Sample records for transverse rupture strength

  1. Strength of transversely isotropic rocks

    E-print Network

    Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

    2008-01-01

    This thesis proposes a new Anisotropic Matsuoka-Nakai (AMN) criterion to characterize the failure of transversely isotropic rocks under true triaxial stress states. One major obstacle in formulating an anisotropic criterion ...

  2. Stress-rupture strength of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M. [Teledyne Allvac, Monroe, NC (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-rupture properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.

  3. Hot strength of creep resistant ferritic steels and relationship to creep rupture data

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Hot strength of creep resistant ferritic steels and relationship to creep rupture data R. C relationship between the temperature dependence of hot tensile strength and creep rupture stress. Keywords: Hot in which the hot strength of austenite has been modelled, primarily as an aid to the simulation of the hot

  4. Stress-rupture strength and microstructural stability of W-HF-C wire reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    W-Hf-C/superalloy composites were found to be potentially useful for turbine blade applications on the basis of stress-rupture strength. The 100-and 1000-hour rupture strengths obtained for 70 volume percent fiber composites tested at 1090 C were 420 and 280 MN/sq m (61,000 and 41,000 psi). The investigation indicated that with better quality fibers, composites having 100- and 1000-hour rupture strengths of 570 and 370 MN/sq m (82,000 and 54,000 psi) may be obtained. Metallographic studies indicated sufficient fiber-matrix compatibility for long time applications at 1090 C for 1000 hours or more.

  5. Severe neonatal complication of transverse lie after preterm premature rupture of membranes

    PubMed Central

    Van der Kaay, D C M; Horsch, S; Duvekot, J J

    2013-01-01

    Both transverse lie and preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) are associated with neonatal morbidity and mortality. We present a neonate born at 29?weeks gestation with severe birth trauma after PPROM and transverse lie. The patient had extensive swelling and areas of desquamated and necrotic skin of the right lower limb. Neonatal compartment syndrome (NCS) was suspected. Perfusion of the limb improved after decompressing subcutaneous incisions. A fetus in transverse lie may be mechanically damaged in the case of PPROM, especially at an early gestational age. Early recognition is of great interest in the management and prognosis of NCS. PMID:23839604

  6. Design loads and uncertainties for the transverse strength of ships

    SciTech Connect

    Pittaluga, A. [Univ. of Genova (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    Rational design of ship structures is becoming a reality, and a reliability based approach for the longitudinal strength assessment of ship hulls is close to implementation. Transverse strength of ships is a step behind, mainly due to the complexity of the collapse modes associated with transverse strength. Nevertheless, some investigations are being made and the importance of an acceptable stochastic model for the environmental demand on the transverse structures is widely recognized. In the paper, the problem of the determination of the sea loads on a transverse section of a ship is discussed. The problem of extrapolating the calculated results, which are relevant to the submerged portion of the hull, to areas which are only occasionally wet in extreme conditions is also addressed.

  7. Delamination strength of YBCO coated conductors under transverse tensile stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. C. van der Laan; J. W. Ekin; C. C. Clickner; T. C. Stauffer

    2007-01-01

    We present a new experimental technique to measure the delamination strength under transverse tensile stress of YBa2Cu3O7-delta coated conductors for electric power applications. The delamination strength, defined as the tensile stress at which the ceramic layers delaminate from one another, is measured at 76 K for different sample configurations. The delamination strength is reduced by as much as 40% when

  8. Delamination strength of YBCO coated conductors under transverse tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, D. C.; Ekin, J. W.; Clickner, C. C.; Stauffer, T. C.

    2007-08-01

    We present a new experimental technique to measure the delamination strength under transverse tensile stress of YBa2Cu3O7-? coated conductors for electric power applications. The delamination strength, defined as the tensile stress at which the ceramic layers delaminate from one another, is measured at 76 K for different sample configurations. The delamination strength is reduced by as much as 40% when the conductor is slit to smaller width, a standard fabrication process, and this reduction is due to damage to the ceramic layers near the edges of the conductor. We found that the delamination strength of slit coated conductors can be raised significantly by reinforcing the conductor by laminating it with copper strips and adding solder fillets at the edges. In relatively strong conductors, where the delamination strength is as high as 15 MPa, the critical current does not degrade before actual delamination. This fact greatly simplifies sample characterization of practical high-strength conductors, since only mechanical measurements need to be made. The critical current does, however, degrade significantly as a function of transverse stress before delamination in weak conductors that have relatively low delamination strength below 15 MPa. We discuss how a soft metallic layer in YBCO coated conductors may limit the transverse stress that the superconducting layer experiences in applications. Contribution of NIST, a US Government Agency, not subject to copyright.

  9. Scaling effects on damage development, strength, and stress-rupture life laminated composites in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, J. Andre

    The damage development and strength of ply-level scaled carbon/epoxy composite laminates having stacking sequence of ({+}thetasb{n}/{-}thetasb{n}/90sb{2n} rbracksb{s} where constraint ply angle, theta, was 0sp°, 15sp°, 30sp°,\\ 45sp°,\\ 60sp°, and 75sp°, and size was scaled as n = 1, 2, 3, and 4, is reported in Part I. X-radiography was used to monitor damage developments. First-ply failure stress, and tensile strength were recorded. First-ply failure of the midplane 90sp° plies depended on the stiffness of constraint plies, and size. All 24 cases were predicted using Zhang's shear-lag model and data generated from lbrack0sb2/90sb2rbracksb{s} cross-ply tests. Laminate strength was controlled by the initiation of a triangular-shaped local delamination of the surface angle plies. This delamination was predicted using O'Brien's strain energy release rate model for delamination of surface angle plies. For each ply angle, the smallest laminate was used to predict delamination (and strength) of the other sizes. The in-situ tensile strength of the 0sp° plies within different cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates of varying size and stacking sequence is reported in Part II. No size effect was observed in the strength of 0sp° plies for those lay-ups having failure confined to the gauge section. Laminates exhibiting a size-strength relationship, had grip region failures for the larger sizes. A statistically significant set of 3-point bend tests of unidirectional beams were used to provide parameters for a Weibull model, to re-examine relationship between ultimate strength of 0sp° plies and specimen volume. The maximum stress in the 0sp° plies in bending, and the tensile strength of the 0sp° plies (from valid tests only) was the same. Weibull theory predicted loss of strength which was not observed in the experiments. An effort to model the durability and life of quasi-isotropic E-glass/913 epoxy composite laminates under steady load and in an acidic environment is reported in Part III. Stress-rupture tests of unidirectional coupons immersed in a weak hydrochloric acid solution was conducted to determine their stress-life response. Creep tests were conducted on unidirectional coupons parallel and transverse to the fibers, and on {±}45sp° layups to characterize the lamina stress- and time-dependent compliances. These data were used in a composite stress-rupture life model, based on the critical element modeling philosophy of Reifsnider, to predict the life of two ply-level thickness-scaled quasi-isotropic laminates.

  10. Creep rupture strength of activated-TIG welded 316L(N) stainless steel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Sakthivel; M. Vasudevan; K. Laha; P. Parameswaran; K. S. Chandravathi; M. D. Mathew; A. K. Bhaduri

    2011-01-01

    316L(N) stainless steel plates were joined using activated-tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding and conventional TIG welding process. Creep rupture behavior of 316L(N) base metal, and weld joints made by A-TIG and conventional TIG welding process were investigated at 923K over a stress range of 160–280MPa. Creep test results showed that the enhancement in creep rupture strength of weld joint fabricated

  11. Self-healing slip pulses in dynamic rupture models due to velocity-dependent strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Seismological observations of short slip duration on faults (short rise time on seismograms) during earthquakes are not consistent with conventional crack models of dynamic rupture and fault slip. In these models, the leading edge of rupture stops only when a strong region is encountered, and slip at an interior point ceases only when waves from the stopped edge of slip propagate back to that point. In contrast, some seismological evidence suggests that the duration of slip is too short for waves to propagate from the nearest edge of the ruptured surface, perhaps even if the distance used is an asperity size instead of the entire rupture dimension. What controls slip duration, if not dimensions of the fault or of asperities? In this study, dynamic earthquake rupture and slip are represented by a propagating shear crack. For all propagating shear cracks, slip velocity is highest near the rupture front, and at a small distance behind the rupture front, the slip velocity decreases. As pointed out by Heaton (1990), if the crack obeys a negative slip-rate-dependent strength relation, the lower slip velocity behind the rupture front will lead to strengthening that further reduces the velocity, and under certain circumstances, healing of slip can occur. The boundary element method of Hamano (1974) is used in a program adapted from Andrews (1985) for numerical simulations of mode II rupture with two different velocity-dependent strength functions. For the first function, after a slip-weakening displacement, the crack follows an exponential velocity-weakening relation. The characteristic velocity V0 of the exponential determines the magnitude of the velocity-dependence at dynamic velocities. The velocity-dependence at high velocity is essentially zero when V0 is small and the resulting slip velocity distribution is similar to slip weakening. If V0 is larger, rupture propagation initially resembles slip-weakening, but spontaneous healing occurs behind the rupture front. The rise time and rupture propagation velocity depend on the choice of constitutive parameters. The second strength function is a natural log velocity-dependent form similar to constitutive laws that fit experimental rock friction data at lower velocities. Slip pulses also arise with this function. For a reasonable choice of constitutive parameters, slip pulses with this function do not propagate at speeds greater than the Raleighwave velocity. The calculated slip pulses are similar in many aspects to seismic observations of short rise time. In all cases of self-healing slip pulses, the residual stress increases with distance behind the trailing edge of the pulse so that the final stress drop is much less than the dynamic stress drop, in agreement with the model of Brune (1976) and some recent seismological observations of rupture.

  12. The Inclusion of Arbitrary Load Histories in the Strength Decay Model for Stress Rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Stress rupture is a failure mechanism where failures can occur after a period of time, even though the material has seen no increase in load. Carbon/epoxy composite materials have demonstrated the stress rupture failure mechanism. In a previous work, a model was proposed for stress rupture of composite overwrap pressure vessels (COPVs) and similar composite structures based on strength degradation. However, the original model was limited to constant load periods (holds) at constant load. The model was expanded in this paper to address arbitrary loading histories and specifically the inclusions of ramp loadings up to holds and back down. The broadening of the model allows for failures on loading to be treated as any other failure that may occur during testing instead of having to be treated as a special case. The inclusion of ramps can also influence the length of the "safe period" following proof loading that was previously predicted by the model. No stress rupture failures are predicted in a safe period because time is required for strength to decay from above the proof level to the lower level of loading. Although the model can predict failures during the ramp periods, no closed-form solution for the failure times could be derived. Therefore, two suggested solution techniques were proposed. Finally, the model was used to design an experiment that could detect the difference between the strength decay model and a commonly used model for stress rupture. Although these types of models are necessary to help guide experiments for stress rupture, only experimental evidence will determine how well the model may predict actual material response. If the model can be shown to be accurate, current proof loading requirements may result in predicted safe periods as long as 10(13) years. COPVs design requirements for stress rupture may then be relaxed, allowing more efficient designs, while still maintaining an acceptable level of safety.

  13. Delta ferritic heat-resistant chromium-molybdenum steels with improved rupture strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobner, P. J.; Bišs, V.; Sponseller, D. L.

    1980-06-01

    Nine experimental delta-ferritic steels have been examined as potential low expansion heat-resistant steels for use in fossil fuel power generation, nuclear power generation, nuclear process heat plants and coal gasification plants. The steels contain 10 to 14 pct Cr and 2 to 6 pct Mo, with additions of columbium, titanium, vanadium, aluminum and boron. Room-temperature tensile properties and oxidation resistance of all steels were determined. Selected steels were aged for 1000 h at 760 °C (1400 °F) and subjected to elevated temperature tensile tests at the aging temperature. Creep-rupture properties of selected steels were determined at 760 and 815 °C (1400 and 1500 °F). Extensive metallographic and phase identification studies were conducted. Of the two steels tested for creep-rupture strength, the 10Cr-6Mo-0.5Cb steel, with good room-temperature ductility, has rupture strength exceeding that of martensitic 12Cr-1Mo-V steel. The 14Cr-3Mo-0.5Cb-lTi-2Al steel exhibits an even higher rupture strength, but has only marginal ductility at room temperature.

  14. Die separation and rupture strength for deep reactive ion etched silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. A.; Berfield, T. A.

    2013-08-01

    The work herein analyzes the bending stress required to separate and rupture die from notched silicon wafers. Trenches are formed on the wafers using either a dicing or Bosch deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. Weibull distribution parameters are reported for all variations of the fracture experiments. Additionally, the relative defect rate associated with DRIE-based die separation are compared with traditional saw methods for a variety of notch depths. Results indicate that the DRIE-based separation technique offers improved rupture strength over the traditional methods, but can also greatly reduce die strength if performed improperly. Dies completely separated by the DRIE process showed a mean failure stress of 1.16 GPa with a Weibull standard deviation of 682 MPa compared to 452 and 65 MPa mean and standard deviation stress for die completely separated by a traditional dicing saw.

  15. The Effect of Environmental-Loading History on the Transverse Strength of GRP Laminate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ori Ishai; A. Mazor

    1975-01-01

    Loaded transverse GRP specimens and epoxy references were exposed to different environmental conditions. Tensile strength measurements conducted under exposure and after a drying period yielded the following main conclusions:Current and residual transverse strength was not affected much by cold-water and hot dry air during a short exposure period.Under hot-water exposure, transverse strength showed a significant drop with time, especially beyond

  16. Influence of diesel engine combustion on the rupture strength of partially stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Begun, G.M.; Cavin, O.B.; Foster, B.E.; Graves, R.L.; Kahl, W.K.; Liu, K.C.; Simpson, W.A.

    1988-12-01

    Results are reported for tests on partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ-TS and MS grades) bars exposed in the combustion chambers of two operating single- and two-cylinder 0.825-L diesel engines. The specifics of test conditions and procedures are presented. Subsequent to exposure, the bars were subjected to four-point bending, and the rupture strengths were determined. The TS grade showed a decrease in average strength of 32%, whereas the strength of the MS grade decreased by about 9% in comparison to average behavior of unaged material. Results of x-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy, isothermal aging studies, and ceramographic characterization are given to define reasons for material degradation. 9 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Geometric confinement governs the rupture strength of H-bond assemblies at a critical length scale.

    PubMed

    Keten, Sinan; Buehler, Markus J

    2008-02-01

    The ultrastructure of protein materials such as spider silk, muscle tissue, or amyloid fibers consists primarily of beta-sheets structures, composed of hierarchical assemblies of H-bonds. Despite the weakness of H-bond interactions, which have intermolecular bonds 100 to 1000 times weaker than those in ceramics or metals, these materials combine exceptional strength, robustness, and resilience. We discover that the rupture strength of H-bond assemblies is governed by geometric confinement effects, suggesting that clusters of at most 3-4 H-bonds break concurrently, even under uniform shear loading of a much larger number of H-bonds. This universally valid result leads to an intrinsic strength limitation that suggests that shorter strands with less H-bonds achieve the highest shear strength at a critical length scale. The hypothesis is confirmed by direct large-scale full-atomistic MD simulation studies of beta-sheet structures in explicit solvent. Our finding explains how the intrinsic strength limitation of H-bonds can be overcome by the formation of a nanocomposite structure of H-bond clusters, thereby enabling the formation of larger and much stronger beta-sheet structures. Our results explain recent experimental proteomics data, suggesting a correlation between the shear strength and the prevalence of beta-strand lengths in biology. PMID:18269263

  18. Effects of coating with different ceromers on the impact strength, transverse strength and elastic modulus of polymethyl methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Gül, Esma Ba?ak; Atala, Mustafa Hayati; E?er, Bekir; Polat, Nilüfer Tülin; Asiltürk, Meltem; Gültek, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) after coating with different ceromers. For transverse strength and modulus of elasticity tests, specimens of 65×10×2.5 mm dimensions were prepared (5 groups, n=10). For impact strength test, specimens of 60×7.5×4 mm dimensions were prepared (5 groups, n=10). Test group specimens were coated with one of four different types of ceromers, and specimens in the control group were not coated. After specimens were tested for transverse and impact strengths, the data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Conover post hoc tests (p<0.05). GLYMOTEOS-TiO2 and A174-TEOS significantly increased the transverse strength of PMMA. All ceromers caused a statistically significant increase in the elastic modulus of PMMA. While GLYMO-TEOS-ZrO2 significantly decreased the impact strength, the other ceromers did not cause any statistically significant difference in impact strength. Coating with ceromers substantially improved the mechanical properties of PMMA. PMID:25904101

  19. Assessment of an improved multiaxial strength theory based on creep-rupture data for Inconel 600

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    A new multiaxial strength theory incorporating three independent stress parameters was developed and reported by the author in 1984. It was formally incorporated into ASME Code Case N47-29 in 1990. The new theory provided significantly more accurate stress-rupture life predictions than obtained using the classical theories of von Mises, Tresca, and Rankins (maximum principal stress), for Types 304 and 316 stainless steel tested at 593 and 600{degrees}C respectively under different biaxial stress states. Additional results for Inconel 600 specimens tested at 816{degrees}C under tension-tension and tension-compression stress states are presented in this paper and show a factor of approximately 2.4 reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed lives as compared to the classical theories of von Mises and Tresca and a factor of about 5 as compared to the Rankins theory. A key feature of the theory, which incorporates the maximum deviatoric stress, the first invariant of the stress tensor, and the second invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor, is its ability to distinguish between life under tensile versus compressive stress states.

  20. Determination of transverse shear strength through torsion testing

    SciTech Connect

    Marcucelli, K.T.; Fish, J.C. [Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, Palmdale, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The in-plane characterization of composite materials is, in general, well understood and widely utilized throughout the aerospace industry. However, the use of composites in structural elements such as fuselage frames and rotorcraft flexbeams place large out-of-plane or through-the-thickness stresses for which there is little data. Efforts to determine the interlaminar shear strength of laminated composites have been hampered due to the nonlinear behavior of test specimens and the limitations of current analysis tools. An inexpensive rectangular torsion test specimen was designed to determine the interlaminar shear strength, s{sub 23}, of composite materials. Six different layups were fabricated of AS4/2220-3 carbon/epoxy unidirectional tape and tested in pure torsion. All of the specimens failed abruptly with well-defined shear cracks and exhibited linear load-deflection behavior. A quasi-three-dimensional (Q-3-D) finite element analysis was conducted on each of the specimen configurations to determine the interlaminar shear stress at failure. From this analysis, s{sub 23} was found to be 107 MPa for this material.

  1. Transverse creep and stress-rupture of borsic-aluminum composites and borsic-aluminum composites containing stainless steel and titanium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. Breinan; K. G. Kreider

    1973-01-01

    The transverse creep and stress rupture behavior of a number of Borsic®-aluminum composites was investigated at temperatures from 200° to 400°C. The cpmposites studied consisted of nominally 50 vol pct Borsic fiber and included matrices of 6061, 2024, 2219, and 5052 aluminum alloys. The effect of heat treatment was studied in the heat-treatable alloys. Where transverse composite behavior differed from

  2. Transverse creep and stress-rupture of borsic-aluminum composites and borsic-aluminum composites containing stainless steel and titanium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. Breinan; K. G. Kreider

    1973-01-01

    The transverse creep and stress rupture behavior of a number of Borsic?-aluminum composites was investigated at temperatures\\u000a from 200? to 400?C. The cpmposites studied consisted of nominally 50 vol pct Borsic fiber and included matrices of 6061, 2024,\\u000a 2219, and 5052 aluminum alloys. The effect of heat treatment was studied in the heat-treatable alloys. Where transverse composite\\u000a behavior differed from

  3. Comparisons of 76Hz transverse and radial magnetic field strength components received in Connecticut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, P. R.

    1986-03-01

    Since June 1970, we have made extremely low frequency (ELF) measurements of the transverse horizontal magnetic field strength, H sub phi, received in Connecticut. Occasionally, we also have measured either the vertical electric field strength, E sub v, or the radial horizontal magnetic field strength, H sub rho. The AN/BSR-1 ELF receivers are located at the Naval Underwater Systems Center (NUSC), at New London, CT. The transmission source for these farfield (1.6-Mm range) measurements is the U.S. Navy's ELF Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF), located in the Chequamegon National Forest in north-central Wisconsin. The results of 136 days of radial magnetic field measurements taken from November 1977 through June 1984 are discussed in this report. The main result is that during disturbed propagation conditions, the radial and transverse magnetic field strength daily plots (versus GMT) are usually dissimilar (in both amplitude and relative phase).

  4. Effect of low transverse magnetic field on the confinement strength in a quasi-1D wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Thomas, K. J. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH, UK and Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Smith, L. W.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Jones, G. A. C.; Griffiths, J. [Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom); Pepper, M. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH, UK and Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-04

    Transport measurements in a quasi-one dimensional (1D) quantum wire are reported in the presence of low transverse magnetic field. Differential conductance shows weak quantised plateaus when the 2D electrons are squeezed electrostatically. Application of a small transverse magnetic field (0.2T) enhances the overall degree of quantisation due to the formation of magneto-electric subbands. The results show the role of magnetic field to fine tune the confinement strength in low density wires when interaction gives rise to double row formation.

  5. Evaluation of the effect of sizing levels on transverse flexural and shear strengths of carbon\\/epoxy composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Upadhyaya; P. Tsakiropoulos

    1995-01-01

    The effect of fiber sizing levels on shear and transverse flexural strengths of epoxy-sized Grafil XAS carbon fibers\\/Epon 828 epoxy matrix composite materials has been studied. The results of short-beam shear and transverse flexural tests suggest that an optimum sizing level exists that yields maximum short-beam shear and transverse flexural strengths. Among the three types of fibers studied (unsized, 0.7

  6. Effects on stress rupture life and tensile strength of tin additions to Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W.

    1982-01-01

    Because Inconel 718 represents a major use of columbium and a large potential source of columbium for aerospace alloys could be that of columbium derived from tin slags, the effects of tin additions to Inconel 718 at levels which might be typical of or exceed those anticipated if tin slag derived columbium were used as a melting stock were investigated. Tin was added to 15 pound Inconel 718 heats at levels varying from none added to approximately 10,000 ppm (1 wt%). Limited 1200 F stress rupture testing was performed at stresses from 68,000 to 115,000 psi and a few tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 800 and 1200 F. Additions of tin in excess of 800 ppm were detrimental to ductility and stress rupture life.

  7. Fatigue strength of transverse butt welded joints under random loading. Application of Miner's rule in ?max = ?y tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ota; Y. Maeda; N. Suzuki

    1997-01-01

    The fatigue strength of transverse butt welded joints is obtained in tests involving the maximum stress ?max being kept the same as the yield strength of the material ?y while the minimum stress ?min is randomly varied. The tests involve modification of the stress conditions of actual welded structures containing high tensile residual stress up to the yield strength. The

  8. EVALUATIONS OF EFFECT OF UOâ ON THE CORE STRENGTH OF STAINLESS STEEL FUEL ELEMENTS (TASK 7306)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Funston

    1952-01-01

    A test procedure was established for evaluating the core strength of ; stainless steel fuel elements at temperatures to 1800 deg F. This evaluation, ; known as a transverse rupture test, measures the short time tensile stress ; required to rupture a specimen in a plane parallel to the surface of the sheet. ; The strength of commercial 309 stainless

  9. High-frequency spectral falloff of earthquakes, fractal dimension of complex rupture, b value, and the scaling of strength on faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.

    1991-01-01

    The high-frequency falloff ??-y of earthquake displacement spectra and the b value of aftershock sequences are attributed to the character of spatially varying strength along fault zones. I assume that the high frequency energy of a main shock is produced by a self-similar distribution of subevents, where the number of subevents with radii greater than R is proportional to R-D, D being the fractal dimension. In the model, an earthquake is composed of a hierarchical set of smaller earthquakes. The static stress drop is parameterized to be proportional to R??, and strength is assumed to be proportional to static stress drop. I find that a distribution of subevents with D = 2 and stress drop independent of seismic moment (?? = 0) produces a main shock with an ??-2 falloff, if the subevent areas fill the rupture area of the main shock. By equating subevents to "islands' of high stress of a random, self-similar stress field on a fault, I relate D to the scaling of strength on a fault, such that D = 2 - ??. Thus D = 2 corresponds to constant stress drop scaling (?? = 0) and scale-invariant fault strength. A self-similar model of aftershock rupture zones on a fault is used to determine the relationship between the b value, the size distribution of aftershock rupture zones, and the scaling of strength on a fault. -from Author

  10. Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

  11. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  12. Assessment of an improved multiaxial strength theory based on creep-rupture data for type 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddleston, R. L.

    1992-03-01

    A new multiaxial strength theory incorporating three independent stress parameters was developed and reported by the author in 1984. It was formally incorporated into ASME Code Case N47-29 in 1990. In the earlier paper, the new model was shown to provide significantly more accurate stress-rupture life predictions, than the classical theories of von Mises, Tresca, and Rankine, for the type 304 stainless steel tested at 593 C under different biaxial stress states. Further assessments for other alloys are showing similar results. The current paper provides additional results for type 316 stainless steel specimens tested at 600 C under tension-tension and tension-compression stress states and shows 2 to 3 orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter in predicted versus observed lives. A key feature of the new theory, which incorporates the maximum deviatoric stress, the first invariant of the stress tensor, and the second invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor, is its ability to distinguish between life under tensile versus compressive stress states.

  13. Method of Estimating the Long-term Rupture Strength of 11Cr-2W-0.4Mo-1Cu-Nb-V Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Manabu

    2015-05-01

    Long-term rupture data of 11Cr-2W-0.4Mo-1Cu-Nb-V steel were analyzed using an exponential equation for stress regarding time to rupture as a thermal activation process. The fitness was compared with the usually employed method assuming power-law creep. In the exponential method, rupture data are classified into several groups according to the thermal activation process; the activation energy, Q; the activation volume, V; then, the Larson-Miller constant, C, values are calculated, and a regression equation is obtained for each data group. The fitness level of the equation was satisfactorily high for each group. The values of Q, V, and C were unusually small for a data group where an unexpected drop in rupture strength was observed. The critical issue is how to comprehend signs of degradation within the short term. We can observe several signs at a creep time of approximately one-tenth of the times of the degradation events. The small values of Q and V indicate that completely softened regions form and creep locally, which is consistent with previous observations. From both metallurgical considerations and the variations of Q and V, it is suggested that the rate of the unexpected drop in strength is mitigated after further long-term creep.

  14. Temperature Dependence on the Strength and Stress Rupture Behavior of a Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Calomino, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Tensile strengths and stress rupture lives of carbon-fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) specimens were measured at 800 C and are compared to previously reported 1200 C data. All tests were conducted in an environmental chamber containing 1000 ppm of oxygen in argon. The average 800 C tensile strength of 610 MPa is 10% greater than at 1200 C. Average stress rupture lives at 800 C were 2.5 times longer than those obtained at 1200 C. The difference in the 800 and 1200 C lives is related to the oxidation rate of the reinforcing carbon fibers, which is the primary damage mode of C/SiC composites in oxygen-containing environments.

  15. A Comparison of Creep Rupture Strength of Ferritic/Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluations of creep rupture properties of dissimilar weld joints of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels with Alloy 800 at 823 K were carried out. The joints were fabricated by a fusion welding process employing an INCONEL 182 weld electrode. All the joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals, and the strength reduction was greater in the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and less in the 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. Failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with the decrease in stress. At still lower stresses, the failure in the joints occurred at the ferritic/austenitic weld interface. The stress-life variation of the joints showed two-slope behavior and the slope change coincided with the occurrence of ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Preferential creep cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure, whereas creep cavitation at the interfacial particles induced ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Micromechanisms of the type IV failure and the ferritic/austenitic interface cracking in the dissimilar weld joint of the ferritic steels and relative cracking susceptibility of the joints are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing, and finite element analysis (FEA) of the stress state across the joint.

  16. Strength Tests of Thin-walled Duralumin Cylinders in Combined Transverse Shear and Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquiest, Eugene E

    1935-01-01

    This report is the fourth of a series presenting the results of strength tests on thin-walled cylinders and truncated cones of circular and elliptic section; it includes the results on 100 thin-walled duralumin cylinders of circular section with ends clamped to rigid bulkheads. The tests show that as the ratio of moment to shear varies from small to large values the failure changes from a shear to a bending type. In the report a chart is presented that shows the corresponding changes in strength.

  17. Stress-rupture life and strength retention of an aramid fiber\\/epoxy composite under accelerating conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Penn; R. J. Sherry

    1977-01-01

    The long-term tensile strength retention of Kevlar 49 (aramid fiber)\\/epoxy composite under sustained loading at 56.4 percent of the ultimate fiber tensile strength (3400 MPa) was studied to evaluate the lifetime to failure of the composite under the same load level. To obtain data in a conveniently short time, elevated temperature was used according to an acceleration relation (Arrhenius type)

  18. Delamination strength of YBCO coated conductors under transverse tensile stressContribution of NIST, a US Government Agency, not subject to copyright

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D C van der Laan; J W Ekin; C C Clickner; T C Stauffer

    2007-01-01

    We present a new experimental technique to measure the delamination strength under transverse tensile stress of YBa2Cu3O7?? coated conductors for electric power applications. The delamination strength, defined as the tensile stress at which the ceramic layers delaminate from one another, is measured at 76 K for different sample configurations. The delamination strength is reduced by as much as 40% when

  19. Numerical analysis of stress distribution in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes during anvil tests for the evaluation of transverse delamination strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dizon, John Ryan C.; Gorospe, Alking B.; Shin, Hyung-Seop

    2014-05-01

    Rare-earth-Ba-Cu-O (REBCO) based coated conductors (CCs) are now being used for electric device applications. For coil-based applications such as motors, generators and magnets, the CC tape needs to have robust mechanical strength along both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The CC tape in these coils is subjected to transverse tensile stresses during cool-down and operation, which results in delamination within and between constituent layers. In this study, in order to explain the behaviour observed in the evaluation of c-axis delamination strength in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes by anvil tests, numerical analysis of the mechanical stress distribution within the CC tape has been performed. The upper anvil size was varied in the analysis to understand the effect of anvil size on stress distribution within the multilayered CC tape, which is closely related to the delamination strength, delamination mode and delamination sites that were experimentally observed. The numerical simulation results showed that, when an anvil size covering the whole tape width was used, the REBCO coating film was subjected to the largest stress, which could result in low mechanical delamination and electromechanical delamination strengths. Meanwhile, when smaller-sized anvils were used, the copper stabilizer layer would experience the largest stress among all the constituent layers of the CC tape, which could result in higher mechanical and electromechanical delamination strengths, as well as high scattering of both of these delamination strengths. As a whole, the numerical simulation results could explain the damage evolution observed in CC tapes tested under transverse tensile stress, as well as the transverse tensile stress response of the critical current, Ic.

  20. Uterine Rupture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon R. Sheehan; Deirdre J. Murphy

    \\u000a Uterine rupture may be defined as a disruption of the uterine muscle extending to and involving the uterine serosa or disruption\\u000a of the uterine muscle with extension to the bladder or broad ligament [1]. Uterine dehiscence is defined as disruption of\\u000a the uterine muscle with intact uterine serosa [1]. Uterine rupture is associated with severe maternal and perinatal morbidity\\u000a and

  1. Damage Behaviors and Compressive Strength of Toughened CFRP Laminates with Thin Plies Subjected to Transverse Impact Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokozeki, Tomohiro; Aoki, Yuichiro; Ogasawara, Toshio

    It has been recognized that damage resistance and strength properties of CFRP laminates can be improved by using thin-ply prepregs. This study investigates the damage behaviors and compressive strength of CFRP laminates using thin-ply and standard prepregs subjected to out-of-plane impact loadings. CFRP laminates used for the evaluation are prepared using the standard prepregs, thin-ply prepregs, and combinations of the both. Weight-drop impact test and post-impact compression test of quasi-isotropic laminates are performed. It is shown that the damage behaviors are different between the thin-ply and the standard laminates, and the compression-after-impact strength is improved by using thin-ply prepregs. Effects of the use of thin-ply prepregs and the layout of thin-ply layers on the damage behaviors and compression-after-impact properties are discussed based on the experimental results.

  2. The effects of metal coating on the diffusion bonding in Al 2 O 3 \\/Inconel 600 and the modulus of rupture strength of alumina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. R. Hwang; R. Y. Lee

    1996-01-01

    Alumina with a sputter-deposited metal film was diffusion bonded to Inconel 600. A higher bonding strength and lower joining temperature were obtained with titanium coating compared to that for the non-coated sample. The improved joining behaviour was attributed to an enhanced interface reaction and reduction in the thermal stress. Also, the effect of various coatings of 3 µm thickness on

  3. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at higher magnetic fields. On the exit side there is mostly moderate to high skin dose increases for 0.2-3 T with the only exception being large positive angles. Exit bolus of 1 cm thickness will have a significant impact on lowering such exit skin dose increases that occur as a result of the ERE.

  4. Subducted seafloor relief stops rupture in South American great earthquakes: Implications for rupture behaviour in the 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Sparkes; Frederik Tilmann; Niels Hovius; John Hillier

    2010-01-01

    Great subduction earthquakes cause destructive surface deformation and ground shaking over hundreds of kilometres. Their rupture length is limited by the characteristic strength of the subduction plate interface, and by lateral variations in its mechanical properties. It has been proposed that subduction of topographic features such as ridges and seamounts can affect these properties and stop rupture propagation, but the

  5. Nickel base alloy with improved stress rupture properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, H. E.; Quigg, R. J.

    1968-01-01

    Nickel base superalloy with improved stress rupture properties is used for jet aircraft turbine blades. This alloy is capable of maintaining its strength and its creep, oxidation, and thermal fatigue resistance at high temperature.

  6. What Is an Earthquake?: Fault-Rupture Analogies

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity has two parts: the first part will demonstrate the weaknesses of simple fault models (like block diagrams) in depicting the process of fault rupture accurately; and the second part is centered around a fairly simple animation of rupture propagation, seen by an oblique map view, that attempts to show more accurately what we should envision when we think about fault rupture. This activity provides different analogies for describing the process of fault rupture, with attention paid to the strengths and weaknesses of each.

  7. Creep-rupture of polymer-matrix composites. [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An accelerated characterization method for resin matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep rupture analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer matrix composites. Comparisons between creep rupture experiments and analytical models are presented. The time dependent creep rupture process in graphite epoxy laminates is examined as a function of temperature and stress level.

  8. Effect of inclination angle on fiber rupture load in fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Zhang; Victor C. Lib

    2002-01-01

    A model has been formulated for analyzing the influence of fiber inclination angle on its rupture load in fiber reinforced cementitious composite. As a stiff fiber is pulled with an angle to the direction of pulling, the fiber rupture load decreases compared to the case with zero inclination angles. This phenomenon is called fiber apparent strength (defined as rupture load

  9. Strength degradation of a tungsten carbide-cobalt composite at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Acchar, W.; Gomes, U.U.; Kaysser, W.A.; Goring, J.

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the transverse rupture strength behavior of tungsten carbide blended with 10 wt% Co as a function of temperature. The samples were tested in three-point bending flexure in the temperature range 25--1000 C. Specimens were also indented at room temperature to measure the crack size and the corresponding values of hardness and toughness. The results showed that the WC-Co composite suffered a strength loss at temperatures above 600 C. The fracture analysis indicated the presence of oxidation and microstructural defects in the samples tested at the higher temperatures.

  10. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. El-Bahy; A. Kotb; A. Galal; A. EL-Hakim

    2006-01-01

    Summary  Rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts (RICDC) is a rare phenomenon. The mechanism of rupture, pathophysiology of fat in the\\u000a ventricles and subarachnoid spaces, possible complications, and proper management of such conditions are proposed on the basis\\u000a of a review of the literature and experience with two cases of ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts (One was in the pineal\\u000a region, while another

  11. Creep and creep rupture of fiber reinforced polymers: Long term variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Eric M.

    Fiber reinforced polymers continue to be used in ever increasing quantities for large weight critical structures which are designed to be in service for decades. Catastrophic failure of these structures can have dire consequences. Therefore, long term creep and creep rupture predictions are of critical importance. To this end, a multiscale creep rupture model based on the kinetic concept of strength is developed to predict failure. A linkage between damage evolution and the apparent modulus degradation is proposed, which allows for the prediction of creep strain. This combined creep strain and creep rupture model is implemented in a progressive failure user subroutine for finite element software. Model calibration experiments were conducted on Panex 35/M9.7 material system. Combining structural quantification, full field strain measurements and finite element simulations, mechanisms behind material variability and scatter have been identified and modeled resulting in improved life predictions. The material data collected and a video of the two-dimensional strain evolution during a transverse load and unload test have been provided as supplemental materials.

  12. Creep rupture behavior of unidirectional advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.

    1980-01-01

    A 'material modeling' methodology for predicting the creep rupture behavior of unidirectional advanced composites is proposed. In this approach the parameters (obtained from short-term tests) required to make the predictions are the three principal creep compliance master curves and their corresponding quasi-static strengths tested at room temperature (22 C). Using these parameters in conjunction with a failure criterion, creep rupture envelopes can be generated for any combination of in-plane loading conditions and ambient temperature. The analysis was validated experimentally for one composite system, the T300/934 graphite-epoxy system. This was done by performing short-term creep tests (to generate the principal creep compliance master curves with the time-temperature superposition principle) and relatively long-term creep rupture tensile tests of off-axis specimens at 180 C. Good to reasonable agreement between experimental and analytical results is observed.

  13. [Knee extensor mechanism ruptures].

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B; Fritschy, D

    2011-08-10

    Knee extensor mechanism is composed of the quadriceps and its tendon, patella and patellar tendon. Rupture of either the quadriceps or patellar tendon, or of the patella itself, lead to a disruption of the knee extensor mechanism. Clinical examination reveals an inability to actively extend the knee. Standard radiographs of the knee show a suprapatellar swelling of the soft tissues in case of quadriceps tendon rupture, or a displaced patellar fracture, or a patella alta in case of patellar tendon rupture. Echography and MRI confirm the diagnosis and may reveal associated injuries. In case of knee extensor mechanism rupture, early surgical reconstruction of quadriceps or patellar tendon, or patella osteosynthesis, are mandatory to achieve early functional recovery. PMID:21919393

  14. Spontaneous rupture of uterus.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Meraj; Ranasinghe, J Sudharma

    2002-08-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the uterus is a life-threatening obstetrical emergency. Diagnosis may be delayed because of the bizarre presentation or absence of significant pain and tenderness, which could have been masked by the analgesic medications used during labor. We present a case of spontaneous rupture in a multigravid female who was undergoing oxytocin-augmented labor while receiving epidural analgesia. She had had no previous cesarean deliveries or uterine surgery. Half an hour after an initial complaint of left inguinal pain, which was thought to be related to a patchy epidural block, she presented with changes in vital signs and significant fetal decelerations. At emergent cesarean section, a uterine rupture was noted. The uterine rupture extended down to the left vaginal angle, was not reparable and a hysterectomy was performed. The fetus survived. PMID:12208442

  15. Transverse Devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Julian Goldsmid

    Attractions of devices based on the transverse thermoelectric effects. Theory of synthetic transverse thermo-elements and\\u000a selection of materials. Advantages of a porous component in satisfying conflicting requirements.

  16. New Empirical Relationships among Magnitude, Rupture Length, Rupture Width, Rupture Area, and Surface Displacement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald L. Wells; Kevin J. Coppersmith

    1994-01-01

    Source parameters for historical earthquakes worldwide are com- piled to develop a series of empirical relationships among moment magnitude (M), surface rupture length, subsurface rupture length, downdip rupture width, rupture area, and maximum and average displacement per event. The resulting data base is a significant update of previous compilations and includes the ad- ditional source parameters of seismic moment, moment

  17. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  18. FRP rupture strains in the split-disk test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Chen; S. Q. Li; L. A. Bisby; J. Ai

    2011-01-01

    The strengthening of concrete and concrete-filled steel columns by applying externally-bonded fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite jackets has become a popular retrofit technique. Failure of such FRP-wrapped columns is usually governed by rupture of the FRP in the hoop direction. Two common material test methods have been used to obtain the hoop strength and rupture strain of FRP composites used in

  19. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  20. Earthquake in a Maze: Compressional Rupture Branching During the 2012 Mw 8.6 Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Stock, J.; Duputel, Z.; Luo, Y.; Tsai, V. C.

    2012-08-01

    Seismological observations of the 2012 moment magnitude 8.6 Sumatra earthquake reveal unprecedented complexity of dynamic rupture. The surprisingly large magnitude results from the combination of deep extent, high stress drop, and rupture of multiple faults. Back-projection source imaging indicates that the rupture occurred on distinct planes in an orthogonal conjugate fault system, with relatively slow rupture speed. The east-southeast-west-northwest ruptures add a new dimension to the seismotectonics of the Wharton Basin, which was previously thought to be controlled by north-south strike-slip faulting. The rupture turned twice into the compressive quadrant, against the preferred branching direction predicted by dynamic Coulomb stress calculations. Orthogonal faulting and compressional branching indicate that rupture was controlled by a pressure-insensitive strength of the deep oceanic lithosphere.

  1. Bilateral traumatic quadriceps tendon rupture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Holm

    1999-01-01

    Summary  Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare condition. In most cases the patients with bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture\\u000a have a general degenerative disease. This case story present a middle-aged male, who became a traumatic bilateral quadriceps\\u000a tendon rupture. Though treated acutely and trained intensively he did not achieve full range of motion.

  2. [Symphysis rupture during partus].

    PubMed

    Nouta, Klaas-Auke; Van Rhee, Marina; Van Langelaan, Evert J

    2011-01-01

    A few hours after the birth of her first child a 36-year-old woman developed anterior pelvic pain. The pain worsened on walking. It proved that during the birth the patient had felt something 'give'. On X-ray a diastasis of 50 mm was seen in the symphysis and symphysis rupture was diagnosed. The patient was treated conservatively with bed rest and pelvic stabilisation. After 17 weeks she was symptom-free. Symphysis rupture during partus is rare. It is characterised by pain around the symphysis and/or the sacro-iliac joints during the first 24 hours post partum. Diagnosis can be made by X-ray. Treatment is predominantly conservative comprising pelvic stabilisation and bed rest. PMID:21426597

  3. Thrombus rupture via cavitation.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y

    2015-07-16

    Aneurysm growth is accompanied by formation of intraluminal thrombus. The onset of thrombus rupture via unstable void growth is studied in the present note. The experimentally calibrated constitutive model of thrombus developed by Wang et al. (2001) is enhanced with a failure description and used for analysis of cavitation. It is found that unstable cavity growth can start at hydrostatic tension of 0.18MPa which lies within the physiological range of stresses in the arterial wall. PMID:26001987

  4. [Delayed splenic rupture (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Alawneh, I

    1979-12-01

    Splenic rupture is a common injury associated with blunt abdominal trauma. In contrast, delayed splenic rupture is less frequent and comprises about 8--28% of cases of splenic rupture. The symptom free period can last for days or weeks. The mechanism is explained as follows. A rupture of the parenchyma occurs but the spleen capsula remains intact. A hematoma forms below the capsule and causes a strong overdistension of the capsule so that a bursting and release of blood into the abdominal cavity results. The mortality rate with splenic ruptures in 6--55% and with delayed splenic ruptures 14.6%. Our experiences are reviewed. After commencement of the hemorrhage therapy must consist of treatment for shock and immediate laparotomy and splenectomy. PMID:44648

  5. Traumatic bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars Hansen; Søren Larsen; Troels Laulund

    2001-01-01

    Bilateral spontaneous quadriceps tendon rupture is a very rare event, with only an estimated 40 cases reported in the literature.\\u000a We report a case of bilateral spontaneous quadriceps tendon rupture and review the literature. The reviewed literature recommends\\u000a early repair; therefore, early diagnosis is crucial. Reportedly, up to 50% of spontaneous bilateral quadriceps ruptures are\\u000a misdiagnosed at first, resulting in

  6. Design shear strength formula for high strength concrete beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Russo; G. Somma; P. Angeli

    2004-01-01

    After a brief review on the concrete shear strength mechanisms, two very reliable expressions for predicting the shear strength\\u000a of beams without transverse reinforcement are reported: the one proposed by Bažant and Kim [7], which is valid for Normal\\u000a strength Concrete (NSC) beams, and the other recently proposed by the authors, which is valid for High Strength Concrete (HSC)\\u000a beams.

  7. Outcomes following quadriceps tendon ruptures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K O'Shea; P Kenny; J Donovan; F Condon; J. P McElwain

    2002-01-01

    Complete rupture of the quadriceps femoris tendon is a well-described injury. There is a scarcity of literature relating to the outcome of patients with this injury after surgery. We undertook a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical repair of their ruptured quadriceps tendon at our institution over a seven year period-totalling 27 patients. Males were more commonly affected with

  8. Chronic rupture of tendo Achillis.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Ajis, Adam; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2007-12-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most commonly ruptured tendon in the human body. About 20% of complete ruptures of the Achilles tendon are diagnosed late. The management of chronic ruptures of tendo Achillis is usually different from that of acute rupture, as the tendon ends normally will have retracted. As clinical diagnosis of chronic ruptures can be problematic, imaging can be useful. Most investigators counsel operative management, and the possibility of undertaking a tendon transfer should be kept in mind. Local tendons, such as the flexor digitorum longus, the flexor hallucis longus, and the tendon of peroneus brevis, can be used, and some investigators have reported the use of a free gracilis tendon graft. Allografts and synthetic grafts are also employed. There are no comparative studies and no randomized controlled trials to guide clinicians toward an evidence-based approach to management. PMID:17996617

  9. Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of ‘rupture’ from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method. PMID:24741691

  10. Microstructural observation on helium injected and creep ruptured JPCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Shiraishi, H.; Kamitsubo, H.; Kohno, I.; Shikata, T.; Hishinuma, A.

    1986-11-01

    Detailed and quantitative TEM observation was performed on high temperature helium injected and creep ruptured JPCA to seek the prominent TiC distribution developed for suppression of helium embrittlement. Three different preinjection treatments were adopted for changing the TiC distribution. Considerable degradation in creep rupture strength by helium occurred in solution-annealed specimens, although there was much less effect of other treatments which included aging prior to injection. The concentration of helium at grain boundaries and the promotion of precipitation by helium during injection were responsible for the degradation. Therefore, the presence of TiC precipitates before helium introduction will help prevent degradation. On the other hand, the rupture elongation was reduced by helium after all treatments, although helium trapping by TiC precipitates in the matrix was successfully achieved. Consequently, the combined use of several methods may be necessary for further suppression of helium embrittlement.

  11. Strength of Multiple Parallel Biological Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W; Noy, A

    2005-12-07

    Multivalent interactions play a critical role in a variety of biological processes on both molecular and cellular levels. We have used molecular force spectroscopy to investigate the strength of multiple parallel peptide-antibody bonds using a system that allowed us to determine the rupture forces and the number of ruptured bonds independently. In our experiments the interacting molecules were attached to the surfaces of the probe and sample of the atomic force microscope with flexible polymer tethers, and unique mechanical signature of the tethers determined the number of ruptured bonds. We show that the rupture forces increase with the number of interacting molecules and that the measured forces obey the predictions of a Markovian model for the strength of multiple parallel bonds. We also discuss the implications of our results to the interpretation of force spectroscopy measurements in multiple bond systems.

  12. Risk of Uterine Rupture and Placenta Accreta With Prior Uterine Surgery Outside of the Lower Segment

    PubMed Central

    Gyamfi-Bannerman, Cynthia; Gilbert, Sharon; Landon, Mark B.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Varner, Michael W.; Caritis, Steve N.; Meis, Paul J.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Sorokin, Yoram; Carpenter, Marshall; Peaceman, Alan M.; O’Sullivan, Mary J.; Sibai, Baha M.; Thorp, John M.; Ramin, Susan M.; Mercer, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Women with a prior myomectomy or prior classical cesarean delivery are often delivered early by cesarean due to concern for uterine rupture. Although theoretically at increased risk for placenta accreta, this risk has not been well quantified. Our objective was to estimate and compare the risks of uterine rupture and placenta accreta in women with prior uterine surgery. Methods Women with prior myomectomy or prior classical cesarean delivery were compared to women with a prior low transverse cesarean to estimate rates of both uterine rupture and placenta accreta. Results One hundred seventy-six women with a prior myomectomy, 455 with a prior classical cesarean delivery, and 13,273 women with a prior low transverse cesarean were evaluated. Mean gestational age at delivery differed by group (p<0.001), prior myomectomy (37.3 weeks), prior classical cesarean delivery (35.8 weeks), and low transverse cesarean (38.6 weeks). The frequency of uterine rupture in the prior myomectomy group was 0% (95% CI 0-1.98%). The frequency of uterine rupture in the low transverse cesarean group (0.41%) was not statistically different from the risk in the prior myomectomy group (p>0.99) or in the prior classical cesarean delivery group (0.88%, p=0.13). Placenta accreta occurred in 0% (95% CI 0-1.98%) of prior myomectomy compared with 0.19% in the low transverse cesarean group (p>0.99) and 0.88% in the prior classical cesarean delivery group (p=0.01 relative to low transverse cesarean). The adjusted OR for the prior classical cesarean delivery group (relative to low transverse cesarean) was 3.23 (1.11-9.39) for uterine rupture and 2.09 (0.69-6.33) for accreta. The frequency of accreta for those with previa was 11.1% for the prior classical cesarean delivery and 13.6% for low transverse cesarean groups (p>0.99=1.0). Conclusion A prior myomectomy is not associated with higher risks of either uterine rupture or placenta accreta. The absolute risks of uterine rupture and accreta after prior myomectomy are low. PMID:23168757

  13. Creep and rupture of an ODS alloy with high stress rupture ductility. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalarney, M. E.; Arsons, R. M.; Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Baranow, S.

    1982-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture properties of an oxide (Y2O3) dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy, which also is strengthened by gamma-prime precipitates, was studied at 760 and 1093 C. At both temperatures, the alloy YDNiCrAl exhibits unusually high stress rupture ductility as measured by both elongation and reduction in area. Failure was transgranular, and different modes of failure were observed including crystallographic fracture at intermediate temperatures and tearing or necking almost to a chisel point at higher temperatures. While the rupture ductility was high, the creep strength of the alloy was low relative to conventional gamma prime strengthened superalloys in the intermediate temperature range and to ODS alloys in the higher temperature range. These findings are discussed with respect to the alloy composition; the strengthening oxide phases, which are inhomogeneously dispersed; the grain morphology, which is coarse and elongated and exhibits many included grains; and the second phase inclusion particles occurring at grain boundaries and in the matrix. The creep properties, in particular the high stress dependencies and high creep activation energies measured, are discussed with respect to the resisting stress model of creep in particle strengthened alloys.

  14. Steam generator tube rupture study

    E-print Network

    Free, Scott Thomas

    1986-01-01

    This report describes our investigation of steam generator behavior during a postulated tube rupture accident. Our study was performed using the steam generator, thermal-hydraulic analysis code THERMIT-UTSG. The purpose ...

