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1

Prediction of creep-rupture life of unidirectional titanium matrix composites subjected to transverse loading  

SciTech Connect

Titanium matrix composites (TMCs) incorporating unidirectional fiber reinforcement are considered as enabling materials technology for advanced engines which require high specific strength and elevated temperature capability. The resistance of unidirectional TMCs to deformation under longitudinally applied sustained loading at elevated temperatures has been well documented. Many investigators have shown that the primary weakness of the unidirectional TMC is its susceptibility to failure under very low transverse loads, especially under sustained loading. Hence, a reliable model is required to predict the creep-rupture life of TMCs subjected to different transverse stress levels over a wide range of temperatures. In this article, the authors propose a model to predict the creep-rupture life of unidirectional TMC subjected to transverse loading based on the creep-rupture life of unidirectional TMC subjected to transverse loading based on the creep-rupture behavior of the corresponding fiberless matrix. The model assumes that during transverse loading, the effective load-carrying matrix ligament along a row of fibers controls the creep-rupture strength and the fibers do not contribute to the creep resistance of the composite. The proposed model was verified using data obtained from different TMC fabricated using three matrix compositions, which exhibited distinctly different types of creep behavior. The results show that the creep-rupture life of the transverse TMC decreases linearly with increasing ratio of the fiber diameter to the ply thickness. The creep-rupture life is also predicted to be independent of fiber spacing along the length of the specimen.

John, R.; Khobaib, M. [Univ. of Dayton Research Inst., OH (United States); Smith, P.R. [WL/MLLN, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States). Materials Directorate

1996-10-01

2

Stress-rupture strength of alloy 718  

SciTech Connect

Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-rupture properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.

Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M. [Teledyne Allvac, Monroe, NC (United States)

1996-03-01

3

Transverse strength of SCS6 silicon carbide fibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A diametral compression test was used to measure the transverse strength of SCS-6 SiC fibers before and after heat treatment. Subjecting fibers to diametral compression successfully produced transverse tensile failure in the form of fiber cracking along the same diametral plane in which the compressive load was applied. An analysis of the hoop stress along the diametral plane, in which

Jeffrey I. Eldridge; Jonathan P. Wiening; Terry S. Davison; Marek-Jerzy Pindera

1993-01-01

4

In Vitro Study of Transverse Strength of Fiber Reinforced Composites  

PubMed Central

Objective Reinforcement with fiber is an effective method for considerable improvement in flexural properties of indirect composite resin restorations. The aim of this in-vitro study was to compare the transverse strength of composite resin bars reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Materials and Methods Thirty six bar type composite resin specimens (3󫎾5 mm) were constructed in three groups. The first group was the control group (C) without any fiber reinforcement. The specimens in the second group (P) were reinforced with pre-impregnated fibers and the third group (N) with non-impregnated fibers. These specimens were tested by the three-point bending method to measure primary transverse strength. Data were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey抯 tests. Results There was a significant difference among the mean primary transverse strength in the three groups (P<0.001). The post-hoc (Tukey) test showed that there was a significant difference between the pre-impregnated and control groups in their primary transverse strength (P<0.001). Regarding deflection, there was also a significant difference among the three groups (P=0.001). There were significant differences among the mean deflection of the control group and two other groups (PC&N<.001 and PC&P=.004), but there was no significant difference between the non-and pre-impregnated groups (PN&P=.813). Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that reinforcement with fiber considerably increased the transverse strength of composite resin specimens, but impregnation of the fiber used implemented no significant difference in the transverse strength of composite resin samples.

Mosharraf, R.; Hashemi, Z.; Torkan, S.

2011-01-01

5

Transverse strength of SCS-6 silicon carbide fibers  

SciTech Connect

A diametral compression test was used to measure the transverse strength of SCS-6 SiC fibers before and after heat treatment. Subjecting fibers to diametral compression successfully produced transverse tensile failure in the form of fiber cracking along the same diametral plane in which the compressive load was applied. An analysis of the hoop stress along the diametral plane, in which the effects of the C core were included, showed that there is a large tensile hoop stress concentration in the SiC sheath at the interface between the C core and the SiC sheath, where the stress is 6.3 times greater than the stress present in a solid SiC fiber under identical loading. This high tensile hoop stress concentration promotes crack initiation near the core and significantly limits the capability of these fibers to withstand transverse compressive loading. The maximum tensile hoop stresses, located at the interface between the C core and SiC sheath, at the measured failure loads were 850 MPa for the as-received SCS-6 fiber and 1,210 MPa for fibers exposed to a 1-h heat treatment at 1,850 C in 138 MPa of Ar.

Eldridge, J.I. (NASA, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center); Wiening, J.P.; Davison, T.S.; Pindera, M.J. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science)

1993-12-01

6

The effect of the addition of different fibres on the transverse and impact strength of acrylic resin denture base material.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the addition of different types of fibres on the transverse and impact strength of acrylic resin denture base material. The addition of glass fibres (strand) and polyethylene fibres produced a non significant increase in the modulus of elasticity, compared with the control of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin. The addition of glass fibres (woven and strand), polyethylene and carbon fibres to acrylic resin produced a non significant increase in the modulus of rupture. The addition of carbon, glass (strand) and polyethylene fibres produced a significant increase in the impact strength. Within the limitations of this study the addition of silk fibres did not produce an improvement in the mechanical properties. PMID:12868211

Rahamneh, A; Jagger, D C; Harrison, A

2003-06-01

7

Rupture strength of structural steels after thermomechanical treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.A significant improvement in the set of in-service properties of the commercially smelted ferritic-pearlitic steels under investigation is achieved as a result of TMT in the intercritical temperature interval (regulated rolling at 800癈) and accelerated cooling; this is associated with the formation of mixed ferritic-martensitic and ferritic-bainitic-martensitic structures, which ensure a simultaneous improvement in strength, plasticity, impact strength, cold resistance,

V. I. Bol'shakov; V. N. Rychagov

1990-01-01

8

Tensile strength and rupture energy of hybrid poly(methylvinylsiloxane) composites reinforced with short PET fibers and wollastonite whiskers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the tensile strength and rupture energy of hybrid poly(methylvinylsiloxane) composites reinforced with short PET fibers and wollastonite whiskers have been studied. It was observed that for a fixed fiber volume fraction, the tensile strength and rupture energy of the hybrid composites first decreased and then increased with wollastonite whisker volume fraction. Analyses of the fiber efficiency factor

Shanju Fu; Pingping Wu; Zhewen Han

2002-01-01

9

[Transverse strength and acoustic emission characteristics of commercial denture base resins].  

PubMed

Transverse strength and acoustic emission (AE) characteristics were measured by the transverse test in deionized water at 37 degrees C on commercial denture base resins (five heat-cured type resins and one polysulfone). Difference in flexural property of five heat-cured denture base resins was not shown from the transverse deflection according to JIS, but high toughness of polysulfone was recognized in transverse deflection, flexural strength, flexural modulus, flexural rigidity, flexural proof stress, and fracture energy. The five heat-cured denture base resins showed a low AE activity, but the polysulfone resin high AE activity. Significant rates of AE for polysulfone were detected at a kgf of approximately 50-60% the maximum load. The presence of Kaiser effect in its cycle transverse test was confirmed. PMID:2135527

Kondo, S; Ohkawa, S; Hanawa, T; Sugawara, T; Ota, M

1990-05-01

10

Microstructural stability and creep rupture strength of the martensitic steel P92 for advanced power plant  

SciTech Connect

Japanese 9% Cr steel containing 0.5% Mo and 1.8% W (P92) has been investigated. Quantitative microstructural analyses using TEM of thin foils and extraction double replicas have been carried out after different austenitization and tempering treatments and after creep deformation at 600 and 650 C. Statistical quantitative analyses were undertaken to determine the dislocation density within the martensite laths, the width of the martensite laths/subgrains and the size and distribution of the carbide and carbonitride precipitates. Correlation of the results of the microstructural investigation with the creep rupture properties allowed the stability of the microstructure during the high temperature exposure to be assessed. The consequences of microstructural changes for the extrapolation of creep rupture data to design lifetimes are considered. Taking into account the strengthening mechanisms which remain effective in long term testing, the 100,000 h stress rupture strength of P92 at 600 C is estimated at 115 MPa.

Ennis, P.J. [Research Centre Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Materials in Energy Systems; Zielinska-Lipiec, A.; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A. [Univ. of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Science; Wachter, O. [Preussen Elektra AG, Hannover (Germany)

1997-12-01

11

Copper, Boron, and Cerium Additions in Type 347 Austenitic Steel to Improve Creep Rupture Strength  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Type 347 austenitic stainless steel (18Cr-12Ni-Nb) was alloyed with copper (3 wt pct), boron (0.01 to 0.06 wt pct), and cerium (0.01 wt pct) with an aim to increase the creep rupture strength of the steel through the improved deformation and cavitation resistance. Short-term creep rupture strength was found to increase with the addition of copper in the 347 steel, but the long-term strength was inferior. Extensive creep cavitation deprived the steel of the beneficial effect of creep deformation resistance induced by nano-size copper particles. Boron and cerium additions in the copper-containing steel increased its creep rupture strength and ductility, which were more for higher boron content. Creep deformation, grain boundary sliding, and creep cavity nucleation and growth in the steel were found to be suppressed by microalloying the copper-containing steel with boron and cerium, and the suppression was more for higher boron content. An auger electron spectroscopic study revealed the segregation of boron instead of sulfur on the cavity surface of the boron- and cerium-microalloyed steel. Cerium acted as a scavenger for soluble sulfur in the steels through the precipitation of cerium sulfide (CeS). This inhibited the segregation of sulfur and facilitated the segregation of boron on cavity surface. Boron segregation on the nucleated cavity surface reduced its growth rate. Microalloying the copper-containing 347 steel with boron and cerium thus enabled to use the full extent of creep deformation resistance rendered by copper nano-size particle by increase in creep rupture strength and ductility.

Laha, Kinkar; Kyono, J.; Shinya, Norio

2012-04-01

12

Assessment of an improved multiaxial strength theory based on creep-rupture data for Inconel 600  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new multiaxial strength theory incorporating three independent stress parameters was developed and reported by the author in 1984. It was formally incorporated into ASME Code Case N47-29 in 1990. The new theory provided significantly more accurate stress-rupture life predictions than obtained using the classical theories of von Mises, Tresca, and Rankins (maximum principal stress), for Types 304 and 316

Huddleston

1993-01-01

13

Comparisons of 76Hz transverse and radial magnetic field strength components received in Connecticut  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since June 1970, we have made extremely low frequency (ELF) measurements of the transverse horizontal magnetic field strength, H sub phi, received in Connecticut. Occasionally, we also have measured either the vertical electric field strength, E sub v, or the radial horizontal magnetic field strength, H sub rho. The AN/BSR-1 ELF receivers are located at the Naval Underwater Systems Center (NUSC), at New London, CT. The transmission source for these farfield (1.6-Mm range) measurements is the U.S. Navy's ELF Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF), located in the Chequamegon National Forest in north-central Wisconsin. The results of 136 days of radial magnetic field measurements taken from November 1977 through June 1984 are discussed in this report. The main result is that during disturbed propagation conditions, the radial and transverse magnetic field strength daily plots (versus GMT) are usually dissimilar (in both amplitude and relative phase).

Bannister, P. R.

1986-03-01

14

Persistent disability despite sufficient calf muscle strength after rerupture of surgically treated acute achilles tendon ruptures.  

PubMed

Rerupture after treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture is considered a serious complication. Yet data on long-term outcome after rerupture are limited. This study evaluated outcome after rerupture and compares it to a reference of uncomplicated cases. Thirteen patients with a rerupture following minimally invasive surgical Achilles tendon rupture repair were evaluated using Leppilahti score and resumption of work and sport. Mean follow-up was 8.7 years. Results were compared with a reference group of 23 uncomplicated cases with a follow-up of at least 1 year. The study was designed as a follow-up study. The relative risk for a fair/poor outcome by Leppilahti score after a rerupture when compared with uncomplicated cases is 2.83 (95% confidence interval=1.17-6.87; P=.0185). Although rerupture did not affect ultimate resumption of professional life, the relative risk for quitting sport or resuming sport at a lower level after a rerupture is 3.33 (95% confidence interval=1.71-6.51; P=.0001). In contrast, the plantar flexion strength deficit is 5% to 10% in the rerupture group and up to 20% in the reference group. Despite sufficient recovery of calf muscle strength, rerupture after acute Achilles tendon rupture treatment results in significant long-term functional disabilities. PMID:21123666

Metz, Roderik; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M M; Andrlik, Milan; van der Werken, Christiaan

2010-12-01

15

Mechanism and possible solution for transverse solidification cracking in laser welding of high strength aluminium alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

In laser and hybrid laser\\/arc welding of high strength aluminium alloys, a large number of transverse cracks were found in the weld fusion zone. The cracking behaviour was evaluated experimentally and scanning electron microscopy images of crack surfaces confirmed that the cracks occurred when the weld fusion zone was in the semi-solid state. Thermal histories in the workpiece under representative

B. Hu; I. M. Richardson

2006-01-01

16

[Durability of commercial composite resin. Chronological change in transverse strength and transverse elastic modulus of composite resin immersed in MeOH].  

PubMed

The durability of visible light-cured composite resin was examined. Five kinds of commercial redox type composite resin and 7 kinds of visible light-cured composite resin were used and their base monomers were analyzed by HPLC. After the set products were immersed in MeOH, transverse strength and transverse elastic modulus were measured. Furthermore, the MeOH sorption, solubility in MeOH and main soluble component were examined. The main component of the base monomer in all 5 kinds of redox type was Bis-GMA. Seven kinds of visible light-cured composite resin consisted of 4 kinds of Bis-GMA (including BMPEPP) and 3 kinds of UDMA. Both cases of redox type and visible light-cured type of composite resin, when they were immersed in MeOH, transverse strength and transverse elastic modulus decreased. In the case of redox type (Clearfil posterior new bond), the decrease of transverse strength and transverse elastic modulus was small, that is, its base monomer was Bis-GMA, and large quantities of hybrid type filler were mixed. In the case of redox type, transverse strength and transverse elastic modulus showed a tendency to decrease with the increase of MeOH sorption. Solubility of 12 kinds of these composite resins was 0.25-4.78% and its main component in Pyrofil light bond A was BMPEPP, the residual were coincident with the main component of base monomer. PMID:2152041

Anzai, M

1990-05-01

17

Transverse creep and stress-rupture of borsic-aluminum composites and borsic-aluminum composites containing stainless steel and titanium  

Microsoft Academic Search

The transverse creep and stress rupture behavior of a number of Borsic?-aluminum composites was investigated at temperatures\\u000a from 200? to 400?C. The cpmposites studied consisted of nominally 50 vol pct Borsic fiber and included matrices of 6061, 2024,\\u000a 2219, and 5052 aluminum alloys. The effect of heat treatment was studied in the heat-treatable alloys. Where transverse composite\\u000a behavior differed from

E. M. Breinan; K. G. Kreider

1973-01-01

18

Creep Rupture Strength and Microstructure of Low C-10Cr2Mo Heat-Resisting Steels with V and Nb  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new ferritic heat-resisting steels of 0.05C-10Cr-2Mo-0.10V-0.05Nb (Cb) composition with high creep rupture strength and\\u000a good ductility have already been reported. The optimum amounts of V and Nb that can be added to the 0.05C-10Cr-2Mo steels\\u000a and their effects on the creep rupture strength and microstructure of the steels have been studied in this experiment. The\\u000a optimum amounts of V

T. Fujita; K. Asakura; T. Sawada; T. Takamatsu; Y. Otoguro

1981-01-01

19

Running exercises improve the strength of a partially ruptured Achilles tendon  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To examine the effects of running and swimming exercises on the functional performance and mechanical strength of a recovering Achilles tendon. Methods: 30 Sprague-Dawley rats had surgical transection of their right medial Achilles tendon. The rats were divided into running (n = 11), swimming (n = 10), and control (n = 9) groups. The running and swimming groups were given daily exercise training, starting from the fifth day after the injury; the control group did not exercise throughout the period of the experiment. An Achilles functional index (AFI) was recorded before the operation and on the third, 10th, and 30th days after the operation. On the 30th day, the rats were killed and their Achilles tendons harvested for biomechanical testing of load relaxation properties, stiffness, and ultimate tensile strength (UTS). The AFI data were analysed by two way analysis of variance; load relaxation, stiffness, and UTS data were analysed by multivariate analysis, with ? at 0.05. Results: The UTS of the running group was higher than in the control group (p = 0.015), while there was no significant difference between the swimming and control groups (p = 0.228). Differences in stiffness and load relaxation were non-significant (p = 0.823 and 0.633, respectively). The AFI results did not differ among the three groups (p = 0.242). Conclusions: Running exercises can improve the strength of partially ruptured Achilles tendons at 30 days after injury.

See, E; Ng, G; Ng, C; Fung, D

2004-01-01

20

Contributions of different factors to the improvement of the creep rupture strength of creep resistant martensitic steels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boilers, pipes, and turbine components of fossil power gener- ating plants are expected to be exposed to steam at increased temperature and pressure to improve power generating e - ciency. This trend requires high Cr creep resistant martensitic steels having higher creep rupture strength (CRS) than Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. The aim of this paper is to overview di erent factors

Yousef Elarbi; B閘a Palot醩

2007-01-01

21

Recovery of calf muscle strength following acute achilles tendon rupture treatment: a comparison between minimally invasive surgery and conservative treatment.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to measure the effect of treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures on calf muscle strength recovery. Eighty-three patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture were randomly allocated to either minimally invasive surgery with functional after-treatment or conservative treatment by functional bracing. Calf muscle strength using isokinetic testing was evaluated at 3 months and after 6 or more months posttreatment. To exclusively investigate the effect of treatment on outcome, the authors excluded patients with major complications from the analysis. In 31 of 39 patients in the surgical treatment group and 25 of 34 patients in the conservative treatment group, isokinetic strength tests were performed. In the analysis of differences in mean peak torque, no statistically significant differences were found between surgery and conservative treatment, except for plantar flexion strength at 90 degrees per second at the second measurement, favoring conservative treatment. After 8 to 10 months follow- up, loss of plantar flexion strength was still present in the injured leg in both treatment groups. In conclusion, isokinetic muscle strength testing did not detect a statistically significant difference between minimally invasive surgical treatment with functional after-treatment and conservative treatment by functional bracing of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. PMID:19825777

Metz, Roderik; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M M; Tamminga, Rob; van der Werken, Christiaan

2009-09-04

22

Operative reconstruction after transverse rupture of the tendons of both peroneus longus and brevis. Surgical reconstruction by transfer of the flexor digitorum longus tendon.  

PubMed

Rupture of the tendons of both peroneus longus and peroneus brevis results in considerable disability. We have performed transfer of flexor digitorum longus (FDL) to peroneus brevis in two patients with lateral instability of the hindfoot due to chronic transverse tears of both tendons for which end-to-end repair was not possible. Both patients had excellent function when reviewed after eight and six years, respectively, with no symptoms. CT showed a normal appearance of the FDL in both patients, but the peroneal muscles looked abnormal. Transfer of the FDL provides a reliable solution to lateral instability of the hindfoot resulting from loss of function of both peronei. PMID:9768886

Borton, D C; Lucas, P; Jomha, N M; Cross, M J; Slater, K

1998-09-01

23

Surface ruptures on the transverse Xiaoyudong fault: A significant segment boundary breached during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ~ 220 km-long rupture of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake breached several km-scale geometric discontinuities along strike, including the previously un-mapped NW-trending Xiaoyudong fault, connecting between the two major, NE-trending rupture planes on the Beichuan and Pengguan Faults. In this paper, we present high-resolution mapping of the 8-km-long surface breaks and sinistral oblique thrusting coseismic slip on the Xiaoyudong fault. Scarp height is the largest at the NW end, reaching 3.5 m, and decreases southward in steps to less than 0.2 m, with an average slip gradient of 6 10- 3 at a few tens of meters length scale, but up to 50 10- 3 locally. Left-lateral offsets co-vary with the vertical component. The largest sinistral slip vector we observed is 2.2 m. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that the Xiaoyudong fault is likely a ~ 30癝W-dipping lateral ramp that soles into the Pengguan fault, and at its northwestern end intersects with the Beichuan fault, where the latter has a step in the fault plane. Kinematically, the Xiaoyudong fault functions as a tear and conjugate fault and coincides with significant coseismic slip rake rotations on both the Beichuan and Pengguan Faults. Similar correlation of fault bends with sharp changes in faulting style occurs at other steps along the Wenchuan rupture. The Xiaoyudong fault may have played a positive role in linking coseismic slip partitioning between parallel reverse fault planes, facilitating the growth of a longer and more destructive rupture. This highlights the role of tear faults in bridging ruptures between segments, such that reverse-type ruptures can breach steps wider than anticipated from strike-slip fault examples. Transfer faults are common, and perhaps poorly documented features in reverse fault systems and their roles in ruptures may increase the maximum potential earthquake magnitude for fold-and-thrust belts.

Liu-Zeng, Jing; Sun, Jing; Wang, Peng; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Ji, Chen; Zhang, Zhihui; Xu, Qiang; Wen, Li

2012-12-01

24

Effects of Cu, Ag and Sb on the creep-rupture strength of lead-free solder alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

The materials used in the present research are pure Sn metal and Sn-0.5% Cu, Sn-3.5%Ag, Sn-0.3%Sb, and Sn-3.5%Ag-0.5%Cu alloys.\\u000a Effects of Cu, Ag and Sb on the creep-rupture strength of lead-free solder alloys have been investigated. Creep tests are\\u000a performed at the stress and temperature range of 3 to 12 MPa and 378 to 403 K, respectively. A 3.5% addition

Noboru Wade; Kepeng Wu; Johji Kunii; Seiji Yamada; Kazuya Miyahara

2001-01-01

25

The effect of starting point placement technique on thoracic transverse process strength: an ex vivo biomechanical study  

PubMed Central

Background The use of thoracic pedicle screws in spinal deformity, trauma, and tumor reconstruction is becoming more common. Unsuccessful screw placement may require salvage techniques utilizing transverse process hooks. The effect of different starting point placement techniques on the strength of the transverse process has not previously been reported. The purpose of this paper is to determine the biomechanical properties of the thoracic transverse process following various pedicle screw starting point placement techniques. Methods Forty-seven fresh-frozen human cadaveric thoracic vertebrae from T2 to T9 were disarticulated and matched by bone mineral density (BMD) and transverse process (TP) cross-sectional area. Specimens were randomized to one of four groups: A, control, and three others based on thoracic pedicle screw placement technique; B, straightforward; C, funnel; and D, in-out-in. Initial cortical bone removal for pedicle screw placement was made using a burr at the location on the transverse process or transverse process-laminar junction as published in the original description of each technique. The transverse process was tested measuring load-to-failure simulating a hook in compression mode. Analysis of covariance and Pearson correlation coefficients were used to examine the data. Results Technique was a significant predictor of load-to-failure (P = 0.0007). The least squares mean (LS mean) load-to-failure of group A (control) was 377 N, group B (straightforward) 355 N, group C (funnel) 229 N, and group D (in-out-in) 301 N. Significant differences were noted between groups A and C, A and D, B and C, and C and D. BMD (0.925 g/cm2 [range, 0.624-1.301 g/cm2]) was also a significant predictor of load-to-failure, for all specimens grouped together (P < 0.0001) and for each technique (P <0.05). Level and side tested were not found to significantly correlate with load-to-failure. Conclusions The residual coronal plane compressive strength of the thoracic transverse process is dependent upon the screw starting point placement technique. The funnel technique significantly weakens transverse processes as compared to the straightforward technique, which does not significantly weaken the transverse process. It is also dependent upon bone mineral density, and low failure loads even in some control specimens suggest limited usefulness of the transverse process for axial compression loading in the osteoporotic thoracic spine.

2010-01-01

26

Modeling for fracture in materials under long-term static creep loading and neutron irradiation. Part 2. Prediction of creep rupture strength for austenitic materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present some results of prediction of creep rupture strength and plasticity for austenitic materials prior to and after\\u000a irradiation with variable neutron flux rates, based on physicomechanical model as outlined in Part 1. The calculated results\\u000a are compared with the available experimental data.

B. Z. Margolin; A. G. Gulenko; I. P. Kursevich; A. A. Buchatskii

2006-01-01

27

The Strength and Stiffness in Transverse Tension of Unidirectional Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The development of test specimens for the determination of the tensile strength, strain to failure, and Young's modulus of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastics in a direction perpendicular to the fibers is described. Also presented are the resu...

D. L. Mead

1972-01-01

28

High-frequency spectral falloff of earthquakes, fractal dimension of complex rupture, b value, and the scaling of strength on faults  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The high-frequency falloff ??-y of earthquake displacement spectra and the b value of aftershock sequences are attributed to the character of spatially varying strength along fault zones. I assume that the high frequency energy of a main shock is produced by a self-similar distribution of subevents, where the number of subevents with radii greater than R is proportional to R-D, D being the fractal dimension. In the model, an earthquake is composed of a hierarchical set of smaller earthquakes. The static stress drop is parameterized to be proportional to R??, and strength is assumed to be proportional to static stress drop. I find that a distribution of subevents with D = 2 and stress drop independent of seismic moment (?? = 0) produces a main shock with an ??-2 falloff, if the subevent areas fill the rupture area of the main shock. By equating subevents to "islands' of high stress of a random, self-similar stress field on a fault, I relate D to the scaling of strength on a fault, such that D = 2 - ??. Thus D = 2 corresponds to constant stress drop scaling (?? = 0) and scale-invariant fault strength. A self-similar model of aftershock rupture zones on a fault is used to determine the relationship between the b value, the size distribution of aftershock rupture zones, and the scaling of strength on a fault. -from Author

Frankel, A.

1991-01-01

29

Glass rupture disk  

DOEpatents

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01

30

The effects of HEMA-monomer and air atmosphere treatment of glass fibre on the transverse strength of a provisional fixed partial denture resin.  

