage on strength properties of a provisional fixed partial denture resin.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Gülay; Keyf, Filiz

    2003-04-01

    Fracture resistance of provisional restorations is an important clinical concern. This property is directly related to transverse strength. Strengthening of provisional fixed partial dentures may result from reinforcement with various fiber types. This study evaluated the effect of fiber type and water storage on the transverse strength of a commercially available provisional resin under two different conditions. The denture resin was reinforced with either glass or aramid fiber or no reinforcement was used. Uniform samples were made from a commercially available autopolymerizing provisional fixed partial denture resin. Sixteen bar-shaped specimens (60 x 10 x 4 mm) were reinforced with pre-treated epoxy resin-coated glass fibers, with aramid fibers, or with no fibers. Eight specimens of each group, with and without fibers, were tested after 24 h of fabrication (immediate group), and after 30-day water storage. A three-point loading test was used to measure the transverse strength, the maximal deflection, and the modulus of elasticity. The Kruskal-Wallis Analysis of Variance was used to examine differences among the three groups, and then the Mann-Whitney U Test and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test were applied to determine pair-wise differences. The transverse strength and the maximal deflection values in the immediate group and in the 30-day water storage group were not statistically significant. In the group tested immediately, the elasticity modulus was found to be significant (P = 0.042). In the 30-day water storage group, all the values were statistically insignificant. The highest transverse strength was displayed by the glass-reinforced resin (66.25MPa) in the immediate group. The transverse strength value was 62.04MPa for the unreinforced samples in the immediate group. All the specimens exhibited lower transverse strength with an increase in water immersion time. The transverse strength value was 61.13 MPa for the glass-reinforced resin and was 61.24 MPa for the unreinforced resin. The aramid-reinforced resin decreased from 62.29 to 58.77 MPa. The addition of fiber reinforcement enhanced the physical properties (the transverse strength, the maximal deflection, the modulus of elasticity) of the processed material over that seen with no addition of fiber. Water storage did not statistically affect the transverse strength of the provisional denture resin compared to that of the unreinforced resin. The transverse strength was lowered at water storage but it was not statistically significant. The transverse strength was enhanced by fiber addition compared to the unreinforced resin. The glass fiber was superior to the other fiber. Also the modulus of elasticity was enhanced by fiber addition compared to the unreinforced resin. PMID:12797420

  3. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  4. Abdominal incisions--vertical or transverse?

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, H.; Coleridge-Smith, P. D.; Joyce, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Two-hundred and nine patients were entered into a prospective, randomized trial in order to determine whether a vertical or transverse abdominal incision is the more satisfactory in producing sound wounds. Ninety-six patients were randomized between paramedian and transverse incisions, and followed up for at least 1 year. No significant difference in the incidence of wound failure could be shown between 46 paramedian and 50 transverse incisions. Those patients who were considered to require a vertical incision were randomized between median and paramedian incisions. No significant difference in wound failure rates between 39 median and 40 paramedian incisions could be demonstrated. No advantage or disadvantage of a transverse over a vertical abdominal incision or of a paramedian over a median incision could be shown in this study. PMID:6462980

  5. Transversally periodic solitary gravitycapillary waves

    PubMed Central

    Milewski, Paul A.; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravitycapillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravitycapillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  6. Development of Transverse Modes Damped DLA Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.

    2009-01-22

    As the dimensions of accelerating structures become smaller and beam intensities higher, the transverse wakefields driven by the beam become quite large with even a slight misalignment of the beam from the geometric axis. These deflection modes can cause inter-bunch beam breakup and intra-bunch head-tail instabilities along the beam path, and thus BBU control becomes a critical issue. All new metal based accelerating structures, like the accelerating structures developed at SLAC or power extractors at CLIC, have designs in which the transverse modes are heavily damped. Similarly, minimizing the transverse wakefield modes (here the HEMmn hybrid modes in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures) is also very critical for developing dielectric based high energy accelerators. In this paper, we present the design of a 7.8 GHz transverse mode damped DLA structure currently under construction, along with plans for the experimental program.

  7. Factors Controlling Stress Rupture of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, J. A.; Yun, H. M.

    1999-01-01

    The successful application of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) depends strongly on maximizing material rupture life over a wide range of temperatures and applied stresses. The objective of this paper is to examine the various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that control the high-temperature stress rupture of CMC for stresses below and above those required for cracking of the 0 C plies (Regions I and II, respectively). Using creep-rupture results for a variety of ceramic fibers and rupture data for CMC reinforced by these fibers, it is shown that in those cases where the matrix carries little structural load, CMC rupture conditions can be predicted very well from the fiber behavior measured under the appropriate test environment. As such, one can then examine the intrinsic characteristics of the fibers in order to develop design guidelines for selecting fibers and fiber microstructures in order to maximize CMC rupture life. For those cases where the fiber interfacial coatings are unstable in the test environment, CMC lives are generally worse than those predicted by fiber behavior alone. For those cases where the matrix can support structural load, CMC life can even be greater provided matrix creep behavior is properly controlled. Thus the achievement of long CMC rupture life requires understanding and optimizing the behavior of all constituents in the proper manner.

  8. Patient specific stress and rupture analysis of ascending thoracic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Olfa; Davis, Frances M; Rodriguez-Matas, Jose F; Duprey, Ambroise; Avril, Stéphane

    2015-07-16

    An ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm (ATAA) is a serious medical condition which, more often than not, requires surgery. Aneurysm diameter is the primary clinical criterion for determining when surgical intervention is necessary but, biomechanical studies have suggested that the diameter criterion is insufficient. This manuscript presents a method for obtaining the patient specific wall stress distribution of the ATAA and the retrospective rupture risk for each patient. Five human ATAAs and the preoperative dynamic CT scans were obtained during elective surgeries to replace each patient's aneurysm with a synthetic graft. The material properties and rupture stress for each tissue sample were identified using bulge inflation tests. The dynamic CT scans were used to generate patient specific geometries for a finite element (FE) model of each patient's aneurysm. The material properties from the bulge inflation tests were implemented in the FE model and the wall stress distribution at four different pressures was estimated. Three different rupture risk assessments were compared: the maximum diameter, the rupture risk index, and the overpressure index. The peak wall stress values for the patients ranged from 28% to 94% of the ATAA's failure stress. The rupture risk and overpressure indices were both only weakly correlated with diameter (ρ=-0.29, both cases). In the future, we plan to conduct a large experimental and computational study that includes asymptomatic patients under surveillance, patients undergoing elective surgery, and patients who have experienced rupture or dissection to determine if the rupture risk index or maximum diameter can meaningfully differentiate between the groups. PMID:25979384

  9. Development of a high strength hot isostatically pressed /HIP/ disk alloy, MERL 76

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.; Eng, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A nickel-based powder metal disk alloy developed for use in advanced commercial gas turbines is described. Consideration is given to final alloy chemistry modifications made to achieve a desirable balance between tensile strength and stress rupture life and ductility. The effects of post-consolidation heat treatment are discussed, the preliminary mechanical properties obtained from full-scale turbine disks are presented.

  10. Transverse electric conductivity in collisional quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, A. V.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2012-11-01

    Expressions for the transverse electric conductivity and transverse permittivity of collisional quantum plasma for an arbitrary value of the degeneracy factor of the electron gas are derived using the Wigner-Vlasov-Boltzmann kinetic equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision integral. Different particular cases are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the case of completely degenerate quantum plasma. The results obtained are compared with Lindhard's formula.

  11. Kinetic theory for transverse optomechanical instabilities.

    PubMed

    Tesio, E; Robb, G R M; Ackemann, T; Firth, W J; Oppo, G-L

    2014-01-31

    We investigate transverse symmetry-breaking instabilities emerging from the optomechanical coupling between light and the translational degrees of freedom of a collisionless, damping-free gas of cold, two-level atoms. We develop a kinetic theory that can also be mapped on to the case of an electron plasma under ponderomotive forces. A general criterion for the existence and spatial scale of transverse instabilities is identified; in particular, we demonstrate that monotonically decreasing velocity distribution functions are always unstable. PMID:24580450

  12. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos G.; Weiss, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In the partonic (or light-front) description of relativistic systems the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent charge and magnetization densities in transverse space. This formulation allows one to identify the chiral components of nucleon structure as the peripheral densities at transverse distances b = O(M{sub {pi}}{sup -1}) and compute them in a parametrically controlled manner. A dispersion relation connects the large-distance behavior of the transverse charge and magnetization densities to the spectral functions of the Dirac and Pauli form factors near the two--pion threshold at timelike t = 4 M{ sub {pi}}{sup 2}, which can be computed in relativistic chiral effective field theory. Using the leading-order approximation we (a) derive the asymptotic behavior (Yukawa tail) of the isovector transverse densities in the "chiral" region b = O(M{sub {pi}}{sup -1}) and the "molecular" region b = O(M{sub N}{sup 2}/M{sub {pi}}{sup 3}); (b) perform the heavy-baryon expansion of the transverse densities; (c) explain the relative magnitude of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities in a simple mechanical picture; (d) include Delta isobar intermediate states and study the peripheral transverse densities in the large-N{ sub c} limit of QCD; (e) quantify the region of transverse distances where the chiral components of the densities are numerically dominant; (f) calculate the chiral divergences of the b{sup 2}-weighted moments of the isovector transverse densities (charge and anomalous magnetic radii) in the limit M{sub {pi}} -> 0 and determine their spatial support. Our approach provides a concise formulation of the spatial structure of the nucleon's chiral component and offers new insights into basic properties of the chiral expansion. It relates the information extracted from low-t elastic form factors to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes.

  13. Strength Training for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Strength training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' strength training are discussed, presenting general principles of strength training for children…

  14. Rupture Synchronicity in Complex Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, K. R.; Jordan, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    While most investigators would agree that the timing of large earthquakes within a fault system depends on stress-mediated interactions among its elements, much of the debate relevant to time-dependent forecasting has been centered on single-fault concepts, such as characteristic earthquake behavior. We propose to broaden this discussion by quantifying the multi-fault concept of rupture synchronicity. We consider a finite set of small, fault-spanning volumes {Vk} within a fault system of arbitrary (fractal) complexity. We let Ck be the catalog of length tmax comprising Nk discrete times {ti(k)} that mark when the kth volume participates in a rupture of magnitude > M. The main object of our analysis is the complete set of event time differences {τij(kk') = ti(k) - tj(k')}, which we take to be a random process with an expected density function ρkk'(t). When k = k', we call this function the auto-catalog density function (ACDF); when k ≠ k', we call it the cross-catalog density function (CCDF). The roles of the ACDF and CCDF in synchronicity theory are similar to those of autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions in time-series analysis. For a renewal process, the ACDF can be written in terms of convolutions of the interevent-time distribution, and many of its properties (e.g., large-t asymptote) can be derived analytically. The interesting information in the CCDF, like that in the ACDF, is concentrated near t = 0. If two catalogs are completely asynchronous, the CCDF collapses to an asymptote given by the harmonic mean of the ACDF asymptotes. Synchronicity can therefore be characterized by the variability of the CCDF about this asymptote. The brevity of instrumental catalogs makes the identification of synchronicity at large M difficult, but we will illustrate potentially interesting behaviors through the analysis of a million-year California catalog generated by the earthquake simulator, RSQSim (Deiterich & Richards-Dinger, 2010), which we sampled at a dozen fault-spanning volumes. At the magnitude threshold M = 7, the ACDF can be well fit by renewal models with fairly small aperiodicity parameters (α < 0.2) for all fault volumes but one (on the San Jacinto fault). At interseismic (Reid) time scales, we observe pairs of fault segments that are tightly locked, such as the Cholame and Carrizo sections of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), where the CCDF and two ACDFs are nearly equal; segments out of phase (Carrizo-SAF/Coachella-SAF and Coachella-SAF/San Jacinto), where the CCDF variation is an odd function of time; and segments where events are in phase with integer ratios of recurrence times (2:1 synchronicity of Coachella-SAF/Mojave-SAF and Carrizo-SAF/Mojave-SAF). At near-seismic (Omori) time scales, we observe various modes of clustering, triggering, and shadowing in RSQSim catalogs; e.g., events on Mojave-SAF trigger Garlock events, and events on Coachella-SAF shut down events on San Jacinto. Therefore, despite its geometrical complexity and multiplicity of time scales, the RSQSim model of the San Andreas fault system exhibits a variety of synchronous behaviors that increase the predictability of large ruptures within the system. A key question for earthquake forecasting is whether the real San Andreas system is equally, or much less, synchronous.