  15. Achilles tendon rupture rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, R. S.; Parsons, N.; Underwood, M.; Costa, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The evidence base to inform the management of Achilles tendon rupture is sparse. The objectives of this research were to establish what current practice is in the United Kingdom and explore clinicians’ views on proposed further research in this area. This study was registered with the ISRCTN (ISRCTN68273773) as part of a larger programme of research. Methods We report an online survey of current practice in the United Kingdom, approved by the British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and completed by 181 of its members. A total of ten of these respondents were invited for a subsequent one-to-one interview to explore clinician views on proposed further research in this area. Results The survey showed wide variations in practice, with patients being managed in plaster cast alone (13%), plaster cast followed by orthoses management (68%), and orthoses alone (19%). Within these categories, further variation existed regarding the individual rehabilitation facets, such as the length of time worn, the foot position within them and weight-bearing status. The subsequent interviews reflected this clinical uncertainty and the pressing need for definitive research. Conclusions The gap in evidence in this area has resulted in practice in the United Kingdom becoming varied and based on individual opinion. Future high-quality randomised trials on this subject are supported by the clinical community. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:65–9 PMID:25868938

  16. [Uterine rupture in modern obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Grio, R; Piacentino, R; Zaccheo, F; Giobbe, C; Caccuri, D; Tamburrano, F; Marchino, G L; Fuda, G

    1990-10-01

    The paper reports 18 cases of womb rupture observed in the Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the University of Turin from April 1978 to June 1988. Following an analysis of the data relating to the above cases, the paper concludes that in order to reduce the incidence of womb rupture it is important to hospitalize high-risk patients preferably before the start of labour so as to intervent using caesarian section. PMID:2290596

  17. Histologic analysis of ruptured quadriceps tendons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Per David Trobisch; Matthias Bauman; Kuno Weise; Fabian Stuby; David J. Hak

    2010-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon injuries. Degenerative changes in the tendon are felt to be an important precondition\\u000a for rupture. We retrospectively reviewed 45 quadriceps tendon ruptures in 42 patients. Quadriceps tendon ruptures occurred\\u000a most often in the sixth and seventh decade of life. Men were affected six times as often as women. A tissue sample from the\\u000a rupture-zone was

  18. Evaluation of mechanical properties of high strength concrete for prestressed concrete bridge design

    E-print Network

    Chompreda, Praveen

    2001-01-01

    tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and flexural strength (modulus of rupture) at 7, 28, and 56 days. Creep and shrinkage were also monitored. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine the probability distribution, bias factors...

  19. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  20. Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

    2002-12-01

    Can the rupture directivity of past earthquakes be inferred from fault geometry? Nakata et al. [J. Geogr., 1998] propose to relate the observed surface branching of fault systems with directivity. Their work assumes that all branches are through acute angles in the direction of rupture propagation. However, in some observed cases rupture paths seem to branch through highly obtuse angles, as if to propagate ``backwards". Field examples of that are as follows: (1) Landers 1992. When crossing from the Johnson Valley to the Homestead Valley (HV) fault via the Kickapoo (Kp) fault, the rupture from Kp progressed not just forward onto the northern stretch of the HV fault, but also backwards, i.e., SSE along the HV [Sowers et al., 1994, Spotila and Sieh, 1995, Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995, Rockwell et al., 2000]. Measurements of surface slip along that backward branch, a prominent feature of 4 km length, show right-lateral slip, decreasing towards the SSE. (2) At a similar crossing from the HV to the Emerson (Em) fault, the rupture progressed backwards along different SSE splays of the Em fault [Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995]. (3). In crossing from the Em to Camp Rock (CR) fault, again, rupture went SSE on the CR fault. (4). Hector Mine 1999. The rupture originated on a buried fault without surface trace [Li et al., 2002; Hauksson et al., 2002] and progressed bilaterally south and north. In the south it met the Lavic Lake (LL) fault and progressed south on it, but also progressed backward, i.e. NNW, along the northern stretch of the LL fault. The angle between the buried fault and the northern LL fault is around -160o, and that NNW stretch extends around 15 km. The field examples with highly obtuse branch angles suggest that there may be no simple correlation between fault geometry and rupture directivity. We propose that an important distinction is whether those obtuse branches actually involved a rupture path which directly turned through the obtuse angle (while continuing also on the main fault), or rather involved arrest by a barrier on the original fault and jumping [Harris and Day, JGR, 1993] to a neighboring fault on which rupture propagated bilaterally to form what appears as a backward-branched structure. Our studies [Poliakov et al., JGR in press, 2002; Kame et al, EOS, 2002] of stress fields around a dynamically moving mode II crack tip show a clear tendency to branch from the straight path at high rupture speeds, but the stress fields never allow the rupture path to directly turn through highly obtuse angles, and hence that mechanism is unlikely. In contrast, study of fault maps in the vicinity of the Kp to HV fault transition [Sowers et al., 1994], discussed as case (1) above, strongly suggest that the large-angle branching occurred as a jump, which we propose as the likely general mechanism. Implications for the Nakata et al. [1998] aim of inferring rupture directivity from branch geometry is that this will be possible only when rather detailed characterization (by surface geology, seismic relocation, trapped waves) of fault connectivity can be carried out in the vicinity of the branching junction, to ascertain whether direct turning of the rupture path through an angle, or jumping and then propagating bilaterally, were involved in prior events. They have opposite implications for how we would associate past directivity with a (nominally) branched fault geometry.

  1. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture reconstruction using a modified flexor hallucis longus transfer

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Jean-François; Philippot, Rémi; Brunet-Guedj, Elisabeth; Moyen, Bernard; Besse, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the management and outcome of 11 patients presenting with chronic Achilles tendon (AT) rupture treated by a modified flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfer. Seven patients presented with a neglected AT rupture, one with a chronic AT rupture associated with Achilles tendinosis and three with an AT re-rupture. AT defect after fibrosis debridement averaged 7.4 cm. In addition to FHL transfer, we performed an augmentation using the two remaining fibrous scar stumps of the ruptured AT. Functional assessment was performed using the AOFAS score and isokinetic evaluation was performed to assess ankle plantarflexion torque deficit. Follow-up averaged 79 months. Functional outcome was excellent with a significant improvement of the AOFAS score at latest follow-up. No re-rupture nor major complication, particularly of wound healing, was observed. All patients presented with a loss of active range of motion of the hallux interphalangeal joint without functional weakness during athletic or daily life activities. Isokinetic testing at 30 degrees/second and 120 degrees/second revealed a significant average decrease of 28?±?11% and 36?±?4.1%, respectively, in plantarflexion peak torque. Although strength deficit persisted at latest follow-up, functional improvement was significant without morbidity due to FHL harvesting. For patients with chronic AT rupture with a rupture gap of at least 5 cm, surgical repair using FHL transfer with fibrous AT stump reinforcement achieved excellent outcomes. PMID:19697026

  2. Keeping score in rupture disks

    SciTech Connect

    Brazier, G.

    1993-09-01

    At first glance it may seem that the world of rupture disks isn't one bursting with innovation--after all, some of the first designs of more than 60 years ago are still in use today. But take a closer look: Rupture disk technology is hardly standing still. Over the years, the disks have evolved from simple calibrated foils to highly-specialized devices that employ advanced designs and manufacturing techniques to ensure safety in critical applications. The new disks generally feature high accuracy, zero leakage, long service life, and non-fragmentation. Recent products use special metals and alloys to withstand corrosive process conditions and offer a much wider range of operating conditions than these of early devices. Manufacturers are also introducing rupture disks that are intrinsically fail-safe--i.e., the units burst at or below their rated burst pressure even if they are damaged during installation or are improperly installed.

  3. Spontaneous Forniceal Rupture in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Upputalla, Roshni; Moore, Robert M.; Jim, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Forniceal rupture is a rare event in pregnancy. We report a case of a 26-year-old primigravid woman who experienced a forniceal rupture at 23 weeks of gestation with no inciting cause except for pregnancy. Pregnancy is associated with ureteral compression due to increase in pelvic vasculature with the right ureter more dilated due to anatomic reasons. Hormones such as prostaglandins and progesterone render the ureter more distensible to allow for pressure build-up and an obstructive picture at the collecting system. We will discuss physiologic changes in pregnancies that predispose to this uncommon phenomenon and the most up-to-date management strategies. PMID:25648411

  4. Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self-energizing and requires low force compared to current pyrotechnic-based burst disk hermetic valves. This is a novel design for producing a single-use, self-rupturing, hermetically sealed valve for isolation of pressurized gas and/or liquids. This design can also be applied for single-use disposable valves for chemical instruments. A welded foil diaphragm is fully supported by two mated surfaces that are machined to micron accuracies using EDM. To open the valve, one of the surfaces is moved relative to the other to (a) remove the support creating an unsupported diaphragm that ruptures due to over pressure, and/or (b) produce tension in the diaphragm and rupture it.

  5. [Proximal and distal ruptures of the biceps brachii tendon].

    PubMed

    Klonz, A; Loitz, D; Reilmann, H

    2003-09-01

    Proximal ruptures. Ruptures of the long head of the M. biceps humeri are commonly caused by degenerative changes within the tendon. Non-operative treatment gives good results, the loss of power regarding elbow flexion and supination amounts to only 8-21%. Refixation may be indicated for cosmetic reasons and offers a small but evident improvement of flexion and supination power. Deformity of the slipped muscle can be corrected effectively. Residual complaints after conservative treatment often result from associated subacromial problems. Distal ruptures. Ruptures of the distal tendon should be treated operatively. The loss of power after conservative treatment is evident (30-40% for flexion, >50% for supination). Extra-anatomical tenodesis to the brachialis muscle or anatomical fixation to the radial tuberosity can be applied. Flexion power and cosmesis can be addressed by both techniques. If supination strength is to be restored, the tendon has to be fixed anatomically. Preparation of the tuberosity bears the risk of heterotopic ossification or nerve damage. Mini-open techniques, using only a limited anterior approach, may decrease risks. PMID:14959750

  6. Chordal rupture. I: aetiology and natural history.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, D B; Dawkins, K D; Kay, P H; Paneth, M

    1983-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1981, 12% of patients undergoing mitral valve surgery were found to have chordal rupture. Spontaneous or primary rupture accounted for 74.6% of patients (primary group); in the remainder (secondary group) chordal rupture complicated chronic rheumatic valvular disease (8.9%), bacterial endocarditis on both normal (8.5%) and rheumatic valves (4.7%), ischaemic heart disease (2.3%), acute rheumatic fever (0.5%), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.5%). Isolated posterior rupture was seen most frequently (54%), with anterior rupture in 36% and rupture of both mitral cusps in 10% of patients. A short symptomatic history of acute mitral regurgitation was rare, occurring in only 4% of patients in either the primary or secondary groups, suggesting that mitral regurgitation due to ruptured chordae is a progressive disease. In contrast to previous reports the clinical presentation did not help to differentiate the aetiology of the chordal rupture. PMID:6626391

  7. Rupture of inferior thyroid artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Beal, S L; Dublin, A B; Stone, W K

    1987-08-01

    We report a case in which rupture of an aneurysm of the inferior thyroid artery caused respiratory arrest. The aneurysm was embolized successfully by an angiographic technique. Published reports of rupture of thyroid artery aneurysms are reviewed. PMID:3612969

  8. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion.

    PubMed

    Balik, Mehmet Sabri; Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-06-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  9. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  10. RBMK pressure tube rupture assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. E. Schmitt; G. V. Tsiklauri

    1994-01-01

    The Russian RBMK reactor core design consists of multiple parallel pressure tube channels that contain Zr clad, UOâ fuel pin bundles. These parallel channels are contained within graphite moderator blocks which are, in turn, contained within a sealed core cavity. Current safety evaluation efforts of the RBMK reactors have been concentrating in the area of tube ruptures within the core

  11. Numerical model of seismic rupture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan B. Nielsen; Albert Tarantola

    1992-01-01

    Simple numerical models of the cellular automaton type have been proposed recently, as an analogy for seismic faults. Those showed interesting features of spontaneous rupture evolution or even seismic recurrence. It is possible to incorporate realistic rheology and tensorial physics into this kind of model, to extend it to a portion of crust instead of a single fault-plane and to

  12. A Retrospective Analysis of Ruptured Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Woo Yeol; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Rupture is an important complication of breast implants. Before cohesive gel silicone implants, rupture rates of both saline and silicone breast implants were over 10%. Through an analysis of ruptured implants, we can determine the various factors related to ruptured implants. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 72 implants that were removed for implant rupture between 2005 and 2014 at a single institution. The following data were collected: type of implants (saline or silicone), duration of implantation, type of implant shell, degree of capsular contracture, associated symptoms, cause of rupture, diagnostic tools, and management. Results Forty-five Saline implants and 27 silicone implants were used. Rupture was diagnosed at a mean of 5.6 and 12 years after insertion of saline and silicone implants, respectively. There was no association between shell type and risk of rupture. Spontaneous was the most common reason for the rupture. Rupture management was implant change (39 case), microfat graft (2 case), removal only (14 case), and follow-up loss (17 case). Conclusions Saline implants have a shorter average duration of rupture, but diagnosis is easier and safer, leading to fewer complications. Previous-generation silicone implants required frequent follow-up observation, and it is recommended that they be changed to a cohesive gel implant before hidden rupture occurs. PMID:25396188

  13. Estimation of Dynamic Rupture Parameters of the 1999 Duzce, Turkey Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanircan, Gulum; Dalguer, Luis; Nur Bekler, Feyza; Meral Ozel, Nurcan

    2010-05-01

    The 1999 Kocaeli(Mw:7.4) and Duzce (Mw:7.1), Turkey Earthquakes have in common a specific rupture characteristic: Ruptures propagated eastward from hypocenters by supershear rupture velocity. Dynamic rupture properties of the Kocaeli Earthquake have been studied by several researchers. In order to better understand propagation characteristics of the northern branch of the NAFZ as well as judging whether or not the supershear propagation is a systematic feature of this fault zone, rupture dynamics of the 1999 Düzce, Turkey Earthquake has been investigated. The parameterization of the dynamic model, that describes the friction law and stress state on the fault, has been constrained with the slip distribution on the fault plane calculated from the kinematic waveform inversion of near field strong motion records. These parameters have been used as input for dynamic code. Dynamic stress drop was calculated by iterative dynamic rupture simulation by assuming an initial stress drop distribution through kinematic inversion results and changing the stress drop distribution until the slip distribution from dynamic model and that of kinematic model match to each other. Strength excess parameter was estimated by a trial and error scheme from a series of dynamic rupture simulation until the total rupture time be equivalent to the total rupture time of kinematic model. Calculation of slip weakening distance and its definition for dynamic simulation is still subject under investigations. Recent investigations showed that Dc varies in rough proportion to the total slip, so it is variable in space. In this sense, critical slip weakening distances is assumed to be between 10- 30% of the total slip of kinematic model and the first time peak slip-velocity of kinematic model correspond to time of the slip-weakening distance. For the calculation a full dynamic rupture simulation code, namely Support Operator Rupture Dynamic Code(SORD) developed by, Ely et.al,( 2008) has been employed. The results of this study will be used for a full dynamic rupture simulation for the generation of low frequency velocity ground motion and are expected to provide important insight into the nature of the rupture-induced directivity and super-shear rupture observed in this earthquake.

  14. Components of the Creep Strength of Welds

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    ://www.msm.cam.ac.uk ABSTRACT Modern power plant steels and welding alloys, designed to resist creep deforma- tion at high in determining the ultimate creep properties. In this work, we have used a combination of models and a knowledge of the mechanical properties and microstructure, to factorise the long#21;term creep rupture strength

  15. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture without predisposing systemic disease or steroid use: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua-Ding; Cai, Dao-Zhang; Wang, Kun; Zeng, Chun

    2012-01-01

    There is a dearth of case reports describing simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon ruptures in the medical literature. These ruptures are often associated with systemic disorders such as lupus erythematosus or chronic steroid use. The author describes a case of a 24-year-old man who sustained traumatic bilateral patellar tendon ruptures without any history of systemic disease or steroidal medication. We repaired and reattached the ruptured tendons to the patella and augmented our procedure with allogeneic tendon followed by wire loop reinforcement. One year after operation, the patient regained a satisfactory range of motion of both knees with good quadriceps strength and no extensor lag. The recurrent microtrauma from a history of intense sports activity and a high body mass index may have played an important role in this trauma event. PMID:22300921