PubMed

This study focused on some mechanical properties such as the transverse strength, the maximal deflection, and the modulus of elasticity of resin reinforced with two different types of agents-treated and with untreated glass fibre, and without fibre. A Teflon mould was used to prepare six groups of specimens. Two different types of chemical modification agents, hydroxyethyl-methacrylate (HEMA)-monomer and air atmosphere were applied to create hydrophilic surfaces on the glass fibres. The flow rate was kept at two different levels, 25 and 60 mL min-1. The discharge powers of the surface treatment process were 15 or 20 W. The fibres were exposed to glow discharge conditions for the periods of 10 or 15 min. Without fibre specimens were the control group. The provisional resin was same in all groups. All the specimens were subjected to transverse testing with a cross-head speed of 5 mm min-1. The three-point load test was used to record the load of the fracture for each specimens. The Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance was used to compare the transverse strength, the maximal deflection and the modulus of elasticity. The differences in the transverse strength and the maximal deflection between the six groups were found statistically significant but the modulus of elasticity was not statistically significant. The transverse strength of HEMA-monomer (group A) was shown the highest value (66.3 MPa). For without-fibre group, the value was 52.9 MPa. This difference was statistically significant when the Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparing. Repairing or remaking provisional restorations can be a time-consuming endeavour. The added strength of the polymethyl methacrylate with the fibre can reduce clinical failures of provisional fixed partial dentures. The surface treatment process was increased the transverse strength and the maximal deflection. The clinical implication of chemical modification agents-coated fibres is reduced incidence of fixed provisional restoration failure. PMID:14641682

Keyf, F; Uzun, G; Mutlu, M

2003-11-01

31

Effect of Steam Corrosion on HTGR Core Support Post Strength Loss. Part II. Consequences of Steam Generator Tube Rupture Event.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To perform the assessment, a series of eight tube-rupture events of varying severity and probability were postulated. Case 1 pertains to the situation where the moisture detection, loop isolation, and dump procedures function as planned; the remaining sev...

R. P. Wichner

1977-01-01

32

The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study  

PubMed Central

Background: Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 10 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each), depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round), with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (?= 0.05). Results: Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group (P < 0.001) (88.77 MPa), with exception of round surface design repaired with glass fiber reinforced repair resin (89.92 MPa) which was significantly superior to the other joint surface contours (P < 0.001). Glass fiber reinforced resin significantly improved the repaired denture base resins as compared to the plain repair resin (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Specimens repaired with glass fiber reinforced resin and round surface design exhibited highest transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins.

Anasane, Nayana; Ahirrao, Yogesh; Chitnis, Deepa; Meshram, Suresh

2013-01-01

33

Heat to Heat Variations in the Creep Rupture Strength of a Modified AISI 316 Grade Stainless Steel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A modified AISI 316 grade stainless steel has been used as the construction material for a large number of structural and core components for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor. The creep rupture properties of this material belonging to these different heats h...

M. D. Mathew S. L. Mannan S. K. Ray P. Rodriguez

1984-01-01

34

A Comparison of Creep Rupture Strength of Ferritic/Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaluations of creep rupture properties of dissimilar weld joints of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels with Alloy 800 at 823 K were carried out. The joints were fabricated by a fusion welding process employing an INCONEL 182 weld electrode. All the joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals, and the strength reduction was greater in the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and less in the 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. Failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with the decrease in stress. At still lower stresses, the failure in the joints occurred at the ferritic/austenitic weld interface. The stress-life variation of the joints showed two-slope behavior and the slope change coincided with the occurrence of ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Preferential creep cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure, whereas creep cavitation at the interfacial particles induced ferritic/austenitic weld interface cracking. Micromechanisms of the type IV failure and the ferritic/austenitic interface cracking in the dissimilar weld joint of the ferritic steels and relative cracking susceptibility of the joints are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing, and finite element analysis (FEA) of the stress state across the joint.

Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M. D.

2012-04-01

35

The effect of grain boundary orientation on creep and rupture of IN738 and nichrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Creep rupture specimens taken from directionally solidified ingots of IN-738 and Nichrome in which the grain boundaries were\\u000a oriented longitudinally, transversely, and 45 deg to the stress axis have been tested over a range of temperature and stress.\\u000a For both alloys, the ductility was appreciably higher in the longitudinal orientation; but in IN-738, the creep strength was\\u000a higher in the

D. A. Woodford; J. J. Frawley

1974-01-01

36

Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at higher magnetic fields. On the exit side there is mostly moderate to high skin dose increases for 0.2-3 T with the only exception being large positive angles. Exit bolus of 1 cm thickness will have a significant impact on lowering such exit skin dose increases that occur as a result of the ERE.

Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia)

2010-10-15

37

Bio-inspired mechanics of reversible adhesion: Orientation-dependent adhesion strength for non-slipping adhesive contact with transversely isotropic elastic materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geckos and many insects have evolved elastically anisotropic adhesive tissues with hierarchical structures that allow these animals not only to adhere robustly to rough surfaces but also to detach easily upon movement. In order to improve our understanding of the role of elastic anisotropy in reversible adhesion, here we extend the classical JKR model of adhesive contact mechanics to anisotropic materials. In particular, we consider the plane strain problem of a rigid cylinder in non-slipping adhesive contact with a transversely isotropic elastic half space with the axis of symmetry oriented at an angle inclined to the surface. The cylinder is then subjected to an arbitrarily oriented pulling force. The critical force and contact width at pull-off are calculated as a function of the pulling angle. The analysis shows that elastic anisotropy leads to an orientation-dependent adhesion strength which can vary strongly with the direction of pulling. This study may suggest possible mechanisms by which reversible adhesion devices can be designed for engineering applications.

Chen, Shaohua; Gao, Huajian

2007-05-01

38

Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and

Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

2009-01-01

39

Uterine Rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Uterine rupture may be defined as a disruption of the uterine muscle extending to and involving the uterine serosa or disruption\\u000a of the uterine muscle with extension to the bladder or broad ligament [1]. Uterine dehiscence is defined as disruption of\\u000a the uterine muscle with intact uterine serosa [1]. Uterine rupture is associated with severe maternal and perinatal morbidity\\u000a and

Sharon R. Sheehan; Deirdre J. Murphy

40

Creep Ruptures in Heterogeneous Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present creep experiments on fiber composite materials with different controlled heterogeneity. All samples exhibit a power-law relaxation of the strain rate in the primary creep regime (Andrade's law) followed by a power-law acceleration up to rupture. We discover that the rupture time is proportional to the duration of the primary creep regime, showing the interplay between the two regimes and offering a method of rupture prediction. These experimental results are rationalized by a mean-field model of representative elements with nonlinear viscoelastic rheology and with a large heterogeneity of strengths.

Nechad, H.; Helmstetter, A.; El Guerjouma, R.; Sornette, D.

2005-01-01

41

Creep ruptures in heterogeneous materials.  

PubMed

We present creep experiments on fiber composite materials with different controlled heterogeneity. All samples exhibit a power-law relaxation of the strain rate in the primary creep regime (Andrade's law) followed by a power-law acceleration up to rupture. We discover that the rupture time is proportional to the duration of the primary creep regime, showing the interplay between the two regimes and offering a method of rupture prediction. These experimental results are rationalized by a mean-field model of representative elements with nonlinear viscoelastic rheology and with a large heterogeneity of strengths. PMID:15783567

Nechad, H; Helmstetter, A; El Guerjouma, R; Sornette, D

2005-01-31

42

Creep rupture of polymer-matrix composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

An accelerated characterization method for resin-matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep-rupture analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer-matrix composites. Comparisons between creep-rupture experiments and analytical models are presented.

H. F. Brinson; W. I. Griffith; D. H. Morris

1981-01-01

43

Quantum field theories on a lattice: Variational methods for arbitrary coupling strengths and the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper continues our studies of quantum field theories on a lattice. We develop techniques for computing the low-lying spectrum of a lattice Hamiltonian using a variational approach, without recourse either to weak- or strong-coupling expansions. Our variational methods, which are relatively simple and straightforward, are applied to the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field as well as to

Sidney D. Drell; Marvin Weinstein; Shimon Yankielowicz

1977-01-01

44

Rupture disc  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a rupturable member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut

Robert G

1977-01-01

45

Transversity 2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Purpose and status of the Italian transversity project / F. Bradamante -- Transversity asymmetries / D. Boer -- The transverse angular momentum sum rule / E. Leader -- Measurement of Collins and Sivers asymmetries at HERMES / L. L. Pappalardo (for the HERMES collaboration) -- Review of SSA results on deuteron at COMPASS / A. Richter (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Single spin asymmetries on a transversely polarized proton target at COMPASS / S. Levorato (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- New preliminary results on the transversity distribution and the Collins fragmentation functions / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Sivers effect in SIDIS pion and kaon production / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Spin-orbit correlations / M. Burkardt -- Correlation functions in hard and (semi)-inclusive processes / M. Schlegel, S. Mei[symbol]ner and A. Metz -- Transversity via exclusive [pie symbol]-electroproduction / G. R. Goldstein, S. Liuti and S. Ahmad -- Estimate of the Sivers asymmetry at intermediate energies with rescattering extracted from exclusive processes / A. Bianconi -- Exclusively produced p[symbol] asymmetries on the deuteron and future GPD measurements at COMPASS / C. Schill (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Transversity and transverse-momentum-dependent distribution measurements from PHENIX and BRAHMS / C. Aidala (for the PHENIX and BRAHMS collaborations) -- Sivers and Collins effects in polarized pp scattering processes / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Sivers function in constituent quark models / S. Scopetta ... [et al.] -- Sivers, Boer-Mulders and transversity in Drell-Yan processes / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- TMDs and Drell-Yan experiments at Fermilab and J-PARC / J.-C. Peng -- Double polarisation observables at PAX / M. Nekipelov (for the PAX collaboration) -- Future Drell-Yan measurement @ COMPASS / M. Colantoni (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Measurements of unpolarized azimuthal asymmetries at COMPASS / W. K鋐er (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries of the unpolarized cross-section at HERMES / F. Giordano (for the HERMES collaboration) -- Measurement of transversity via an interference fragmentation function at HERMES / R. Fabbri (for the HERMES collaboration) -- Relating leading and higher twist contributions to nucleon spin structure / P. G. Ratcliffe and O. V. Teryaev -- DIS at low and high transverse momentum: matches and mismatches / A. Bacchetta ... [et al.] -- Pretzelosity distribution function h[symbol] / H. Avakian ... [et al.] -- Transverse momentum-spin correlations / L. P. Gamberg, G. R. Goldstein and M. Schlegel -- Exploring confinement with spin / J. P. Ralston -- SIDIS asymmetries in quark-diquark model / A. Kotzinian -- Parton densities in a spectator model with axial-vector diquarks / M. Radici -- Gluonic pole matrix elements in spectator models / A. Mukherjee, L. P. Gamberg and P. J. Mulders -- TMD measurements at CLAS6 and CLAS12 / H. Avakian (for the CLAS6 and CLAS12 collaborations) -- Nucleon to pion transition distribution amplitudes in a light-cone quark model / M. Pincetti, B. Pasquini and S. Boffi -- Antiproton polarization studies for FAIR (How to polarize antiprotons and what to use them for?) / H. Str鰄er, F. Rathmann and P. Lenisa -- No one can encompass the unencompassable: the highlights of transversity-2008 / N. N. Nikolaev.

Giuseppe, Ciullo; Paolo, Lenisa; Marco, Contalbrigo; Delia, Hasch

2009-04-01

46

[Transverse myelitis].  

PubMed

Transverse myelitis is a disease with various pathogenesis. It leads to a partial or total transverse lesion of the spinal cord structures resulting in an acute or subacute: motor (paralysis or paresis), sensory (most often with sensory level) and autonomic symptoms and signs. Its etiology is complex and sometimes difficult to establish explicitly. The most frequent reason of transverse myelitis is infection, but there are other factors like: postinfectious, neoplastic, paraneoplastic, demyelinating, immunological (connective tissue diseases), vascular and others. Idiopathic transverse myelitis accounts for about 10-40% of cases, and despite thorough diagnostics its aetiology cannot be established. Transeverse myelitis has been known for years, but it still poses a big problem both diagnostically and therapeuthically. Its course is frequently serious leading to persistent neurological damage and permanent disability. Diagnostic methods of choice are spinal cord MRI and CSF examination with assessment of oligoclonal bands, biomarkers of inflammatory process, 14-3-3 protein and neuronal specific enolase. Its treatment is determined by established aetiology. Many inconsistencies, no clear cut definition of the disease and lack of diagnostic criteria are being discussed by the group of experts working in Transverse Myelitis Consortium Group. PMID:22320033

Drozdowski, Wies?aw

2008-01-01

47

Transverse Myelitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

First described in 1882, and termed acute transverse myelitis (TM) in 1948 (1), TM is a rare syndrome with an incidence of between one and eight new cases per million people per year (2). TM is characterized by focal inflammation within the spinal cord and clinical manifestations are caused by resultant neural\\u000a dysfunction of motor, sensory, and autonomic pathways within

Chitra Krishnan; Adam I. Kaplin; Deepa M. Deshpande; Carlos A. Pardo; Douglas A. Kerr

48

Transverse myelitis  

SciTech Connect

Transverse myelitis is a known complication of radiation treatment for carcinoma of the heat and neck. In a five year period, 1970 to 1975, 120 patients with head and neck cancer received radiation as part of their treatment in this hospital. A review of the records of these patients showed only two cases of myelitis, an incidence of about 2%. This paper reviews the clinical syndrome; treatment and preventive measures are discussed and a survey of the literature is presented.

Black, M.J.; Motaghedi, B.; Robitaille, Y.

1980-05-01

49

Stress-rupture strength of alloy 718  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further

R. L. Kennedy; W. D. Cao; W. M. Thomas

1996-01-01

50

Recurrent spontaneous esophageal rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spontaneous esophageal rupture is an uncommon and poorly understood condition. Recurrent rupture is extremely rare, with only one previously reported case in the literature. Here, we present a case series of two patients who had recurrent ruptures, and discuss the principles underlying the management of such cases.

Omar A. Khan; Clifford W. Barlow; David F. Weeden; Khalid M. Amer

2005-01-01

51

Spontaneous Kidney Allograft Rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spontaneous renal allograft rupture is one of the most dangerous complications of kidney transplantation, which can result in graft loss.This condition needs immediate surgical intervention. Conservative management has dismal results. Its prevalence varies from 0.3% to 3%. Rupture occurs in first few weeks after transplantation. Predisposing factors for graft rupture are acute rejection, acute tubular necrosis, and renal vein thrombosis.

H. Shahrokh; H. Rasouli; M. A. Zargar; K. Karimi; K. Zargar

2005-01-01

52

Effect of carbide and nitride addition on the strength of sintered TiC-Mo2C-Ni carbides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of TaC, VC, Cr3C2, NbC, and TiN additives on the strength and hardness of sintered TiC-Mo2C-Ni hard metals was studied. The additive powder was mixed separately with the TiC-Mo2C-Ni base powder. The powder mixtures were then compacted and sintered in a vacuum. Experimental results showed that the transverse rupture strength of sintered hard metals was effectively promoted by adding the VC and TiN powders, respectively. However, no additives increased the hardness value of the base materials.

Wang, Wen-Fung

2002-10-01

53

What Is an Earthquake?: Fault-Rupture Analogies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity has two parts: the first part will demonstrate the weaknesses of simple fault models (like block diagrams) in depicting the process of fault rupture accurately; and the second part is centered around a fairly simple animation of rupture propagation, seen by an oblique map view, that attempts to show more accurately what we should envision when we think about fault rupture. This activity provides different analogies for describing the process of fault rupture, with attention paid to the strengths and weaknesses of each.

54

Rupture of plasma membrane under tension.  

PubMed

We present a study on the rupture behavior of single NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts under tension using micropipette aspiration. Membrane rupture was characterized by breaking and formation of an enclosed membrane linked to a tether at the cell apex. Three different rupture modes, namely: single break, initial multiple breaks, and continuous multiple breaks, were observed under similar loading condition. The measured mean tensile strengths of plasma membrane were 3.83 1.94 and 3.98 1.54mN/m for control cells and cells labeled with TubulinTracker, respectively. The tensile strength data was described by Weibull distribution. For the control cells, the Weibull modulus and characteristic strength were 1.86 and 4.40 mN/m, respectively; for cells labeled with TubulinTracker, the Weibull modulus and characteristic strength were 2.68 and 4.48 mN/m, respectively. Based on the experimental data, the estimated average transmembrane proteins-lipid cleavage strength was 2.64 0.64 mN/m. From the random sampling of volume ratio of transmembrane proteins in cell membrane, we concluded that the Weibull characteristic of plasma membrane strength was likely to be originated from the variation in transmembrane proteins-lipid interactions. PMID:21288526

Tan, Samuel Chun Wei; Yang, Tianyi; Gong, Yingxue; Liao, Kin

2011-02-01

55

The Strength of Adhesive Joints  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main rules pertaining to the strength of adhesive joints are: (1) This strength is a mechanical (or rheological) property. The local stress which causes the extension of a pre-existing crack can be determined only if the stress pattern in the whole adhint is known and the intensification of stress at flaws is taken into account. (2) The rupture occurs

J. J. Bikerman

1972-01-01

56

Triggered reverse fault and earthquake due to crustal unloading, northwest Transverse Ranges, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

A reverse-right-oblique surface rupture, associated with a ML 2.5 earthquake, formed in a diatomite quarry near Lompoc, California, in the northwesternmost Transverse Ranges on April 7, 1981. The 575-m-long narrow zone of ruptures formed in clay interbeds in diatomite and diatomaceous shale of the Neogene Monterey Formation. The ruptures parallel bedding, dip 39 59癝, and trend about N84癊 on the

R. F. Yerkes; W. L. Ellsworth; J. C. Tinsley

1983-01-01

57

[Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm].  

PubMed

Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is a high lethal risk pathology, which requires precise diagnosis and urgent and efficient surgical treatment. Despite improved diagnostic capabilities (echoscopy, in specialized departments--angiography, computed tomography, magnetic nucleus resonance), mortality related to this pathology remains high in intensive care units. In the present article data concerning prevalence and clinical outcomes of the rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm for 1999-2001 is presented in detail. During this period 22 patients have undergone surgery due to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. Described are most prevalent complications, mortality rates and causes, analyzed are treatment strategy and tactics. PMID:12474751

Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Antusevas, Aleksandras

2002-01-01

58

Mechanisms for rupture of pancreatic pseudocysts. A biomechanical evaluation.  

PubMed Central

Considerable morbidity and mortality continue to attend the rupture of pancreatic pseudocysts. If the mechanism responsible for rupture were known, it is conceivable that patients with impending rupture could be identified and appropriate measures taken. In an effort to determine whether pseudocysts rupture from increased internal pressure, in vivo pressure measurements and stress calculations were performed in 10 intact pseudocysts. Next, fresh strips of pseudocyst wall tissue from seven patients were placed in a tensile testing machine, and ultimate strength (peak stress capacity) was determined. The average in vitro peak stress prior to yield and separation was 12.30 +/- 2.75 Kg-F/cm2. Both this value, and calculated internal pressures required to achieve this level of wall stress, are more than 100 times greater than the corresponding values ever measured in humans. In all likelihood, pseudocysts rupture from diminished wall thickness resulting from immaturity and/or enzymatic debridement.

Bradley, E L; Vito, R P

1984-01-01

59

[Knee extensor mechanism ruptures].  

PubMed

Knee extensor mechanism is composed of the quadriceps and its tendon, patella and patellar tendon. Rupture of either the quadriceps or patellar tendon, or of the patella itself, lead to a disruption of the knee extensor mechanism. Clinical examination reveals an inability to actively extend the knee. Standard radiographs of the knee show a suprapatellar swelling of the soft tissues in case of quadriceps tendon rupture, or a displaced patellar fracture, or a patella alta in case of patellar tendon rupture. Echography and MRI confirm the diagnosis and may reveal associated injuries. In case of knee extensor mechanism rupture, early surgical reconstruction of quadriceps or patellar tendon, or patella osteosynthesis, are mandatory to achieve early functional recovery. PMID:21919393

Duthon, V B; Fritschy, D

2011-08-10

60

Partial Rotator Cuff Ruptures  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Partial rotator cuff ruptures are not rare and occur mainly in the supraspinatus tendon and may extend to that of infraspinatus,\\u000a but rarely to the tendon of subscapularis. Isolated lesions in the tendons of infraspinatus, teres minor or subscapularis\\u000a are rare. Partial ruptures usually occur before the sixth decade of life and can be a cause of unexplained pain in

Antonio Cartucho

61

Arterial distensibility in patients with ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms: Is it a predisposing factor for rupture risk?  

PubMed

Background A risk factor assessment that reliably predicts whether patients are predisposed to intracranial aneurysm (IA) rupture has yet to be formulated. As such, the clinical management of unruptured IA remains unclear. Our aim was to determine whether impaired arterial distensibility and hypertrophic remodeling might be indicators of risk for IA rupture. Material and Methods The study population (n=49) was selected from consecutive admissions for either unruptured IA (n=23) or ruptured IA (n=26) from January to December 2010. Hemodynamic measures were taken from every patient, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure using a sphygmomanometer. Unruptured IA and ruptured IA characteristics, including aneurysmal shape, size, angle, aspect ratio, and bottleneck factor, were measured and calculated from transverse brain CT angiography images. With ultrasound, the right common carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured, as well as the lumen diameter during systole and diastole. Arterial wall strain, distensibility, stiffness index, and elastic modulus were calculated and compared between patients with unruptured IAs and ruptured IAs. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results General demographic data did not differ between patients with unruptured IAs and ruptured IAs. Greater mean intima-media thickness (p=0.013), mean stiffness index (p=0.044), and mean elastic modulus (p=0.026) were observed for patients with ruptured IAs. Moreover, mean strain (p=0.013) and mean distensibility (p=0.024) were decreased in patients with ruptured IAs. Conclusions Patients with ruptured IAs demonstrated decreased arterial distensibility and increased intima-media thickness at the level of the carotid arteries. By measuring these parameters via ultrasound, it may be possible to predict whether patients with existing IAs might rupture and hemorrhage into the subarachnoid space. PMID:23974299

Dusak, Abdurrahim; Kamasak, Kaan; Goya, Cemil; Adin, Mehmet E; Elbey, Mehmet A; Bilici, Aslan

2013-08-26

62

Arterial distensibility in patients with ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms: Is it a predisposing factor for rupture risk?  

PubMed Central

Background A risk factor assessment that reliably predicts whether patients are predisposed to intracranial aneurysm (IA) rupture has yet to be formulated. As such, the clinical management of unruptured IA remains unclear. Our aim was to determine whether impaired arterial distensibility and hypertrophic remodeling might be indicators of risk for IA rupture. Material/Methods The study population (n=49) was selected from consecutive admissions for either unruptured IA (n=23) or ruptured IA (n=26) from January to December 2010. Hemodynamic measures were taken from every patient, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure using a sphygmomanometer. Unruptured IA and ruptured IA characteristics, including aneurysmal shape, size, angle, aspect ratio, and bottleneck factor, were measured and calculated from transverse brain CT angiography images. With ultrasound, the right common carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured, as well as the lumen diameter during systole and diastole. Arterial wall strain, distensibility, stiffness index, and elastic modulus were calculated and compared between patients with unruptured IAs and ruptured IAs. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results General demographic data did not differ between patients with unruptured IAs and ruptured IAs. Greater mean intima-media thickness (p=0.013), mean stiffness index (p=0.044), and mean elastic modulus (p=0.026) were observed for patients with ruptured IAs. Moreover, mean strain (p=0.013) and mean distensibility (p=0.024) were decreased in patients with ruptured IAs. Conclusions Patients with ruptured IAs demonstrated decreased arterial distensibility and increased intima-media thickness at the level of the carotid arteries. By measuring these parameters via ultrasound, it may be possible to predict whether patients with existing IAs might rupture and hemorrhage into the subarachnoid space.

Dusak, Abdurrahim; Kamasak, Kaan; Goya, Cemil; Adin, Mehmet E.; Elbey, Mehmet A.; Bilici, Aslan

2013-01-01

63

Clinical recovery of two hip adductor longus ruptures: a case-report of a soccer player  

PubMed Central

Background Non-operative treatment of acute hip adductor longus ruptures in athletes has been described in the literature. However, very limited information concerning the recovery of this type of injury exists. This case represented a unique possibility to study the recovery of two acute adductor longus ruptures, using novel, reliable and validated assessment methods. Case presentation A 22-year old male soccer player (Caucasian) sustained two subsequent acute adductor longus ruptures, one in each leg. The injuries occurred 10爉onths apart, and were treated non-surgically in both situations. He was evaluated using hip-strength assessments, self-report and ultrasonography until complete muscle-strength recovery of the hip adductors had occurred. The player was able to participate in a full soccer training session without experiencing pain 15爓eeks after the first rupture, and 12爓eeks after the second rupture. Full hip adductor muscle-strength recovery was obtained 52爓eeks after the first rupture and 10爓eeks after the second rupture. The adductor longus injuries, as verified by initial ultrasonography (10燿ays post-injury), showed evidence of a complete tendon rupture in both cases, with an almost identical imaging appearance. It was only at 6 and 10爓eeks ultrasonographic follow-up that the first rupture was found to include a larger anatomical area than the second rupture. Conclusion From this case we can conclude that two apparently similar hip adductor longus ruptures, verified by initial ultrasonography (10燿ays post-injury), can have very different hip adductor strength recovery times. Assessment of adductor strength recovery may therefore in the future be a useful and important additional measure for determining when soccer players with hip adductor longus ruptures can return safely to play.

2013-01-01

64

Transverse Plasma Wave Echos.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Transverse plasma echos can arise from two spatially separated, steady-state excitations, a transverse one at frequency omega 1 and a longitudinal one at frequency omega 2. Our theoretical results for the location, polarization, and other characteristics ...