  15. Stainless steels with improved strength for service at 760 C and above

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1998-03-01

    An evaluation was undertaken of modified 25Cr-20Ni stainless steels and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel for advanced energy applications at 760 C (1,400 F) and higher. It was found that good fabricability, strength, and ductility could be produced in the modified steels. Stress rupture data to beyond 10,000 h showed that the strengths of the modified steels were more than double that for type 310H stainless steel.

  16. Exploring the transverse spin structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alesio, Umberto

    2008-10-13

    We discuss our present understanding of the transverse spin structure of the nucleon and of related properties originating from parton transverse motion. Starting from the transversity distribution and the ways to access it, we then address the role played by spin and transverse momentum dependent (TMD) distributions in azimuthal and transverse single spin asymmetries. The latest extractions of the Sivers, Collins and transversity functions are also presented.

  17. Transverse structure of the QCD string

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Harvey B.

    2010-11-15

    The characterization of the transverse structure of the QCD string is discussed. We formulate a conjecture as to how the stress-energy tensor of the underlying gauge theory couples to the string degrees of freedom. A consequence of the conjecture is that the energy density and the longitudinal-stress operators measure the distribution of the transverse position of the string, to leading order in the string fluctuations, whereas the transverse-stress operator does not. We interpret recent numerical measurements of the transverse size of the confining string and show that the difference of the energy and longitudinal-stress operators is a particularly natural probe at next-to-leading order. Second, we derive the constraints imposed by open-closed string duality on the transverse structure of the string. We show that a total of three independent ''gravitational'' form factors characterize the transverse profile of the closed string, and obtain the interpretation of recent effective string theory calculations: the square radius of a closed string of length {beta} defined from the slope of its gravitational form factor, is given by (d-1/2{pi}{sigma})log({beta}/4r{sub 0}) in d space dimensions. This is to be compared with the well-known result that the width of the open string at midpoint grows as (d-1/2{pi}{sigma})log(r/r{sub 0}). We also obtain predictions for transition form factors among closed-string states.

  18. Creep and stress rupture of a mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion and precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Mervyn, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture behavior of a mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and gamma-prime precipitation strengthened nickel-base alloy (alloy MA 6000E) was studied at intermediate and elevated temperatures. At 760 C, MA 6000E exhibits the high creep strength characteristic of nickel-base superalloys and at 1093 C the creep strength is superior to other ODS nickel-base alloys. The stress dependence of the creep rate is very sharp at both test temperatures and the apparent creep activation energy measured around 760 C is high, much larger in magnitude than the self-diffusion energy. Stress rupture in this large grain size material is transgranular and crystallographic cracking is observed. The rupture ductility is dependent on creep strain rate, but usually is low. These and accompanying microstructural results are discussed with respect to other ODS alloys and superalloys and the creep behavior is rationalized by invoking a recently-developed resisting stress model of creep in materials strengthened by second phase particles.

  19. Earthquake rupture in shallow, unconsolidated sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, R. J.; De Paola, N.; Marco, S.; Holdsworth, R.

    2014-12-01

    Faults in shallow, unconsolidated sediment are often associated with aseismic creep, due to the velocity-strengthening behaviour of unconsolidated materials observed during lab experiments. They are expected to appear as broad zones of distributed deformation. However, large seismic ruptures can still propagate to the surface through shallow sediment, causing vast damage and destructive tsunamis. Our understanding of how seismic rupturing of shallow faults in unconsolidated sediment occurs in nature is limited due to the lack of direct observations constraining their structure, deformation patterns and mechanisms, and frictional behaviour. We studied syn-depositional normal faults, which deform unconsolidated, saturated lake sediments of the palaeo-Dead Sea. The sediments belong to the Lisan Formation (~70-18 Ka) and comprise alternating 1-3 mm thick laminae of aragonite and ultrafine-grained detritus. The faults formed at the surface, the only overburden being the overlying water column, and are known to have hosted seismic slip during large events (M ? 6), due to their association with seismites. The faults are discrete, localized structures, which sharply truncate laminae in the host sediment. Slip surfaces are sharp and straight and accompanied by a narrow slip zone, up to 1 cm wide, but often ? 1 mm wide, containing ultrafine-grained gouge. The majority of slip, up to 3 m, is concentrated in these slip zones. Faults can be categorised as having either simple geometry (one continuous fault strand accommodates all the displacement) or complex geometry (two or more fault segments share the overall displacement). Slip profiles constructed for simple geometry faults all have similar shapes, regardless of maximum displacement, whereas those for complex geometry faults are highly variable, due to segment interaction. It is apparent from the slip profiles that these faults grow and interact in the same way as 'brittle' faults in cohesive rocks. We will present results of microstructural analyses of the fault rocks, to constrain the deformation mechanisms occurring during seismic slip in unconsolidated sediment. We will also present results of low- and high-velocity friction experiments, which will constrain the conditions under which brittle deformation and seismic slip occur in these materials.

  20. [Isolated ruptures of the tendon of the biceps femoris muscle].

    PubMed

    Rehm, O; Linke, R; Schweigkofler, U; Hoffmann, R F; Jäger, A

    2009-03-01

    Traumatic ruptures of tendons in the region of the knee joint are often accompanied by substantial degenerative and inflammatory alterations, especially when the patella and quadriceps tendons are affected. Isolated ruptures of the tendon of the distal biceps femoris muscle at the dorsolateral aspect of the knee are rare and result in an acute reduction of flexion capability. However, tears of the biceps femoris tendon are not associated with degenerative changes. This article reports on the diagnosis and treatment of a 27-year-old football player who suffered an acute isolated rupture of the biceps femoris tendon. PMID:19224187

  1. Endovascular Treatment of an Aortic Traumatic Double Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Attinà, Domenico; Buia, Francesco; Russo, Vincenzo; Pilato, Emanuele; Lovato, Luigi; Bartolomeo, Roberto Di; Zompatori, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic thoracic aortic rupture is a life-threatening condition; aortic isthmus is the most common site of rupture, but in rare cases traumatic injury can localize elsewhere, such as at aortic arch or at the level of the diaphragm. In the past few years, endovascular treatment of traumatic aortic injury became a safe procedure, with lower mortality and complication, if compared with open surgery. We report a case of a 40-year-old-man admitted to emergency department after a violent car crash in which an aortic traumatic double rupture was successfully treated with two endovascular stent-grafts coverage. PMID:25859315

  2. The Initial Rupture of the 2000 Western Tottori Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, M.; Umeda, Y.; Mori, J.; Kawakata, H.

    2002-12-01

    Two clear P phases were identified on the seismograms for the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake(M7.3). Following the initial P phase (P1), a larger arrival (P2) several seconds later indicates that the rupture did not grow smoothly, but has at least 2 subevents. Hypocenters corresponding to these two P arrivals were determined using 14 stations within hypocentral distances of 60 km. The initial rupture started from the edge of a region that has had swarm activity, including M5 events, since 1989. The source of the second larger P phase was located 1km deeper and 5km southeast from the initial rupture. The hypocenter of the second rupture was off the fault plane estimated from the mechanism solution of the initial rupture using the P1 phase first motions. The average time interval between the two phases was 2.5 second, which is consistent with an empirical relation between the magnitude and duration time for initial ruptures. According to rupture model of this earthquake determined by Sekiguchi and Iwata, little slip occurred near the starting point, and 3 seconds after, larger slip occurred 5km southeast of the starting point, corresponding to our location of the source of second rupture. In this study, we tried deriving the rupture process for the spatiotemporal slip distribution of the first few seconds of the rupture of this earthquake by using a waveform inversion. We divided the area near the initial hypocenter into 10 x 6 subfaults with dimensions of 250 x 250 m2. For the inversion, we used 3-component data from 12 KiK-net and K-net stations data integrated from acceleration to velocity and bandpassed filtered from 0.1 to 3.0 Hz. Green_fs functions were calculated using a 1-dimensional velocity structure that was determined from the temporary aftershock observations. We used 12 time windows spaced at 0.05 sec intervals Our results show that the area of the initial rupture area was about 0.5 km2 and extended toward the southeast from the initial hypocenter. There does not appear to be much slip in the area between the location of the initial rupture and the location of the sudden increase in slip 2.5 seconds later.

  3. Endovascular treatment of an aortic traumatic double rupture.

    PubMed

    Attinà, Domenico; Buia, Francesco; Russo, Vincenzo; Pilato, Emanuele; Lovato, Luigi; Bartolomeo, Roberto Di; Zompatori, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic thoracic aortic rupture is a life-threatening condition; aortic isthmus is the most common site of rupture, but in rare cases traumatic injury can localize elsewhere, such as at aortic arch or at the level of the diaphragm. In the past few years, endovascular treatment of traumatic aortic injury became a safe procedure, with lower mortality and complication, if compared with open surgery. We report a case of a 40-year-old-man admitted to emergency department after a violent car crash in which an aortic traumatic double rupture was successfully treated with two endovascular stent-grafts coverage. PMID:25859315

  4. Laparoscopic splenectomy for spontaneous rupture of the spleen

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Pinky M.; Philip, Roji; Masurkar, Vishwanath G.; Khadse, Prashant L.; Randive, Nilima U.

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic splenectomy is a gold standard for management of planned benign splenic pathologies. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen (SRS) leading to acute abdomen occurs in only 1% of all splenic ruptures. Laparoscopic splenectomy in traumatic and atraumatic rupture due to intra-splenic pathology is reported. We present the first reported case of laparoscopic splenectomy in a 23-year-old male who presented with hemoperitoneum due to idiopathic or SRS. The procedure was safely accomplished with slight modified technique and minimum usage of advanced gadgets. PMID:26917926

  5. [Spontaneous rupture of intracranial dermoid cyst. Clinical and radiological study].