  16. Rupture directivity of small earthquakes at Parkfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Deborah L.; Shearer, Peter M.; Goertz-Allmann, Bettina P.; Vernon, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    AbstractTheoretical modeling of strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> along a bimaterial interface suggests that earthquakes initiating on the interface will have a preferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. We test this model with 450 small earthquakes (2 < M < 5) from Parkfield, California, to look for evidence of consistent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity along the San Andreas Fault. We analyze azimuthal variations in earthquake source spectra after applying an iterative correction for wave propagation effects. Our approach avoids directly modeling source spectra because these models generally assume symmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; instead, we look for azimuthal variations in the amplitudes of the source spectra over specified frequency bands. Our overall results show similar proportions of events exhibiting characteristics of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity toward either the southeast or northwest. However, the proportion of events with southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity increases as we limit the data set to larger magnitudes, with 70% of the 46 events M > 3 exhibiting southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characteristics. Some spatial and temporal variability in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity is also apparent. We observe a higher proportion of northwest directivity <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> following the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake, which <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> toward the northwest. Our results are generally consistent with the preferred southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity model but suggest that directivity is likely due to several contributing factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.S31A0181T"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocities of Small Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tomic, J.; Houston, H.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Whether the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of small earthquakes differs from those of large earthquakes has been a long- standing question in seismology. Recent proposals as to whether and how the physics of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may change with earthquake size have sparked interest in the energy budget, which depends strongly on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity (Vr). Small earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities have proved difficult to determine due to the strong attenuation of high-frequency waves. We analyze P and S waves of small earthquakes to detect <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity and constrain Vr. We apply the projected Landweber deconvolution (PLD) method to a data set of 30 earthquakes 3.6<M<4.5 recorded by the HiNet seismic array. We use small aftershocks as empirical Green's functions (EGF) to deconvolve from the main shocks and obtain the relative source time functions (RSTF). The EGF approach removes the effects of complex structure between the earthquakes and the stations. Variation in RSTFs with azimuth yields estimates of Vr for 6 earthquakes from 0.4 to 0.9?. Our results are broadly consistent with those of Yamada and Mori (JGR, 2005) and McGuire (BSSA, 2004). We now explore the implications of the range in Vr for static stress drop (??), and the ratio of radiated energy to seismic moment, which are interrelated. Kanamori and Rivera (BSSA, 2004) discuss how Vr and ?? must change with earthquake moment, if the ratio of energy to moment ? increases with moment, as has been suggested by various studies. There is currently no consensus that such a change in this ratio truly occurs. The increase in the energy-to- moment ratio is controlled by the relation between moment and corner frequency, which has moment inversely proportional to corner frequency raised to the power (3 + ?). Data compiled in Kanamori and Rivera suggests ? of 0.5. Then Vr of 0.4 to 0.9? for M3 events require that ?? of M3 events range from 1 to 0.1 respectively, of that of M7 events. More constraints on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities of small earthquakes will help to resolve possible changes in the energy budget, and thus earthquake physics, with earthquake size.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NIH-MEDLINEPLUS&redirectUrl=http://kidshealth.org/teen/food_fitness/exercise/strength_training.html"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> Training</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Strength</span> training is a vital part of a balanced exercise routine that includes aerobic activity and flexibility exercises. Regular ... sit-ups, or body weight squats) for <span class="hlt">strength</span> training. Many people tend to lump all types of ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20150010395&hterms=student+stress&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dstudent%2Bstress"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmental Durability and Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of EBC/CMCs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This research focuses on the <span class="hlt">strength</span> and creep performance of SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems under complex simulated engine environments. Tensile-<span class="hlt">strength</span> and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> testing was conducted to illustrate the material properties under isothermal and thermal gradient conditions. To determine material durability, further testing was conducted under exposure to thermal cycling, thermal gradients and simulated combustion environments. Emphasis is placed on experimental techniques as well as implementation of non-destructive evaluation, including modal acoustic emission and electrical resistivity monitoring, to characterize <span class="hlt">strength</span> degradation and damage mechanisms. Currently, little is known about the behavior of EBC-CMCs under these conditions; consequently, this work will prove invaluable in the development of structural components for use in high temperature applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16281033"><span id="translatedtitle">The deterministic nature of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Olson, Erik L; Allen, Richard M</p> <p>2005-11-10</p> <p>Understanding the earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is central to our understanding of fault systems and earthquake hazards. Multiple hypotheses concerning the nature of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have been proposed but no unifying theory has emerged. The conceptual hypothesis most commonly cited is the cascade model for fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In the cascade model, slip initiates on a small fault patch and continues to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> further across a fault plane as long as the conditions are favourable. Two fundamental implications of this domino-like theory are that small earthquakes begin in the same manner as large earthquakes and that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is not deterministic--that is, the size of the earthquake cannot be determined until the cessation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Here we show that the frequency content of radiated seismic energy within the first few seconds of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> scales with the final magnitude of the event. We infer that the magnitude of an earthquake can therefore be estimated before the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is complete. This finding implies that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is to some degree deterministic and has implications for the physics of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. PMID:16281033</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.201...70P"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of initial stress and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation parameters on forbidden zone <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Well established theoretical and numerical results of 2-D <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have been accepted for years to limit the speed of mode II cracks to be below the Rayleigh velocity or above the shear wave speed. However, recent work has numerically produced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds in this so-called `forbidden zone', that is the region of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities between the Rayleigh wave speed and the shear wave speed, for 3-D simulations. We verify that finding here and further examine the dependence of that behaviour on initial stress and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation parameters. Using a 3-D finite element model for dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, numerical experiments were performed for different initial stress conditions as well as different size initiation patches and forced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities. It is shown that the initial stress on the fault has a strong influence on the resulting <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, specifically with regards to the distance at which the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> transitions to supershear speeds, the maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity attained on the fault, and how rapidly the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> passes through the forbidden zone. It is also demonstrated that for the same initial stress, increasing the size of the nucleation patch or the speed of forced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can artificially increase the gradient of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity within the forbidden zone. This suggests that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is uniquely predetermined by the stress state and material properties of the fault and surrounding medium in these models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60438208"><span id="translatedtitle">Stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of lead-free soldered joints used to assemble copper plumbing systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>R. J. Fields; D. A. Shepherd; A. Cohen; A. G. Jr. Kireta</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>A cooperative program on stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of lead-free soldered joints was initiated several years ago between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Copper Development Association (CDA). It was created because the conservative code-assigned joint <span class="hlt">strength</span> properties of soldered wrought and cast copper and copper alloy fittings prohibited the broader use of copper plumbing tube in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6924409"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> of welded copper joints</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kuzyukova, A.N.; Fedorenko, M.I.; Kovalenko, N.I.; Zelik, E.I.</p> <p>1983-07-01</p> <p>A coefficient of the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of welded joints in structures of copper and its alloys made by manual arc welding are known. At the Severedonetsk Branch of the Institute of Chemical Engineering the <span class="hlt">strength</span> coefficients were determined for welded joints made of MZR (phosphorous-deoxydized) copper produced by manual argonarc welding. Optimum welding regimes were selected, and specimens of strips tested for tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Metallographic investigations showed significant grain growth in the zone of thermal influence. The results of mechanical tests are given. The results are verified by the fabrication of nine models. All the models <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> in the zone of thermal influence, confirming results that the zone of thermal influence was the weak point in the welded joints in copper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30822950"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> — A case report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>T. K. Kaar; M. O’Brien; P. Murray; G. B. Mullan</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Summary  The diagnosis of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon is made relatively infrequently and bilateral simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a\\u000a rarity. We report a case of spontaneous bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with documented chronic renal\\u000a insufficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism. A predisposing cause to the condition as obtained in this case, has been\\u000a described in cases previously published</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730014827&hterms=Patent+search&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3D%2522Patent%2Bsearch%2522"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of cryogenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc design</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JMEP...23.2858O"><span id="translatedtitle">Material Parameters for Creep <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Austenitic Stainless Steel Foils</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Osman, H.; Borhana, A.; Tamin, M. N.</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of austenitic stainless steel foil, 347SS, used in compact recuperators have been evaluated at 700 °C in the stress range of 54-221 MPa to establish the baseline behavior for its extended use. Creep curves of the foil show that the primary creep stage is brief and creep life is dominated by tertiary creep deformation with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lives in the range of 10-2000 h. Results are compared with properties of bulk specimens tested at 98 and 162 MPa. Thin foil 347SS specimens were found to have higher creep rates and higher <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ductility than their bulk specimen counterparts. Power law relationship was obtained between the minimum creep rate and the applied stress with stress exponent value, n = 5.7. The value of the stress exponent is indicative of the rate-controlling deformation mechanism associated with dislocation creep. Nucleation of voids mainly occurred at second-phase particles (chromium-rich M23C6 carbides) that are present in the metal matrix by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. The improvement in <span class="hlt">strength</span> is attributed to the precipitation of fine niobium carbides in the matrix that act as obstacles to the movement of dislocations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1237870"><span id="translatedtitle">Tendon <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> Associated With Corticosteroid Therapy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Halpern, Alan A.; Horowitz, Bruce G.; Nagel, Donald A.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>In five patients, tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred in association with corticosteroid therapy, either systemic or local infiltration. The chronic nature of the pain in all of these patients suggests that what we often call tendinitis may in fact be early or partial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of tendons. Patients who receive local infiltration of corticosteroids should perhaps be advised of the risk of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon. In addition, particularly when the Achilles tendon is involved, immobilization should be utilized initially for a presumed tendinitis or early <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, to protect the tendon from further injury. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:919538</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=DOE-PATENT-XML&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/6168850"><span id="translatedtitle">Method and apparatus for determining tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Ratigan, J.L.</p> <p>1982-05-28</p> <p>A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, whereafter the tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S33F4914C"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> characterization of the 2014 Napa Valley earthquake from 3 different perspectives</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cedric, T.; Adams, M.; Ji, C.; Archuleta, R. J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The extensive strong-ground motion data of the August 24 Mw 6.1 Napa Valley earthquake exhibits an interesting pattern of the strong ground motion. Although the slip models based on seismic and geodetic data revealed mainly north-north-west <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, the largest ground acceleration of 0.94g was observed at a station south of the hypocenter, presumably associated with the initiation stage of this earthquake. Here, the kinematic and dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of this earthquake is studied using the strong-ground motion data in the vicinity (< 40 km) of the epicentre of the Napa Valley earthquake. Three inversion algorithms are applied. First, a conventional non-linear finite fault inversion is conducted to constrain the overall slip history using relatively long period (> 1 s) seismic data. Second, a dynamic finite fault inversion, which approximates the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as multiple elliptical cracks, is carried out to understand what are the stress and <span class="hlt">strength</span> conditions on the fault that produces a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history that is compatible with the observed data. Finally, an iterative Landweber back-projection algorithm is used to constrain the finer spatio-temporal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history associating with the high frequency radiation. The efforts particularly focus on the initiation stage of the fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18773155"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The role of computational mechanics].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Giannoglou, Georgios; Giannakoulas, Georgios; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I; Rudolf, Jobst</p> <p>2008-07-01</p> <p>Until today, there is no reliable criterion to predict the risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), which could help in the final clinical decision. The acceptance of the traditional diameter criterion has led to unnecessary surgical procedures with the subsequent high mortality and morbidity. On the other hand, small aneurysms are known that sometimes are subject to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which could be avoided in the case of an early surgical decision. Thus, it becomes necessary to find new criteria, which can reliably predict the actual risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of AAAs in the clinical setting. This prediction will certainly be a useful clinical tool in the management of patients with AAAs. According to the biomechanical approach in predicting the risk of aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and to the fundamental principles in cardiovascular mechanics, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs when the AAA wall stresses exceed the failure <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the wall. Therefore, it becomes obvious that the knowledge of the distribution of stress on a particular AAA wall would be a good indication of its susceptibility to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. A methodology to noninvasively determine the in vivo distribution of stresses on the AAA wall is therefore necessary. PMID:18773155</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S13B..04M"><span id="translatedtitle">An earthquake in a maze: compressional <span class="hlt">rupture</span> branching during the 11 April 2012 M8.6 off-Sumatra earthquake</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Meng, L.; Ampuero, J. P.; Stock, J. M.; Duputel, Z.; Luo, Y.; Tsai, V. C.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Geophysical observations of the 2012 Mw 8.6 Sumatra earthquake reveal unprecedented complexity of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The surprisingly large magnitude results from the combination of deep extent, high stress drop and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of multiple faults. Back-projection source imaging indicates that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs on distinct planes in an orthogonal conjugate fault system, with relatively slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed. The ESE-WNW <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> add a new dimension to the seismotectonics of the Wharton Basin which was previously thought to be controlled by N-S strike-slip faulting. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> followed an exceptionally tortuous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> path. It featured two episodes of branching into fault segments that were experiencing increased compressive dynamic stresses, hence increased frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span>. By conducting 2D dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations, we find that the compressional branching can only occur under slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed and low apparent friction coefficient. Poroelastic effects can also contribute by buffering the dynamic clamping. We suggest that serpentinized minerals may provide low friction, fluids and dynamic weakening down to 25 km depth, and ductile shear heating instability may provide a weakening mechanism from 40 to 60 km depth. The absence of known weakening mechanism in the intermediate depth range suggests that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may penetrate over velocity-strengthening regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40772761"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> properties of nylon- and polypropylene-fiber-reinforced concretes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>P. S. Song; S. Hwang; B. C. Sheu</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">strength</span> potential of nylon-fiber-reinforced concrete was investigated versus that of the polypropylene-fiber-reinforced concrete, at a fiber content of 0.6 kg\\/m3. The compressive and splitting tensile <span class="hlt">strengths</span> and modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (MOR) of the nylon fiber concrete improved by 6.3%, 6.7%, and 4.3%, respectively, over those of the polypropylene fiber concrete. On the impact resistance, the first-crack and failure <span class="hlt">strengths</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23955186"><span id="translatedtitle">Quadriceps and patellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Dennis; Stinner, Daniel; Mir, Hassan</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>The diagnosis of quadriceps and patellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> requires a high index of suspicion and thorough history-taking to assess for medical comorbidities that may predispose patients to tendon degeneration. Radiographic assessment with plain films supplemented by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging when the work-up is equivocal further aids diagnosis; however, advanced imaging is often unnecessary in patients with functional extensor mechanism deficits. Acute repair is preferred, and transpatellar bone tunnels serve as the primary form of fixation when the tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs at the patellar insertion, with or without augmentation depending on surgeon preference. Chronic tears and disruptions following total knee arthroplasty are special cases requiring reconstructions with allograft, synthetic mesh, or autograft. Rehabilitation protocols generally allow immediate weight-bearing with the knee locked in extension and crutch support. Limited arc motion is started early with active flexion and passive extension and then advanced progressively, followed by full active range of motion and strengthening. Complications are few but include quadriceps atrophy, knee stiffness, and rerupture. Outcomes are excellent if repair is done acutely, with poorer outcomes associated with delayed repair. PMID:23955186</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49567589"><span id="translatedtitle">Fatal lower extremity varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Garyfalia Ampanozi; Ulrich Preiss; Gary M. Hatch; Wolf Dieter Zech; Thomas Ketterer; Stephan Bolliger; Michael J. Thali; Thomas D. Ruder</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare cause of death, although varicosities are a common pathology. We present three cases of sudden death due to varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After a review of the literature, the case circumstances and the findings of imaging examination, performed in two cases, are presented. One of them had undergone a post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA), and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/m8m84318h084v172.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Richard H. Daffner; Barry L. Riemer; Anthony R. Lupetin; Nilima Dash</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The diagnosis of acute tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22561379"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendons <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Celik, Evrim Co?kun; Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Ofluoglu, Demet; Demircay, Emre</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and some medications. We report a case of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that may be related to the long-term use of a statin. PMID:22561379</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30371419"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultrasound Diagnosis of Quadriceps Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Brian G. LaRocco; George Zlupko; Paul Sierzenski</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are an uncommon knee injury. The diagnosis is often complicated by a limited examination secondary to edema and pain, the insensitivity of radiographs, and the unavailability of non-emergent magnetic resonance imaging. A delay in diagnosis and treatment has been shown to cause significant morbidity. A case report of bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is presented demonstrating the utility</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25728450"><span id="translatedtitle">Aortic valve <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during isometric muscle contraction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Payne, Darrin M; Richards, Tammy; Hamilton, Andrew</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Aortic valve <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been previously reported in association with blunt chest trauma as well as spontaneously in the setting of abnormal valves. We present a case of a patient who required emergent aortic valve replacement following <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of his aortic valve during an isometric muscle contraction. PMID:25728450</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://ejcts.ctsnetjournals.org/cgi/reprint/21/4/649.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Iatrogenic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the tracheobronchial tree</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>H. S. Hofmann; G. Rettig; J. Radke; H. Neef; R. E Silber</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Objective: Iatrogenic tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are seldom but severe complications after intubation or bronchoscopy. Therefore, we evaluated the reasons, the subsequent therapy and the outcome of patients with tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, who were admitted to our hospital. Methods: In a retrospective study we examined 19 patients (15 women, four men; 43–87 years) treated for acute tracheobronchial lesions. Eleven (58%) patients had a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25468102"><span id="translatedtitle">Free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after arterial switch operation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel; Aroca, Ángel; Pérez-Caballero, Ramón; Pita, Ana</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>A neonate underwent arterial switch operation, supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for 3 days. Two weeks later, a pseudoaneurysm was seen on an echocardiogram, and a free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was suggested. Prompt surgery was performed, a free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> assessed, and a patch with BioGlue was applied successfully. One year later, the child is in good condition. PMID:25468102</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/24812576"><span id="translatedtitle">Management of acute tendo Achillis <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Adam Ajis; Nicola Maffulli</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Acute <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the tendo Achillis are increasingly frequent, and affect mainly middle-aged adults. The optimal management of acute <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the tendo Achillis is widely debated. The contentious issues can be summarised into conservative versus operative management, early versus late mobilisation and, if operative management is selected, percutaneous versus open repair. In general, rerupture is more common after non-operative</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/912343"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Normalization Temperature on Creep <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>T.C. Totemeier; H. Tian; J.A. Simpson</p> <p>2006-05-01</p> <p>The effect of normalization temperature from 850 to 1050°C on the structure and creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel was studied. Normalization at temperatures less than 925°C resulted in structures containing significant polygonized, recovered ferrite. These structures had poor creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>; roughly two orders of magnitude increase in minimum creep rate or decrease in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life for 850°C compared to 1050°C normalization at test conditions of 600°C and 145 MPa. Room-temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> and hardness were also reduced. Normalization at temperatures between 925°C and 1000°C also resulted in reduced creep <span class="hlt">strength</span> in comparison with 1050°C normalization, even though tempered martensite microstructures were formed and little change in room temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> was observed–the reduction was attributed to subtle differences in fine MX precipitates. The effect of reduced normalization temperature was more pronounced for higher temperature, lower stress creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24684544"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetic basis of cranial cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (CCLR) in dogs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Baird, Arabella Elizabeth Gardiner; Carter, Stuart D; Innes, John F; Ollier, William E; Short, Andrea D</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Cranial Cruciate Ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (CCLR) is one of the most common forms of lameness in dogs and is analogous to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the anterior cruciate ligament in humans, for which it can serve as a model. As there is a strong breed-related predisposition to CCLR in dogs, a study was undertaken to consider putative genetic components in susceptible dog breeds. A candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping approach using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (Sequenom Ltd) was designed to investigate several CCLR-susceptible dog breeds and identify CCLR-associated genes/gene regions that may confer susceptibility or resistance. A meta-analysis was performed using the breed case/control candidate gene data to identify SNP associations that were common to the whole cohort of susceptible dogs. We identified SNPs in key genes involved in ligament <span class="hlt">strength</span>, stability and extracellular matrix formation (COL5A1, COL5A2, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL11A1, COL24A1, FBN1, LOX, LTBP2) which were significantly associated with CCLR susceptibility across the dog breeds used in this study. These SNPs could have an involvement in CCLR due to a detrimental effect on ligament structure and <span class="hlt">strength</span>. This is the first published candidate gene study that has revealed significant genetic associations with canine CCLR. PMID:24684544</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000004892&hterms=hi&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dhi"><span id="translatedtitle">Intermediate Temperature Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a Woven Hi-Nicalon, BN-Interphase, SiC Matric Composite in Air</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet; Brewer, David</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Woven Hi-Nicalon (TM) reinforced melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites were tested under tensile stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> conditions in air at intermediate temperatures. A comprehensive examination of the damage state and the fiber properties at failure was performed. Modal acoustic emission analysis was used to monitor damage during the experiment. Extensive microscopy of the composite fracture surfaces and the individual fiber fracture surfaces was used to determine the mechanisms leading to ultimate failure. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of these composites were significantly worse than expected compared to the fiber properties under similar conditions. This was due to the oxidation of the BN interphase. Oxidation occurred through the matrix cracks that intersected the surface or edge of a tensile bar. These oxidation reactions resulted in minor degradation to fiber <span class="hlt">strength</span> and strong bonding of the fibers to one another at regions of near fiber-to-fiber contact. It was found that two regimes for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> exist for this material: a high stress regime where <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs at a fast rate and a low stress regime where <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs at a slower rate. For the high stress regime, the matrix damage state consisted of through thickness cracks. The average fracture <span class="hlt">strength</span> of fibers that were pulled-out (the final fibers to break before ultimate failure) was controlled by the slow-crack growth <span class="hlt">rupture</span> criterion in the literature for individual Hi-Nicalon (TM) fibers. For the low stress regime, the matrix damage state consisted of microcracks which grew during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test. The average fracture <span class="hlt">strength</span> of fibers that were pulled-out in this regime was the same as the average fracture <span class="hlt">strength</span> of individual fibers pulled out in as-produced composites tested at room temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26054172"><span id="translatedtitle">[Idiopathic bilateral patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Choufani, C; Barthélemy, R; Danis, J; Demoures, Th; Rigal, S</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>In the absence of systemic disease, specific treatment or sport tendonitis, simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is rare. Often missed on the first glance, it represents a diagnostic difficulty that should not be overlooked at the initial medical visit. The loss of active extension of the lower limb and a radiographic patella alta, even in a bilateral context, should raise suspicion of this diagnosis. It is then necessary to search for predisposing causes and to evoke the differential, or frequently associated, diagnoses. The present report illustrates these diagnostic difficulties and summarizes some clinical considerations that might help to avoid neglecting these different elements at the first medical visit (positive diagnosis, associated lesions, favouring factors). PMID:26054172</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0709.4625v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transversity</span> Measurements at COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>COMPASS Collaboration; C. Schill</p> <p>2007-09-28</p> <p>The measurement of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin effects in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering is an important part of the COMPASS physics program. From the analysis of the 2002-2004 data, new results for the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> target spin asymmetry of z-ordered identified pion and kaon pairs are presented. In addition, a first result for the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> target spin asymmetry of exclusively produced rho^0 mesons on the deuteron is shown.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6331637"><span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of candidate materials for nuclear process heat applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Schubert, F.; te Heesen, E.; Bruch, U.; Cook, R.; Diehl, H.; Ennis, P.J.; Jakobeit, W.; Penkalla, H.J.; Ullrich, G.</p> <p>1984-08-01</p> <p>Creep and stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties are determined for the candidate materials to be used in hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) components. The materials and test methods are briefly described based on experimental results of test durations of about20000 h. The medium creep <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of the alloys Inconel-617, Hastelloy-X, Nimonic-86, Hastelloy-S, Manaurite-36X, IN-519, and Incoloy-800H are compared showing that Inconel-617 has the best creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties in the temperature range above 800/sup 0/C. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of welded joints is in the lower range of the scatterband of the parent metal. The properties determined in different simulated HTGR atmospheres are within the scatterband of the properties obtained in air. Extrapolation methods are discussed and a modified minimum commitment method is favored.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.S13D..07U"><span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic Interface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Extremely Heterogeneous Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Uenishi, K.; Tsuji, K.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Fracture experiments of monolithic brittle materials usually show the maximum speed of smooth <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at some 30 % of the relevant shear wave speed. This experimental maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed is by far lower than those predicted by theories and inferred from inversions of seismograms, and some seismic inversions (e.g., the 1979 Imperial Valley, 1992 Landers, 1999 Izmit, 2001 the central Kunlunshan and 2002 Denali earthquakes) even suggest the existence of supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds (i.e., <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagating faster than the relevant shear wave). Recently, Uenishi et al. ( SSJ Fall Meeting, 2004, 2005; AGU Fall Meeting, 2006) experimentally investigated dynamic fracture in monolithic hyperelastic materials under static mode-§ loading conditions with relatively high crack-parallel stresses. Using a high-speed digital video camera system, they showed that cracks may propagate supersonically even in homogeneous materials. However, the exact mechanism for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> nucleation and the transition of a nucleated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from sub-Rayleigh to super-shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed has not been identified yet. In this contribution, we further develop our experimental system and investigate dynamic fracture in extremely heterogeneous media, consisting of thin fluid and solid films: Inside a wire frame (50mm high, 50mm wide), a flat soap film contacts a flat thin solid plastic film (20mm high, 20mm wide), under static tensile loading conditions. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (crack), initiated at a point, propagates subsonically in the linear elastic fluid film (see e.g., Uenishi et al., SSJ Fall Meeting, 2006, for the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in monolithic fluid films). When the circular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front reaches the interface, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> advances along the interface and then it is "diffracted" at the two corners of the interface. We record the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation process utilizing our high-speed digital video camera at a frame rate of 20 ?s (20×10-6s). The observed results show that interface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation may accelerate (or even decelerate) and the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior is very sensitive to the geometry of the interface between the two films: (1) When the subsonic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front reaches the first rectangular corner, it accelerates around the corner and then advances supersonically along the interface; and (2) when the supersonic interface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front approaches the second corner (obtuse with respect to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front in fluid), it bifurcates for a short period (400 ?s): the first branch unexpectedly expands rather straight into the bulk and the second one propagates along the interface at a lower speed; At a later stage, again unexpectedly, the first branched crack decelerates significantly in the bulk and the two cracks eventually merge into a single crack. The overall behavior is - in some sense - similar to that of the oblique shock and Prandtl- Meyer expansion waves in fluid mechanics, and it might give new insights not only into the question of high <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds of natural earthquakes but also into the generation mechanism of tsunamis. u.ac.jp/~uenishi/</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25748805"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> tiny middle cerebral artery aneurysm].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kawahara, Ichiro; Tsutsumi, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hirose, Makoto; Shirakawa, Yasushi; Toba, Tamotsu</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>With new neuroimaging techniques, the detection rate of unruptured intracranial aneurysms has increased. While most detected aneurysms are small and left untreated because of the low risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, we still encounter many cases of small aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Middle cerebral artery(MCA)aneurysms have lower risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> compared to those in the anterior cerebral or internal carotid-posterior communicating arteries. Identification of small aneurysms with a high risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is important to improve management of these aneurysms. We report 10 cases of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tiny(<3mm)MCA aneurysms. All patients underwent clipping and nine had good outcomes. One patient had poor outcome due to the worsening of chronic heart failure and kidney failure. A tiny aneurysm can <span class="hlt">rupture</span> if the aneurysmal wall is fragile. Therefore, the fragility of the aneurysmal wall is an important predictive factor of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Presently, however, it is difficult to determine when an operation for an unruptured tiny aneurysm is indicated; new neuroimaging techniques that detect the fragility of the aneurysmal wall are needed. PMID:25748805</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhDT.......143L"><span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Ground Motion Modeling on Realistically Complex Strike-Slip Faults</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lozos, Julian Charles</p> <p></p> <p>Faults are complex structures: they are geometrically complex, and have variable stress conditions and frictional behaviors along their length. In addition, faults exist in heterogeneous settings, in terms of surrounding geology, and in terms of regional and local stresses. These individual types of heterogeneity all contribute to complex dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behaviors and ground motion distributions, as inferred from observational data and supported by previous modeling studies. In this study, we investigate the effects of individual types of complexity, and we combine different types of heterogeneity in order to enhance the realism of models of real-world faults. We use the finite element method to conduct dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models of earthquakes on faults with complex geometry, initial stresses, frictional parameters, and surrounding geology, and with combinations of these factors, in order to investigate the effects of this complexity on fault interactions, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> extent, and ground motion. In particular, we investigate the effect of critical weakening distance on the ability of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to propagate through a discontinuity in the fault trace, the effect of a small fault between the larger strands of a stepover on the ability of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to jump the stepover, and how zones of aseismic creep affect <span class="hlt">rupture</span> through locked portions of the same fault. We also construct realistically complex models of the northern San Jacinto Fault, California, incorporating realistic geometry, velocity structure, and combined regional and stochastic stress fields. We find that the distribution of complexity of any type on the fault, which leads to heterogeneous fault <span class="hlt">strength</span>, has the primary controlling effect on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior. The relative <span class="hlt">strength</span> or weakness of the fault, rather than the actual value, is most important. We also find that the balance of the energy budget is crucial; if too much energy is redirected into fracture, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> stops. Lastly, we find that each type of complexity affects <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in its own way, but it is difficult to separate out the effects of individual factors in a model that incorporates many types of heterogeneity. We therefore emphasize the importance of including as many types of realistic complexity as feasible when modeling real faults.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25669735"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of renal angiomyolipoma during childbirth.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Orywal, Ann Kathrin; Zeile, Martin; Brüning, Roland; Gross, Andreas J; Netsch, Christopher</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumor of the kidney, originating from perivascular epithelioid cells. Normally asymptomatic, symptoms that can occur are flank pain due to strong growth or spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with retroperitoneal hemorrhage and hypovolemic shock. The risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is higher during pregnancy and also growth can be enhanced, probably hormone mediated. We report a case of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> renal angiomyolipoma during childbirth in a woman who presented with hypovolemic shock as a result of retroperitoneal hemorrhage. Emergency endovascular treatment was successful with sparing most of the affected kidney as demonstrated by angiography imaging and follow-up computed tomographic scan. PMID:25669735</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1320378"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Distal Biceps Tendon in a Collegiate Football Player: A Case Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Thompson, Karen L.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To provide health care personnel with guidelines for the management of a distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Background: Traumatic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the biceps tendon are rare, but serious, and usually involve the long head of the proximal insertion. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> of the distal tendon account for only 3% of all biceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. A history of tendinitis, overuse, or anabolic steroid abuse may predispose tendons to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Surgical repair, followed by a comprehensive rehabilitation program, is indicated to regain full <span class="hlt">strength</span> and range of motion in both flexion and supination. Differential Diagnosis: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the distal head of the biceps brachii muscle at the insertion on the radial tuberosity. Treatment: After the injury, the athlete continued to compete for the remainder of the collegiate football season. He then underwent surgery to repair the tendon at its insertion. Post- operatively, the athlete was immobilized in a cast and then a brace to prevent any movement of the muscle. Rehabilitation proceeded with isometric exercises and manual resistive exercises of the shoulder and wrist. At 16 weeks, the athlete was cleared for biceps curls and wrist supination. At 6 months, the athlete had regained full use of the muscle. Uniqueness: This is a relatively rare injury, usually occurring at the proximal tendon insertion and in those who are middle aged (30 to 50 years old). Also, the surgical intervention in this case was delayed without detrimental effects to the patient. Conclusions: This study shows that, while surgical intervention to repair a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> distal biceps tendon is necessary, appropriate conservative measures can be taken to allow surgery to be delayed without harm to the patient. The athletic trainer should be aware of how to recognize and treat this injury. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4. PMID:16558487</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T41D..03X"><span id="translatedtitle">Fault barriers favor activation of backthrusts near segment ends of megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xu, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Increasing evidence indicates that backthrusts may become active during or after megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in subduction zones, such as in Chile and Sumatra areas (Melnick et al., 2012; Singh et al., 2011). Previous studies on relevant mechanisms mainly focused on the interaction between forethrusts and the megathrust. Here we aim to investigate through dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations how backthrusts may be activated by megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in subduction zone environment. Assuming a single backthrust branch, our preliminary results show that the activation of backthrust is difficult if the megathrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can easily pass through the fault junction, owing to a quickly established stress shadow zone in the wake of the megathrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front. In contrast, if the megathrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is arrested or delayed around the junction, a resultant backward stress lobe of the type discussed by Xu and Ben-Zion (2013) can load the backthrust over a considerable amount of time and facilitates <span class="hlt">rupture</span> activation along the backthrust. A number of candidates can serve to arrest or delay megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, such as the velocity-strengthening frictional behavior and off-fault weak materials in the shallow portion of subduction zones, fault bend or ramp, and subducted seamount. Moreover, these features are also found capable of generating backthrusts during the long-term quasi-static process, which provide pre-existing weakness to be reactivated by later dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Our results agree, from a different point of view, with the study based on the critical taper theory (Cubas et al., 2013) that an increase of friction towards the trench favors the activation of backthrusts near the up-dip limit of megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. The results highlight the role of fault geometric or <span class="hlt">strength</span> heterogeneities in controlling the strain partitioning on and off the main fault plane. Accordingly, activated backthrusts may be treated as markers that reflect the limits of seismogenic zones, and thus may be used to characterize segmentation of subduction zones. Backthrusts can contribute, like forethrusts, to local tsunami generation, intra-plate seismicity, etc., and should be examined in further detail in future studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/783737"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">TRANSVERSITY</span> SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>BOER,D.</p> <p>2001-04-27</p> <p>The theoretical aspects of two leading twist <span class="hlt">transversity</span> single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of <span class="hlt">transversity</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/781134"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">TRANSVERSELY</span> POLARIZED L PRODUCTION.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>BORER,D.</p> <p>2000-05-22</p> <p><span class="hlt">Transversely</span> polarized {Lambda} production in hard scattering processes is discussed in terms of a leading twist T-odd fragmentation function which describes the fragmentation of an unpolarized quark into a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized {Lambda}. We focus on the properties of this function and its relevance for the RHIC and HERMES experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900006692&hterms=epoxy+shear+strength&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Depoxy%2Bshear%2Bstrength"><span id="translatedtitle">Probabilistic simulation of uncertainties in composite uniaxial <span class="hlt">strengths</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chamis, C. C.; Stock, T. A.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite <span class="hlt">strengths</span>. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using composite mechanics with Monte Carlo simulation. The variables for which uncertainties are accounted include constituent <span class="hlt">strengths</span> and their respective scatter. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to illustrate the procedure and its effectiveness to formally estimate the probable scatter in the composite uniaxial <span class="hlt">strengths</span>. The results show that ply longitudinal tensile and compressive, <span class="hlt">transverse</span> compressive and intralaminar shear <span class="hlt">strengths</span> are not sensitive to single fiber anomalies (breaks, intergacial disbonds, matrix microcracks); however, the ply <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> is.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008EEEV....7..165A"><span id="translatedtitle">Simplified approach for design of raft foundations against fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Part II: soil-structure interaction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anastasopoulos, I.; Gerolymos, N.; Gazetas, G.; Bransby, M. F.</p> <p>2008-06-01</p> <p>This is the second paper of two, which describe the results of an integrated research effort to develop a four-step simplified approach for design of raft foundations against dip-slip (normal and thrust) fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The first two steps dealing with fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation in the free-field were presented in the companion paper. This paper develops an approximate analytical method to analyze soil-foundation-structure interaction (SFSI), involving two additional phenomena: (i) fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> diversion (Step 3); and (ii) modification of the vertical displacement profile (Step 4). For the first phenomenon (Step 3), an approximate energy-based approach is developed to estimate the diversion of a fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to presence of a raft foundation. The normalized critical load for complete diversion is shown to be a function of soil <span class="hlt">strength</span>, coefficient of earth pressure at rest, bedrock depth, and the horizontal position of the foundation relative to the outcropping fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. For the second phenomenon (Step 4), a heuristic approach is proposed, which “scans” through possible equilibrium positions to detect the one that best satisfies force and moment equilibrium. Thus, we account for the strong geometric nonlinearities that govern this interaction, such as uplifting and second order ( P-?) effects. Comparisons with centrifuge-validated finite element analyses demonstrate the efficacy of the method. Its simplicity makes possible its utilization for preliminary design.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22273168"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> gravity versus observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J.J., E-mail: enrique.alvarez@uam.es, E-mail: anton.fernandez@uam.es, E-mail: jj.lopezvillarejo@uam.es [Instituto de Física Teórica, UAM/CSIC and Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain)</p> <p>2009-07-01</p> <p>Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by <span class="hlt">transverse</span> vectors, ?{sub ?}?{sup ?} = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed <span class="hlt">transverse</span>, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is <span class="hlt">transverse</span>, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These <span class="hlt">transverse</span> deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://portal.acs.org/portal/PublicWebSite/education/outreach/CNBP_029486#page=7"><span id="translatedtitle">Spaghetti <span class="hlt">Strength</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-08</p> <p>In this activity on page 7 of the PDF, learners explore how engineers characterize building materials. Learners test the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of spaghetti and determine how the number of spaghetti strands affects the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of a bundle of spaghetti. Use this activity to chemical bonds, mechanical testing, and engineering. Note: The pasta strands can be dipped in water and stuck together to more closely mimic the layers within a piece of plywood. More information about this can be found at the top of page 7, directly underneath the cartoon image. Safety note: Do not eat or drink any of the materials in this activity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.S53D..03A"><span id="translatedtitle">Macroscopic Asymmetry of Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> on a Bimaterial Interface With Velocity- Weakening Friction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ampuero, J.; Ben-Zion, Y.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Large faults typically separate rocks of different elastic properties. In-plane <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on bimaterial interfaces have remarkable dynamic properties that may be relevant to many issues of basic and applied science (e.g., Ben-Zion, 2001). In contrast to slip between similar media, slip along a bimaterial interface generates dynamic changes of normal stress that modify the local fault <span class="hlt">strength</span> (e.g., Weertman, 1980). One important issue is whether <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on a bimaterial interface evolves toward a unilateral wrinkle-like pulse in the direction of motion of the compliant medium (the "preferred" direction), or whether it propagates as a symmetric bilateral crack. Some field data suggest that bimaterial interfaces in natural fault zones produce macroscopic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> asymmetry (Dor et al., 2006; Lewis et al., 2005, 2006); however, this is a subject of ongoing debate. Rubin and Ampuero (2006) performed numerical simulations of bimaterial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> under pure slip-weakening friction. They found bilateral crack-like <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> without significant asymmetry of slip. For <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> that stopped in low stress areas, there was asymmetry in the final stress distribution, induced by a small scale pulse that detaches from the crack when it stops. This may provide a mechanism for the observed asymmetry of microearthquakes on segments of the San Andreas fault (Rubin and Gillard, 2000). In addition, the results included very prominent asymmetry of slip velocities at the opposite <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts. In calculations with slip-weakening friction the strong asymmetry of slip velocities can not manifest itself into macroscopic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> asymmetry. However, incorporating in the simulations rate-dependent friction may produce larger stress drop in the preferred direction, leading to macroscopically asymmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (Ben-Zion, 2006). In this work we study the effect of velocity-weakening friction on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along a bimaterial interface, using 2D in-plane simulations with a spectral boundary integral method and a rate-and-state dependent friction law with strong velocity dependence. The law contains slip-weakening or velocity-weakening as limit cases, depending on the length scale in the state evolution law. The steady-state friction coefficient is inversely proportional to slip-rate, mimicking the weakening mechanisms thought to operate on natural faults at high velocities. We examine the behavior of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> triggered by a slightly overstressed nucleation zone of size larger than a critical size derived by linear stability analysis. We characterize the range of friction parameters and initial stress values for which <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> behave as cracks or pulses, decaying or sustained, with subshear or super-shear speeds. All sustained <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are initially bilateral. In the range where sub-shear pulse-like <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is observed, the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> develop strong macroscopic asymmetry with continuing propagation along the bimaterial interface. This is manifested by significantly larger seismic potency and propagation distance in the preferred direction, similar to what was found by Shi and Ben-Zion (2006) with strong nucleation phases and slip-weakening friction. The stress asymmetry mechanism described by Rubin and Ampuero (2006) remains in our velocity-weakening simulations as a super-imposed small-scale feature.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~steveday/PUBLISHED/Dalguer_etal_SurfSubsurf.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">Rupturing</span> and Buried Dynamic-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models Calibrated with Statistical Observations of Past Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Luis A. Dalguer; Hiroe Miyake; Steven M. Day; Kojiro Irikura</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In the context of the slip-weakening friction model and simplified asper- ity models for stress state, we calibrate dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models for buried and surface-<span class="hlt">rupturing</span> earthquakes constrained with statistical observations of past earth- quakes. These observations are the kinematic source models derived from source in- versions of ground-motion and empirical source models of seismic moment and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area. The calibrated</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29285122"><span id="translatedtitle">Patella baja following chronic quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Michael Hockings; John C. Cameron</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Patella baja is a complication of chronic quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In this case we present the treatment of this problem by the proximal transfer of the tibial tubercle allowing an environment in which the quadriceps tendon can heal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6752786"><span id="translatedtitle">Pregnancy-related <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of arterial aneurysms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barrett, J M; Van Hooydonk, J E; Boehm, F H</p> <p>1982-09-01</p> <p>Over 50 per cent of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> arterial aneurysms in women under the age of 40 are pregnancy-related. The hemodynamic and endocrine changes of pregnancy appear to be the cause of arterial alterations which may lead to new aneurysm formation and/or weakening of preexisting aneurysms. The most commonly reported arteries to have aneurysms <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy are the aorta, cerebral arteries, splenic artery, renal artery, coronary artery, and ovarian artery. In many instances, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an arterial aneurysm will initially simulate other less serious disease processes, thus delaying the correct diagnosis until a catastrophic event occurs. Early diagnosis and treatment of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> arterial aneurysm are imperative in order to give optimal chances of survival to the mother and fetus. PMID:6752786</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25697302"><span id="translatedtitle">Haemorrhagic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatic simple cysts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Simon, Tiarah; Bakker, Ilsalien S; Penninga, Luit; Nellensteijn, David R</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Haemorrhagic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a life-threatening complication of a hepatic simple cyst. A 63-year-old man presented with severe acute abdominal pain and a massive haemoperitoneum resulting from haemorrhagic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a large hepatic cyst. The haemorrhagic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was aggravated by an overdose of vitamin K-antagonist treatment. CT scans revealed a large hepatic simple cyst. The patient was successfully treated conservatively with resuscitation, transfusion therapy and administration of coagulation agents. To date, there is no clear evidence regarding optimal treatment of haemorrhagic hepatic cyst <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The risk of recurrent bleeding from the haemorrhagic hepatic simple cyst, and the need for final treatment to avoid rebleeding either by percutaneous sclerotherapy, endovascular embolisation, surgical cyst resection, or surgical deroofing, is discussed. PMID:25697302</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.era.lib.ed.ac.uk/handle/1842/6246"><span id="translatedtitle">FRP <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strains in FRP wrapped columns </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Li, Shiqing</p> <p>2012-06-25</p> <p>Applying lateral confinement to concrete columns using fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites is a very promising technique. FRP <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is the typical failure mode of FRP wrapped columns under axial compression. numerous ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/13894242"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of bacteria by explosive decompression.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>FOSTER, J W; COWAN, R M; MAAG, T A</p> <p>1962-02-01</p> <p>Foster, John W. (University of Georgia, Athens), Robert M. Cowan, and Ted A. Maag. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of bacteria by explosive decompression. J. Bacteriol. 83:330-334. 1962.-A device is described for instantaneously <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> bacteria and other cells in a closed system under controlled conditions by explosive decompression. With this device, 31 to 59% of Serratia marcescens, ranging up to 20 mg (dry wt) of cells per ml, were <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> after nitrogen saturation at 1740 psi. Under similar conditions, 10 to 25% of Brucella abortus and Staphylococcus aureus were <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of these organisms produced readily separable cell walls. Centrifugation in linear glycerol gradients was applied to further separate cell walls from debris. Mycoplasma gallinarum, Leptospira pomona, and Eimeria tenella (avian coccidia) oöcysts were also broken up by the decompression chamber. Pressure and duration of saturation of cells with gas affected <span class="hlt">rupture</span> efficiency. Within the limits of this study, concentration of organisms and volume of suspensions did not have a definite effect. PMID:13894242</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740006119&hterms=mater&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmater"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Petrasek, D. W.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C (2000 F) tensile and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C (2000 F). The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> at 1093 C (2000 F). Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C (2000 F). The stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C (2000 F) ultimate tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the composites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30740694"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon with contralateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the patellar tendon in an otherwise healthy athlete</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>N I Munshi; C E Mbubaegbu</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>A case of a healthy athlete with simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of quadriceps tendon and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the contralateral patella tendon is reported. Both tendons <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> in the same patient is rare and this is the first reported case in a previously healthy person. Different mechanisms are implicated in the different <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. The rarity is because the simultaneous presence of contributory factors</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730008902&hterms=seamless+steel+tubes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dseamless%2Bsteel%2Btubes"><span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests of internally pressurized Hastelloy-X tubes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gumto, K. H.; Colantino, G. J.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>Seamless Hastelloy-X tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1400 to 1650 F and internal helium pressures from 800 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 58 to 3600 hr. The creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the tubes was from 20 to 40 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1596503"><span id="translatedtitle">A conceptual model of a single-event gate-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> in power MOSFETs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>J. R. Brews; M. Allenspach; R. D. Schrimpf; K. F. Galloway; J. L. Titus; C. F. Wheatley</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Proposes a physical model of hole-collection following a heavy-ion strike to explain the development of oxide fields sufficient to cause single-event gate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (SEGR) in power MOSFETs. It is found that the size of the maximum field and the time at which it is attained are strongly affected by the hole mobility. Oxide fields larger than the intrinsic breakdown <span class="hlt">strength</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0712.3178v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transversity</span> signals at COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>By COMPASS Collaboration</p> <p>2007-12-19</p> <p>COMPASS is a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS, with a rich physics program focused on nucleon spin structure and on hadron spectroscopy. One of the main goals of the spin program is the measurement of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin distribution function $\\Delta_T q(x)$ in semi-inclusive DIS off <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized nucleons. For this purpose approximately 20% of the running time in the years 2002 to 2004 with the longitudinally polarized muon beam of 160 GeV and with $^6$LiD polarized target was used to collect data with the target polarized <span class="hlt">transversely</span> with respect to the beam direction. The 2002 data have been already analysed and published. We present here the preliminary results from the full statistics for the Collins and Sivers single hadron asymmetries and for the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin asymmetry in hadron pair production.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930091707&hterms=Duralumin&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DDuralumin"><span id="translatedtitle">The Crinkling <span class="hlt">Strength</span> and the Bending <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Round Aircraft Tubing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Osgood, William R</p> <p>1938-01-01</p> <p>The upper limit of the column <span class="hlt">strength</span> of structural members composed of thin material is the maximum axial stress such members can carry when short enough to fail locally, by crinkling. This stress is a function of the mechanical properties of the material and of the geometrical shape of the cross section. The bending <span class="hlt">strength</span>, as measured by the modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, of structural members is also a function of these same variables. Tests were made of round tubes of chromium-molybdenum steel and of duralumin to determine the crinkling <span class="hlt">strengths</span> and the bending <span class="hlt">strengths</span> in terms of the specified yield <span class="hlt">strength</span> and the ratio of diameter to thickness. Empirical formulas are given relating these quantities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/hep-ex/0507013v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transversity</span> measurements at HERMES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Markus Diefenthaler</p> <p>2005-07-02</p> <p>Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries (SSA) in semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) of positrons on a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised hydrogen target are presented. Azimuthal moments for both the Collins and the Sivers mechanism are extracted. In addition the subleading-twist contribution due to the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin component from SSA on a longitudinally polarised hydrogen target is evaluated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26055584"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of unscarred uterus in a primigravida with preterm prelabour <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mourad, Wael Sayed; Bersano, Debbra J; Greenspan, Peter B; Harper, Diane Medved</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Intrapartum uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a true obstetrical emergency. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is associated with severe maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. It is rare in the unscarred uterus of a primigravida. A 23-year-old primigravida with an unscarred uterus was admitted with preterm prelabour <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes at 36(+4)?weeks of gestation. Abnormal fetal heart monitoring, associated with acute onset of severe abdominopelvic pain, developed on admission. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> occurred prior to onset of regular uterine contractions and in the absence of any interventional oxytocin. The neonate had evidence of severe acidosis despite emergency caesarean delivery. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, even in the unlikely setting of a primigravida with an unscarred uterus. PMID:26055584</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050201897&hterms=SiC+ceramic+properties&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DSiC%2Bceramic%2Bproperties"><span id="translatedtitle">Ceramic Composite Intermediate Temperature Stress-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Properties Improved Significantly</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet B.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Silicon carbide (SiC) composites are considered to be potential materials for future aircraft engine parts such as combustor liners. It is envisioned that on the hot side (inner surface) of the combustor liner, composites will have to withstand temperatures in excess of 1200 C for thousands of hours in oxidizing environments. This is a severe condition; however, an equally severe, if not more detrimental, condition exists on the cold side (outer surface) of the combustor liner. Here, the temperatures are expected to be on the order of 800 to 1000 C under high tensile stress because of thermal gradients and attachment of the combustor liner to the engine frame (the hot side will be under compressive stress, a less severe stress-state for ceramics). Since these composites are not oxides, they oxidize. The worst form of oxidation for <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction occurs at these intermediate temperatures, where the boron nitride (BN) interphase oxidizes first, which causes the formation of a glass layer that strongly bonds the fibers to the matrix. When the fibers strongly bond to the matrix or to one another, the composite loses toughness and <span class="hlt">strength</span> and becomes brittle. To increase the intermediate temperature stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties, researchers must modify the BN interphase. With the support of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, significant improvements were made as state-of-the-art SiC/SiC composites were developed during the Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program. Three approaches were found to improve the intermediate-temperature stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties: fiber-spreading, high-temperature silicon- (Si) doped boron nitride (BN), and outside-debonding BN.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/15143852"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationship Between NMR <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Relaxation, Trabecular Bone Architecture, and <span class="hlt">Strength</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>H. Chung; F. W. Wehrli; J. L. Williams; S. D. Kugelmass</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Structure, biomechanical competence, and incremental NMR line broadening (R'_2) of water in the intertrabecular spaces of cancellous bone were examined on 22 cylindrical specimens from the lumbar vertebral bodies of 16 human subjects 24-86 years old (mean, 60 years old). A strong association (r = 0.91; P < 0.0001) was found between Young's modulus of elasticity and R'_2 for a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15663050"><span id="translatedtitle">Nonoperative management of neonatal splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Driscoll, Karen; Benjamin, Louis C; Gilbert, James C; Chahine, A Alfred</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>Neonatal injury of the spleen is an uncommon but serious condition. Although the standard management of children with splenic injury is nonoperative, there is scant evidence in the literature to support handling neonates in the same way. We report a case of neonatal splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that was managed nonoperatively. A 3.6-kg full-term female born vaginally became tachycardic and pale on the second day of life. She had a distended abdomen and a hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dL. Her blood pressure remained within normal limits. She was transfused 20 cc/kg packed red blood cells. CT scan showed a grade V splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Coagulopathy workup was negative. The assumption was that she had a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen secondary to a traumatic delivery. She remained stable after the transfusion. It took 32 weeks for a CT scan to show complete healing. Traditionally, neonatal splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been treated with splenectomy or splenorrhaphy. The first case of a neonate to be treated nonoperatively was reported in 2000. Our patient is only the second reported case. We chose to follow her with imaging to document healing and to rule out a tumor, as epidermoid cysts and hemangioendotheliomas can cause neonatal splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We also review the literature to try to gain some insight into the management of this rare problem. PMID:15663050</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.200..888G"><span id="translatedtitle">On the initiation of sustained slip-weakening <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> by localized stresses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Galis, M.; Pelties, C.; Kristek, J.; Moczo, P.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Mai, P. M.</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Numerical simulations of dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> require an artificial initiation procedure, if they are not integrated in long-term earthquake cycle simulations. A widely applied procedure involves an `overstressed asperity', a localized region stressed beyond the static frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span>. The physical properties of the asperity (size, shape and overstress) may significantly impact <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. In particular, to induce a sustained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the asperity size needs to exceed a critical value. Although criteria for estimating the critical nucleation size under linear slip-weakening friction have been proposed for 2-D and 3-D problems based on simplifying assumptions, they do not provide general rules for designing 3-D numerical simulations. We conduct a parametric study to estimate parameters of the asperity that minimize numerical artefacts (e.g. changes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> shape and speed, artificial supershear transition, higher slip-rate amplitudes). We examine the critical size of square, circular and elliptical asperities as a function of asperity overstress and background (off-asperity) stress. For a given overstress, we find that asperity area controls <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation while asperity shape is of lesser importance. The critical area obtained from our numerical results contrasts with published theoretical estimates when background stress is low. Therefore, we derive two new theoretical estimates of the critical size under low background stress while also accounting for overstress. Our numerical results suggest that setting the asperity overstress and area close to their critical values eliminates strong numerical artefacts even when the overstress is large. We also find that properly chosen asperity size or overstress may significantly shorten the duration of the initiation. Overall, our results provide guidelines for determining the size of the asperity and overstress to minimize the effects of the forced initiation on the subsequent spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Tectp.621...69T"><span id="translatedtitle">Hitherto unknown shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanism as a source of instability in intact hard rocks at highly confined compression</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tarasov, Boris G.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Today, frictional shear resistance along pre-existing faults is considered to be the lower limit on rock shear <span class="hlt">strength</span> for confined conditions corresponding to the seismogenic layer. This paper introduces a recently identified shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span>. In the new mechanism, the rock failure associated with consecutive creation of small slabs (known as ‘domino-blocks') from the intact rock in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tip is driven by a fan-shaped domino structure representing the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance, self-sustaining stress intensification, and self-unbalancing conditions. Due to this the failure process caused by the mechanism is very dynamic and violent. This makes it impossible to directly observe and study the mechanism and can explain why the mechanism has not been detected before. This paper provides physical motivation for the mechanism, based upon side effects accompanying the failure process. Physical and mathematical models of the mechanism presented in the paper explain unique and paradoxical features of the mechanism. The new shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanism allows a novel point of view for understanding the nature of spontaneous failure processes in hard rocks including earthquakes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T41A2550H"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of stress state on slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation in subduction fault zones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hirauchi, K.; Muto, J.; Otsuki, K.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Slow slip events (SSEs) in subduction zones are characterized by a low <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity (~1-10 km/day), long duration (days to years), and no measurable radiating seismic energy. In southwest Japan, short-term SSEs have been observed to occur preferentially along the plate interface beneath the serpentinized mantle wedge. The existence of high Poisson's ratios (~0.4) in these areas suggests that aqueous fluids are present under conditions of near-lithostatic pore pressure. These geophysical observations suggest that fluids play an important role in facilitating slow slip under low stress conditions. However, the physical mechanisms underlying the generation of SSEs are not yet fully understood. To explore the influence of stress state on the process of slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along the plate interface, unstable slip experiments on simulated fault zones of serpentines (lizardite/chrysotile and antigorite) and olivine were performed in a gas-medium triaxial apparatus at room temperature and confining pressures of 60-170 MPa. We show that antigorite and olivine have friction coefficients that agree with Byerlee's law (? ~0.7), while liz/ctl has a lower friction coefficient of ~0.5. During a single unstable slip, we clearly observe an initial quasi-static slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> phase that is almost always followed by an unstable, high-speed <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We find that the velocity and duration of slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation become lower and longer, respectively, with decreasing confining pressure (at least from 140 down to 60 MPa) and in the case of lower fault-zone <span class="hlt">strength</span> (i.e., lizardite/chrysotile). Our experimental results suggest that the generation of SSEs is facilitated by conditions of low normal stress and low fault-zone <span class="hlt">strength</span> along the plate interface, which may be weakened by metamorphic reactions that result in the production of hydrous phases (e.g., serpentines and talc) and/or the direct involvement of fluid itself, leading to a reduction in the effective normal stress.