B. D. Fried C. Olson

1968-01-01

65

Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon fiber is becoming more prevalent in everyday life. As such, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of, not solely general mechanical properties, but of long-term material behavior. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber is very difficult due to high strength and low strain to rupture properties. Past efforts have included testing upon strands, single tows and overwrapped pressure vessels. In this study, 1 inch wide, [0/90癩s laminated composite specimens were constructed from fabric supplied by T.D. Williamson Inc. Specimen fabrication methods and gripping techniques were investigated and a method was developed to collect long term creep rupture behavior data. An Instron 1321 servo-hydraulic material testing machine was used to execute static strength and short term creep rupture tests. A hanging dead-weight apparatus was designed to perform long-term creep rupture testing. The testing apparatus, specimens, and specimen grips functioned well. Collected data exhibited a power law distribution and therefore, a linear trend upon a log strength-log time plot. Statistical analysis indicated the material exhibited slow degradation behavior, similar to previous studies, and could maintain a 50 year carrying capacity at 62% of static strength, approximately 45.7 ksi.

Burton, Kathryn Anne

66

The effect of the interphase/interface region on creep and creep rupture of thermoplastic composites  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the interphase/interface region on the static mechanical properties, creep and creep rupture behavior of thermoplastic (J2) composites was investigated. The mechanical properties of the J2 composites were altered by systematic changes in fiber surface chemistry. Four fiber systems were used including the AU4, AS4(1) (2), and AS4CGP fibers. (AS4(1) and AS4(2) represent different batch numbers.) Surface energies and chemistry of carbon fibers were examined using the Dynamic Contact Angle (DCA) method and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The mesoindentation technique was used to measure the interfacial shear strengths (ISS) of the composites. For the same batch of the composites, the ISS ratios for AS4(2)/J2 to AU4/J2 and AS4CGP/J2 to AU4/J2 were 1.22 and 1.24, respectively. The mechanical properties of these composites in the fiber direction were insensitive to the ISS. The transverse and shear moduli of the J2 composites were also not affected by the ISS. The static strengths, in general, ordered themselves from strong to weak as follows: AS4(2)/J2 greater than AS4CGP/J2 is greater than AU4/J2. However, the creep rupture strength revealed a different ordering: AS4CGP/J2 is greater than AS4(2)/J2 is greater than AU4/J2. This suggests that static mechanical properties may not be a good indicator for long term mechanical performance. Experimental results showed that the interphase/interface region did not affect the degradation rates of the creep rupture strength of the J2 composites. DMA creep tests were performed at elevated temperatures for J2 composites. A master curve of each composite was generated. The shift factors obeyed the Arrhenius type equation. The activation energies of composites were approximately the same. The creep response of the AU4/J2, AS4(2)/J2, and AS4CGP/J2 composites were not dependent upon the ISS. Severe delaminations were observed in the AS4(1)/J2 composite laminates.

Chang, Y.S.

1992-01-01

67

Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm.  

PubMed

Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

Costa, S韑via; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

2013-06-13

68

Incomplete Cesarean Scar Rupture  

PubMed Central

Background Uterine rupture at the site of a previous cesarean scar is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of pregnancy, which is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Case Presentation A 30-year old woman at 24th week of gestation and complaint of pain, contractions and spotting was admitted in Royan Institute in Tehran, Iran. She had a past medical history of an EP and a cesarean section delivery, respectively 4 and 2 years before hospitalization. Herniation of an amniotic membrane into the maternal bladder was found on ultrasound examination. Conclusion Risk factors of cesarean scar rupture should be considered in women undergoing subsequent pregnancies as they need extra care. Ultrasonography can be used to evaluate women with previous cesarean section to assess the risks of scar rupture during subsequent pregnancies.

Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Siahbazi, Shiva; Akhbari, Farnaz

2013-01-01

69

Quantitative relations between earthquake source properties from dynamic rupture simulations incorporating off-fault plasticity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High stress concentrations at earthquake rupture fronts may generate inelastic off-fault response around the rupture tip, leading to increased energy absorption in the damage zone. Accounting for off-fault plasticity in earthquake rupture simulations imposes physical limits on extreme ground motion as plastic dissipation limits the rupture speed and peak slip rate of pulses. We present physics-based relations between earthquake source parameters derived from analytic considerations and from a consistent set of 2D dynamic rupture models that incorporate severe velocity-weakening friction and off-fault plasticity assuming homogeneous initial conditions. Specifically, we deduce a non-linear relation between the peak slip velocity and rupture speed, which holds for sub- and super-shear, crack- and pulse-like ruptures. We find that these relations are statistically consistent with the correlation of peak slip rate and rupture speed in 3D dynamic rupture models under linear slip weakening friction and highly heterogeneous initial stress. Furthermore the closeness to failure (CF) parameter introduced by Templeton and Rice (2008) is an adequate predictor of rupture speed for slow ruptures, whereas rupture speeds larger than ~80% S-wave speed have a more complicated dependence on stress orientation and the relative strength of the fault. These relations, combined with the limits on rupture speed imposed by off-fault plasticity, may encapsulate a major influence of plastic deformation on near-field ground motions. Our study captures fundamental processes governing dynamic rupture propagation coupled to self-similar off-fault energy dissipation. Thus, our results may be a suitable starting point to develop new pseudo-dynamic source parametrizations for source inversion and ground motion prediction that account for off-fault plasticity. We will report on the suitability of these relations in the presence of other sources of rupture complexity, e.g. coalescing rupture fronts.

Gabriel, Alice; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Dalguer, Luis A.; Mai, P. Martin

2013-04-01

70

Ruptured extrauterine pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extrauterine pregnancies contribute substantially to maternal mortality in all parts of the world. The most common cause of these deaths is massive bleeding after rupture of the ectopic pregnancy. The advent of transvaginal ultrasonography in early pregnancy and the use of quantitative measurement of the ?-unit of human chorionic gonadotropin have revolutionized the management of this condition. These diagnostic modalities

D. R. Slabbert; T. F. Kruger

2006-01-01

71

Seismological evidence and dynamic model of reverse rupture propagation during the 2010 M7.2 El Mayor Cucapah earthquake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake has produced some unique observations that exemplify the complexity of rupture dynamics. An eyewitness located near the fault when the rupture broke reported signatures of reverse surface rupture (rupture towards the South at a location North from the hypocenter). We report here on seismological evidence of this phenomenon and present dynamic rupture simulations that illustrate a possible mechanism. Reverse rupture propagation is not admissible in traditional source inversions, because of restrictive assumptions about the rupture kinematics adopted to reduce the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. In contrast, source imaging by back-projection of dense array data is free from such assumptions. Recently, we have enhanced the array back-projection technique to achieve higher resolution on rupture evolution. We have also extended this approach to recordings at regional distance, despite the complexity of the regional Pn waveforms. We imaged the source of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake by back-projecting Pn waves recorded by the SIEDCAR array in New Mexico. Our analysis reveals a segment with reverse rupture propagation consistent with the eyewitness reports. Our simulations of dynamic earthquake rupture show that reverse rupture propagation can be caused by delayed rupture of a strong fault region with a negative along-strike gradient of strength excess. In this scenario the rupture front tunnels through (or surrounds) the strong area, then starts breaking the opposite, weaker end of the strong patch, inducing a reverse rupture front.

Meng, L.; Ampuero, J. P.; Page, M. T.; Hudnut, K. W.

2011-12-01

72

Creep rupture properties of a Ni-Cr-W superalloy in air environment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Creep rupture properties in air environment were investigated at 900, 1000 and 1050degC using bar, plate and seamless tube materials of a Ni-Cr-W superalloy developed for use at service temperatures around 1000degC. Long-term creep rupture strength was es...

Y. Kurata H. Tsuji M. Shindo H. Nakajima

1996-01-01

73

Experimental study on the hierarchical rupture process of faults having heterogeneous asperities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Earthquake faulting is characterized by nonuniform distributions of rupture velocity, stress drop as well as co-seismic slip, indicating nonuniform distribution of local strength over the earthquake fault. Strong seismic wave is generally radiated from where the rupture velocity or stress drop changes rapidly. Many after shocks, especially strong ones, may take place at the unbroken barriers on the earthquake fault.

X. Lei; K. Kusunose; T. Satoh; O. Nishizawa

2001-01-01

74

Role of Fault Branches in Earthquake Rupture Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyze earthquake ruptures propagating along a straight "main" fault and encountering a finite-length branch fault. Such intersections are often observed in natural fault systems. The predicted effects of the interaction with the branch that we report can be remarkable; they can strongly perturb the propagation velocity on the main fault and, in some cases, even arrest that propagation. Earlier work [Poliakov et al., 2002, Kame et al., 2003; Bhat et al., 2004] emphasized the role of the fault pre-stress state, branch geometry (i.e., branching angle), and the incoming rupture velocity at the branching junction in determining whether the rupture would follow the branch or continue on the main fault or both, through simulations which did not let a rupture on the branch encounter a barrier or a fault end (called "infinite" branch cases henceforth). In this study we look at "finite" branch cases, and study the effect also of branch length, with rupture being blocked from propagation beyond the branch end. It is known that sudden stoppage of a dynamic rupture front leads to the propagation of large dynamic stress perturbations in the medium. These have been known to nucleate ruptures on adjacent fault segments [Harris and Day, 1983, Harris et al., 2001,Fliss et al., 2004, among others]. We thus anticipate interaction between the rupture on the main fault and the branched one at two stages, namely, when the rupture is propagating on the branch and when it is suddenly blocked at the branch end. We show that in general rupture termination on a compressional branch little affects propagation on the main fault compared to the infinite branch cases. For branches on the extensional side, we show in some cases that whereas an infinite branch would have allowed (or stopped) rupture propagation on the main fault, a finite branch stops (or allows) propagation on the main fault. Such results have a dependence on branch length that we document. We also illustrate branch-related complexities in rupture velocity evolution which could be one of the sources of the high-frequency content of strong ground motion records. Complexities in the slip distribution, often associated with a presumed heterogeneous strength distribution along the fault, can also be observed when rupture is terminated on a branch.

Bhat, H. S.; Dmowska, R.; Olives, M.; Rice, J. R.

2006-12-01

75

Role of fault branches in earthquake rupture dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyze earthquake ruptures propagating along a straight "main" fault and encountering a finite-length branch fault. Such intersections are often observed in natural fault systems. The predicted effects of the interaction with the branch that we report can be remarkable; they can strongly perturb the propagation velocity on the main fault and, in some cases, even arrest that propagation. Earlier work (Kame et al., 2003; Bhat et al., 2004) emphasized the role of the fault pre-stress state, branch geometry (i.e., branching angle), and the incoming rupture velocity at the branching junction in determining whether the rupture would follow the branch or continue on the main fault or both, through simulations which did not let a rupture on the branch encounter a barrier or a fault end (called `infinite' branch cases henceforth). In this study we look at "finite" branch cases, and study the effect also of branch length, with rupture being blocked from propagation beyond the branch end. It is known that sudden stoppage of a dynamic rupture front leads to the propagation of large dynamic stress perturbations in the medium. These have been known to nucleate or terminate ruptures on adjacent fault segments (Harris et al., 1991; Harris and Day, 1993, 1999; Harris et al., 2002; Fliss et al., 2005, among others). We thus anticipate interaction between the rupture on the main fault and the branched one at two stages, when the rupture is propagating on the branch and when it is suddenly blocked at the branch end. We show that in general rupture termination on a compressional branch little affects propagation on the main fault compared to the infinite branch cases. For branches on the extensional side, we show in some cases, that whereas an infinite' branch would have allowed (or stopped) rupture propagation on the main fault, a finite branch stops (or allows) propagation on the main fault. Such results have a dependence on branch length that we document. We also illustrate branch-related complexities in rupture velocity evolution which could be one of the sources of the high-frequency content of strong ground motion record. Complexities in the slip distribution, often associated with a presumed heterogeneous strength distribution along the fault, can also be observed when rupture is terminated on a branch.

Bhat, Harsha S.; Olives, Marion; Dmowska, Renata; Rice, James R.

2007-11-01

76

Creep rupture of wallaby tail tendons.  

PubMed

The tail tendons from wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus) suffer creep rupture at stresses of 10 MPa or above, whereas their yield stress in a dynamic test is about 144 MPa. At stresses between 20 and 80 MPa, the time-to-rupture decreases exponentially with stress, but at 10 MPa, the lifetime is well above this exponential. For comparison, the stress on a wallaby tail tendon, when its muscle contracts isometrically, is about 13.5 MPa. Creep lifetime depends sharply on temperature and on specimen length, in contrast to strength and stiffness as observed in dynamic tests. The creep curve (strain versus time) can be considered as a combination of primary creep (decelerating strain) and tertiary creep (accelerating strain). Primary creep is non-damaging, but tertiary creep is accompanied by accumulating damage, with loss of stiffness and strength. 'Damage' is quantitatively defined as the fractional loss of stiffness. A creep theory is developed in which the whole of tertiary creep and, in particular, the creep lifetime are predicted from measurements made at the onset of creep, when the tendon is undamaged. This theory is based on a 'damage hypothesis', which can be stated as: damaged material no longer contributes to stiffness and strength, whereas intact material makes its full contribution to both. PMID:9244804

Wang, X T; Ker, R F

1995-03-01

77

TRANSVERSELY POLARIZED L PRODUCTION.  

SciTech Connect

Transversely polarized {Lambda} production in hard scattering processes is discussed in terms of a leading twist T-odd fragmentation function which describes the fragmentation of an unpolarized quark into a transversely polarized {Lambda}. We focus on the properties of this function and its relevance for the RHIC and HERMES experiments.

BORER,D.

2000-05-22

78

Rust and Rupture: Atherosclerosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter provides an overview of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and integrates the latest clinical guidelines and\\u000a trials into a concise and practical guide to cardiovascular risk reduction and the management of dyslipidemia. These measures\\u000a form the basis for a management strategy aimed at halting the progression of atherosclerosis, stabilizing rupture-prone plaques,\\u000a preventing arterial thrombosis, and improving cardiovascular prognosis.

Justin T. Saunders; Christie M. Ballantyne

79

Premature rupture of membranes.  

PubMed Central

The management of patients with premature rupture of membranes has changed markedly in the past several years. The basis for this is a combination of a better understanding of newborn physiology, improved neonatal care, refinements in antibiotic therapy, and the widespread use of maternal and fetal monitoring. The best outcome for both mother and infant undoubtedly reflects data based on a combination of factors, among which are gestational age survival, evidence of fetal distress, presence or absence of labor and sepsis, and of course, the cervical condition as it is related to labor-readiness. An important recent advance is the recognition that an active observation management program is associated with less morbidity and mortality than the classic management course of delivery within 12 hours of membrane rupture. The fact that preterm premature rupture of membranes tends to recur in subsequent pregnancies offers an opportunity for prevention. Moreover, advances in perinatal and neonatal care will continue to improve the outcomes of these women and their children.

Poma, P. A.

1996-01-01

80

Rupture modes in laboratory earthquakes: Effect of fault prestress and nucleation conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismic inversions show that earthquake risetimes may be much shorter than the overall rupture duration, indicating that earthquakes may propagate as self-healing, pulse-like ruptures. Several mechanisms for producing pulse-like ruptures have been proposed, including velocity-weakening friction, interaction of dynamic rupture with fault geometry and local heterogeneity, and effect of bimaterial contrast. We present experimental results on rupture mode selection in laboratory earthquakes occurring on frictional interfaces, which were prestressed both in compression and in shear. Our experiments demonstrate that pulse-like ruptures can exist in the absence of a bimaterial effect or of local heterogeneities. We find a systematic variation from crack-like to pulse-like rupture modes with both (1) decreasing nondimensional shear prestress and (2) decreasing absolute levels of shear and normal prestress for the same value of nondimensional shear prestress. Both pulse-like and crack-like ruptures can propagate with either sub-Rayleigh or supershear rupture speeds. Our experimental results are consistent with theories of ruptures on velocity-weakening interfaces, implying that velocity-weakening friction plays an important role in governing the dynamic behavior of earthquake ruptures. We show that there is no measurable fault-normal stress decrease on the fault plane due to the nucleation procedure employed in experiments, and hence, this is not a factor in the rupture mode selection. We find that pulse-like ruptures correspond to the levels of nondimensional shear prestress significantly lower than the static friction coefficient, suggesting that faults hosting pulse-like ruptures may operate at low levels of prestress compared to their static strength.

Lu, Xiao; Rosakis, Ares J.; Lapusta, Nadia

2010-12-01

81

Barriers to faulting in the Basin-Range province: evidence from the Sou Hills transverse block  

SciTech Connect

Transverse structural blocks may inhibit the propagation of fault ruptures in the Basin-Range province. The Sou Hills, between Dixie and Pleasant Valleys, is a block of uplifted Tertiary bedrock transverse to the NNE-SSW trend of the central Nevada seismic belt. Three lines of evidence indicate that offset due to normal faulting is much less in the Sou Hills compared to adjacent segments of the seismic belt. First, estimates of total late Cenozoic offsets of pre-extension basalts show that the total offset is less in the Sou Hills. Second, analyses of landforms that reflect rates of relative uplift show that Quaternary tectonic activity on range-bounding faults declines where faults join the Sou Hills. Third, measurements of late Quaternary fault scarps show that individual rupture segments in the Sou Hills are shorter in length and have smaller displacements compared to the nearly continuous ruptures of several meters offset found along the Tobin and Stillwater Ranges to the north and south. The Sou Hills rupture pattern is distinctive: ruptures are dispersed over a wide zone rather than being concentrated along well-defined range fronts. Normal faulting patterns produced by the 1915 Pleasant Valley, Nevada and the 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquakes indicate that a discontinuous, spatially dispersed faulting style typifies ruptures which die out in transverse bedrock features. These historic analogues support a model for prehistoric faulting in which ruptures have repeatedly died out in the Sou Hills. Transverse blocks such as the Sou Hills appear to present barriers to propagating ruptures.

Fonseca, J.E.

1985-01-01

82

Blood vessel rupture by cavitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cavitation is thought to be one mechanism for vessel rupture during shock wave lithotripsy treatment. However, just how cavitation\\u000a induces vessel rupture remains unknown. In this work, a high-speed photomicrography system was set up to directly observe\\u000a the dynamics of bubbles inside blood vessels in ex vivo rat mesenteries. Vascular rupture correlating to observed bubble dynamics\\u000a were examined by imaging

Hong Chen; Andrew A. Brayman; Michael R. Bailey; Thomas J. Matula

2010-01-01

83

Rupture of an oxide blister  

SciTech Connect

Expressions have been derived which describe the critical stress and pressure necessary to rupture oxide blisters which form on aluminum during the growth of corrosion pits. These expressions have been derived and evaluated for radial cracks in the oxide blister. The critical stress and corresponding pressure for rupture decrease with increasing blister radius and decrease with increasing crack length. The critical stress is independent of the ratio of oxide film thickness to blister radius, whereas the rupture pressure increases with this ratio. The critical stress is independent of Poisson`s ratio for the oxide film whereas the rupture pressure is weakly dependent on Poisson`s ratio for the oxide film.

Ryan, R.L.; McCafferty, E. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-08-01

84

[Achilles tendon rupture].  

PubMed

The treatment of acute of Achilles tendon rupture experienced a dynamic development in the last ten years. Decisive for this development was the application of MRI and above all the ultrasonography in the diagnostics of the pathological changes and injuries of tendons. The question of rupture morphology as well as different courses of healing could be now evaluated objectively. These advances led consequently to new modalities in treatment concepts and rehabilitation protocols. The decisive input for improvements of the outcome results and particularly the shortening of the rehabilitation period came with introduction of the early functional treatment in contrast to immobilizing plaster treatment. In a prospective randomized study (1987-1989) at the Trauma Dept. of the Hannover Medical School could show no statistical differences comparing functional non-operative with functional operative therapy with a special therapy boot (Variostabil/Adidas). The crucial criteria for therapy selection results from the sonographically measured position of the tendon stumps in plantar flexion (20 degrees). With complete adaptation of the tendons' ends surgical treatment does not achieve better results than non-operative functional treatment in term of tendon healing and functional outcome. Regarding the current therapeutic standards each method has is advantages and disadvantages. Both, the operative and non-operative functional treatment enable a stable tendon healing with a low risk of re-rupture (1-2%). Meanwhile there is consensus for early functional after-treatment of the operated Achilles' tendons. There seems to be a trend towards non-operative functional treatment in cases of adequate sonographical findings, or to minimal invasive surgical techniques. PMID:10798233

Thermann, H; H黤ner, T; Tscherne, H

2000-03-01

85

THE EFFECTS OF TRANSVERSE MICROTEXTURE ON THE TRANSVERSE COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION IN CARBON FIBERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

reinforcements used in composite materials due to its high specific stiffness and specific strength. Extensive research efforts have been conducted on the property- structure relationships in carbon fibers. However, most work in the past focused on the relationships between axial properties and the preferred orientation of the graphite basal planes (1). Little has been done about the effect of transverse

Shinn-Shyong Tzeng; R. J. Diefendorf

86

Long-term creep-rupture failure envelope of epoxy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An accelerated testing methodology based on the time-temperature superposition principle has been proposed in the literature for the long-term creep strength of polymer matrices and polymer composites. Also, it has been suggested that a standard master curve may be a feasible assumption to describe the creep behavior in both tension and compression modes. In the present research, strength master curves for an aerospace epoxy (8552) were generated for tension and compression, by shifting strength data measured at various temperatures. The shift function is obtained from superposition of creep-compliance curves obtained at different temperatures. A standard master curve was presented to describe the creep-rupture of the polymer under tension and compression. Moreover, long-term creep-rupture failure envelopes of the polymer were presented based on a two-part failure criterion for homogeneous and isotropic materials. Ultimately, the approach presented allows the prediction of creep-rupture failure envelopes for a time-dependent material based on tensile strengths measured at various temperatures, considering that the ratio between tensile and compressive strengths is known.

Melo, Jos Daniel D.; de Medeiros, Antonio M.

2013-06-01

87

Using Dynamic Rupture Models to Explore Physical Controls on the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake Rupture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismic and geodetic recordings are routinely used to invert for kinematic source models of large earthquakes, which provide us with detailed images of slip distribution and rupture evolution on causative faults. To gain insight into physical conditions that allow a fault to slip and a rupture to propagate in the way they did, we can resort to dynamic source models that obey physical laws in continuum mechanics and rock friction. Published kinematic models of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake reveal several features of the rupture. These features include 1) high static stress drop with large amounts of slip in a small area, 2) a weak initial phase, down-dip rupture for the first 40 seconds, extensive shallow rupture during 60 to 70 seconds, and continuing deeper rupture lasting more than 100 seconds, and 3) systematically down-dip high-frequency radiation with respect to the hypocenter. In this study, we use spontaneous rupture models to explore what physical conditions, including the initial stress state and friction properties on the subducting fault, can reproduce these features, so that we can gain some physical insights into controls on this megathrust earthquake. Dynamic rupture simulations of this shallow dipping megathrust faulting at reasonable spatial and temporal resolutions require parallel computing on supercomputers. Our newly parallelized finite element method algorithm EQdyna allows us to simulate a large suite of spontaneous rupture models to examine the questions. In model setup, we use depth-dependence principal stresses and take into account variations in pore fluid pressure and frictional properties associated with subducted seafloor features such as seamounts. Our preliminary results suggest followings. First, a high strength and high stress drop patch (probably a subducted seamount or seamout chain) just above the hypocenter on the fault plane can delay up-dip rupture and result in a concentrated large slip area. Second, significantly negative stress drop on the shallow portion of the subducting fault associated with the active accretionary prism is needed to reduce the amplitude of shallow slip and to confine shallow slip in a small area near the trench just up-dip of the region of maximum fault slip. Third, heterogeneities in the seismic strength parameter S down-dip of the hypocenter, probably due to both heterogeneous stresses from previous earthquakes and heterogeneous friction properties at the brittle and ductile transition zone, can produce large amounts of high-frequency radiations.

Duan, B.

2011-12-01

88

Acute Achilles tendon rupture in badminton players.  

PubMed

All patients with badminton-related acute Achilles tendon ruptures registered during 1990 to 1994 at the University Hospital of Ume were retrospectively followed up using a questionnaire. Thirty-one patients (mean age, 36.0 years), 27 men and 4 women, were included. Thirty patients (97%) described themselves as recreational players or beginners. The majority of the injuries (29 of 31, 94%) happened at the middle or end of the planned game. Previous local symptoms had been noticed by five patients (16%). Long-term results showed that patients treated with surgery had a significantly shorter sick leave absence than patients treated without surgery (50 versus 75 days). There was no obvious selection favoring any treatment modality. None of the surgically treated patients had reruptures, but two reruptures occurred in the nonsurgically treated group. There seemed to be fewer remaining symptoms and a higher sports activity level after the injury in the surgically treated group. Our results indicate that local muscle fatigue may interfere with strength and coordination. Preventive measures such as specific treatment of minor injuries and adequate training of strength, endurance, and coordination are important. Our findings also indicate that surgical treatment and careful postoperative rehabilitation is of great importance among badminton players of any age or sports level with Achilles tendon rupture. PMID:9617415

Fahlstr鰉, M; Bj鰎nstig, U; Lorentzon, R

89

The transition of dynamic rupture styles in elastic media under velocity-weakening friction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although kinematic earthquake source inversions show dominantly pulse-like subshear rupture behavior, seismological observations, laboratory experiments and theoretical models indicate that earthquakes can operate with different rupture styles: either as pulses or cracks, that propagate at subshear or supershear speeds. The determination of rupture style and speed has important implications for ground motions and may inform about the state of stress and strength of active fault zones. We conduct 2D in-plane dynamic rupture simulations with a spectral element method to investigate the diversity of rupture styles on faults governed by velocity-and-state-dependent friction with dramatic velocity-weakening at high slip rate. Our rupture models are governed by uniform initial stresses, and are artificially initiated. We identify the conditions that lead to different rupture styles by investigating the transitions between decaying, steady state and growing pulses, cracks, sub-shear and super-shear ruptures as a function of background stress, nucleation size and characteristic velocity at the onset of severe weakening. Our models show that small changes of background stress or nucleation size may lead to dramatic changes of rupture style. We characterize the asymptotic properties of steady state and self-similar pulses as a function of background stress. We show that an earthquake may not be restricted to a single rupture style, but that complex rupture patterns may emerge that consist of multiple rupture fronts, possibly involving different styles and back-propagating fronts. We also demonstrate the possibility of a super-shear transition for pulse-like ruptures. Finally, we draw connections between our findings and recent seismological observations.

Gabriel, A.-A.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Mai, P. M.