    PubMed

    Boissonnot, L; Drouineau, J; Roualdes, G; Morin, M; Neau, J P; Bataille, B

    1986-12-01

    A 22 year old woman had a seizure, and the skull X-ray showed an intracranial arched calcification. CT scan permitted diagnosis of dermoid cyst. Rupture of the cyst was testified by low density areas disseminated on the cortical surface and intra-ventricular fat level. Surgical removal confirmed dermoid cyst with rupture and fat fluid inside. Authors underline infrequency of such intra-ventricular fat level. CT scan, with low density of lipidic origin promote considerably such diagnosis both of the real nature of the cyst and of its rupture. PMID:3806479

  6. TachoSil for postinfarction ventricular free wall rupture.

    PubMed

    Pocar, Marco; Passolunghi, Davide; Bregasi, Alda; Donatelli, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Despite a decline in the last three decades, postinfarction ventricular free wall rupture still complicates more than 3% of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarctions and remains a surgical challenge. TachoSil (Nycomed, Zurich, Switzerland) is an equine collagen patch coated with human fibrinogen and human thrombin, which has recently been used for haemostasis in cardiovascular surgery, but its potential usefulness in free wall rupture has not been reported. Initial clinical experience with an on-pump sutureless technique without cardioplegia, using wide TachoSil patching to achieve free wall rupture repair, has been described. PMID:22419793

  7. Laparoscopic splenectomy for spontaneous rupture of the spleen.

    PubMed

    Thapar, Pinky M; Philip, Roji; Masurkar, Vishwanath G; Khadse, Prashant L; Randive, Nilima U

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic splenectomy is a gold standard for management of planned benign splenic pathologies. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen (SRS) leading to acute abdomen occurs in only 1% of all splenic ruptures. Laparoscopic splenectomy in traumatic and atraumatic rupture due to intra-splenic pathology is reported. We present the first reported case of laparoscopic splenectomy in a 23-year-old male who presented with hemoperitoneum due to idiopathic or SRS. The procedure was safely accomplished with slight modified technique and minimum usage of advanced gadgets. PMID:26917926

  8. Frictional melting during the rupture of the 1994 bolivian earthquake

    PubMed

    Kanamori; Anderson; Heaton

    1998-02-01

    The source parameters of the 1994 Bolivian earthquake (magnitude Mw = 8.3) suggest that the maximum seismic efficiency eta was 0.036 and the minimum frictional stress was 550 bars. Thus, the source process was dissipative, which is consistent with the observed slow rupture speed, only 20% of the local S-wave velocity. The amount of nonradiated energy produced during the Bolivian rupture was comparable to, or larger than, the thermal energy of the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption and was sufficient to have melted a layer as thick as 31 centimeters. Once rupture was initiated, melting could occur, which reduces friction and promotes fault slip. PMID:9452378

  9. Laparoscopic repair of a bladder rupture in a foal.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R B; Ducharme, N G; Hackett, R P

    1995-01-01

    Ruptured bladder was diagnosed in a 90-day-old Thoroughbred colt that had suffered a open, comminuted tibial fracture 2 days earlier. The bladder rupture was identified by laparoscopic examination of the abdomen and was repaired using a laparoscopic stapling instrument. This technique provided good visualization and allowed repair of the rupture with minimal intervention. Ten months after surgery, the foal was admitted to a referral surgical practice because of colic and stanguria. A urinary calculus was removed from the penile urethra by urethrotomy. Laparoscopic repair of the bladder with nonabsorbable staples may be contraindicated because of possible urolith formation. PMID:7701772

  10. Composite impact strength improvement through a fiber/matrix interphase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    Research was conducted to improve the impact strength and toughness of fiber/resin composites by means of a fiber coating interphase. Graphite fiber/epoxy resin composites were fabricated with four different fiber coating systems introduced in a matrix-fiber interphase. Two graphite fibers, a high strength and a high modulus type, were studied with the following coating systems: chemical vapor deposited boron, electroless nickel, a polyamide-imide resin and a thermoplastic polysulfone resin. Evaluation methods included the following tests: Izod, flexure, shear fracture toughness, longitudinal and transverse tensile, and transverse and longitudinal compression. No desirable changes could be effected with the high strength fiber, but significant improvements in impact performance were observed with the polyamide-imide resin coated high modulus fiber with no loss in composite modulus.

  11. Guide to transverse projections and mass-constraining variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, A. J.; Khoo, T. J.; Konar, P.; Kong, K.; Lester, C. G.; Matchev, K. T.; Park, M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper seeks to demonstrate that many of the existing mass-measurement variables proposed for hadron colliders (mT, meff, mT2, missing p→T, hT, s^min⁡, etc.) are far more closely related to each other than is widely appreciated, and indeed can all be viewed as a common mass-bound specialized for a variety of purposes. A consequence of this is that one may understand better the strengths and weaknesses of each variable, and the circumstances in which each can be used to best effect. In order to achieve this, we find it necessary first to revisit the seemingly empty and infertile wilderness populated by the subscript “T” (as in “p̸T”) in order to remind ourselves what this process of transversification actually means. We note that, far from being simple, transversification can mean quite different things to different people. Those readers who manage to battle through the barrage of transverse notation distinguishing “⊤” from “∨” or from “∘,” and “early projection” from “late projection,” will find their efforts rewarded towards the end of the paper with (i) a better understanding of how collider mass variables fit together, (ii) an appreciation of how these variables could be generalized to search for things more complicated than supersymmetry, (iii) will depart with an aversion to thoughtless or naïve use of the so-called transverse methods of any of the popular computer Lorentz-vector libraries, and (iv) will take care in their subsequent papers to be explicit about which of the 61 identified variants of the “transverse mass” they are employing.

  12. Guide to transverse projections and mass-constraining variables

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, A. J.; Khoo, T. J.; Lester, C. G.; Konar, P.; Kong, K.; Matchev, K. T.; Park, M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper seeks to demonstrate that many of the existing mass-measurement variables proposed for hadron colliders (m{sub T}, m{sub eff}, m{sub T2}, missing p-vector{sub T}, h{sub T}, {radical}(s-circumflex){sub min}, etc.) are far more closely related to each other than is widely appreciated, and indeed can all be viewed as a common mass-bound specialized for a variety of purposes. A consequence of this is that one may understand better the strengths and weaknesses of each variable, and the circumstances in which each can be used to best effect. In order to achieve this, we find it necessary first to revisit the seemingly empty and infertile wilderness populated by the subscript 'T' (as in 'pe{sub T}') in order to remind ourselves what this process of transversification actually means. We note that, far from being simple, transversification can mean quite different things to different people. Those readers who manage to battle through the barrage of transverse notation distinguishing 'T' from 'v' or or from 'o', and 'early projection' from 'late projection', will find their efforts rewarded towards the end of the paper with (i) a better understanding of how collider mass variables fit together, (ii) an appreciation of how these variables could be generalized to search for things more complicated than supersymmetry, (iii) will depart with an aversion to thoughtless or naieve use of the so-called 'transverse methods' of any of the popular computer Lorentz-vector libraries, and (iv) will take care in their subsequent papers to be explicit about which of the 61 identified variants of the 'transverse mass' they are employing.

  13. Detachment of agglutinin-bonded red blood cells. I. Forces to rupture molecular-point attachments.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E; Berk, D; Leung, A

    1991-01-01

    A simple micromechanical method has been developed to measure the rupture strength of a molecular-point attachment (focal bond) between two macroscopically smooth membrane capsules. In the procedure, one capsule is prepared with a low density coverage of adhesion molecules, formed as a stiff sphere, and held at fixed position by a micropipette. The second capsule without adhesion molecules is pressurized into a spherical shape with low suction by another pipette. This capsule is maneuvered to initiate point contact at the pole opposite the stiff capsule which leads to formation of a few (or even one) molecular attachments. Then, the deformable capsule is slowly withdrawn by displacement of the pipette. Analysis shows that the end-to-end extension of the capsule provides a direct measure of the force at the point contact and, therefore, the rupture strength when detachment occurs. The range for point forces accessible to this technique depends on the elastic moduli of the membrane, membrane tension, and the size of the capsule. For biological and synthetic vesicle membranes, the range of force lies between 10(-7)-10(-5) dyn (10(-12)-10(-10) N) which is 100-fold less than presently measurable by Atomic Force Microscopy! Here, the approach was used to study the forces required to rupture microscopic attachments between red blood cells formed by a monoclonal antibody to red cell membrane glycophorin, anti-A serum, and a lectin from the snail-helix pomatia. Failure of the attachments appeared to be a stochastic function of the magnitude and duration of the detachment force. We have correlated the statistical behavior observed for rupture with a random process model for failure of small numbers of molecular attachments. The surprising outcome of the measurements and analysis was that the forces deduced for short-time failure of 1-2 molecular attachments were nearly the same for all of the agglutinin, i.e., 1-2 x 10(-6) dyn. Hence, microfluorometric tests were carried out to determine if labeled agglutinins and/or labeled surface molecules were transferred between surfaces after separation of large areas of adhesive contact. The results showed that the attachments failed because receptors were extracted from the membrane. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:2065188

  14. Comparisons of 76 Hz vertical electric and horizontal magnetic field strengths received in Connecticut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, P. R.

    1986-03-01

    The results of 60 days of selected whip antenna measurements are discussed in this report. The main result is that the Connecticut vertical electric field strength behavior is usually very similar to the transverse-horizontal magnetic field strength behavior (in both amplitude and relative phase) during both normal and disturbed propagation conditions.

  15. Strength Modeling Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Lee, P.; Wong, S.

    1985-01-01

    Strength modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human strength, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic strength; (3) effector force versus joint torque; (4) instantaneous versus steady force; (5) active force versus reactive force; (6) presence or absence of gravity; (7) body somatotype and composition; (8) body (segment) masses; (9) muscle group envolvement; (10) muscle size; (11) fatigue; and (12) practice (training) or familiarity. In surveying the available literature on strength measurement and modeling an attempt was made to examine as many of these parameters as possible. The conclusions reached at this point toward the feasibility of implementing computationally reasonable human strength models. The assessment of accuracy of any model against a specific individual, however, will probably not be possible on any realistic scale. Taken statistically, strength modeling may be an effective tool for general questions of task feasibility and strength requirements.

  16. Design procedure prevents PE pipe rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Grigory, S.C.

    1995-12-01

    A rupture prevention design procedure for plastic gas distribution pipe is nearing completion at Southwest Research Institute (SWRI). Given the pipe size, polyethylene (PE) resin, and minimum operating temperature, the maximum safe operating pressure can be determined for which rapid crack propagation (RCP) cannot occur. A computer program, called PFRAC, has been developed for this purpose and uses Charpy energy as the measurement of fracture toughness of PE. Present efforts, however, involve replacing Charpy energy with a dynamic toughness measurement obtained from the Small Scale Steady State (S4) test that is required in ISO 4437. The program is being financed by the Gas Research Institute, Chicago. RCP events in PE pipe have been rare primarily because operating pressures are low and pipe diameters are small in most gas distribution systems. However, controlled RCP experiments in the US and other countries clearly demonstrate that as the gas industry moves toward higher line pressures and larger diameters, the likelihood of an RCP event increases. Recognizing this, ISO includes a requirement for RCP in its ISO 4437 standard for pipe greater than 10 inches in diameter or operating pressures greater than 58 psig. The S4 test may be used on all pipe diameters. A full scale test or the S4 test can be used on pipe greater than 10 inches diameter.