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT.......100G"><span id="translatedtitle">Field, laboratory, and theoretical investigations of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Griffith, William Ashley</p> <p></p> <p>Examination of faults exhumed from seismic depths to the surface of the earth provides high resolution, continuous access to meso- and micro-scale structure that is difficult or impossible to resolve for faults at depth. Quantitative integration of field observations of fault structure with analytical, theoretical and laboratory models allow structural geologists to provide constraints on the mechanics of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a dynamic sense. Field maps and thin section observations document the occurrence of pseudotachylyte (solidified melt produced during seismic slip) on small, sub-vertical strike-slip faults in granitoid rocks of the central Sierra Nevada. Measurements from these faults are used to provide constraints on ambient conditions during seismic faulting. The pseudotachylytes are less than 0.3 mm thick and are found in faults typically up to 1 cm in thickness, and total measured left-lateral offset along sampled faults is approximately 20 cm. Field and microstructural evidence indicate that the faults exploited pre-existing mineralized joints and show the following overprinting structures: mylonites more or less coeval with quartz veins, cataclasites and pseudotachylytes more or less coeval with epidote veins, and zeolite veins. Based on observations of the microstructural textures of faults combined with theoretical heat transfer and energy budget calculations, it is suggested that only a fraction (<30%) of the total offset was associated with seismic slip. The elusive nature of these pseudotachylytes demonstrates that observations in outcrop and optical microscope are not sufficient to rule out frictional melting as a consequence of seismic slip in similar fault rocks. The static stress drop is estimated on small exhumed strike-slip faults in the vicinity of the faults described in the first chapter. The faults are exposed in outcrop along their entire tip-to-tip lengths of 8-12 m. The contribution of seismic slip to the total slip along the studied cataclasite-bearing small faults may be further constrained than the previous chapter estimate (<7 cm) by measuring the length of epidote-filled, rhombohedral dilatational jogs (rhombochasms) distributed semi-periodically along the length of the faults. This affords measurement of both the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length and slip, yielding stress drop calculations ranging from 90 to 250 MPa, i.e., one to two orders of magnitude larger than typical seismological estimates for earthquakes. These inferred seismic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred along small, deep-seated faults, and, given the calculated stress drops and observations that brittle faults exploited joints sealed by quartz-bearing mylonite, we conclude that these were "strong" faults. The Bear Creek fault zones localize outcrop-scale damage into tabular zones between two sub parallel boundary faults, producing a fracture-induced material contrast across the boundary faults with softer rocks between the boundary faults and intact granodiorite outside. Using detailed mapping and microstructural analysis of small fault zones to build and constrain numerical effective medium experiments, the effect of mesoscopic (outcrop-scale) damage zone fractures on the effective isotropic elastic moduli of the fault rocks is evaluated, showing that the bulk response of the fractured damage zone is strain-weakening, and can be as much as 75% more compliant than the unfractured granodiorite. Observations of the geometry and distribution of pseudotachylyte veins along faults in multiple field areas motivated the investigation of the growth of tensile microcracks in Homalite-100 around sub-rayleigh experimental shear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> (Laboratory Earthquakes) propagating along an interface with frictional and cohesive <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Opening microcracks were produced only along one side of the interface where they were associated with transient tensile stress perturbation due to the propagating shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The orientation of microcracks is related to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and the ambient static stress field. The results of this study provide a rat</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25577259"><span id="translatedtitle">Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E; Walker, Eric A</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Imaging findings of breast silicone implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition. PMID:25577259</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20130001714&hterms=introduction+data+mining&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dintroduction%2Bdata%2Bmining"><span id="translatedtitle">Large-Scale Weibull Analysis of H-451 Nuclear- Grade Graphite Specimen <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Nemeth, Noel N.; Walker, Andrew; Baker, Eric H.; Murthy, Pappu L.; Bratton, Robert L.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>A Weibull analysis was performed of the <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution and size effects for 2000 specimens of H-451 nuclear-grade graphite. The data, generated elsewhere, measured the tensile and four-point-flexure room-temperature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of specimens excised from a single extruded graphite log. <span class="hlt">Strength</span> variation was compared with specimen location, size, and orientation relative to the parent body. In our study, data were progressively and extensively pooled into larger data sets to discriminate overall trends from local variations and to investigate the <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution. The CARES/Life and WeibPar codes were used to investigate issues regarding the size effect, Weibull parameter consistency, and nonlinear stress-strain response. Overall, the Weibull distribution described the behavior of the pooled data very well. However, the issue regarding the smaller-than-expected size effect remained. This exercise illustrated that a conservative approach using a two-parameter Weibull distribution is best for designing graphite components with low probability of failure for the in-core structures in the proposed Generation IV (Gen IV) high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. This exercise also demonstrated the continuing need to better understand the mechanisms driving stochastic <span class="hlt">strength</span> response. Extensive appendixes are provided with this report to show all aspects of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data and analytical results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1502.03207v1"><span id="translatedtitle">Capillary <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of suspended polymer concentric rings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Zheng Zhang; G. C. Hilton; Ronggui Yang; Yifu Ding</p> <p>2015-02-11</p> <p>We present the first experimental study on the simultaneous capillary instability amongst viscous concentric rings suspended atop an immiscible medium. The rings <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> upon annealing, with three types of phase correlation between neighboring rings. In the case of weak substrate confinement, the rings <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> independently when they were sparsely distanced, but via an out-of-phase mode when packed closer. If the substrate confinement was strong, the rings would <span class="hlt">rupture</span> via an in-phase mode, resulting in radially aligned droplets. The concentric ring geometry caused a competition between the phase correlation of neighboring rings and the kinetically favorable wavelength, yielding an intriguing, recursive surface pattern. This frustrated pattern formation behavior was accounted for by a scaling analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JChPh.142q4910M"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of DNA molecule</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mishra, R. K.; Modi, T.; Giri, D.; Kumar, S.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Using Langevin dynamics simulations, we study effects of the shear force on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a double stranded DNA molecule. The model studied here contains two single diblock copolymers interacting with each other. The elastic constants of individual segments of diblock copolymer are considered to be different. We showed that the magnitude of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force depends on whether the force is applied at 3' - 3' - ends or 5' - 5' - ends. Distributions of extension in hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds along the chain show the striking differences. Motivated by recent experiments, we have also calculated the variation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force for different chain lengths. Results obtained from simulations have been validated with the analytical calculation based on the ladder model of DNA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1507.00114v1"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of DNA molecule</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>R. K. Mishra; T. Modi; D. Giri; S. Kumar</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Using Langevin Dynamic simulations, we study effects of the shear force on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a double stranded DNA molecule. The model studied here contains two single diblock copolymers interacting with each other. The elastic constants of individual segments of the diblock copolymer are considered to be different. We showed that the magnitude of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force depends on whether the force is applied at $3'-3'-$ends or $5'-5'-$ends. Distributions of extension in hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds along the chain show the striking differences. Motivated by recent experiments, we have also calculated the variation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force for different chain lengths. Results obtained from simulations have been validated with the analytical calculation based on the ladder model of DNA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26139761"><span id="translatedtitle">Right ventricular hydatid cyst <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> to pericardium.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sabzi, Feridoun; Vaziri, Siavoosh; Faraji, Reza</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Cardiac hydatidosis is rare presentation of body hydatidosis. Incidence of cardiac involvements range from 5% to 5% of patients with hydatid disease. Most common site of hydatid cyst in heart is interventricular septum and left ventricular free wall. Right ventricular free wall involvement by cyst that <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> to pericardial cavity is very rare presentation of hydatid cyst. Cardiac involvement may have serious consequences such as <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to blood steam or pericardial cavity. Both the disease and its surgical treatment carry a high complication rate, including <span class="hlt">rupture</span> leading to cardiac tamponade, anaphylaxis and also death. In the present report, a 43-year-old man with constrictive pericarditis secondary to a pericardial hydatid cyst is described. PMID:26139761</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10140552"><span id="translatedtitle">Component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequency estimates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Johnson, D.A.; Marteeny, M.L.</p> <p>1991-11-01</p> <p>In order to perform detailed internal flooding risk analyses of nuclear power plants, external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies are needed for various types of components - piping, valves, pumps, flanges, and others. However, there appears to be no up-to-date, comprehensive source for such frequency estimates. This report attempts to fill that void. Based on a comprehensive search of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) contained in Nuclear Power Experience (NPE), and estimates of component populations and exposure times, component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies were generated. The remainder of this report covers the specifies of the NPE search for external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events, analysis of the data, a comparison with frequency estimates from other sources, and a discussion of the results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25743861"><span id="translatedtitle">Patellar ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in an adolescent.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pires e Albuquerque, Rodrigo Sattamini; de Araújo, Gabriel Costa Serrão; Labronici, Pedro José; Gameiro, Vinícius Schott</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the patellar tendon is a well-known injury in the orthopaedic literature. However, it is unusual and rarely reported in adolescent children. On the one hand, in the immature skeleton, the most frequent lesion above the kneecap is the sleeve fracture. On the other hand, in the distal region, avulsion of the tibial tuberosity is more common. Patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in an adolescent is a rare lesion. We report a case in which an adolescent sustained a fall when jumping. No predisposing factors have been found. The injury was treated with surgical repair with transosseous suturing and reinforcement with semitendinosus tendon. The aim of this study is to present a case of traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the extensor mechanism of the knee in an adolescent and the therapy used. PMID:25743861</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25956123"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of DNA molecule.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mishra, R K; Modi, T; Giri, D; Kumar, S</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Using Langevin dynamics simulations, we study effects of the shear force on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a double stranded DNA molecule. The model studied here contains two single diblock copolymers interacting with each other. The elastic constants of individual segments of diblock copolymer are considered to be different. We showed that the magnitude of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force depends on whether the force is applied at 3' - 3' - ends or 5' - 5' - ends. Distributions of extension in hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds along the chain show the striking differences. Motivated by recent experiments, we have also calculated the variation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force for different chain lengths. Results obtained from simulations have been validated with the analytical calculation based on the ladder model of DNA. PMID:25956123</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70035044"><span id="translatedtitle">Validation of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of the 2001 Kunlun, China (Ms = 8.1), earthquake from seismological and geological observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Wen, Y.-Y.; Ma, K.-F.; Song, T.R.-A.; Mooney, W.D.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>We determine the finite-fault slip distribution of the 2001 Kunlun earthquake (Ms = 8.1) by inverting teleseismic waveforms, as constrained by geological and remote sensing field observations. The spatial slip distribution along the 400-km-long fault was divided into five segments in accordance with geological observations. Forward modelling of regional surface waves was performed to estimate the variation of the speed of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation during faulting. For our modelling, the regional 1-D velocity structure was carefully constructed for each of six regional seismic stations using three events with magnitudes of 5.1-5.4 distributed along the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> portion of the Kunlun fault. Our result shows that the average <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is about 3.6 km s-1, consistent with teleseismic long period wave modelling. The initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was almost purely strike-slip with a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of 1.9 km s-1, increasing to 3.5 km s-1 in the second fault segment, and reaching a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of about 6 km s-1 in the third segment and the fourth segment, where the maximum surface offset, with a broad fault zone, was observed. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity decelerated to a value of 3.3 km s-1 in the fifth and final segment. Coseismic slip on the fault was concentrated between the surface and a depth of about 10 km. We infer that significant variations in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and the observed fault segmentation are indicative of variations in <span class="hlt">strength</span> along the interface of the Kunlun fault, as well as variations in fault geometry. ?? 2009 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2009 RAS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970010494&hterms=Nica&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DNica"><span id="translatedtitle">Time/Temperature Dependent Tensile <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of SiC and Al2O3-Based Fibers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>In order to understand and model the thermomechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced composites, stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span>, fast-fracture, and warm-up <span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies were conducted on various advanced SiC and Al2O3-based fibers in the,temperature range from 20 to 1400 C in air as well as in inert environments. The measured stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span>, fast fracture, and warm-up <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strengths</span> were correlated into a single master time/temperature-dependent <span class="hlt">strength</span> plot for each fiber type using thermal activation and slow crack growth theories. It is shown that these plots are useful for comparing and selecting fibers for CMC and MMC reinforcement and that, in comparison to stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests, the fast-fracture and warm-up tests can be used for rapid generation of these plots.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4481443"><span id="translatedtitle">Prognostic factors of spontaneously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular carcinoma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Han, Xiang-Jun; Su, Hong-Ying; Shao, Hai-Bo; Xu, Ke</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>AIM: To evaluate the prognostic factors in patients with spontaneously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Seventy-nine patients experiencing spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of HCC between April 2004 and August 2014 were enrolled in this study. The clinical features, treatment modalities and outcomes were reviewed. The statistical methods used in this work included univariate analysis, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with log-rank tests, and multivariate analysis using a Cox regression hazard model. RESULTS: Of the 79 patients with HCC <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, 17 (21.5%) underwent surgery, 32 (40.5%) underwent transarterial embolization (TAE), and 30 (38%) received conservative treatment. The median survival time was 125 d, and the mortality rate at 30 d was 27.8%. Multivariate analysis revealed that lesion length (HR = 1.46, P < 0.001), lesion number (HR = 1.37, P = 0.042), treatment before tumor <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (HR = 4.36, P = 0.019), alanine transaminase levels (HR = 1.0, P = 0.011), bicarbonate levels (HR = 1.18, P < 0.001), age (HR = 0.96, P = 0.026), anti-tumor therapy during the follow-up period (HR = 0.21, P = 0.008), and albumin levels (HR = 0.89, P = 0.010) were independent prognostic factors of survival after HCC <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage was also an important prognostic factor; the median survival times for BCLC stages A, B and C were 251, 175 and 40 d, respectively (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Anti-tumor therapy during the follow-up period, without a history of anti-tumor therapy prior to HCC <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, small tumor length and number, and early BCLC stage are the most crucial predictors associated with satisfactory overall survival. Other factors play only a small role in overall survival. PMID:26139994</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S53A0177S"><span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Processes Along the Philippine Trench</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sevilla, W. I.; Ammon, C. J.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>Earthquakes along subduction zones exhibit spatial and temporal variations in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes. Recent studies have demonstrated a systematic decrease in the moment-normalized <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration of earthquakes with depth along the plate interface. Several shallow earthquakes were observed to exhibit anomalously long <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration, comparable with the durations of tsunami earthquakes. These observations were suggested to be manifestations of subduction faults with frictional properties capable of generating tsunami earthquakes. The cause of the duration variation was hypothesized to be related to physical changes in properties of subducted sediment. The Philippine trench is a setting where we can study the variations of earthquake source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes along the plate interface. The trench is young (< 5 Ma) with a poorly developed accretionary prism. Bathymetry, seismic reflection studies, and offshore drilling show little or no evidence of accretion of the materials from the subducting Philippine Sea plate. Eighty nine possible interplate earthquakes were selected from the Harvard CMT catalogue for the year 1989 to 2001. From these, about 30 events had adequate signal-to-noise ratios and well-constrained mechanisms to warrant further investigation. We used teleseismic broadband records of vertical component waveforms and applied multi-station deconvolution technique to extract the source time function and depth of each event. Our results showed no systematic trend of decreasing source duration with depth at the Philippine trench. The observed moment-normalized durations of all the shallow earthquakes are shorter than tsunami earthquakes. We observed a significant scatter in the relationship between source time and depth, which may reflect heterogeneity of the materials at the trench interface. The thickness of low-rigidity materials in the trench shallow region appears insufficient to affect the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> durations and produce anomalously slow <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. These null results for the sediment-starved Philippine Trench support the earlier hypothesis that the variations of earthquake duration with depth in other subduction zones is related to sediment properties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1412.4518v1"><span id="translatedtitle">Nucleon <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Structure at COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Nour Makke</p> <p>2014-12-15</p> <p>COMPASS is a fixed target experiment at CERN. Part of its physics programme is dedicated to study the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin and the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum structure of the nucleon using SIDIS. For these measurements, data have been collected using <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised proton and deuteron targets. A selection of recent measurements of azimuthal asymmetries using data collected with <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised protons is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47884627"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral synchronous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>P. Ellanti; N. Davarinos; S. Morris; J. Rice</p> <p></p> <p>Background  Bilateral simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon is a rare entity. They are often associated with degenerative changes\\u000a of the tendons and predisposing conditions such as diabetes or excessive steroid use. They most commonly tend to occur in\\u000a patients of 40 years of age or older.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  We describe a case of a 67-year-old man with simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of both</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25878942"><span id="translatedtitle">Thoracic outlet syndrome following breast implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mistry, Raakhi; Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We present a patient with bilateral breast implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19210943"><span id="translatedtitle">[Gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after ingestion of liquid nitrogen].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Knudsen, Anders Riegels; Nielsen, Casper; Christensen, Peter</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>A 28-year-old male was admitted to hospital with severe abdominal distension and subcutaneous emphysema after ingesting 15 ml liquid nitrogen to produce an impressive burp. A <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the stomach at the lesser curvature was sutured by laparotomy. Peroperative gastroscopy showed no signs of cold-induced lesions. Liquid nitrogen boils at -196 degrees C. When heated to body temperature, it instantly expands 700 times, in this case predictably leading to gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Therefore, any oral intake of even small amounts of liquid nitrogen should be avoided. PMID:19210943</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4387153"><span id="translatedtitle">Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Following Breast Implant <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Summary: We present a patient with bilateral breast implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvA..91e2103J"><span id="translatedtitle">Dissipative Landau-Zener quantum dynamics with <span class="hlt">transversal</span> and longitudinal noise</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Javanbakht, S.; Nalbach, P.; Thorwart, M.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>We determine the Landau-Zener transition probability in a dissipative environment including both longitudinal as well as <span class="hlt">transversal</span> quantum-mechanical noise originating from a single noise source. For this, we use the numerically exact quasiadiabatic path integral, as well as the approximative nonequilibrium Bloch equations. We find that <span class="hlt">transversal</span> quantum noise in general influences the Landau-Zener probability much more strongly than longitudinal quantum noise does at a given temperature and system-bath coupling <span class="hlt">strength</span>. In other words, <span class="hlt">transversal</span> noise contributions become important even when the coupling <span class="hlt">strength</span> of <span class="hlt">transversal</span> noise is smaller than that of longitudinal noise. We furthermore reveal that <span class="hlt">transversal</span> noise renormalizes the tunnel coupling independent of temperature. Finally, we show that the effect of mixed longitudinal and <span class="hlt">transversal</span> noise originating from a single bath cannot be obtained from an incoherent sum of purely longitudinal and purely <span class="hlt">transversal</span> noise.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24428049"><span id="translatedtitle">[Characteristics of duodenal <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> depending on topographical and anatomical properties of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pigolkin, Iu I; Dubrovin, I A; Chirkov, R N; Dubrovina, I A; Khachaturian, B S; Mosoian, A S; Dallakian, V F</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>We have studied specific morphological properties of duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> depending on the topographic and anatomical features of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma suffered in a car crash (with the victim found in the passenger compartment or involved in an automobile-pedestrian accident) and a railway crash (a train-pedestrian accident) or resulting from a blunt-force trauma, a fall from height, a fall on the stomach, and traumatic compression of the body. We took into consideration the anatomical peculiarities of the duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, such as its circular, horseshoe, and loop-like shape. The study has demonstrated that the frequency of duodenal injury associated with a blunt abdominal trauma shows a stronger dependence on the topographical and anatomical peculiarities of duodenum than on the circumstances of the case. Specifically, the circular duodenum and especially its descending portion are more readily subjected to the damage than the organs of a different shape. The position of the break with respect to the duodenal axis is an important diagnostic signs allowing to clarify circumstances of the blunt injury. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are typical of strong impacts associated with the short-term interaction between the damaging object and the affected part of the body whereas longitudinal <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> more commonly occur as a result the long-term traumatic impact. Bile imbibition of paraduodenal and peripancreatic retroperitoneal adipose tissue may be used as an additional diagnostic sign of duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:24428049</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://ia.usu.edu/viewproject.php?project=ia:14673"><span id="translatedtitle">Parallel Lines and <span class="hlt">Transversals</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p>Mrs. Sonntag</p> <p>2010-10-07</p> <p>In this lab you will review the names of angles formed by <span class="hlt">transversals</span>. In addition you will discover the unique relationship that these pairs of anlges have when the <span class="hlt">transversal</span> cuts through two parallel lines. picture We have already discussed many angle relationships in class. For example, we have learned to identify vertical angles and linear pairs. Each of the angles have a special relationship. Vertical angles are congruent, and Linear angles are supplementary. In the following lesson you will review the names of angle pairs ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960002349&hterms=hi&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dhi"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Creep and Stress-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Behavior of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fibers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Tensile creep and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies were conducted on Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers at 1200 and 1400 C in argon and air. Examined were as-received fibers as well as fibers annealed from 1400 to 1800 C for 1 hour in argon before testing. The creep and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> results for these annealed fibers were compared to those of the as-received fibers to determine the effects of annealing temperature, test temperature, and test environment. Argon anneals up to 1500 C degrade room temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> of Hi-Nicalon fibers, but improve fiber creep resistance in argon or air by as much as 100% with no significant degradation in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Argon anneals above 1500 C continue to improve fiber creep resistance when tested in argon, but significantly degrade creep resistance and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> when tested in air. Decrease in creep resistance in air is greater at 1200 C than at 1400 C. Mechanisms are suggested for the observed behavior.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7551757"><span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the Achilles tendon: a review of long-term results.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krueger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Scherzer, S</p> <p>1995-06-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the Achilles tendon is frequently sports-related. In the time from 1 January, 1978 until 31 December, 1988, we treated 358 men and 54 women with such an injury at the Staatliche Orthopaedische Klinik in Munich. The average age of these patients was 43 years. The site of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was generally located between 3-5 cm proximal of the distal insertion of the tendon. In the follow-up examination of 122 patients with surgical treatment of tendo calcaneus <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> 85% showed 'good' to 'very good' subjective results. Of the operated patients 97% would choose the same treatment under similar circumstances. The isokinetic studies demonstrated a loss of static and dynamic <span class="hlt">strength</span> in plantar flexion of the ankle joint of 9.1%, and 16.7% respectively, when compared to the healthy contralateral side. The ultrasound examination revealed a thickening of the tendon and of the dorsal paratenon with changes in the internal structure of the injured Achilles tendon. In spite of these favourable results, the high complication rate of 15.1% shows the need for new and extensive studies regarding the various alternative treatment forms, such as functional, non-operative options, to finally resolve the debate about the optimal treatment of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. PMID:7551757</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25489894"><span id="translatedtitle">Intracranial venous hemodynamics and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of cerebral aneurysm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Kwo-Whei; Tsai, Fong-Y; Chen, Wei-Liang; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Kuo, Chen-Ling</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Many uncertain and inconsistent etiologies of cerebral aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> including a wide spectrum of factors have been reported. Our recent observation discloses the potential new factor of cerebral aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with cerebral venous pressure gradient. We retrospectively reviewed 52 cases treated with coil embolization with or without cerebral aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Seventeen males and 30 females were recruited in this study. Quantitative color-coded cerebral angiography was performed during coil therapeutic procedures to measure cerebral venous circulation. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> cases had shorter and symmetrical cerebral venous circulation time (P <0.05). In addition, an asymmetrical venous outflow pattern was critical for aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Non-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cases tended to have slower and asymmetrical cerebral venous circulation compared with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cases. Symmetrical and shorter cerebral venous circulation in the dysplasia venous outlet may be a potential new factor for cerebral aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:25489894</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EP%26S...66..101T"><span id="translatedtitle">Source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake: how did the two subparallel faults <span class="hlt">rupture</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tanaka, Miho; Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Kubo, Hisahiko</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake (MW 6.6) occurred about a month after the 2011 Great Tohoku earthquake (MW 9.0), and it is thought to have been induced by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. After the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, two subparallel faults (the Itozawa and Yunodake faults) were identified by field surveys. The hypocenter was located nearby the Itozawa fault, and it is probable that the Itozawa fault <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> before the Yunodake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Here, we estimated the source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the 2011 Hamadori earthquake using a model with two subparallel faults based on strong motion data. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> starting point and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> delay time of the Yunodake fault were determined based on Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC). The results show that the Yunodake fault started to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from the northern deep point 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The estimated slip distribution in the shallow part is consistent with the surface slip distribution identified by field surveys. Time-dependent Coulomb failure function changes (?CFF) were calculated using the stress change from the Itozawa fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in order to evaluate the effect of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the Yunodake fault. The ?CFF is positive at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> starting point of the Yunodake fault 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; therefore, it is concluded that during the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, the Yunodake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was triggered by the Itozawa fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6559155"><span id="translatedtitle">Noninterceptive <span class="hlt">transverse</span> beam diagnostics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chamberlin, D.D.; Minerbo, G.N.; Teel, L.E. Jr.; Gilpatrick, J.D.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> emittance properties of a high-current linear accelerator may be measured by using TV cameras sensitive to the visible radiation emitted following beam interactions with residual gas. This paper describes the TV system being used to measure emittances for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1030718"><span id="translatedtitle">D-Zero Cryostat Supplemental <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Disc</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab</p> <p>1987-08-03</p> <p>The common relief and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc vent line requires a double disc assembly with vented interspace for accurate disc burst pressures. The first disc must take pump and purge vacuum loading, but be set to operate at 110% of the MAWP, 18.3 psig (ASME code). The available solution is 18.3 psig with a burst tolerance of +/- psig. The interspace should be locally vented by a flow limiting vent valve to decouple the vent line backpressure from the vessel <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc. The second disc must take the worst case vent line backpressure, the steady state value found in D-Zero engineering note 3740.000-EN-63 with all three cryostats simultaneously venting at the fire condition into the 4-inch x 6-inch and 6-inch x 8-inch sections. This value is less than 2 psid. The maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the second disc must be less than the minimum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the first disc less 2 psid i.e. < 16.3.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/09_28_2010_otk7Nay4LH_09_28_2010_1"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Northwest Saudi Arabia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Wendy McCausland of the USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program and Hani Zahran of the Saudi Geological Survey view the southern end of the surface fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> caused by a M5.4 earthquake in the Saudi Arabian desert on May 19, 2009. The ground displacements in the soft sediments of the foreground...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1285246"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendons.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Young, T B</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A case is reported of simultaneous traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of quadriceps tendons diagnosed in the accident and emergency department within 2 hours of injury. This is an extremely rare injury and diagnosis is often missed. Possible mechanism of the injury, predisposing factors, guidelines for diagnosis and results of surgical treatment are discussed, and the literature is reviewed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4015792</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2425781"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a renal angiomyolipoma (hamartoma)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Stavorovsky, M.; Irge, D.; Morag, B.; Schujman, E.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>A 54-year-old woman with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of angiomyolipoma is presented. The literature on the 2 types of angiomyolipoma, without and with association of tuberose sclerosis, their rarity and the difficulties in their diagnoses, is reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:523379</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21675627"><span id="translatedtitle">Laparoscopic splenectomy for atraumatic splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Grossi, Ugo; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Amato, Gerardo; Mazzari, Andrea; Tomaiuolo, Pasquina M C; Cavicchioni, Camillo; Bellantone, Rocco</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>A traumatic splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (ASR) is a rare clinical entity. Several underlying benign and malignant conditions have been described as a leading cause. We report on a case of ASR in a 41-year-old man treated with laparoscopic splenectomy. Considering ASR as a life-threatening condition, a prompt diagnosis can be life saving. PMID:21675627</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15858563"><span id="translatedtitle">Earth science: microseismicity data forecast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schorlemmer, Danijel; Wiemer, Stefan</p> <p>2005-04-28</p> <p>On 28 September 2004 there was an earthquake of magnitude 6.0 at Parkfield, California. Here we show that the size distribution of the micro-earthquakes recorded in the decades before the main shock occurred allowed an accurate forecast of its eventual <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area. Applying this approach to other well monitored faults should improve earthquake hazard assessment in future. PMID:15858563</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29102331"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous intramural <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the oesophagus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>C Steadman; P Kerlin; F Crimmins; J Bell; D Robinson; L Dorrington; A McIntyre</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The clinical, endoscopic, and radiological features of seven patients with an uncommon oesophageal injury characterised by long lacerations of the oesophageal mucosa with haematoma formation but without perforation are reported. The injuries were not related to forceful vomiting or any other definable cause but were similar to those previously described as intramural oesophageal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy undertaken to identify</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.icf11.com/proceeding/extended/3110.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">RECENT ADVANCES IN MODELLING DUCTILE <span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. A. Benzerga; J. Besson; A. Pineau</p> <p></p> <p>A brief account of recent advances in modelling ductile <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is given. The importance of the inhomogeneity in the distribution of cavity nucleation sites is firstly emphasized. Then some recent extensions of the Gurson model to account for non spherical void shape are presented. Finally recent progress in modelling cavity coalescence is highlighted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.141p4907G"><span id="translatedtitle">Star polymers <span class="hlt">rupture</span> induced by constant forces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>García, N. A.; Febbo, M.; Vega, D. A.; Milchev, A.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25362341"><span id="translatedtitle">Star polymers <span class="hlt">rupture</span> induced by constant forces.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>García, N A; Febbo, M; Vega, D A; Milchev, A</p> <p>2014-10-28</p> <p>In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks. PMID:25362341</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2975082"><span id="translatedtitle">Penile Fracture with Associated Urethral <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Boncher, Nicholas A.; Vricella, Gino J.; Jankowski, Jason T.; Ponsky, Lee E.; Cherullo, Edward E.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Penile fracture of the erect penis is an uncommon but emergent urological trauma. Potential outcomes include erectile dysfunction, penile curvature, and urethral injury. Treatment is emergent surgical repair. We present the case of a 42-year-old man with a penile fracture complicated by a urethral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and subsequent repair. A discussion of the key aspects of this condition is presented. PMID:21076536</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4268758"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> rectal duplication with urogenital abnormality: Unusual presentation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Shankar, Gowri; Santhanakrishnan, Ramesh</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Rectal duplication (RD) accounts for 5% of alimentary tract duplication. A varied presentation and associated anomalies have been described in the literature. Antenatal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the RD is very rare. We present an unusual case of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> RD associated with urogenital abnormalities in newborn male. We are discussing diagnosis, embryology, management and literature review of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> RD. PMID:25552833</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v077/i011/JB077i011p02087/JB077i011p02087.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Zones of Large South American Earthquakes and Some Predictions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>John A. Kelleher</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>This study attempts to forecast likely locations for large shallow South American earthquakes in the near future by examining the past space-time pattern of occurrence of large (M _ 7.7) earthquakes, the lateral extent of their <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones, and, where possible, the direction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> zones of large shallow earthquakes generally abut and do not overlap. Patterns of</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/25138777"><span id="translatedtitle">Delayed <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Extensor Pollicis Longus Tendon following Closed Injury</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>R. G. SIMPSON</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Closed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the extensor pollicis longus tendon is most often seen following lower radial fractures, but is uncommon in the absence of fracture. Redden has recently described <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following rotational injury of the forearm.I wish to record three cases of closed delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following direct injury to the area of the tendon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~steveday/PUBLISHED/Pitarka_et_al_2009_buried.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Study of Ground-Motion Differences between Buried-<span class="hlt">Rupturing</span> and Surface-<span class="hlt">Rupturing</span> Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Arben Pitarka; Luis A. Dalguer; Steven M. Day; Paul G. Somerville; Kazuo Dan</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Recent ground-motion observations suggest that surface-<span class="hlt">rupturing</span> earth- quakes generate weaker near-fault ground motion than buried earthquakes. This dif- ference is significant in the period range of 0.3-3 sec. Contributing factors to this phenomenon may include the effect of fault zone weakness at shallow depth on rup- ture dynamics and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity during earthquakes. We present results from numerical experiments of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://musserlab.medicine.tamhsc.edu/PDFs%20of%20papers/Hamai%20et%20al%28BJ2007%29.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Single Giant Vesicle <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Events Reveal Multiple Mechanisms of Glass-Supported Bilayer Formation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Chiho Hamai; Paul S. Cremer; Siegfried M. Musser</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The formation of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on glass from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) was studied using fluorescence microscopy. We show that GUV <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs by at least four mechanisms, including 1), spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of isolated GUVs yielding almost heart-shaped bilayer patches (asymmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>); 2), spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of isolated GUVs yielding circular bilayer patches (symmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>); 3), induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1523..188I"><span id="translatedtitle">New STAR <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin results</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Igo, George; STAR Collaboration</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>New measurements of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> single spin asymmetries at midrapidity of single hadrons and di-hadrons produced in jets are reported. They provide data on quark <span class="hlt">transversity</span> in p+p collisions at RHIC. Pushing out to the Forward Meson Spectrometer (FMS) rapidities in future measurements will probe quark <span class="hlt">transversity</span> at high x. Another <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin result from STAR is also reported: It is found that the ?0 <span class="hlt">transverse</span> single spin asymmetries at 2.5<?<4 extend to very high <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum with no observed decrease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5250398"><span id="translatedtitle">Lifetimes statistics for single Kevlar 49 aramid filaments in creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> at elevated temperatures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wu, H.F.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Kevlar 49 fibrous composites are routinely fabricated to have <span class="hlt">strengths</span> above 1.5 GPa(200 ksi), but in many applications one would like to sustain such stresses for long time periods, sometimes at elevated temperatures. Thus the temperature dependence of the creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in the fibers is of interest. Experimental data are presented for the lifetime of single Kevlar 49 filaments under constant stress at elevated temperatures. The goal of this research was to fully characterize the statistical <span class="hlt">strength</span> and lifetime behavior of single filaments in order to separate fiber effects from fiber/matrix interactions in the creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> lifetime of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites as described for example in Phoenix and Wu (1983). First we conducted experiments to determine distributions for the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of filaments from the two distinct spools as a function of temperature. As expected, the data could generally be fitted by a two-parameter Weibull distribution. Lifetime experiments at 80 and 130/sup 0/C were conducted at several stress levels chosen as suitable fractions of the Weibull scale parameter for short-term <span class="hlt">strength</span> for that temperature. The lifetime data were well modelled by a two-parameter Weibull distribution with large variability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22348502"><span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> waves in chromospheric mottles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Center, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Center (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Morton, R. J. [Mathematics and Information Science, Northumbria University, Camden Street, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Christian, D. J., E-mail: dkuridze01@qub.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)</p> <p>2013-12-10</p> <p>Using data obtained by the high temporal and spatial resolution Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope, we investigate at an unprecedented level of detail <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations in chromospheric fine structures near the solar disk center. The oscillations are interpreted in terms of propagating and standing magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Wave characteristics including the maximum <span class="hlt">transverse</span> velocity amplitude and the phase speed are measured as a function of distance along the structure's length. Solar magnetoseismology is applied to these measured parameters to obtain diagnostic information on key plasma parameters (e.g., magnetic field, density, temperature, flow speed) of these localized waveguides. The magnetic field <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the mottle along the ?2 Mm length is found to decrease by a factor of 12, while the local plasma density scale height is ?280 ± 80 km.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004APS..APR.L8003S"><span id="translatedtitle">Strong <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Coupling in the Tevatron</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Syphers, Michael</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>During the 20 years since it was first commissioned, the Fermilab Tevatron has developed strong coupling between the two <span class="hlt">transverse</span> degrees of freedom. A distributed zeroth harmonic skew quadrupole circuit has traditionally been used to correct for <span class="hlt">transverse</span> coupling, and the <span class="hlt">strength</span> required of this circuit has increased since 1983 by more than an order of magnitude. In recent years changes to the Tevatron for colliding beams operation have altered the skew quadrupole corrector distribution and strong local coupling has become evident, often encumbering routine operation. In February 2003 it was discovered that the superconducting coils within the main bending magnets of the Tevatron had become vertically displaced within their iron yokes relative to their measured positions in the early 1980's during construction. The ensuing systematic skew quadrupole field introduced by this displacement accounts for the required corrector settings and observed beam behavior. Beam observations, explanations, and remedial measures are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4410472"><span id="translatedtitle">Proximal coracobrachialis tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, subscapularis tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and medial dislocation of the long head of the biceps tendon in an adult after traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Saltzman, Bryan M.; Harris, Joshua D.; Forsythe, Brian</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the coracobrachialis is a rare entity, in isolation or in combination with other muscular or tendinous structures. When described, it is often a result of direct trauma to the anatomic area resulting in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the muscle belly. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old female who suffered a proximal coracobrachialis tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from its origin at the coracoid process, with concomitant subscapularis tear and medial dislocation of the long head of biceps tendon after first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Two weeks after injury, magnetic resonance imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed during combined arthroscopic and open technique. Soft-tissue tenodesis of coracobrachialis to the intact short head of the biceps, tenodesis of the long head of biceps to the intertubercular groove, and double-row anatomic repair of the subscapularis were performed. The patient did well postoperatively, and ultimately at 6 months follow-up, she was without pain, and obtained 160° of active forward elevation, 45° of external rotation, internal rotation to T8, 5/5 subscapularis and biceps <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Scoring scales had improved from the following preoperative to final follow-up: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 53.33-98.33; constant, 10-100; visual analogue scale-pain, 4-0. DASH score was 5. PMID:25937715</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=force+AND+speed&pg=5&id=EJ663741"><span id="translatedtitle">Application of <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Diagnosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Newton, Robert U.; Dugan, Eric</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the various <span class="hlt">strength</span> qualities (maximum <span class="hlt">strength</span>, high- and low-load speed <span class="hlt">strength</span>, reactive <span class="hlt">strength</span>, rate of force development, and skill performance), noting why a training program design based on <span class="hlt">strength</span> diagnosis can lead to greater efficacy and better performance gains for the athlete. Examples of tests used to assess <span class="hlt">strength</span>…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60541858"><span id="translatedtitle">High-<span class="hlt">strength</span> austenitic stainless steel tubing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>R. W. Swindeman; P. J. Maziasz</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Developmental steels were investigated that were basically 14%Cr- 16%Ni-2%Mo-Fe with V, Ti, and Nb additions. Commercial steels of current interest include Esshete 1250 [1], 17-14CuMo [2], Sumitomo St3Cu{reg_sign} [3-4], and Sandvik 12R72HV{reg_sign}, which is similar to Din 1.4970 [5]. The investigation included fabricability, creep- and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>, and exploratory tests regarding creep-crack growth, fatigue, and weldability. Testing temperatures were in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60047689"><span id="translatedtitle">High-<span class="hlt">strength</span> austenitic stainless steel tubing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>R. W. Swindeman; P. J. Maziasz</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Developmental steels were investigated that were basically 14%Cr- 16%Ni-2%Mo-Fe with V, Ti, and Nb additions. Commercial steels of current interest include Esshete 1250 (1), 17-14CuMo (2), Sumitomo St3Cu{reg sign} (3-4), and Sandvik 12R72HV{reg sign}, which is similar to Din 1.4970 (5). The investigation included fabricability, creep- and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>, and exploratory tests regarding creep-crack growth, fatigue, and weldability. Testing temperatures</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21410798"><span id="translatedtitle">Partonic <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Momentum Distributions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rossi, Patrizia [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati-INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)</p> <p>2010-08-04</p> <p>In recent years parton distributions have been generalized to account also for <span class="hlt">transverse</span> degrees of freedom and new sets of more general distributions, <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Momentum Dependent (TMD) parton distributions and fragmentation functions were introduced. Different experiments worldwide (HERMES, COMPASS, CLAS, JLab-Hall A) have measurements of TMDs in semi-inclusive DIS processes as one of their main focuses of research. TMD studies are also an important part of the present and future Drell-Yan experiments at RICH and JPARC and GSI, respectively, Studies of TMDs are also one of the main driving forces of the Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV upgrade project. Progress in phenomenology and theory is flourishing as well. In this talk an overview of the latest developments in studies of TMDs will be given and newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as planned near term and future measurements will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1301.7193v2"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Entanglement of Biphotons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Felix Just; Andrea Cavanna; Maria V. Chekhova; Gerd Leuchs</p> <p>2013-08-23</p> <p>We measure the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> entanglement of photon pairs on their propagation from the near to the far field of spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC). The Fedorov ratio, depending on the widths of conditional and unconditional intensity measurements, is shown to be only able to characterize entanglement in the near and far field zones of the source. Therefore we also follow a different approach. By evaluating the first-order coherence of a subsystem of the state we can quantify its entanglement. Unlike previous measurements, which determine the Fedorov ratio via intensity correlations, our setup is sensitive to both phase and modulus of the biphoton state and thus always grants experimental access to the full <span class="hlt">transverse</span> entanglement of the SPDC state. It is shown theoretically that this scheme represents a direct measurement of the Schmidt number.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18099380"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> thermoelectric devices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>C. Reitmaier; F. Walther; H. Lengfellner</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Multilayer structures A–B–A??? consisting of alternating layers of a metal A and a semiconductor B can show large anisotropy\\u000a in their transport properties. In tilted multilayer structures, where layer planes and sample surface include a nonzero tilt\\u000a angle, nonvanishing off-diagonal elements in the sample’s transport tensors lead to <span class="hlt">transverse</span> Seebeck and Peltier effects.\\u000a Achievable temperature differences and figures of merit</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4469860"><span id="translatedtitle">An unusual presentation of recurrent uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tan, Shu Qi; Thia, Edwin Wee Hong; Tee, Chee Seng John; Yeo, George Seow Heong</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We describe a case of recurrent uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the site of a previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Our patient had a history of right interstitial pregnancy with spontaneous uterine fundal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at 18 weeks of pregnancy. During her subsequent pregnancy, she was monitored closely by a senior consultant obstetrician. The patient presented at 34 weeks with right hypochondriac pain. She was clinically stable and fetal monitoring showed no signs of fetal distress. Ultrasonography revealed protrusion of the intact amniotic membranes in the abdominal cavity at the uterine fundus. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare but hazardous obstetric complication. High levels of caution should be exercised in patients with a history of prior uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as they may present with atypical symptoms. Ultrasonography could provide valuable information in such cases where there is an elevated risk of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26106245"><span id="translatedtitle">An unusual presentation of recurrent uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tan, Shu Qi; Thia, Edwin Wee Hong; Tee, Chee Seng John; Yeo, George Seow Heong</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We describe a case of recurrent uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the site of a previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Our patient had a history of right interstitial pregnancy with spontaneous uterine fundal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at 18 weeks of pregnancy. During her subsequent pregnancy, she was monitored closely by a senior consultant obstetrician. The patient presented at 34 weeks with right hypochondriac pain. She was clinically stable and fetal monitoring showed no signs of fetal distress. Ultrasonography revealed protrusion of the intact amniotic membranes in the abdominal cavity at the uterine fundus. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare but hazardous obstetric complication. High levels of caution should be exercised in patients with a history of prior uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as they may present with atypical symptoms. Ultrasonography could provide valuable information in such cases where there is an elevated risk of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site. PMID:26106245</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2739847"><span id="translatedtitle">A review on delayed presentation of diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rashid, Farhan; Chakrabarty, Mallicka M; Singh, Rajeev; Iftikhar, Syed Y</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a life-threatening condition. Diaphragmatic injuries are quite uncommon and often result from either blunt or penetrating trauma. Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are usually associated with abdominal trauma however, it can occur in isolation. Acute traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm may go unnoticed and there is often a delay between the injury and the diagnosis. A comprehensive literature search was performed using the terms "delayed presentation of post traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>" and "delayed diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>". The diagnostic and management challenges encountered are discussed, together with strategies for dealing with them. We have focussed on mechanism of injury, duration, presentation and site of injury, visceral herniation, investigations and different approaches for repair. We intend to stress on the importance of delay in presentation of diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and to provide a review on the available investigations and treatment methods. The enclosed case report also emphasizes on the delayed presentation, diagnostic challenges and the advantages of laparoscopic repair of delayed diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:19698091</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950021870&hterms=distribution+service&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Ddistribution%2Bservice"><span id="translatedtitle">Design prediction for long term stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> service of composite pressure vessels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Robinson, Ernest Y.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Extensive stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies on glass composites and Kevlar composites were conducted by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory beginning in the late 1960's and extending to about 8 years in some cases. Some of the data from these studies published over the years were incomplete or were tainted by spurious failures, such as grip slippage. Updated data sets were defined for both fiberglass and Kevlar composite stand test specimens. These updated data are analyzed in this report by a convenient form of the bivariate Weibull distribution, to establish a consistent set of design prediction charts that may be used as a conservative basis for predicting the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of composite pressure vessels. The updated glass composite data exhibit an invariant Weibull modulus with lifetime. The data are analyzed in terms of homologous service load (referenced to the observed median <span class="hlt">strength</span>). The equations relating life, homologous load, and probability are given, and corresponding design prediction charts are presented. A similar approach is taken for Kevlar composites, where the updated stand data do show a turndown tendency at long life accompanied by a corresponding change (increase) of the Weibull modulus. The turndown characteristic is not present in stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test data of Kevlar pressure vessels. A modification of the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> equations is presented to incorporate a latent, but limited, <span class="hlt">strength</span> drop, and design prediction charts are presented that incorporate such behavior. The methods presented utilize Cartesian plots of the probability distributions (which are a more natural display for the design engineer), based on median normalized data that are independent of statistical parameters and are readily defined for any set of test data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20001726"><span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of forged, thick section 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Choudhary, B.K.; Saroja, S.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S.L.</p> <p>1999-11-01</p> <p>Detailed investigations have been performed to examine the creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of a 1,000-mm diameter and 300-mm-thick tube plate forging of 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel in quenched and tempered (Q + T), simulated postweld heat treatment (SPWHT), and thermally aged (TA) conditions. Creep tests were conducted over a wide stress range (50 to 275 MPa) at 793 and 873 K. The alloy exhibited well-defined primary, steady-state, and extended tertiary creep stages at all test conditions. At 793 K, no significant difference in the creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties was noted between Q + T, SPWHT, and TA conditions. On the other hand, SPWHT specimens exhibited lower creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> than that of Q + T specimens at 873 K. Applied stress ({sigma}{sub a}) dependence of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life (t{sub r}) exhibited two-slope behavior. Both the Monkman-Grant ({dot {epsilon}}{sub s}.t{sub r} = C{sub MG}) and modified Monkman-Grant ({dot {epsilon}}.t{sub r}/{epsilon}{sub f} = C{sub MMG}) relationships were found to be valid for 9Cr-1Mo steel, where {dot {epsilon}}{sub s} is the steady-state creep rate and {epsilon}{sub f} is the strain to failure. The two-slope behavior was also reflected as two constants in the Monkman-Grant relationship (MGR) and modified Monkman-Grant relationship (MMGR) in the two stress regimes. Further, two creep damage tolerance factors ({lambda} = 1/C{sub MMG}) of 5 and 10 were also observed in the high and low stress regimes, respectively. The alloy exhibited high creep ductility, which was retained for longer <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lives at low stresses, and the creep ductility increased with increase in test temperature. The failure mode remained transgranular under all test conditions. The extensive tertiary creep in the alloy has been attributed to microstructural degradation associated with precipitates and dislocation substructure. The creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the forging was found to be lower than that of thin section bars and tubes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/kt656u3r73678380.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> moisture sensitivity of aramid\\/epoxy composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Ronald E. Allred; David K. Roylance</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> tensile properties of Kevlar 49 aramid\\/Fiberite 934 epoxy composites have been measured as a function of moisture content. Moisture effects are substantial: losses of 14% in stiffness, 35% in <span class="hlt">strength</span> and 27% in elongation were observed at 25‡ C. These losses were caused by the expected degradation mechanisms of matrix plasticization and interface weakening and also by an unexpected</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/248127"><span id="translatedtitle">Layer- and direction-specific material properties, extreme extensibility and ultimate material <span class="hlt">strength</span> of human abdominal aorta and aneurysm: a uniaxial extension study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Teng, Zhongzhao; Feng, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yongxue; Huang, Yuan; Sutcliffe, Michael P. F.; Brown, Adam J.; Jing, Zaiping; Gillard, Jonathan H.; Lu, Qingsheng</p> <p>2015-04-24</p> <p>of extreme extensibility and ultimate material <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the tissue are important if <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is to be modelled. Tissue pieces from 11 abdomen aortic aneurysm (AAA) from patients scheduled for elective surgery and from 8 normal aortic artery (NAA) from...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T43A2638K"><span id="translatedtitle">Development of an extended BIEM and its application to the analysis of earthquake dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> interacting with a medium interface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kusakabe, T.; Kame, N.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>An extended boundary integral equation method (XBIEM) has been recently proposed for the analysis of dynamic crack growth (=dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> model) in an inhomogeneous medium consisting of homogeneous sub-regions. Originally XBIEM is applicable to non-planar geometry of cracks and medium interfaces, but it has been demonstrated only for a simple planar crack along a bimaterial interface. Here we developed a code to analyse non-planar <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with non-planar interfaces in a mode III problem, and applied it to a dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> problem across a planar bimaterial interface to investigate the effect of medium inhomogeneity. For this purpose, we firstly derived all the displacement and displacement velocity kernels in a unified analytic discretized form, in addition to the stress kernels already derived, necessary for versatile geometry of boundaries (i.e., cracks and interfaces) and checked all the kernel components in the simulation of wave propagation across a non-planar interface cutting a homogeneous medium. Then we validated our code in a wave reflection-transmission problem across a planar bimaterial interface. Secondly, in order to realize the analysis of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> crossing a bimaterial interface we introduced a new implicit time-stepping scheme for instantaneously interacting boundary elements on the crack and medium interface. Such interactions only appear in the crack's crossing the interface. Otherwise we can use the explicit scheme as employed for BIEM in a homogeneous medium. We validated our numerical code for the crack growth in a homogeneous medium cut with a planar interface and found that our new scheme worked well. Finally, we tackled dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on a planar fault embedded normal to the planar interface of a bimaterial. Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was allowed not only on the planar main fault but also on the interfacial fault and it is controlled by different slip-weakening laws on each of them: each peak <span class="hlt">strength</span> is individually chosen and its ratio ?=?(interface)/?(main) is chosen as one of controlling parameters. Another parameter ? is chosen as a ratio of the shear wave velocities of the bimaterial, ?=?(+)/?(-). Simulations were conducted for hundres of parameter sets of (?, ?). Our results showed two distinct <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes: a) one is to propagate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> just on the prescribed fault, and b) another is to activate the subsidiary interfacial <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which finally results in arresting <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the main planar fault. Two processes were found to be clearly divided by a line in the parameter plane (?, ?). With increasing ?, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tends to stay on the main fault with less significant activation of subsidiary interfacial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and it agrees with our physical anticipation. With increasing ? from 0.7 to 1.4 (one corresponds to homogeneous), the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes shift from (a) to (b). This dependency may be understandable in terms of two extreme cases: <span class="hlt">rupture</span> approaching a free surface and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> approaching a fixed boundary. In the former case, the traction approaches zero in the vicinity of free surface, and thus stress does not concentrate along the interface, and vice versa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004JSSCh.177..551Y"><span id="translatedtitle">Development of very high <span class="hlt">strength</span> Mo 2NiB 2 complex boride base hard alloy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yamasaki, Yuji; Nishi, Mari; Takagi, Ken-ichi</p> <p>2004-02-01</p> <p>A previous investigation revealed that additions of Cr and V to the Mo 2NiB 2 complex boride base hard alloy changed the boride phase crystal structure from orthorhombic to tetragonal and resulted in a remarkable improvement of mechanical properties associated with microstructural refinement. Moreover, an addition of Mn turned out to be effective in further improvement of the mechanical properties in the V-containing alloy. In this investigation, Ni-5B- xMo-12.5V-2.5Mn (mass%) model alloys with four levels of Mo contents corresponding to Mo/B atomic ratio ranging from 1.0 to 1.3 were prepared to study the effect of the Mo/B atomic ratio on the mechanical properties and microstructure. The results indicated that <span class="hlt">transverses</span> <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> (TRS) increased with increasing Mo/B atomic ratio and showed a maximum value of 3.2 GPa at Mo/B=1.2 and then decreased with increasing atomic ratio. Hardness increased linearly from 86.8 HRA to 90.8 HRA with increasing Mo/B atomic ratio.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70023642"><span id="translatedtitle">Solving the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> problem with different numerical approaches and constitutive laws</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Bizzarri, A.; Cocco, M.; Andrews, D.J.; Boschi, Enzo</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>We study the dynamic initiation, propagation and arrest of a 2-D in-plane shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by solving the elastodynamic equation by using both a boundary integral equation method and a finite difference approach. For both methods we adopt different constitutive laws: a slip-weakening (SW) law, with constant weakening rate, and rate- and state-dependent friction laws (Dieterich-Ruina). Our numerical procedures allow the use of heterogeneous distributions of constitutive parameters along the fault for both formulations. We first compare the two solution methods with an SW law, emphasizing the required stability conditions to achieve a good resolution of the cohesive zone and to avoid artificial complexity in the solutions. Our modelling results show that the two methods provide very similar time histories of dynamic source parameters. We point out that, if a careful control of resolution and stability is performed, the two methods yield identical solutions. We have also compared the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> evolution resulting from an SW and a rate- and state-dependent friction law. This comparison shows that despite the different constitutive formulations, a similar behaviour is simulated during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and arrest. We also observe a crack tip bifurcation and a jump in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity (approaching the P-wave speed) with the Dieterich-Ruina (DR) law. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> arrest at a barrier (high <span class="hlt">strength</span> zone) and the barrier-healing mechanism are also reproduced by this law. However, this constitutive formulation allows the simulation of a more general and complex variety of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behaviours. By assuming different heterogeneous distributions of the initial constitutive parameters, we are able to model a barrier-healing as well as a self-healing process. This result suggests that if the heterogeneity of the constitutive parameters is taken into account, the different healing mechanisms can be simulated. We also study the nucleation phase duration Tn, defined as the time necessary for the crack to reach the half-length Ic. We compare the Tn values resulting from distinct simulations calculated using different constitutive laws and different sets of constitutive parameters. Our results confirm that the DR law provides a different description of the nucleation process than the SW law adopted in this study. We emphasize that the DR law yields a complete description of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process, which includes the most prominent features of SW.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3277969"><span id="translatedtitle">Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> ICA during Transsphenoidal Surgery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ghatge, S.B.; Modi, D.B.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Summary <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the internal carotid artery (ICA) during transsphenoidal surgery is a rare but potentially lethal complication. Direct surgical repair of the ICA may be difficult and time-consuming in an acute setting. Urgent endovascular treatments with vascular plug or stent-graft have been the feasible options to date. We desrcibe two cases of iatrogenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of ICA during transsphenoidal surgery. In the first case we occluded the ICA with a vascular plug at the site of tear where cross circulation was adequate. In the second case we had to preserve the ICA with stent-graft since there was no adequate cross circulation. These two strategies are discussed below. PMID:20377977</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11985760"><span id="translatedtitle">Calf muscle function after Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. A prospective, randomised study comparing surgical and non-surgical treatment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Möller, M; Lind, K; Movin, T; Karlsson, J</p> <p>2002-02-01</p> <p>In a prospective, randomised, multicentre study, 112 patients with Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (ATR) were allocated to surgical treatment (n=59), followed by early functional rehabilitation using a brace, and non-surgical treatment (n=53), i.e. eight weeks of plaster treatment. In this study, the results of the isokinetic muscle <span class="hlt">strength</span> evaluation are presented for contractions in both the concentric and the eccentric mode, plantar flexion and dorsiflexion, two angular velocities and three different positions of the subject. The heel-raise test for endurance, maximum calf circumference and tendon width were also evaluated. The re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate was 20.8% in the non-surgically-treated group and 1.7% in the surgically-treated group. No significant differences were found between the treatment groups in terms of the isokinetic <span class="hlt">strength</span> measurements and the endurance test among the patients who did not sustain a re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span>. If a re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> is avoided, both surgical and non-surgical treatment for ATR produce good functional outcome; however, the muscle function was not restored after two years in either group. PMID:11985760</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900000179&hterms=Burnout&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DBurnout"><span id="translatedtitle">Wrapped Wire Detects <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Of Pressure Vessel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hunt, James B.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1184350"><span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">strength</span> of molecular adhesion bonds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Evans, E; Ritchie, K</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material <span class="hlt">strength</span> and <span class="hlt">strength</span> of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond <span class="hlt">strength</span>, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction kinetics in liquids to bond dissociation under force and tested the predictions by smart Monte Carlo (Brownian dynamics) simulations of bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. By definition, bond <span class="hlt">strength</span> is the force that produces the most frequent failure in repeated tests of breakage, i.e., the peak in the distribution of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forces. As verified by the simulations, theory shows that bond <span class="hlt">strength</span> progresses through three dynamic regimes of loading rate. First, bond <span class="hlt">strength</span> emerges at a critical rate of loading (> or = 0) at which spontaneous dissociation is just frequent enough to keep the distribution peak at zero force. In the slow-loading regime immediately above the critical rate, <span class="hlt">strength</span> grows as a weak power of loading rate and reflects initial coupling of force to the bonding potential. At higher rates, there is crossover to a fast regime in which <span class="hlt">strength</span> continues to increase as the logarithm of the loading rate over many decades independent of the type of attraction. Finally, at ultrafast loading rates approaching the domain of molecular dynamics simulations, the bonding potential is quickly overwhelmed by the rapidly increasing force, so that only naked frictional drag on the structure remains to retard separation. Hence, to expose the energy landscape that governs bond <span class="hlt">strength</span>, molecular adhesion forces must be examined over an enormous span of time scales. However, a significant gap exists between the time domain of force measurements in the laboratory and the extremely fast scale of molecular motions. Using results from a simulation of biotin-avidin bonds (Izrailev, S., S. Stepaniants, M. Balsera, Y. Oono, and K. Schulten. 1997. Molecular dynamics study of unbinding of the avidin-biotin complex. Biophys. J., this issue), we describe how Brownian dynamics can help bridge the gap between molecular dynamics and probe tests. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9083660</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S43C2258L"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> behavior and ground motion from 3D simulations of the Casa Loma - Claremont stepover on the San Jacinto Fault, southern California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lozos, J.; Oglesby, D. D.; Brune, J. N.; Olsen, K. B.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>The extensional stepover between the Claremont and Casa Loma strands of the San Jacinto Fault in southern California is an area in which complex fault geometry may have a controlling effect on both <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and ground motion. The two main strands of the fault in this region are roughly parallel, with an average 4 km separation between them, but smaller complexities within the individual strands may affect <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity, slip rate, seismic radiation, and ground motion. The presence of the Farm Road strand, a smaller fault segment between the Claremont and Casa Loma strands, may add further complexity to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior. We use the three-dimensional finite element method to conduct models of this complex stepover region. We test several different nucleation locations, several initial stress states, and several different seismogenic depths for the Farm Road strand. We then use the outputs of these dynamic models to determine ground motion distributions from these <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. We find that the nucleation location strongly affects the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>'s ability to jump the stepover; nucleations closer to the overlap are less likely to result in jumping <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Including the Farm Road strand makes a considerable difference in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior and ground motion distribution when compared to a model without it, though its contribution is complex. The <span class="hlt">strength</span> of its effect is variable based on nucleation location, and while its presence does allow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to jump the larger stepover in stress states that would normally prohibit jumping, it serves to reduce radiated energy and ground motion in stress states that would allow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to jump in the absence of the smaller strand. The depth of the Farm Road strand has more effect on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the stress state that would not permit jumping in the absence of that segment. These results suggest that hazard associated with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the northern San Jacinto depends on specific nucleation point, but also that a seemingly less-permissive stress state for throughgoing <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may ultimately lead to stronger ground motions. This work also continues to highlight the non-monotonic effects of an intermediate fault segment on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior through a larger stepover.