2012-09-01

90

The Principles of Strength and Fatigue in Optical Fibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tensile strength is defined as the applied stress (tensile load per unit cross-sectional area) recorded at the instant of rupture for a test specimen. Historically, attempts to catalogue and report the intrinsic strength of glass were frustrated by considerable dispersion in the acquired measurement data. In addition to large variability, typical strength values were found to be one, two or

J. Carr; S. Saikkonen

1986-01-01

91

Creep Rupture Modelling of Polymers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Damage by creep related fracture process is of primary importance in en gineering polymers and their composites. Modelling of creep rupture is useful for engi neering design especially in obtaining design stresses. Previously, the creep rupture times of polyethylene and polypropylene have been described successfully using a three element model with a critical elastic stored energy criterion. The modelling is

S. H. Teoh; B. W. Cherry; H. H. Kausch

1992-01-01

92

Creep Ruptures in Heterogeneous Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present creep experiments on fiber composite materials with different controlled heterogeneity. All samples exhibit a power-law relaxation of the strain rate in the primary creep regime (Andrade's law) followed by a power-law acceleration up to rupture. We discover that the rupture time is proportional to the duration of the primary creep regime, showing the interplay between the two regimes

H. Nechad; A. Helmstetter; R. El Guerjouma; D. Sornette

2005-01-01

93

Spontaneous Rupture of Pyometra  

PubMed Central

Spontaneous perforation is a very rare complication of pyometra. The clinical findings of perforated pyometra are similar to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract and other causes of acute abdomen. In most cases, a correct and definite diagnosis can be made only by laparotomy. We report two cases of diffuse peritonitis caused by spontaneous perforated pyometra. The first case is a 78-year-old woman with abdominal pain for which laparotomy was performed because of suspected incarcerated hernia. The second case is a 61-year-old woman with abdominal pain for which laparotomy was performed because of symptoms of peritonitis. At laparotomy of both cases, 1 liter of pus with the source of uterine was found in the abdominal cavity. The ruptured uterine is also detected. More investigations revealed no malignancy as the reason of the pyometra.

Mallah, Fatemeh; Eftekhar, Tahere; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

2013-01-01

94

Experimental Method of In-pile Creep Rupture Behavior of ODS Cladding Materials in the Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo  

Microsoft Academic Search

An in-pile creep rupture experiment was conducted in the experimental fast reactor Joyo to evaluate the creep rupture strength of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel under neutron irradiation. ODS has been developed as a most promising fuel cladding material for the next generation fast reactor because of its high temperature resistance and low swelling properties. The irradiation test device

Chikara Ito; Eiichi Kagota; Takafumi Aoyama

2008-01-01

95

Transverse localization of sound  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show how disorder can be used to guide a broadband ultrasonic wave. The idea is to exploit the transverse localization regime that has been reported for light. Our waveguide consists of a set of parallel cylindrical scatterers randomly distributed in the transverse plane. An ultrasonic beam propagating along the direction of scatterers is found to remain confined in the two other directions on a size smaller than the waveguide diameter and driven by the localization length. Interestingly, the guided wave is also found to propagate with a very limited temporal dispersion.

Bretagne, Alice; Fink, Mathias; Tourin, Arnaud

2013-09-01

96

Large-Scale Weibull Analysis of H-451 Nuclear-Grade Graphite Specimen Rupture Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A Weibull analysis was performed of the strength distribution and size effects for 2000 specimens of H-451 nuclear-grade graphite. The data, generated elsewhere, measured the tensile and four-point-flexure room-temperature rupture strength of specimens ex...

A. Walker E. H. Baker N. N. Nemeth P. L. Murthy R. L. Bratton

2012-01-01

97

Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on Tensile Strength of Polypropylene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the effects of the intensity of electron beam and the variation with time after irradiation of electron beam on the tensile strength of the polypropylene (PP), which is widely used as medicine containers, were investigated. PP with and without colorants were used first and samples irradiated under various intensity of EB. A tensile test on the irradiated samples with elapsed time after the irradiation of the electron beam was carried out. The effects of those factors on the tensile strength were discussed. The following results were obtained (1) The tensile strength of PP decreased due to the influence of the electron beam irradiation, however the rate of the decrease in strength was small compared with the original one. Furthermore, the rate of the decrease in strength was very small owing to the variation with time after the EB irradiation. (2) The tensile rupture strength of PP increased and the rupture strain owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, these rupture strength increased and the rupture strain decreased along with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. (3) The tensile rupture strain energy of PP decreased owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, the strain energy decreases with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. Moreover, the strength characteristics of PP with colorants received greater influence of electron beam compared with the one without colorants.

Yamada, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masayuki; Shimbo, Minoru; Miyano, Yasushi

98

Rupture of the triceps tendon associated with steroid injections.  

PubMed

Rupture of the triceps mechanism is an uncommon injury that has been recognized with increasing frequency in recent years. It has been proposed that such injuries commonly accompany fractures of the radial head and must be actively evaluated in the presence of such a fracture. We present a unique case of isolated rupture of the triceps tendon in an athlete who was lifting weights. This case was complicated by a history of olecranon bursitis that had been treated with numerous local steroid injections, as well as a history of anabolic steroid abuse. Both systemic steroids and local injections may predispose tendons to rupture. Triceps tendon ruptures may result in uniformly good to excellent results if recognized and treated surgically. This case also serves as a reminder of the risks of treating inflamed tissues with local steroid injections, especially in strength athletes who place high demands on their musculoskeletal structures. Finally, this case documents a second case of triceps mechanism rupture in an athlete who has abused anabolic steroids. A study by Hunter et al. suggests that oral steroid abuse may be associated with detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of connective tissue, demonstrating another negative effect of anabolic steroid use in athletes. PMID:8346768

Stannard, J P; Bucknell, A L

99

Ejs Transverse Wave Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Transverse Wave model displays the motion of a transverse wave on a string. The simulation allows an arbitrarily polarized wave to be created. The magnitude of the components of the wave and the relative phase between the components of the wave can all be changed via sliders. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting 釵pen Ejs Model from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Transverse Wave model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_ehu_waves_transverse.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for wave motion are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Aguirregabiria, Juan

2008-08-19

100

Electroproduction and Transversity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exclusive electroproduction from the proton is suggested for extracting the tensor charge and other quantities related to transversity from experimental data [1]. A connection between a description based on partonic degrees of freedom, given in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), and Regge phenomenology is discussed. Pion electroproduction is described in terms of the chiral odd (spin flip) GPDs for both longitudinal and transverse virtual photon polarizations. A mechanism for the Q^2-dependence of the &*circ; vertex is proposed that, by treating separately natural and unnatural parity exchanges at this vertex, allows one to separate the transverse and longitudinal virtual photon contributions, the latter being dominated by unnatural exchanges. A study of the sensitivity of different observables in both unpolarized and polarized scattering to both the tensor charge and the transverse anomalous magnetic moment [2], is presented with the aim of providing a practical method for extracting the latter. Future investigations using a variety of targets (proton, deuteron and ^4He) and probes -- both electron and neutrino scattering as well as hadronic reactions will be discussed. [1] S. Ahmad, G. R. Goldstein and S. Liuti, arXiv:0805.3568 [hep-ph] [2] M. Burkardt, Phys. Lett. B 639, 462 (2006).

Liuti, Simonetta

2008-10-01

101

Noninterceptive transverse beam diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The transverse emittance properties of a high-current linear accelerator may be measured by using TV cameras sensitive to the visible radiation emitted following beam interactions with residual gas. This paper describes the TV system being used to measure emittances for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project.

Chamberlin, D.D.; Minerbo, G.N.; Teel, L.E. Jr.; Gilpatrick, J.D.

1981-01-01

102

Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus  

PubMed Central

We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome.

Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Mohamed Ali, Elouer; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannai

2013-01-01

103

Partial ACL rupture: an MR diagnosis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. We sought to clarify the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) to show partial ante- rior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures and to allow dis- tinction of partial from complete ACL ruptures. Materials and methods. Eighty-eight patients were stud- ied by arthroscopy and MR (36 with normal ACLs, 21 with partial ACL ruptures, and 31 with complete ACL ruptures). MR

Lawrence Yao; Amilcare Gentili; Leonard Petrus; Joong K. Lee

1995-01-01

104

[Splenic rupture and anticoagulant therapy].  

PubMed

Splenic rupture associated with anticoagulant therapy is a rare entity. We report a case of spontaneous splenic rupture in a 62-year-old man who was treated by acenocoumarol orally after an aortic-valve replacement. Unrecognised, minor trauma may lead to splenic haemorrhage in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. The symptoms and signs may mimic those of acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock. Early diagnosis is essential. Reversal of the anticoagulant and emergent splenectomy are the treatments of choice. PMID:15324967

Badaoui, R; Chebboubi, K; Delmas, J; Jakobina, S; Mahjoub, Y; Riboulot, M

2004-07-01

105

Creep rupture of polymer composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

A creep-rupture model, based on a creep model which was successfully applied in a previous paper to model and predict the creep of a unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced epoxy composite and that of the epoxy matrix, and a critical energy fracture criterion, are presented. The results of the successful application of this model to predict the creep rupture of AS4\\/3501-6 composite specimens

J. Raghavan; M. Meshii

1997-01-01

106

Lifetime statistics for single graphite fibres in creep rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental results are presented for the lifetime in creep rupture of single graphite fibres. The fibres were extracted\\u000a from unsized, Hercules IM6 tows and were tested at a gauge length of 5 cm under standard ambient conditions (21C, 50% r.h.).\\u000a The results were analysed using a theoretical model which embodies Weibull distributions for both strength and lifetime, and\\u000a a power-law

D. S. Farquhar; F. M. Mutrelle; S. L. Phoenix; R. L. Smith

1989-01-01

107

Delayed repair of a ruptured pectoralis major muscle. A case report.  

PubMed

Repair of a pectoralis major muscle rupture at the tendinous insertion into the humerus was successfully performed 13 years after the initial injury. Repair was possible only because the ruptured sternal portion of the muscle was scarred to the intact clavicular portion and therefore had not retracted. The attachment of the avulsed sternal head to the intact clavicular head enabled successful restoration of strength and function, as well as normal contour and appearance of the pectoralis major muscle complex. PMID:10751005

Anbari, A; Kelly, J D; Moyer, R A

108

Conditions governing the occurrence of supershear ruptures under slip-weakening friction  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general theory for transitions between sub-Rayleigh and intersonic rupture speeds is developed for faults governed by slip-weakening friction. The transition occurs when stresses moving at intersonic speeds ahead of expanding or accelerating sub-Rayleigh ruptures exceed the peak strength of the fault, initiating slip within a daughter crack. Upon reaching a critical nucleation length, the daughter crack becomes dynamically unstable,

Eric M. Dunham

2007-01-01

109

Constitutive parameters for earthquake rupture dynamics based on high-velocity friction tests with variable sliprate  

Microsoft Academic Search

To reproduce the dynamic rupture process of earthquakes, the fault geometry, initial stress distribution and a frictional\\u000a constitutive law on the fault are important parameters as initial and boundary conditions of the system. Here, we focus on\\u000a the frictional constitutive relation on the fault. During a high-speed rupture, fault strength decreases as slip develops\\u000a which can be described by a

Eiichi Fukuyama; Kazuo Mizoguchi

2010-01-01

110

Transverse entanglement of biphotons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We measure the transverse entanglement of photon pairs on their propagation from the near to the far field of spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC). The Fedorov ratio, depending on the widths of conditional and unconditional intensity measurements, is shown to be only able to characterize entanglement in the near and far field zones of the source. Therefore we also follow a different approach. By evaluating the first-order coherence of a subsystem of the state we can quantify its entanglement. Unlike previous measurements, which determine the Fedorov ratio via intensity correlations, our setup is sensitive to both phase and modulus of the biphoton state and thus always grants experimental access to the full transverse entanglement of the SPDC state. It is shown theoretically that this scheme represents a direct measurement of the Schmidt number.

Just, F.; Cavanna, A.; Chekhova, M. V.; Leuchs, G.

2013-08-01

111

Diagnosis and treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture.  

PubMed

This clinical practice guideline is based on a series of systematic reviews of published studies in the available literature on the diagnosis and treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. None of the 16 recommendations made by the work group was graded as strong; most are graded inconclusive; four are graded weak; two are graded as moderate strength; and two are consensus statements. The two moderate-strength recommendations include the suggestions for early postoperative protective weight bearing and for the use of protective devices that allow for postoperative mobilization. PMID:20675643

Chiodo, Christopher P; Glazebrook, Mark; Bluman, Eric Michael; Cohen, Bruce E; Femino, John E; Giza, Eric; Watters, William C; Goldberg, Michael J; Keith, Michael; Haralson, Robert H; Turkelson, Charles M; Wies, Janet L; Raymond, Laura; Anderson, Sara; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick

2010-08-01

112

Transverse Spin Physics: Recent Developments  

SciTech Connect

Transverse-spin physics has been very active and rapidly developing in the last few years. In this talk, I will briefly summarize recent theoretical developments, focusing on the associated QCD dynamics in transverse spin physics.

Yuan, Feng

2008-12-10

113

Chronic Achilles tendon rupture reconstruction using a modified flexor hallucis longus transfer  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to report the management and outcome of 11 patients presenting with chronic Achilles tendon (AT) rupture treated by a modified flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfer. Seven patients presented with a neglected AT rupture, one with a chronic AT rupture associated with Achilles tendinosis and three with an AT re-rupture. AT defect after fibrosis debridement averaged 7.4燾m. In addition to FHL transfer, we performed an augmentation using the two remaining fibrous scar stumps of the ruptured AT. Functional assessment was performed using the AOFAS score and isokinetic evaluation was performed to assess ankle plantarflexion torque deficit. Follow-up averaged 79爉onths. Functional outcome was excellent with a significant improvement of the AOFAS score at latest follow-up. No re-rupture nor major complication, particularly of wound healing, was observed. All patients presented with a loss of active range of motion of the hallux interphalangeal joint without functional weakness during athletic or daily life activities. Isokinetic testing at 30 degrees/second and 120 degrees/second revealed a significant average decrease of 28??11% and 36??4.1%, respectively, in plantarflexion peak torque. Although strength deficit persisted at latest follow-up, functional improvement was significant without morbidity due to FHL harvesting. For patients with chronic AT rupture with a rupture gap of at least 5 cm, surgical repair using FHL transfer with fibrous AT stump reinforcement achieved excellent outcomes.

Luciani, Jean-Francois; Philippot, Remi; Brunet-Guedj, Elisabeth; Moyen, Bernard; Besse, Jean-Luc

2009-01-01

114

Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Can the rupture directivity of past earthquakes be inferred from fault geometry? Nakata et al. [J. Geogr., 1998] propose to relate the observed surface branching of fault systems with directivity. Their work assumes that all branches are through acute angles in the direction of rupture propagation. However, in some observed cases rupture paths seem to branch through highly obtuse angles, as if to propagate ``backwards". Field examples of that are as follows: (1) Landers 1992. When crossing from the Johnson Valley to the Homestead Valley (HV) fault via the Kickapoo (Kp) fault, the rupture from Kp progressed not just forward onto the northern stretch of the HV fault, but also backwards, i.e., SSE along the HV [Sowers et al., 1994, Spotila and Sieh, 1995, Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995, Rockwell et al., 2000]. Measurements of surface slip along that backward branch, a prominent feature of 4 km length, show right-lateral slip, decreasing towards the SSE. (2) At a similar crossing from the HV to the Emerson (Em) fault, the rupture progressed backwards along different SSE splays of the Em fault [Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995]. (3). In crossing from the Em to Camp Rock (CR) fault, again, rupture went SSE on the CR fault. (4). Hector Mine 1999. The rupture originated on a buried fault without surface trace [Li et al., 2002; Hauksson et al., 2002] and progressed bilaterally south and north. In the south it met the Lavic Lake (LL) fault and progressed south on it, but also progressed backward, i.e. NNW, along the northern stretch of the LL fault. The angle between the buried fault and the northern LL fault is around -160o, and that NNW stretch extends around 15 km. The field examples with highly obtuse branch angles suggest that there may be no simple correlation between fault geometry and rupture directivity. We propose that an important distinction is whether those obtuse branches actually involved a rupture path which directly turned through the obtuse angle (while continuing also on the main fault), or rather involved arrest by a barrier on the original fault and jumping [Harris and Day, JGR, 1993] to a neighboring fault on which rupture propagated bilaterally to form what appears as a backward-branched structure. Our studies [Poliakov et al., JGR in press, 2002; Kame et al, EOS, 2002] of stress fields around a dynamically moving mode II crack tip show a clear tendency to branch from the straight path at high rupture speeds, but the stress fields never allow the rupture path to directly turn through highly obtuse angles, and hence that mechanism is unlikely. In contrast, study of fault maps in the vicinity of the Kp to HV fault transition [Sowers et al., 1994], discussed as case (1) above, strongly suggest that the large-angle branching occurred as a jump, which we propose as the likely general mechanism. Implications for the Nakata et al. [1998] aim of inferring rupture directivity from branch geometry is that this will be possible only when rather detailed characterization (by surface geology, seismic relocation, trapped waves) of fault connectivity can be carried out in the vicinity of the branching junction, to ascertain whether direct turning of the rupture path through an angle, or jumping and then propagating bilaterally, were involved in prior events. They have opposite implications for how we would associate past directivity with a (nominally) branched fault geometry.

Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

2002-12-01

115

Shear Strength  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. John Atkinson, of the University of the West of England, developed a site for undergraduate students wanting to learn more about soil classification. His site addresses issues such as: shear strength, peak strength, and residual strength testing. Filled with charts, diagrams, statistics, the information is pertinent and easily understood by almost any audience.

Atkinson, John

2008-10-07

116

Traumatic Rupture of the Aorta  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether delay of the repair of the ruptured thoracic aorta in patients with other major injuries is safe and has a potential positive impact on survival. Summary Background Data The accepted treatment for acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta has been repair of the injury as soon as possible. This form of management, however, has been accompanied by a death rate of 0% to 54% mortality, often related to the presence of other injuries. Methods The records of 30 consecutive patients with rupture of the thoracic aorta from blunt trauma treated from 1995 to 2001 were retrospectively reviewed. Two of them died shortly after admission and were excluded from further consideration. The remaining 28 patients were divided according to the time of the repair of the rupture into two groups. Group 1 patients underwent repair of the rupture immediately after the diagnosis was made. Group 2 patients, who had associated injuries that were likely to increase the risk of surgical death, had either repair more than 48 hours after injury (subgroup 2A) or had no repair (subgroup 2B). The patients in group 2 had their mean arterial pressure maintained at less than 70 mm Hg with medication to eliminate shear stress on the aortic tear while being observed. Results Twenty-eight patients (22 men, 6 women) with an average age of 36 years (range 1976) were treated. Twenty-five had rupture of the descending thoracic aorta and three had rupture in the ascending thoracic aorta. Group 1 comprised 14 patients, 5 of whom died during surgery or in the early postoperative period. Group 2 comprised 14 patients, 9 in subgroup 2A and 5 in subgroup 2B. Two patients in subgroup 2A and three patients in subgroup 2B died of associated injuries or illnesses. Rupture of the traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta did not occur in any of the patients in group 2. Conclusions Delayed repair of acute traumatic aortic rupture is safe under appropriate treatment and should be considered in selected patients.

Symbas, Panagiotis N.; Sherman, Andrew J.; Silver, Jeffery M.; Symbas, John D.; Lackey, Jodi J.

2002-01-01

117

Rupture of the tracheobronchial tree.  

PubMed Central

Eleven cases of tracheobronchial rupture are described. Nine were the result of external non-penetrating trauma and all but three had other serious injuries. The remaining two were caused by endobronchial intubation. Of the cases caused by external injury, respiratory tract injury was confined to the cervical trachea in three. Two required tracheostomy and repair and the third was managed conservatively; all made satisfactory recoveries. Intrathoracic rupture was recognised on or soon after admission in three cases. One patient died of uncontrollable pulmonary haemorrhage before he could be operated on; immediate repair gave good long term results in the other two. In three cases rupture of the main bronchus was not recognised until complete obstruction developed three, five, and 12 weeks after the accidents. The strictures were resected and the lung re-expanded. Robertshaw endobronchial tubes ruptured the left main bronchus in two patients undergoing oesophageal surgery. Uneventful recovery followed immediate repair. The difficulty of confirming rupture of a major airway is discussed and the importance of conserving the lung when the diagnosis has been missed is emphasised. Images

Roxburgh, J C

1987-01-01

118

Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

2005-09-07

119

Strain evolution and the relative role of heat and strain rate during continental rupture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The evolution of strain during continental rupture can be quite complex, and may be due to changes in far-field stresses, or due to the naturally evolving strength profile of the lithosphere. Here we use a 2-d finite element model to examine the relative impact of strain rate versus the initial thermal structure of the lithosphere on the evolution of rift systems. Model results indicate that the initial thermal structure of the lithosphere has first-order control on the rifting evolution and subsequent rupture, while stretching rate places a second-order control on the rifting evolution. Three styles of rift-to-rupture evolution are recognized as distinguished by the location of rupture and the amount of strain accommodated prior to rupture. Style 1 is distinguished by limited strain prior to rupture that is located in the center of the rifted region; style 2 is distinguished by moderate amount of strain prior to rupture that is located near the edge of the rifted region, and style 3 is distinguished by extensive rifting without transition to rupture. In general, cool upper mantle temperatures are associated with style 1, moderate upper mantle temperatures and slower strain rates are associated with style 2, while hot upper mantle temperatures are associated with style 3. Detailed tracking of the modeled rifts provides key insights to the importance of the interaction between the evolving thermal structure, strength profile, and rift geometry. For example, the West Antarctic Rift System displayed an early stage of wide rifting, followed by a transition to rifting across a narrow region. Numerical simulations of the region suggest that this transition in rifting style was the natural result of the evolving thermal/strength structure of the lithosphere, and no change in plate motions nor impingement of a thermal plume is necessary to explain the strain evolution.

Huerta, A. D.; Crane, J.; Rheams, E.

2011-12-01

120

Dynamic Rupture Segmentation Along The Nankai Trough, Southwest Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In southwest Japan, large devastating earthquakes (Mw>8) occurred along the Nankai subduction zone every 100-200 years (e.g. Ando, 1975, Tectonophys.; Ishibashi, 2004, Ann. Geophys.). Historical records revealed the segmented nature of the 600 km long seismogenic zone, producing Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes to occur separately or jointly at each cycle. The intersegment zone which separates Nankai and Tonankai source areas, near the Kii Peninsula, should have some special physical properties. In this study, we investigate the dynamic linkage of the coseismic slips on the Nankai and Tonankai segments, by modeling the spontaneous rupture propagation on the subduction interface. To conduct a reliable modeling, the parameters lateral variations along the place interface are introduced by combining several geophysical observation data sets. First, we use a large-scale 3D geometry for the plate interface, inferred from seismicity; we also integrate the slip deficit distribution (Hashimoto et al., 2009, SSJ meeting) obtained by inversion of GPS data, to constrain the distribution of stress drop on the interface. This distribution is not uniform, and explains the 1st order asperities of the subduction zone: Hyuga, Nankai, Tonankai and Tokai areas appear clearly as loaded regions. In addition, a constitutive friction law is required to link fault slip and stress release. We compiled regional geophysical information relevant to the segmentation, to infer the distribution of the frictional parameters at seismogenic depths. We focused on areas where the rupture is known to have stopped. The barriers seem to be related to upper plate structure (Wells et al. 2003, JGR, Rosenau and Oncken 2009, JGR). Uplifted areas show common characteristics: end of seismogenic segments, underplating in the wedge, and higher density of the upper old wedge (granitic intrusions). Following above review, we introduced 3 barrier regions delimiting 2 asperity regions (Nankai and Tonankai). Inside the barrier, the fracture energy changes in regional scale, via a change of the critical slip distance scaling. The strength remains uniform along the interface. Asperities are produced by the initial stress distribution inferred from slip deficit. Using this model setting, we computed a few different spontaneous rupture scenarios, by changing only the location of rupture initiation. Remarkably, we could reproduce the segmentation of the rupture, as observed during the 1940抯 sequence, provided that the rupture initiates close to the Kii peninsula barrier area. However, if the rupture initiate far from the Kii peninsula, close to Tokai or west of Muroto cape for instance, the rupture is more likely to break the full plate interface in a single rupture event, consistently with what has been observed in the past. The rupture segmentation appears to be a consequence of the friction properties off-Kii Peninsula, as well as the rupture initiation position. This work provides a reliable way to enlighten the conditional segmentation process, as a consequence of the earthquake dynamic rupture.

Hok, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Hashimoto, C.

2010-12-01

121

46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs 搂 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture disc is the only pressure relief device on the tank,...

2011-10-01

122

Traumatic duodenal rupture in a soccer player  

PubMed Central

Traumatic duodenal rupture resulting from blunt trauma during soccer is an extremely rare occurrence. A case report of this unusual condition is presented together with a review of the literature. Key Words: soccer; football; duodenal rupture; trauma

Houshian, S.

2000-01-01

123

Chordal rupture. I: aetiology and natural history.  

PubMed Central

Between 1970 and 1981, 12% of patients undergoing mitral valve surgery were found to have chordal rupture. Spontaneous or primary rupture accounted for 74.6% of patients (primary group); in the remainder (secondary group) chordal rupture complicated chronic rheumatic valvular disease (8.9%), bacterial endocarditis on both normal (8.5%) and rheumatic valves (4.7%), ischaemic heart disease (2.3%), acute rheumatic fever (0.5%), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.5%). Isolated posterior rupture was seen most frequently (54%), with anterior rupture in 36% and rupture of both mitral cusps in 10% of patients. A short symptomatic history of acute mitral regurgitation was rare, occurring in only 4% of patients in either the primary or secondary groups, suggesting that mitral regurgitation due to ruptured chordae is a progressive disease. In contrast to previous reports the clinical presentation did not help to differentiate the aetiology of the chordal rupture.