  17. Rupture of the membranes and postpartum infection.

    PubMed

    Novak-Antolic, Z; Pajntar, M; Verdenik, I

    1997-02-01

    The greatest risk of preterm prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) is preterm delivery. According to the Perinatal Information System of Slovenia there were 5.92% preterm deliveries in 1994. We studied 809 deliveries of less than 34 weeks of gestation in the Ljubljana Maternity, from 1992 to 1994; 33.7% of these started with PPROM. Risk factors for PPROM were conization, cerclage and use of antibiotics for any reason in current pregnancy. Amnionitis and febrile illness during labour increased with longer duration of PPROM but maternal postpartum infections did not. In neonates, more cases of lower Apgar scores after 1 and 5 min and more cases of suspected sepsis were found with the increased duration of PPROM. In Slovenia, with good facilities for transport in utero and good neonatal care, after PPROM it is best to transport the pregnant women to the third level center and then wait until labour starts or to recur to prompt delivery when maternal or fetal signs so require. From 1987 to 1993 there were 159264 deliveries in gestations equal to or over 34 weeks; 20.8% started with PROM. In our observational study we found the best results when labour was induced. There are, however, many disagreements about the management of (P)PROM. PMID:9138956

  18. A Controllable Earthquake Rupture Experiment on the Homestake Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Murdoch, L. C.; Garagash, D.; Reches, Z.; Martel, S. J.; Gwaba, D.; Elsworth, D.; Lowell, R. P.; Onstott, T. C.

    2010-12-01

    Fault-slip is typically simulated in the laboratory at the cm-to-dm scale. Laboratory results are then up-scaled by orders of magnitude to understand faulting and earthquakes processes. We suggest an experimental approach to reactivate faults in-situ at scales ~10-100 m using thermal techniques and fluid injection to modify in situ stresses and the fault strength to the point where the rock fails. Mines where the modified in-situ stresses are sufficient to drive faulting, present an opportunity to conduct such experiments. During our recent field work in the former Homestake gold mine in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota, we found a large fault present on multiple mine levels. The fault is subparallel to the local foliation in the Poorman formation, a Proterozoic metamorphic rock deformed into regional-scale folds with axes plunging ~40 to the SSE. The fault extends at least 1.5 km along strike and dip, with a center ~1.5 km deep. It strikes ~320-340 N, dips ~45-70 NE, and is recognized by a ~0.3-0.5 m thick distinct gouge that contains crushed host rock and black material that appears to be graphite. Although we could not find clear evidence for fault displacement, secondary features suggest that it is a normal fault. The size and distinct structure of this fault make it a promising target for in-situ experimentation of fault strength, hydrological properties, and slip nucleation processes. Most earthquakes are thought to be the result of unstable slip on existing faults, Activation of the Homestake fault in response to the controlled fluid injection and thermally changing background stresses is likely to be localized on a crack-like patch. Slow patch propagation, moderated by the injection rate and the rate of change of the background stresses, may become unstable, leading to the nucleation of a small earthquake (dynamic) rupture. This controlled instability is intimately related to the dependence of the fault strength on the slip process and has been analyzed for the Homestake fault conditions. Scale analyses indicate that this transition occurs for the nucleation patch size ~1 m. This represents a fundamental limitation for laboratory experiments, where the induced dynamic patch could be tractable, and necessitates larger scale field tests ~10-100 m. The ongoing dewatering is expected to affect displacements in the fault vicinity. This poroelastic effect can be used to better characterize the fault. Nucleation, propagation, and arrest of dynamic fault slip is governed by fluid overpressure source, diffusion, and the magnitude of the background loading in relation to the peak and residual strength in the fault zone at the ambient pore pressure level. More information on in-situ stresses than currently available is required to evaluate the fault state. Yet, initial modeling suggests that a suitable place for such an experiment is where the Homestake fault intersects the 4850-ft mine level or at greater depths.

  19. Electrical manipulation of crystal symmetry for switching transverse acoustic phonons.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H; Jho, Y D; Stanton, C J

    2015-01-30

    We experimentally explore the use of a novel device where lateral electric fields can be applied to break the translational symmetry within the isotropic plane and hence change the selection rules to allow normally forbidden transverse acoustic (TA) phonon generations. The ultrafast screening of the lateral electric field by the photocarriers relieves shear strain in the structure and switches on the propagating TA waves. The amplitude and on-state time of the TA mode can be modulated by the external field strength and size of the laterally biased region. The observed frequency shift with an external bias as well as the strong geometrical dependence confirm the role of the asymmetric potential distribution in electrically manipulating the crystal symmetry to control modal behavior of acoustic phonons. PMID:25679892

  20. Electrical Manipulation of Crystal Symmetry for Switching Transverse Acoustic Phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, H.; Jho, Y. D.; Stanton, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally explore the use of a novel device where lateral electric fields can be applied to break the translational symmetry within the isotropic plane and hence change the selection rules to allow normally forbidden transverse acoustic (TA) phonon generations. The ultrafast screening of the lateral electric field by the photocarriers relieves shear strain in the structure and switches on the propagating TA waves. The amplitude and on-state time of the TA mode can be modulated by the external field strength and size of the laterally biased region. The observed frequency shift with an external bias as well as the strong geometrical dependence confirm the role of the asymmetric potential distribution in electrically manipulating the crystal symmetry to control modal behavior of acoustic phonons.

  1. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Co-existence of a rare dyspnea with pericardial diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kargı, Ahmet Bülent; Zeybek, Arife

    2015-01-01

    Pericardial-diaphragmatic rupture is a rare condition which occurs after blunt trauma and involves the herniation of abdominal organs into the pericardium. A 77-year-old female patient presenting with complaints of palpitation and difficulty in breathing was admitted to the emergency room. Left lateral thoracotomy revealed the herniation of abdominal organs into the thorax. A pericardial-diaphragmatic rupture and a pericardial rupture were found to co-exist. The diaphragm and the pericardium were repaired primarily. The case is presented here because herniation of abdominal organs into the pleural cavity through the pericardium is a rare condition. PMID:26336505

  3. Co-existence of a rare dyspnea with pericardial diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Öz, Necdet; Kargı, Ahmet Bülent; Zeybek, Arife

    2015-06-01

    Pericardial-diaphragmatic rupture is a rare condition which occurs after blunt trauma and involves the herniation of abdominal organs into the pericardium. A 77-year-old female patient presenting with complaints of palpitation and difficulty in breathing was admitted to the emergency room. Left lateral thoracotomy revealed the herniation of abdominal organs into the thorax. A pericardial-diaphragmatic rupture and a pericardial rupture were found to co-exist. The diaphragm and the pericardium were repaired primarily. The case is presented here because herniation of abdominal organs into the pleural cavity through the pericardium is a rare condition. PMID:26336505

  4. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  5. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  6. Multi-Canister overpack necessity of the rupture disk

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, K.E.

    1998-11-03

    The Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) rupture disk precludes the MCO from pressurization above the design limit during transport from the K Basins to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility and prior to connection of the CVD process piping. Removal of the rupture disk from the MCO design would: (a) result in unacceptable dose consequences in the event a thermal runaway accident occurred; (b) increase residual risk; and (c) remove a degree of specificity from the dose calculations. The potential cost savings of removing the rupture disk from the MCO design is offset by the cost of design modifications, changes to hazard analyses and safety analyses, and changes to existing documentation. Retaining the rupture disk mitigates the consequences of MCO overpressurization, and considering the overall economic impacts to the SNF Project, is the most cost effective approach.

  7. Spontaneous Posterior Uterine Rupture in Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smid, Marcela C; Waltner-Toews, Rebecca; Goodnight, William

    2016-03-01

    Background The maternal and fetal risks of uterine distension in rapidly progressive twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in the setting of prior uterine scar are poorly characterized. Case We present the case of a 42-year-old woman, G4P1201, at 21 weeks gestation with stage-1 TTTS who developed a spontaneous posterior uterine rupture necessitating emergent laparotomy and delivery of previable fetuses, possibly due to prior uterine scar from a displaced intrauterine device. Conclusion TTTS may be a risk factor for uterine rupture, including uterine rupture in atypical anatomic locations. Prior unrecognized uterine scars, including perforations, may magnify the risk for atypical uterine rupture in the setting of excessive uterine distension. PMID:26929874

  8. Experimental investigation of creep rupture of reactor vessel lower head

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tze Yao; Pilch, M.M.; Bentz, J.H.

    1997-12-01

    This paper summarizes experiments on creep rupture of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower heads under the thermal and pressure loads of a core meltdown accident. Lower head failure (LHF) is of importance to accident assessment and accident management.

  9. Staged Management of a Ruptured Internal Mammary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Young; Kim, Gun Jik; Oh, Tak Hyuk; Lee, Young Ok; Lee, Sang Cjeol; Cho, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of an internal mammary artery (IMA) aneurysm in a patient with type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF-1) is a rare but life-threatening complication requiring emergency management. A 50-year-old man with NF-1 was transferred to the emergency department of Kyungpook National University Hospital, where an IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were diagnosed and drained. The IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were successfully repaired by staged management combining endovascular treatment and subsequent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The patient required cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation, the staged management of coil embolization, and a subsequent VATS procedure. This staged approach may be an effective therapeutic strategy in cases of IMA aneurysmal rupture. PMID:27066438

  10. Asymptomatic spontaneous rupture of suprasellar dermoid cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, S K; Phadke, R V; Trivedi, P; Bannerji, D

    2002-12-01

    Suprasellar dermoid cysts are uncommon intracranial lesions. CT and MRI findings in a rare case of asymptomatic rupture of suprasellar dermoid cyst with subarachnoid dissemination is described. PMID:12577101

  11. Arterial helium embolism from a ruptured intraaortic balloon.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, J W; Smith, J; Brown, P; Zinetti, C

    1988-12-01

    A 67-year-old man sustained a sudden global neurological deficit immediately following rupture of an intraaortic balloon catheter. Considerable improvement in his neurological function occurred during and after three hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:3196106

  12. Etiology and pathophysiology of tendon ruptures in sports.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Natri, A

    1997-04-01

    Of all spontaneous tendon ruptures, complete Achilles tendon tears are most closely associated with sports activities (1-3). Schönbauer (3) reported that 75% of all ruptures of the Achilles tendon are related to sports. In Plecko & Passl (2) the number was 60%. In our material of 430 cases, the number of sports-related Achilles ruptures was very similar (62%), while only 2% of ruptures of other tendons were sports-related (P < 0.001) (1). Also, the majority of Achilles reruptures occurred in sports. The ruptures occurred most often in soccer (34%), track and field (16%) and basketball (14%). The distribution of Achilles ruptures according to different sports varies considerably from country to country, according to the national sport traditions. For example, in northern and middle Europe, soccer, tennis, track and field, indoor ball games, downhill skiing, and gymnastics are the most common; and in North America, football, basketball, baseball, tennis and downhill skiing dominate the statistics (1, 2, 4). In sports, some Achilles ruptures are not spontaneous or degeneration-induced but may occur as a consequence of the remarkably high forces that are involved in the performance (2). Ruptures in the high jump or triple jump are good examples. In such cases, failure in the neuromuscular protective mechanisms due to fatigue or disturbed co-ordination can frequently be found. The spontaneous complete rupture of the supraspinatus tendon of the rotator cuff does not occur very frequently in sports. Those sports that include high-energy throwing movements, such as American and Finnish baseball, American football, rugby and discuss and javelin throwing, may, however, produce this injury. Partial tears and inflammations of the rotator cuff complex are much more frequent in throwing sports. The complete rupture of the proximal long head of the biceps brachii tendon is rare among competitive and recreational athletes. In our material, under 2% of these ruptures were associated with sports activities (5). The rupture (avulsion) of the distal tendon of the biceps muscle is rare. In sports, gymnastics, body building and weight lifting have been said to be able to produce this injury (6). In general, complete ruptures of the quadriceps tendon and the patellar tendon occur most often in older individuals. In our study, the mean age of these patients was 65 years (5). However, these injuries do also occur in younger age groups, especially in athletes. In athletes, the rupture most frequently occurs in high-power sports events, such as high jump, basketball and weight lifting, at the age of 15-30 years. A chronic-patellar apicitis (jumper's knee) may predispose rupture of the tendon (7). As is the case with the rotator cuff complex, overuse inflammation and partial tears of the quadriceps and patellar tendons are one of the most characteristic athletic injuries. Complete spontaneous ruptures of other tendons in sports are rare, although the literature does provide case studies from almost every tendon the human body possesses (8-18). PMID:9211611

  13. [Subcapsular hematoma and rupture of the liver graft].