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.201.1416H"><span id="translatedtitle">Transient gravity perturbations induced by earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harms, J.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Barsuglia, M.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Montagner, J.-P.; Somala, S. N.; Whiting, B. F.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>The static and transient deformations produced by earthquakes cause density perturbations which, in turn, generate immediate, long-range perturbations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, an analytical solution is derived for gravity perturbations produced by a point double-couple source in homogeneous, infinite, non-self-gravitating elastic media. The solution features transient gravity perturbations that occur at any distance from the source between the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> onset time and the arrival time of seismic P waves, which are of potential interest for real-time earthquake source studies and early warning. An analytical solution for such prompt gravity perturbations is presented in compact form. We show that it approximates adequately the prompt gravity perturbations generated by strike-slip and dip-slip finite fault <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in a half-space obtained by numerical simulations based on the spectral element method. Based on the analytical solution, we estimate that the observability of prompt gravity perturbations within 10 s after <span class="hlt">rupture</span> onset by current instruments is severely challenged by the background microseism noise but may be achieved by high-precision gravity strainmeters currently under development. Our analytical results facilitate parametric studies of the expected prompt gravity signals that could be recorded by gravity strainmeters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S33B4526W"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocities of Intermediate- and Deep-Focus Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Warren, L. M.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes --- how they vary between subduction zones, how they vary with depth, and what their maximum values are --- may help constrain the mechanism(s) of the earthquakes. As part of a global study of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes, I have used <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity to estimate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vector (speed and orientation) for 422 earthquakes >70 km depth with MW ?5.7 since 1990. I estimate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity relative to the local P-wave velocity (vr/?). Since the same method is used for all earthquakes, the results can be readily compared across study areas. The study areas --- Middle America, South America, Tonga-Kermadec, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, and Japan-Kurils-Kamchatka --- include some of the warmest and coldest subduction zones: subducting plate ages range from 9-150 Myr and descent rates range from 1-13 cm/yr. Across all subduction zones and depth ranges, for the 193 earthquakes with observable directivity and well-constrained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vectors, most earthquakes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the more horizontal of the two possible nodal planes. However, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vectors appear to be randomly-oriented relative to the slip vector, so the earthquakes span the continuum from Mode II (i.e., parallel slip and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vectors) to Mode III <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (i.e., perpendicular slip and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vectors). For this earthquake population, the mean <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is 0.43 vr/? ± 0.14 vr/?. The mean earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities are similar between all subduction zones. Since the local seismic wavespeed is faster in colder subduction zones, absolute <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities are faster in colder subduction zones. Overall, the fastest <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities exceed the local S-wave speed. The supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are associated with earthquakes closer to Mode II than Mode III faulting. This is consistent with theoretical calculations, which limit the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity to the S-wave speed for Mode III <span class="hlt">rupture</span> but the P-wave speed for Mode II <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0902.0184v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Spin Physics at COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Federica Sozzi; for the COMPASS Collaboration</p> <p>2009-02-02</p> <p>The study of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin effects is part of the scientific program of COMPASS, a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS. COMPASS investigates the <span class="hlt">transversity</span> PDFs in semi-inclusive DIS, using a longitudinally polarized muon beam of 160 GeV/c impinging on a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized target. From 2002 to 2004, data have been collected using a $^6$LiD target <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized. <span class="hlt">Transversity</span> has been measured using different quark polarimeters: the azimuthal distribution of single hadrons, the azimuthal dependence of the plane containing hadron pairs, and the measurement of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> polarization of baryons ($\\Lambda$ hyperons). All the asymmetries have been found to be small, and compatible with zero, a result which has been interpreted as a cancellation between the u and d-quark contributions. In 2007 COMPASS has taken data using a NH$_3$ polarized proton target which will give complementary information on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin effects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=DOE-PATENT-XML&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/865853"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> field focused system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Anderson, Oscar A. (Berkeley, CA)</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">transverse</span> field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004JMagR.169..300M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> relaxation mechanisms in articular cartilage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mlynárik, V.; Szomolányi, P.; Toffanin, R.; Vittur, F.; Trattnig, S.</p> <p>2004-08-01</p> <p>Relaxation rates in the rotating frame ( R1 ?) and spin-spin relaxation rates ( R2) were measured in articular cartilage at various orientations of cartilage layer to the static magnetic field ( B0), at various spin locking field <span class="hlt">strengths</span> and at two different static magnetic field <span class="hlt">strengths</span>. It was found that R1 ? in the deep radial zone depended on the orientation of specimens in the magnet and decreased with increasing the spin locking field <span class="hlt">strength</span>. In contrast, R1 ? values in the transitional zone were nearly independent of the specimen orientation and the spin locking field <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Measurements of the same specimens at 2.95 and 7.05 T showed an increase of R1 ? and most R2 values with increasing B0. The inverse B0 dependence of some R2 values was probably due to a multicomponent character of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetization decay. The experiments revealed that the dominant T1 ? and T2 relaxation mechanism at B0?3 T is a dipolar interaction due to slow anisotropic motion of water molecules in the collagen matrix. On average, the contribution of scalar relaxation due to rapid proton exchange in femoral head cartilage at 2.95 T is about 6% or less of the total R1 ? at the spin locking field of 1000 Hz.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000054540&hterms=tows+matrix&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dtows%2Bmatrix"><span id="translatedtitle">Intermediate Temperature Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Woven SiC Fiber, BN Interphase, SiC Matrix Composites in Air</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Morscher, Gregory N.; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Tensile stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments were performed on woven Hi-Nicalon reinforced SiC matrix composites with BN interphases in air. Modal acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the damage accumulation in the composites during the tests and microstructural analysis was performed to determine the amount of matrix cracking that occurred for each sample. Fiber fractograph), was also performed for individual fiber failures at the specimen fracture surface to determine the <span class="hlt">strengths</span> at which fibers failed. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strengths</span> were significantly worse than what would have been expected front the inherent degradation of the fibers themselves when subjected to similar <span class="hlt">rupture</span> conditions. At higher applied stresses the rate of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> "?as larger than at lower applied stresses. It was observed that the change in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate corresponded to the onset of through-thickness cracking in the composites themselves. The primary cause of the sen,ere degradation was the ease with which fibers would bond to one another at their closest separation distances, less than 100 nanometers, when exposed to the environment. The near fiber-to-fiber contact in the woven tows enabled premature fiber failure over large areas of matrix cracks due to the stress-concentrations created b), fibers bonded to one another after one or a few fibers fail. i.e. the loss of global load sharing. An@, improvement in fiber-to-fiber separation of this composite system should result in improved stress- <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties. A model was den,eloped in order to predict the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life-time for these composites based on the probabilistic nature of indin,idual fiber failure at temperature. the matrix cracking state during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test, and the rate of oxidation into a matrix crack. Also incorporated into the model were estimates of the stress-concentration that would occur between the outer rim of fibers in a load-bearing bundle and the unbridged region of a matrix crack after Xia et al. For the lower stresses, this source of stress-concentration was the likely cause for initial fiber failure that would trigger catastrophic failure of the composite.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NIH-MEDLINEPLUS&redirectUrl=http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/growingstronger/why/index.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Why <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Training?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Physical Activity Physical Activity Share Compartir Why <span class="hlt">strength</span> training? Research has shown that strengthening exercises are both ... person's mental and emotional health. Benefits of <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Training There are numerous benefits to <span class="hlt">strength</span> training regularly, ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/m2808610315v6307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">On <span class="hlt">strength</span> of porous material: Simple systems and densified systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Lauge Fuglsang Nielsen</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The question of non-destructive testing of porous materials has always been of interest for the engineering profession. A\\u000a number of empirically based relations between stiffness (modulus of elasticity) and <span class="hlt">strength</span> (modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>) of materials\\u000a have been established in order to control quality without damaging or destroying the material or the building component considered.\\u000a The efficiency of modulus of elasticity-modulus</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14992708"><span id="translatedtitle">Recovery of the posterior tibial muscle after late reconstruction following tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Valderrabano, Victor; Hintermann, Beat; Wischer, Thorsten; Fuhr, Peter; Dick, Walter</p> <p>2004-02-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to determine the recovery potential of the posterior tibial muscle after late reconstruction following tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in stage II of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Fourteen patients (18 women, 6 men; mean age 59.8 years) were investigated 47 months (range, 24-76 months) after surgical reconstruction of a completely <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> posterior tibial tendon (end-to-end anastomosis, side-to-side augmentation with the flexor digitorum longus tendon) in combination with a distal calcaneal osteotomy with a tricortical iliac crest bone graft for lengthening of the lateral column. At follow-up, clinical and radiological investigations were performed, including <span class="hlt">strength</span> measurement and qualitative and quantitative MRI investigation. The overall clinical results were graded excellent in 12 patients, good in one, fair in one, and poor in none. The average ankle-hindfoot score (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society) improved from preoperatively 49.1 (range, 32-60) to 93.1 (range, 76-100) at follow-up. The functional result correlated with patient's satisfaction and sports activities (p <.05). All patients showed a significant <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the posterior tibial muscle on the affected side, but it was smaller than on non-affected side (p <.05). The mean posterior tibial muscle <span class="hlt">strength</span> was 75.1 N on affected and 104.9 N on nonaffected side, corresponding to a ratio of 0.73 between the two legs. The mean area of the posterior tibial muscle was 1.89 cm(2) on affected side, and 3.48 cm(2) on nonaffected side, corresponding to a ratio of 0.55 between the two legs. While fatty degeneration for the posterior tibial muscle was found in all patients, it was found to decrease with increasing <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the posterior tibial muscle (p <.05) and muscular size (p <.05). On postoperative MRI, the posterior tibial tendon could be found to be intact in all patients. The recovery potential of the posterior tibial muscle was shown to be significant even after delayed repair of its <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon. A <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and/or diseased posterior tibial tendon should not be transected as it excludes any recovery possibilities of the posterior tibial muscle. PMID:14992708</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20005580"><span id="translatedtitle">Stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of lead-free soldered joints used to assemble copper plumbing systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fields, R.J.; Shepherd, D.A.; Cohen, A.; Kireta, A.G. Jr.</p> <p>1999-11-01</p> <p>A cooperative program on stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of lead-free soldered joints was initiated several years ago between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Copper Development Association (CDA). It was created because the conservative code-assigned joint <span class="hlt">strength</span> properties of soldered wrought and cast copper and copper alloy fittings prohibited the broader use of copper plumbing tube in building construction. Further, there was a challenge to the use of the only remaining code-approved solder because of a health concern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1101.5962v5"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Spin and <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Momentum Effects at COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>C. Schill; for the COMPASS Collaboration</p> <p>2011-10-05</p> <p>The investigation of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum effects in deep inelastic scattering is one of the key physics programs of the COMPASS collaboration. In the years 2002-2004 COMPASS took data scattering 160 GeV muons on a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized 6LiD target. In 2007, a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized NH3 target was used. Three different channels to access the <span class="hlt">transversity</span> distribution function have been analyzed: The azimuthal distribution of single hadrons, involving the Collins fragmentation function, the azimuthal dependence of the plane containing hadron pairs, involving the two-hadron interference fragmentation function, and the measurement of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> polarization of lambda hyperons in the final state. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> quark momentum effects in a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized nucleon have been investigated by measuring the Sivers distribution function. Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering give important information on the inner structure of the nucleon as well, and can be used to estimate both the quark <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum in an unpolarized nucleon and to access the so-far unmeasured Boer-Mulders function. COMPASS has measured these asymmetries in 2004 using spin-averaged 6LiD data.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4400530"><span id="translatedtitle">Femoral pseudoaneurysm <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> into urinary bladder: A rare presentation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shrestha, Kajan Raj; Luitel, Bhoj Raj; Shrestha, Ujma; Shrestha, Uttam Krishna</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Femoral pseudoaneurysm is a common occurrence in intravenous drug abuser due to repeated trauma to the femoral artery causing arterial leak contained by the surrounding tissue and does not contain all the layers of arterial wall. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of these aneurysm to exterior is a common presentation while <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into surrounding structure deemed an emergency surgical attention. Hence, we report an unusual case of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of femoral pseudoaneurysm into urinary bladder who presented us with history of hematuria and was successfully managed. PMID:25887167</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4397006"><span id="translatedtitle">A Rare Case of Adductor Longus Muscle <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>van de Kimmenade, R. J. L. L.; van Bergen, C. J. A.; van Deurzen, P. J. E.; Verhagen, R. A. W.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>An adductor longus muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare injury. This case report describes a 32-year-old patient with an adductor longus <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The trauma mechanism was a hyperabduction movement during a soccer game. Nonoperative treatment was initiated. After a follow-up of 4 years, the patient was without pain but a small swelling was still visible. This report describes the anatomy, pathophysiology, and evidence-based treatment of adductor longus <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:25918663</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4448101"><span id="translatedtitle">Right Hemi-Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: An Injury Missed or Masked?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dhua, Anjan</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Right sided traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in children is uncommon and may escape early detection. Missed injuries are associated with high mortality and morbidity due to incarceration and strangulation of abdominal viscera. We report a 15-month-old child with blunt trauma chest and abdomen, who presented with bilateral hemothoraces and liver laceration seven days after the incident. Diagnosis of right diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was confirmed after another week. The surgical repair of diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was undertaken successfully.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3981329"><span id="translatedtitle">Delayed diagnosis of a right-sided traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ku?era, Alexandr; Rygl, Michal; Šnajdauf, Ji?í; Kavalcová, Lucie; Petr?, Ond?ej; Ritschelová, Vlasta; Kyn?l, Martin</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Right-sided traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in childhood is a very rare injury. Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> often manifests itself later, after an organ progressively herniates into the pleural cavity. When the patient is tubed, the ventilation pressure does not allow herniation of an organ, which occurs when the patient is ex-tubed. We present a patient with a delayed diagnose of right sided diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with a complicated post-operation state. PMID:24765402</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11881313"><span id="translatedtitle">[Pregnancy-related, rarely-seen spontaneous lumbar artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Iskender, Serkan; Ergün, Alper; Ipekçi, Fuat; Ekinci, Ozgür; Yener, Oktay</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Some arterial aneurysm <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> can be seen during pregnancy. However, spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the lumbar artery in pregnancy are very rare. In that manuscript we present a 22 year old female who is 8 months pregnant, seen at a peripheral hospital for suspicion of placenta decolmant. When the fetal heart sounds were missed, the patient was transported to our hospital. We reoperated on her as an emergency. We found that a spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the lumbar artery. PMID:11881313</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25863875"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> anterior mediastinal teratoma with radiologic, pathologic, and bronchoscopic correlation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Escalon, Joanna G; Arkin, Jordan; Chaump, Michael; Harkin, Timothy J; Wolf, Andrea S; Legasto, Alan</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>While most teratomas are asymptomatic, intrathoracic teratomas can rarely <span class="hlt">rupture</span> spontaneously causing more alarming symptoms. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> teratoma is a serious clinical entity, and early recognition is crucial for avoidance of further complications and preparation of proper surgical approach. We present a case of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> anterior mediastinal teratoma with radiologic, pathologic, and bronchoscopic correlation. This case uniquely illustrates a patient presenting with signs of infection and progressively worsening symptoms, thus emphasizing the need for early diagnosis and the importance of imaging. PMID:25863875</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S11C4351F"><span id="translatedtitle">Cohesive Zone Length of Gabbro at Supershear <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fukuyama, E.; Xu, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Yamashita, F.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We investigated the shear strain field ahead of a supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The strain data was obtained during large-scale biaxial friction experiments conducted at NIED in March 2013. We conducted friction experiments using a pair of meter-scale gabbro rock specimens whose simulated fault area was 1.5m x 0.1m. We applied 2.6MPa normal stress and loading velocity of 0.1mm/s. At the long side of the fault edge, which is parallel to the slip direction, 32 2-component semi-conductor strain gauges were installed at an interval of 50mm and 10mm off the fault. The data are conditioned by high frequency strain amplifiers (<0.5MHz) and continuously recorded at an interval of 1MHz with 16-bit resolution. Many stick slip events were observed and a unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> event was chosen in this analysis that propagated with supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity. One of the reasons for this selection was that the strain field ahead of the supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was not contaminated by elastic waves. Focusing on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front, stress concentration was observed and sharp stress drop occurred immediately inside the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We found that the stress concentration becomes mild as the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagates and length of the stress concentration area becomes longer. This observation is quite interesting because in this experiment the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagated at a constant speed close to root two times the shear wave velocity and thus a longer stress concentration region suggests more energy dissipation. We could speculate that such longer stress concentration area suggests longer plastic region ahead of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (or longer cohesive distance). I.e. the cohesive zone length becomes longer as the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagates to maintain constant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity propagation. We empirically obtained the relation Lc = 1.8x10^-5 L for 0.1<L<1.4[m] where Lc is cohesive zone length and L is <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> length.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25796925"><span id="translatedtitle">[The morphological characteristic of an experimental <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the liver for the simulation of the blunt abdominal injury].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dubrovina, I A; Dubrovin, I A; Leonov, S V; Volod'ko, S N</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">strength</span> and the energy of a striking blow with a clenched fist may be as high as 300 kgf (3,000 H) and 824.4 J respectively. Pressing a human body against a hard surface leads to a deep chest deflection while the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the liver is associated with a lower blow <span class="hlt">strength</span> and energy (2,000 H and 141.5 J respectively). In such situations, the shockproof mechanisms of the injury prevail giving rise to antishock peripheral and central <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the liver due to the general deformation and displacement of this organ in the direction of the blow. In the absence of barriers preventing the inertial movement of the body, even a strong strike (1950 H) with an energy of 202.5 J does not cause a damage to the liver; it occurs when the strike <span class="hlt">strength</span> and energy amount to 2650 H and 260.1 J respectively. In such cases, the direct injury mechanism develops manifested in the formation of local liver injures. The results of the study suggest the possibility of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the liver inflicted by a clenched fist strike delivered to the abdomen. PMID:25796925</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790037288&hterms=directional+solidified&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Ddirectional%2Bsolidified"><span id="translatedtitle">Shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a directionally solidified eutectic gamma/gamma-prime - alpha /Mo/ alloy. [for aircraft engine turbine blades</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Harf, F. H.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Directionally solidified gamma/gamma-prime - alpha (Mo) eutectic alloys are being evaluated for application as advanced aircraft engine turbine blades. Their excellent high-temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> is partly due to their directionally aligned microstructure. However, alloys with such directional structures may display low shear <span class="hlt">strength</span> at 760 C, the operating temperature of advanced blade roots. The objective of this investigation was to determine the shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the gamma/gamma-prime - alpha eutectic alloy and possibly to improve it by microstructural and heat-treatment variations. Bars of gamma/gamma-prime - alpha alloy containing nominally 5.7% Al and 33.5% Mo by weight with balance Ni were directionally solidified at rates between 10 and 100 mm per hour. Materials were solidified in furnaces with thermal gradients at the liquid-solid interface of 250 or 100 C per cm. A limited number of longitudinal shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests were conducted at 760 C and 207 MPa in the as-solidified and in several heat-treated conditions. It was found that the shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> failures are partly transgranular and that resistance to failure is promoted by good fiber alignment and a matrix structure consisting mainly of gamma-prime. Well-aligned as-solidified specimens sustained the shear stress for an average of 81 hours, while cellular material failed in one hour or less.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790004034&hterms=mater&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dmater"><span id="translatedtitle">Shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a directionally solidified eutectic gamma/gamma prime - alpha (Mo) alloy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Harf, F. H.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Directionally solidified Mo alloys are evaluated to determine the shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> and to possibly improve it by microstructural and heat treatment variations. Bars of the alloy containing nominally 5.7% Al and 33.5% Mo by weight with balance Ni were directionally solidified at rates between 10 and 100 mm per hour in furnaces with thermal gradients at the liquid-solid interface of 250 or 100 C per cm. A limited number of longitudinal shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests were conducted at 760 C and 207 MPa in the as - solidified and in several heat treated conditions. It is shown that shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> failures are partly transgranular and that resistance to failure is prompted by good fiber alignment and a matrix structure consisting mainly of gamma prime. Well aligned as - solidified specimens sustained the shear stress for an average of 81 hours. A simulated coating heat treatment appeared to increase the transformation of gamma to gamma prime and raised the average shear life of aligned specimens to 111 hours. However, heat treatments at 1245 C and especially at 1190 C appeared to be detrimental by causing partial solutioning of the gamma prime, and reducing lives to 47 and 10 hours, respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23530530"><span id="translatedtitle">Laser welding of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> intestinal tissue using plasmonic polypeptide nanocomposite solders.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huang, Huang-Chiao; Walker, Candace Rae; Nanda, Alisha; Rege, Kaushal</p> <p>2013-04-23</p> <p>Approximately 1.5 million people suffer from colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease in the United States. Occurrence of leakage following standard surgical anastomosis in intestinal and colorectal surgery is common and can cause infection leading to life-threatening consequences. In this report, we demonstrate that plasmonic nanocomposites, generated from elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) cross-linked with gold nanorods, can be used to weld <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> intestinal tissue upon exposure to near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. Mechanical properties of these nanocomposites can be modulated based on the concentration of gold nanorods embedded within the ELP matrix. We employed photostable, NIR-absorbing cellularized and noncellularized GNR-ELP nanocomposites for ex vivo laser welding of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> porcine small intestines. Laser welding using the nanocomposites significantly enhanced the tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>, leakage pressure, and bursting pressure of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> intestinal tissue. This, in turn, provided a liquid-tight seal against leakage of luminal liquid from the intestine and resulting bacterial infection. This study demonstrates the utility of laser tissue welding using plasmonic polypeptide nanocomposites and indicates the translational potential of these materials in intestinal and colorectal repair. PMID:23530530</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100026038&hterms=defense+cascade+model&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Ddefense%2Bcascade%2Bmodel"><span id="translatedtitle">A Critique of a Phenomenological Fiber Breakage Model for Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Composite Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Reeder, James R.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is not a critical failure mode for most composite structures, but there are a few applications where it can be critical. One application where stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be a critical design issue is in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV's), where the composite material is highly and uniformly loaded for long periods of time and where very high reliability is required. COPV's are normally required to be proof loaded before being put into service to insure <span class="hlt">strength</span>, but it is feared that the proof load may cause damage that reduces the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> reliability. Recently, a fiber breakage model was proposed specifically to estimate a reduced reliability due to proof loading. The fiber breakage model attempts to model physics believed to occur at the microscopic scale, but validation of the model has not occurred. In this paper, the fiber breakage model is re-derived while highlighting assumptions that were made during the derivation. Some of the assumptions are examined to assess their effect on the final predicted reliability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoJI.199.1709C"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> velocity inferred from near-field shear strain analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Causse, M.; Cornou, C.; Bécasse, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We propose a new technique to determine the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of large strike slip earthquakes. By means of simple numerical ground motion simulations, we show that when the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> penetrates a shallow layer of sediment or fractured rock, shock waves propagate along the surface fault trace in the forward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. Such shock waves, which are insensitive to the complexity of slip over the fault plane, propagate at a phase velocity equal to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed. We show that those shock waves can be easily isolated in the frequency domain, and that phase velocity can then be simply obtained from shear strain.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24902970"><span id="translatedtitle">Mechanisms of plaque formation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bentzon, Jacob Fog; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Virmani, Renu; Falk, Erling</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Atherosclerosis causes clinical disease through luminal narrowing or by precipitating thrombi that obstruct blood flow to the heart (coronary heart disease), brain (ischemic stroke), or lower extremities (peripheral vascular disease). The most common of these manifestations is coronary heart disease, including stable angina pectoris and the acute coronary syndromes. Atherosclerosis is a lipoprotein-driven disease that leads to plaque formation at specific sites of the arterial tree through intimal inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis, and calcification. After decades of indolent progression, such plaques may suddenly cause life-threatening coronary thrombosis presenting as an acute coronary syndrome. Most often, the culprit morphology is plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with exposure of highly thrombogenic, red cell-rich necrotic core material. The permissive structural requirement for this to occur is an extremely thin fibrous cap, and thus, <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occur mainly among lesions defined as thin-cap fibroatheromas. Also common are thrombi forming on lesions without <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (plaque erosion), most often on pathological intimal thickening or fibroatheromas. However, the mechanisms involved in plaque erosion remain largely unknown, although coronary spasm is suspected. The calcified nodule has been suggested as a rare cause of coronary thrombosis in highly calcified and tortious arteries in older individuals. To characterize the severity and prognosis of plaques, several terms are used. Plaque burden denotes the extent of disease, whereas plaque activity is an ambiguous term, which may refer to one of several processes that characterize progression. Plaque vulnerability describes the short-term risk of precipitating symptomatic thrombosis. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of atherosclerotic plaque initiation and progression; how plaques suddenly precipitate life-threatening thrombi; and the concepts of plaque burden, activity, and vulnerability. PMID:24902970</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T43A2632D"><span id="translatedtitle">Forecasting the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Directivity of Large Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Donovan, J. R.; Jordan, T. H.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Forecasting the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity of large earthquakes is an important problem in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), because directivity strongly influences ground motions. We cast this forecasting problem in terms of the conditional hypocenter distribution (CHD), defined to be the probability distribution of a hypocenter given the spatial distribution of fault slip (moment release). The simplest CHD is a uniform distribution for which the hypocenter probability density equals the moment-release probability density. We have compiled samples of CHDs from a global distribution of large earthquakes using three estimation methods: (a) location of hypocenters within the slip distribution from finite-fault inversions, (b) location of hypocenters within early aftershock distributions, and (c) direct inversion for the directivity parameter D, defined in terms of the degree-two polynomial moments of the source space-time function. The data from method (a) are statistically inconsistent with the uniform CHD suggested by McGuire et al. (2002) using method (c). Instead, the data indicate a 'centroid-biased' CHD, in which the expected distance between the hypocenter and the hypocentroid is less than that of a uniform CHD; i.e., the directivities inferred from finite-fault models appear to be closer to bilateral than predicted by the uniform CHD. One source of this discrepancy may be centroid bias in the second-order moments owing to poor localization of the slip in finite-fault inversions. We compare these observational results with CHDs computed from a large set of theoretical <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in the Southern California fault system produced by the Rate-State Quake simulator (RSQSim) of Dieterich and Richards-Dinger (2010) and discuss the implications for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics and fault-zone heterogeneities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24679079"><span id="translatedtitle">Isolated unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the alar ligament.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment. PMID:24679079</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/hep-ex/0602013v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transversity</span> Physics at Compass</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>F. Bradamante</p> <p>2006-02-06</p> <p><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> spin physics is an important part of the scientific programme of the COMPASS experiment at CERN, which started taking data in 2002, scattering 160 GeV/c muon beam on a polarized $^6$LiD target. The analysis of the data taken with the target polarized orthogonally to the muon beam direction has allowed to measure for the first time the Collins and Sivers asymmetries of the deuteron. Both for the positive and the negative hadrons produced in semi-inclusive DIS the measured asymmetries are small and, within errors, compatible with zero: results on part of the accumulated statistics have already been published. Two-hadron asymmetries and $\\Lambda$ polarization transfered from the struck quark are also being investigated, and preliminary results on the data collected in the years 2002 and 2003 are given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2423576"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Bile Duct <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Pregnancy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Piotrowski, Joseph J.; Liechty, R. Dale</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Spontaneous bile duct <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred in a 23-year-old who required emergency Cesarean section for fetal distress. This condition has not been reported in association with pregnancy. Only forty cases of spontaneous bile duct perforation in adults have been previously reported. Seventy percent of these perforations were related to biliary calculi. Sites of perforation were evenly distributed between common hepatic duct and common bile duct. Recommended treatment includes cholecystectomy, common bile duct exploration, T-tube placement, and Roux-En-Y ductal anastomosis if disruption is extensive. PMID:2152327</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70024680"><span id="translatedtitle">Complex earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and local tsunamis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Geist, E.L.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a factor of 3 or more. These results indicate that there is substantially more variation in the local tsunami wave field derived from the inherent complexity subduction zone earthquakes than predicted by a simple elastic dislocation model. Probabilistic methods that take into account variability in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes are likely to yield more accurate assessments of tsunami hazards.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/cond-mat/0602371v2"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> processes in fiber bundle models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Per C. Hemmer; Alex Hansen; Srutarshi Pradhan</p> <p>2006-03-23</p> <p>Fiber bundles with statistically distributed thresholds for breakdown of individual fibers are interesting models of the static and dynamics of failures in materials under stress. They can be analyzed to an extent that is not possible for more complex materials. During the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in a fiber bundle avalanches, in which several fibers fail simultaneously, occur. We study by analytic and numerical methods the statistics of such avalanches, and the breakdown process for several models of fiber bundles. The models differ primarily in the way the extra stress caused by a fiber failure is redistributed among the surviving fibers.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21316943"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Spin Effects at COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wollny, H. [Physikalisches Institut der Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)</p> <p>2009-08-04</p> <p>The measurement of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin effects in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) is an important part of the COMPASS physics program. In the years 2002-2004 data was taken by scattering a 160 GeV/c muon beam off a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized deuteron target. In 2007, additional data was collected on a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized proton target. New preliminary results for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries from the analysis of the proton data are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70044050"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> history of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan, China, earthquake: Evaluation of separate and joint inversions of geodetic, teleseismic, and strong-motion data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Hartzell, Stephen; Mendoza, Carlos; Ramírez-Guzmán, Leonardo; Zeng, Yuesha; Mooney, Walter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>earthquake. A linear multiple-time-window approach is used to parameterize the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Because of the complexity of the Wenchuan faulting, three separate planes are used to represent the <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> surfaces. This earthquake clearly demonstrates the <span class="hlt">strengths</span> and limitations of geodetic, teleseismic, and strong-motion data sets. Geodetic data (static offsets) are valuable for determining the distribution of shallower slip but are insensitive to deeper faulting and reveal nothing about the timing of slip. Teleseismic data in the distance range 30°–90° generally involve no modeling difficulties because of simple ray paths and can distinguish shallow from deep slip. Teleseismic data, however, cannot distinguish between different slip scenarios when multiple fault planes are involved because steep takeoff angles lead to ambiguity in timing. Local strong-motion data, on the other hand, are ideal for determining the direction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from directivity but can easily be over modeled with inaccurate Green’s functions, leading to misinterpretation of the slip distribution. We show that all three data sets are required to give an accurate description of the Wenchuan <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The moment is estimated to be approximately 1:0×1021 N · m with the slip characterized by multiple large patches with slips up to 10 m. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> initiates on the southern end of the Pengguan fault and proceeds unilaterally to the northeast. Upon reaching the cross-cutting Xiaoyudong fault, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the adjacent Beichuan fault starts at this juncture and proceeds bilaterally to the northeast and southwest.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.T23B1924G"><span id="translatedtitle">Thick Consolidated Sediments Allow <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> to Reach the Trench During December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Great Earthquake</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gulick, S. P.; Austin, J. A.; Bangs, N. L.; Martin, K. M.; McNeill, L. C.; Henstock, T.; Bull, J. M.; Dean, S. M.; Djajadihardja, Y.; Permana, H.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>Slip inversions for the 2004 Sumatran-Andaman great earthquake (Mw 9.2) suggest that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagated up dip to as far west as the Sunda Trench. Because earthquake moment magnitude scales with the subsurface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area, the moment magnitude varies with the updip extent of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The magnitude of the 2004 event, and aftershock distribution, suggest an updip limit of seismogenesis at or seaward of the Trench, but this result is surprising given the unlithified, weak sediments generally present at the distal toes of convergent margin accretionary prisms. We present new seismic reflection images collected as part of a UK-US-Germany-Indonesia experiment aboard the R/V Sonne. The data were acquired using a 2.4 km streamer and 5500 cubic inch G-gun array imaging the outer region of the 2004 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area; these data show extremely thick (>5 km), accreting sedimentary strata within which lie discrete, coherent stratigraphic blocks along mostly landward-vergent thrusts. The décollement lies near the base of this incoming sediment section, likely composed primarily of Nicobar/Bengal Fan turbidites. Available scientific ocean drilling results confirm that these sediments are silt- and occasionally sand-rich. We suggest that advanced dewatering and lithification of these thick turbidites, which experienced substantial burial depths, have made them more competent than most trench-fill sediments elsewhere; this inherent <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the incoming section explains observed preservation of stratigraphic packages that are present up to at least 3 km shallower and 40 km landward of the deformation front. The combination of a deeply buried décollement and advanced lithification of the Trench sediments may allow seismogenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to continue up-dip as far as the Sunda Trench. Potential for extended updip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may similarly exist along other subduction margins whose trenches contain significant thickness of sand- and silt-rich sediment and a deeply buried plate boundary thrust.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22959496"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinical outcomes after repair of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: a systematic review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ciriello, Vincenzo; Gudipati, Suribabu; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Soucacos, P N; Giannoudis, Peter V</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>The existing evidence regarding the management of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> remains obscure. The aim of the current review is to investigate the characteristics, the different techniques employed and to analyse the clinical outcomes following surgical repair of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. An Internet based search of the English literature of the last 25 years was carried out. Case reports and non-clinical studies were excluded. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Coleman Methodology Score. All data regarding mechanism and site of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, type of treatment, time elapsed between diagnosis and repair, patients' satisfaction, clinical outcome, return to pre-injury activities, complications and recurrence rates were extracted and analysed. Out of 474 studies identified, 12 met the inclusion criteria. The average of Coleman Methodology Score was 50.46/100. In total 319 patients were analysed with a mean age of 57 years (16-85). The mean time of follow-up was 47.5 months (3 months to 24 years). The most common mechanism of injury was simple fall (61.5%). Spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were reported in 3.2% of cases. The most common sites of tear were noted between 1cm and 2 cm of the superior pole of the patella and, in the older people, at the osseotendinous junction. The most frequently used repair technique was patella drill holes (50% of patients). Simple sutures were used in mid-substance <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Several reinforcement techniques were employed in case of poor quality or retraction of the torn ends of tendon. The affected limb was immobilised in a cast for a period of 3-10 weeks. Quadriceps muscular atrophy and muscle <span class="hlt">strength</span> deficit were present in most of the cases. Worst results were noted in delayed repairs. Reported complications included heterotopic ossifications in 6.9% of patients, deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in 2.5%, superficial infection in 1.2% and deep infection in 1.1%. It appears that the type of surgical repair does not influence the clinical results. The majority of the studies reported good or excellent ROM and return to the pre-injury activities. The overall rate of re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 2%. PMID:22959496</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31698592"><span id="translatedtitle">A Comparative Study of Aortic Wall Stress Using Finite Element Analysis for <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> and Non-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. K Venkatasubramaniam; M. J Fagan; T Mehta; K. J Mylankal; B Ray; G Kuhan; I. C Chetter; P. T McCollum</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Background. The decision to repair an asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is currently based on diameter (?5.5 cm) alone. However, aneurysms less than 5.5 cm do <span class="hlt">rupture</span> while some reach greater than 5.5 cm without <span class="hlt">rupturing</span>. Hence the need to predict the risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on an individual patient basis is important. This study aims to calculate and compare wall</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0909.5287v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Spin Effects at COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>C. Schill</p> <p>2009-09-29</p> <p>The investigation of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum effects in deep inelastic scattering is one of the key physics programs of the COMPASS collaboration. In the years 2002-2004 COMPASS took data scattering 160 GeV muons on a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized 6LiD target. In 2007, a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized NH3 target was used. Three different channels to access the <span class="hlt">transversity</span> distribution function have been analyzed: The azimuthal distribution of single hadrons, involving the Collins fragmentation function, the azimuthal dependence of the plane containing hadron pairs, involving the two-hadron interference fragmentation function, and the measurement of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> polarization of lambda hyperons in the final state. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> quark momentum effects in a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized nucleon have been investigated by measuring the Sivers distribution function. Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering give important information on the inner structure of the nucleon as well, and can be used to estimate both the quark <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum in an unpolarized nucleon and to access the so-far unmeasured Boer-Mulders function. COMPASS has measured these asymmetries using spin-averaged 6LiD data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/w66312mw41g2411p.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The elliptic paraboloid failure surface for <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic materials off-axis loaded</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>P. S. Theocaris</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The elliptic paraboloid failure surface has been well established as a potential criterion for yielding and failure of <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic materials, presenting also the <span class="hlt">strength</span> differential effect [1]. This was done by extending well established criteria for isotropic materials presenting the <span class="hlt">strength</span> differential effect (SDE), through an introduction process which maintained basic physical principles for the anisotropic materials. All previous</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/289472"><span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> fatigue behavior of unidirectionally reinforced metal matrix composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>John, R.; Buchanan, D.J. [Univ. of Dayton Research Inst., Dayton, OH (United States). Structural Integrity Div.] [Univ. of Dayton Research Inst., Dayton, OH (United States). Structural Integrity Div.; Larsen, J.M. [Air Force Research Lab., Wright Patterson AFB, OH (United States). Materials and Mfg. Directorate] [Air Force Research Lab., Wright Patterson AFB, OH (United States). Materials and Mfg. Directorate</p> <p>1998-11-03</p> <p>Unidirectionally reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are targeted for use in many aerospace applications which require high specific <span class="hlt">strength</span> and stiffness at elevated temperatures. Such applications include blings and disks. The primary weakness of a component made of unidirectionally reinforced MMC is its susceptibility to <span class="hlt">transverse</span> loads. The <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the component in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction is significantly lower than that in the longitudinal direction under monotonic, sustained and fatigue loading conditions. Hence, replacement of monolithic components with MMC components requires that the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the MMC should be predicted accurately. This paper discusses the applicability of a net-section based model to predict the fatigue behavior of [909] MMC under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> loading.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6808592"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> resistive-wall instability of a bunched electron beam in a wiggler</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rangarajan, G.; Chan, K.C.D.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> motion of a beam traversing a narrow beam pipe is modified by resistive-wall effects. Depending on the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the focusing force from the alternating wiggler field, the effect ranges from a modification of the oscillation to a growth in <span class="hlt">transverse</span> displacement with the length of pipe. This <span class="hlt">transverse</span> effect saturates after a number of bunches have passed. The saturated <span class="hlt">transverse</span> effect depends only on the pipe radius b (it increases as 1/b/sup 2/), but is independent of the thickness /tau/ and conductivity sigma of the pipe. However, /tau/ and sigma affect the time needed to attain saturation. 5 refs., 2 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23118397"><span id="translatedtitle">Management of extensor mechanism <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after TKA.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rosenberg, A G</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Disruption of the extensor mechanism in total knee arthroplasty may occur by tubercle avulsion, patellar or quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, or patella fracture, and whether occurring intra-operatively or post-operatively can be difficult to manage and is associated with a significant rate of failure and associated complications. This surgery is frequently performed in compromised tissues, and repairs must frequently be protected with cerclage wiring and/or augmentation with local tendon (semi-tendinosis, gracilis) which may also be used to treat soft-tissue loss in the face of chronic disruption. Quadriceps <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be treated with conservative therapy if the patient retains active extension. Component loosening or loss of active extension of 20° or greater are clear indications for surgical treatment of patellar fracture. Acute patellar tendon disruption may be treated by primary repair. Chronic extensor failure is often complicated by tissue loss and retraction can be treated with medial gastrocnemius flaps, achilles tendon allografts, and complete extensor mechanism allografts. Attention to fixing the graft in full extension is mandatory to prevent severe extensor lag as the graft stretches out over time. PMID:23118397</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6188768"><span id="translatedtitle">TMI-2 lower head creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Thinnes, G.L.</p> <p>1988-08-01</p> <p>The TMI-2 accident resulted in approximately 40% of the reactor's core melting and collecting on the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel. The severity of the accident has raised questions about the margin of safety against <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the lower head in this accident since all evidence seems to indicate no major breach of the vessel occurred. Scoping heat transfer analyses of the relocated core debris and lower head have been made based upon assumed core melting scenarios and core material debris formations while in contact with the lower head. This report describes the structural finite element creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> analysis of the lower head using a temperature transient judged most likely to challenge the structural capacity of the vessel. This evaluation of vessel response to this transient has provided insight into the creep mechanisms of the vessel wall, a realistic mode of failure, and a means by which margin to failure can be evaluated once examination provides estimated maximum wall temperatures. Suggestions for more extensive research in this area are also provided. 6 refs., 15 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25279443"><span id="translatedtitle">False vs True <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cohain, J S</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>New medical nomenclature: False <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes or False ROM and Double <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes or Double ROM are being introduced into the English language. A single caregiver found about 1% of term births and 10% of term PROM involved False ROM, in which the chorion breaks while the amnion remains intact. Diagnostically, if meconium or vernix is observed, then both the chorionic and amniotic sacs have broken. In the absence of detection of vernix or meconium, an immediate accurate diagnostic test for False ROM is lacking and differentiating between True ROM from False ROM is possible only after leaking stops, which takes hours to days. The obvious benefit of differentiating between 'True' and 'False' ROM, is that in the case of False ROM, the amnion is intact and ascending infections are likely not at increased risk, although research is lacking as to whether False ROM is associated with an increased rate of ascending infection. Three cases of False ROM are presented and avenues for future research are enumerated. PMID:25279443</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4180267"><span id="translatedtitle">Poxvirus membrane biogenesis: <span class="hlt">rupture</span> not disruption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Locker, Jacomine Krijnse; Chlanda, Petr; Sachsenheimer, Timo; Brügger, Britta</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Summary Enveloped viruses acquire their membrane from the host by budding at, or wrapping by, cellular membranes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, however, suggested that the prototype member of the poxviridae, vaccinia virus (VACV), may create its membrane ‘de novo’ with free open ends exposed in the cytosol. Within the frame of the German-wide priority programme we re-addressed the biogenesis and origin of the VACV membrane using electron tomography (ET), cryo-EM and lipid analysis of purified VACV using mass spectrometry (MS). This review discussed how our data led to a model of unconventional membrane biogenesis involving membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the generation of a single open membrane from open membrane intermediates. Lipid analyses of purified virus by MS suggest an ER origin with a relatively low cholesterol content compared with whole cells, confirming published data. Unlike previous reports using thin-layer chromatography, no depletion of phosphatidylethanolamine was detected. We did detect, however, an enrichment for phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol in the virion. Our data are discussed in the light of other pathogens that may require cellular membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during their intracellular life cycle. PMID:23168015</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T33C2644F"><span id="translatedtitle">How is a stick slip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiated?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fukuyama, E.; Mizoguchi, K.; Yamashita, F.; Kawakata, H.; Takizawa, S.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>We investigated the initiation process of stick slip events that occurred during large scale rock friction experiments conducted on the large scale shaking table at NIED (Fukuyama et al., 2012, AGU Fall meeting). We used a pair of Indian gabbro rock samples stacked vertically and applied normal and shear forces. The sliding area between the samples is 1.5m in length and 0.1m in width. We conducted a sequence of experiments using the same rock sample, and before each experiment we removed gouge particles created during the previous experiment by a brush and a cleaner. Here, we show the experiments under constant slip velocity of 0.1mm/s with constant normal stress of 2.7MPa (LB04-003) or 6.7MPa (LB04-005); the final displacement reached 0.04m. We used 44 acoustic sensors (PZT, vertical mode, 0.5MHz resonance frequency), 32 2-comp strain gouges (SGs) for shear strain and 16 1-comp SGs for normal strain measurements, with 48 0.5MHz dynamic SG amplifiers. We also used a 2MN load cell for shear force measurement and three 0.4MN load cells for vertical forces. Data are recorded continuously at an interval of 10MHz for PZT and 1MHz for other sensors. Just after the shear force applied, many stick slip events (SEs) occurred at an interval of a few seconds. By looking carefully at the PZT and SG array data during an SE, we found that one SE consists of many micro stick slip events (MSEs), which can be grouped into two (the former and the latter). These two groups correspond to the acceleration and deceleration stage of the SE. In LB04-005 (6.7MPa normal stress), a clear nucleation phase can be detected that initiated at a narrow area, propagate slowly (~20m/s) and accelerated. Then, a seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> started to propagate at a velocity of ~3km/s (subshear) or ~6.5km/s (supershear). Detailed features are shown in Mizoguchi et al. (this meeting). It should be noted that this seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiated at a narrow area inside the nucleation zone and sometimes after a certain amount of time; it does not seem a smooth transition process from the acceleration to the seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as proposed in Ohnaka and Shen (1999, JGR). In contrast, under low normal stress case (LB04-003, 2.7MPa), there were no visible nucleation phases but a sequence of foreshocks was observed, which was not dominant in LB04-005. The foreshock slip area was typically around 10cm long. Again, we could not see any visible correlation between the location and preceding time of foreshocks and that of seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation. By looking at the fault surface topography that was recorded as photograph images before and after the experiment, in the nucleation zone, grooves are not developed, while outside the nucleation area, grooves are well developed. Grooves are caused by the creation of gouge particles during the sliding. It could be interesting to note that outside the groove, the sliding surface looks very smooth and shiny, indicating that this area was polished but did not create gouge particles. Therefore, we might speculate that this shiny fault area is responsible for the initiation phase and when the stress state becomes critical, seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> starts around one of the grooves. And in LB04-003, the shiny area might not support the shear stress so that the foreshock releases the strain around the grooves.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://web.gps.caltech.edu/~ampuero/docs/AmpBZ07.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Geophys. J. Int. (2007) 000, 000000 Cracks, pulses and macroscopic asymmetry of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on a</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Ampuero, Jean Paul</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>with a preferred propagation direction, that of slip of the more compliant material. Such <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have macroscopic, crack-like <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> show macroscopic asymmetry under restrictive conditions. The discussed mechanism ­ earthquake source mechanism ­ faulting ­ lateral heterogeneity ­ <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation 1 INTRODUCTION</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://rohan.sdsu.edu/~steveday/PUBLISHED/HarrisDay05GRL.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Material contrast does not predict earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation Ruth A. Harris</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Day, Steven M.</p> <p></p> <p>Material contrast does not predict earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation direction Ruth A. Harris U) earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation direction can be predicted from the material contrast, and 2) earthquake (2005), Material contrast does not predict earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation direction, Geophys. Res. Lett</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.appliedultrasonics.com/pdf/pdf12.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Improving Fatigue <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Welded Joints by Ultrasonic Impact Treatment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Sougata ROY</p> <p></p> <p>Summary Enhancement in fatigue performance of welded joints by Ultrasonic Impact Treatment (UIT) was evaluated with large-scale rolled beam and built-up specimens having yield <span class="hlt">strength</span> of 345 to 760 MPa. Eighteen rolled-beam specimens having welded details at cover plates and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> stiffeners and eight built-up specimens having only <span class="hlt">transverse</span> stiffener details were fatigue tested after treating the weld details by</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/hep-ph/9405400v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Energy Flow at HERA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>K. Golec-Biernat; J. Kwiecinski; A. D. Martin; P. J. Sutton</p> <p>1994-05-27</p> <p>We calculate the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy flow accompanying small $x$ deep-inelastic events and compare with recent data obtained at HERA. In the central region between the current jet and the remnants of the proton we find that BFKL leading $\\ln(1/x)$ dynamics gives a distinctively large <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy distribution, in approximate agreement with recent data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0804.2427v1"><span id="translatedtitle">General formulation of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> hydrodynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Radoslaw Ryblewski; Wojciech Florkowski</p> <p>2008-04-15</p> <p>General formulation of hydrodynamics describing <span class="hlt">transversally</span> thermalized matter created at the early stages of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Similarities and differences with the standard three-dimensionally thermalized relativistic hydrodynamics are discussed. The role of the conservation laws as well as the thermodynamic consistency of two-dimensional thermodynamic variables characterizing <span class="hlt">transversally</span> thermalized matter is emphasized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998GeoJI.132...14S"><span id="translatedtitle">RESEARCH PAPERS : Transition process from nucleation to high-speed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation: scaling from stick-slip experiments tonatural earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shibazaki, Bunichiro; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The process of earthquake generation is governed by a coupled non-linear system consisting of the equation of motion in elastodynamics and a fault constitutive relation. On the basis of the results of stick-slip experiments we constructed a theoretical source model with a slip-dependent constitutive law. Using the theoretical source model, we simulated the transition process numerically from quasi-static nucleation to high-speed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and succeeded in quantitatively explaining the three phases observed in stick-slip experiments, that is very slow (1 cm s-1 ) quasi-static nucleation preceding the onset of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, dynamic but slow (10 m s-1 ) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth without seismic-wave radiation, and subsequent high-speed (2 km s-1 ) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. Theoretical computation of far-field waveforms with this model shows that a slow initial phase preceding the main P phase expected from a classical source model is radiated in the accelerating stage from the slow dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth to the high-speed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. On the assumption that the physical law governing <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes in natural earthquakes is essentially the same as that in stick-slip events, we scaled the theoretical source model explaining the stick-slip experiments to the case of natural earthquakes so that the scaled source model explains the observed average stress drop, the critical nucleation-zone size, and the duration of the slow initial phase well. The physical parameters prescribing the source model are the weak-zone size L , the critical weakening displacement Dc , the breakdown <span class="hlt">strength</span> drop ?b , and the rigidity ? of the surrounding elastic medium. In scaling these parameters, we held a non-dimensional controlling parameter ?' = (?Dc )/(?b L ) in numerical simulation constant. From the results of scaling we found the following fundamental relations between the source parameters: (1) the critical weakening displacement Dc is in proportion to the weak-zone size L , but (2) the breakdown <span class="hlt">strength</span> drop ?b is independent of L .</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S33A2490S"><span id="translatedtitle">Interplay between seismic and aseismic slips within mega-earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Senatorski, P.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Scenarios of mega-earthquakes involve subsequent seismic events: foreshocks, single or multiple main shocks, and aftershocks. In the long-term scale, the largest events define seismic cycles or super cycles. Seismic events are separated by slow <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> that concentrate stresses at the strongest, locked fault patches, or asperities. A complex interplay between seismic and aseismic slips has been revealed both by computer simulations (e.g., Senatorski, 2002) and observations (e.g., Kato et al., 2012). The objective of the present work is to relate different distributions of plate coupling <span class="hlt">strengths</span> to earthquake sequence characteristics and earthquake statistics, focusing on the role played by slow slips during seismic cycles. It is shown that the <span class="hlt">strength</span> distributions are responsible for both the long-term shear stress along the plate interface and subsequent earthquake patterns. The results are discussed in the context of subduction zone physics and observations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=DOE-PATENT-XML&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/863664"><span id="translatedtitle">High <span class="hlt">strength</span> nickel-chromium-iron austenitic alloy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Gibson, Robert C. (Ringwood, NJ); Korenko, Michael K. (Richland, WA)</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>A solid solution strengthened Ni-Cr-Fe alloy capable of retaining its <span class="hlt">strength</span> at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 42 to 48% nickel, 11 to 13% chromium, 2.6 to 3.4% niobium, 0.2 to 1.2% silicon, 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium, 2.6 to 3.4% molybdenum, 0.1 to 0.3% aluminum, 0.1 to 0.3% titanium, 0.02 to 0.05% carbon, 0.002 to 0.015% boron, up to 0.06 zirconium, and the balance iron. After solution annealing at 1038.degree. C. for one hour, the alloy, when heated to a temperature of 650.degree. C., has a 2% yield <span class="hlt">strength</span> of 307 MPa, an ultimate tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of 513 MPa and a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of as high as 400 MPa after 100 hours.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2967677"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultrasound Diagnosis of Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> After Statin Use</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nesselroade, Ryan D.; Nickels, Leslie Connor</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare injury. We report the case of bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> sustained with minimal force while refereeing a football game. The injury was suspected to be associated with statin use as the patient had no other identifiable risk factors. The diagnosis was confirmed using bedside ultrasound. PMID:21079697</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26023494"><span id="translatedtitle">An epigastric heteropagus twin with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> giant omphalocele.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dar, Sajid Hameed; Liaqat, Naeem; Iqbal, Javaid; Latif, Tariq; Iqbal, Asif</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We present a case of heteropagus twins attached to the epigastric region. The neonate also had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> giant omphalocoele with most of gut and liver lying outside the abdominal cavity. Patient had uneventful surgery for separation of twins and repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> omphalocoele. PMID:26023494</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4420321"><span id="translatedtitle">An Epigastric Heteropagus Twin with <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Giant Omphalocele</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dar, Sajid Hameed; Iqbal, Javaid; Latif, Tariq; Iqbal, Asif</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We present a case of heteropagus twins attached to the epigastric region. The neonate also had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> giant omphalocoele with most of gut and liver lying outside the abdominal cavity. Patient had uneventful surgery for separation of twins and repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> omphalocoele. PMID:26023494</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2670885"><span id="translatedtitle">Pictorial essay. Roentgenologic appearance of traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Horvath, M; Verschakelen, J; Ponette, E; Baert, A L</p> <p>1989-04-01</p> <p>The difficulties in recognizing a diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are well known and mostly due to a lack of typical clinical findings and an aspecific chest X-ray. This paper gives a brief review of the radiological techniques which can be helpful in the early diagnosis of traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm. PMID:2670885</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/w585748305725427.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral synchronous quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: a case report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Varatharaj Mounasamy; Robert C. Chadderdon; Candice McDaniel; Mark C. Willis</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Bilateral spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of quadriceps tendons is rare and is usually associated with predisposing comorbid conditions.\\u000a We report an uncommon case of bilateral synchronous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon after a ground level fall in a 51-year-old\\u000a male, 8 years after renal transplant.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30505369"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon after arthroscopic lateral meniscectomy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Renato Viola; Nicola Marzano; Roberto Vianello</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>We report a case of complete quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that occured a few days after arthroscopic lateral meniscectomy. Complications following arthroscopy are rare; there have been many reports of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the literature, but none by this kind of mechanism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30500642"><span id="translatedtitle">Achilles allograft reconstruction of a chronic patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>PD McNally; EA Marcelli</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Chronic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the patellar tendon are uncommon injuries. They are technically difficult to repair because of scar formation, poor quality of the remaining tendon, and quadriceps muscle atrophy and contracture. We report the reconstruction of a chronic patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with an interesting complication, a tibial stress fracture. The reconstruction was performed 3 months after the injury using an</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59275619"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> while playing basketball</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M Shah; N Jooma</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49692160"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a uremic patient</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Yu-Cheng Pei; Po-Ching Hsieh; Li-Zen Huang; Cheng-Kuen Chiang</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Quadriceps is a part of extensor mechanism, and it is a strong muscle bundle for knee joint movement. It rarely <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in the general population. We present a case with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and discuss the causes. A 45-year-old man had a history of end stage renal disease and received regular hemodialysis treatment for more than 12 years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30510857"><span id="translatedtitle">Repair of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> using suture anchors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>David P. Richards; F. Alan Barber</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> quadriceps tendon is commonly performed by weaving sutures through the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon and then attaching the tendon to the bone by passing these sutures through tunnels in the superior patella. This technical note is the first report we are aware of in the English language literature of a technique that uses suture anchors to attach the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2299153"><span id="translatedtitle">Dorsal dislocation of the lunate with multiple extensor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schwartz, M G; Green, S M; Coville, F A</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>An old dorsal lunate dislocation with associated multiple extensor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> is described. Treatment consisted of proximal row carpectomy and transfer of the extensor indicis proprius to the distal stumps of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> extensor tendons to the long, ring, and small fingers. PMID:2299153</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23627342"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous posterior capsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with lens dislocation in pseudoexfoliation syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Takkar, Brijesh; Mahajan, Deepankur; Azad, Shorya; Sharma, Yog; Azad, Rajvardhan</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Spontaneous posterior capsule <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a very rare entity and its association with lens-nucleus dislocation even more. Herein we report such a case of spontaneous posterior capsule <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with lens dislocation in a case of Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome. PMID:23627342</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2490-6-22.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> renal artery aneurysm during pregnancy, a clinical dilemma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Khaled B Soliman; Yaser Shawky; Mohamed M Abbas; Mohamed Ammary; Allaa Shaaban</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>BACKGROUND: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a renal artery aneurysm (RAA) during pregnancy is a rare event, with a high mortality rate for both mother and fetus. Increased blood flow and intra-abdominal pressure, and vascular changes secondary to increased steroid production are postulated as contributory to the increased risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy. CASE PRESENTATION: We present here a case report of total</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52223894"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Dynamics With Energy Loss Outside the Slip Zone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>D. J. Andrews</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone contributes to fracture energy. Because the thickness of the damage zone increases with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation distance, fracture energy increases with earthquake size. A <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front propagating near its limiting velocity has a stress concentration with large shear components at orientations different from that of the slip zone. These components can</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/ag8p5j9ajdgwc0xj.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Emergent endovascular treatment of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>K. Sugiu; K. Tokunaga; K. Watanabe; W. Sasahara; S. Ono; T. Tamiya; I. Date</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of endovascular and surgical treatments for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs) to determine which treatment is preferable. We evaluated the cases of 25 consecutive patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> VADAs treated in our institution. From 1992 to 1997, five patients were treated surgically. Since 1998, 20 patients with VADAs have been</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/x308190202366250.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomechanics of Plaque <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Progress, Problems, and New Frontiers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Peter D. Richardson</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has become identified as a critical step in the evolution of arterial plaques, especially as clinically significant events occur in critical arteries. It has become common in the past dozen years or so to consider which plaques are vulnerable, even though not yet <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. Thrombotic events have remained significant, but in a context where they are seen as</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/reports/reprints/Parsons_GRL39.