Oliveira, D B; Dawkins, K D; Kay, P H; Paneth, M

1983-01-01

124

Nonlinear transverse current response in zigzag graphene nanoribbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

By employing a self-consistent approach, we reveal a number of unique properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbons under crossed electric and magnetic fields: (1) a very strong electrical polarization along the transverse direction of the ribbon, and (2) a strong nonlinear Hall current under a rather moderate electrical field. At the field strength of 5000 V\\/cm, the ratio of the nonlinear

Bo Wang; Zhongshui Ma; C. Zhang

2011-01-01

125

Transverse Behavior of Unidirectional Ribbon Reinforced METGLAS \\/ Epoxy Laminates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The finite element method (FEM) is used to model the elastic behavior of an epoxy based, rectangular shaped, metallic glass reinforced composite. Since a microscopic representation is utilized, the effects of reinforcement aspect ratio, volume fraction, amount of overlap and the distance between reinforcement along the width and thickness direction on the macroscopic transverse moduli and strength are determined.Comparisons of

Y. T. Yeow

1980-01-01

126

Open repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.  

PubMed

Although the Achilles tendon is the strongest in the body, it also is the most often ruptured. Achilles tendon rupture most often occurs during sports activities in middle-aged men. Operative repair of a ruptured Achilles tendon can be accomplished with a variety of techniques, ranging from open repair, to minimally invasive technique, to endoscopic-assisted repair. This article focuses on open repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Surgical techniques, rehabilitation protocol, and the authors' preferred method are described. PMID:19857843

Rosenzweig, Seth; Azar, Frederick M

2009-12-01

127

Rupture dimensions and rupture processes of fluid-induced microcracks in salt rock  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed and applied a simple empirical Green function method to study induced microcracks observed during hydraulic fracturing experiments in salt rock. Either unidirectional ruptures on rectangular faults or allround ruptures on elliptical faults are tested to explain the observed directivity effects in body-wave amplitude spectra. Mostly, the rectangular rupture model and horizontal fault planes are favored. The average rupture

T. Dahm

2001-01-01

128

Histopathological findings in spontaneous tendon ruptures.  

PubMed

A spontaneous rupture of a tendon may be defined as a rupture that occurs during movement and activity, that should not and usually does not damage the involved musculotendinous units (1). Spontaneous tendon ruptures were uncommon before the 1950s. B鰄ler found only 25 Achilles tendon ruptures in Wien between 1925 and 1948 (2). M鰏ender & Klatnek treated 20 Achilles tendon ruptures between 1953 and 1956, but 105 ruptures between 1964 and 1967 (3). Lawrence et al. found only 31 Achilles tendon ruptures in Boston during a period of 55 years (1900-1954) (4). During the recent decades tendon ruptures have, however, become relatively common in developed countries, especially in Europe and North America. A high incidence of tendon ruptures has been reported in Austria, Denmark, Finland, Germany. Hungary, Sweden, Switzerland and the USA; somewhat lower incidences have been reported in Canada, France, Great Britain and Spain. On the other hand, Greece, Japan, the Netherlands and Portugal have reported a clearly lower incidence. Interestingly, Achilles tendon ruptures are a rarity in developing countries, especially in Africa and East-Asia (5). In many developed countries, the increases in the rupture incidence have been dramatic. In the National Institute of Traumatology in Budapest, Hungary, the number of patients with an Achilles tendon rupture increased 285% in men and 500% in women between two successive 7-year periods, 1972-1978 and 1979-1985 (5). PMID:9211612

J髗sa, L; Kannus, P

1997-04-01

129

Case report Recurrent spontaneous esophageal rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spontaneous esophageal rupture is an uncommon and poorly understood condition. Recurrent rupture is extremely rare, with only one previously reported case in the literature. Here, we present a case series of two patients who had recurrent ruptures, and discuss the principles underlying the management of such cases. Q 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Omar A. Khan; Clifford W. Barlow; David F. Weeden; Khalid M. Amer

130

Blunt Traumatic Rupture of the Aorta  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Aortic rupture is a potentially fatal complication in trauma. We report our surgical result in the treatment of traumatic aortic rupture in eastern Taiwan. Patients and Methods: From August 1996 to October 2000, six patients with traumatic aortic rupture had surgery at Tzu Chi General Hospital. Five had a widened mediastinum on chest X-ray examination. They were diag- nosed

Shen-Feng Chao; Bee-Song Chang

131

Fractal avalanche ruptures in biological membranes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bilayer membranes envelope cells as well as organelles, and constitute the most ubiquitous biological material found in all branches of the phylogenetic tree. Cell membrane rupture is an important biological process, and substantial rupture rates are found in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells under a mechanical load. Rupture can also be induced by processes such as cell death, and active

Irep G鰖en; Paul Dommersnes; Ilja Czolkos; Aldo Jesorka; Tatsiana Lobovkina; Owe Orwar

2010-01-01

132

Traumatic pericardial rupture with skeletonized phrenic nerve  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Traumatic pericardial rupture is a rare presentation. Pericardial rupture itself is asymptomatic unless complicated by either hemorrhage or herniation of the heart through the defect. Following diagnosis surgical repair of the pericardium is indicated because cardiac herniation may result in vascular collapse and sudden death. OBJECTIVES: Here we present a case of traumatic, non-herniated pericardial rupture with complete skeletonization

Zain Khalpey; Taufiek K Rajab; Jan D Schmitto; Philipp C Camp

2011-01-01

133

Helical CT of Blunt Diaphragmatic Rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE. This study evaluated CT findings for signs of blunt diaphragmatic rupture. MATERIALS AND METHODS. CT examinations of 179 blunt trauma patients, includ- ing 11 with left-sided and five with right-sided blunt diaphragmatic rupture, were reviewed by two staff radiologists who first decided by consensus on the presence or absence of 11 pub- lished signs of blunt diaphragmatic rupture and

Alain Nchimi; David Szapiro; Beno顃 Ghaye; Val閞ie Willems; Jamil Khamis; Luc Haquet; Charlemagne Noukoua; Robert F. Dondelinger

134

Spontaneous rupture of a splenotic nodule.  

PubMed Central

A case is presented of spontaneous rupture of splenic tissue occurring 14 years after a splenectomy was carried out for trauma. Spontaneous rupture of a splenotic nodule has not previously been described and it may be added to the list of causes of spontaneous haemoperitoneum. The incidence and function of residual splenic tissue are briefly discussed and other causes of splenic rupture are outlined.

Lanigan, D. J.

1990-01-01

135

MRI of tibialis anterior tendon rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ruptures of the tibialis anterior tendon are rare. We present the clinical histories and MRI findings of three recent male patients with tibialis anterior tendon rupture aged 5867爕ears, all of whom presented with pain over the dorsum of the ankle. Two of the three patients presented with complete rupture showing discontinuity of the tendon, thickening of the retracted portion of

Robert A. Gallo; Brett H. Kolman; Richard H. Daffner; Robert L. Sciulli; Catherine C. Roberts; Patrick J. DeMeo

2004-01-01

136

Rupture of spleen post colonoscopy.  

PubMed

We review an interesting case of elective colonoscopy for rectal bleeding in a 68-year-old woman complicated by splenic rupture. She was managed by aggressive fluid and blood resuscitation followed by splenectomy. She had a smooth recovery and was discharged home 4 days after admission. The extreme rarity and interesting clinical course of the patient are discussed. PMID:19668895

Younes, Nidal A; Al-Ardah, Mahmoud I; Daradkeh, Salam S

2009-08-01

137

Biceps brachii tendon ruptures: a review of diagnosis and treatment of proximal and distal biceps tendon ruptures.  

PubMed

The biceps brachii is a unique muscle with 2 proximal tendons and a single distal tendon. Although these tendons are part of the same muscle, they have significantly different functions. It is hypothesized that the long head of the biceps acts as a pain generator in the shoulder, though the biomechanical function is still under debate. Conversely, the distal biceps tendon is the major supinator of the forearm and serves a secondary flexor. As such, injuries to these tendons must be evaluated independently. Biceps brachii ruptures most often occur in middle-aged men following a traumatic event. Injuries to the long head of the biceps are primarily treated nonoperatively with adequate results. Injuries of distal tendon occur less often, but are receiving significant attention in the literature in regard to treatment options. Surgical repair of distal biceps ruptures is indicated in patients who want to restore supination strength and endurance. It is unclear which operative technique is superior, although the most recent data suggest increased strength of the cortical button repair. This article provides a comprehensive review of both proximal and distal biceps brachii ruptures in addition to our treatment algorithm. PMID:20631471

Geaney, Lauren E; Mazzocca, Augustus D

2010-06-01

138

Computational evaluation of aortic aneurysm rupture risk: what have we learned so far?  

PubMed

In current clinical practice, aneurysm diameter is one of the primary criteria used to decide when to treat a patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). It has been shown that simple association of aneurysm diameter with the probability of rupture is not sufficient, and other parameters may also play a role in causing or predisposing to AAA rupture. Peak wall stress (PWS), intraluminal thrombus (ILT), and AAA wall mechanics are the factors most implicated with rupture risk and have been studied by computational risk evaluation techniques. The objective of this review is to examine these factors that have been found to influence AAA rupture. The prediction rate of rupture among computational models depends on the level of model complexity and the predictive value of the biomechanical parameters used to assess risk, such as PWS, distribution of ILT, wall strength, and the site of rupture. There is a need for simpler geometric analogues, including geometric parameters (e.g., lumen tortuosity and neck length and angulation) that correlate well with PWS, conjugated with clinical risk factors for constructing rupture risk predictive models. Such models should be supported by novel imaging techniques to provide the required patient-specific data and validated through large, prospective clinical trials. PMID:21521062

Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Ioannou, Christos V; Papaharilaou, Yannis; Kostas, Theodoros; Katsamouris, Asterios N

2011-04-01

139

Two patients with a complete proximal rupture of the hamstring.  

PubMed

Two men visited our Emergency Room because of a water-ski-accident. At physical examination, there was hematoma at the upper leg with loss of strength at extension of the hip and flexion of the knee. Both patients had a palpable gap just distal of the ischial tuberosity. Further imaging by sonography and MR-scan showed a rupture of the proximal hamstring tendon. Treatment was operative refixation of the hamstring tendons at the ischial tuberosity. After treatment consisted of brace for 4 weeks after operation. Both patients returned to their pre-operatively sports, though at a lower level. Surgical treatment of a complete proximal rupture of the hamstrings is recommended in case of sportive patients. PMID:19688217

Floor, Sebastiaan; van der Veen, Alex H; Devilee, Roger J

2009-08-18

140

Multiple tendon ruptures of unknown etiology.  

PubMed

Tendon ruptures are common findings in foot and ankle practice. The etiology of tendon ruptures tends to be multifactorial-usually due to a combination of trauma, effects of systemic diseases, adverse effects of medications, and obesity. We present an unusual case of right Achilles tendinitis, left Achilles tendon rupture, bilateral peroneus longus tendon rupture, and left peroneus brevis tendon rupture of unknown etiology. This case report highlights the need for research for other possible, lesser known etiologies of tendon pathology. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, Level IV, Case Study. PMID:23966259

Axibal, Derek P; Anderson, John G

2013-08-21

141

Successful treatment for rupture of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm: two case reports.  

PubMed

We report 2 cases of ruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm (PDAA) treated by transcatheter embolization (TAE). In the first case, a 63-year-old man complained of sudden abdominal pain and was transferred to our hospital because he collapsed in a state of shock. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed retroperitoneal hematoma and ascites. Abdominal angiography showed bleeding from one of the branches of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery. The ruptured PDAA was terminated by TAE. In the second case, a 65-year-old man experienced sudden abdominal pain. Abdominal CT revealed a retroperitoneal hematoma. He received TAE to terminate bleeding from a PDAA, but his abdominal pain worsened. At operation, ileus caused by the hematoma compressing the transverse colon was diagnosed, and cecostomy was performed. He recovered well and was discharged a few days later. In summary, a patient with a ruptured PDAA should first be treated by TAE, followed if necessary by surgery. PMID:15783046

Mihara, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Keiichi; Nemoto, Takehiko; Rokkaku, Kyu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tachibana, Masatsugu