    PubMed

    Görög, Dénes; Fehérvári, Imre; Doros, Attila; Nemes, Balázs; Máthé, Zoltán; Kóbori, László; Járay, Jeno

    2008-08-01

    Subcapsular hematoma and/or rupture of the graft is uncommon but serious complication of liver transplantation. It may develop spontaneously or following parenchymal injuries or percutaneous transhepatic invasive procedures. This report describes three cases of subcapsular hematoma and/or rupture of the graft with different courses among 350 liver transplantations. In the first case, the patient died due to graft rupture caused by a pseudoaneurysm after biopsy. In the second case, a small injury of the donor liver resulted in a deep rupture, which required partial resection of the graft. The patient died in sepsis later. The third patient presented with a large subcapsular haematoma during transplantation, which was successfully treated. The authors' strategies developed intraoperatively for the management of hematomas. These involve opening and removing of the haematoma, haemostasis with Argon coagulation, which resulted in an adherent Glisson's capsule to the parenchyma and covering with collagen fleece coated with fibrinogen and thrombin. PMID:18799407

  14. Pancreatic rupture in four cats with high-rise syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liehmann, Lea M; Dörner, Judith; Hittmair, Katharina M; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Reifinger, Martin; Dupré, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic trauma and rupture are rare after feline high-rise syndrome; however, should it happen, pancreatic enzymes will leak into the abdominal cavity and may cause pancreatic autodigestion and fatty tissue saponification. If not diagnosed and treated, it can ultimately lead to multiorgan failure and death. In this case series, 700 records of high-rise syndrome cats that presented between April 2001 and May 2006 were analysed, and four cats with pancreatic rupture were identified. Clinical signs, diagnosis using ultrasonography and lipase activity in blood and abdominal effusion, and treatment modalities are reported. Three cats underwent surgical abdominal exploration, one cat was euthanased. Rupture of the left pancreatic limb was confirmed in all cases. Two of the operated cats survived to date. High-rise syndrome can lead to abdominal trauma, including pancreatic rupture. A prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment should be considered. PMID:22314089

  15. The 2010 Chile Earthquake - Variations in the Rupture Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S. L.; Comte, D.; Lay, T.; Kiser, E.; Ishii, M.

    2010-12-01

    The magnitude 8.8, February 27, 2010 Chile, that occurred along the south central Nazca/South American plate boundary was an underthrusting event with an aftershock length of ~600 km along strike, with a bi-lateral rupture that started near Cobquecura and ruptured north to Valparaiso and ruptured 100 km south of Concepcion. This segment of the south central coast of Chile has a long record of damaging underthrusting earthquakes dating back to 1570 that based on intensity and tsunami reports show variations in the rupture mode between earthquake cycles. In light of the recent 2010 Chile earthquake we review the historic earthquake record along this segment of the subduction zone and compare it to the slip distribution determined during the 2010 mainshock. The 2010 earthquake appears to have failed at least 2 segments of the plate boundary that failed previously in multiple earthquakes with different rupture lengths. The southern region of the 2010 rupture last failed in 1835, 1751, 1657 and 1570. The northern segment of the 2010 rupture last failed in 1928 (Ms=8.0), 1751, and in 1730. The 1751 earthquake probably ruptured both the 1928 and 1835 earthquake zones based on intensities and tsunami reports. The 1751 earthquake had intensity 9 in Concepcion, Talcahuano, Chillan, and Talca, and intensity 6 at Valparaiso (Askew and Algermissen, 1985). The northern termination of the 2010 rupture appears to end near 33.5°S to ~34°S which coincides with the southern portion of the 1985 (Mw=8.0) zone that previously ruptured in 1906 (Ms=8.4). Modeling of teleseismic P, SH and R1 waveforms show a bilateral rupture with the largest patch of slip ~ 100 km north and updip of the epicenter with smaller patches of slip to the south and down dip of the epicenter (Lay et al., 2010). As expected the rupture velocity is difficult to constrain with teleseismic data. Recent results from back projecting the P-waves recorded using Transportable Array data in the U.S. also show a bilateral rupture with the location of the highest slip region north of the epicenter. All of these methods show significant mainshock slip in the 1928 rupture zone and lesser amounts of slip in the part of the 1835 rupture zone that did not fail in 1928, despite the longer time since 1835. The aftershocks of the 2010 and 1985 earthquakes overlap but the high slip region of the 2010 earthquakes does not appear to overlap significantly with the high slip region of the 1985 earthquake and the latter may have contributed to the termination of the 2010 earthquake. The 2010 Chile earthquake segment along the south central Chile subduction shows large variations in the rupture mode in previous earthquakes. What controls the size of the earthquake (i.e. how many segments fail in a given event) is still uncertain but important in understanding the potential hazard of the Chile subduction zone.

  16. Acute Patellar Tendon Rupture after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seung Joon; Pham, The Hien

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a catastrophic complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Though revision TKA has been suspected of being a predisposing factor for the occurrence of patellar tendon rupture, there are few reports on patellar tendon rupture after revision TKA. Here, we present a case of acute patellar tendon rupture that occurred after TKA revision. In the patient, the patellar tendon was so thin and could not be repaired, and accordingly was sutured end to end. We used the anterior tibialis tendon allograft to augment the poor quality patellar tendon tissue. Fixation of the allograft was done by using the bone tunnel created through tibial tuberosity and suturing the allograft to the patellar tendon and quadriceps tendon. The patient was instructed to wear a full extension knee splint and was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after operation. Full knee extension could be achieved 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26060612

  17. Spontaneous Posterior Uterine Rupture in Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Marcela C.; Waltner-Toews, Rebecca; Goodnight, William

    2015-01-01

    Background The maternal and fetal risks of uterine distension in rapidly progressive twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in the setting of prior uterine scar are poorly characterized. Case We present the case of a 42-year-old woman, G4P1201, at 21 weeks gestation with stage-1 TTTS who developed a spontaneous posterior uterine rupture necessitating emergent laparotomy and delivery of previable fetuses, possibly due to prior uterine scar from a displaced intrauterine device. Conclusion TTTS may be a risk factor for uterine rupture, including uterine rupture in atypical anatomic locations. Prior unrecognized uterine scars, including perforations, may magnify the risk for atypical uterine rupture in the setting of excessive uterine distension. PMID:26929874

  18. Acoustic investigation of rupture nucleation in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, Alexandre; Brantut, Nicolas; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Adeliner, Mathilde; Fortin, Jerome; Gueguen, Yves

    2010-05-01

    Triaxial compression experiments were performed on several materials (Glass, Granite, Basalt, Sandstone, Marble and Gypsum) at confining pressures ranging from 10 to 100MPa, and from room temperature to 70 degrees C. During each of these experiments, acoustic waves radiated from damage accumulation and fast crack propagation were continuously monitored thanks to a fast acoustic recorder, which enables to obtain continuous acoustogram of rupture nucleation and propagation, without the limitations of former trigger systems. In our experiments, rupture does not need to be slowed down, and the transition from quasi-static nucleation to dynamic propagation has now been systematically investigated.Comparing each material, three main observation can be drawn : - First, the amount of damage accumulation before the dynamic rupture propagation varies from material to material, and also depends on the pressure and temperature conditions. For instance, glass, granites and sandstones are typically materials where the nucleation involves a large amount of cracking prior to rupture. In contrast, rupture in basalt at low confinement is not preceded by any damage accumulation. Finally, pre-rupture damage accumulation can also be purely aseismic, which is the case of marble for instance. - Second, the brittle-ductile transition does not exactly overlaps the aseismic-seismic transition, at least in the conditions at which we performed our experiments. For example, marble deforms plastically beyond 50MPa, and although the deformation is ductile, a large amount of crack accumulates in the rock, which tends to make it unstable. In the same way, acoustic emissions decrease in gypsum with increasing pressure and temperatures. - Finally, the time during which rupture propagates depends largely on the rheology. For instance, and in the case of ductile failures such as in marble, dislocation and twin accumulation is such that cracks propagation steps are small and/or slow, and thus the radiated energy release rate remains small at early stages of rupture and increases with rupture speed. Put together, our observations clearly highlight the dependence of the radiated acoustic (and microseismic?) energy during rupture nucleation and early stages of crack propagation not only on the rupture propagation speed and the slip velocity but most importantly on the rock's lithology and rheology.

  19. Laboratory investigation of the radiative energy transfer during rupture nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A. J.; Brantut, N.; Ougier-Simonin, A.; Adelinet, M.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Triaxial compression experiments were performed on several materials (Glass, Granite, Basalt, Sandstone, Marble and Gypsum) at confining pressures ranging from 10 to 100MPa, and from room temperature to 70 degrees C. During each of these experiments, acoustic waves radiated from damage accumulation and fast crack propagation were continuously monitored thanks to a fast acoustic recorder, which enables to obtain continuous acoustogram of rupture nucleation and propagation, without the limitations of former trigger systems. In our experiments, rupture does not need to be slowed down, and the transition from quasi-static nucleation to dynamic propagation has now been systematically investigated.Comparing each material, three main observation can be drawn : - First, the amount of damage accumulation before the dynamic rupture propagation varies from material to material, and also depends on the pressure and temperature conditions. For instance, glass, granites and sandstones are typically materials where the nucleation involves a large amount of cracking prior to rupture. In contrast, rupture in basalt at low confinement is not preceded by any damage accumulation. Finally, pre-rupture damage accumulation can also be purely aseismic, which is the case of marble for instance. - Second, the brittle-ductile transition does not exactly overlaps the aseismic-seismic transition, at least in the conditions at which we performed our experiments. For example, marble deforms plastically beyond 50MPa, and although the deformation is ductile, a large amount of crack accumulates in the rock, which tends to make it unstable. In the same way, acoustic emissions decrease in gypsum with increasing pressure and temperatures. - Finally, the time during which rupture propagates depends largely on the rheology. For instance, and in the case of ductile failures such as in marble, dislocation and twin accumulation is such that cracks propagation steps are small and/or slow, and thus the radiated energy release rate remains small at early stages of rupture and increases with rupture speed. Put together, our observations clearly highlight the dependence of the radiated acoustic (and microseismic?) energy during rupture nucleation and early stages of crack propagation not only on the rupture propagation speed and the slip velocity but most importantly on the rock’s lithology and rheology.