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Paleoseismic interevent times interpreted for an unsegmented earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forecast</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Paleoseismic interevent times interpreted for an unsegmented earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forecast Tom] Forecasters want to consider an increasingly rich variety of earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Past occurrence is captured. This has not been a problem before, because forecasts have assumed that faults are segmented</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32875810"><span id="translatedtitle">Monochorionic Twins with <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Vasa Previa: Double Trouble!</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>D. Papathanasiou; R. Witlox; D. Oepkes; F. J. Walther; K. W. M. Bloemenkamp; E. Lopriore</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Velamentous cord insertion and vasa previa occur more frequently in monochorionic twin pregnancies than in singleton pregnancies. Both have been linked with poor perinatal outcome due to the increased risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the velamentous vessels. We present a case of acute fetal distress in 2 fetuses in a monochorionic twin pregnancy caused by <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vasa previa that was not</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1009.0819v2"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Spin Physics at COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Christian Schill; for the COMPASS collaboration</p> <p>2010-09-08</p> <p>The investigation of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum effects in deep inelastic scattering is one of the key physics programs of the COMPASS collaboration. Three channels have been analyzed at COMPASS to access the <span class="hlt">transversity</span> distribution function: The azimuthal distribution of single hadrons, involving the Collins fragmentation function, the azimuthal dependence of the plane containing hadron pairs, involving the two-hadron interference fragmentation function, and the measurement of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> polarization of Lambda hyperons in the final state. Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering give important information on the inner structure of the nucleon as well, and can be used to estimate both the quark <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum k_T in an unpolarized nucleon and to access the so-far unmeasured Boer-Mulders function. COMPASS has measured these asymmetries using spin-averaged 6LiD data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S23D..02S"><span id="translatedtitle">Relaxing Segmentation: Does It Improve Characterization of Fault <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Behavior?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schwartz, D. P.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Most faults have not <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> once historically, let alone repeatedly. Estimating future <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length of an earthquake source has been a challenge since the 1970s when concepts of full and half fault lengths were employed. In the 1980s paleoseismic event timing and observations of slip, coupled with geometric and other physical fault changes, led to concepts of fault segmentation and it's modeling for hazard. The Uniform California Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Forecast 3 (UCERF 3, Field et al., 2014) relaxed segmentation, guided by rules in which a separation distance of ?5km and orientation to Coulomb stress changes at fault junctions are prime factors for allowing fault-to-fault jumps. A set of ~350 fault sections produced ~250K <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> ranging in length from 15 km-1200 km. An inversion provided the rates of these, which range from 102-108 years. Many of the long <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have exceedingly low individual rates within the UCERF 3 geologic model but are sufficient in number to release cumulative moment that brings the long-term (Myr) and historical (since 1850) MFDs for the California region into close agreement. Does UCERF 3 have too many multi-fault <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>? Since 1850 there have been ~260 surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> worldwide in shallow continental crust. 77% are 0-49km; 6% exceed 150km, and the longest is 1906 San Francisco (435-470 km). In California since 1857 there have been 31 surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. 77% are shorter than 49 km. The longest are 1906, 1857 Fort Tejon (297km), and 1872 Owens Valley (108 km). Most long historical strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are continuous and geomorphically well-defined traces with limited geometric changes. In contrast, UCERF3 modeling of the south Hayward, as an example, allows it to participate in <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> that extend to the south ends of the San Andreas or San Jacinto faults (900 km). These include branching (Hayward-Calaveras, San Andreas-San Jacinto) and jumps (Calaveras-San Andreas) on creeping sections of these faults. 5km is the connectivity threshold in UCERF 3 but only 40% of historical <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have negotiated this distance. There are other controls of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation: frictional properties, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics, creep, and, as shown by the 2002 Denali-Totschunda <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the timing of the prior event and level of stress accumulation on adjacent fault sections. Time will be the tester.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.msm.cam.ac.uk/phase-trans/2007/model_Masuyama_2007.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CREEP <span class="hlt">STRENGTH</span> OF HIGH CR FERRITIC STEELS DESIGNED USING NEURAL NETWORKS AND PHASE STABILITY CALCULATIONS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Cambridge, University of</p> <p></p> <p>CREEP <span class="hlt">STRENGTH</span> OF HIGH CR FERRITIC STEELS DESIGNED USING NEURAL NETWORKS AND PHASE STABILITY in the creep resistance of 9- 12%Cr steels used for boiler header/piping and steam turbine rotor applications, and their creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties and microstructures were investigated for comparison with the predicted results</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.msm.cam.ac.uk/phase-trans/2002/ananth/creep_trends.ps"><span id="translatedtitle">Components of the Creep <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Welds M. Murugananth and H.K.D.H. Bhadeshia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Cambridge, University of</p> <p></p> <p>the precise role of each chemical and microstructural component in determining the ultimate creep properties major contributions to the long#21;term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Introduction Ferritic steels are used;cient, but are expensive. The main design requirement is that the fer- ritic steel should resist creep</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870004080&hterms=heat+affected+zone&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2522heat%2B%252B%2Baffected%2B%252B%2Bzone%2522"><span id="translatedtitle">The effect of electron beam welding on the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of a Nb-Zr-C alloy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Moore, T. J.; Titran, R. H.; Grobstein, T. L.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests of electron beam welded PWC-11 sheet were conducted at 1350 K. Full penetration, single pass welds were oriented <span class="hlt">transverse</span> to the testing direction in 1 mm thick sheet. With this orientation, stress was imposed equally on the base metal, weld metal, and heat-affected zone. Tests were conducted in both the postweld annealed and aged conditions. Unwelded specimens with similar heat treatments were tested for comparative purposes. It was found that the weld region is stronger than the base metal for both the annealed and aged conditions and that the PWC-11 material is stronger in the annealed condition than in the aged condition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/654186"><span id="translatedtitle">Stainless steels with improved <span class="hlt">strength</span> for service at 760 C and above</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Swindeman, R.W.</p> <p>1998-03-01</p> <p>An evaluation was undertaken of modified 25Cr-20Ni stainless steels and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel for advanced energy applications at 760 C (1,400 F) and higher. It was found that good fabricability, <span class="hlt">strength</span>, and ductility could be produced in the modified steels. Stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data to beyond 10,000 h showed that the <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of the modified steels were more than double that for type 310H stainless steel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26599774"><span id="translatedtitle">High temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> and inelastic behavior of plate–fin structures for HTGR</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>F. Kawashima; T. Igari; Y. Miyoshi; Y. Kamito; M. Tanihira</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, both high temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> and inelastic behavior of plate–fin structures were discussed for applying these structures to the compact heat exchangers such as recuperative and intermediate heat exchangers for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). Firstly tensile, creep and fatigue tests of the brazed plate–fin model of small size were carried out to obtain the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> and inelastic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15698332"><span id="translatedtitle">Multifractal scaling of thermally activated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sornette, D; Ouillon, G</p> <p>2005-01-28</p> <p>We propose a "multifractal stress activation" model combining thermally activated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and long memory stress relaxation, which predicts that seismic decay rates after mainshocks follow the Omori law approximately 1/t(p) with exponents p linearly increasing with the magnitude M(L) of the mainshock. We carefully test this prediction on earthquake sequences in the Southern California earthquake catalog: we find power law relaxations of seismic sequences triggered by mainshocks with exponents p increasing with the mainshock magnitude by approximately 0.1-0.15 for each magnitude unit increase, from p(M(L) = 3) approximately 0.6 to p(M(L) = 7) approximately 1.1, in good agreement with the prediction of the multifractal model. PMID:15698332</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23696292"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Rathke cleft cyst mimicking pituitary apoplexy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Neidert, Marian Christoph; Woernle, Christoph Michael; Leske, Henning; Möller-Goede, Diane; Pangalu, Athina; Schmid, Christoph; Bernays, René-Ludwig</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Rathke cleft cysts (RCCs) are benign cystic lesions of the sellar and suprasellar region that are asymptomatic in most cases. Occasionally, compression of the optic pathway and hypothalamo-pituitary structures may cause clinical symptoms, such as headaches, visual deficits and endocrinopathies. Acute presentation caused by hemorrhage into an RCC have been described in the literature, and the term "Rathke cleft cyst apoplexy" has been coined. We present the case of a 32-year-old man with acute onset of meningitis-type symptoms and imaging findings resembling hemorrhagic pituitary tumor apoplexy. In retrospect, clinical symptoms, intraoperative appearance, and histologic examination were compatible with the diagnosis of nonhemorrhagic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an RCC. Thus, the clinical presentation of "Rathke cleft cyst apoplexy" is not necessarily caused by hemorrhage. PMID:23696292</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0902.0519v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Spin Effects at COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>H. Wollny</p> <p>2009-02-03</p> <p>Single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized nucleon targets have been under intense experimental investigation over the past few years. They provide new insights into QCD and the nucleon structure. For instance, they allow the determination of the third yet-unknown leading-twist quark distribution function $\\Delta_{T}q(x)$, the <span class="hlt">transversity</span> distribution. Additionally, they give insight into the parton <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum distribution and angular momentum. The measurement of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin effects in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering is an important part of the COMPASS physics program. In the years 2002-2004 data were collected scattering a 160 GeV muon beam on a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized deuteron target. In 2007, additional data were collected on a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized proton target. New results from the analysis of the proton data will be presented. A different but not less important insight into the nucleon structure might be given by the Sivers asymmetry. This angular dependence of the cross-section arises from an intrinsic asymmetry in the parton <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum distribution. The Sivers function is tightly related to the total angular momentum carried by the quarks in the nucleon. New COMPASS results for the Sivers asymmetry of the proton will be shown.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790022184&hterms=nickel+alloys&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DTitle%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dnickel%2Balloys"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> and longitudinal tensile properties at 760 C of several oxide dispersion strenghened nickel-base alloys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Anglin, A. E., Jr.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> and longitudinal tensile properties of the oxide dispersion strengthened nickel base alloys MA-793, MA-754, MA-755E, and MA-6000E were determined at 760 C. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> tensile <span class="hlt">strengths</span> were comparable to longitudinal <span class="hlt">strengths</span>. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> ductility levels generally were less than two percent elongation. Both tensile and yield <span class="hlt">strengths</span> increased with increasing strain rate over the range 0.001 to 0.05 per second. Ductility was not strain rate sensitive, but related to grain size and grain aspect ratio. The fracture mode of most alloys changed from transgranular for longitudinally oriented specimens to intergranular for <span class="hlt">transverse</span> specimens. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> properties of DM MAR M-200 + Hf were also determined for comparison.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70011287"><span id="translatedtitle">Triggered reverse fault and earthquake due to crustal unloading, northwest <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Ranges, California.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Yerkes, R.F.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Tinsley, J.C.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>A reverse-right-oblique surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, associated with a ML 2.5 earthquake, formed in a diatomite quarry near Lompoc, California, in the northwesternmost <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Ranges on April 7, 1981. The 575-m-long narrow zone of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> formed in clay interbeds in diatomite and diatomaceous shale of the Neogene Monterey Formation. The <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> parallel bedding, dip 39o-59oS, and trend about N84oE on the north limb of an open symmetrical syncline. Maximum net slip was 25 cm; maximum reverse dip slip was 23 cm, maximum right-lateral strike slip was about 9 cm, and average net slip was about 12 cm. The seismic moment of the earthquake is estimated at 1 to 2 X 1018 dyne/cm and the static stress drop at about 3 bar. The removal of an average of about 44 m of diatomite resulted in an average load reduction of about 5 bar, which decreased the normal stress by about 3.5 bar and increased the shear stress on the tilted bedding plane by about 2 bar. The April 7, 1981, event was a very shallow bedding-plane <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, apparently triggered by crustal unloading. -Authors</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12392137"><span id="translatedtitle">Fragmentation of <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized quarks probed in <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum distributions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>John Collins</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>It is shown that the azimuthal dependence of the distribution of hadrons in a quark jet is a probe of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin of the quark initiating the jet. This results in a new spin-dependent fragmentation function that acts at the twist-2 level. One example of a process where it contributes is semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering with a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0902.0266v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> spin effects in COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>A. Bressan; for the COMPASS experiment</p> <p>2009-02-02</p> <p>In the years 2002-2004 COMPASS has collected data with the LiD target polarization oriented <span class="hlt">transversely</span> with respect to the muon beam direction for about 20% of the running time, to measure <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin effects in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, one of the main objectives of the COMPASS spin program. In 2007, COMPASS has used for the first time a proton NH_3 target with the data taking time equally shared between longitudinal and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> polarization of the target. After reviewing the results obtained with the deuteron, the new results for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries of the proton will be presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S23D..04L"><span id="translatedtitle">The Nucleation and Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Laboratory Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Latour, S.; Schubnel, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Madariaga, R. I.; Ampuero, J. P.; Vinciguerra, S.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We present the results of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments intended to mimic seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of faults.The experimental device consists of a plate of polycarbonate in which a fault is cut at a critical angle, such that it produces stick-slip when it is submitted to uniaxal stress loading. The <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are visualized by photo-elasticity recorded with a high velocity camera. The radiated wavefield is studied with a network of acoustic sensors. In a first part, we study the slow initiation of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We show that this stage actually consists of two phases, a long exponential growth followed by a catastrophic acceleration. The critical length and critical <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of the transition scale depend inversely on the normal stress; while the characteristic time is independent of the normal stress. We discuss these results with respect to recent observations of earthquake nucleation in natural faults. In a second part, we will show that this experiment can be used to study the effect of barriers on a fault, as well as the effect on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation of a kink on a fault. We provide detailed observation of the wavefield radiated by the barrier, and compare it to the wavefield radiated by a kink. We compare the observations with theoretical results for the radiation of a barrier in a 2D in-plane geometry, and with 2D numerical simulations of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics by the spectral element method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6261G"><span id="translatedtitle">Interaction of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with small-scale heterogeneities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Galis, Martin; Mai, P. Martin</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Broadband ground motion simulations, with frequencies up to 10Hz, are important for engineering purposes, in particular for seismic hazard assessment for critical facilities. One problem in such simulations is the generation of high frequency radiation emitted during the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. Ad-hoc kinematic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characterizations can be tweaked through empirical models to radiate over the desired frequency range, but their physical consistency remains questionable. In contrast, for physically self-consistent dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling, controlled by friction, material parameters and the adopted physical laws, the mechanism that may lead to appropriate high-frequency radiation require heterogeneity in friction, stress, or fault geometry (or even all three quantities) at unknown but small length scales. Dunham at al. (2011) studied dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on rough faults in 2D, and described how fault roughness excites high-frequency radiation. In our study, we focus on the interaction of the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with small-scale heterogeneities on planar faults in 3D. We study effects of the interaction of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with 1) small-scale heterogeneities in the medium (that is, randomized 3D wave speed and density variations), and 2) small-scale heterogeneities in the frictional parameters. Our numerical results show significant variations in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity or peak slip velocity if small-scale heterogeneities are present. This indicates that the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is sensitive to both types of spatial inhomogeneity. At the same time we observe that the resulting near-source seismic wave fields are not very sensitive to these <span class="hlt">rupture</span> variations, indicating that wavefront healing effects may "simplify" the complex seismic radiation once the waves propagated several wave-lengths away from the fault.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6129871"><span id="translatedtitle">Gluon propagator and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> vertices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhang, R.B.</p> <p>1985-03-15</p> <p>It is shown explicitly that in the axial gauge the Slavnov-Taylor identity contains no useful information for determining the gluon propagator through the Dyson-Schwinger equation; rather, it is the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> vertex which plays the crucial role.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18253586"><span id="translatedtitle">Commutateur a effet pockels <span class="hlt">transversal</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>J. Gouzerh; G. Hepner</p> <p>1970-01-01</p> <p>We show that it is advantageous to use <span class="hlt">transversal</span> Pockels effect in the light commutators working with finite apertures. The natural birefringence is compensated for, whatever the angle of incidence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21130725"><span id="translatedtitle">A novel indirect tensile test method to measure the biaxial tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of concretes and other quasibrittle materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zi, Goangseup [Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea, University, 5 Ga 1, An-Am Dong, Sung-Buk Gu, Seoul, 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: g-zi@korea.ac.kr; Oh, Hongseob [Department of Civil Engineering, Jinju National University, 150 Chilam Dong, Jinju, Kyongnam, 660-758 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun-Kyu [Department of Civil Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Cheoncheon Dong, Jangan Gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)</p> <p>2008-06-15</p> <p>A novel indirect tensile test method, the biaxial flexure test (BFT) method, has been developed to measure the biaxial tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of concretes. The classical modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (MOR) test has been generalized to three dimensions. In this method, we use a circular plate as the new test specimen. This plate is supported by an annular ring. We apply an external load to this specimen through a circular edge. The centers of the specimen, the loading device and the support are identical. The biaxial tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> measured by this new method is about 19% greater than the uniaxial tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> obtained from the classical modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test as reported by other researchers. However, at the same time, we also found that the stochastic deviation of the biaxial tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> is about 63% greater than the uniaxial <span class="hlt">strength</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9452378"><span id="translatedtitle">Frictional melting during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the 1994 bolivian earthquake</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kanamori; Anderson; Heaton</p> <p>1998-02-01</p> <p>The source parameters of the 1994 Bolivian earthquake (magnitude Mw = 8.3) suggest that the maximum seismic efficiency eta was 0.036 and the minimum frictional stress was 550 bars. Thus, the source process was dissipative, which is consistent with the observed slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, only 20% of the local S-wave velocity. The amount of nonradiated energy produced during the Bolivian <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was comparable to, or larger than, the thermal energy of the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption and was sufficient to have melted a layer as thick as 31 centimeters. Once <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was initiated, melting could occur, which reduces friction and promotes fault slip. PMID:9452378</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24856574"><span id="translatedtitle">Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with primary CMV infection, AMSAN, and IVIG.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Havenon, Adam; Davis, Gary; Hoesch, Robert</p> <p>2014-07-15</p> <p>Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare complication of primary cytomegalovirus infection, but has not been reported after administration of intravenous immunoglobulin or in the setting of the Guillain-Barré syndrome and its many variants, which often lead to treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. There is strong evidence that intravenous immunoglobulin causes sequestration of erythrocytes in the spleen and extravascular hemolytic anemia. This may result in a two-hit scenario that clinicians should be aware of, where a patient who is at risk for splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to primary cytomegalovirus infection receives intravenous immunoglobulin as treatment for the cytomegalovirus-associated Guillain-Barré syndrome, further increasing their risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:24856574</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3702928"><span id="translatedtitle">Prophylactic decompression of extensor pollicis longus to prevent <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Navaratnam, A V; Ball, S; Eckersley, R</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>We present a case of a patient with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of right extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon, who had also developed left wrist pain and weakness in his left EPL that MRI studies confirmed to be caused by tendinosis. Subsequently, decompression of left EPL and reconstruction of right EPL with palmaris longus tendon graft was undertaken. In this case, decompression of the left EPL tendon led to resolution of the patient's symptoms as well as preventing tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We advocate the use of ultrasound imaging to evaluate EPL in these cases and prophylactic decompression of EPL tendon to avoid <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in those patients found to have tendinosis. PMID:23780776</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22034601"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> OSCILLATIONS IN CHROMOSPHERIC MOTTLES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Dorrian, G. D., E-mail: dkuridze01@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Observatory of Athens, Lofos Nymfon, Thiseio, P.O. Box 20048, GR-11810 Athens (Greece)</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>A number of recent investigations have revealed that <span class="hlt">transverse</span> waves are ubiquitous in the solar chromosphere. The vast majority of these have been reported in limb spicules and active region fibrils. We investigate long-lived, quiet-Sun, on-disk features such as chromospheric mottles (jet-like features located at the boundaries of supergranular cells) and their <span class="hlt">transverse</span> motions. The observations were obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope. The data set is comprised of simultaneous imaging in the H{alpha} core, Ca II K, and G band of an on-disk quiet-Sun region. Time-distance techniques are used to study the characteristics of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations. We detect over 40 <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations in both bright and dark mottles, with periods ranging from 70 to 280 s, with the most frequent occurrence at {approx}165 s. The velocity amplitudes and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> displacements exhibit characteristics similar to limb spicules. Neighboring mottles oscillating in-phase are also observed. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations of individual mottles are interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Their estimated periods and damping times are consistent with phase mixing and resonant mode conversion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvC..84d5205M"><span id="translatedtitle">Realizing vector meson dominance with <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge densities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Miller, G. A.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density in a fast-moving nucleon is represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the Dirac form factor in the timelike region (spectral function). At a given <span class="hlt">transverse</span> distance b the integration effectively extends over energies in a range t?1/b, with exponential suppression of larger values. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density at peripheral distances thus acts as a low-pass filter for the spectral function and allows one to select energy regions dominated by specific t-channel states, corresponding to definite exchange mechanisms in the spacelike form factor. We show that distances b˜0.5-1.5fm in the isovector density are maximally sensitive to the ? meson region, with only a ˜10% contribution from higher-mass states. Soft-pion exchange governed by chiral dynamics becomes relevant only at larger distances. In the isoscalar density higher-mass states beyond the ? are comparatively more important. The dispersion approach suggests that the positive <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density in the neutron at b˜1fm, found previously in a Fourier analysis of spacelike form factor data, could serve as a sensitive test of the the isoscalar <span class="hlt">strength</span> in the ˜1GeV mass region. In terms of partonic structure, the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> densities in the vector meson region b˜1fm support an approximate mean-field picture of the motion of valence quarks in the nucleon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S51B2375M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Synchronicity in Complex Fault Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Milner, K. R.; Jordan, T. H.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>While most investigators would agree that the timing of large earthquakes within a fault system depends on stress-mediated interactions among its elements, much of the debate relevant to time-dependent forecasting has been centered on single-fault concepts, such as characteristic earthquake behavior. We propose to broaden this discussion by quantifying the multi-fault concept of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> synchronicity. We consider a finite set of small, fault-spanning volumes {Vk} within a fault system of arbitrary (fractal) complexity. We let Ck be the catalog of length tmax comprising Nk discrete times {ti(k)} that mark when the kth volume participates in a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of magnitude > M. The main object of our analysis is the complete set of event time differences {?ij(kk') = ti(k) - tj(k')}, which we take to be a random process with an expected density function ?kk'(t). When k = k', we call this function the auto-catalog density function (ACDF); when k ? k', we call it the cross-catalog density function (CCDF). The roles of the ACDF and CCDF in synchronicity theory are similar to those of autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions in time-series analysis. For a renewal process, the ACDF can be written in terms of convolutions of the interevent-time distribution, and many of its properties (e.g., large-t asymptote) can be derived analytically. The interesting information in the CCDF, like that in the ACDF, is concentrated near t = 0. If two catalogs are completely asynchronous, the CCDF collapses to an asymptote given by the harmonic mean of the ACDF asymptotes. Synchronicity can therefore be characterized by the variability of the CCDF about this asymptote. The brevity of instrumental catalogs makes the identification of synchronicity at large M difficult, but we will illustrate potentially interesting behaviors through the analysis of a million-year California catalog generated by the earthquake simulator, RSQSim (Deiterich & Richards-Dinger, 2010), which we sampled at a dozen fault-spanning volumes. At the magnitude threshold M = 7, the ACDF can be well fit by renewal models with fairly small aperiodicity parameters (? < 0.2) for all fault volumes but one (on the San Jacinto fault). At interseismic (Reid) time scales, we observe pairs of fault segments that are tightly locked, such as the Cholame and Carrizo sections of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), where the CCDF and two ACDFs are nearly equal; segments out of phase (Carrizo-SAF/Coachella-SAF and Coachella-SAF/San Jacinto), where the CCDF variation is an odd function of time; and segments where events are in phase with integer ratios of recurrence times (2:1 synchronicity of Coachella-SAF/Mojave-SAF and Carrizo-SAF/Mojave-SAF). At near-seismic (Omori) time scales, we observe various modes of clustering, triggering, and shadowing in RSQSim catalogs; e.g., events on Mojave-SAF trigger Garlock events, and events on Coachella-SAF shut down events on San Jacinto. Therefore, despite its geometrical complexity and multiplicity of time scales, the RSQSim model of the San Andreas fault system exhibits a variety of synchronous behaviors that increase the predictability of large <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> within the system. A key question for earthquake forecasting is whether the real San Andreas system is equally, or much less, synchronous.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70016332"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process of a multiple main shock sequence: analysis of teleseismic, local and field observations of the Tennant Creek, Australia, earthquakes of January 22, 1988</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Choy, G.L.; Bowman, J.R.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>On January 22, 1988, three large intraplate earthquakes (with MS 6.3, 6.4 and 6.7) occurred within a 12-hour period near Tennant Creek, Australia. Broadband displacement and velocity records of body waves from teleseismically recorded data are analyzed to determine source mechanisms, depths, and complexity of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of each of the three main shocks. Hypocenters of an additional 150 foreshocks and aftershocks constrained by local arrival time data and field observations of surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are used to complement the source characteristics of the main shocks. The interpretation of the combined data sets suggests that the overall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process involved unusually complicated stress release. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> characteristics suggest that substantial slow slip occurred on each of the three fault interfaces that was not accompanied by major energy release. Variation of focal depth and the strong increase of moment and radiated energy with each main shock imply that lateral variations of <span class="hlt">strength</span> were more important than vertical gradients of shear stress in controlling the progression of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. -from Authors</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29515033"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiple tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in systemic lupus erythematosus: case report and review of the literature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>I Potasman; H M Bassan</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare complication that appears to occur in patients receiving corticosteroid therapy. A case is presented with sequential bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of Achilles tendon and unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a patellar tendon. Six more published cases are reviewed. Tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in SLE has affected both males and females between the ages of 24 and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~kbolsen/PUBL_dir/2012GL053005.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Small intermediate fault segments can either aid or hinder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation at stepovers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Olsen, Kim Bak</p> <p></p> <p>Small intermediate fault segments can either aid or hinder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation at stepovers Julian complexities along faults are known to be likely endpoints for coseismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as sug- gested by analysis of historic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and corroborated by models of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on bent or discontinuous faults. However, natural</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60334882"><span id="translatedtitle">Analyses and correlations of HAPO <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experience with natural uranium material</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>R. R. Bloomstrand; W. I. Neef</p> <p>1958-01-01</p> <p>One of the major factors restricting reactor power levels is the incidence of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> slugs. The primary purpose in studying <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> is to determine how reactor operating variables affect <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rates. With this knowledge reactor operating conditions may be adjusted or controlled in the manner that will optimize reactor production. In addition, knowledge of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate relationships are useful in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26060612"><span id="translatedtitle">Acute Patellar Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rhee, Seung Joon; Pham, The Hien; Suh, Jeung Tak</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a catastrophic complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Though revision TKA has been suspected of being a predisposing factor for the occurrence of patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, there are few reports on patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after revision TKA. Here, we present a case of acute patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that occurred after TKA revision. In the patient, the patellar tendon was so thin and could not be repaired, and accordingly was sutured end to end. We used the anterior tibialis tendon allograft to augment the poor quality patellar tendon tissue. Fixation of the allograft was done by using the bone tunnel created through tibial tuberosity and suturing the allograft to the patellar tendon and quadriceps tendon. The patient was instructed to wear a full extension knee splint and was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after operation. Full knee extension could be achieved 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26060612</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18345441"><span id="translatedtitle">Early surgery for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysms: technical note.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sillero, Rafael de Oliveira; Sillero Filho, Valter José; Freire, Sylvio de Barros; Sillero, Valter José</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>We describe a collection of techniques to be considered in the early clipping of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysms located in the anterior circulation when dealing with the swollen red and scaring brain many times found after craniotomy. PMID:18345441</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4304499"><span id="translatedtitle">Delayed presentation of traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with complicated cholecystitis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chun, Jae Min</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The right-sided diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is often clinically occulted due to buffering effects of the liver and thus, erroneous diagnosis of such <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may result in life-threatening conditions. A 44-year-old female who had a history of car accident in 2006 was admitted to our hospital for pleuritic pain. On the chest computed tomography, she was diagnosed with diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> accompanied by herniation of hypertrophic left liver with complicated cholecystitis and we carried out cholecystectomy, reduction of the liver, pleural drainage, and primary closure of the diaphragm via thoracic approaches. Our case is presented in three unique aspects: herniation of left hemiliver, hypertrophic liver herniated up to the 4th rib level, and combination of complicated cholecystitis. Although the diagnosis of right-sided diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be challenging for the surgeon, an early diagnosis can prevent further complications on the clinical presentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/59743"><span id="translatedtitle">Controls on earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and triggering mechanisms in subduction zones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Llenos, Andrea Lesley</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Large earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and triggering mechanisms that drive seismicity in subduction zones are investigated in this thesis using a combination of earthquake observations, statistical and physical modeling. A comparison ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4458483"><span id="translatedtitle">Acute Patellar Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rhee, Seung Joon; Pham, The Hien</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a catastrophic complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Though revision TKA has been suspected of being a predisposing factor for the occurrence of patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, there are few reports on patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after revision TKA. Here, we present a case of acute patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that occurred after TKA revision. In the patient, the patellar tendon was so thin and could not be repaired, and accordingly was sutured end to end. We used the anterior tibialis tendon allograft to augment the poor quality patellar tendon tissue. Fixation of the allograft was done by using the bone tunnel created through tibial tuberosity and suturing the allograft to the patellar tendon and quadriceps tendon. The patient was instructed to wear a full extension knee splint and was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after operation. Full knee extension could be achieved 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26060612</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4320801"><span id="translatedtitle">Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a Mesodiverticular Band to a Meckel's Diverticulum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sommerhalder, Christian; Fretwell, Kenneth R.; Salzler, Gregory G.; Creasy, John M.; Robitsek, R. Jonathan; Schubl, Sebastian D.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band has not previously been reported in the clinical literature. We are reporting a case of hemoperitoneum in a 51-year-old male after an aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band. This case demonstrates that in rare instances, a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the mesodiverticular band leading to Meckel's diverticulum can lead to significant hemoperitoneum. This is usually caused by a traumatic injury but in our case was apparently caused by an aneurysm of the mesodiverticular artery. Patients with known Meckel's diverticula should be aware of the possibility of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as should clinicians treating those with a history of this usually benign congenital abnormality. Rapid surgical intervention is necessary to repair the source of bleeding, as massive blood loss was encountered in this case. PMID:25688323</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22668529"><span id="translatedtitle">Delayed and occult splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: a diagnostic puzzle.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Poiasina, E; Battaglia, L; Leo, E; Muscarà, C; Rampa, M; Vannelli, A</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a common complaint encountered in emergency surgery. Trauma is the most common cause of splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, while non-traumatic or occult splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (OSR) is a rare condition. The differential diagnosis weighs on treatment that ranges between close monitoring, splenorrhaphy, splenic conservation and splenectomy. We report a case of an 63-year-old man presenting with acute atraumatic left upper quadrant pain. Preliminary diagnosis was subsequently determined to be a hematoma secondary to OSR. More accurate detailed history revealed a previous trauma, which occurred more than one year before and mimicked an OSR. Delayed and occult splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are as different diagnosis as different treatment. Even in emergency surgery, the key for a target therapeutic strategy should consider an accurate diagnostic time. PMID:22668529</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25688323"><span id="translatedtitle">Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a Mesodiverticular Band to a Meckel's Diverticulum.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sommerhalder, Christian; Fretwell, Kenneth R; Salzler, Gregory G; Creasy, John M; Robitsek, R Jonathan; Schubl, Sebastian D</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band has not previously been reported in the clinical literature. We are reporting a case of hemoperitoneum in a 51-year-old male after an aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band. This case demonstrates that in rare instances, a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the mesodiverticular band leading to Meckel's diverticulum can lead to significant hemoperitoneum. This is usually caused by a traumatic injury but in our case was apparently caused by an aneurysm of the mesodiverticular artery. Patients with known Meckel's diverticula should be aware of the possibility of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as should clinicians treating those with a history of this usually benign congenital abnormality. Rapid surgical intervention is necessary to repair the source of bleeding, as massive blood loss was encountered in this case. PMID:25688323</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4236745"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between High-frequency Radiation and Asperity <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span>, Revealed by Hybrid Back-projection with a Non-planar Fault Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Hirano, Shiro</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>High-frequency seismic waves are generated by abrupt changes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and slip-rate during an earthquake. Therefore, analysis of high-frequency waves is crucial to understanding the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. Here, we developed a hybrid back-projection method that considers variations in focal mechanisms by introducing a non-planar fault model that reflects the subducting slab geometry. We applied it to teleseismic P-waveforms of the Mw 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake to estimate the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.5–2.0?Hz) radiation. By comparing the result with the coseismic slip distribution obtained by waveform inversion, we found that strong high-frequency radiation can precede and may trigger a large asperity <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Moreover, in between the large slip events, high-frequency radiation of intermediate <span class="hlt">strength</span> was concentrated along the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front. This distribution suggests that by bridging the two large slips, this intermediate-<span class="hlt">strength</span> high-frequency radiation might play a key role in the interaction of the large slip events. PMID:25406638</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1119802"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Model and Service Envelope for PBX 9501</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stevens, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)</p> <p>2014-02-05</p> <p>An analytical method is proposed for making an assessment of the severity of the response of PBX 9501 in structural response simulations. The approach is based on the coherent use of a <span class="hlt">strength</span> model and a failure criterion. The <span class="hlt">strength</span> model is based on a creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> function and an associated cumulative damage model. The material's residual <span class="hlt">strength</span> at any time during a simulation of structural response is determined by taking into account both the actual stress history up to that time, and a hypothetical continuation of the applied stresses that are assumed to grow until material failure results. The residual <span class="hlt">strength</span> is used by the failure criterion to define the region of safe (non-failed) material response. The Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion is chosen for its general applicability to materials with both cohesive and frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span>. The combined use of the residual <span class="hlt">strength</span> model and the failure criterion provides a quantitative method of assessing the severity of the response of PBX 9501 material in structural simulations: the proximity of any evolving, general state of stress to the failure surface (which shrinks due to the cumulative damage caused by the past stress history) can be calculated and used as a measure of margin to failure. The <span class="hlt">strength</span> model has been calibrated to a broad range of uniaxial tension and compression tests, and a small set of creep tests, and is applicable to a broad range of loading conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/c167202v38488351.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Esophageal <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>: triage using the systemic inflammatory response syndrome score</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Kouichi Furugaki; Junichi Yoshida; Koji Hokazono; Takuya Emoto; Jo Nakashima; Mayumi Ohyama; Toshiyuki Ishimitsu; Masahiro Shinohara; Kenichi Matsuo</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Esophageal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare entity. Delay in the diagnosis and treatment may threaten the patient’s life. The decision for\\u000a surgical or nonsurgical treatment, however, remains controversial because advocates of both treatments have reported comparable\\u000a results. To quantify the decision making, we suggest the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) score for triage of\\u000a an esophageal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Using this criterion for</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6548382"><span id="translatedtitle">Acute traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: early stent-graft repair</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. Lachat; T. Pfammatter; H. Witzke; E. Bernard; U. Wolfensberger; A. Künzli; M. Turina</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Objective: Prospective evaluation of early stent-graft repair of acute traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Methods: Twelve patients with acute traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the descending aorta, out of a series of 337 endovascular aortic procedures, were treated by implantation of self-expanding stent-grafts. The procedures were performed within a mean post-injury time-period of 5±7 days (median: 1 day). The feasibility of stent-grafting was</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31443453"><span id="translatedtitle">Tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from blunt thoracic trauma in children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M Ait Ali Slimane; F Becmeur; D Aubert; B Bachy; F Varlet; Y Chavrier; S Daoud; B Fremond; J. M Guys; P de Lagausie; Y Aigrain; O Reinberg; P Sauvage</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Background\\/Purpose: Tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in blunt thoracic trauma in children are rare. The aim of this study was to suggest the means of an early diagnosis and a conservative management as often as possible.Methods: Sixteen cases of tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> by blunt thoracic trauma were observed over 26 years in 9 regional pediatric centers.Results: There were 12 boys and 4 girls, from</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40031702"><span id="translatedtitle">Aqueous solvents for extracting glanded cottonseed protein without gland <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>L. L. Muller; T. J. Jacks; T. P. Hensarling</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The presence of pigment glands has thwarted attempts to extract edible cottonseed protein aqueously from glanded seeds or\\u000a gland-rich meals, probably because of the widely held belief that glands <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on contact with aqueous media. We found several\\u000a aqueous salt solutions in which glands did not <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Glands remained intact in saturated (2m) sodium sulfate, but not in saturated 2m</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoJI.188.1141B"><span id="translatedtitle">Tracking unilateral earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by P-wave polarization analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bayer, B.; Kind, R.; Hoffmann, M.; Yuan, X.; Meier, T.</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>Rapid estimation of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation is essential to declare an early warning for tsunami-generating earthquakes. An increasing number of seismological methods have been developed to determine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> parameters, such as length, velocity and propagation direction, especially since the occurrence of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake that resulted in a devastating tsunami in the Indian Ocean region. Here, we present a new method to follow the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in near real time by a polarization analysis of local and regional P phases that permits a faster determination of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties than using teleseismic records. The new technique has the capability to provide detailed information in less than 10 min. Originally, the method stems from a single-station earthquake location method and is expanded here to monitor P-phase polarization variations through time. As the earthquake source moves away from the hypocentre, the backazimuth of an incoming P phase is expected to change accordingly. With polarization analysis we may be able to monitor the temporal change in P-wave backazimuth to follow the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in near real time. Three component P phases are scanned to determine the azimuthal variation as a function of time. The backazimuth of a moving <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front is determined by the first eigenvector of the covariance matrix. The linearity of the particle motion is used as a measure of the quality of the data. Seismic stations at local and regional distances (?) are used. We tested the new method with a theoretical simulation and observed seismograms of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (2004 December 26, Mw= 9.3), and we were able to follow the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> for the first 200 s. For larger <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, stations at more than 30° epicentral distances would be required. The method is also successfully applied to the Wenchuan earthquake (2008 May 12, Mw= 8.0).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26015380"><span id="translatedtitle">[Analysis of <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> during Follow-up of Unruptured Aneurysm].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Koyama, Shinya; Inoue, Mizuho; Uchida, Hiroki; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Saito, Atsushi; Kon, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p><i>Object</i>:To elucidate clinical aspects of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms, we retrospectively investigated associations between risk factors and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and unruptured cases during conservative management. <i>Methods</i>:Two hundred and twenty-nine patients with 291 unruptured cerebral aneurysms treated between 2000 and 2012 were analyzed. Mean duration of observation was 62 months(1183.4 person-years). We investigated the following six risk factors: history of subarachnoid hemorrhage;multiplicity;location of aneurysms;aneurysm size ?5mm;bleb or irregular forms;and follow-up period <1 year. <i>Results</i>:Twenty-two aneurysms in 22 patients(19 women;86.4%)<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> during this study. The annual rate of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 1.86%. In <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cases, mean age was 66.7 years. According to univariate analysis, aneurysm size?5mm(<i>p</i>=0.000), bleb or irregular form(<i>p</i>=0.006)and duration of observation<1 year(<i>p</i>=0.000)were significantly associated with aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In multivariate analysis of these factors, aneurysm size?5mm(<i>p</i>=0.0188;odds ratio(OR), 3.4;95% confidence interval(CI), 1.2-9.7)and duration of observation<1 year(<i>p</i>=0.006;OR, 5.0;95% CI, 1.6-14.9)represented independent risk factors for aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. <i>Conclusions</i>:The results of this study were almost the same as those of the UCAS Japan study. In addition, duration of observation <1 year was a risk factor for aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. When we decide on surgical treatment after considering factors such as aneurysm size, form, and surgical risk, surgery should be performed as soon as possible. PMID:26015380</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21766204"><span id="translatedtitle">[Ligament <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the lower extremity in the elderly].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Herbort, M; Raschke, M J</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>There is an increasing incidence of ligament <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the lower extremities in older patients. This higher incidence is caused by the typical current demographic changes in the population and the higher level of activity and athletic motivation of the older people in our society. In this review we address the most important ligament <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the lower extremity in the old patient. Quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are mostly the result of degenerative and abrasion changes. The ACL <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the other hand occurs spontaneously after adequate trauma and without former degenerative changes especially in highly active patients. For a differentiated treatment of the older patient with tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, secondary diseases, an increased risk and complication profile and a potentially decreased compliance during rehabilitation must be taken into consideration before indicating operative or conservative therapy. There are no strict age-related limitations for indication of an operative treatment of tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in the older patient. In this patient group a differentiated treatment decision is recommended. PMID:21766204</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005APS..MARW37001M"><span id="translatedtitle">Volume Fraction Dependence of Droplet <span class="hlt">Rupturing</span> in Concentrated Nanoemulsions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Meleson, K.</p> <p>2005-03-01</p> <p>We investigate droplet <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> by extreme shear in concentrated silicone oil-in-water nanoemulsions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant. According to Taylor's prediction for dilute emulsions, the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> droplet radius, a, varies inversely with the viscosity of the continuous phase. If one assumes that the emulsion's effective viscosity controls the average radius of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> droplets, then emulsions that have larger droplet volume fractions, ?s would be <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> by the same shear flow to smaller radii. In stark contrast to this, we find that the average droplet radius actually rises with as ? approaches the quiescent maximally random jammed value of 0.64. This is evidence that both droplet <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> and coalescence occur when concentrated emulsions are subjected to extreme shear. We have also observed phase inversion to an oil-continuous emulsion for ? > 0.64. This supports the idea that coalescence occurs as the driving shear breaks thin films between the concentrated oil droplets at high ?. In addition, we find that the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> droplet size is relatively insensitive to large changes in the oil viscosity inside the droplets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6394169"><span id="translatedtitle">Short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predictions for Tantalum alloy T-3</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stephens, J.J.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>A knowledge of the short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG's) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTG's near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (<span class="hlt">rupture</span> times up to {approximately}2 {times} 10{sup 3} hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of approximately 100 hrs. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5814124"><span id="translatedtitle">Short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predictions for tantalum alloy T-111</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stephens, J.J. (Division 1832 Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5800 (US))</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>A knowledge of the short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (<span class="hlt">rupture</span> times up to {similar to}2{times}10{sup 3} hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of approximately 100 hrs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1409.3028v1"><span id="translatedtitle">Missing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy significance at CMS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Nathan Mirman; Yimin Wang; James Alexander</p> <p>2014-09-10</p> <p>Missing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy significance may be used to help distinguish real missing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy due to undetected particles from spurious missing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy due to resolution smearing. We present a description of the missing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy significance variable, and assess its performance in Z$\\rightarrow\\mu\\mu$, dijet, and W$\\rightarrow e\</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48048399"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon with contralateral patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: an unusual case and a review of the literature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. Jalgaonkar; A. Rafee; O. Haddo; S. Sarkar</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of quadriceps tendon with contralateral patellar tendon is very rare. There are only two case reports\\u000a in English literature. We report the case of a healthy 41-year-old female with simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of her left quadriceps\\u000a tendon and right patellar tendon. There were no known precipitating factors for this injury. Surgical repair and early rehabilitation\\u000a achieved satisfactory outcome.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40448876"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanism of the October 1, 1995 ( M w=6.2) Dinar earthquake, SW Turkey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>H. Koral</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>A moderate earthquake (Mw=6.2) caused substantial damage in the town of Dinar at 17:57 UT, on October 1, 1995. Surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been observed to be discontinuous for 10km along the NW-trending Dinar fault segments. The surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has consisted of nearly vertical cracks up to several tens of meters long and a meter wide that display linear, sigmoidal and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1023157"><span id="translatedtitle">Pseudoscalar Meson Electroproduction and <span class="hlt">Transversity</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gary Goldstein, Simonetta Liuti</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>Exclusive meson leptoproduction from nucleons in the deeply virtual exchanged boson limit can be described by generalized parton distributions (GPDs). Including spin dependence in the description requires 8 independent quark-parton and gluon-parton functions. The chiral even subset of 4 quark-nucleon GPDs are related to nucleon form factors and to parton distribution functions. The chiral odd set of 4 quark-nucleon GPDs are related to <span class="hlt">transversity</span>, the tensor charge, and other quantities related to <span class="hlt">transversity</span>. Different meson or photon production processes access different combinations of GPDs. This is analyzed in terms of t-channel exchange quantum numbers, JPC and it is shown that pseudoscalar production can isolate chiral odd GPDs. There is a sensitive dependence in various cross sections and asymmetries on the tensor charge of the nucleon and other <span class="hlt">transversity</span> parameters. In a second section, analyticity and completeness are shown to limit the partonic interpret ation of the GPDs in the ERBL region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2900591"><span id="translatedtitle">Carotid Atheroma <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Observed In Vivo and FSI-Predicted Stress Distribution Based on Pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> Imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Soares, Bruno; Wintermark, Max; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Saloner, David</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Atherosclerosis at the carotid bifurcation is a major risk factor for stroke. As mechanical forces may impact lesion stability, finite element studies have been conducted on models of diseased vessels to elucidate the effects of lesion characteristics on the stresses within plaque materials. It is hoped that patient-specific biomechanical analyses may serve clinically to assess the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> potential for any particular lesion, allowing better stratification of patients into the most appropriate treatments. Due to a sparsity of in vivo plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data, the relationship between various mechanical descriptors such as stresses or strains and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vulnerability is incompletely known, and the patient-specific utility of biomechanical analyses is unclear. In this article, we present a comparison between carotid atheroma <span class="hlt">rupture</span> observed in vivo and the plaque stress distribution from fluid–structure interaction analysis based on pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> medical imaging. The effects of image resolution are explored and the calculated stress fields are shown to vary by as much as 50% with sub-pixel geometric uncertainty. Within these bounds, we find a region of pronounced elevation in stress within the fibrous plaque layer of the lesion with a location and extent corresponding to that of the observed site of plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:20232151</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860015344&hterms=murakami&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmurakami"><span id="translatedtitle">Anisotropy of high temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> in precipitation-hardened nickel-base superalloy single crystals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Nakagawa, Y. G.; Terashima, H.; Yoshizawa, H.; Ohta, Y.; Murakami, K.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The anisotropy of high temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> of nickel-base superalloy, Alloy 454, in service for advanced jet engine turbine blades and vanes, was investigated. Crystallographic orientation dependence of tensile yield <span class="hlt">strength</span>, creep and creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> was found to be marked at about 760C. In comparison with other single crystal data, a larger allowance in high <span class="hlt">strength</span> off-axial orientation from the 001 axis, and relatively poor <span class="hlt">strength</span> at near the -111 axis were noted. From transmission electron microscopy the anisotropic characteristics of this alloy were explained in terms of available slip systems and stacking geometries of gamma-prime precipitate cuboids which are well hardened by a large tantalum content. 100 cube slip was considered to be primarily responsible for the poor <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the -111 axis orientation replacing the conventional 111 plane slip systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991MiJo...34..284F"><span id="translatedtitle">The ACT programmable <span class="hlt">transversal</span> filter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fleisch, Daniel A.; Pieters, Glenn C.</p> <p>1991-05-01</p> <p>The use of an acoustic charge transfer (ACT) programmable <span class="hlt">transversal</span> filter (PTF) as a wideband analog filter with a user-programmable amplitude and phase response is considered. The fundamentals of the ACT technology making it possible to implement a wideband tapped delay line with programmable tap weights are described, and it is shown how the ACT tapped delay line can be used to implement a complete <span class="hlt">transversal</span> filter through the addition of on-chip tap-weighting and memory circuits. Some of the applications that may utilize this approach, including receiver IF filtering, interference cancellation, and signal generation are reviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990JGR....95.6867C"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process of a multiple main shock sequence: Analysis of teleseismic, local, and field observations of the Tennant Creek, Australia, earthquakes of January 22, 1988</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Choy, George L.; Bowman, J. Roger</p> <p>1990-05-01</p> <p>On January 22, 1988, three large intraplate earthquakes (with MS 6.3, 6.4, and 6.7) occurred within a 12-hour period near Tennant Creek, Australia. These earthquakes, which occurred over a small interval of time and within a small volume of space, present a unique opportunity to study the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the class of intraplate earthquakes that occur as multiple main shocks. Broadband displacement and velocity records of body waves from teleseismically recorded data are analyzed to determine source mechanisms, depths, and complexity of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of each of the three main shocks. Hypocenters of an additional 150 foreshocks and aftershocks constrained by local arrival time data and field observations of surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are used to complement the source characteristics of the main shocks in order to derive as complete a description of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process as possible. The interpretation of the combined data sets suggests that the overall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process involved unusually complicated stress release. As locations of the main shock hypocenters progressively moved from west to east, we infer that the first and third main shocks, denoted as MS1 and MS3, produced the southeast-northwest trending scarps observed at the western end (the Kunayungku fault) and at the eastern end (the east end of the Lake Surprise fault), respectively, of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone. The epicenter of the only immediate foreshock was located in the gap between these two fault scarps. MS1 nucleated near this epicenter and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> upward and to the northwest from a depth of 6.5 km. MS3 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> predominantly to the SE at a depth of 4.5 km. The second main shock, MS2, is inferred to have produced the deformation of the southwest trending central scarp segment (the western end of the Lake Surprise fault). From the sense of thrusting seen at the surface and from the distribution of aftershock hypocenters, the south dipping nodal planes derived from waveform modeling are identified as the fault planes for earthquakes MS1 and MS3. In contrast, the dip of the central fault scarp is reversed relative to the dips of the western and eastern fault scarps. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process Of MS2 turns out to be commensurately complex and sufficiently explains the geological complexity. MS2 consisted of three subevents. The southeast dipping nodal plane of the first two subevents is coplanar with a southeast dipping plane implied by locations of aftershocks which did not break the surface. Choice of the north dipping plane as the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane of the third subevent, consistent with the surface deformation and coplanar with a second plane delineated by aftershocks, would imply conjugate faulting. The majority of the aftershocks are concentrated near the edges of the fault planes, and there is an absence of activity in the center of the planes. The areas of absent activity may represent the failed asperities of the main shocks in which substantial stress relief occurred. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of each main shock is characterized by the rapid release of energy followed by a much slower release of moment and by aftershock zones whose dimensions exceed the inferred dimensions of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These characteristics suggest that substantial slow slip occurred on each of the three fault interfaces that was not accompanied by major energy release. The first main shock nucleated at the deepest part of its aftershock zone and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> upward. In contrast, MS2 and MS3 nucleated at depths that were one third to one half of the maximum depth of their aftershock zones. This variation of focal depth and the strong increase of moment and radiated energy with each main shock imply that lateral variations of <span class="hlt">strength</span> were more important than vertical gradients of shear stress in controlling the progression of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12183909"><span id="translatedtitle">[Effect of fillers on the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of silicone systems].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Snejdrová, E; Zelenka, J; Rehula, M</p> <p>2002-07-01</p> <p>The present paper examines the <span class="hlt">strength</span> behaviour of addition silicone systems composed of Lukopren A 6200 and three inorganic fillers (Skron SF 600, Cab-O-Sil LM 150, sodium chloride) in different concentrations and particle sizes. The tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> sigma (MPa) and the relative lengthening of samples on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> epsilon (%) were measured. With increasing concentration of the filler in the system relative lengthening of matrices is decreased. This trend corresponds with the theoretical hypotheses and it is understandable also with regard to the fact that the filler, in comparison with silicone rubber, possesses very low ductility. An addition of Sikron increases tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of samples. Dependence of tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> on the amount of Sikron in the system is linear. This behaviour is typical of fibrous composites and the composites with high adhesion between the filler and matrix. Concentrations of Cab-O-Sil up to 5% did not exert an effect on tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>. An important increase in <span class="hlt">strength</span> was shown only by the systems containing 10% of Cab-O-Sil. Experimental dependence of tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> on the amount of Cab-O-Sil in the system can be described by the equation for composites with Hookean behaviour till destruction. The effect of sodium chloride on tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> is more complicated. In the systems with NaCl particles of 20 microns, <span class="hlt">strength</span> is not practically changed up to a content of 40% of NaCl in the system. In larger size fractions, tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> is decreased, and with a change in particle size, shape is probably changed as well. PMID:12183909</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8880628"><span id="translatedtitle">Antepartum surveillance in preterm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vintzileos, A M</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this presentation is to describe noninvasive techniques of antepartum fetal assessment which allow the differentiation of fetuses who will benefit from remaining in-utero versus those who are at risk for intraamniotic infection and will benefit from your prompt delivery. The literature is reviewed in regard to the fetal biophysical profile, the effect of premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes (PROM), the usefulness of individual biophysical component in predicting intraamniotic infection (amniotic fluid volume, non-stress testing), the use of the fetal biophysical profile in improving pregnancy outcome, the relationships among umbilical artery velocimetry, fetal biophysical profile and intraamniotic infection and the mechanisms by which infection diminishes fetal biophysical activities in PROM. After reviewing our own as well as the published experience with the use of fetal biophysical assessment in patients with PROM, the following conclusions are suggested: a) most studies have shown strong correlation between abnormal biophysical assessment and infection outcome (maternal and/or neonatal infection) as well as intraamniotic infection, if there is frequent (i.e. daily) testing; and b) fetal biophysical tests (profiles, NSTs, amniotic fluid volume determinations) are quite reliable in predicting the well fetus who can safely remain in-utero and also the fetus who is at high risk for developing neonatal sepsis. A protocol for management of preterm PROM will be outlined based upon frequent (daily) fetal biophysical assessment. Although there are no controlled randomized trials to support that pregnancy outcome is improved by the use of frequent biophysical assessment, non-randomized studies as well as studies with historic controls suggest that the use of frequent biophysical assessment is beneficial in managing patients with PROM. PMID:8880628</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840020892&hterms=Richard+Unger&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DRichard%2BW.%2BUnger"><span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of candidate Stirling engine iron supperalloys in high-pressure hydrogen. Volume 2: Hydrogen creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.; Hales, C.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of nine iron base and one cobalt base candidate Stirling engine alloys is evaluated. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% strain data are analyzed. The 3500 h <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life stress and stress to obtain 1% strain in 3500 h are also estimated.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12797420"><span id="translatedtitle">The effect of fiber reinforcement type and water storage on <span class="hlt">strength</span> properties of a provisional fixed partial denture resin.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Uzun, Gülay; Keyf, Filiz</p> <p>2003-04-01</p> <p>Fracture resistance of provisional restorations is an important clinical concern. This property is directly related to <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Strengthening of provisional fixed partial dentures may result from reinforcement with various fiber types. This study evaluated the effect of fiber type and water storage on the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of a commercially available provisional resin under two different conditions. The denture resin was reinforced with either glass or aramid fiber or no reinforcement was used. Uniform samples were made from a commercially available autopolymerizing provisional fixed partial denture resin. Sixteen bar-shaped specimens (60 x 10 x 4 mm) were reinforced with pre-treated epoxy resin-coated glass fibers, with aramid fibers, or with no fibers. Eight specimens of each group, with and without fibers, were tested after 24 h of fabrication (immediate group), and after 30-day water storage. A three-point loading test was used to measure the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>, the maximal deflection, and the modulus of elasticity. The Kruskal-Wallis Analysis of Variance was used to examine differences among the three groups, and then the Mann-Whitney U Test and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test were applied to determine pair-wise differences. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> and the maximal deflection values in the immediate group and in the 30-day water storage group were not statistically significant. In the group tested immediately, the elasticity modulus was found to be significant (P = 0.042). In the 30-day water storage group, all the values were statistically insignificant. The highest <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> was displayed by the glass-reinforced resin (66.25MPa) in the immediate group. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> value was 62.04MPa for the unreinforced samples in the immediate group. All the specimens exhibited lower <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> with an increase in water immersion time. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> value was 61.13 MPa for the glass-reinforced resin and was 61.24 MPa for the unreinforced resin. The aramid-reinforced resin decreased from 62.29 to 58.77 MPa. The addition of fiber reinforcement enhanced the physical properties (the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>, the maximal deflection, the modulus of elasticity) of the processed material over that seen with no addition of fiber. Water storage did not statistically affect the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the provisional denture resin compared to that of the unreinforced resin. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> was lowered at water storage but it was not statistically significant. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> was enhanced by fiber addition compared to the unreinforced resin. The glass fiber was superior to the other fiber. Also the modulus of elasticity was enhanced by fiber addition compared to the unreinforced resin. PMID:12797420</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3021316"><span id="translatedtitle">Hemodynamic-Morphologic Discriminants for Intracranial Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xiang, Jianping; Natarajan, Sabareesh K.; Tremmel, Markus; Ma, Ding; Mocco, J; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Meng, Hui</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background and Purpose To identify significant morphologic and hemodynamic parameters that discriminate intracranial aneurysm (IA) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status using 3D angiography and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Methods 119 IAs (38 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, 81 unruptured) were analyzed from 3D angiographic images and CFD. Six morphologic and seven hemodynamic parameters were evaluated for significance with respect to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis identified area under the curve (AUC) and optimal thresholds separating <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> from unruptured aneurysms for each parameter. Significant parameters were examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis in 3 predictive models—morphology only, hemodynamics only, and combined—to identify independent discriminants, and the AUC-ROC of the predicted probability of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status was compared among these models. Results Morphologic parameters (Size Ratio [SR], Undulation Index, Ellipticity Index, and Nonsphericity Index) and hemodynamic parameters (Average Wall Shear Stress [WSS], Maximum intra-aneurysmal WSS, Low WSS Area, Average Oscillatory Shear Index [OSI], Number of Vortices, and Relative Resident Time) achieved statistical significance (p<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated SR to be the only independently significant factor in the morphology model (AUC=0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75–0.91), whereas WSS and OSI were the only independently significant variables in the hemodynamics model (AUC=0.85, 95% CI 0.78–0.93). The combined model retained all three variables, SR, WSS, and OSI (AUC=0.89, 95% CI 0.82–0.96). Conclusion All three models—morphological (based on SR), hemodynamic (based on WSS and OSI), and combined—discriminate IA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status with high AUC values. Hemodynamics is as important as morphology in discriminating aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status. PMID:21106956</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090034483&hterms=Mechanics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DMechanics"><span id="translatedtitle">Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Lifting Philosophy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle s Kevlar-49 (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed nonconservative life predictions have been made where stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23 percent lower than what had previously been used to predict stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070022369&hterms=Mechanics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DMechanics"><span id="translatedtitle">Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Lifing Philosophy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, Leigh</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle's Kevlar-49 fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed non-conservative life predictions have been made where stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic-plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23% lower than what had previously been used to predict stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26600386"><span id="translatedtitle">Corium crust <span class="hlt">strength</span> measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>S. Lomperski; M. T. Farmer</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Corium <span class="hlt">strength</span> is of interest in the context of a severe reactor accident in which molten core material melts through the reactor vessel and collects on the containment basemat. Some accident management strategies involve pouring water over the melt to solidify it and halt corium\\/concrete interactions. The effectiveness of this method could be influenced by the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the corium</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.2593O"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental investigations on the brittleness and slowness of shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation in porous saturated rocks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Zhu, Wenlu</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Pore fluid pressure and shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are long known to be interwoven: an increase in pore fluid pressure can unclamp a fault by reducing the effective normal stress and thus cause the fault to slip at lower shear stress. This mechanism is well illustrated by induced seismicity near fluid injection. More recently, several lines of evidence suggest that pore fluid pressure play a significant role in slow slip phenomena, which include non-volcanic tremors, low to very low frequency earthquakes, episodic tremor and slip. However, the differences in seismic signals between the induced but regular seismicity and the slow slips indicate different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes which question our understanding of the source processes. In this study, we designed loading configurations and conducted triaxial deformation experiments to investigate how the reduction of effective normal stress affects slip instability and fracture propagation. Water saturated porous sedimentary rocks were deformed at constant strain rates and under fully drained conditions. Using the existing theoretical framework (bifurcation model, slip weakening model), we provide quantitative measure of the differences between slow and regular slip behaviors. In the brittle faulting regime, generally considered to allow the dynamic propagation of a shear fracture which produces regular earthquakes, excess pore pressure does not induce any change in slip behavior but enhanced seismic slip by lowering the shear <span class="hlt">strength</span> which can explain the increased seismicity associated with elevated pore pressure near reservoirs. In the transitional regime where aseismic creep takes place instead, failure process should lead to a diffused, velocity strengthening aseismic fault. However, in these conditions, excess pore pressure enables slip to occur with quantifiable differences from that in brittle regime, showing a slower slip rate and smaller stress drop. A decrease of normal stress only produces similar <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characteristics than observed in the brittle faulting regime. Microstructural observations highlight that increasing pore pressure allows overcoming the dilatancy strengthening. Moreover, our data show that if a rock already <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in a slow manner in the brittle regime, increasing pore pressure allows sustaining a more brittle slip behavior. Further observations even suggest that there may exist a continuous spectrum of slip rate and energy budget between ordinary earthquake (rapid slip) and slow slip phenomena.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.T41E..05O"><span id="translatedtitle">Coupling, fluids and foreshocks - preparing megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> at the Chilean plate boundary</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oncken, O.; Moreno, M.; Schurr, B.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Recent studies have suggested that geodetic locking at convergent plate boundaries is closely related to slip distribution of subsequent megathrust earthquakes. The nature of locking and its evolution towards <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, however, remains a matter of debate. The international initiative IPOC (Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile; ipoc-network.org) addresses these goals at the Chilean margin. We explore geophysical and geodetic data collected in the decade before an event to identify the petrophysical state as well as change along the plate interface leading up to a megathrust event. Seismological data exhibit well defined changes of reflectivity and Vp/Vs ratio along the plate interface that released the M=8.8Maule earthquake of 2010. High Vp/Vs domains, interpreted as zones of elevated pore fluid pressure, spatially correlate with lower locking degree, and exhibit higher background seismicity as expected for partly creeping domains. In turn, unstable slip associated to a higher degree of locking is promoted in lower pore fluid pressure domains. We speculate that hydraulic loading during the terminal stage of a seismic cycle to close to lithostatic pore pressure with an equivalent reduction of effective <span class="hlt">strength</span> may be as relevant for earthquake triggering as stress loading from long-term plate convergence. In contrast to the Maule earthquake, the Pisagua Mw=8.1 earthquake of 2014, while also <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> a geodetically well-defined major asperity, was preceded by a protracted series of foreshocks. Since July 2013 three seismic clusters hit this part of the plate boundary with increasing magnitudes in a domain that was transitional between a fully locked and a creeping portion. Leading up to this earthquake the b-value of the foreshocks gradually dropped during the years prior to the earthquake, reversing its trend a few days before the Pisagua earthquake. We conclude that gradual weakening of the central part of the Northern Chile seismic gap accentuated by the foreshock activity in a zone of intermediate seismic coupling was instrumental in causing final failure. In spite of similar geodynamic conditions, processes leading up to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> were distinct for the Pisagua and the Maule earthquake suggesting a diversity of evolutionary paths towards megathrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/nucl-th/9906055v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Energy Production at RHIC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Qun Li; Yang Pang; Nu Xu</p> <p>1999-06-18</p> <p>We study the mechanism of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy (E_T) production in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The time evolution starting from the initial energy loss to the final E_T production is closely examined in transport models. The relationship between the experimentally measured E_T distribution and the maximum energy density achieved is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000120371&hterms=12378&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D12378"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Magnetic Field Propellant Isolator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Foster, John E.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>An alternative high voltage isolator for electric propulsion and ground-based ion source applications has been designed and tested. This design employs a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetic field that increases the breakdown voltage. The design can greatly enhance the operating range of laboratory isolators used for high voltage applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://accelconf.web.cern.ch/accelconf/d07/papers/moo1a02.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">High Resolution <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Profile Measurement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>E. Bravin</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The performance of a particle accelerator is in large part defined by the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> emittance of the beams. In most cases, like colliders and light sources (Synchrotrons or Free Electron Lasers), the quality of the final product, i.e. luminosity and brilliance, is directly linked to this parameter. For this reason many techniques and devices have been developed over the years</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52889899"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Spin Transport in Graphene</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Tariq M. G. Mohiuddin; A. A. Zhukov; D. C. Elias; E. W. Hill; S. V. Morozov; A. K. Geim; K. S. Novoselov</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>In this paper we report <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin transport properties of graphene in a device, where for the first time a mono-atomically thin atomic fabric was sandwiched between magnetic thin films. We found that a single layer graphene flake was sufficient to break the exchange coupling between magnetic films and also to enhance the magnetoresistance effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.kettering.edu/~drussell/Demos/waves/wavemotion.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Longitudinal and <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Wave Motion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Mechanical Waves are waves which propagate through a material medium (solid, liquid, or gas) at a wave speed which depends on the elastic and inertial properties of that medium. There are two basic types of wave motion for mechanical waves: longitudinal waves and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> waves.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24711944"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthetic augmented suture anchor reconstruction for a complete traumatic distal triceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a male professional bodybuilder with postoperative biomechanical assessment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nikolaidou, Maria-Elissavet; Banke, Ingo J; Laios, Thomas; Petsogiannis, Konstantinos; Mourikis, Anastasios</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Bodybuilding is a high-risk sport for distal triceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Management, especially in high-demanding athletes, is operative with suture anchor refixation technique being frequently used. However, the rate of rerupture is high due to underlying poor tendon quality. Thus, additional augmentation could be useful. This case report presents a reconstruction technique for a complete traumatic distal triceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a bodybuilder with postoperative biomechanical assessment. A 28-year-old male professional bodybuilder was treated with a synthetic augmented suture anchor reconstruction for a complete triceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of his right dominant elbow. Postoperative biomechanical assessment included isokinetic elbow <span class="hlt">strength</span> and endurance testing by using multiple angular velocities to simulate the "off-season" and "precompetition" phases of training. Eighteen months postoperatively and after full return to training, the biomechanical assessment indicated that the <span class="hlt">strength</span> and endurance of the operated elbow joint was fully restored with even higher ratings compared to the contralateral healthy arm. The described reconstruction technique can be considered as an advisable option in high-performance athletes with underlying poor tendon quality due to high tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> and lack of donor site morbidity, thus enabling them to restore preinjury status and achieve safe return to sports. PMID:24711944</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3965944"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthetic Augmented Suture Anchor Reconstruction for a Complete Traumatic Distal Triceps Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in a Male Professional Bodybuilder with Postoperative Biomechanical Assessment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nikolaidou, Maria-Elissavet; Banke, Ingo J.; Laios, Thomas; Petsogiannis, Konstantinos; Mourikis, Anastasios</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Bodybuilding is a high-risk sport for distal triceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Management, especially in high-demanding athletes, is operative with suture anchor refixation technique being frequently used. However, the rate of rerupture is high due to underlying poor tendon quality. Thus, additional augmentation could be useful. This case report presents a reconstruction technique for a complete traumatic distal triceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a bodybuilder with postoperative biomechanical assessment. A 28-year-old male professional bodybuilder was treated with a synthetic augmented suture anchor reconstruction for a complete triceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of his right dominant elbow. Postoperative biomechanical assessment included isokinetic elbow <span class="hlt">strength</span> and endurance testing by using multiple angular velocities to simulate the “off-season” and “precompetition” phases of training. Eighteen months postoperatively and after full return to training, the biomechanical assessment indicated that the <span class="hlt">strength</span> and endurance of the operated elbow joint was fully restored with even higher ratings compared to the contralateral healthy arm. The described reconstruction technique can be considered as an advisable option in high-performance athletes with underlying poor tendon quality due to high tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> and lack of donor site morbidity, thus enabling them to restore preinjury status and achieve safe return to sports. PMID:24711944</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000056990&hterms=ohio+state+knee&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dohio%2Bstate%2Bknee"><span id="translatedtitle">Growth of Matrix Cracks During Intermediate Temperature Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a SiC/SiC Composite in Air</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Morscher, Gregory N.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The crack density of woven Hi-Nicalon(sup TM) (Nippon Carbon, Japan) fiber, BN interphase, melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites was determined for specimens subjected to tensile stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at 815 C. A significant amount of matrix cracking occurs due to the growth of fiber-bridged microcracks even at stresses below the run-out condition. This increased cracking corresponded to time dependent strain accumulation and acoustic emission activity during the constant load test. However, the portion of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> specimens subjected to cooler temperatures (< 600 C than the hot section had significantly lower crack densities compared to the hotter regions. From the acoustic emission and time dependent strain data it can be inferred that most of the matrix crack growth occurred within the first few hours of the tensile <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiment. The crack growth was attributed to an interphase recession mechanism that is enhanced by the presence of a thin carbon layer between the fiber and the matrix as a result of the composite fabrication process. One important consequence of matrix crack growth at the lower stresses is poor retained <span class="hlt">strength</span> at room temperature for specimens that did not fail.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25950545"><span id="translatedtitle">Recurrent patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a patient after intramedullary nailing of the tibia: reconstruction using an achilles tendon allograft.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jagow, Devin M; Garcia, Branden J; Yacoubian, Stephan V; Yacoubian, Shahan V</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Various complications after intramedullary (IM) nailing of the tibia have been reported, the most common of which are anterior knee pain and symptoms similar to patella tendonitis. Complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the patellar tendon after IM nailing of the tibia has been reported on 2 occasions, in conjunction with predisposing patient factors, such as systemic disease or a proud tibial nail. Patellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are disabling injuries that can be technically difficult to repair because of the poor quality of remaining tendon tissue, quadriceps muscle atrophy and/or contracture, and scar-tissue formation. Many methods have described the surgical reconstruction of the knee extensor mechanism, which is most commonly performed after total knee arthroplasty. We report the successful surgical and clinical outcome of patellar tendon reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft in a patient subject to late and recurrent <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> after IM nailing of the tibia through a mid-patellar tendon-splitting approach. Seven months after tendon reconstruction, the patient exhibited full knee flexion, an extension lag of 10º, 4/5 quadriceps <span class="hlt">strength</span>, and return to her baseline ambulatory status. PMID:25950545</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020025578&hterms=SiC+detector&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DSiC%2Bdetector"><span id="translatedtitle">Stress-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Stress-Relaxation of SiC/SiC Composites at Intermediate Temperature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Tensile static stress and static strain experiments were performed on woven Sylramic (Dow Corning, Midland, MI) and Hi-Nicalon (Nippon Carbon, Japan) fiber reinforced, BN interphase, melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites at 815 C. Acoustic emission was used to monitor the damage accumulation during the test. The stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of Sylramic composites were superior to that of Hi-Nicalon Tm composites. Conversely, the applied strain levels that Hi-Nicalon composites can withstand for stress-relaxation experiments were superior to Sylramic composites; however, at a cost of poor retained <span class="hlt">strength</span> properties for Hi-Nicalon composites. Sylramic composites exhibited much less stress-oxidation induced matrix cracking compared to Hi-Nicalon composites. This was attributed to the greater stiffness and roughness of Sylramic fibers themselves and the lack of a carbon layer between the fiber and the BN interphase for Sylramic composites, which existed in Hi-Nicalon composites. Due to the lack of stress-relief for Sylramic composites, time to failure for Sylramic composite stress-relaxation experiments was not much longer than for stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments when comparing the peak stress condition for stress-relaxation with the applied stress of stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/515594"><span id="translatedtitle">Alumina <span class="hlt">strength</span> degradation in the elastic regime</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.</p> <p>1997-08-01</p> <p>Measurements of Kanel et. al. [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. Failure (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall <span class="hlt">strength</span> determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study the authors have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of <span class="hlt">strength</span> degradation in the elastic regime.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...577A.125A"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimating the magnetic field <span class="hlt">strength</span> from magnetograms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Asensio Ramos, A.; Martínez González, M. J.; Manso Sainz, R.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>A properly calibrated longitudinal magnetograph is an instrument that measures circular polarization and gives an estimation of the magnetic flux density in each observed resolution element. This usually constitutes a lower bound of the field <span class="hlt">strength</span> in the resolution element, given that it can be made arbitrarily large as long as it occupies a proportionally smaller area of the resolution element and/or becomes more <span class="hlt">transversal</span> to the observer while still produce the same magnetic signal. However, we know that arbitrarily stronger fields are less likely - hG fields are more probable than kG fields, with fields above several kG virtually absent - and we may even have partial information about their angular distribution. Based on a set of sensible considerations, we derive simple formulae based on a Bayesian analysis to give an improved estimation of the magnetic field <span class="hlt">strength</span> for magnetographs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19329920"><span id="translatedtitle">An unusual late complication after SFA stenting: the artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chisci, E; De Donato, G; Setacci, F; Raucci, A; Giubbolini, M; Setacci, C</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Peripheral artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a late complication of an endovascular stenting, due to the protrusion of a stent, has never been described in the literature in thigh arteries. Here we describe two anecdotic cases of artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after superficial femoral artery (SFA) stenting. In both cases the endovascular procedure was performed as a reintervention at 2 and 27 months after a failed surgical or hybrid procedure for limb revascularization. The stent had been delivered in the first part of the SFA and the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred at the junction between the common femoral artery and SFA, which is one of the most flexible parts of the femoral artery. The cause of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was probably caused by an ulcer of the stent against the artery wall concomitant with a status of local or systemic infection. A huge pseudoaneurysm developed in both cases. The massive bleeding was stopped by an emergency surgical bypass, with the removal of the stented artery. These two cases show the possibility of SFA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after stenting. Previous surgical treatment, the site of stenting (first part of the SFA) and an active infection could predispose patients to this life-threatening complication. PMID:19329920</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495864"><span id="translatedtitle">Collagen type V polymorphism in spontaneous quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Galasso, Olimpio; Iaccino, Enrico; Gallelli, Luca; Perrotta, Ida; Conforti, Francesco; Donato, Giuseppe; Gasparini, Giorgio</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Spontaneous simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is associated with multiple medical conditions and pharmacological treatments; however, identifying prior risk factors is impossible in most cases. Achilles tendon and anterior cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are associated with collagen, type V, alpha 1 (COL5A1) polymorphism. This genetic variant may be implicated quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The COL5A1 encodes the protein for pro-?1 chains of the low-abundance heterotrimeric type V collagen. In most noncartilaginous tissues, type V collagen is a quantitatively minor component of type I collagen that has been implicated in the regulation of the size and configuration of type I collagen fibrils. The functional significance of COL5A1 polymorphism in relation to type V collagen expression or activity has not been determined.This article describes a patient with COL5A1 polymorphism and spontaneous simultaneous quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. However, genetic and histologic studies performed on blood and tendon tissues and 3 consecutive sex- and age-matched controls showed a statistically significant reduction in collagen type V expression and an alteration in collagen structure in the tendon. These findings might explain the pathomechanisms of spontaneous tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> associated with COL5A1 polymorphism. PMID:22495864</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11381504"><span id="translatedtitle">Midcalf ultrasonography for the diagnosis of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Baker's cysts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sato, O; Kondoh, K; Iyori, K; Kimura, H</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Clinically significant and palpable enlargement of the gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa is known as a Baker's cyst. Baker's cysts may <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, resulting in a swollen, painful leg that is clinically indistinguishable from acute deep vein thrombosis. For this reason, <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Baker's cysts are sometimes called pseudothrombophlebitis. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Baker's cysts, and to evaluate the role of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of this condition. The hospital records of 106 patients (43 men and 63 women) who were referred to the vascular surgical department at Saitama Medical Center with unilateral or bilateral swollen legs between June 1997 and June 2000 were reviewed retrospectively. The total number of affected limbs was 125, being 52 right legs and 73 left legs. Deep vein thrombosis was the most common cause of swollen legs, being diagnosed in 44.8%. No specific anatomical derangement was found in 39 limbs (31.2%), and these were defined as idiopathic. Lymphedema was also common, being diagnosed in 16 limbs. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Baker's cysts were observed in three limbs, with an incidence of 2.4%. In all of these patients, a large hypoechoic space was seen behind the calf muscles and this sonolucent area was easily detected by a conventional scanner, being pathognomonic of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Baker's cyst. PMID:11381504</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2443772"><span id="translatedtitle">Two Cases of Spontaneous Liver <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Literature Review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cozzi, P. J.; Morris, D. L.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Spontaneous liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is uncommon, difficult to diagnose and carries a universally high mortality. It has been well documented to occur as a complication of primary or secondary hepatic malignancy. Similarly, there are 28 cases of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> haemangiomata described in the world literature. It is also well described in severe pregnancy-induced hypertension and is said to carry a mortality of 18% for patients treated by packing and drainage of the haematoma and 75% for patients treated with liver resection. Two female patients aged 60 and 61 presented to our accident and emergency department. One had a history of hypertension only and the other a history of a bleeding diathesis from the lupus anticoagulant. Both presented with hypotension and abdominal pain and both were diagnosed by abdominal CT scan. One was treated with hepatic artery ligation and tamponade and the other with liver resection and correction of the coagulopathy. Neither had any evidence of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> haemangioma or tumour at laparotomy or on histological examination, and both are alive and well. The conclusions to be drawn from this review and our own recent experience is that the treatment of choice for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> haemangiomata is liver resection and, for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy, is tamponade with packs and evacuation of the haematoma. Hepatic arteriography and embolisation, if possible, is a useful adjunct. Correction ofany coagulopathy is essential. We can only speculate that the aetiology in our patients was uncontrolled hypertension in one and coagulopathy in the other. PMID:8809590</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JSeis..19..695A"><span id="translatedtitle">Maximum magnitude estimation considering the regional <span class="hlt">rupture</span> character</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anbazhagan P.; Bajaj, Ketan; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S. N.</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>The main objective of the paper is to develop a new method to estimate the maximum magnitude ( M max) considering the regional <span class="hlt">rupture</span> character. The proposed method has been explained in detail and examined for both intraplate and active regions. Seismotectonic data has been collected for both the regions, and seismic study area (SSA) map was generated for radii of 150, 300, and 500 km. The regional <span class="hlt">rupture</span> character was established by considering percentage fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (PFR), which is the ratio of subsurface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length (RLD) to total fault length (TFL). PFR is used to arrive RLD and is further used for the estimation of maximum magnitude for each seismic source. Maximum magnitude for both the regions was estimated and compared with the existing methods for determining M max values. The proposed method gives similar M max value irrespective of SSA radius and seismicity. Further seismicity parameters such as magnitude of completeness ( M c ), " a" and " b " parameters and maximum observed magnitude ( M {max/obs}) were determined for each SSA and used to estimate M max by considering all the existing methods. It is observed from the study that existing deterministic and probabilistic M max estimation methods are sensitive to SSA radius, M c , a and b parameters and M {max/obs} values. However, M max determined from the proposed method is a function of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> character instead of the seismicity parameters. It was also observed that intraplate region has less PFR when compared to active seismic region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6205G"><span id="translatedtitle">Critical size and overstress of the initiation zone for spontaneous dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation with a linear slip-weakening friction law</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Galis, Martin; Pelties, Christian; Kristek, Jozef; Moczo, Peter; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Mai, P. Martin</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Numerical simulations of dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> require an artificial initiation procedure. Under linear slip-weakening friction, the concept of a stress asperity is often applied, in which the asperity is characterized by its size, shape, and overstress (difference between static <span class="hlt">strength</span> and initial stress inside the asperity). However, the physical properties of this initiation zone may have significant impact on the resulting dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. Criteria for estimating the critical size of the initiation zone (the minimum size of the initiation zone leading to spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation) have been proposed for 2D and 3D problems based on simplifying assumptions. However, these estimates do not provide general rules for designing 3D numerical simulations, and hence a trial and-error approach is often necessary. Therefore, it is desirable to define guidelines to estimate the size of the initiation zone and the overstress such that the effects of the artificial initiation are minimized when generating realistic dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> scenarios. We perform an extensive parameter study in terms of numerical simulations of 3D dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation to examine the critical size of square, circular and elliptical initiation zones as a function of asperity overstress and background (off-asperity) stress. For fixed overstress, we find that the area of the initiation zone controls the nucleation process. Comparing our numerical results with published theoretical estimates, we discover that the estimates by Uenishi & Rice (2004) are applicable to configurations with low background stress and small overstress. None of the published estimates are consistent with numerical results for configurations with high background stress. We therefore derive new equations to estimate the initiation zone size in environments with high background stress. Our results provide guidelines to appropriately define the size of the initiation zone and overstress to minimize effects of the forced initiation on the subsequent spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.T11D4603T"><span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of 2-D <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Propagation of Stick-slip Events during Meter-sized Biaxial Friction Experiments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tsuchida, K.; Kawakata, H.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Using centimeter-sized rock specimens, friction experiments have been carried out. Ohnaka and Kuwahara (1990) showed a stably propagating shear strain drop (nucleation phase) followed by its accelerated propagation. Such process was reproduced by numerical simulations considering heterogeneous fault <span class="hlt">strength</span> and the weakening (e.g., Dieterich, 1992; Matsu'ura et al., 1992). However, in previous studies, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation was measured only with 1-D array of strain gauges along in-plane direction. In addition, very few nucleation phenomena were observed in natural earthquakes. We performed friction experiments using a pair of meter-sized Indian gabbro specimens. The fault plane was 1.5 m long and 0.5 m wide. The specimens were loaded at a speed as low as 0.0025 m/s. We continuously observed shear strains and elastic waves with 2-D array of piezoelectric sensors and strain gauges to improve our knowledge about <span class="hlt">rupture</span> nucleation process. Sensors and gauges were installed at 24 sites located 60 mm below the fault plane at intervals of 150 mm and 75 mm for in-plane and anti-plane directions, respectively. The stick-slip events were extracted using wave amplitudes and the ratio of share and normal stresses. Two typical stable phases (nucleation phases) of decrease in shear strain were recognized followed by the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The first decrease was initiated around the edge in anti-plane direction (northern side). The decreasing rate was lower than 10-6 s-1, and the decrease preferably propagated in anti-plane direction at a speed slower than 100 m/s. The second decrease was initiated about when the first one reached the opposite end (southern side). The decreasing rate was higher (~10-4 s-1) than that of the first one, and the decrease preferably propagated in anti-plane direction at a higher speed (an order of 100 m/s). About when the second phase got back to the northern end, the rapid decrease (~10-3 s-1) was initiated at the western edge, and two-dimensionally propagated faster than 1 km/s, which corresponded to dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Then, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> nucleation and dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagations in laboratory were suggested to be controlled by the sample edge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JGRB..114.2304W"><span id="translatedtitle">Illuminating the near-sonic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities of the intracontinental Kokoxili Mw 7.8 and Denali fault Mw 7.9 strike-slip earthquakes with global P wave back projection imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Walker, Kristoffer T.; Shearer, Peter M.</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>The Denali and Kokoxili strike-slip earthquakes are two of the longest recent intracontinental <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Previous studies report a range of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities. Here we image these earthquakes by reverse time migration of the intermediate-frequency P wave train recorded by global broadband seismometers. This technique permits a relatively direct measure of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity (speed and direction) as constrained by the radiated seismic energy, free from restrictive assumptions or <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed bounds placed on the solution. We compare our results with published seismic, GPS displacement, and surface slip inversion results. Both <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were initially subshear and transitioned over a distance no longer than 40 km to supershear speeds close to the P wave speed of ˜5.6 km/s. We investigate the accuracy of our results with synthetic data and experiment with using different imaging parameters and seismic subnetworks. These tests allow us to rule out the possibility of subshear speeds along the supershear segments. Although we cannot exclude supershear speeds of 4.5-6.5 km/s, our most reliable <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities of ˜5.6 km/s are close to the local P wave speeds. We hypothesize that these intracontinental faults have weak shear <span class="hlt">strengths</span> or high breakdown slips or crustal rigidities and experience at least moderate slip or slip rate weakening. Our observations and previous published results lead us to speculate that very long, surface-extending faults with general homogeneity in prestress and fault <span class="hlt">strength</span>, together with smaller adjacent fault segments to provide triggering, may be necessary ingredients for the sub-Rayleigh to supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed transition in strike-slip earthquakes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25741921"><span id="translatedtitle">[Neglected ipsilateral simultaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of patellar and quadriceps tendon].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Karahasano?lu, ?lker; Yolo?lu, Osman; Kerimo?lu, Servet; Turhan, Ahmet U?ur</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Neglected patellar and quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare injury, but ipsilateral simultaneous patellar and quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was not described in the literature to our knowledge. In this article, we report a 40-year-old healthy male patient with neglected ipsilateral patellar and quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> treated by peroneus longus tendon autograft. Patient had received some conservative and surgical treatments for patellar fracture before applying to our clinic. After our treatment using peroneus longus autograft and interference nails, patient was immobilized for six weeks in cylindrical cast. Flexion exercises and full weight bearing were started after cast removal. Patient had no complaint at postoperative second year. Patient was a neglected case. Surgical repair and early rehabilitation enabled us to achieve a satisfactory outcome. PMID:25741921</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4173840"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse Implant <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: An Uncommon Presentation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mallon, Peter; Ganachaud, François; Malhaire, Caroline; Brunel, Raphael; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Feron, Jean-Guillaume; Couturaud, Benoit; Fitoussi, Alfred</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Summary: A woman in her 50s underwent delayed bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse implant reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer. Symptoms of implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> developed 43 months after surgery with an erythematous rash on her trunk. The rash then spread to her reconstructed breast mounds. Initial ultrasound scan and magnetic resonance imaging were normal; however, subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated left implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> only. In theater, following removal of both implants, both were found to be <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. The rash on her trunk resolved within 3 weeks in the postoperative period. Chemical analyses of silicone in both implants confirmed a nonauthorized silicone source; in addition, the chemical structure was significantly different between the left and right implant, perhaps explaining the variation in presentation. PMID:25289223</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10181223"><span id="translatedtitle">Engineering evaluation of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> strainer in Building 309</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Papenfuss, J.N.</p> <p>1982-10-01</p> <p>This report deals with the consequences of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> steam strainer and is divided into two sections. Section 1 evaluates the engineering aspects of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> steam strainer, investigates the events that culminated in the damage and considers factors that may have contributed to the incident. Recommendations are presented to upgrade the system in Building 309 by incorporating hardware changes and proposes a change in operating procedures. Section 2 utilizes the findings presented in Section 1 as a basis for conducting a review on the remainder of the 300 Area steam system, in order to identify similar problem areas. Corrective action recommendations to reduce the risk of repeating component <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from water hammer conditions were developed out of the survey and the associated review.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001APS..DFD.JJ013D"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Modes of Wetting-Suppression Lubricating Films</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>dell'Aversana, Pasquale; Vetrano, Maria Rosaria; Neitzel, G. Paul</p> <p>2001-11-01</p> <p>The use of both thermocapillarity and forced convection to generate lubricating gas films capable of suppressing wetting of a solid by a liquid are now well known. The possibility of utilizing this phenomenon in potential applications such as bearings requires a knowledge of the mechanisms of film failure under load. Employing interferometry and high-speed digital photography, we have investigated film <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in various circumstances. Contrary to the chance behavior sometimes reported, the present observations indicate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode in many situations to be quite repeatable. In an attempt to explain the observed results, it is speculated that convective transport of surface electric charge increases the electrostatic attraction between the solid and some portions of the liquid surface, initiating film <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at these locations; previous work by Taylor and recent results seem to substantiate such a hypothesis. This, in turn, points to the possibility of managing the surface-charge distribution to control film stability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026333"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard for strike-slip earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Petersen, M.; Cao, T.; Dawson, Tim; Frankel, A.; Wills, C.; Schwartz, D.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>We present fault displacement data, regressions, and a methodology to calculate in both a probabilistic and deterministic framework the fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard for strike-slip faults. To assess this hazard we consider: (1) the size of the earthquake and probability that it will <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to the surface, (2) the rate of all potential earthquakes on the fault (3) the distance of the site along and from the mapped fault, (4) the complexity of the fault and quality of the fault mapping, (5) the size of the structure that will be placed at the site, and (6) the potential and size of displacements along or near the fault. Probabilistic fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard analysis should be an important consideration in design of structures or lifelines that are located within about 50m of well-mapped active faults.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11828558"><span id="translatedtitle">Gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a diver due to rapid ascent.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Petri, Nadan M; Vranjkovi?-Petri, Lena; Aras, Nebojsa; Druzijani?, Nikica</p> <p>2002-02-01</p> <p>A 37-year-old, experienced female diver developed gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to rapid ascent from a depth of 37 meters. The incident was preceded by a heavy meal, intake of soda beverages, swallowing of air and water under water, and panic. Sharp abdominal pain was present immediately after surfacing and afterwards. Full abdominal distension developed within two hours after the ascent. No other diving-related pathology was found. Surgery was performed around three hours after the accident and revealed pneumoperitoneum, gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, gastric content in the abdomen cavity, and signs of acute peritonitis. On surgery, a 4-cm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the lesser curvature was found and sutured. The patient was discharged eight days after the event. PMID:11828558</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2229970"><span id="translatedtitle">Flexor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> secondary to hamate hook fractures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Milek, M A; Boulas, H J</p> <p>1990-09-01</p> <p>Four patients with flexor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> secondary to hook of the hamate fracture are described. None of the patients had the diagnosis of fracture made before tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. All patients were treated with excision of the fractured hook and tendon repair. The tendon repair was usually an end-to-side (Y junction) of the profundus of the small to the profundus of the ring finger. After operation, all patients were free of pain and returned to their preinjury activity levels, but most had some limitation of motion in the digit with the tendon repair. The complication of tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> not uncommonly follows basilar hook of the hamate fractures. Treatment by excision of the fracture and end-to-side tendon repair produces satisfactory results. Range of motion after tendon repair seems to depend more on the patient's age and the amount of inflammation at the site of repair rather than on the method of tendon repair. PMID:2229970</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2589064"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in infectious mononucleosis: a review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Asgari, M. M.; Begos, D. G.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the spleen is a rare complication of infectious mononucleosis (IM) occurring in 0.1-0.5 percent of patients with proven IM [1]. Although splenectomy has been advocated as the definitive therapy in the past, numerous recent reports have documented favorable outcomes with non-operative management. A review of the literature suggests that non-operative management can be successful if appropriate criteria, such as hemodynamic stability and transfusion requirements are applied in patient selection. We report the case of a 36 year old man with infectious mononucleosis who had a spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and who was successfully managed by splenectomy. Based on review of the literature, an approach to management of a spontaneously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen secondary to IM is suggested. PMID:9493849</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026874"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and comparison with other strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Haeussler, P.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Dawson, T.E.; Stenner, H.D.; Lienkaemper, J.J.; Cinti, F.; Montone, P.; Sherrod, B.; Craw, P.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>On 3 November 2002, an M7.9 earthquake produced 340 km of surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the Denali and two related faults in Alaska. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> proceeded from west to east and began with a 40-km-long break on a previously unknown thrust fault. Estimates of surface slip on this thrust are 3-6 m. Next came the principal surface break along ???218 km of the Denali fault. Right-lateral offsets averaged around 5 m and increased eastward to a maximum of nearly 9 m. The fault also <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> beneath the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, which withstood almost 6 m of lateral offset. Finally, slip turned southeastward onto the Totschunda fault. Right-lateral offsets are up to 3 m, and the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is about 76 km long. This three-part <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ranks among the longest strike-slip events of the past two centuries. The earthquake is typical when compared to other large earthquakes on major intracontinental strike-slip faults. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4310132"><span id="translatedtitle">Rapid aneurysm growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in systemic lupus erythematosus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Graffeo, Christopher S.; Tanweer, Omar; Nieves, Cesar Fors; Belmont, H. Michael; Izmirly, Peter M.; Becske, Tibor; Huang, Paul P.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to intracranial aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a major neurosurgical emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Rapid aneurysm growth is associated with <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disorder whose complications can include cerebral vasculitis and vasculopathy. Intracranial aneurysms are not known to occur more frequently in SLE patients than the general population; however, aneurysm growth rates have not been studied in SLE. Case Description: We present a 43-year-old female with SLE on prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, and azathioprine with moderate disease activity who presented with severe, acute-onset headache and was found to have Hunt and Hess grade II SAH due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an 8 mm saccular anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm. The patient developed severe vasospasm, re-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, and was taken for angiography and embolization, which was challenging due to a high degree of vasospasm and arterial stenosis. Review of imaging from less than 2 years prior demonstrated a normal ACoA complex without evidence of an aneurysm. Conclusion: We review the literature and discuss the risk factors and pathophysiology of rapid aneurysm growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as well as the pathologic vascular changes associated with SLE. Although SLE patients do not develop intracranial aneurysm at an increased rate, these changes may predispose them to higher incidence of growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This possibility-coupled with increased morbidity and mortality of SAH in SLE-suggests that SAH should be considered in SLE patients presenting with headache, and advocates for more aggressive treatment of SLE patients with unruptured aneurysms. PMID:25657862</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S54C..06S"><span id="translatedtitle">3D Simulations of Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> on Rough Faults</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shi, Z.; Day, S. M.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Natural faults during their evolution stages manifest varying degrees of geometric complexities over a broad range of scales spanning from larger-scale features such as branching and segmentation to smaller-scale features such as topographic variations on the slip surface. At a microscopic scale, surface roughness affects the frictional properties through its role in the distribution and evolution of contact areas of the sliding surface. At a larger scale, the geometric irregularities of the fault affects the inter-seismic and post-seismic static stress distribution that is responsible for earthquake nucleation. Our study, however, focuses on the fundamental role that surface roughness plays in the dynamic processes of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and resultant ground motion using numerical simulations of 3D dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. As have been shown in several previous 2D numerical studies, dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagating along rough fault surface can excite high-frequency radiation as they accelerate and decelerate from interaction with geometric irregularities. Also perturbation of local dynamic stress due to roughness contributes to the heterogeneous distributions of slip rate and slip over the entire fault. With the goal of producing more realistic physics-based dynamic ground motion, we perform 3D numerical simulations of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along faults with self-similar roughness distribution of wavelength scales spanning three orders of magnitude (10^2 -10^5 m). We examine the influence of fault roughness characteristics (shortest wavelength and amplitude-to-wavelength ratio) on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior, the resultant ground motion pattern and the final slip pattern. The fault is governed by a rate-and-state friction with strongly velocity-weakening feature and the inelastic yielding of off-fault bulk material is subject to Drucker-Prager viscoplasticity. Initial investigations clearly indicate that the amount of high-frequency radiation generated and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties are heavily influenced by the roughness properties. Detailed analyses of our simulation results will be presented at the conference.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.S51D1765X"><span id="translatedtitle">Interaction Between Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> And Off-fault Brittle Damage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xu, S.; Ampuero, J.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Lyakhovsky, V.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>The high stress concentration at the front of a dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is expected to produce rock damage (reduction of elastic moduli) in the material surrounding the main fault plane. Off-fault yielding and energy absorption in the damage process should reduce the amplitude of the ground motion. However, the reduced elastic moduli in the damaged zone can amplify locally the motion and create a waveguide that may allow the motion to propagate with little geometric attenuation. In addition, the asymmetric damage generated in the in- plane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode may produce bimaterial interfaces that can reduce the frictional dissipation and increase the radiation efficiency. Previous studies incorporated plastic yielding in simulations of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (Andrews, 1975, 2005; Ben- Zion and Shi, 2005; Templeton et al., 2008) while keeping the elastic moduli unchanged. In this work we examine the dynamics of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and generated motion in a model consisting of a frictional fault in a medium governed by a continuum damage rheology that accounts for the evolution of elastic moduli (e.g. Lyakhovsky and Ben-Zion, 2008). We perform numerical simulations based on the Spectral Element Method to study how the parameters of the friction law, damage rheology and background stress control the rate of growth of the off-fault damage zone, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, the energy partition to various components, and the maximum slip rate and ground motion. We compare the peak motion generated with our damage model to results of analogous simulations using Coulomb plastic yielding. Off-fault damage is of special importance for <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> along faults that separate rocks of different elastic properties, because they can generate asymmetric patterns of material degradation that might be observable in the field. We plan to perform simulations involving velocity-weakening friction and off-fault damage associated with pre-existing bimaterial faults.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3070915"><span id="translatedtitle">Association of Hemodynamic Characteristics and Cerebral Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cebral, Juan R.; Mut, Fernando; Weir, Jane; Putman, Christopher M.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background and purpose Hemodynamic factors are thought to play an important role in the initiation, growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of cerebral aneurysms. This report describes a study of the associations between qualitative intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics and the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of cerebral aneurysms. Methods 210 consecutive aneurysms were analyzed using patient-specific CFD simulations under pulsatile flow conditions. The aneurysms were classified into categories depending on the complexity and stability of the flow pattern, size of the impingement region, and inflow concentration by two blinded observers. A statistical analysis was then performed with respect to history of previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Inter-observer variability analysis was performed. Results <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> aneurysms were more likely to have complex flow patterns (83%, p<0.001), stable flow patterns (75%, p=0.0018), 66% concentrated inflow (66%, p=<0.0001), and small impingement regions (76%, p=0.0006) compared to unruptured aneurysms. Inter-observer variability analyses indicate that all the classifications performed are in very good agreement, i.e. well within the 95% confidence interval. Conclusions A qualitative hemodynamic analysis of cerebral aneurysms using image based patient-specific geometries has shown that concentrated inflow jets, small impingement regions, complex flow patterns, and unstable flow patterns are correlated with a clinical history of prior aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These qualitative measures provide a starting point for more sophisticated quantitative analysis aimed at assigning aneurysm risk of future <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These analyses highlight the potential for CFD to play an important role in the clinical determination of aneurysm risks. PMID:21051508</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27..619A"><span id="translatedtitle">Hybrid Simulation of Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Seismic Wave Propagation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aochi, H.; Olsen, K. B.; Fukuyama, E.; Madariaga, R.</p> <p></p> <p>We have developed a hybrid method for flexible and efficient modeling of the entire earthquake process, from dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation to the radiation in a hetero- geneous three-dimensional medium. The dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation is computed using the boundary integral equation method (BIEM), and the wave propagation out- side the fault is carried out by a fourth-order finite-difference method (FDM). Thus, our method combines the flexibility of the BIEM to compute spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on non-planar or multi-segmented fault geometries using a wide range of friction laws with the efficiency of the FDM to compute wave propagation in arbitrar- ily heterogeneous crustal models. The method has several important applications. The effects of fault segmentation and curvature on dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and its dynamic radiation can be analyzed in detail. The presence of any significant signature in ground motion patterns from dynamic effects for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on non-planar fault geometries can be used to develop guidelines to improve future kinematic (prescribed) simulations. In addition, the statistics of recurrent <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on multiple, arbitrarily-shaped fault systems can be computed and used to increase our knowledge of earthquake occurrence. Here, we present details of the implementation of the hybrid method and the interface between the BIEM and FDM. We also show preliminary results for hybrid simulations of the 1992 M7.3 Landers, California, and the 1999 M7.4 Izmit, Turkey, earthquakes. Both earthquakes were associated with complex fault geometry on vertical fault sys- tem in the simulations. For the two events, we compute the ground motion for different fault geometry models and compare synthetic seismograms to strong motion data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1003.0989v1"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> angular momentum of photons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Andrea Aiello; Christoph Marquardt; Gerd Leuchs</p> <p>2010-03-04</p> <p>We develop the quantum theory of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasi-paraxial photon beams in vacuum, and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order <span class="hlt">transverse</span> derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21413382"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> angular momentum of photons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Aiello, Andrea [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Guenter-Scharowsky-Strasse 1/Bau 24, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Guenter-Scharowsky-Strasse 1/Bau 24, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute for Optics, Information and Photonics, University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7/B2, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)</p> <p>2010-05-15</p> <p>We develop the quantum theory of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasiparaxial photon beams in vacuum and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular-momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order <span class="hlt">transverse</span> derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular-momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/v8814230275l68r5.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> of composite materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>F. F. Egorov; P. S. Kislyi; P. A. Verkhovodov</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>1.A study was made of the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of ZrN-Al2O3 composite materials produced by solid- and liquid-phase sintering in argon and nitrogen. It is shown that the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of composites sintered in nitrogen is such less than that of composites sintered in argon, which is linked with the formation of new phases at boundaries between dissimilar phases and with a weakening</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1106.1369v1"><span id="translatedtitle">Achievable <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Cylindrical Electromagnetic Mode</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>R. Chen; X. Li</p> <p>2011-06-04</p> <p>The system of Maxwell equations with an initial condition in a vacuum is solved in a cylindrical coordinate system. It derives the cylindrical <span class="hlt">transverse</span> electromagnetic wave mode in which the electric field and magnetic field are not in phase. Such electromagnetic wave can generate and exist in actual application, and there is no violation of the law of conservation of energy during the electromagnetic field interchanges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6627116"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> excitation type laser oscillator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Akiba, T.; Hishii, M.; Nagai, H.; Shibayama, K.</p> <p>1982-08-03</p> <p>A high pressure <span class="hlt">transverse</span> excitation type laser oscillator comprises a plane anode and a plurality of rod type cathodes to form glow discharge. Each cathode is covered with a cylindrical insulator having heat resistance except for a small discharge surface whereby the shift of the glow discharge caused by varying the pressure or the discharge current can be prevented to thus obtain stable glow discharge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4462307"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a patient with congenital afibrinogenemia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Arcagök, Baran Cengiz; Özdemir, Nihal; Tekin, Ay?e; Özcan, Rah?an; Eliçevik, Mehmet; ?enyüz, Osman Faruk; Çam, Halit; Celkan, Tiraje</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Afibrinogenemia is a rare bleeding disorder which is observed with an incidence of 1:1 000 000. It is an autosomal recessive disease and occurs as a result of mutation in one of the three genes which code the three polypeptide chains of fibrinogen. Basic clinical findings include spontaneous bleeding, bleeding after minor trauma or due to surgery. Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in afibrinogenemia has been reported only in 6 cases so far. In this article, we present a 15-year old congenital afibrinogenemia patient with spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25086901"><span id="translatedtitle">Prepatellar continuation <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: Report of an unusual case.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Majeed, Haroon; dos Remedios, Ian; Datta, Praveen; Griffiths, David</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>In anatomical studies the deepest soft tissue layer, related to the deep rectus femoris tendinous fibers, has been described as the "prepatellar quadriceps continuation". We present an unusual case of an isolated prepatellar continuation <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which to our knowledge is the first described case in the literature. Injuries to the extensor mechanism may include isolated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the prepatellar continuation with intact quadriceps and patellar tendons. Diagnosis may be difficult with ultrasound scan and requires MRI scan for confirmation. Appropriate clinical assessment and regular physiotherapy lead to a full functional recovery. PMID:25086901</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25245048"><span id="translatedtitle">Diagnosis and management of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal mycotic pseudoaneurysm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dua, Anahita; Kuy, SreyRam; Desai, Sapan S; Kumar, Naveen; Heller, Jennifer; Lee, Cheong J</p> <p>2014-09-22</p> <p>Infected popliteal aneurysms are a rare but high-risk pathology that may present as a surgical emergency with acute <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and sepsis. Management of acute ischemia in the presence of systemic sepsis is challenging and requires timely diagnosis, rapid intervention, and multidisciplinary communication to ensure an optimum outcome for both life and limb in these patients. We report on a case of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> mycotic popliteal artery aneurysm as a consequence of septic embolization from infective endocarditis managed by reverse saphenous vein bypass. The clinical presentation, diagnostic process, and approach to management along with a literature review on mycotic popliteal aneurysm are presented in this case report. PMID:25245048</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4127872"><span id="translatedtitle">Renal allograft transplant recipient with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hydatid native kidney</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Wani, Imtiyaz; Khan, Imran; Wani, Muzaffar</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> native hydatid kidney. Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition. PMID:25125908</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3965915"><span id="translatedtitle">Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Entrapment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jahollari, Artan; Sarac, Atilla; Ozal, Ertugrul</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Intra-aortic balloon pump is used frequently to support a failing myocardium in cardiac patients. Due to the invasive nature of this device, usage is accompanied by consistent risk of complications. Balloon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, although it occurs rarely, may lead to entrapment if diagnosis delays. A 78-year male who underwent cardiac surgery experienced balloon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and entrapment in the right femoral artery during the postoperative follow-up. Surgical extraction under local anesthesia was performed and the patient had an uneventful course. Fast and gentle solution of the problem is necessary to prevent further morbidity or mortality related to a retained balloon catheter in these delicate patients. PMID:24707435</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S41A0949I"><span id="translatedtitle">Multi-scale dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation on fractal patch model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ide, S.; Aochi, H.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>We carried out multi-scale full-dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations, using our new calculation scheme (Aochi and Ide, GRL, 2004) and a fractal patch model as an approximation of realistic heterogeneity. A basic assumption of this model is that a local slip weakening distance (or fracture energy) at a point is proportional to the size of the minimum asperity which includes that point. Since typical topography of fault surface obeys self-affine fractal statistics, we assumed that the asperity distribution is also represented by a power law. For simplicity we prepared seven different sizes of circular patches as discretized representation of asperities. When the patch radius increases by two, the number of patches decreases by four, where the fractal dimension is 2. The whole model space is a fault plane of 4096x4096 square grids, on which the circular patches are distributed randomly. This space is represented by four 64x64 subspaces on different scales and each subspace is connected to the subspaces on the larger and/or smaller scales by renormalization. The assumed values of initial, yield, and residual stresses are homogeneous across the fault plane. We begin each dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation with breaking one of the patches of the minimum level. In most cases, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> stops immediately after the initiation. Sometimes, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> coalesces with adjacent patches, propagates into a patch of next level. Frequency-size distribution of these events is approximated by a power law, which is explained by the probability of interaction between asperities. The probability of triggering of dense patch distribution is high and resultant slope of the power law is less steep. Whole <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is spontaneous based on exact elasto-dynamics and slip-weakening law except for the nucleation in the minimum level. Thus we observed very heterogeneous process during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> directivity, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front shape, slip distribution, and moment release functions. Some moment rate functions increase irregularly, which resemble to so-called initial phases observed in real seismic waves. We cannot distinguish small and large events from the initial rise of moment rate functions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr20071437"><span id="translatedtitle">The Uniform California Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Forecast, Version 2 (UCERF 2)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>2007 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>California?s 35 million people live among some of the most active earthquake faults in the United States. Public safety demands credible assessments of the earthquake hazard to maintain appropriate building codes for safe construction and earthquake insurance for loss protection. Seismic hazard analysis begins with an earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forecast?a model of probabilities that earthquakes of specified magnitudes, locations, and faulting types will occur during a specified time interval. This report describes a new earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forecast for California developed by the 2007 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP 2007).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S31G..01T"><span id="translatedtitle">Rapid Mapping of Surface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> from the South Napa Earthquake</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trexler, C. C.; Morelan, A. E., III; Oskin, M. E.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Rapid documentation (<1 day) of co-seismic surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> location and slip is essential for scientific and emergency response. We demonstrate how social media (text messaging and Twitter) and the emerging 3D data collection technique known as Structure from Motion (SfM), used in conjunction with traditional field reconnaissance, enabled us to rapidly locate and document surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from the Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake. On the morning of the event, our field team used information available on social media to identify locations with potential surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Preliminary observations of surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (measurements and geo-tagged photographs) were texted to the office-based team member who created digital maps of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> trace and shared them online via Twitter in near-real time. We documented many ephemeral features (such as offset roads, curbs, and driveways) along the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> trace within 12 hours of the event, before these features were destroyed by road and infrastructure repair. We were able to return to most sites again within several days, allowing us to document continuing slip and create time-series datasets of offset features. After the collection and re-collection of data at selected sites, we made detailed measurements remotely using 3D models constructed with SfM. The ability to quantitatively project features into the fault plane using these models allows for accurate measurements of small features often difficult to observe and quantify in the field. Traditionally, even preliminary maps of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> extent and offset magnitudes are not available for several days after an event because office-based processing and compilation is required. Because we were able to compile our data in real time, we distributed our results while they were still valuable for ongoing scientific response. Our work helped other science teams efficiently target fieldwork and instrument deployment; for example, one geodetic survey team used our surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> map to adjust their field deployment plans in an effort to capture rapidly-decaying postseismic movement. With social media and rapid, inexpensive data collection methods like SfM in mind, scientific response to future events has the potential to be more efficient and coordinated than ever before.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApSS..238...47A"><span id="translatedtitle">Force spectroscopy of covalent bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> versus protein extraction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Afrin, Rehana; Okazaki, Susumu; Ikai, Atsushi</p> <p>2004-11-01</p> <p>Development of protein extraction and identification methods from a live cell surface using minimally invasive technology has an important implication as a possible tool to study time-dependent changes of the distribution of intrinsic membrane proteins in specific locals on the cell membrane. We have approached to this problem using an atomic force microscope mounted with a chemically modified probe with amino reactive covalent crosslinkers against amino groups on the membrane proteins. We discuss the probability of protein extraction versus covalent bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the experimentally observed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force in protein extraction. Possibility of protein unfolding by mechanical stretching during extraction from the cell surface is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3118014"><span id="translatedtitle">Splenic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: A Case of Massive Hemoperitoneum Following Therapeutic Colonoscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Takekawa, Sarah; Furumoto, Nancy</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Colonoscopies are usually regarded as safe procedures with low complication rates and are recommended for anyone over the age of fifty for colon cancer screening. Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare complication of colonoscopy with few reported cases in the English literature. We present the only reported case of such a complication in the state of Hawai‘i and the 44th reported case in the English literature. Physicians need to be more aware of the possibility of splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following colonoscopy to avoid delay of diagnosis and treatment of this life-threatening complication. PMID:20535686</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.control.toronto.edu/~maggiore/DATA/PAPERS/CONFERENCES/MTNS04.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">MANEUVER REGULATION, <span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> FEEDBACK LINEARIZATION, AND ZERO</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Maggiore, Manfredi</p> <p></p> <p>MANEUVER REGULATION, <span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> FEEDBACK LINEARIZATION, AND ZERO DYNAMICS Chris Nielsen,1 Manfredi focus is on output maneuver regulation where stabilizing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> dynamics is a key requirement. Keywords: Maneuver regulation, path following, feedback linearization, zero dynamics, non-square systems</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6694985"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> momentum distributions of hadrons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jacak, B.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The study of hadron production in heavy ion collisions is essential to the search for effects beyond independent nucleon-nucleon collisions, for example the predicted phase transition to quark matter. Hadron distributions are known over a large range of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momenta for p-p collisions, so a careful study of the differences can be made. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum distributions of hadrons may provide global information about p-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions, such as the degree of thermalization achieved, and perhaps provide evidence for collective expansion of the highly excited central region. Comparison of the p{sub t} and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mass, m{sub t}, distributions of different hadronic species are crucial to extract this kind of information. Hadronic p{sub t} spectra show effects of the collision dynamics, such as hard scattering processes, and possibly rescattering of partons as well as of the formed hadrons. Such modifications have been observed in p-nucleus collisions, and can be expected to be important in nucleus-nucleus reactions. The spectral shape changes arising in this manner cause a background in efforts to extract global information from hadronic p{sub t} spectra. Lastly, there is an excess of pions observed at low p{sub t} in p-A and A-A collisions. the origin of these soft pions is not yet well understood. The phenomenon represents a major difference between p-p and nuclear collisions. 31 refs., 8 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21293498"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> spin effects at COMPASS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pesaro, G. [Trieste University and INFN, via Valerio 2, 34148 Trieste (Italy)</p> <p>2009-03-23</p> <p>The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has a broad physics program focused on the nucleon spin structure and on hadron spectroscopy, using both muon and hadron beams. One of the main objectives for the spin program with the muon beam is the measurement of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin effects in semi inclusive deep inelastic scattering. A longitudinally polarized 160 GeV/c muon beam is impinging on a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized target: from 2002 to 2004 a {sup 6}LiD(deuteron) target has been used, while during 2007 data taking a NH{sub 3}(proton) target was put in place. All measured <span class="hlt">transverse</span> asymmetries on deuteron have been found to be small, and compatible with zero, within the few percent statistical errors. These results, which are currently used as input for global fits, can be interpreted as cancellation between u and d quark contribution in the deuteron. The first results for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries for charged hadrons from the 2007 proton COMPASS data are also presented and discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972126"><span id="translatedtitle">Apple <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Issues</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Syn, C</p> <p>2009-12-22</p> <p><span class="hlt">Strength</span> of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> (UTS), yield <span class="hlt">strength</span> (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the <span class="hlt">strength</span> and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. <span class="hlt">Strength</span> data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile <span class="hlt">strengths</span> have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' <span class="hlt">strength</span> data are typically presented. An example of <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the <span class="hlt">strength</span> reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of <span class="hlt">strength</span> indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post-LEP apples seem to have been from a single batch of material. The pre-LEP apples of the weak <span class="hlt">strength</span> and the post-LEP apples with even weaker <span class="hlt">strength</span> could have been made of the same batch of material, and the small <span class="hlt">strength</span> differential might be due to the difference in the induction heating system. If the pre-LEP apples with the lower <span class="hlt">strength</span> and the post LEP apples are made from the same batch of material, their combined scatter of <span class="hlt">strength</span> data would be wider and can be understood as a result of the additional processing steps of stress relief and induction heating as discussed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992dtam.confR....S"><span id="translatedtitle">The experimental assessment of jet <span class="hlt">transverse</span> velocity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Summers, Richard L.; Wright, Kipp C.</p> <p></p> <p>Shaped charge jets exhibit a velocity gradient from tip to tail, stretching the jet until it particulates. After particulation, jet particle tumble and lack of jet straightness degrade penetration. Jet straightness is characterized by the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> velocities of the jet particles. The measurement of jet <span class="hlt">transverse</span> velocity requires a great deal of experimental precision. An experimental method involving flash x-ray equipment for the measurement of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> velocity is presented. In addition, the mechanisms which induce jet <span class="hlt">transverse</span> velocities are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1991-THESIS-A258"><span id="translatedtitle">Optimum design of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tendons in post-tensioned slab bridges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Aftab, Syed</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>of the tendons. The lower bounds for spacing and force are taken to be zero. Also, maximum principal stresses in the slab are limited by the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of concrete, i. e. F) F) F) F2 F2 F2 l I I I st s 7 <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Post ? Tensioning FIG. 2. Design...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54852069"><span id="translatedtitle">Anisotropy of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetoresistance in cubic magnetite at room temperature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>D. Kostopoulos; K. Alexopoulos</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The room-temperature <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetoresistance of cubic synthetic magnetite was measured for various field <span class="hlt">strengths</span>, with the field rotated within the (110) plane. The results can be interpreted as being due to a linear negative term and a positive term that saturates beyond 4 kG. The negative term is isotropic whereas the positive one is anisotropic, being largest for the [110</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18073627"><span id="translatedtitle">Measurements of electrical discharge properties of a <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-flow CO2 laser</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>E. Ose; A. Schumann; W. Triebel</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>This paper deals with investigations of the dependence of the spatial structure of the electrical potential, the current density, the gas temperature, and the reduced electrical field <span class="hlt">strength</span> in the discharge volume of a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> gas flow CO2 laser on the geometry of the electrodes. The data were obtained by means of Langmuir double probes. The results are compared with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1116343"><span id="translatedtitle">QCD Evolution of Helicity and <span class="hlt">Transversity</span> TMDs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Prokudin, Alexei [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and <span class="hlt">transversity</span> parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13067654"><span id="translatedtitle">Generating Problems: Weighted <span class="hlt">Transversals</span> of a Hypergraph</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>E. Boros; V. Gurvich; L. Khachiyan; K. Makino</p> <p></p> <p>We consider a generalization of the notion of <span class="hlt">transversal</span> to a flnite hypergraph, so called weighted <span class="hlt">transversals</span>. Given a non-negative weight vector assigned to each hyperedge of an input hypergraph A and a non- negative threshold vector, we deflne a weighted <span class="hlt">transversal</span> as a mini- mal vertex set which intersects all the hyperedges of A except for a sub- family</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2930608"><span id="translatedtitle">The impact of Vitamin C supplementation in pregnancy and in-vitro upon fetal membrane <span class="hlt">strength</span> and remodeling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mercer, Brian M.; Abdelrahim, Adli; Moore, Robert M.; Novak, Jillian; Kumar, Deepak; Mansour, Joseph M.; Perez-Fournier, Marina; Milluzzi, Cynthia J.; Moore, John J.