142

Rupture directivity of small earthquakes at Parkfield  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AbstractTheoretical modeling of strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> along a bimaterial interface suggests that earthquakes initiating on the interface will have a preferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. We test this model with 450 small earthquakes (2 < M < 5) from Parkfield, California, to look for evidence of consistent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity along the San Andreas Fault. We analyze azimuthal variations in earthquake source spectra after applying an iterative correction for wave propagation effects. Our approach avoids directly modeling source spectra because these models generally assume symmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; instead, we look for azimuthal variations in the amplitudes of the source spectra over specified frequency bands. Our overall results show similar proportions of events exhibiting characteristics of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity toward either the southeast or northwest. However, the proportion of events with southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity increases as we limit the data set to larger magnitudes, with 70% of the 46 events M > 3 exhibiting southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characteristics. Some spatial and temporal variability in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity is also apparent. We observe a higher proportion of northwest directivity <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> following the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake, which <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> toward the northwest. Our results are generally consistent with the preferred southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity model but suggest that directivity is likely due to several contributing factors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kane, Deborah L.; Shearer, Peter M.; Goertz-Allmann, Bettina P.; Vernon, Frank L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6120485"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> electron resonance accelerator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> (to the velocity, v, of the particles to be accelerated) electron oscillations are generated in high (e.g. solid) density plasmas by either an electromagnetic wave or by the field of charged particles traveling parallel to v. The generating field oscillates with frequency ..omega.. = ..omega../sub p/, where ..omega../sub p/ is the plasma frequency. The plasma is confined to a sequence of microstructures with typical dimensions of d approx. = 2..pi..c/..omega../sub p/, allowing the generating fields to penetrate. Since ..omega../sub p/ is now high, the time scales, T, are correspondingly reduced. The microstructures are allowed to explode after t = T, until then they are confined by ion inertia. As a result of resonance, the electric field, E, inside the microstructures can exceed the generating field E/sub L/. The generating force is proportional to E/sub L/ (as opposed to E/sub L//sup 2/). Phase matching of particles is possible by appropriate spacing of the microstructures or by a gas medium. The generating beam travels outside the plasma, filamentation is not a problem. The mechanism is relatively insensitive to the exact shape and position of the microstructures. This device contains features of various earlier proposed acceleration mechanisms and may be considered as the limiting case of several of those for small d, T and high E.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Csonka, P.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22175702"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dorsal vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after practice of taqaandan, necrotising cavernositis, penile reconstruction, urethroplasty and penile prosthesis implantation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Penile fracture is an uncommon and emergent urologic condition defined as traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the corpus cavernosum secondary to a blunt trauma of the erect penis. Tunica albuginea is thinned and stretched in the erect state, and a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tear in the corpus cavernosums may occur by a buckling force. However, penile dorsal vein tears may mimic penile fracture. Also, corporeal infection and purulent cavernositis are associated with trauma, cavernosography, priapism, intracavernosal injection therapy and penile prosthesis. PMID:22175702</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faydaci, G; Ozgul, A; Kuyumcuoglu, U; Aktoz, T; Oder, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N8925328"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep and Creep-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Behavior of Vanadium-Base Alloys.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vanadium base alloys as potential cladding material for Fast Breeder Reactor fuel elements are studied. Creep and creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior are compared. In the temperature range 650 to 875 C the <span class="hlt">strength</span> behavior up to 43,000 hr and the creep constants were...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Schirra</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AIPC..778..699B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formability Studies on <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Tailor Welded Blanks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) technology is one of the several approaches that have been used to reduce the weight of the automobile body. TWBs are made up of two or more blanks having different/same properties (geometry, material etc.) prior to forming. The formability of these blanks depends on material and geometric parameters like <span class="hlt">strength</span> ratio and thickness ratio. The study of these blanks can be classified on the basis of the weld orientation chosen viz. <span class="hlt">transverse</span> weld or longitudinal weld with respect to the major straining direction. This paper studies the formability issues related to <span class="hlt">transverse</span> TWB by FE simulation. The formability is assessed by analyzing tensile and Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests. The weld region is assumed to be a line in all the simulations. While modeling the tensile test, ultimate tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> (UTS) and elongation are monitored, and in LDH testing, pole height and maximum load (in near plane strain condition) are monitored. LDH testing shows that as thickness ratio increases, the load bearing capacity and the pole height decreases. There is a contribution from both the thicker and the thinner blank to the overall deforming volume. Failure location analysis shows that there is an abrupt change in the location of the failure from punch nose region to weld line region as the thickness ratio reaches a critical magnitude (1.08). The study of material properties shows that as the yield <span class="hlt">strength</span> ratio (S ratio) and strain hardening exponent ratio (N ratio) between the blanks increases, the maximum load which the blank can sustain without failure (UTS) increases. This becomes constant and comparable to that of single sheet at higher N and S ratios.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhaskar, V. Vijay; Narasimhan, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23517694"> <span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> cerebral artery blister aneurysm].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the case of a young patient with subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> blister-like aneurysm. Since this kind of aneurysms have fragile walls without a well-defined neck, their treatment is difficult. We initially planned the deployment of a flow-diverter stent, but an angiogram obtained after 10 days revealed a morphological change of the aneurysm. Therefore, we finally deployed a conventional stent and introduced 2 micro coils into the point of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, obtaining a good morphological result without rebleeding. Follow-up at 1 and 6 months did not observe regrowth of the aneurysm. We offer a brief introduction and discussion of this pathology and its treatment. PMID:23517694</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vega Vald閟, Pedro; Murias Quintana, Eduardo; Meil醤 Mart韓ez, Angela; Guti閞rez Morales, Julio; Lopez Garcia, Antonio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21934278"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of horseshoe kidney.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the case of a 25-year-old male who came to the emergency room for pain and abdominal distension following trauma to the mesogastrium. A CT scan was performed, revealing a voluminous retroperitoneal hematoma with laceration of both inferior renal poles with regard to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the isthmus of a horseshoe kidney. The patient presented anemization and increased pain, requiring selective embolization by means of arteriography of a branch of the right renal artery and placement of a double J stent due to urinary extravasation in the lower left kidney pole. Following 1 year of monitoring, the patient has maintained normal renal function. Renal affection in blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, occurring in 7% of previously pathological kidneys. The traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of horseshoe kidney is facilitated by its particular anatomical characteristics, constituting an infrequent entity, knowledge of which is necessary to achieve conservative management that renders it possible to preserve renal function. PMID:21934278</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Molina Escudero, R; Cancho Gil, M J; Husillos Alonso, A; Lled Garc韆, E; Herranz Amo, F; Ogaya Pini閟, G; Ram髇 Botella, E; Sim, G; Navas Mart韓ez, M C; Hern醤dez Fern醤dez, C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7837018"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatically <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globes in children.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This retrospective study was designed to document the etiology of traumatically <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globes in children and to determine the prognostic value of several clinical parameters with respect to visual outcome. Forty-six children 16 years of age and under seen in the emergency room over a 2-year period were found to have full thickness penetration of the globe. Fifty-nine percent of injuries occurred during recreational activities, and 59% occurred outside of the home. Boys outnumbered girls by a 6:1 ratio. For children, initial visual acuity proved to be less valuable as a prognostic indicator with regard to final vision than has been reported in adults. Smaller corneal wounds offered better visual outcomes. Four eyes were enucleated. Ten <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> (22%) were related to activity involving guns. Four of six BB gun injuries were the result of a ricocheted BB. Visual outcomes in gun-related injuries were particularly poor. PMID:7837018</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rudd, J C; Jaeger, E A; Freitag, S K; Jeffers, J B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/912343"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Normalization Temperature on Creep <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of normalization temperature from 850 to 1050癈 on the structure and creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel was studied. Normalization at temperatures less than 925癈 resulted in structures containing significant polygonized, recovered ferrite. These structures had poor creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>; roughly two orders of magnitude increase in minimum creep rate or decrease in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life for 850癈 compared to 1050癈 normalization at test conditions of 600癈 and 145 MPa. Room-temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> and hardness were also reduced. Normalization at temperatures between 925癈 and 1000癈 also resulted in reduced creep <span class="hlt">strength</span> in comparison with 1050癈 normalization, even though tempered martensite microstructures were formed and little change in room temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> was observed杢he reduction was attributed to subtle differences in fine MX precipitates. The effect of reduced normalization temperature was more pronounced for higher temperature, lower stress creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T.C. Totemeier; H. Tian; J.A. Simpson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22293388"> <span id="translatedtitle">Minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer in management of acute achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with tendinosis: a case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chronic tendinopathy is characterized by pain in the tendon, generally at the start and completion of exercise. However, tendinosis may lead to decreased blood flow, increased stiffness of the tendon and reduced tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>, and predispose to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Operative treatment is indicated to restore the function of the Achilles tendon and alleviate the prerupture heel cord pain. A case of acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with extensive tendinosis that was successfully treated with minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer is reported. PMID:22293388</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lui, Tun Hing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3618675"> <span id="translatedtitle">Risk Factors for Endometritis Following Low <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Cesarean Section</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective To determine independent risk factors for endometritis (EMM) following low <span class="hlt">transverse</span> cesarean section (LTCS). Study design We performed a retrospective case-control study from July 1999 to June 2001 in a large tertiary-care academic hospital. EMM was defined as fever beginning > 24 hours or continuing for ? 24 hours after delivery plus fundal tenderness in the absence of other causes for fever. Independent risk factors for EMM were determined by multivariable logistic regression. A fractional polynomial method was used to examine risk of EMM associated with the continuous variable, duration of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes. Results EMM was identified in 124/1605 (7.7%) women within 30 days after LTCS. Independent risk factors for EMM included age (odds ratio (OR) for each additional year 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.90-0.97) and anemia/perioperative blood transfusion (OR 2.18; CI:1.30-3.68). Risk of EMM was marginally associated with a proxy for low socioeconomic status, lack of private health insurance (OR 1.72; CI: 0.99-3.00), amniotomy (OR 1.69; CI:0.97-2.95), and longer duration of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes. Conclusion Risk of EMM was independently associated with younger age and anemia, and was marginally associated with lack of private health insurance, and amniotomy. Although duration of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes was only marginally associated with increased risk of EMM, increased risk was observed very soon after <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes. Knowledge of these risk factors is important to guide selective use of prophylactic antibiotics during labor and heighten awareness of the risk in subgroups at highest risk of infection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">OLSEN, Margaret A.; BUTLER, Anne M.; WILLERS, Denise M.; GROSS, Gilad A.; DEVKOTA, Preetishma; FRASER, Victoria J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17500958"> <span id="translatedtitle">Load capacity and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> displacement in viscoelastic fiber bundles.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of viscoelastic fiber bundles under uniaxial constant tensile loading, assuming global load sharing (GLS) for the redistribution of load following fiber failure. We consider loading paths such that the stress raises to a value sigma0 under a time-independent loading (negligible creep strain) and remains fixed thereafter. Motivated by experimental observations, we introduce an "effective" strain controlled failure criterion to incorporate damage into the system, thus damage is distributed over time. In addition, when a "limit" value for the effective stress is reached, failure of the remaining alive fibers is instantaneous. This enables us to show both analytically and numerically that creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs for external loads above a critical value that is less than the static fracture bundle's <span class="hlt">strength</span> in accordance with experimental observations. An analytical expression for this critical load is given. For stress levels below the critical value, the system suffers only partial failure since the deformation tends to a stationary solution for which the effective stress is below the limit value giving rise to an infinite lifetime. On the other hand, if the time-independent loading process ends in the softening regime, the deformation of the system monotonically increases in time resulting in global failure at finite time irrespectively of the applied load. Moreover, the applied model is found to be consistent with the experimentally observed increase of the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> displacement with decreasing steady external load (above the critical value). PMID:17500958</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baxevanis, Theocharis; Katsaounis, Theodoros</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhRvE..75d6104B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Load capacity and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> displacement in viscoelastic fiber bundles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of viscoelastic fiber bundles under uniaxial constant tensile loading, assuming global load sharing (GLS) for the redistribution of load following fiber failure. We consider loading paths such that the stress raises to a value ?0 under a time-independent loading (negligible creep strain) and remains fixed thereafter. Motivated by experimental observations, we introduce an 揺ffective strain controlled failure criterion to incorporate damage into the system, thus damage is distributed over time. In addition, when a 搇imit value for the effective stress is reached, failure of the remaining alive fibers is instantaneous. This enables us to show both analytically and numerically that creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs for external loads above a critical value that is less than the static fracture bundle抯 <span class="hlt">strength</span> in accordance with experimental observations. An analytical expression for this critical load is given. For stress levels below the critical value, the system suffers only partial failure since the deformation tends to a stationary solution for which the effective stress is below the limit value giving rise to an infinite lifetime. On the other hand, if the time-independent loading process ends in the softening regime, the deformation of the system monotonically increases in time resulting in global failure at finite time irrespectively of the applied load. Moreover, the applied model is found to be consistent with the experimentally observed increase of the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> displacement with decreasing steady external load (above the critical value).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baxevanis, Theocharis; Katsaounis, Theodoros</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22907871"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mitochondrial swelling and incipient outer membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in preapoptotic and apoptotic cells.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was first noted in isolated mitochondria in which the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) had lost its selective permeability. This phenomenon referred to as mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) refers to a permeabilized inner membrane that originates a large swelling in the mitochondrial matrix, which distends the outer membrane until it <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Here, we have expanded previous electron microscopic observations that in apoptotic cells, OMM <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is not caused by a membrane stretching promoted by a markedly swollen matrix. It is shown that the widths of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> regions of the OMM vary from 6 to 250 nm. Independent of the perforation size, herniation of the mitochondrial matrix appeared to have resulted in pushing the IMM through the perforation. A large, long focal herniation of the mitochondrial matrix, covered with the IMM, was associated with a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the OMM that was as small as 6 nm. Contextually, the collapse of the selective permeability of the IMM may precede or follow the release of the mitochondrial proteins of the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm. When the MPT is a late event, exit of the intermembrane space proteins to the cytoplasm is unimpeded and occurs through channels that <span class="hlt">transverse</span> the outer membrane, because so far, the inner membrane is impermeable. No channel within the outer membrane can expose to the cytoplasm a permeable inner membrane, because it would serve as a conduit for local herniation of the mitochondrial matrix. PMID:22907871</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sesso, A; Beliz醨io, J E; Marques, M M; Higuchi, M L; Schumacher, R I; Colquhoun, A; Ito, E; Kawakami, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3549475"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mitochondrial Swelling and Incipient Outer Membrane <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Preapoptotic and Apoptotic Cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was first noted in isolated mitochondria in which the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) had lost its selective permeability. This phenomenon referred to as mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) refers to a permeabilized inner membrane that originates a large swelling in the mitochondrial matrix, which distends the outer membrane until it <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Here, we have expanded previous electron microscopic observations that in apoptotic cells, OMM <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is not caused by a membrane stretching promoted by a markedly swollen matrix. It is shown that the widths of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> regions of the OMM vary from 6 to 250 nm. Independent of the perforation size, herniation of the mitochondrial matrix appeared to have resulted in pushing the IMM through the perforation. A large, long focal herniation of the mitochondrial matrix, covered with the IMM, was associated with a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the OMM that was as small as 6 nm. Contextually, the collapse of the selective permeability of the IMM may precede or follow the release of the mitochondrial proteins of the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm. When the MPT is a late event, exit of the intermembrane space proteins to the cytoplasm is unimpeded and occurs through channels that <span class="hlt">transverse</span> the outer membrane, because so far, the inner membrane is impermeable. No channel within the outer membrane can expose to the cytoplasm a permeable inner membrane, because it would serve as a conduit for local herniation of the mitochondrial matrix. Anat Rec, 2012. 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sesso, A; Belizario, JE; Marques, MM; Higuchi, ML; Schumacher, RI; Colquhoun, A; Ito, E; Kawakami, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/378679"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> coupled-bunch feedback system in the SRRC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">transverse</span> feedback system has been implemented and commissioned in the SRRC storage ring to suppress <span class="hlt">transverse</span> coupled-bunch oscillations of the electron beam. The system includes <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillation detectors, notch filter, baseband quadrature processing circuitry, power amplifiers, and kickers. To control a large number of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> coupled-bunch modes, the system is broad-band, bunch-by- bunch in nature. Because the system is capable of bunch-by-bunch correction, it can also be useful for suppressing instabilities introduced by ions. The sextupole <span class="hlt">strength</span> was then reduced to improve dynamic aperture and hence lifetime of the storage ring.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hsu, K.T.; Kuo, C.C.; Kuo, C.H.; Lin, K.K.; Ueng, T.S.; Weng, W.T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7116984"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation through soil</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The phenomenon of earthquake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation through soil is quite complex and is not well understood at this time. This paper presents the results of an integrated investigation of this problem. Insights are developed from the examination of surface fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> field case histories, laboratory physical model tests, and physical analogies to the earthquake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. Field observations and experimental results illustrate the typical patterns of behavior developed in the soil overlying a base rock fault displacement. Evidence suggests that differential movement across the distinct fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dissipates as the fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagates toward the ground surface through unconsolidated earth materials, and that the characteristics of the soil overlying the bedrock fault strongly influence the observed earthquake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bray, J.D.; Seed, R.B.; Seed, H.B. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)); Cluff, L.S. (Pacific Gas Electric, San Francisco, CA (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22998894"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contractions, a risk for premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of fetal membranes: a new protocol with cyclic biaxial tension.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study aims at investigating the effect of repeated mechanical loading on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and deformation properties of fetal membranes. Ten membranes delivered by cesarean sections were tested using a custom-built inflation device which provides a multi-axial stress state. For each membrane, a group of samples was first cyclically stretched by application of pressure ranging between 10 and 40 mmHg. After cycles, samples were subjected to inflation up to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Differences between mechanical parameters from cycled and uncycled samples were analyzed. Ten cycles at 40% of mean critical membrane tension--representative of mean physiologic contractions--did not affect <span class="hlt">strength</span> and stiffness of fetal membranes but reduced the work to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, thus indicating that contractions might increase the risk of premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the membrane. Cyclic testing demonstrated a large hysteresis loop and irreversible deformation on the first cycle, followed by rapid stabilization on subsequent cycles. In 80% of tests, amnion <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> first and at the periphery of the sample, under uniaxial strain state. Chorion <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> at higher deformation levels in the middle, under biaxial strain state. PMID:22998894</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Perrini, Michela; B黵zle, Wilfried; Haller, Claudia; Ochsenbein-K鰈ble, Nicole; Deprest, Jan; Zimmermann, Roland; Mazza, Edoardo; Ehrbar, Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6954399"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermally induced <span class="hlt">transverse</span> cracking in graphite-epoxy cross-ply laminates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermally induced <span class="hlt">transverse</span> cracking in T300/5208 graphite-epoxy cross-ply laminates was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The six laminate configurations studied were: 0/90(3)s, 0(2)/90(2)s, 0(3)/90s, 90/0(3)s, 90(2)/0(2)s, and 90(3)/0s. The thermal load required to initiate <span class="hlt">transverse</span> cracking was determined experimentally and compared to a theoretical prediction. Experimental results for the accumulation of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> cracks under cyclic thermal loading between - 250 and 250 F for up to 500 thermal cycles are presented. The calculated in situ <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-lamina <span class="hlt">strength</span> was determined to be at least 1.9 times the unidirectional-lamina <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>. All laminate configurations exhibited an increase in crack density with increasing thermal cycles. 8 references.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adams, D.S.; Bowles, D.E.; Herakovich, C.T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a 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showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoJI.190.1784C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and ground accelerations induced by CO2 injection in the shallow crust</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Because of the critically stressed nature of the upper crust, the injection of large volumes of carbon dioxide (CO2) into shallow geological reservoirs can trigger seismicity and induce ground deformations when the injection increases the fluid pressure in the vicinity of potentially seismic faults. The increased fluid pressure reduces the <span class="hlt">strength</span> against fault slip, allowing the stored elastic energy to be released in seismic events that can produce felt ground accelerations. Here, we seek to explore the likelihood ground motions induced by a CO2 injection using hydromechanical modelling with multiphase fluid flow and dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, including fault-frictional weakening. We extend the previous work of Cappa and Rutqvist, in which activation of a normal fault at critical stress may be possible for fast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> nucleating by localized increase in fluid pressure and large decrease in fault friction. In this paper, we include seismic wave propagation generated by the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. For our assumed system and injection rate, simulations show that after a few days of injection, a dynamic fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of few centimetres nucleates at the base of the CO2 reservoir and grows bilaterally, both toward the top of the reservoir and outside. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is asymmetric and affects a larger zone below the reservoir where the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is self-propagating (without any further pressure increase) as a result of fault-<span class="hlt">strength</span> weakening. The acceleration and deceleration of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> generate waves and result in ground accelerations (0.1-0.6 g) consistent with observed ground motion records. The maximum ground acceleration is obtained near the fault, and horizontal accelerations are generally markedly higher than vertical accelerations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cappa, Fr閐閞ic; Rutqvist, Jonny</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://portal.acs.org/portal/PublicWebSite/education/outreach/CNBP_029486#page=7"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spaghetti <span class="hlt">Strength</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this activity on page 7 of the PDF, learners explore how engineers characterize building materials. Learners test the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of spaghetti and determine how the number of spaghetti strands affects the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of a bundle of spaghetti. Use this activity to chemical bonds, mechanical testing, and engineering. Note: The pasta strands can be dipped in water and stuck together to more closely mimic the layers within a piece of plywood. More information about this can be found at the top of page 7, directly underneath the cartoon image. Safety note: Do not eat or drink any of the materials in this activity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Society, American C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21549964"> <span id="translatedtitle">A case of 'second <span class="hlt">rupture</span>' following open repair of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Achilles tendon.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a case of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a 54-year-old man whilst rehabilitating following end-to-end open repair of an acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> following surgical repair of Achilles tendon is well known. This case however, is atypical as the second <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred significantly proximal to the first <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. To our knowledge this is the first time this has been described in the English literature. We have termed this incident a 'second <span class="hlt">rupture</span>'. We describe the surgical technique used by the operating surgeon during open repair of this 'second <span class="hlt">rupture</span>', involving a gastrocnemius flap turndown. This has lead to the patient making a good recovery, despite complications. This case report serves to inform surgeons of the existence of this type of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, whilst considering possible aetiologies and suggesting a technique for repair of the injury. PMID:21549964</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rushton, P R P; Singh, A K; Deshmukh, R G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22055493"> <span id="translatedtitle">A case of "fresh <span class="hlt">rupture</span>" after open repair of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Achilles tendon.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the case of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a 54-year-old man while rehabilitating after end-to-end open repair of an acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> after surgical repair of Achilles tendon is well known. The present case, however, is atypical, because the second <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred significantly proximal to the first <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. To our knowledge, this is the first time this has been described in English language studies. We have termed this incident a fresh <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. A gastrocnemius turndown flap was used to repair the fresh <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which led to a satisfactory recovery. This case report serves to inform surgeons of the existence of this type of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, while considering the possible etiologies and suggesting a technique that has been shown to be successful in the present case. PMID:22055493</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rushton, Paul R P; Singh, Alok K; Deshmukh, Rajiv G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/k9wj3p82pt46w82r.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed presentation of traumatic intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A child with urine ascites as a delayed manifestation of post-traumatic intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is presented. The\\u000a diagnosis was suggested by abdominal CT scan and confirmed with a cystogram. While uncommon, late presentation of intraperitoneal\\u000a bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following trauma may occur from masking of a primary laceration or development of secondary <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the\\u000a site of a hematoma in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Brown; H. L. Magill; T. L. Black</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21020857"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> correlations in multiphoton entanglement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have analyzed the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N-photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N-photon case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wen Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih Yanhua [Physics Department, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE82010537"> <span id="translatedtitle">Noninterceptive <span class="hlt">Transverse</span>-Beam Measurements.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Totally noninterceptive techniques for accurate measurement of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> beam distributions are required for high-current continuous wave (cw) linacs, such as the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator. Sensors responding to visible radiati...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. D. Chamberlin G. N. Minerbo C. T. Mottershead</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19157825"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> correlations in multiphoton entanglement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have analyzed the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N -photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N -photon case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jianming Wen; Morton H. Rubin; Yanhua Shih</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhRvA..76d5802W"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> correlations in multiphoton entanglement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have analyzed the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N -photon state. The Klyshko抯 two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N -photon case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wen, Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih, Yanhua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60071712"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> correlations in multiphoton entanglement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have analyzed the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N-photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N-photon case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wen Jianming; Morton H. Rubin; Shih Yanhua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983JGR....88.4277D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Breaking of a single asperity: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process and seismic radiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The problem of spontaneous shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a single circular asperity on an infinite fault plane is studied. Initially, the fault plane is broken everywhere except at a circular asperity. An applied displacement at infinity results in a stress concentration along the bounding edge of the asperity. The frictional stress on the broken part of the fault plane is taken to be a constant. Once a point on the asperity breaks, the stress there drops to the same value as on the `main' fault surface. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is started by relaxing the shear stress at a point on the asperity edge and is then allowed to propagate spontaneously, using a critical stress level fracture criterion. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is calculated numerically. It is found that for asperities of constant <span class="hlt">strength</span>, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> first propagates around the edge of the asperity and then inward, a phenomenon best described by the well-known term of classic military maneuver: `the double encircling pincer movement.' In the appendix, the expressions for the far-field seismic radiation due to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of such an asperity are derived. It is shown that the nth Cartesian component of the far-field displacement at (x, t) for P, SV, and SH waves, using the notation of Aki and Richards (1980), is given by un(x, t) = (Dni/4??c2R)??s0?i3{?, t - [(R - ? ?)/c]} dS(?). Thus the far-field pulses can be directly found from the stress drops on the fault plane. This formula is also true for `crack' or `dislocation' problems. The directivity function Dni for displacement for the asperity problem is found to be that for the double couple, modified by some factor. In particular, the fault plane is a nodal plane for SV waves. For the <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> of asperities on a finite fault, these directivity functions are applicable only to the initial part of observed pulses at a receiver, provided the receiver is not located on the fault plane outside the broken part of the main crack edge, in which case it is inapplicable for all time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Das, S.; Kostrov, B. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29298585"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extracellular matrix content of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> anterior cruciate ligament tissue</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs) can <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with simple movements, suggesting that structural changes in the ligament may reduce the loading capacity of the ligament. We aimed to investigate if proteoglycan and collagen levels were different between <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and non-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ACLs. We also compared changes in <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tissue over time.During arthroscopic knee reconstruction surgery 24 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ACLs were collected from participants</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kate Young; Tom Samiric; Julian Feller; Jill Cook</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23707180"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in athletes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The incidence of AT <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has increased in recent decades. AT <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> frequently occur in the third or fourth decade of life in sedentary individuals who play sport occasionally. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> also occur in elite athletes. Clinical examination must be followed by imaging. Conservative management and early mobilization can achieve excellent results, but the rerupture rate is not acceptable for the management of young, active, or athletic individuals. Open surgery is the most common option for AT <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, but there are risks of superficial skin breakdown and wound problems. These problems can be prevented with percutaneous repair. PMID:23707180</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22034601"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> OSCILLATIONS IN CHROMOSPHERIC MOTTLES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A number of recent investigations have revealed that <span class="hlt">transverse</span> waves are ubiquitous in the solar chromosphere. The vast majority of these have been reported in limb spicules and active region fibrils. We investigate long-lived, quiet-Sun, on-disk features such as chromospheric mottles (jet-like features located at the boundaries of supergranular cells) and their <span class="hlt">transverse</span> motions. The observations were obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope. The data set is comprised of simultaneous imaging in the H{alpha} core, Ca II K, and G band of an on-disk quiet-Sun region. Time-distance techniques are used to study the characteristics of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations. We detect over 40 <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations in both bright and dark mottles, with periods ranging from 70 to 280 s, with the most frequent occurrence at {approx}165 s. The velocity amplitudes and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> displacements exhibit characteristics similar to limb spicules. Neighboring mottles oscillating in-phase are also observed. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations of individual mottles are interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Their estimated periods and damping times are consistent with phase mixing and resonant mode conversion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Dorrian, G. D., E-mail: dkuridze01@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Observatory of Athens, Lofos Nymfon, Thiseio, P.O. Box 20048, GR-11810 Athens (Greece)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26199854"> <span id="translatedtitle">Automated optimization of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> frame layouts for ships by elastic-plastic finite element analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a model for the optimum design of ship <span class="hlt">transverse</span> frames. An elastic-plastic finite element analysis algorithm for plane frames has been incorporated in the model to evaluate the ultimate <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the overall frame, and different effects of design loads. Using these <span class="hlt">strengths</span> and load effects, appropriate design constraints are then formulated to prevent different failure categories;</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. K. Rahman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NIMPA.726....8H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tomographic reconstruction of the full 4D <span class="hlt">transverse</span> phase space</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a method to measure and reconstruct the full 4D <span class="hlt">transverse</span> phase space of a particle beam. The method assumes that it is possible to freely and independently rotate the separate 2D <span class="hlt">transverse</span> phase spaces in the horizontal and vertical directions. Using images of the beam that would be captured on a screen, we develop a mathematical procedure that will reconstruct the full 4D particle distribution. We simulate this procedure for a hypothetical distribution and show that the reconstruction agrees with the actual distribution. Finally, we demonstrate for the practical case of a two-quadrupole setup that it is indeed possible to adjust the quadrupole <span class="hlt">strengths</span> so that the separate 2D <span class="hlt">transverse</span> phase spaces can be rotated independently. However, in this setup, the rotation angles are restricted to smaller ranges. Even so, the reconstructed results reproduce the actual distribution clearly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hock, K. M.; Wolski, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6861944"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tensile creep and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of polymer derived SiC fibers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tensile creep and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies were conducted on polymer derived Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon, and SiC/BN-coated Nicalon SiC fibers. Test conditions were temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C, stresses from 100 to 1600 MPa, stress application times up to 200 hours, and air, argon, and vacuum test environments. For all fibers, creep occurred predominantly in the primary stage. Hi-Nicalon had much higher 0.2 and 1 percent creep <span class="hlt">strengths</span> than as-produced as well as-coated Nicalon fibers. The stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of Hi-Nicalon up to 100 hours was also higher than that of the coated and as-produced Nicalon fibers. SiC/BN coating on Nicalon increased only the short-term low-temperature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Limited testing in argon and vacuum suggests that for all fiber types, creep and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> resistances are reduced in comparison to the results in air. Possible mechanisms for the observed behavior are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yun, H.M.; Goldsby, J.C.; Dicarlo, J.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29201007"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the uterus: A changing picture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eighty nine cases of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the gravid uterus occurring over a period of 15 years with 77,133 deliveries, were analysed. The overall incidence of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> uteri was 1 per 866 deliveries. The patients were devided into two groups, those with a scarred uterus (47) and those with an unscarred uterus (42). Distinct differences in terms of parity, age, aetiology</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. V. Van der Merwe; W. U. A. M. Ombelet</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v081/i032/JB081i032p05679/JB081i032p05679.