  20. Atraumatic splenic rupture after coagulopathy owing to a snakebite.

    PubMed

    Kang, Changwoo; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong Chun; Kim, Dong Seob; Jeong, Chi-Young

    2014-09-01

    Among the many complications that may follow envenomation by some species of venomous snakes, coagulopathy is common and well known. However, hemoperitoneum induced by coagulopathy after a snakebite is rare. Atraumatic spontaneous splenic rupture is also an uncommon and life-threatening condition. Here, we report a case of presumptive envenomation by Gloydius spp. that resulted in atraumatic splenic rupture as a probable manifestation of coagulopathy, which has not been previously reported. PMID:24882658

  1. Surgical treatment of symptomatic and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tonev, A; Dimitrov, S; Shkvarla, L; Zahariev, T; Nachev, G

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increased volume of patients undergoing selective reconstruction on the occasion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in the last decades, the number of patients with rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) is not significantly decreased. RAAA is catastrophic and life-threatening condition. It remains a challenge to every practitioner. To optimize the surgical practice we studied the literature for the treatment of symptomatic and rupture aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. PMID:24151748

  2. First report of splenic rupture following deep enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Girelli, Carlo Maria; Pometta, Roberta; Facciotto, Corinna; Mella, Roberto; Bernasconi, Giordano

    2016-01-01

    Splenic rupture is a rare complication of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures. Herein, we report for the first time a case of splenic rupture following therapeutic retrograde double-balloon enteroscopy, which occurred in an 85-year-old man who was treated for recurrent mid-intestinal bleeding that resulted from ileal angioectasia. This patient promptly underwent an operation and eventually recovered. PMID:27170840

  3. Ruptured giant dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Dange, Nitin; Mahore, Amit; Goel, Atul

    2010-08-01

    We report a 27-year-old male with a giant dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus that extended into the posterior fossa and ruptured, causing meningitis and hydrocephalus. We also discuss the radiological features, surgical challenges and management difficulties of such a cyst. A giant dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus that extends into the posterior fossa and subsequently ruptures has not been previously reported. PMID:20483617

  4. Tetraventricular hydrocephalus due to ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, N; Oguzkurt, L

    2000-01-01

    We present the MR imaging findings in a patient who developed tetraventricular hydrocephalus after massive rupture of dermoid cysts with generalized subarachnoid and ventricular spread of cyst contents. The development of tetraventricular hydrocephalus due to ruptured dermoid is a very unusual complication, and was attributed to cyst contents interfering with passage of cerebrospinal fluid through the arachnoid granulations and fourth ventricular outlet foramina. PMID:11097411

  5. Imaging features of postpartum uterine rupture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Has, Recep; Topuz, Samet; Kalelioglu, Ibrahim; Tagrikulu, Demet

    2008-01-01

    We present a case report on a postpartum uterine rupture with the history of a previous cesarean section. During the diagnosis of rupture, ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging of the uterus were obtained. Ultrasound examination did not result in substantial information. CT and magnetic resonance imaging established the correct diagnosis. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, and the diagnosis was confirmed. Diagnostic qualifications of these three instruments were compared. PMID:17435984

  6. Traumatic rupture of both peroneal longus and brevis tendons.

    PubMed

    Pelet, Stéphane; Saglini, Marco; Garofalo, Raffaele; Wettstein, Michael; Mouhsine, Elyazid

    2003-09-01

    Injuries of peroneal tendons are rare. Diagnosis of traumatic rupture is often late and presents as chronic ankle instability. A case of a complete traumatic rupture of both peroneal longus and brevis tendons with acute clinical and radiological diagnosis is presented. Surgical repair was performed by direct end-to-end suture on the 4th day after trauma, with excellent functional outcome at 1-year follow-up. PMID:14524524

  7. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm diagnosed through non-contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chatra, Priyank S

    2013-01-01

    Rupture of an aneurysm is a rare complication although it is considered a common cause of death. Some of these patients present with the classic triad of symptoms such as abdominal pain, pulsatile abdominal mass and shock. Most symptoms are misleading and will only present as vague abdominal pain. Here we describe one such patient with an unusual presentation of a misleading abdominal mass which was eventually diagnosed as a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm after an emergency MRI. PMID:25003065

  8. A Tuboovarian Abscess Associated with a Ruptured Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer S.; Sheele, Johnathan Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of a tuboovarian abscess complicated by a ruptured spleen. Our patient was a 27-year-old female with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who presented to the emergency department (ED) with complaints of urinary symptoms and diarrhea. After being diagnosed with a tuboovarian abscess (TOA), she received antibiotics and was admitted to the gynecology service. Shortly thereafter she developed hemorrhagic shock, necessitating a splenectomy and salpingooophorectomy from a ruptured spleen. PMID:26904315

  9. Targets for Earthscope (USArray) in Southern California: Mid-Crustal Decollements Beneath the Transverse Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuis, G. S.; Langenheim, V. E.; Howard, K. A.; Catchings, R. D.; Okaya, D. A.; Clayton, R. W.; Nicholson, C.

    2002-12-01

    The Big Bend region of the San Andreas fault, in southern California, promises to be a productive region to investigate the linkage of strike-slip and compressional tectonics using flexible arrays under the USArray component of Earthscope. This region, occupied in large part by the Transverse Ranges, has been investigated recently by two active- and passive-source seismic-imaging surveys approximately 70 km apart (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment--LARSE94 and LARSE99). These surveys imaged mid-crustal reflective zones, interpreted as decollements, that originate at the San Andreas fault, extend southward beneath the Transverse Ranges and sedimentary basins of the Los Angeles region, and connect or appear to connect upward to compressional faults, including the exposed Sierra Madre and San Gabriel faults and the blind thrust faults that ruptured in the 1971 San Fernando and 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquakes. In the Transverse Ranges north of the Whittier Narrows epicenter, the reflective zone contains anomalously bright reflections and is subhorizontal (LARSE94); in the Transverse Ranges north of the San Fernando epicenter, the reflective zone contains clear but not anomalous reflections and dips moderately northward (LARSE99). These interpreted decollements may be continuous with one another. To test this possibility, we propose to image the region between the two LARSE surveys, through the vicinity of downtown Los Angeles, where such a decollement may be connected upward to postulated blind thrust faults beneath the Elysian Park anticline. We propose a seismic-imaging survey that begins at the coast, approximately follows the Los Angeles river northward, crosses the Elysian Park anticline, passes through the triple junction of the Hollywood, Verdugo, and Raymond faults, and passes over the Transverse Ranges to the Mojave Desert. In addition to this proposed transect, there are at least two other proposed transects, both east and west of the Los Angeles region, where mid-crustal decollements are likely to be imaged. In the eastern Transverse Ranges, exposed thrust faults along both north and south flanks of the San Bernardino Mountains dip beneath the mountains toward the complex San Andreas fault zone. A seismic-imaging transect through this region may determine if there is a mid-crustal decollement that roots at the San Andreas fault and connects upward to the exposed thrusts. A decollement may even link the San Andreas and the Eastern California shear zones. A western transect, across the western Transverse Ranges, would address whether a mid-crustal decollement acted as a surface above which the upper crust rotated by more than 90 degrees beginning in the early Miocene (~19 Ma).

  10. Rupture history of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan, China, earthquake: Evaluation of separate and joint inversions of geodetic, teleseismic, and strong-motion data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, Stephen; Mendoza, Carlos; Ramírez-Guzmán, Leonardo; Zeng, Yuesha; Mooney, Walter

    2013-01-01

    An extensive data set of teleseismic and strong-motion waveforms and geodetic offsets is used to study the rupture history of the 2008 Wenchuan, China, earthquake. A linear multiple-time-window approach is used to parameterize the rupture. Because of the complexity of the Wenchuan faulting, three separate planes are used to represent the rupturing surfaces. This earthquake clearly demonstrates the strengths and limitations of geodetic, teleseismic, and strong-motion data sets. Geodetic data (static offsets) are valuable for determining the distribution of shallower slip but are insensitive to deeper faulting and reveal nothing about the timing of slip. Teleseismic data in the distance range 30°–90° generally involve no modeling difficulties because of simple ray paths and can distinguish shallow from deep slip. Teleseismic data, however, cannot distinguish between different slip scenarios when multiple fault planes are involved because steep takeoff angles lead to ambiguity in timing. Local strong-motion data, on the other hand, are ideal for determining the direction of rupture from directivity but can easily be over modeled with inaccurate Green’s functions, leading to misinterpretation of the slip distribution. We show that all three data sets are required to give an accurate description of the Wenchuan rupture. The moment is estimated to be approximately 1.0 × 1021 N · m with the slip characterized by multiple large patches with slips up to 10 m. Rupture initiates on the southern end of the Pengguan fault and proceeds unilaterally to the northeast. Upon reaching the cross-cutting Xiaoyudong fault, rupture of the adjacent Beichuan fault starts at this juncture and proceeds bilaterally to the northeast and southwest.

  11. Hypocenter locations in finite-source rupture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mai, P.M.; Spudich, P.; Boatwright, J.

    2005-01-01

    We use a database of more than 80 finite-source rupture models for more than 50 earthquakes (Mw, 4.1-8.1) with different faulting styles occurring in both tectonic and subduction environments to analyze the location of the hypocenter within the fault and to consider the correlation between hypocenter location and regions of large slip. Rupture in strike-slip and crustal dip-slip earthquakes tends to nucleate in the deeper sections of the fault; subduction earthquakes do not show this tendency. Ratios of the hypocentral slip to either the average or the maximum slip show that rupture can nucleate at locations with any level of relative displacement. Rupture nucleates in regions of very large slip (D ??? 2/3 Dmax,) in only 16% of the events, in regions of large slip (1/3 Dmax < D < 2/3 Dmax,) in 35% of the events, and in regions of low slip (D ??? 1/3 Dmax) in 48% of the events. These percentages significantly exceed the percentages of fault area with very large (???7%) and large (???28%) slip. Ruptures that nucleate in regions of low slip, however, tend to nucleate close to regions of large slip and encounter a zone of very large slip within half the total rupture length. Applying several statistical tests we conclude that hypocenters are not randomly located on a fault but are located either within or close to regions of large slip.

  12. The temporal distribution of seismic radiation during deep earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, H.; Vidale, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The time history of energy release during earthquakes illuminates the process of failure, which remains enigmatic for events deeper than about 100 kilometers. Stacks of teleseismic records from regional arrays for 122 intermediate (depths of 100 to 350 kilometers) and deep (depths of 350 to 700 kilometers) earthquakes show that the temporal pattern of short-period seismic radiation has a systematic variation with depth. On average, for intermediate depth events more radiation is released toward the beginning of the rupture than near the end, whereas for deep events radiation is released symmetrically over the duration of the event, with an abrupt beginning and end of rupture. These findings suggest a variation in the style of rupture related to decreasing fault heterogeneity with depth.The time history of energy release during earthquakes illuminates the process of failure, which remains enigmatic for events deeper than about 100 kilometers. Stacks of teleseismic records from regional arrays for 122 intermediate (depths of 100 to 350 kilometers) and deep (depths of 350 to 700 kilometers) earthquakes show that the temporal pattern of short-period seismic radiation has a systematic variation with depth. On average, for intermediate depth events more radiation is released toward the beginning of the rupture than near the end, whereas for deep events radiation is released symmetrically over the duration of the event, with an abrupt beginning and end of rupture. These findings suggest a variation in the style of rupture related to decreasing fault heterogeneity with depth.

  13. Short term creep rupture predictions for tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge of the short term creep rupture behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (rupture times up to ˜2×103 hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to rupture, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term rupture data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the rupture time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a rupture time of approximately 100 hrs.

  14. Short term creep rupture predictions for Tantalum alloy T-3

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge of the short term creep rupture behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG's) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTG's near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (rupture times up to {approximately}2 {times} 10{sup 3} hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to rupture, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term rupture data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the rupture time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a rupture time of approximately 100 hrs. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Short term creep rupture predictions for tantalum alloy T-111

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge of the short term creep rupture behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (rupture times up to {similar to}2{times}10{sup 3} hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to rupture, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term rupture data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the rupture time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a rupture time of approximately 100 hrs.