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Generation of reactive-oxygen species (ROS) has been suggested as a mechanism of fetal membrane (FM) weakening leading to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, particularly with preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the fetal membranes (preterm PROM). In vitro, FM incubation with Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mimics physiological FM weakening, concomitant with generation of ROS and collagen remodeling. Proinflammatory cytokines are also postulated to have a role in the development of the FM physiological weak zone where <span class="hlt">rupture</span> normally initiates in term gestations. We hypothesized that antioxidant treatment may block ROS development and resultant FM weakening. Two studies examining antioxidant effects upon FM <span class="hlt">strength</span> were conducted, one in vivo and the other in vitro. FM of patients enrolled in a multicenter placebo-controlled trial to determine the effect of Vitamin C (1 gm/day) and Vitamin E (400IU/day) upon complications of preeclampsia were examined for FM biomechanical properties and biochemical remodeling at birth. Separately, biomechanics and biochemical markers of remodeling were determined in FM fragments incubated with TNF with or without Vitamin C pre-incubation. Supplemental dietary Vitamin C in combination with Vitamin E did not modify <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>, work to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, or MMP9 (protein or activity) either within or outside the term FM physiological weak zone. In vitro, TNF decreased FM <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> by 50% while increasing MMP9 protein. Vitamin C did not inhibit these TNF-induced effects. Vitamin C alone had a weakening effect on FM in vitro. We speculate that vitamin C supplementation during pregnancy will not be useful in the prevention of preterm PROM. PMID:20581351</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.2164E"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> termination at restraining bends: The last great earthquake on the Altyn Tagh Fault</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Elliott, Austin J.; Oskin, Michael E.; Liu-Zeng, Jing; Shao, Yanxiu</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Strike-slip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation falters where changes in fault strike increase Coulomb failure stress. Numerical models of this phenomenon offer predictions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> extent based on bend geometry, but have not been verified with field data. To test model predictions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> barriers, we examine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> extent along a section of the sinistral Altyn Tagh Fault punctuated by three major double bends. We measure 3-8 m offsets and map >95 km of continuous scarps that define the most recent surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We document the eastern terminus of this <span class="hlt">rupture</span> within the Aksay bend, where an undeformed Pleistocene alluvial fan we mapped and dated overlaps the fault. We conclude, based on this geomorphologic evidence, that multiple Holocene <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have stopped in the Aksay bend. Our field data validate model predictions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> termination at a >18° restraining bend and support use of geometric parameters to define expected earthquake sizes in seismic hazard models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29505602"><span id="translatedtitle">Insidious bilateral infrapatellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>L M Cooney; J M Aversa; J H Newman</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus developed insidious bilateral infrapatellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initially diagnosed as steroid myopathy. Simultaneous loss of extension at the knee due to quadriceps or infrapatellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> is reviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1000628"><span id="translatedtitle">Insidious bilateral infrapatellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cooney, L M; Aversa, J M; Newman, J H</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus developed insidious bilateral infrapatellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initially diagnosed as steroid myopathy. Simultaneous loss of extension at the knee due to quadriceps or infrapatellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> is reviewed. Images PMID:7458438</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S11C4364F"><span id="translatedtitle">Mechanical and Microphysical Constraints on Co-seismic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> into the Creeping Segment of the San Andreas Fault</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>French, M. E.; Chester, F. M.; Chester, J. S.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Experimentally-determined mechanical properties of clay-rich fault rock, and the associated micromechanical processes, are used to constrain the conditions of slip instability along the San Andreas Fault (SAF). Using smectite-rich fault gouge collected from the Central Deforming Zone (CDZ) of the SAF in the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), rotary and triaxial shear deformation experiments were conducted at rates that correspond to co-seismic slip (1 m/s) and in-situ creep (~10-10 s-1). Frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span> depends on rate, temperature, availability of pore water, and fabric development, all of which reflect operation of different microscopic mechanisms at high and low shear rates. On the basis of the results, we use an energy balance for a propagating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to evaluate the potential for seismic slip along the CDZ. Appropriate scaling of the gouge <span class="hlt">strength</span> from experimental to in-situ conditions, particularly for seismic slip rates, is critical to evaluating seismic hazards. Accordingly, the micromechanical processes identified from results of the deformation experiments are used to constrain and evaluate several different scaling relations between <span class="hlt">strength</span>, critical displacement, and normal stress for the CDZ gouge. Experiments show that, at in situ creep rates, dislocation glide in clay is the rate-controlling mechanism and is responsible for the low <span class="hlt">strength</span> (? = 0.11), which limits the potential energy available for sustaining co-seismic frictional slip. As a consequence, microseismic patches within the CDZ are predicted to arrest for all scaling relationships under in-situ deformation conditions. Dynamic weakening at co-seismic rates involves thermal fluid pressurization, and for some scaling relations may be sufficient to sustain propagation of a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that nucleates within the adjacent locked segment into the CDZ</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NIH-MEDLINEPLUS&redirectUrl=http://kidshealth.org/parent/nutrition_center/staying_fit/strength_training.html"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> Training and Your Child</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... prevent injuries and speed up recovery. About <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Training <span class="hlt">Strength</span> training is the practice of using free weights, weight ... harder, they grow stronger and more efficient. <span class="hlt">Strength</span> training can also help fortify the ligaments and tendons ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32397033"><span id="translatedtitle">Multi-slice computed tomography with N1177 identifies <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> atherosclerotic plaques in rabbits</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Jozef Leo Van Herck; Guido R. Y. De Meyer; Wim Martinet; Rodrigo A. Salgado; Bharati Shivalkar; Roel De Mondt; Helene Van De Ven; Annick Ludwig; Pieter Van Der Veken; Luc Van Vaeck; Hidde Bult; Arnold G. Herman; Christiaan J. Vrints</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rupture</span>-prone and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> plaques are characterized by the presence of large numbers of macrophages. N1177 is a contrast\\u000a agent consisting of iodinated nanoparticles that are selectively phagocytosed by macrophages. The aim of this study was to\\u000a investigate the effect of N1177 on the CT attenuation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>-prone and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> plaques in rabbits. In addition, we examined\\u000a in vitro whether uptake</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/22494920"><span id="translatedtitle">Differential scanning calorimetric examination of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> lower limb tendons in human</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>N. Wiegand; L. Vámhidy; D. L?rinczy</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are serious injuries of the lover limb in middle age and physically active population. While the Achilles\\u000a tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is common, the patellar ligament and quadriceps ligament <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are an absolutely rare injury. Usually there\\u000a is no correlation between the velocity of the trauma and the supervening of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The aetiology of the degenerative\\u000a changes in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.T11B4563B"><span id="translatedtitle">Improved Data Set for the Frequency of Gaps and Steps in Ground <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Biasi, G. P.; Wesnousky, S. G.; Morelan, A. E., III</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Observations of actual ground <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from moderate and large earthquakes show a wide range of behaviors, including fault-to-fault jumps, branching topologies, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> traces with multi-kilometer gaps between them. Seismic hazard assessments have responded to these observations by including increasingly sophisticated scenarios of possible <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in their earthquake rate forecasts. The largest of these to date has been the Uniform California Earthquake Forecast 3 (UCERF3), which explicitly included <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> with fault-to-fault jumps in its <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate estimates. High-level site-specific seismic source characterizations such as for the Diablo Canyon Power Plant have also begun including complicated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> geometries. Systematic collection of observations from ground <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> earthquakes provide one way to evaluate these seismic source models. We have expanded an initial collection by Wesnousky (2008) with events post-dating that collection and events for which new information is available. New events increase the strike-slip and normal event set by 50% and reverse events by 35%. New data allow us to revise previous estimates for strike-slip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the probability that a step of 1 km or more in width will arrest <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Observationally, 65% of strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> include at least one step of 1 km or greater. The number of steps through which <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are observed to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> through can be modeled by a geometric distribution in which steps are crossed about 59% of the time. Steps are slightly more effective at arresting <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in normal and reverse faulting cases, being crossed 56% and 50%, respectively. New events were also systematically examined for gaps in the mapped <span class="hlt">rupture</span> trace. We find gaps of 1 km or more in about half of the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the new event set. These empirical data will compliment new research into <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation across gaps, exemplified by the 2010 El Mayor Cucapah earthquake, which included a gap measured variously at 7 or 15 km in length.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/33951848"><span id="translatedtitle">Chronic Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> reconstruction using a modified flexor hallucis longus transfer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Julien Wegrzyn; Jean-François Luciani; Rémi Philippot; Elisabeth Brunet-Guedj; Bernard Moyen; Jean-Luc Besse</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to report the management and outcome of 11 patients presenting with chronic Achilles tendon\\u000a (AT) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> treated by a modified flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfer. Seven patients presented with a neglected AT <span class="hlt">rupture</span>,\\u000a one with a chronic AT <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with Achilles tendinosis and three with an AT re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span>. AT defect after fibrosis\\u000a debridement</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/55/70/04/PDF/2007.22.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> et asymtrie de la transmission des prix agricoles internationaux</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> et asymétrie de la transmission des prix agricoles internationaux Julie Subervie octobre de prix mondiaux aux producteurs. Les mécanismes d'intervention sur les prix peuvent en eet conduire à un aai- blissement de la transmission des variations de prix mondiaux aux producteurs, mais</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2495524"><span id="translatedtitle">Retroperitoneal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the duodenum due to blunt trauma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Strachan, J. C. M.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>The subject is reviewed and a further case of retroperitoneal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the second part of the duodenum due to blunt abdominal trauma in a child is reported. The equivocal initial clinical signs and characteristic X-rays are described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/14332833"><span id="translatedtitle">FUNCTIONAL RESULTS AFTER SURGICAL REPAIR OF QUADRICEPS TENDON <span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>T. DE BAERE; B. GEULETTE; L. BARRAS</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>We present the long-term results of surgical repair of a traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon in a group of 24 patients with a mean age of 58 years. There were 21 male and 3 female patients. Fifteen patients were seen for clinical control after a mean follow-up of 75 months and they all presented with some quadriceps muscle atrophy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.brl.uiuc.edu/Publications/2005/Ammi-USProc-846-2005.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Double Passive Cavitation Detection of OptisonTM Shell <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of</p> <p></p> <p>Double Passive Cavitation Detection of OptisonTM Shell <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Azzdine Y. Ammi1 , Robin O). The experimental setup is based on a passive cavitation detection system described in previous work. However by ultrasonic capsule destruction [3,4]. In previous work using a passive cavitation detection (PCD) system [5</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20373929"><span id="translatedtitle">Quality of care for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> uterus in Sagamu, Nigeria.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oladapo, O T; Durojaiye, B O</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>A retrospective study was conducted at a Nigerian tertiary hospital to assess the quality of emergency care provided to women managed for a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> uterus over an 11-year period. There were 76 cases of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> uterus and 4,770 deliveries (1.6%) during the period. Ten women died from a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> uterus, giving a case fatality rate of 13.2%. The mean admission-assessment interval by a senior clinician was 48.4 min. The mean decision-laparotomy interval was 6.9 h. Deviations from management protocol were noted in 66 women (86.8%) and underlying reasons were classified as patient-orientated (59.2%), medical personnel (13.2%) and administrative (22.4%) problems. Among women who died, there were more administrative problems, intraoperative and total blood losses were significantly more and preoperative haematocrit was significantly less compared with survivors. The poor quality of care for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> uterus in this centre is attributable to patients' financial limitations, which is compounded by administrative problems, particularly those regarding inefficient blood transfusion services. This study demonstrates the urgent need for implementation of a national health insurance scheme at this centre and reiterates the feasibility of employing detailed enquiry of peripartal circumstances to identify specific problems underlying major causes of maternal morbidity and mortality. PMID:20373929</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23947891"><span id="translatedtitle">Anthrax toxin-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of artificial lipid bilayer membranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nablo, Brian J; Panchal, Rekha G; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E; Robertson, Joseph W F; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M; Kasianowicz, John J</p> <p>2013-08-14</p> <p>We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm. PMID:23947891</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3751978"><span id="translatedtitle">Anthrax toxin-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of artificial lipid bilayer membranes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm. PMID:23947891</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25368704"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous postpartum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an intact uterus: a case report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mavromatidis, George; Karavas, George; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Petousis, Stamatios; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Rousso, David</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of uterus is an obstetrical complication characterized by a breach in the uterine wall and the overlying serosa. We report an unusual case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an unscarred uterus in a 33-year-old woman, a day after her third successful vaginal delivery. A 33-year-old pregnant woman, gravid 3, para 3, was referred to our department at 39 gestational week because of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes. Despite tocolysis administration, her pregnancy was delivered vaginally after 2 days, giving birth to a male neonate of 3,020 g with normal Apgar scores at first and fifth minute. Her uterus was intact and gynecological examination after delivery was normal without any potential signs or symptoms of pathology. However, the day following her labor, patient complained of left iliac fossa pain. Her blood tests revealed a CRP value at 27.6 mg/L, whereas the X-rays revealed an extensive impacted fecal mass in the colon. MRI revealed that the left lower myometrial part of the uterus was depicted abrupt, with simultaneous presence of hemorrhagic stuff. The decision of laparotomy was therefore made in order to further evaluate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of uterus and properly treat patient. And subtotal hysterectomy was performed. Postoperative follow-up period was not characterized by any complications and patient was finally discharged 4 days after hysterectomy. PMID:25368704</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www-civ.eng.cam.ac.uk/cjb/papers/cp80.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">ACCELERATED TECHNIQUE TO PREDICT STRESS-<span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span> BEHAVIOUR OF ARAMID</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Burgoyne, Chris</p> <p></p> <p>ACCELERATED TECHNIQUE TO PREDICT STRESS-<span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span> BEHAVIOUR OF ARAMID FIBRES Ioannis P. Giannopoulos PhD student, Dept of Engineering, University of Cambridge, UK Chris J. Burgoyne Reader in Concrete Structures, Dept of Engineering, University of Cambridge, UK Keywords: Stepped Isothermal Method, Stress</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://rses.anu.edu.au/~nick/teachdoc/papers/Lomax_Michelini_2009.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Tsunami early warning using earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration Anthony Lomax1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Rawlinson, Nick</p> <p></p> <p>Tsunami early warning using earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration Anthony Lomax1 and Alberto Michelini2] Effective tsunami early warning for coastlines near a tsunamigenic earthquake requires notification within 5, greater than about 50 s. Here we show that T0 gives more information on tsunami importance than moment</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48906082"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> dynamics with energy loss outside the slip zone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>D. J. Andrews</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Energy loss in a fault damage zone, outside the slip zone, contributes to the fracture energy that determines <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of an earthquake. A nonelastic two-dimensional dynamic calculation is done in which the slip zone is modeled as a fault plane and material off the fault is subject to a Coulomb yield condition. In a mode 2 crack-like solution in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55022822"><span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a fault kink in antiplane model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. Adda-Bedia; R. Madariaga</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>We study the propagation, seismic radiation and energy balance of a two-dimensional antiplane crack that propagates at a constant sub-shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity when it encounters a geometric discontinuity on the fault. We solve exactly the case of a kink of arbitrary angle as well as that of a finite unbreakable barrier that serves as a model. The solution obtained by</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/t356627370m1655p.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Neonatal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the bladder secondary to posterior urethral valves</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>L. Johanson</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the neonatal urinary bladder during pregnancy or delivery is an extremely rare event, in some patients seondary to posterior urethral valves. In a recent case early diagnosis facilitated prompt surgical repair. A temporary bladder fistula secured survival and micturition cystourethrography establishment of the valves, which were successfully resected at two weeks of age.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v103/iB12/98JB02302/98JB02302.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Poroelastic rebound along the Landers 1992 earthquake surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Gilles Peltzer; Paul Rosen; Francois Rogez; K. Hudnut</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Maps of surface displacement following the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake, generated by interferometric processing of ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, reveal effects of various postseismic deformation processes along the 1992 surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The large-scale pattern of the postseismic displacement field includes large lobes, mostly visible on the west side of the fault, comparable in shape with the lobes observed</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S13D4479L"><span id="translatedtitle">A Reliable Way to Track <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Process of Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Z.; Ge, Z.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Compressive sensing (CS) is an algorithm which could find the solution to a sparse linear problem, which is physically consist with inversion problem of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. Because relative to the whole fault plane, the seismic power radiation area is sparse in a specific moment during a great earthquake. CS method is used to invert the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process from teleseismic P wave data recorded by multiple seismic arrays with different azimuths and epicentral distances. Synthetic tests illustrate that, our method can suppress the artifacts caused by interference phases ( eg. PcP ) thus we can obtain a more reliable result than using the data from a single array. Moreover, the "swimming effect" in traditional back-projection method can be reduced due to the better azimuth coverage. Then the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the Mw7.9 earthquake in the Aleutian Islands, occurred at June 23, 2014 20:53 UTC is inverted. The results show that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is along the subduction zone, which can be used to locate the primary fault plane combined with central moment tensor. In addition, where the released power concentrates in the earthquake is also given, which could help us determine which area is effected by the earthquake most heavily, thus the rescue operation can be effective. In conclusion, different from traditional beamforming method, CS can offer a high-resolution solution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/38329744"><span id="translatedtitle">Cognitive impairments after surgical repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and unruptured aneurysms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Argye E Hillis; Nancy Anderson; Prakesh Sampath; Daniele Rigamonti</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVESTo determine the frequency and severity of neuropsychological impairments associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, and associated with repair of intracerebral aneurysms.METHODSTwo groups of patients who underwent repair of intracerebral aneurysms were studied: patients with unruptured aneurysms (n=20) and patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms (n=27). All patients were administered a battery of standardised neuropsychological tests about 3 months after surgery. A subset</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/x6607l1417608833.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> cystic mesenchymal hamartoma: An unusual cause of neonatal ascites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>J. C. George; M. D. Cohen; R. D. Tarver; R. N. Rosales</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Cystic mesenchymal hamartoma is an uncommon benign liver neoplasm usually seen in infants with an asymptomatic abdominal mass [1]. We report a neonate who presented with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cystic mesenchymal hamartoma which produced respiratory distress due to massive ascites. To our knowledge, this complication has never been reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29553805"><span id="translatedtitle">Early aortic valve cusp <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in relapsing polychondritis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>D A Marshall; R Jackson; A P Rae; H A Capell</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Aortic regurgitation associated with relapsing polychondritis usually occurs late in the disease as a result of aortic root dilatation. A case where aortic regurgitation occurred early and was due to cusp <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with a normal aortic root is reported. The patient required urgent aortic valve replacement within six weeks of developing a murmur despite apparent control of inflammation with immunosuppressive</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10990565"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the left common iliac vein.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gaschignard, N; Le Paul, Y; Maouni, T; Le Priol, P D</p> <p>2000-09-01</p> <p>We report a case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the left common iliac vein in a 58-year-old woman. Because of hemorrhagic shock, the intervention had to be performed under emergency circumstances, precluding repair of the external iliac vein, which was ligated. The postoperative course was uneventful. We also review the 17 prior cases found in the literature. PMID:10990565</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870006230&hterms=earthquake+italy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dearthquake%2Bitaly"><span id="translatedtitle">Mechanics of shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> applied to earthquake zones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Li, Victor C.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The mechanics of shear slippage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in rock masses are reviewed. The essential ideas in fracture mechanics are summarized emphasizing the interpretation and relation among the fracture parameters in shear cracks. The slip-weakening model is described. The general formulation of the problem of nonuniform slip distribution in a continuum is covered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4296268"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous Endovascular Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Cerebral Aneurysms and Vasospasm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cho, Young Dae; Ahn, Jun Hyong; Jung, Seung Chai; Kim, Chang Hun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Lim, Jeong Wook</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objective The management of patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysms and severe vasospasm is subject to considerable controversy. We intended to describe herein an endovascular technique for the simultaneous treatment of aneurysms and vasospasm. Materials and Methods A series of 11 patients undergoing simultaneous endovascular treatment of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms and vasospasm were reviewed. After placement of a guiding catheter within the proximal internal carotid artery for coil embolization, an infusion line of nimodipine was wired to one hub, and of a microcatheter was advanced through another hub (to select and deliver detachable coils). Nimodipine was then infused continuously during the coil embolization. Results This technique was applied to 11 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms accompanied by vasospasm (anterior communicating artery, 6 patients; internal carotid artery, 2 patients; posterior communicating and middle cerebral arteries, 1 patient each). Aneurysmal occlusion by coils and nimodipine-induced angioplasty were simultaneously achieved, resulting in excellent outcomes for all patients, and there were no procedure-related complications. Eight patients required repeated nimodipine infusions. Conclusion Our small series of patients suggests that the simultaneous endovascular management of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysms and vasospasm is a viable approach in patients presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and severe vasospasm. PMID:25598688</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1502.03623.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Force-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a DNA duplex</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Mosayebi, Majid; Doye, Jonathan P K; Ouldridge, Thomas E</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article we consider the shear-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> a duplex within a given experiment depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to demonstrate that this approach naturally captures the experimentally observed dependence of the critical force on duplex length for a given observation time. In particular, the critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence o...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28957594"><span id="translatedtitle">Repair of distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in athletes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Donald F. DAlessandro; Clarence L. Shields; James E. Tibone; Robert W. Chandler</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Ten athletes with distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> that had been anatomically repaired with a double-incision technique were reviewed to determine their functional recovery. All of the patients were men, with an average age of 40 years (range, 25 to 49). Eight of the 10 patients were weight lifters or body builders, and 7 had participated on a competitive level at</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59314720"><span id="translatedtitle">Audit on the management of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> membranes at term</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>S Manjambigai; H Sawhney; R Nagrani</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>AimThe National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines advocate induction of labour (IOL) with Syntocinon infusion after 24 h of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes (SROM) at term and avoidance of digital examination. Based on this guideline, we audited our practice of IOL and also audited the documentation of discussion with patients about duration and pain relief in labour</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23151757"><span id="translatedtitle">Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during trial of labor: controversy of induction's methods.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ophir, Ella; Odeh, Marwan; Hirsch, Yael; Bornstein, Jacob</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>The rate of attempted vaginal birth after cesarean has decreased during the past 15 years. Most of the change since the mid 1990s is the result of increasing reports of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during trial of labor, with the highest rates related to labor induction. Not all induction agents have the same magnitude of increased risk of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and there have been only a small number of randomized controlled trials of labor induction in women with previous cesarean delivery. Evaluation of the evidence on specific methods of induction reveals that the lowest rate of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs with oxytocin at 1.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.9%-1.5%) then dinoprostone at 2% (95% CI, 1.1%-3.5%), and the highest rate is with misoprostol, 6% (95% CI, 0.74%-51.4%). We review the incidence of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during induction of labor after previous cesarean and examine the methods of induction and the safety of different techniques for cervical ripening, induction, and/or augmentation of labor in women with previous cesarean delivery. PMID:23151757</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2366171"><span id="translatedtitle">Delayed repair in Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. A case report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Beckett, D E</p> <p>1990-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Achilles tendon is a significant injury. The management of this problem can be greatly complicated if there is a time delay between the injury and the patient seeking professional care. The author presents such a case and looks at the various philosophies relative to therapy. PMID:2366171</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6644869"><span id="translatedtitle">New finding in the radiographic diagnosis of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Newmark, H.; Mellon, W.S. Jr.; Malhotra, A.K.; Olken, S.M.; Halls, J.</p> <p>1982-06-01</p> <p>The authors describe a new radiographic sign of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the Achilles tendon system. It is a fracture, with separation through an osteophyte at the insertion of this tendon. Previously reported signs are also discussed as well as the present case report.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://w3.pppl.gov/~egilson/pub/Gilson.PhysRev.ST-I.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> beam compression on the Paul trap simulator experiment Erik P. Gilson,* Moses Chung, Ronald C. Davidson, Philip C. Efthimion, and Richard Majeski</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Gilson, Erik</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> beam compression on the Paul trap simulator experiment Erik P. Gilson,* Moses Chung the lattice period and <span class="hlt">strength</span> are changed over the course of the experiment to <span class="hlt">transversely</span> compress a beam by the beam compression process. Both the results of particle-in-cell simulations performed with the warp code</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29293435"><span id="translatedtitle">Reconstruction of patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A case report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Milankov Ziva Miroslav; Semnic Robert; Miljkovi? Natasa; Harhaji Vladimir</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following use of its central third for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. We report one case of patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after harvesting the mid-third for ACL reconstruction. A number of different surgical methods exist for reconstructing patellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Here we report a case using a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.biotheory.umd.edu/PDF/Barsegov_PRL_2008.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Role of Internal Chain Dynamics on the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Kinetic of Adhesive Contacts V. Barsegov,1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Thirumalai, Devarajan</p> <p></p> <p>the applied force (f) to the chain end is less than the critical force for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (fc), the reversible <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is coupled to the internal Rouse modes. If f=fc > 1 the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is irreversible. In both the stability of the stem. Using an exactly solvable Rouse model, with one or two adhesive contacts between</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30224584"><span id="translatedtitle">Neonatal sepsis after betamethasone administration to patients with preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Stephen T. Vermillion; David E. Soper; Jennifer Chasedunn-Roark</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Objective: We sought to determine the effect of antenatal betamethasone exposure on the incidence of early onset neonatal sepsis in patients with preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes. Study Design: We performed a nonconcurrent prospective analysis of infants delivered between 24 and 34 weeks’ gestation after preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes. Patients with preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes were categorized into</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.acclab.helsinki.fi/~knordlun/pub/Las13preprint.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Loop punching and bubble <span class="hlt">rupture</span> causing surface roughening -a model for W fuzz growth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Nordlund, Kai</p> <p></p> <p>epl draft Loop punching and bubble <span class="hlt">rupture</span> causing surface roughening - a model for W fuzz growth A growth by loop punching. The bubbles close to the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The balance between these processes]. Instead, we show that the balance between loop punching and bubble <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cause the kinetic surface</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60890823"><span id="translatedtitle">THE EFFECT OF ATMOSPHERE ON CREEP-<span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span> PROPERTIES OF A NICKEL-CHROMIUM- ALUMINUM ALLOY</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>P. Shahinian; M. R. Achter</p> <p>1958-01-01</p> <p>The role of ductility in the effect of environment om creep and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ; properties was investigated employing a 76% nickel, 19% chromium, and 4% aluminum ; alloy. Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests were conducted primarily in air and im vacuum at ; 1300, 1500, and 1900 deg F. It was found that at low temperatures and high ; stresses, timeto-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> was longer</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://seismo.berkeley.edu/~rallen/pub/2010wurman/WurmanPhDThesis2010.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake Early Warning and the Physics of Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Gilead Wurman</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Allen, Richard M.</p> <p></p> <p>Earthquake Early Warning and the Physics of Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> By Gilead Wurman 2010 #12; #12; 1 Abstract Earthquake Early Warning and the Physics of Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of whether earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are self-similar, cascading failures, or whether their size is somehow</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/~shaw/publications/Shaw13b.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Appendix E--Evaluation of Magnitude-Scaling Relationships and Depth of <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Shaw, Bruce E.</p> <p></p> <p>Statement of the Problem In the Uniform California Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Forecast, version 2 (UCERF2) (Working for the Uniform California Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Forecast, version 3 (UCERF3). Earthquake Sizes Continued use-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University. #12;Appendix E of Uniform California Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Forecast</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12836398"><span id="translatedtitle">PREDISPOSITION OF DOG BREEDS TO <span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span> OF THE CRANIAL CRUCIATE LIGAMENT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. NEâAS; J. ZATLOUKAL; H. KECOVÁ; M. DVO</p> <p></p> <p>Neãas A., J. Zatloukal, H. Kecová, M. Dvofiák: Predisposition of Dog Breeds to <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Cranial Cruciate Ligament. Acta Vet. Brno 2000, 69: 305-310. Obtaining more data on breed predisposition of dogs to the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and data on accompanying abnormalities of joints of pelvic limbs affected by the CCL <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may help in answering some questions</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6695289"><span id="translatedtitle">Idiopathic uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the mid-trimester of pregnancy. A case report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Duflou, J A; Odes, R A</p> <p>1984-02-11</p> <p>Spontaneous uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the second trimester of pregnancy is rare. A case of spontaneous fundal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a multigravid woman who had had two previous lower segment caesarean sections is described. The atypical clinical presentation and postmortem findings are evaluated and discussed. Keys to the diagnosis and principles of management of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the pregnant uterus are outlined. PMID:6695289</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.T11A0346S"><span id="translatedtitle">Variable <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Mode at Subduction Zones Around the Pacific</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Satake, K.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>The enormity of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, in comparison with 19th- and 20th-century earthquakes in its <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area, serves as a reminder that a subduction zone may produce earthquakes larger than those in recorded in the past. Historical record and paleoseismological data show that variability in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode is characteristic of some subduction zones. Infrequent, gigantic earthquakes predominate in geologic records, while historic data tell of more frequent, smaller earthquakes. This implies that along the Cascadia subduction zone, great (M > 8) earthquake can occur more frequently than estimated from paleoseismological record. Like the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the giant 1960 Chilean earthquake (Mw 9.5) was unusually large. Historical predecessors of the 1960 earthquake occurred in 1837, 1737, and 1575. However, midway along the 1960 <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, only the 1575 event produced geologic records of subsidence and tsunami as obvious as those of 1960. The 1837 and 1737 <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were probably small, at least at this latitude (Cisternas et al., 2005). Along the Nankai trough of southwest Japan, recurrence of semi-regular earthquakes has been documented in the 1300 years' written history, with an indication of some variability. The easternmost Suruga trough was <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> in 1854 but not in 1944, leaving a seismic gap for the anticipated Tokai earthquake. The 1707 earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> both Nankai and Tokai sources that <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> separately in 1854 and in 1944 and 1946. The 1605 earthquake seems to be an unusual tsunami earthquake. Near Tokyo, along the Sagami trough, historical records and marine terraces show two types of large earthquakes (1923 type and 1703 type; Shishikura, 2003); their average recurrence intervals are estimated geologically as several hundred years and a few thousand years, respectively. Earthquakes larger than Mw 8.2 can happen along the southern Kuril trench even though they are unknown from the 200-year written history of Hokkaido. Plate-boundary earthquakes close to M 8, at intervals of 100 years or less, had been considered characteristic in this subduction zone. The 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (M 8.0), for instance, was preceded by similar earthquakes, from slightly different source areas, in 1952 and 1843. However, tsunami deposits show that unusually large tsunamis repeated at intervals averaging about 500 yr, with the most recent event in the 17th century (Hirakawa et al., 2000; Nanayama et al., 2003). The inferred inundation area is much wider than those typical earthquakes, and is best explained by earthquakes that broke more than one of the historical segments. Only these multi-segment earthquakes triggered deep postseismic creep that produced decimeters of coastal uplift (Sawai et al., 2004).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24144568"><span id="translatedtitle">A retrospective analysis of urethral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in 63 cats.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Addison, Elena S; Halfacree, Zoe; Moore, Alasdair Hotston; Demetriou, Jackie; Parsons, Kevin; Tivers, Michael</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to investigate the short- and long-term morbidity and mortality associated with urethral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in cats. Medical records were reviewed from four veterinary hospitals. Diagnosis was made from retrograde urethrography or direct visualisation during surgery. Location of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was categorised as pre-, intra- or post-pelvic. Follow-up data were collected from referring veterinarians. Sixty-three cats were included in the study of which, males predominated (88.9%). Trauma was the most common cause (n = 35; 55.6%) with the remainder due to iatrogenic injury. Forty-eight cats (88.9%) were treated surgically and six (11.1%) managed conservatively. Significant differences between cats suffering traumatic versus iatrogenic injury included the presence of musculoskeletal injuries (P <0.001); the location of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (P <0.001); the degree of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (P <0.001); definitive management (P <0.001) and short-term complications (P = 0.026). Short-term complications were significantly associated with the following: musculoskeletal injuries (P = 0.012); uroabdomen/uroretroperitoneum (P = 0.004); azotaemia (P = 0.021); postoperative urinary diversion (P = 0.036) and >1 surgery performed (P = 0.006). Forty-seven cats (74.6%) survived to discharge. Prognostic factors associated with survival to discharge included the presence of musculoskeletal injuries (P = 0.017); cause of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (P = 0.017); location of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (P = 0.039) and definitive management (P = 0.020). Twenty-four cats (57.1%) suffered short-term complications and 10 (27.0%) suffered long-term complications. Of those cats surviving to discharge 30 (71.4%) had a good outcome. Median follow-up was 16 months. Outcome was significantly associated with cause of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (P = 0.04); short-term complications (P = 0.03) and long-term complications (P <0.001). In conclusion, a significantly greater proportion of cats with iatrogenic injuries survived to discharge and had a good outcome compared with those that suffered trauma. PMID:24144568</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T51C2486M"><span id="translatedtitle">Seismic waves radiated during dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of granite laboratory samples</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mclaskey, G.; Kilgore, B. D.; Lockner, D. A.; Beeler, N. M.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Using arrays of piezoelectric sensors, we analyze the way that seismic waves are radiated during dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of saw-cut faults in granite laboratory samples. We compare stick-slip events generated on a on a 0.15 m-long fault in a triaxial apparatus at 70 to 200 MPa normal stress with those on a 2 m-long fault in a large-scale biaxial apparatus at 1 to 7 MPa normal stress. The two machines have different values of unloading stiffness and produce stick-slip events with significantly different properties. Events on the triaxial apparatus have greater overall slip (400 to 1600 ?m) and larger sample-average shear stress changes (25 to 110 MPa) but shorter overall slip duration (200 to 400 ?s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (50 to 150 ?m slip, 0.1 to 0.4 MPa stress changes, and 2 to 4 ms overall slip duration). As a result, the average slip speeds are much larger for events on the triaxial apparatus (2 to 4 m/s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (15 to 75 mm/s). To explore the consequences of these differences, and how they relate to differences in dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes and seismic radiation, each sample is instrumented with at least 15 piezoelectric sensors which are used to study the timing, location, amplitude, and frequency content of radiated seismic waves. In addition, an array of strain gages on the 2 m samples allows us to explore how the local distribution of shear stress along the fault affects the way that fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs. We find that at low stress levels fault slip along the 2 m fault occurs as brief bursts of rapid, seismic slip followed by slowly expanding (5 to 200 m/s) fronts of largely aseismic afterslip (80 to 500 ?m/s slip rates). Higher stress levels on the same fault produce <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> that propagate close to the shear wave speed and continuously radiate seismic waves near the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front. In some cases we observe the rapid termination of seismic radiation on the 2 m fault when a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front propagates into a low stress region. Finally, we evaluate which of our observations are controlled by the boundary conditions and elastic properties of the apparatus and which are controlled by the elastic and frictional properties of the rocks and are most relevant to dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes that generate natural earthquakes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910000045&hterms=Verdet+constant&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DVerdet%2Bconstant"><span id="translatedtitle">Optical Isolators With <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Magnets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fan, Yuan X.; Byer, Robert L.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>New design for isolator includes zigzag, forward-and-backward-pass beam path and use of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> rather than longitudinal magnetic field. Design choices produce isolator with as large an aperture as desired using low-Verdet-constant glass rather than more expensive crystals. Uses commercially available permanent magnets in Faraday rotator. More compact and less expensive. Designed to transmit rectangular beam. Square cross section of beam extended to rectangular shape by increasing one dimension of glass without having to increase magnetic field. Potentially useful in laser systems involving slab lasers and amplifiers. Has applications to study of very-high-power lasers for fusion research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880018948&hterms=lpg&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dlpg"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">Transversely</span> Isotropic Thermoelastic Theory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Arnold, S. M.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>A continuum theory is presented for representing the thermoelastic behavior of composites that can be idealized as <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic. This theory is consistent with anisotropic viscoplastic theories being developed presently at NASA Lewis Research Center. A multiaxial statement of the theory is presented, as well as plane stress and plane strain reductions. Experimental determination of the required material parameters and their theoretical constraints are discussed. Simple homogeneously stressed elements are examined to illustrate the effect of fiber orientation on the resulting strain distribution. Finally, the multiaxial stress-strain relations are expressed in matrix form to simplify and accelerate implementation of the theory into structural analysis codes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/494319"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> Beltrami equation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barletta, E. [Basilicate Univ., Potenza (Italy)</p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>Let (M, T{sub 1,0} (M)) be a CR manifold (of hypersurface type) where (1) T{sub 1,0}(M) denotes its CR structure (of CR dimension N). Let {mu} be a pointwise C-anti-linear endomorphism of T{sub 1,0}(M). Let (T{sub 1}, ..., T{sub N}) be a (local) frame of T{sub 1,0}(M) and consider the first order PDE (with variable coefficients): T{sub J}{line_integral} = {mu}{sub j}{sup l}T{sub l}{line_integral} where {mu}T{sub j} = {mu}{sub j}{sup l}T{sub l}. This is the Beltrami equation, cf. the terminology of A. Koranyi & H.M. Reimann. Next, assume that P {improper_subset} K er {mu}, so that {mu} descends to an endomorphism of H. Finally, if we restrict ourselves to basic unknown functions {line_integral} {element_of} {Omega}{sub B}{sup 0} (F) i.e. {line_integral} is constant along each leaf of (F) then (1) may be written as (2) {zeta}{sub {alpha}}({line_integral}) = {mu}{sub {alpha}}{sup {beta}} {zeta}{sub {beta}} ({line_integral}). This makes sense for an arbitrary CR foliation (F), of a C{sup {infinity}} manifold M, endowed with a C-anti-linear endomorphism {mu} of its <span class="hlt">transverse</span> CR structure, and is invariant under a change of admissible frame. We refer to (2) as the (<span class="hlt">transverse</span>) Beltrami equation of (M, F). We use the theory of CR foliations to show that the components of an automorphism {phi} preserving the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> contact structure of a given embedded strictly pseudoconvex CR foliation satisfy (2) where {mu} is the complex dilatation of {phi} and conversely. For <span class="hlt">transversally</span> Heisenberg CR foliations we use the results in sections 2 and 3 to characterize K-quasiconformality of a foliation automorphism. 10 refs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.1159C"><span id="translatedtitle">The mechanical implications of deep fluids in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of giant landslides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cappa, Frédéric; Guglielmi, Yves; Viseur, Sophie; Garambois, Stéphane</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Fluids are known to be a triggering and driving factor for landslides. Hydromechanical coupling has been proposed as possible explanation for landslide dynamics, including both slow, aseismic slip, as well as fast, seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The widely accepted understanding is that rainfall, snowmelt and the seasonality of the groundwater recharge increases fluid pressures, which in turn reduces effective stress, and thus alters the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of rocks and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> surfaces, promoting sliding. So far, most interpretations focused on the effects of rainfall infiltration into landslides, and did not investigate in detail the role of groundwater table variations below the landslides on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes. However, such considerations are important, since observations of well-documented giant landslides showed that the moving volume extends hundreds of meters above the slope aquifer. Furthermore, although motions correlate well with seasonal infiltrations, no significant pore pressure increase has ever been measured within the landslide body, particularly in high-permeability rocky landslides. Indeed, motions occur in the near surface of the unsaturated slope, which is in general highly permeable (which allows high infiltration rates), perched, highly discontinuous, size-limited, and experiences low magnitude pore pressure build-up that is not high enough to significantly vary the effective stresses in the slope. Triggering of local instabilities by such perched low-pressurized zones may be possible only at the critical stress level of the rock, but do not explain the slow increase in the permanent background seasonal accelerations and decelerations that affect the entire landslide. Thus, clarifying the role of fluids, especially the effects of groundwater table variations within the deep aquifer on the unsaturated slope slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is important for improved understanding of weak forcing mechanisms on landslides and risk assessment. The study of strain partitioning in two giant rocky landslides in France (La Clapière and Séchilienne, estimated volume of about 60 million cubic meters) provides a unique insight into the sensitivity of landslide motions to the changes in deep fluid pressures and surface frictional properties. Here we show with hydromechanical modeling that a significant part of the observed landslide motions and associated seismicity may be caused by poroelastic strain below the landslide, induced by groundwater table variations. In the unstable volume near the surface, calculated strain and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be controlled by stress transfer and friction weakening above the phreatic zone and reproduce well high-motion zone characteristics measured by geodesy and seismology. The key model parameters are friction weakening and the position of groundwater level, which is sufficiently constrained by field data and seismic imaging to support the physical validity of the model. These results are of importance for the understanding of surface strain evolution under weak forcing and they demonstrated that the seasonal variation of deep fluids below the landslide is a major increasing factor of instability.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24834440"><span id="translatedtitle">Graphene mechanics: II. Atomic stress distribution during indentation until <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Costescu, Bogdan I; Gräter, Frauke</p> <p>2014-06-28</p> <p>Previous Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments found single layers of defect-free graphene to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at unexpectedly high loads in the micronewton range. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we modeled an AFM spherical tip pressing on a circular graphene sheet and studied the stress distribution during the indentation process until <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We found the graphene <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force to have no dependency on the sheet size and a very weak dependency on the indenter velocity, allowing a direct comparison to experiment. The deformation showed a non-linear elastic behavior, with a two-dimensional elastic modulus in good agreement with previous experimental and computational studies. In line with theoretical predictions for linearly elastic sheets, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forces of non-linearly elastic graphene are proportional to the tip radius. However, as a deviation from the theory, the atomic stress concentrates under the indenter tip more strongly than predicted and causes a high probability of bond breaking only in this area. In turn, stress levels decrease rapidly towards the edge of the sheet, most of which thus only serves the role of mechanical support for the region under the indenter. As a consequence, the high ratio between graphene sheets and sphere radii, hitherto supposed to be necessary for reliable deformation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies, could be reduced to a factor of only 5-10 without affecting the outcome. Our study suggests time-resolved analysis of forces at the atomic level as a valuable tool to predict and interpret the nano-scale response of stressed materials beyond graphene. PMID:24834440</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=DOE-PATENT-XML&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/991715"><span id="translatedtitle">High <span class="hlt">strength</span> alloys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX</p> <p>2010-08-31</p> <p>High <span class="hlt">strength</span> metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high <span class="hlt">strength</span> metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21344449"><span id="translatedtitle">Spin Resonance <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Calculations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Courant, E. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 (United States)</p> <p>2009-08-04</p> <p>In calculating the <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance <span class="hlt">strengths</span> calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60689839"><span id="translatedtitle">Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> EVAR Trial</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Harjeet Rayt; Kelly Lambert; Matthew Bown; Guy Fishwick; Robert Morgan; Mark McCarthy; Nick London; Robert Sayers</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRB..11712401C"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> propagation inferred from damage patterns, slip distribution, and segmentation of the 1957 MW 8.1 Gobi-Altay earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along the Bogd fault, Mongolia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Choi, Jin-Hyuck; Jin, Kwangmin; Enkhbayar, Dandar; Davvasambuu, Battogtokh; Bayasgalan, Amgalan; Kim, Young-Seog</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>A detailed analysis of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> patterns and slip changes along the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with the 1957 Gobi-Altay earthquake (MW= 8.1) in Mongolia, which occurred along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault, was carried out to better understand segmentation and propagation. The major surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> show a simple linear pattern, whereas minor <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> along the major <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, which are concentrated at <span class="hlt">rupture</span> step overs and tip zones, show complex patterns. In the latter case, their patterns strongly resemble the geometric and kinematic characteristics of previously reported mesoscale fault damage patterns. The geomorphologic offsets show that left-lateral slip dominated with an average displacement of 3.5 to 4.0 m, but it decreased or transferred to dip-slip components mainly at <span class="hlt">rupture</span> step-overs and tip zones. Abrupt changes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> patterns and slip distribution indicate that the coseismic surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along the Bogd fault comprises three major segments from west to east, namely, the North-Ih, East-Ih, and North-Baga Bogd segments, and a highly damaged eastern tip zone. Based on the location of the epicenter, as well as the asymmetrically distributed damage structures and slips, we infer that the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagated eastward unilaterally through several segments and reached the easternmost step-over, which acted as a tough barrier. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> finally terminated, producing a highly deformed tip damage zone developed to accommodate released stress. We argue that detailed analysis of damage patterns, slip distribution, and slip transfer can help us to better understand fault segmentation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026394"><span id="translatedtitle">Near-source ground motions from simulations of sustained intersonic and supersonic fault <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Aagaard, B.T.; Heaton, T.H.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>We examine the long-period near-source ground motions from simulations of M 7.4 events on a strike-slip fault using kinematic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds that range from subshear speeds through intersonic speeds to supersonic speeds. The strong along-strike shear-wave directivity present in scenarios with subshear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds disappears in the scenarios with <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagating faster than the shear-wave speed. Furthermore, the maximum horizontal displacements and velocities rotate from generally fault-perpendicular orientations at subshear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds to generally fault-parallel orientations at supersonic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds. For <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds just above the shear-wave speed, the orientations are spatially heterogeneous as a result of the random nature of our assumed slip model. At locations within a few kilometers of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the time histories of the polarization of the horizontal motion provide a better diagnostic with which to gauge the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed than the orientation of the peak motion. Subshear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are associated with significant fault-perpendicular motion before fault-parallel motion close to the fault; supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are associated with fault-perpendicular motion after significant fault-parallel motion. Consistent with previous studies, we do not find evidence for prolonged supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the long-period (>2 sec) ground motions from the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake. However, we are unable to resolve the issue of whether a limited portion of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (approximately 10 km in length) propagated faster than the shear-wave speed. Additionally, a recording from the 2002 Denali fault earthquake does appear to be qualitatively consistent with locally supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Stronger evidence for supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in earthquakes may require very dense station coverage in order to capture these potentially distinguishing traits.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crying+AND+children&id=EJ725757"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Vulnerability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gilliam, Bobby; Franklin, John Travis</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Many aspects of our work with at-risk children are spiritual by nature. A whole generation of at-risk children are crying out and asking hard questions. Although we certainly will not have all the answers, a shared experience of the very vulnerability of our human condition can turn this into a <span class="hlt">strength</span> for us and our children. The authors propose…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3647170"><span id="translatedtitle">Acoustic-Friction Networks and the Evolution of Precursor <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Fronts in Laboratory Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ghaffari, H. O.; Young, R. P.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The evolution of shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts in laboratory earthquakes is analysed with the corresponding functional networks, constructed over acoustic emission friction-patterns. We show that the mesoscopic characteristics of functional networks carry the characteristic time for each phase of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> evolution. The classified <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts in network states–obtained from a saw-cut fault and natural faulted Westerly granite - show a clear separation into three main groups, indicating different states of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts. With respect to the scaling of local <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>' durations with the networks' parameters, we show that the gap in the classified fronts could be related to the possibility of a separation between slow and regular fronts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ChPhB..22i6701C"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> trapping on the ground state of a cigar-shaped two-component Bose—Einstein condensate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cui, Guo-Dong; Sun, Jian-Fang; Jiang, Bo-Nan; Qian, Jun; Wang, Yu-Zhu</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>We derive the coupled nonpolynomial nonlinear Schrödinger equations for a two-component Bose—Einstein condensate in a quasi-one-dimension geometry and investigate the effects of a tightly <span class="hlt">transverse</span> trapping on the ground state and the miscibility—immiscibility threshold. We find that the density profile of the matter wavepacket is remarkably dependent on the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> width and the effective one-dimension nonlinear coupling <span class="hlt">strengths</span> in miscible and immiscible regimes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24524943"><span id="translatedtitle">Pathomorphological differentiation between traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and nontraumatic arterial dissection of the intracranial vertebral artery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ro, Ayako; Kageyama, Norimasa</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>We aimed to establish an objective indicator for differential diagnosis between traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the intracranial vertebral artery (TRIVA) and nontraumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from intracranial vertebral artery dissection (NIVAD). We investigated 19 intracranial vertebral artery (IVA) samples, including three from TRIVA, seven from NIVAD and nine non-IVA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cases using 0.2-mm serial histological sections through the IVA. The internal elastic lamina (IEL)-adventitia ratio for each slide was calculated as the ratio of the traced length of the adventitia to the length of the IEL as measured by digital photomicrography. NIVAD cases showed a significant peak in the IEL-adventitia ratio around the area of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, whereas TRIVA and non-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> cases showed no specific increase or decrease in IEL-adventitia ratios throughout the IVAs. All NIVAD cases had a significantly higher average IEL-adventitia ratio across 10 slides at the site of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lesion than at the site furthest from the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In contrast, two out of three TRIVA cases showed no significant difference between the two points. The other TRIVA case showed a significantly lower IEL-adventitia ratio at the point nearest the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> compared with that at the point farthest from the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Other histological characteristics considered specific to either TRIVA or NIVAD were observed. Our results indicate that measuring and comparing IEL-adventitia ratios at <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and non-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> sites of the IVA could be a useful practical indicator for differential diagnosis between TRIVAs and NIVADs. PMID:24524943</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3217427"><span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of Severe Eye Injuries in Automobile Accidents: Static and Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Pressure of the Eye</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kennedy, Eric A.; Voorhies, Katherine D.; Herring, Ian P.; Rath, Amber L.; Duma, Stefan M.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this paper is to determine the static and dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> pressures of 20 human and 20 porcine eyes. This study found the static test results show an average <span class="hlt">rupture</span> pressure for porcine eyes of 1.00 ± 0.18 MPa while the average <span class="hlt">rupture</span> pressure for human eyes was 0.36 ± 0.20 MPa. For dynamic loading, the average porcine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> pressure was 1.64 ± 0.32 MPa, and the average <span class="hlt">rupture</span> pressure for human eyes was 0.91 ± 0.29 MPa. Significant differences are found between average <span class="hlt">rupture</span> pressures from all four groups of tests (p = 0.01). A risk function has been developed and predicts a 50% risk of globe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at 1.02 MPa, 1.66 MPa, 0.35 MPa, and 0.90 MPa internal pressure for porcine static, porcine dynamic, human static, and human dynamic loading conditions, respectively. PMID:15319124</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987PhDT........96L"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Mode Evolution in a Free Electron Laser Oscillator.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>La Sala, John Edward</p> <p>1987-09-01</p> <p>Focusing of light by the electron beam in a Free Electron Laser has been predicted for several years. In a high gain system, complete cancellation of diffractive spreading within the interaction region may be possible, resulting in an optical beam that can be guided and amplified for many tens of meters. Until now, no direct experimental evidence for FEL self-focusing has existed in support of the theory. In this dissertation I report measurements made of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mode evolution in the Stanford Photon Research Lab Free Electron Laser oscillator--the Mark III. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> mode characteristics were obtained by sampling the beam in the far field with small apertures which could be positioned freely in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> plane. Time-resolved signals received by the sampling system were analyzed to infer mode changes that occur in the laser between small signal, where the influence of the electron beam is strongest, and saturation, where the gain has fallen to cavity loss levels. The data indicate that intracavity focusing of the light occurs in small signal, and diminishes as the laser approaches saturation. After the light decouples from the electrons at the end of the current pulse, symmetric <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations are observed in the ringdown, providing evidence of residual focusing in saturation. The data are compared to theory in the form of an FEL simulation code. Agreement between data and theory is found for both the change of the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of self-focusing between small signal and saturation, and for the characteristics of the ringdown oscillations observed in the Mark III FEL. It is concluded that self-focusing occurs at the level and in the form expected by theory, providing experimental support for the theory of optical guiding.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=DOE-PATENT-XML&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/875102"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span>-longitudinal integrated resonator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hutchinson, Donald P. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, Marcus L. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, John T. (Knoxville, TN)</p> <p>2003-03-11</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28601123"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon and contralateral patellar tendon in a patient with chronic renal failure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Hasan Hilmi Muratli; Levent Çelebi; Onur Hapa; Ali Biçimo?lu</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Simultaneous quadriceps and patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is rare. Mechanical factors and coexisting systemic and local factors are taken into consideration in the pathogenesis of these <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. In patients with some chronic systemic diseases, simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can occur spontaneously or with minor traumas. We present a case of simultaneous quadriceps and patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a 21-year-old man with chronic renal</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28248268"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of peripancreatic lymph node with hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis: report of an autopsy case with massive peritoneal bleeding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Tadashi Terada; Tetsu Takeuchi; Rikuzou Hirano; Satomi Nagata; Hiroyuki Kubota; Satoshi Honda</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a tendency for fatal spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> leading to massive hemorrhage. The majority of such <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of HCC occur in the liver, while a few previous studies showed that such HCC <span class="hlt">rupture</span> developed at metastatic sites including the lung, pleura, spleen, and peritoneum. We here report a case of hepatitis C virus-related HCC with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22043438"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of umbilical hernia in pregnancy: a case report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ahmed, Adamu; Stephen, Garba; Ukwenya, Yahaya</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>A 28 year old woman presented with a spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an umbilical hernia in her seventh month of pregnancy. She had four previous unsupervised normal deliveries. There was no history of trauma or application of herbal medicine on the hernia. The hernia sac <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> at the inferior surface where it was attached to the ulcerated and damaged overlying skin. There was a gangrenous eviscerated small bowel. The patient was resuscitated and the gangrenous small bowel was resected and end to end anastomosis done. The hernia sac was excised and the 12 cm defect repaired. Six weeks later, she had spontaneous vaginal delivery of a live baby. We advocate that large umbilical hernias should be routinely repaired when seen in women of child bearing age. PMID:22043438</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24987358"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> hepatic epithelioid angiomyolipoma: a case report and literature review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tajima, Shogo; Suzuki, Akira; Suzumura, Kiyoshi</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>A 38-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to upper abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a hepatic angiomyolipoma (AML; 10.5 × 9.5 × 7.0 cm in size), which had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> into the space between the liver and the diaphragm. Following transcatheter arterial embolization, surgical resection was performed. The tumor consisted of epithelioid cells (50-60%), mature fat (40-50%), and thickened-wall blood vessels. Considering the amount of epithelioid cells and their positivity for E-cadherin and ?-catenin, the tumor was diagnosed as hepatic epithelioid AML. Cases of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatic AML are rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the sixth case reported in the English literature. PMID:24987358</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1544557"><span id="translatedtitle">Intrabiliary <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatic hydatid cyst: sonographic and cholangiographic appearances.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zargar, S A; Khuroo, M S; Khan, B A; Dar, M Y; Alai, M S; Koul, P</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Sonographic and cholangiographic appearances of confirmed intrabiliary <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a hepatic hydatid cyst were studied in 15 cases. Sonographic findings included liver cyst in all cases; nonshadowing echogenic structures in the dilated biliary tree representing hydatid material, such as fragmented membranes, sand, matrix, and daughter vesicles, in eight cases; and loss of continuity of the cyst wall adjacent to the bile duct representing the site of communication in seven cases. Cholangiographic findings were as follows: filling defects of varying size and shapes in the dilated biliary tree in 13 cases, and changing shape and position of these filling defects in three of them; and leakage of contrast medium into the cyst cavity in 12 cases. Intrabiliary <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatic hydatid cyst was suggested by sonography in 10 cases (66.7%) and at cholangiography in 13 cases (86.6%). We conclude that a joint application of sonography and endoscopic cholangiography is mandatory for proper preoperative evaluation of this disorder. PMID:1544557</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139p5101N"><span id="translatedtitle">Statistical mechanics of DNA <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: Theory and simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nath, S.; Modi, T.; Mishra, R. K.; Giri, D.; Mandal, B. P.; Kumar, S.</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>We study the effects of the shear force on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanism on a double stranded DNA. Motivated by recent experiments, we perform the atomistic simulations with explicit solvent to obtain the distributions of extension in hydrogen and covalent bonds below the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force. We obtain a significant difference between the atomistic simulations and the existing results in the literature based on the coarse-grained models (theory and simulations). We discuss the possible reasons and improve the coarse-grained model by incorporating the consequences of semi-microscopic details of the nucleotides in its description. The distributions obtained by the modified model (simulations and theoretical) are qualitatively similar to the one obtained using atomistic simulations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3249338"><span id="translatedtitle">Management of Patients with Traumatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Diaphragm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hwang, Sang-Won; Byun, Jung Hun</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm is an unusual type of trauma. In addition, it is difficult to diagnose because it can be accompanied by injuries to other organs. If it is not detected early, the mortality rate can increase due to serious complications. Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is an important indicator of the severity of the trauma. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors affecting the incidence of complications and mortality in patients who had surgery to treat traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm. Materials and Methods The subjects were patients who had undergone a diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by blunt trauma or stab wounds except patients who were transferred to other hospitals within 3 days of hospitalization, from January 2000 to December 2007. This study was a retrospective study. 43 patients were hospitalized, and 40 patients were included during the study period. Among them, 28 were male, 12 were female, and the average age was 42 (from 18 to 80). Outcome predictive factors including hypoxia, ventilator application days, revised trauma score (RTS), injury severity score (ISS), age, herniated organs, complications, and the mortality rate were investigated. Results Causes of trauma included motor vehicle crashes for 20 patients (50%), falls for 10 (25%), stab wounds for 8 (20%), and agricultural machinery accidents for 2 (5%). Most of the patients (36 patients; 90%) had wound sites on the left. Diagnosis was performed within 12 hours for most patients. The diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was diagnosed preoperatively in 27 patients (70%) and in 12 patients (30%) during other surgeries. For surgical treatment, thoracotomy was performed in 14 patients (35%), laparotomy in 11 (27.5%), and a surgery combining thoracotomy and laparotomy in 15 patients (37.5%). Herniated organs in the thoracic cavity included the stomach for 23 patients (57.5%), the omentum for 15 patients (37.5%), the colon for 10 patients (25%), and the spleen for 6 patients (15%). Accompanying surgeries included splenectomy for 13 patients (32.5%), lung suture for 6 patients (15%), and liver suture for 5 patients (12.5%). The average hospital stay was 47.80±56.72 days, and the period of ventilation was 3.90±5.8 days. The average ISS was 35.90±16.81 (11~75), and the average RTS was 6.46±1.88 (1.02~7.84). The mortality rate was 17.5% (7 patients). Factors affecting complications were stomach hernia and age. Factors affecting the mortality rate were ISS and RTS. Conclusion There are no typical symptoms of the traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm by blunt trauma. Nor are there any special methods of diagnosis; in fact, it is difficult to diagnose because it accompanies injuries to other organs. Stab wounds are also not easy to diagnose, though they are relatively easy to diagnose compared to blunt trauma because the accompanying injuries are more limited. Suture of the diaphragm can be performed through the chest, the abdomen, or the thoracoabdomen. These surgical methods are chosen based on accompanying organ injuries. When there are many organ injuries, there are a great number of complications. Significant factors affecting the complication rate were stomach hernia and age. ISS and RTS were significant as factors affecting the mortality rate. In the case of severe trauma such as pelvic fractures, frequent physical examinations and chest X-rays are necessary to confirm traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm because it does not have specific symptoms, and there are no clear diagnosis methods. Complications and the mortality rate should be reduced with early diagnosis and with treatment by confirming diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the thoracic cavity and the abdomen during surgery. PMID:22263186</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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