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocity of Plane Strain Shear Cracks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Propagation of plane strain shear cracks is calculated numerically by using finite difference equations with second-order accuracy. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> model, in which stress drops gradually as slip increases, combines two different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> criteria: (1) slip begins at a finite stress level; (2) finite energy is absorbed per unit area as the crack advances. Solutions for this model are nonsingular. In</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. J. Andrews</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10680095"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the innominate artery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective: Blunt traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the innominate artery is uncommon. We reviewed our experience to correlate the impact of patient stability, presence of associated injuries and location of the injury within the artery with outcome. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of patients admitted between January 1, 1998 and December 17, 2002 with traumatic innominate artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Injuries were defined</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Riyad Karmy-Jones; Robert DuBose; Stephen King</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60403918"> <span id="translatedtitle">Capacity credit calculation for exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper reports that overpressure relieving in heat exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> case is quite different from other cases, such as fire, utility failure, inadvertent valve opening\\/closure, etc., when designing a pressure relief valve (PRV). In most cases, it is quite straightforward. The calculated relief load is the capacity that needs to be relieved. But, in heat exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cases,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55725946"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic Interface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Extremely Heterogeneous Media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fracture experiments of monolithic brittle materials usually show the maximum speed of smooth <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at some 30 % of the relevant shear wave speed. This experimental maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed is by far lower than those predicted by theories and inferred from inversions of seismograms, and some seismic inversions (e.g., the 1979 Imperial Valley, 1992 Landers, 1999 Izmit, 2001 the central</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Uenishi; K. Tsuji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3085625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Superficial Dorsal Vein <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Imitating Penile Fracture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dorsal vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the penis is a rare condition, and few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein we report a 41-year-old man who presented with mildly painful and acute swollen penis, which initially imitated a penile fracture but was surgically explored and shown to be a superficial dorsal vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Topsakal, Medih; Kavukcu, Ender; Karadeniz, Tahir</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28955380"> <span id="translatedtitle">Posterior tibial tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in athletic people</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present our findings in six athletic patients with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> or partially <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> posterior tibial tendon. Pain in the midarch region, difficulty pushing off while running, and a pronated flattened longitudinal arch are the usual symptoms and physical findings of this injury. Surgical treatment, including reattachment of the rup tured posterior tibial tendon, is effective in restoring some but</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee Woods; Robert E. Leach</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32203434"> <span id="translatedtitle">Arachnoid Cyst <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> with Concurrent Subdural Hygroma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Arachnoid cysts (ACs) are relatively common intracranial mass lesions, which occur most often in the middle cranial fossa. While these lesions can present as a mass lesion, many are asymptomatic. Rarely, posttraumatic or spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of ACs can result in intracystic hemorrhage, subdural hematoma or subdural hygroma. We have encountered two cases of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> arachnoid cysts that resulted in subdural</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jill W. Donaldson; Mary Edwards-Brown; Thomas G. Luerssen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20537884"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute closed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of EHL revisited.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Isolated closed injuries to the EHL are rare. Traumatic closed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of EHL in the absence of diabetes mellitus, arthritis or local steroid injections is hitherto unreported. We present a case of closed EHL <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after a hyperflexion injury to the interphalangeal joint of the big toe, successfully managed with surgery, along with review of existing literature. PMID:20537884</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shah, K; Carter, Bob</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28064956"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitudinal <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of polyester knitted vascular prostheses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim: The purpose of the study was the characterization of a type of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurring on warp-knitted polyester vascular prostheses. Materials and Methods: We studied 20 cases of warp-knitted polyester vascular prostheses that were explanted from humans that showed a longitudinal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a part of a collaborative retrieval program. All the prostheses were immediately fixed in a 10% formaldehyde</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nabil Chakfe; Gunnar Riepe; Florence Dieval; Jean-Francois Le Magnen; Lu Wang; Elisabeth Urban; Marc Beaufigeau; Bernard Durand; Herbert Imig; Jean-Georges Kretz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/reprint/198/3/831.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CREEP <span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span> OF WALLABY TAIL TENDONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tail tendons from wallabies ( Macropus rufogriseus) suffer creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at stresses of 10 MPa or above, whereas their yield stress in a dynamic test is about 144 MPa. At stresses between 20 and 80 MPa, the time-to- <span class="hlt">rupture</span> decreases exponentially with stress, but at 10 MPa, the lifetime is well above this exponential. For comparison, the stress on</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">XIAO TONG WANG; ROBERT F. KER</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19901876"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Andrade Shear Disk</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of the Andrade shear disk as a means of determining the multiaxial stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> criteria for metals is discussed. Test results are reported for disks machined from materials which undergo both small and large strains to failure. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behaviour of the disks which undergo large deformations is analysed. Statements are made concerning the use of conventional constitutive</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. R. Hayhurst; B. Storakers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://patft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.htm&r=1&p=1&f=G&l=50&d=PTXT&S1=%22vivication%22&OS=%22vivication%22&RS=%22vivication%22"> <span id="translatedtitle">Device for <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spinal connection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://patft.uspto.gov/netahtml/PTO/search-adv.htm">US Patent & Trademark Office Database</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A device for <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spinal connection, comprises a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> bar (4) secured to at least one spinal osteosynthesis rod (2) with a connecting/blocking member (5) between the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> bar and the osteosynthesis rod. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> bar and osteosynthesis rod are adapted to be connected to each other in situ by the connection/blocking device which is constituted of a first part (6) in the shape of a jaw (8), provided with a passage (10) for the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> bar (4) and a blocking screw (22) adapted to project into the passage. The connecting/blocking device also includes a second part (7) in the form of an oppositely directed jaw (18) pivoted on the first part (6). The bar (4) in place in the passage (10) being adapted, during screwing in of the screw (22), to come to bear both against the first part (6) and against the second part (7) and to cause the two jaws (8, 18) to move toward each other.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martin; Alain (Saint Medard En Jalles, FR); Franck; Bruno (F-87180 Isle, FR)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3379555"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transversely</span> Isotropic Elasticity Imaging of Cancellous Bone</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To measure spatial variations in mechanical properties of biological materials, prior studies have typically performed mechanical tests on excised specimens of tissue. Less invasive measurements, however, are preferable in many applications, such as patient-specific modeling, disease diagnosis, and tracking of age- or damage-related degradation of mechanical properties. Elasticity imaging (elastography) is a nondestructive imaging method in which the distribution of elastic properties throughout a specimen can be reconstructed from measured strain or displacement fields. To date, most work in elasticity imaging has concerned incompressible, isotropic materials. This study presents an extension of elasticity imaging to three-dimensional, compressible, <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic materials. The formulation and solution of an inverse problem for an anisotropic tissue subjected to a combination of quasi-static loads is described, and an optimization and regularization strategy that indirectly obtains the solution to the inverse problem is presented. Several applications of <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic elasticity imaging to cancellous bone from the human vertebra are then considered. The feasibility of using isotropic elasticity imaging to obtain meaningful reconstructions of the distribution of material properties for vertebral cancellous bone from experiment is established. However, using simulation, it is shown that an isotropic reconstruction is not appropriate for anisotropic materials. It is further shown that the <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic method identifies a solution that predicts the measured displacements, reveals regions of low stiffness, and recovers all five elastic parameters with approximately 10% error. The recovery of a given elastic parameter is found to require the presence of its corresponding strain (e.g., a deformation that generates ?12 is necessary to reconstruct C1212), and the application of regularization is shown to improve accuracy. Finally, the effects of noise on reconstruction quality is demonstrated and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 40 dB is identified as a reasonable threshold for obtaining accurate reconstructions from experimental data. This study demonstrates that given an appropriate set of displacement fields, level of regularization, and signal <span class="hlt">strength</span>, the <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic method can recover the relative magnitudes of all five elastic parameters without an independent measurement of stress. The quality of the reconstructions improves with increasing contrast, magnitude of deformation, and asymmetry in the distributions of material properties, indicating that elasticity imaging of cancellous bone could be a useful tool in laboratory studies to monitor the progression of damage and disease in this tissue.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shore, Spencer W.; Barbone, Paul E.; Oberai, Assad A.; Morgan, Elise F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3033242"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with skeletonized phrenic nerve</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Traumatic pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare presentation. Pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> itself is asymptomatic unless complicated by either hemorrhage or herniation of the heart through the defect. Following diagnosis surgical repair of the pericardium is indicated because cardiac herniation may result in vascular collapse and sudden death. Objectives Here we present a case of traumatic, non-herniated pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with complete skeletonization of the phrenic nerve. Case report An 18-year-old healthy male suffered multi-trauma after falling 50 feet onto concrete. The patient could not be stabilized despite exploratory laparotomy with splenectomy, IR embolization and packing for a liver laceration. Right posterolateral thoracotomy revealed a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> pericardium with a completely skeletonized phrenic nerve. The pericardium was repaired with a Goretex(R) patch. Conclusion A high level of suspicion for pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is necessary in all patients with high-velocity thoracic injuries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvC..84d5205M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Realizing vector meson dominance with <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge densities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density in a fast-moving nucleon is represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the Dirac form factor in the timelike region (spectral function). At a given <span class="hlt">transverse</span> distance b the integration effectively extends over energies in a range t?1/b, with exponential suppression of larger values. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density at peripheral distances thus acts as a low-pass filter for the spectral function and allows one to select energy regions dominated by specific t-channel states, corresponding to definite exchange mechanisms in the spacelike form factor. We show that distances b0.5-1.5fm in the isovector density are maximally sensitive to the ? meson region, with only a 10% contribution from higher-mass states. Soft-pion exchange governed by chiral dynamics becomes relevant only at larger distances. In the isoscalar density higher-mass states beyond the ? are comparatively more important. The dispersion approach suggests that the positive <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density in the neutron at b1fm, found previously in a Fourier analysis of spacelike form factor data, could serve as a sensitive test of the the isoscalar <span class="hlt">strength</span> in the 1GeV mass region. In terms of partonic structure, the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> densities in the vector meson region b1fm support an approximate mean-field picture of the motion of valence quarks in the nucleon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, G. A.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1035548"> <span id="translatedtitle">Realizing vector meson dominance with <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge densities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density in a fast-moving nucleon is represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the Dirac form factor in the timelike region (spectral function). At a given <span class="hlt">transverse</span> distance b the integration effectively extends over energies in a range {radical}t {approx}< 1/b, with exponential suppression of larger values. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density at peripheral distances thus acts as a low-pass filter for the spectral function and allows one to select energy regions dominated by specific t-channel states, corresponding to definite exchange mechanisms in the spacelike form factor. We show that distances b {approx} 0.5 - 1.5 fm in the isovector density are maximally sensitive to the {rho} meson region, with only a {approx}10% contribution from higher-mass states. Soft-pion exchange governed by chiral dynamics becomes relevant only at larger distances. In the isoscalar density higher-mass states beyond the {omega} are comparatively more important. The dispersion approach suggests that the positive <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density in the neutron at b {approx} 1 fm, found previously in a Fourier analysis of spacelike form factor data, could serve as a sensitive test of the isoscalar <span class="hlt">strength</span> in the {approx}1 GeV mass region. In terms of partonic structure, the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> densities in the vector meson region b {approx} 1 fm support an approximate mean-field picture of the motion of valence quarks in the nucleon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerald Miller, Mark Strikman, Christian Weiss</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5451535"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> wakefields at high dispersion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In high energy linear colliders the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> beam emittance has to be preserved in order to achieve small interaction spots. If the beam is off-center in an accelerating cavity, it excites <span class="hlt">transverse</span> wakefields, mainly the dipole mode, which deflects the tail of the beam leading to an emittance growth. In a high dispersive region, even a well centered beam can excite wakefields of higher order modes since the energy spread of the beam causes a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> beam size which is comparable with the beam pipe. During the bunch length compression in the ring-to-linac (RTL) section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), the beam pipe of 75 mm diameter is practically filled in the horizontal plane. Especially, if beam losses start to be involved, the very outer parts of the beam excite wakefields at any pipe irregularities like bellows, diameter steps, etc. Measured evidences, theoretical estimates and comparisons to other effects, like higher order magnet optics, are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Decker, F.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.S42I..02N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping Great Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Area</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">At the northern Cascadia margin, the Juan de Fuca plate is underthrusting North America at about 45 mm/yr. Thermal and deformation studies indicate that, off southern Vancouver Island, the interplate interface is presently fully locked for a distance of some 60 km downdip from the deformation front. Great thrust earthquakes on this section of the interface, with magnitudes of up to 9, have been estimated to occur at an average interval of about 590 yr. Further downdip there is a transition zone from fully locked behavior to aseismic sliding, with the deep aseismic zone exhibiting slow slip thrust events. We show that at the northern Cascadia margin there is a change in the reflection character on seismic images from a thin reflection package (< 2 km thick) where the subduction thrust is inferred to be seismogenic, to a broad reflection band (> 4 km thick) at greater depth where there is aseismic slip. This change in reflection character provides us with a new technique for detailed mapping of the maximum landward extent of great earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The landward edge of the locked zone on the northern Cascadia subduction thrust inferred by reflection imaging appears to lie some 25-30 km closer to the land than estimated from thermal and dislocation modeling, possibly suggesting a somewhat greater megathrust seismic hazard at inland cities. Deep seismic reflection images from Alaska, Chile and SW Japan show a similar broad reflection band above the subduction thrust in the region of stable sliding and thin thrust reflections further seaward, perhaps suggesting that reflection imaging may be a globally important predictive tool for determining the maximum expected <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area in megathrust earthquakes. The eastern Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone is an ideal setting for testing this hypothesis. In this region, recent megathrust earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> areas are defined by aftershocks, inversion of geodetic data points to strong lateral variations in coupling, and wide shelf area allows for a relatively inexpensive and full marine mapping of the locked and transition zones, and partial mapping of the slow slip zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nedimovi?, M. R.; Hyndman, R. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Spence, G. D.; Brocher, T. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5805L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of high-velocity friction experiments to the shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a fault in an elastic half-space</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We developed a physics-based model for earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by numerically simulating shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along a 2D vertical fault with the dynamic frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span> of granite under high slip velocity. Recent experimental observations indicated that the steady-state frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span> of silica-rich igneous rocks (granite, syenite, diorite) alternate between dynamic-weakening under low velocity (V < 0.03 m/s) and dynamic-strengthening under higher velocities (V > 0.03 m/s). This <span class="hlt">strength</span> alternation was attributed to powder-lubrication (weakening), and powder dehydration (strengthening) (Sammis et al., 2011). We used the dynamic friction law which was determined on samples of Sierra White granite under experimental velocities approaching 1 m/s (Reches and Lockner, 2010). We converted their observed friction-distance-velocity relations into an empirical friction model referred to as WEST (WEakening - STrengthening). For the simulation calculations, we used the spectral element code of Ampuero (web.gps.caltech.edu/~ampuero/software), which computes the spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation along an anti-plane shear (mode III) fracture in an elastic half-space. In the present analysis, the WEST friction model is used as the fault <span class="hlt">strength</span> while keeping all other parameters (crust properties and stresses) the same as Version 3 of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) benchmark problem (Harris et al., 2004). This approach allows for direct comparison between the WEST <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the benchmark <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with a fault of slip-weakening friction model (Rojas et al., 2008). We found the following differences between the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the two models: (1) WEST-based <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs earlier at all observation points away from the nucleation zone; (2) WEST-based model has lower (~ 35%) peak velocity and shorter rise-time; and (3) WEST-based <span class="hlt">rupture</span> shows rich, frequent alteration of slip velocity, and consequently, the simulated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is more complex in stress drop, displacements, and friction recovery. We discuss the significant contribution of this experimentally-based friction model to the understanding of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models with emphasis on slip-pulse behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liao, Zonghu; Reches, Zeev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JChPh.135x4706Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">The tensile <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of heterogeneous interfaces: A comparison of static and dynamic first-principles calculations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">First-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations and static quantum chemical (QC) calculations are used to evaluate the tensile <span class="hlt">strengths</span>, ?c, of interfaces consisting of (0001) surfaces of ?-Al2O3 separated by small organic species. The evaluation of ?c with FPMD was achieved by performing simulations in which the simulation cell was extending in a direction normal to the fracture plane until <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the interface occurred. The static QC calculations employed an approach which treated fracture of the interface as a competition between uniform extension of the simulation cell and crack formation at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site, which is analogous to that used in the construction of universal binding energy relationships. The results showed that the static QC calculations accurately reproduced the FPMD simulations with respect to tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> and the cell extension at which <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred, provided that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site employed in the static calculations matched the site at which <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred during the FPMD simulations. A simple strategy for identifying the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site, even in complex systems containing many potential <span class="hlt">rupture</span> sites, is proposed. Overall, the work extends the calculation of tensile <span class="hlt">strengths</span> with static QC methods to highly heterogeneous interfaces, thus providing a computationally efficient alternative to demanding FPMD simulations for this purpose.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhu, Hongjuan; Mosey, Nicholas J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1320378"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Distal Biceps Tendon in a Collegiate Football Player: A Case Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective: To provide health care personnel with guidelines for the management of a distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Background: Traumatic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the biceps tendon are rare, but serious, and usually involve the long head of the proximal insertion. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> of the distal tendon account for only 3% of all biceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. A history of tendinitis, overuse, or anabolic steroid abuse may predispose tendons to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Surgical repair, followed by a comprehensive rehabilitation program, is indicated to regain full <span class="hlt">strength</span> and range of motion in both flexion and supination. Differential Diagnosis: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the distal head of the biceps brachii muscle at the insertion on the radial tuberosity. Treatment: After the injury, the athlete continued to compete for the remainder of the collegiate football season. He then underwent surgery to repair the tendon at its insertion. Post- operatively, the athlete was immobilized in a cast and then a brace to prevent any movement of the muscle. Rehabilitation proceeded with isometric exercises and manual resistive exercises of the shoulder and wrist. At 16 weeks, the athlete was cleared for biceps curls and wrist supination. At 6 months, the athlete had regained full use of the muscle. Uniqueness: This is a relatively rare injury, usually occurring at the proximal tendon insertion and in those who are middle aged (30 to 50 years old). Also, the surgical intervention in this case was delayed without detrimental effects to the patient. Conclusions: This study shows that, while surgical intervention to repair a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> distal biceps tendon is necessary, appropriate conservative measures can be taken to allow surgery to be delayed without harm to the patient. The athletic trainer should be aware of how to recognize and treat this injury. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, Karen L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19888240"> <span id="translatedtitle">Suppression of ballistic electron transmission through a semiconductor II-structure by an external <span class="hlt">transverse</span> electric field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have conducted numerical studies of ballistic electron transport in a semiconductor II-structure when an external <span class="hlt">transverse</span> electric field is applied. The device conductance as a function of electron energy and the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> electric field is calculated on the basis of tight-binding Green's function formalism. The calculations show that a relatively weak electric field can induce very</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sheng Wei-dong; Xia Jian-bai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/r7g0w85147463149.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flutter analysis using <span class="hlt">transversality</span> theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary A new method of calculating the flutter boundaries of undamped aeroelastic 搕ypical section models is presented. The method is an application of the weak <span class="hlt">transversality</span> theorem used in catastrophe theory. In the first instance, the flutter problem is cast in matrix form using a frequency domain method, leading to an eigenvalue matrix. The characteristic polynomial resulting from this matrix</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Afolabi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/397484"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> modes in microchip lasers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two analytical sets of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> eigenmodes are proposed for microchip lasers in one-dimensional geometry. Each set is associated with a particular pump profile. The eigenfunctions are expressed as Bessel or modified Bessel functions. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sanchez, F.; Chardon, A. [Groupement d`Interet Scientifique en Optique et Optronique, Laboratoire d`Optronique, Ecole National Superieure de Sciences Appliquees et de Technologie, 6 rue de Kerampont, B.P. 447, 22305 Lannion Cedex (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6793477"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of candidate Stirling engine alloys after long-term aging at 760/sup 0/C in low-pressure hydrogen</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nine candidate Stirling automotive engine alloys were aged at 760/sup 0/C for 3500 h in low pressure hydrogen or argon to determine the resulting effects on mechanical behavior. Candidate heater head tube alloys were CG-27, W545, 12RN72, INCONEL-718, and HS-188 while candidate cast cylinder-regenerator housing alloys were SA-F11, CRM-6D, XF-818, and HS-31. Aging per se is detrimental to the creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> and tensile <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of the iron-base alloys. The presence of hydrogen does not significantly contribute to <span class="hlt">strength</span> degradation. Based on current MOD 1A Stirling engine design criteria of a 55% urban - 45% highway driving cycle; CG-27 has adequate 3500 h - 87/sup 0/C creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> and SA-F11, CRM-6D, and XF-818 have adequate 3500 h - 775/sup 0/C creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titran, R.H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21144790"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fatal lower extremity varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare cause of death, although varicosities are a common pathology. We present three cases of sudden death due to varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After a review of the literature, the case circumstances and the findings of imaging examination, performed in two cases, are presented. One of them had undergone a post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA), and one a PMCTA as well as a post-mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR) imaging prior to conventional autopsy. One of the cases presented herein is, to our knowledge, the youngest known fatality due to varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:21144790</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Preiss, Ulrich; Hatch, Gary M; Zech, Wolf Dieter; Ketterer, Thomas; Bolliger, Stephan; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3407438"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laparoscopic Repair of a Traumatic Bladder <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Laparoscopic repair of the traumatic intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a proven, safe, and effective technique in the appropriate setting. A 23-year-old male with traumatic intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> proven by cystogram after a motor vehicle collision was successfully repaired via a laparoscopic approach. We describe the technique in detail including 2-layer closure and follow-up care. A review of the literature using PubMed with the key words [laparoscopic repair bladder injury] AND [bladder trauma] was performed. We recommend the consideration of laparoscopic repair of the intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in more trauma patients who meet criteria.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hugo Cuadra, Rene; Ricchiuti, Daniel J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39765024"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of some technological factors on the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of metal-glass seals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The article deals with the adhesive <span class="hlt">strength</span> of metal-glass systems. It establishes correlations between the specific <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> and the temperature-time conditions; this makes it possible to compare different technologies of obtaining seals, evaluate their durability, work out optimal sealing conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. I. Zhuravlev; A. A. Borisenko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49576037"> <span id="translatedtitle">Residual torsional <span class="hlt">strength</span> after impact of CFRP tubes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper investigates the residual torsional <span class="hlt">strength</span> of cylindrical T300-carbon\\/epoxy tubular specimens damaged by low-velocity impacts. A total of 24 specimens were subjected to a 7J <span class="hlt">transverse</span> impact under various torsional preloads. First, the torsional <span class="hlt">strength</span> of four different lamination sequences is studied. Later it is compared with the residual torsional <span class="hlt">strength</span> (RTS) of tubes impacted under different torsional preloads.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Minak; S. Abrate; D. Ghelli; R. Panciroli; A. Zucchelli</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21091032"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute Iliac Artery <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Endovascular Treatment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span> over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V., E-mail: bill_skiadas@yahoo.gr; Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L. [University of Athens, Radiology Department, Areteion Hospital (Greece)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19085055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> without cardiac injury.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare injury following blunt chest trauma. It is frequently fatal because of serious complications such as cardiac herniation and/or contusion. We report a case of traumatic pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> without cardiac injury, which was incidentally identified intraoperatively. A 63-year-old woman was transported to the hospital after sustaining blunt chest trauma from a motor vehicle accident. Radiographic workup demonstrated multiple fractures, pulmonary contusion, and hemopneumothorax. A chest tube was inserted, and persistent bleeding was observed. An exploratory thoracotomy was performed, and active pulmonary bleeding was controlled. Further exploration revealed major pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> without cardiac herniation or intrapericardial injury, which was repaired by a bovine pericardial patch. Her postoperative course was uneventful. It is usually difficult to make a diagnosis of pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and a misdiagnosis often leads to a fatal consequence. Therefore, an immediate surgical exploration is warranted if clinical and radiographic findings suggest the condition. PMID:19085055</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nakamura, Teruya; Maloney, James D; Osaki, Satoru</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10854026"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a soccer player.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traumatic duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> resulting from blunt trauma during soccer is an extremely rare occurrence. A case report of this unusual condition is presented together with a review of the literature. PMID:10854026</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houshian, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=NUREG0651"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Steam Generator Tube <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Events.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The NRC Staff's review of three domestic pressurized water reactor steam generator tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events has shown that no significant offsite doses or systems performance inadequacies have occurred. The plant operators and systems successfully avoided dire...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. B. Marsh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17374865"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectrum of CT findings in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and impending <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysms.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prompt diagnosis of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and impending <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysms is imperative. The computed tomographic (CT) findings of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms are often straightforward. Most <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are manifested as a retroperitoneal hematoma accompanied by an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Periaortic blood may extend into the perirenal space, the pararenal space, or both. Intraperitoneal extravasation may be an immediate or a delayed finding. Discontinuity of the aortic wall or a focal gap in otherwise continuous circumferential wall calcifications may point to the location of a <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. There usually is a delay of several hours between the initial intramural hemorrhage and frank extravasation into the periaortic soft tissues. Contained or impending <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are more difficult to identify. A small amount of periaortic blood may be confused with the duodenum, perianeurysmal fibrosis, or adenopathy. Imaging features suggestive of instability or impending <span class="hlt">rupture</span> include increased aneurysm size, a low thrombus-to-lumen ratio, and hemorrhage into a mural thrombus. A peripheral crescent-shaped area of hyperattenuation within an abdominal aortic aneurysm represents an acute intramural hemorrhage and is another CT sign of impending <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Draping of the posterior aspect of an aneurysmal aorta over the vertebrae is associated with a contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:17374865</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rakita, Dmitry; Newatia, Amit; Hines, John J; Siegel, David N; Friedman, Barak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2770317"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aortic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in seat belt wearers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several investigations have indicated that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the thoracic aorta is one of the leading causes of immediate death in victims of road traffic accidents. In Finland in 1983, 92% of front-seat passengers were seat belt wearers on highways and 82% in build-up areas. The mechanisms of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aorta have been intensively investigated, but the relationship between seat belt wearing and injury mechanisms leading to aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is still largely unknown. This study comprises 4169 fatally injured victims investigated by the Boards of Traffic Accident Investigation of Insurance Companies during the period 1972 to 1985. Chest injuries were recorded as the main cause of death in 1121 (26.9%) victims, 207 (5.0%) of those victims having worn a seat belt. Aortic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were found at autopsy in 98 victims and the exact information of the location of the aortic tears was available in 68. For a control group, we analyzed 72 randomly chosen unbelted victims who had a fatal aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in similar accidents. The location of the aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in unbelted victims was more often in the ascending aorta, especially in drivers, whereas in seat belt wearers the distal descending aorta was statistically more often <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, especially in right-front passengers (p less than 0.05). The steering wheel predominated statistically as the part of the car estimated to have caused the injury in unbelted victims (37/72), and some interior part of the car was the most common cause of fatal thoracic impacts in seat belt wearers (48/68) (p less than 0.001). The mechanism of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aorta in the classic site just distal to the subclavian artery seems to be rapid deceleration, although complex body movements are also responsible in side impact collisions. The main mechanism leading to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the ascending aorta seems to be severe blow to the bony thorax. This also often causes associated thoracic injuries, such as heart <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and sternal fracture. Injuries in the ascending aorta were mostly found in unbelted victims and were sustained in frontal impact collisions, the injury-causing part of the car being the steering wheel. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> of the distal descending part of the aorta were frequently associated with fractures of the thoracic vertebra. PMID:2770317</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Araj鋜vi, E; Santavirta, S; Tolonen, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/24732112"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal and pelvic tumors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of tumors is usually a critical and life-threatening condition. We demonstrate a wide variety of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tumors\\u000a with their imaging characteristics including gastric lymphoma, gastric leiomyosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma of the ileum, hepatocellular\\u000a carcinoma, pancreatic pseudocyst, renal angiomyolipoma, renal cell carcinoma, ovarian endometrial cyst, ovarian corpus luteum\\u000a cyst, and ovarian teratoma. Their imaging features are illustrated with an emphasis on clues</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshie Iwasaki; Junichi Matsumoto; Eimei Okamoto; Hiroshi Niimi; Yasuo Nakajima; Tohru Ishikawa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2584656"> <span id="translatedtitle">Three rare causes of extensor tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Three unusual cases of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of finger extensor tendons by attrition are reported. In one instance it was associated with long-standing nonunion of a scaphoid fracture, with a posttraumatic dorsal subluxation of the lower end of the ulna in another, and with a Madelung's deformity in the third. Extensor tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has not been previously recorded in the English-language literature after the first two conditions. PMID:2584656</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harvey, F J; Harvey, P M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/7q57323t7175088j.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cognitive Frames in Psychology: Demarcations and <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">As there seems to be a recurrent feeling of crisis in psychology, its present state is analyzed in this article. The author\\u000a believes that in addition to the traditional manifestations that have dogged psychology since it emerged as an independent\\u000a science some new features of the crisis have emerged. Three fundamental <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are identified: the 揾orizontal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>\\u000a between various schools</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrey V. Yurevich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14529221"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed primary realignment of posterior urethral <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The treatment of acute posterior urethral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is controversial. Twelve patients who presented with acute posterior urethral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> over a five-year period were treated by delayed primary realignment of the injury. The technique of this procedure and the outcome are the subject of this presentation. Eight patients had successful realignment without strictures. Two patients with strictures responded to simple dilatations with bougies and the other two had formal urethroplasty. PMID:14529221</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shittu, O B; Okeke, L I; Kamara, T B; Adebayo, S A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2879216"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Profunda Femoris Aneurysm Secondary to Neurofibromatosis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neurofibromatosis is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by abnormal growth that involves tissues of mesodermal and neuroectodermal origin. Aneurysms are rarely seen in peripheral arteries. This report presents a case of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> arterial aneurysm secondary to neurofibromatosis; the lesion occurred in the profunda femoris artery, a highly unusual location. Treatment of patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> arterial aneurysm secondary to neurofibromatosis may be interventional or surgical. In this case, a surgical approach was successful.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emrecan, Bilgin; Onem, Gokhan; Susam, Ibrahim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21413382"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> angular momentum of photons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop the quantum theory of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasiparaxial photon beams in vacuum and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular-momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order <span class="hlt">transverse</span> derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular-momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aiello, Andrea [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Guenter-Scharowsky-Strasse 1/Bau 24, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Guenter-Scharowsky-Strasse 1/Bau 24, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute for Optics, Information and Photonics, University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7/B2, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhRvD..81a3002H"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> shape of the electron</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the charge density, form factors and spin distributions of the electron induced by its |e?? light-front Fock state in impact parameter space. Only <span class="hlt">transversally</span> compact Fock states contribute to the leading behavior of the Dirac and Pauli form factors as the momentum transfer tends to infinity. Power suppressed contributions are not compact, and distributions weighted by the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> size have endpoint contributions. The Fock state conserves the spin of the parent electron locally, but the separate contributions of the electron, photon, and orbital angular momentum depend on longitudinal momentum and impact parameter. The sign of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron may be understood intuitively from the density distribution, addressing a challenge by Feynman.