  16. Dynamic rupture modeling with laboratory-derived constitutive relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okubo, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory-derived state variable friction constitutive relation is used in the numerical simulation of the dynamic growth of an in-plane or mode II shear crack. According to this formulation, originally presented by J.H. Dieterich, frictional resistance varies with the logarithm of the slip rate and with the logarithm of the frictional state variable as identified by A.L. Ruina. Under conditions of steady sliding, the state variable is proportional to (slip rate)-1. Following suddenly introduced increases in slip rate, the rate and state dependencies combine to produce behavior which resembles slip weakening. When rupture nucleation is artificially forced at fixed rupture velocity, rupture models calculated with the state variable friction in a uniformly distributed initial stress field closely resemble earlier rupture models calculated with a slip weakening fault constitutive relation. Model calculations suggest that dynamic rupture following a state variable friction relation is similar to that following a simpler fault slip weakening law. However, when modeling the full cycle of fault motions, rate-dependent frictional responses included in the state variable formulation are important at low slip rates associated with rupture nucleation. -from Author

  17. Limitations of rupture forecasting exposed by instantaneously triggered earthquake doublet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, E.; Elliott, J. R.; Sloan, R. A.; Craig, T. J.; Funning, G. J.; Hutko, A.; Parsons, B. E.; Wright, T. J.

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake hazard assessments and rupture forecasts are based on the potential length of seismic rupture and whether or not slip is arrested at fault segment boundaries. Such forecasts do not generally consider that one earthquake can trigger a second large event, near-instantaneously, at distances greater than a few kilometres. Here we present a geodetic and seismological analysis of a magnitude 7.1 intracontinental earthquake that occurred in Pakistan in 1997. We find that the earthquake, rather than a single event as hitherto assumed, was in fact an earthquake doublet: initial rupture on a shallow, blind reverse fault was followed just 19 s later by a second rupture on a separate reverse fault 50 km away. Slip on the second fault increased the total seismic moment by half, and doubled both the combined event duration and the area of maximum ground shaking. We infer that static Coulomb stresses at the initiation location of the second earthquake were probably reduced as a result of the first. Instead, we suggest that a dynamic triggering mechanism is likely, although the responsible seismic wave phase is unclear. Our results expose a flaw in earthquake rupture forecasts that disregard cascading, multiple-fault ruptures of this type.

  18. Evidence for Supershear Rupture During the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.; Beroza, G. C.; Segall, P.

    2005-12-01

    The 1906 San Francisco earthquake is perhaps the single most important event in the history of earthquake science. Measurements taken and analyzed for that event led to the demonstration of elastic rebound. Despite the importance of this earthquake, the two most recently published source models, one based on seismic data and the other based on geodetic data, are sharply discordant. We suggest the two source models can be reconciled if rupture in the 1906 earthquake exceeded the shear wave velocity. Observations of super-shear rupture in recent large strike-slip earthquakes suggests that it is possible and may even be typical of large strike-slip events. We find that we can fit the geodetic data and the envelope of the seismic data provided the rupture exceeds the shear wave speed to the north of Point Arena. We are analyzing non-repeated triangulation measurements and solving the joint slip/rupture velocity inverse problem to test this hypothesis more rigorously. If supershear rupture in large earthquakes is common, it would be of fundamental importance for understanding the hazard posed by large strike-slip faults in general, and for our understanding seismic hazard in northern California in particular, because so much of our characterization of the hazard in that region is based on our understanding of what happened in 1906. The prediction of strong ground motion in future large strike-slip earthquakes will be profoundly different if earthquake rupture velocity is routinely supershear.

  19. Fast rupture propagation for large strike-slip earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dun; Mori, Jim; Koketsu, Kazuki

    2016-04-01

    Studying rupture speeds of shallow earthquakes is of broad interest because it has a large effect on the strong near-field shaking that causes damage during earthquakes, and it is an important parameter that reflects stress levels and energy on a slipping fault. However, resolving rupture speed is difficult in standard waveform inversion methods due to limited near-field observations and the tradeoff between rupture speed and fault size for teleseismic observations. Here we applied back-projection methods to estimate the rupture speeds of 15 Mw ≥ 7.8 dip-slip and 8 Mw ≥ 7.5 strike-slip earthquakes for which direct P waves are well recorded in Japan on Hi-net, or in North America on USArray. We found that all strike-slip events had very fast average rupture speeds of 3.0-5.0 km/s, which are near or greater than the local shear wave velocity (supershear). These values are faster than for thrust and normal faulting earthquakes that generally rupture with speeds of 1.0-3.0 km/s.

  20. Nucleon Spin Structure: Longitudinal and Transverse

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-02-01

    Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments have provided us with the most extensive information on the unpolarized and longitudinal polarized parton (quark and gluon) distributions in the nucleon. It has becoming clear that transverse spin and transverse momentum dependent distributions (TMDs) study are crucial for a more complete understanding of the nucleon structure and the dynamics of the strong interaction. The transverse spin structure and the TMDs are the subject of increasingly intense theoretical and experimental study recently. With a high luminosity electron beam facility, JLab has played a major role in the worldwide effort to study both the longitudinal and transverse spin structure. Highlights of recent results will be presented. With 12-GeV energy upgrade, JLab will provide the most precise measurements in the valence quark region to close a chapter in longitudinal spin study. JLab will also perform a multi-dimensional mapping of the transverse spin structure and TMDs in the valence quark region through Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments, providing a 3-d partonic picture of the nucleon in momentum space and extracting the u and d quark tensor charges of the nucleon. The precision mapping of TMDs will also allow a detailed study of the quark orbital motion and its dynamics.

  1. Estimating the magnetic field strength from magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Martnez Gonzlez, M. J.; Manso Sainz, R.

    2015-05-01

    A properly calibrated longitudinal magnetograph is an instrument that measures circular polarization and gives an estimation of the magnetic flux density in each observed resolution element. This usually constitutes a lower bound of the field strength in the resolution element, given that it can be made arbitrarily large as long as it occupies a proportionally smaller area of the resolution element and/or becomes more transversal to the observer while still produce the same magnetic signal. However, we know that arbitrarily stronger fields are less likely - hG fields are more probable than kG fields, with fields above several kG virtually absent - and we may even have partial information about their angular distribution. Based on a set of sensible considerations, we derive simple formulae based on a Bayesian analysis to give an improved estimation of the magnetic field strength for magnetographs.

  2. Stability and conductivity of self assembled wires in a transverse electric field

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, C.; Hubler, A.

    2015-01-01

    Self assembling wire networks typically evolve to minimize the resistance across electrical contacts which are frequently used in a manner comparable to Hebbian learning. In this work, we demonstrate that electrical fields can also be used to cause an increase in the resistance of the wire network. We show that if such a wire is exposed to a transverse electric field, the wire is deformed in a way that depends on it’s tensile strength. We measure the wire resistance as a function of transverse field for several field strengths and show that by deforming the wire, the amplitude of the resulting shape can be modified in a controllable fashion. At a critical value of the transverse field, we show that the wire loses stability. At this point we observe thresholding behavior in that the resistance increases abruptly to a maximum value and the wire is destroyed. This thresholding behavior suggests that self assembled wires may be manipulated via an transverse electric field and demonstrates that a mechanism exists for the destruction of undesirable connections. PMID:26463476

  3. Stability and conductivity of self assembled wires in a transverse electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, C.; Hubler, A.

    2015-10-01

    Self assembling wire networks typically evolve to minimize the resistance across electrical contacts which are frequently used in a manner comparable to Hebbian learning. In this work, we demonstrate that electrical fields can also be used to cause an increase in the resistance of the wire network. We show that if such a wire is exposed to a transverse electric field, the wire is deformed in a way that depends on it’s tensile strength. We measure the wire resistance as a function of transverse field for several field strengths and show that by deforming the wire, the amplitude of the resulting shape can be modified in a controllable fashion. At a critical value of the transverse field, we show that the wire loses stability. At this point we observe thresholding behavior in that the resistance increases abruptly to a maximum value and the wire is destroyed. This thresholding behavior suggests that self assembled wires may be manipulated via an transverse electric field and demonstrates that a mechanism exists for the destruction of undesirable connections.

  4. Stability and conductivity of self assembled wires in a transverse electric field.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, C; Hubler, A

    2015-01-01

    Self assembling wire networks typically evolve to minimize the resistance across electrical contacts which are frequently used in a manner comparable to Hebbian learning. In this work, we demonstrate that electrical fields can also be used to cause an increase in the resistance of the wire network. We show that if such a wire is exposed to a transverse electric field, the wire is deformed in a way that depends on it's tensile strength. We measure the wire resistance as a function of transverse field for several field strengths and show that by deforming the wire, the amplitude of the resulting shape can be modified in a controllable fashion. At a critical value of the transverse field, we show that the wire loses stability. At this point we observe thresholding behavior in that the resistance increases abruptly to a maximum value and the wire is destroyed. This thresholding behavior suggests that self assembled wires may be manipulated via an transverse electric field and demonstrates that a mechanism exists for the destruction of undesirable connections. PMID:26463476

  5. Strength control of a ceramic composite by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Akira; Seo, Satoshi

    2001-04-01

    The change in strength of barium titanate/zirconia composite on polarization treatment is evaluated, and the mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed. We have already reported that the bending strength of this composite has increased on longitudinal poling. In this study bending strength of BT/8YSZ composite increased on longitudinal poling and decreases on transverse poling compared with the untreated samples. Both strengthened and weakened specimens tend to return to the almost original strength by heating over Tc of barium titanate. Then, the crack propagation after polarization treatment is observed by SEM, and the detour of cracks around barium titanate grains is found in the cracks going along the poling direction. The detour of crack probably has close connection with the increase in strength in the poling direction.

  6. Self-healing pulse-like shear ruptures in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lykotrafitis, George; Rosakis, Ares J; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2006-09-22

    Models predict that dynamic shear ruptures during earthquake faulting occur as either sliding cracks, where a large section of the interface slides behind a fast-moving rupture front, or self-healing slip pulses, where the fault relocks shortly behind the rupture front. We report experimental visualizations of crack-like, pulse-like, and mixed rupture modes propagating along frictionally held, "incoherent" interfaces separating identical solids, and we describe the conditions under which those modes develop. A combination of simultaneously performed measurements via dynamic photoelasticity and laser interferometry reveals the rupture mode type, the exact point of rupture initiation, the sliding velocity history, and the rupture propagation speed. PMID:16990544

  7. Right ventricular free wall dissection as a rupture tract in left ventricular rupture during acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Takada, Aya; Saito, Kazuyuki; Murai, Tatsuya; Kurosaki, Kunihiko; Kurihara, Katsuyoshi; Hamamatsu, Akihiko

    2015-11-01

    Three rare cases of cardiac rupture with right ventricular wall dissection during acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were reported. The cases comprised 2% among our 148 previously reported postinfarction cardiac ruptures with sudden death. The dissections occurred in hearts with biventricular inferior wall AMI and developed between the superficial layers and the deeper layers of inferior wall of the right ventricle. All had an endocardial tear at the basal septum where it meets the inferior free wall of the left ventricle, and had an epicardial tear on the middle inferior wall of the right ventricle. Based on the evidence of the ages of the thrombi of the rupture tracts, delayed epicardial rupture was found besides that soon after the right ventricular dissection. PMID:26594003

  8. STS-93 SSME Nozzle Tube Rupture Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, W. Dennis

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 was launched on July 23, 1999. There was an anomaly at the end of the launch in that the main engines shut down 0.16 second early because sensors detected a low level of oxidizer in the LOX tank (actually the duct from the tank to the vehicle). This resulted in a cutoff velocity for the vehicle that was 16 ft/sec low. It should have been 25872 ft/sec. The OMS engines were subsequently used to achieve the proper orbit. An investigation was immediately initiated into the cause of this LOX tank low level cutoff. It was noticed during the launch that the turbine temperatures for Main Engine 3 (E2019) were approximately 100 F higher than the preflight prediction. Linear Engine Model matching of the data indicated that a nozzle leak best fit the data. Post launch review of the data showed, that at approximately five seconds into the start, numerous parameters indicated small anomalous shifts. These shifts were all consistent with a rupture of nozzle tubes. Post launch review of the films showed that just after Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) ignition and just prior to liftoff a streak is seen in the exhaust plume of E2019. Just after liftoff the streak can be seen emanating from the nozzle wall. This photo confirmed that a leak was coming from the nozzle tubes. Based on the photo, the axial location of the leak was estimated to be 28 in. from the aft end of the nozzle and in line with nozzle coolant feed line #1. The streak continued to be visible during the launch.

  9. Design study of a transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange proof-of-principle experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E.; Kim, K.-J.; Power, J. G.; Piot, P.; Rihaoui, M. M.; Northern Illinois Univ.; FNL

    2008-01-01

    Transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange can be achieved through certain arrangements of dipole magnets and a dipole mode rf cavity. Theory on such schemes has been developed in the past several years. In this paper we report our numerical simulations to optimize a low energy (E sime 15 MeV) proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). Parametric studies of the dipole magnets and cavity strengths, as well as initial beam parameters, are presented.

  10. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  11. State machine components selection based on minimal transversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanowicz, Łukasz; Mróz, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    The article relates to the problem of State Machine Components selection using hypergraphs theory. The base method of exact transversals was presented as well as exact transversal and simple transversal computation. Due to limitations of xt-hypergraph application, authors proposed to extend the baseline method by usage of minimal transversals.

  12. Transverse current on strip dipole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, A. D.

    1982-07-01

    Analyses of the current of thin wire dipole antennas presuppose that the current is parallel to the antenna axis. It is pointed out that a component of current transverse to the antenna axis can exist for antennas having a noncircular cross section, such as the strip dipole. The present investigation is concerned with a perfectly conducting strip antenna which is center driven by a delta function generator, taking into account the surface current-density components Kx(x,z) and Kz(x,z). In the solution of the resulting integral equations, it is assumed that Kz is considerably stronger than the transverse surface current density Kx. After obtaining an approximation to Kz, the second integral equation is solved for Kx. Results for the normalized transverse surface current density are presented in graphs.

  13. Transverse Spin Relaxation in Liquid X

    SciTech Connect

    Romalis, M. V.; Ledbetter, M. P.

    2001-08-06

    Using spin-echo NMR techniques we study the transverse spin relaxation of hyperpolarized liquid X{sup 129}e in a spherical cell. We observe an instability of the transverse magnetization due to dipolar fields produced by liquid X{sup 129}e , and find that imperfections in the {pi} pulses of the spin-echo sequence suppress this instability. A simple perturbative model of this effect is in good agreement with the data. We obtain a transverse spin relaxation time of 1300sec in liquid X{sup 129}e , and discuss applications of hyperpolarized liquid X{sup 129}e as a sensitive magnetic gradiometer and for a permanent electric dipole moment search.

  14. Measuring the transverse spin density of light.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Martin; Bauer, Thomas; Aiello, Andrea; Banzer, Peter

    2015-02-13

    We generate tightly focused optical vector beams whose electric fields spin around an axis transverse to the beams' propagation direction. We experimentally investigate these fields by exploiting the directional near-field interference of a dipolelike plasmonic field probe placed adjacent to a dielectric interface. This directionality depends on the transverse electric spin density of the excitation field. Near- to far-field conversion mediated by the dielectric interface enables us to detect the directionality of the emitted light in the far field and, therefore, to measure the transverse electric spin density with nanoscopic resolution. Finally, we determine the longitudinal electric component of Belinfante's elusive spin momentum density, a solenoidal field quantity often referred to as "virtual." PMID:25723220

  15. High-power, fundamental transverse mode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dental, A.G.; Eisenstein, G.; Marcatili, E.A.J.; Tucker, R.S.

    1988-11-22

    This patent describes an optical source comprising: first and second reflectors separated from and opposite to each other for forming a single resonant optical cavity, a semiconductor gain medium having a major surface including a stripe contact extending longitudinally and transversely along the major surface for defining a large optical cavity in a volume of the gain medium thereunder, the semiconductor gain medium for generating a high-power optical signal by spontaneous emission, a single-mode optical fiber coupled to the semiconductor gain medium responsive to the high-power optical signal for causing a fundamental transverse mode optical signal to be amplified by the gain medium, the semiconductor gain medium and the single-mode optical fiber being disposed within the single resonant optical cavity formed by the reflectors, the optical source for producing stimulated coherent radiation in a fundamental transverse mode.

  16. Compensatory muscle activation caused by tendon lengthening post Achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Suydam, Stephen M.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between the lengthening of the Achilles tendon post rupture and surgical repair to muscle activation patterns during walking in order to serve as a reference for post-surgical assessment. Method The Achilles tendon lengths were collected from 4 patients with an Achilles tendon rupture 6 and 12 month post-surgery along with 5 healthy controls via ultrasound. EMG was collected from the triceps surae muscles and tibialis anterior during over-ground walking. Results Achilles lengths at 6 and 12 months post-surgery were significantly longer (p < 0.05) on the involved side compared to the uninvolved side but there were no side to side differences in the healthy controls. The integrated EMG (iEMG) of the involved side was significantly higher than the uninvolved side in the lateral gastrocnemius at 6 months and for the medial gastrocnemius at 12 months in the patients with Achilles tendon rupture; no side to side difference was found in the healthy controls. The triceps surae muscles’ activations were fair to moderately correlated to the Achilles lengths (0.38 < r < 0.52). Conclusions The increased Achilles tendon length and iEMG from the triceps surae muscles indicate that loss of function is primarily caused by anatomical changes in the tendon and the appearance of muscle weakness is due to a lack of force transmission capability. This study indicates that when aiming for full return of function and strength an important treatment goal appears to be to minimize tendon elongation. Level of evidence Prognostic prospective case series. Level IV. PMID:23609529

  17. Behavior Of A Confined Tension Lap Splice In High-Strength Reinforced Concrete Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, Ahmed H.; Abousafa, Hala; El-Hadidi, Omaia S.

    2015-09-01

    The results of an experimental program conducted on seventeen simply supported concrete beams to study the effect of transverse reinforcement on the behavior of the lap splice of a steel reinforcement in tension zones in high-strength concrete beams are presented. The parameters included in the experimental program were the concrete compressive strength, the lap splice length, the amount of transverse reinforcement provided within the splice region, and the shape of the transverse reinforcement around the spliced bars. The experimental results showed that the displacement ductility increased and the mode of failure changed from a splitting bond failure to a flexural failure when the amount of the transverse reinforcement in the splice region increased, and the compressive strength increased up to 100 MPa. The presence of the transverse reinforcement around the spliced bars had a pronounced effect on increasing the ultimate load, the ultimate deflection, and the displacement ductility. The prediction of maximum steel stresses for spliced bars using the ACI 318-05 building code was compared with the experimental results. The comparison showed that the effect of the transverse reinforcement around spliced bars has to be considered into the design equations for lap splice length in high-strength concrete beams.

  18. Evolution of transverse modes in FELIX macropulses

    SciTech Connect

    Weits, H.H.; Lin, L.; Werkhoven, G.H.C. van

    1995-12-31

    We present ringdown measurements of both the intracavity beam, using a low reflection beamsplitter, as well as the hole-outcoupled beam of FELIX, the intracavity measurements being taken at various sets of transverse coordinates. Recent measurements show a significant difference in the decay of the signals at different radial positions, suggesting the presence of higher order transverse modes. The formation of transverse modes depends on the properties of the cold cavity and its losses (i.e. resonator parameters, diffraction and outcoupling at the hole, absorption and edge losses on the mirrors, waveguide clipping), as well as on the gain mechanism. Both simulations with the axisymmetric ELIXER code and previous hole-outcoupled measurements indicated a substantial energy content of the 2nd or 4th Gauss-Laguerre (GL) mode for the 20-30 {mu}m regime of FELIX. Moreover, as FELIX has a phase degenerate cavity, the fundamental and higher order transverse modes can interplay to create a reduced outcoupling efficiency at the hole. For example, in contrast to the decay rate of 13% per roundtrip that we would expect for a pure gaussian beam when we include a loss of 6% for the reflection at the intracavity beamsplitter, recent simulations indicate a decay rate as high as 23% of the hole-outcoupled signal. In this case the 2nd order GL mode contains 30% of the total intracavity power. The effect of transverse modes on subpulses in the limit cycle regime is an interesting aspect. As soon as a subpulse is losing contact with the electrons, its transverse pattern will exhibit an on-axis hole after a few roundtrips, according to the simulations. This process could mean that the subpulses are less pronounced in the hole-outcoupled signal of FELIX 1.

  19. Relationship between High-frequency Radiation and Asperity Ruptures, Revealed by Hybrid Back-projection with a Non-planar Fault Model

    PubMed Central

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Hirano, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency seismic waves are generated by abrupt changes of rupture velocity and slip-rate during an earthquake. Therefore, analysis of high-frequency waves is crucial to understanding the dynamic rupture process. Here, we developed a hybrid back-projection method that considers variations in focal mechanisms by introducing a non-planar fault model that reflects the subducting slab geometry. We applied it to teleseismic P-waveforms of the Mw 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake to estimate the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.5–2.0 Hz) radiation. By comparing the result with the coseismic slip distribution obtained by waveform inversion, we found that strong high-frequency radiation can precede and may trigger a large asperity rupture. Moreover, in between the large slip events, high-frequency radiation of intermediate strength was concentrated along the rupture front. This distribution suggests that by bridging the two large slips, this intermediate-strength high-frequency radiation might play a key role in the interaction of the large slip events. PMID:25406638

  20. Relationship between high-frequency radiation and asperity ruptures, revealed by hybrid back-projection with a non-planar fault model.

    PubMed

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Hirano, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency seismic waves are generated by abrupt changes of rupture velocity and slip-rate during an earthquake. Therefore, analysis of high-frequency waves is crucial to understanding the dynamic rupture process. Here, we developed a hybrid back-projection method that considers variations in focal mechanisms by introducing a non-planar fault model that reflects the subducting slab geometry. We applied it to teleseismic P-waveforms of the Mw 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake to estimate the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.5-2.0 Hz) radiation. By comparing the result with the coseismic slip distribution obtained by waveform inversion, we found that strong high-frequency radiation can precede and may trigger a large asperity rupture. Moreover, in between the large slip events, high-frequency radiation of intermediate strength was concentrated along the rupture front. This distribution suggests that by bridging the two large slips, this intermediate-strength high-frequency radiation might play a key role in the interaction of the large slip events. PMID:25406638