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoyer, Paul; Kurki, Samu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/10110593"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-<span class="hlt">strength</span> austenitic stainless steel tubing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Developmental steels were investigated that were basically 14%Cr- 16%Ni-2%Mo-Fe with V, Ti, and Nb additions. Commercial steels of current interest include Esshete 1250 [1], 17-14CuMo [2], Sumitomo St3Cu{reg_sign} [3-4], and Sandvik 12R72HV{reg_sign}, which is similar to Din 1.4970 [5]. The investigation included fabricability, creep- and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>, and exploratory tests regarding creep-crack growth, fatigue, and weldability. Testing temperatures were in the range of 600 to 800{degree}C, and times extended to 50,000 h. Excellent <span class="hlt">strength</span> and ductility were observed under all loading conditions. High creep <span class="hlt">strength</span> was due to the formation of an ultrafine precipitate distribution on dislocations produced by warm or cold work. Microstructural examination indicated that the alloys were resistant to creep cavity formation, and microstructures were stable for long times.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5908451"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-<span class="hlt">strength</span> austenitic stainless steel tubing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Developmental steels were investigated that were basically 14%Cr- 16%Ni-2%Mo-Fe with V, Ti, and Nb additions. Commercial steels of current interest include Esshete 1250 (1), 17-14CuMo (2), Sumitomo St3Cu{reg sign} (3-4), and Sandvik 12R72HV{reg sign}, which is similar to Din 1.4970 (5). The investigation included fabricability, creep- and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>, and exploratory tests regarding creep-crack growth, fatigue, and weldability. Testing temperatures were in the range of 600 to 800{degree}C, and times extended to 50,000 h. Excellent <span class="hlt">strength</span> and ductility were observed under all loading conditions. High creep <span class="hlt">strength</span> was due to the formation of an ultrafine precipitate distribution on dislocations produced by warm or cold work. Microstructural examination indicated that the alloys were resistant to creep cavity formation, and microstructures were stable for long times.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60273561"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of candidate materials for nuclear process heat applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Creep and stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties are determined for the candidate materials to be used in hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) components. The materials and test methods are briefly described based on experimental results of test durations of about20000 h. The medium creep <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of the alloys Inconel-617, Hastelloy-X, Nimonic-86, Hastelloy-S, Manaurite-36X, IN-519, and Incoloy-800H are compared showing that Inconel-617 has the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Schubert; E. te Heesen; U. Bruch; R. Cook; H. Diehl; P. J. Ennis; W. Jakobeit; H. J. Penkalla; G. Ullrich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JMagR.147..116D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rapid Acquisition <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Relaxometric Imaging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Segmented echo-planar acquisitions have been incorporated into a multiecho imaging sequence to produce a MRI method for rapid <span class="hlt">transverse</span> relaxometry. The method is demonstrated on gel phantoms and rat brain and found to produce unbiased estimates of T2. Gradient performance can be a limiting factor for the implementation of this technique and there is a cost in signal-to-noise ratio resulting from the higher bandwidth required, as is typical for echo-planar acquisitions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Does, Mark D.; Gore, John C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15132929"> <span id="translatedtitle">Percutaneous repair of acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Various studies have shown that the operative treatment of a freshly <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Achilles tendon is generally considered to be more appropriate than a nonoperative regimen. However, complications in open reconstructions are reported to occur in 11-29%. The method used in this study reduced the risk of complications arising from operation, but simultaneously allowed early postoperative mobilization and functional treatment. It was a percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon, using two Lengemann extension wires for coadaptation of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon. To fix the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site, the authors used a fibrin sealant. The spikes of the wire were hooked in at the fascia of the soleus muscle. Via a big, curved needle, the wire was placed in the distal stumps of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon and guided out laterally and medially above the calcaneus. After blocking the wires distally, the fibrin sealant was applied at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site. The current report describes this method of treatment in 66 patients. The postoperative observation period was 1 year. Sixty-four patients were male and two were female. Their average age was 42 years. The Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred during sporting activities and were treated by operation within 22 hours on average. The outcome was very good in 98%. One patient (2%) suffered a rerupture due to trauma. There were no other complications. PMID:15132929</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gorschewsky, Ottmar; Pitzl, Martin; P黷z, Andrej; Klakow, Andreas; Neumann, Wolfram</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvE..84d1606A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of thin liquid films on structured surfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate stability and breakup of a thin liquid film on a solid surface under the action of disjoining pressure. The solid surface is structured by parallel grooves. Air is trapped in the grooves under the liquid film. Our mathematical model takes into account the effect of slip due to the presence of menisci separating the liquid film from the air inside the grooves, the deformation of these menisci due to local variations of pressure in the liquid film, and nonuniformities of the Hamaker constant which measures the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of disjoining pressure. Both linear stability and strongly nonlinear evolution of the film are analyzed. Surface structuring results in decrease of the fastest growing instability wavelength and the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time. It is shown that a simplified description of film dynamics based on the standard formula for effective slip leads to significant deviations from the behavior seen in our simulations. Self-similar decay over several orders of magnitude of the film thickness near the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> point is observed. We also show that the presence of the grooves can lead to instability in otherwise stable films if the relative groove width is above a critical value, found as a function of disjoining pressure parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ajaev, Vladimir S.; Gatapova, Elizaveta Ya.; Kabov, Oleg A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983Geo....11..287Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Triggered reverse fault and earthquake due to crustal unloading, northwest <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Ranges, California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A reverse-right-oblique surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, associated with a ML 2.5 earthquake, formed in a diatomite quarry near Lompoc, California, in the northwesternmost <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Ranges on April 7, 1981. The 575-m-long narrow zone of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> formed in clay interbeds in diatomite and diatomaceous shale of the Neogene Monterey Formation. The <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> parallel bedding, dip 39 59癝, and trend about N84癊 on the north limb of an open symmetrical syncline. Maximum net slip was 25 cm; maximum reverse dip slip was 23 cm, maximum right-lateral strike slip was about 9 cm, and average net slip was about 12 cm. The seismic moment of the earthquake is estimated at 1 to 2 1018 dyne/cm and the static stress drop at about 3 bar. The removal of an average of about 44 m of diatomite resulted in an average load reduction of about 5 bar, which decreased the normal stress by about 3.5 bar and increased the shear stress on the tilted bedding plane by about 2 bar. The April 7,1981, event was a very shallow bedding-plane <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, apparently triggered by crustal unloading.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yerkes, R. F.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Tinsley, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22strength%22&pg=6&id=EJ663741"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Diagnosis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Discusses the various <span class="hlt">strength</span> qualities (maximum <span class="hlt">strength</span>, high- and low-load speed <span class="hlt">strength</span>, reactive <span class="hlt">strength</span>, rate of force development, and skill performance), noting why a training program design based on <span class="hlt">strength</span> diagnosis can lead to greater efficacy and better performance gains for the athlete. Examples of tests used to assess <span class="hlt">strength</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newton, Robert U.; Dugan, Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/413232"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of grinding direction of fracture <span class="hlt">strength</span> of silicon nitride</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is generally found that grinding <span class="hlt">transverse</span> to the tensile stress direction in flexure bars subjected to four-point bending results in a lower <span class="hlt">strength</span> compared to grinding in the longitudinal direction. In the present study, standard flexure specimens made from a reaction-bonded and a sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN and SRBSN) were surface ground under three different conditions in both longitudinal and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> directions to assess the effect of grinding direction on <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Four-point flexure tests were performed on the specimens and Weibull parameters were calculated. The results showed that while the <span class="hlt">strength</span> was not affected by the grinding condition when grinding was performed in the longitudinal direction, the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the samples ground in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction was reduced as the material removal rate was increased by a factor of 30. This result was confirmed by fractography, which showed that almost all the fracture initiation sites in the longitudinally ground samples were associated with near-surface microstructural features, whereas in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> ground samples fracture initiated from damage introduced by grinding. The <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction by grinding in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction was found to be material dependent, and was larger for SRBSN than for RBSN.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strakna, T.J.; Jahanmir, S. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Allor, R.L. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States); Kumar, K.V. [General Electric Superabrasives, Worthington, OH (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/hml981425664m248.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> sacral fractures with anterior displacement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> fractures of the sacrum with anterior displacement are the rarest type of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> sacral fractures. They usually\\u000a occur at the S1朣2 region in suicide jumpers. A clinical study was performed to evaluate the diagnosis, treatment and outcome\\u000a of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> sacral fractures with anterior displacement. We present six patients with a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> fracture of the sacrum\\u000a with anterior displacement. All</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">George S. Sapkas; Andreas F. Mavrogenis; Panayiotis J. Papagelopoulos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15010168"> <span id="translatedtitle">Repair of distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> using a suture anchor and an anterior approach.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a prospective study, eight consecutive patients with nine <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the distal biceps tendon underwent repair through a single incision. All patients were satisfied with their clinical results and had full ranges of elbow and forearm motion. There were no radial nerve injuries and no radio-ulnar synostoses. Isokinetic testing, after correction for dominance, demonstrated a 6% <span class="hlt">strength</span> deficit, but 7% higher endurance in the repaired extremity for the flexion-concentric test, and no <span class="hlt">strength</span> deficit and 13% higher endurance for supination. The improved endurance is probably explained by initial reduced effort due to apprehension which minimized subsequent fatigue. PMID:15010168</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Balabaud, L; Ruiz, C; Nonnenmacher, J; Seynaeve, P; Kehr, P; Rapp, E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3141706"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute abdomen caused by bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> attributable to neurogenic bladder dysfunction following a stroke: a case report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction Spontaneous bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare and serious event with high mortality. It is not often considered in the patient presenting with peritonitis. This often leads to delays in diagnosis. There are very few case reports of true spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the literature. This is the first such reported case in which bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was attributable to neurogenic bladder dysfunction following a stroke. Case presentation We report the case of a 67-year-old Caucasian man who presented with lower abdominal pain and a peritonitic abdomen. He had a long-term urethral catheter because of urinary retention following a previous stroke. He was treated conservatively with antibiotics before a surgical opinion was sought. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After repair of the defect, he eventually made a full recovery. Conclusion In this unusual case report, we describe an example of a serious event in which delays in diagnosis may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. To date, no unifying theory explaining why <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs has been postulated. We conducted a thorough literature search to examine the etiological factors in other published cases. These etiological factors either increase intra-vesical pressure or decrease the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the bladder wall. We hope that by increasing awareness of these etiological factors, spontaneous bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be diagnosed earlier and appropriate therapy started.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22153660"> <span id="translatedtitle">Results of accelerated postoperative rehabilitation using novel "suture frame" repair of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The management of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a much-debated subject. In recent years, there has been much interest in early postoperative mobilization. We present the results of our Achilles tendon repair technique and accelerated rehabilitation program. The technique we propose uses the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of a 1-loop polydioxanone "suture frame" to enable restoration of the tendon length, immediate positioning of the foot in a near-plantigrade position, and an accelerated rehabilitation program. We followed up 15 cases of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> treated with this technique. The initial follow-up was a review of case notes and a telephone questionnaire. All patients were subsequently invited for a clinical follow-up visit, and 11 patients (68.75%) attended. No cases of infection or repeat <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred. The return to work (mean 5.6 weeks) and return to sport (mean 4.8 months) were relatively rapid. Regarding overall satisfaction on a scale of 0 to 10, the median was 9 (range 8 to 10). Of the 11 patients who attended the clinical follow-up visit, the mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgery ankle-hindfoot score was 94.5 points (range 83 to 100). The Achilles <span class="hlt">rupture</span> repair scores (including isokinetic muscle <span class="hlt">strength</span>) were good or excellent in all but 1 patient, whose result was fair. Of the 11 patients, 10 reported complete satisfaction with their outcome. Our technique with燼ccelerated rehabilitation is safe and effective in the management of acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. It facilitates an early return to work and recreational sports, with excellent overall patient satisfaction. PMID:22153660</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Talbot, Joseph C; Williams, Gary T; Bismil, Quamar; Shaw, David L; Schilders, Ernest</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT.......100G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field, laboratory, and theoretical investigations of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Examination of faults exhumed from seismic depths to the surface of the earth provides high resolution, continuous access to meso- and micro-scale structure that is difficult or impossible to resolve for faults at depth. Quantitative integration of field observations of fault structure with analytical, theoretical and laboratory models allow structural geologists to provide constraints on the mechanics of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a dynamic sense. Field maps and thin section observations document the occurrence of pseudotachylyte (solidified melt produced during seismic slip) on small, sub-vertical strike-slip faults in granitoid rocks of the central Sierra Nevada. Measurements from these faults are used to provide constraints on ambient conditions during seismic faulting. The pseudotachylytes are less than 0.3 mm thick and are found in faults typically up to 1 cm in thickness, and total measured left-lateral offset along sampled faults is approximately 20 cm. Field and microstructural evidence indicate that the faults exploited pre-existing mineralized joints and show the following overprinting structures: mylonites more or less coeval with quartz veins, cataclasites and pseudotachylytes more or less coeval with epidote veins, and zeolite veins. Based on observations of the microstructural textures of faults combined with theoretical heat transfer and energy budget calculations, it is suggested that only a fraction (<30%) of the total offset was associated with seismic slip. The elusive nature of these pseudotachylytes demonstrates that observations in outcrop and optical microscope are not sufficient to rule out frictional melting as a consequence of seismic slip in similar fault rocks. The static stress drop is estimated on small exhumed strike-slip faults in the vicinity of the faults described in the first chapter. The faults are exposed in outcrop along their entire tip-to-tip lengths of 8-12 m. The contribution of seismic slip to the total slip along the studied cataclasite-bearing small faults may be further constrained than the previous chapter estimate (<7 cm) by measuring the length of epidote-filled, rhombohedral dilatational jogs (rhombochasms) distributed semi-periodically along the length of the faults. This affords measurement of both the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length and slip, yielding stress drop calculations ranging from 90 to 250 MPa, i.e., one to two orders of magnitude larger than typical seismological estimates for earthquakes. These inferred seismic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred along small, deep-seated faults, and, given the calculated stress drops and observations that brittle faults exploited joints sealed by quartz-bearing mylonite, we conclude that these were "strong" faults. The Bear Creek fault zones localize outcrop-scale damage into tabular zones between two sub parallel boundary faults, producing a fracture-induced material contrast across the boundary faults with softer rocks between the boundary faults and intact granodiorite outside. Using detailed mapping and microstructural analysis of small fault zones to build and constrain numerical effective medium experiments, the effect of mesoscopic (outcrop-scale) damage zone fractures on the effective isotropic elastic moduli of the fault rocks is evaluated, showing that the bulk response of the fractured damage zone is strain-weakening, and can be as much as 75% more compliant than the unfractured granodiorite. Observations of the geometry and distribution of pseudotachylyte veins along faults in multiple field areas motivated the investigation of the growth of tensile microcracks in Homalite-100 around sub-rayleigh experimental shear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> (Laboratory Earthquakes) propagating along an interface with frictional and cohesive <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Opening microcracks were produced only along one side of the interface where they were associated with transient tensile stress perturbation due to the propagating shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The orientation of microcracks is related to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and the ambient static stress field. The results of this study provide a rat</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Griffith, William Ashley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608249"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electron Ion Collider <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin physics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electron Ion Collider is a future high energy facility for studies of the structure of the nucleon. Three-dimensional parton structure is one of the main goals of EIC. In momentum space <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) are the key ingredients to map such a structure. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised SIDIS experiments. We discuss Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised nucleon and <span class="hlt">transversity</span> that measures distribution of <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised quarks in a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised nucleon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Prokudin, Alexei [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1021916"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electron Ion Collider <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin physics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electron Ion Collider is a future high energy facility for studies of the structure of the nucleon. Three-dimensional parton structure is one of the main goals of EIC. In momentum space <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) are the key ingredients to map such a structure. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised SIDIS experiments. We discuss Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised nucleon and <span class="hlt">transversity</span> that measures distribution of <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised quarks in a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised nucleon</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alexei Prokudin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608401"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phenomenological extraction of <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Momentum Dependent distributions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss phenomenological extraction of <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) from experimental data. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. TMDs reveal three-dimensional distribution of partons inside polarised nucleon. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised experiments using Spin Asymmetries in particular Single Spin Asymmetries (SSAs). We discuss <span class="hlt">transversity</span> that measures distribution of <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised quarks in a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised nucleon and Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarised nucleon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Prokudin, Alexei [Jefferson Lab,12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23378432"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> excitations in liquid Sn.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> acoustic (TA) excitation modes were observed in inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectra of liquid Sn. The excitation energies and widths of the TA modes are in good agreement with results of an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. By comparing current correlation spectra between the experimental and theoretical results quantitatively, we have concluded that the TA modes can be detected experimentally through the quasi-TA branches in the longitudinal current correlation spectra. The lifetime and propagation length of the TA modes were determined to be ~0.7 ps and 0.8-1.0 nm, respectively, corresponding to the size of cages formed instantaneously in liquid Sn. PMID:23378432</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hosokawa, S; Munejiri, S; Inui, M; Kajihara, Y; Pilgrim, W-C; Ohmasa, Y; Tsutsui, S; Baron, A Q R; Shimojo, F; Hoshino, K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5414038"> <span id="translatedtitle">Noninterceptive <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-beam measurements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Totally noninterceptive techniques for accurate measurement of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> beam distributions are required for high-current continuous wave (cw) linacs, such as the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator. Sensors responding to visible radiation from beam interactions with residual gas and computer algorithms reconstructing spatial and phase space distributions have been implemented. This paper reports on early measurements of the beam from the injector of the prototype FMIT facility at Los Alamos. The first section indicates hardware setup and performance whereas the second section describes the data-processing software. The third section outlines the resultant measurements and further developments are discussed in the fourth section.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chamberlin, D.D.; Minerbo, G.N.; Mottershead, C.T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AIPC..821..149F"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Echo Measurements in RHIC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular we examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fischer, Wolfram</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20798388"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Echo Measurements in RHIC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular we examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fischer, Wolfram [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/891912"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> ECHO MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular they examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">FISCHER, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-09-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6856091"> <span id="translatedtitle">Capacity credit calculation for exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper reports that overpressure relieving in heat exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> case is quite different from other cases, such as fire, utility failure, inadvertent valve opening/closure, etc., when designing a pressure relief valve (PRV). In most cases, it is quite straightforward. The calculated relief load is the capacity that needs to be relieved. But, in heat exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cases, the actual amount of relieving capacity from the relieving device is not necessarily equal to the one from the high-pressure side through a tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Very often, the actual amount of relieving capacity from the relieving device is less than the flow from the higher-pressure side through a tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. At the time of a tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the process fluid flows through the breakage of a heat exchanger tube wall from its high-pressure side to its low-pressure side. The process fluid will then flow through the orifice of a PRV from the low-pressure side of the heat exchanger to the back-pressure side, which could be a flare, a K.O. drum or even atmosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wong, W.Y. (Stothert-Christenson Engineering Ltd., Burnaby, B.C. (Canada))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=470154"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from blunt chest trauma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Borrie, J. and Lichter, I. (1974).Thorax, 29, 329-337. Pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from blunt chest trauma. Pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may occur in two distinct anatomical sites, namely the diaphragmatic pericardium and the pleuropericardium. They may be combined. The problems in each type are different. In <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> diaphragmatic pericardium the rent may involve the pericardial cavity alone, or may extend into one or both adjoining pleural cavities. Upward herniation of abdominal viscera can occur, with or without strangulation. The presence of a pericardial rent may be suggested by diagnostic pneumoperitoneum, and chest films showing displaced abdominal viscera; its extent may be fully revealed only by thoracotomy. If the rent involves only the diaphragmatic pericardium without lateral spread into a pleural cavity, the presence of a rent may be revealed only by exploratory thoracotomy with pericardiotomy. In <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> pleuropericardium the rent is usually vertical and may occur on either side, more usually on the left. It may be recognized on chest films in its early stages by the presence of intrapericardial air arising from associated lung trauma. There is serious risk of heart dislocation with or without strangulation. The defect must be surgically repaired and, because of pericardial retraction, it may require a fabric patch. Teflon fabric has proved to be a long-term satisfactory pericardial substitute. Two cases of each type of pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are described and illustrate these points. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Borrie, J.; Lichter, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/147155"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of thermal treatment on tensile creep and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tensile creep and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies were conducted on Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers at 1200 and 1400 C in argon and air. Examined were as-received fibers as well as fibers annealed from 1400 to 1800 C for 1 hour in argon before testing. The creep and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> results for these annealed fibers were compared to those of the as-received fibers to determine the effects of annealing temperature, test temperature, and test environment. Argon anneals up to 1500 C degrade room temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> of Hi-Nicalon fibers, but improve fiber creep resistance in argon or air by as much as 100% with no significant degradation in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Argon anneals above 1500 C continue to improve fiber creep resistance when tested in argon, but significantly degrade creep resistance and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> when tested in air. Decrease in creep resistance in air is greater at 1200 C than at 1400 C. Mechanisms are suggested for the observed behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yun, H.M.; Goldsby, J.C.; Dicarlo, J.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1518..695H"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> excitations in liquid metals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> acoustic excitation modes were detected by inelastic x-ray scattering in liquid Ga, Cu and Fe in the Q range around 10 nm-1 using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8, although these liquid metals are mostly described by a simple hard-sphere liquid. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations clearly support this finding for liquid Ga. From the detailed analyses for the S(Q,?) spectra with good statistic qualities, the lifetime of less than 1 ps and the propagating length of less than 1 nm can be estimated for the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> acoustic phonon modes, which correspond to the lifetime and size of cages formed instantaneously in these liquid metals. The microscopic Poisson's ratio estimated from the dynamic velocities of sound is 0.42 for liquid Ga and about -0.2 for liquid transition metals, indicating a rubber-like soft and extremely hard elastic properties of the cage clusters, respectively. The origin of these microscopic elastic properties is discussed in detail.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hosokawa, S.; Munejiri, S.; Inui, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Shimojo, F.; Hoshino, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.S21A0965M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Examining Structural Controls on Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Dynamics Along the San Andreas Fault</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent numerical simulations of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> [Andrews and Ben-Zion, 1997; Harris and Day, 1997] have confirmed earlier analytical results [Weertman, 1980; Adams, 1995] that a contrast in elastic properties between the two sides of a fault will generate an interaction between the normal stress and fault slip that is not present in a homogeneous medium. It has been shown that for a range of frictional parameters and initial conditions, this interaction produces a statistical preference for unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation in the direction of slip of the more compliant medium [Ben-Zion and Andrews, 1998; Cochard and Rice, 2000; Ben-Zion and Huang 2002]. Thus, the directivity of earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on large faults with well-developed material interfaces may be controlled by material contrasts of the rocks within and across the fault zone. One of the largest known velocity contrasts across a major crustal fault occurs along the Bear Valley section of the San Andreas where high velocity materials on the SW side (P-velocity >5 km/s) are juxtaposed with low-velocity material on the NE side (P-velocity <4 km/s) down to a depth of about 4 km with a less dramatic contrast continuing to about 8 km [Thurber et al., 1997]. This boundary is strong enough to generate significant head-waves refracted along it that are recorded as the first arrivals at stations close to the fault on the NE side [McNally and McEvilly, 1977]. Rubin and Gillard [2000] and Rubin [2002] relocated the events in this region using NCSN waveform data and found that more than twice as many immediate aftershocks to small earthquakes occurred to the NW of the mainshock as to the SE, which they interpreted as being consistent with a preferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction to the SE. Their interpretation that aftershocks to microearthquakes occur preferentially in the direction opposite of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation has not been directly tested and is inconsistent with observations from moderate [Fletcher and Spudich, 1998] and large earthquakes [Kilb et al., 2000], which show considerable variability and possibly the opposite preference. We are attempting to directly test the prediction of a preference for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation to the SE on this fault segment by combining travel-time and waveform modeling of fault-zone head waves, high precision earthquake relocations, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity studies. Initial results indicate that there is considerable variability along strike in the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the across-fault velocity contrast, with maximum values reaching about 25-30%. This spatial variability in the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the material property contrast would be expected to produce a spatial variability in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity. We are developing a catalog of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity estimates for magnitude 2 and larger earthquakes to compare with the variations of the velocity contrast and aftershock asymmetry. Initial results indicate that even in the regions of highest velocity contrast, moderate earthquakes (M=3) can still <span class="hlt">rupture</span> unilaterally to the NE. Detailed high resolution results from head-wave modeling, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity studies, and earthquake relocations will be presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McGuire, J. J.; Ben-Zion, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10140552"> <span id="translatedtitle">Component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequency estimates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to perform detailed internal flooding risk analyses of nuclear power plants, external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies are needed for various types of components - piping, valves, pumps, flanges, and others. However, there appears to be no up-to-date, comprehensive source for such frequency estimates. This report attempts to fill that void. Based on a comprehensive search of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) contained in Nuclear Power Experience (NPE), and estimates of component populations and exposure times, component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies were generated. The remainder of this report covers the specifies of the NPE search for external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events, analysis of the data, a comparison with frequency estimates from other sources, and a discussion of the results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Johnson, D.A.; Marteeny, M.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8948254"> <span id="translatedtitle">Increasing incidence of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the period 1987-91, 153 cases of total Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> were diagnosed in the city of Malmo (population 230,000). Almost two thirds were caused by sporting activities, notably badminton. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> caused by nonsports injuries were found in older subjects. Compared to the age-specific incidence in 1950-73, a marked increase in both sports and nonsports injuries was found and patients in the latter group were older than in the former period. Patients with Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> can be classified into two subgroups with partly different etiologies: young or middle-aged athletes and older non-athletic persons. The increase in the former group is mostly explained by increased participation in recreational sports; the cause of increase in the latter group is unknown. PMID:8948254</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M鰈ler, A; Astron, M; Westlin, N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22338625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linker dependent bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force measurements in single-molecule junctions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use a modified conducting atomic force microscope to simultaneously probe the conductance of a single-molecule junction and the force required to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the junction formed by alkanes terminated with four different chemical link groups which vary in binding <span class="hlt">strength</span> and mechanism to the gold electrodes. Molecular junctions with amine, methylsulfide, and diphenylphosphine terminated molecules show clear conductance signatures and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at a force that is significantly smaller than the measured 1.4 nN force required to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the single-atomic gold contact. In contrast, measurements with a thiol terminated alkane which can bind covalently to the gold electrode show conductance and force features unlike those of the other molecules studied. Specifically, the strong Au-S bond can cause structural rearrangements in the electrodes, which are accompanied by substantial conductance changes. Despite the strong Au-S bond and the evidence for disruption of the Au structure, the experiments show that on average these junctions also <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at a smaller force than that measured for pristine single-atom gold contacts. PMID:22338625</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frei, Michael; Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyC..494..163G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delamination behaviour of GdBCO coated conductor tapes under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tension</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electromechanical property behaviour of 2G coated conductor (CC) tapes fabricated by multi-layer deposition process both in the in-plane and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction should be understood. The CC tapes are used in the fabrication of epoxy resin-impregnated coils. In such case, the Lorentz force due to the high magnetic field applied as well as the thermal stress due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) among constituent layers during cooling to cryogenic temperature will induce <span class="hlt">transversely</span> applied load to the surface of CC tapes in coils. Hence, the CC tape should have a good mechanical property in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction in order to maintain its superior performance under magnetic field. In this study, a test frame which gives precisely aligned <span class="hlt">transverse</span> load was devised. Using the fixture, the delamination behaviours including the delamination <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the GdBCO CC tapes under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tensile loading were investigated. Large variation on the delamination <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the CC tapes was recorded and might have resulted from the slit edge effect and the inhomogeneity of the CC tapes. The Ic degradation behaviour under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> load was related to the location where delamination occurred in the sample.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gorospe, A.; Nisay, A.; Dizon, J. R.; Shin, H. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16146098"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm in computed tomography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of the study is presentation the usefulness of CT examination in evaluation of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms. Material comprises a group of six patients (two women and four men) aged 52-79 years, examined in the 2nd Department of Radiology, Medical University of Lublin between the year 1997 and 2002. In all patients US examination and CT was performed. USG was performed with a Hitachi EUB 410 apparatus. CT was performed with Somatom AR. T scanner by Siemens, with two matrixes, 512 x 512 and 320 x 320 pixels. High resolution reconstruction algorithm was used with the possibility of performing spatial reformations. Five- and 10 mm-axial sections were performed before and after administering of contrast agents. Delayed scans were performed to reveal extravasations of the contrast agent. In three cases axial sections and MPR reconstructions revealed the presence of the periaortic haematoma with active extravasation of the contrasted blood. The <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysm in two cases was associated with extensive retroperitoneal haematoma. The periaortic haematoma extended along the wall of the aneurysm. In one case the haematoma was localized mainly in front of aorta. In one case of aneurysm of abdominal aorta and iliac arteries, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or left iliac artery with large retroperitoneal haematoma in the pelvis and intensive extravasation of contrasted blood was seen. The US examination with Power Doppler and Duplex facilitate in three cases evaluation of aneurysm localization. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysm is life-threatening condition, in vast majority of cases resulting in patient's death. In cases of acute <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the clinical symptoms and CT examination of stable patients are essential. In chronic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the early diagnosis is very important. The main role plays CT examination, which enables revealing of the aneurysm, precise evaluation of the leakage, retroperitoneal haematoma, vertebral destruction and dislocation of aorta and kidneys. PMID:16146098</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pas?awski, Marek; Z?omaniec, Janusz; Gwizdak, Jacek; Szafranek, Joanna</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22883898"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx. PMID:22883898</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/657630"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendons.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bilateral simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendons is very rare and occurred in an 82-year-old man. This may be the fifth case to have been reported in the English literature. Only minor stress on extensor mechanisms preceded the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Interrupted mattress sutures restored muscle continuity and function. A "pull-out" wire system was not used for protection of healing muscles because adequate amount of tissue mass was available for approximation. Excellent results require intensive postoperative physical therapy. Old age of the patient should not be a deterrent to surgical treatment in carefully selected individuals. PMID:657630</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siwek, K W; Rao, J P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23293421"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> rudimentary horn at 22 weeks.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rudimentary horn is a developmental anomaly of the uterus. Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. A case of undiagnosed rudimentary horn pregnancy at 22 weeks presented to Nizwa regional referral hospital in shock with features of acute abdomen. Chances of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in first or second trimester are increased with catastrophic haemorrhage leading to increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Management of such cases is a challenge till today due to diagnostic dilemma. Expertise in ultrasonography and early resort to surgical management is life saving in such cases. PMID:23293421</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dhar, Hansa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3277969"> <span id="translatedtitle">Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> ICA during Transsphenoidal Surgery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the internal carotid artery (ICA) during transsphenoidal surgery is a rare but potentially lethal complication. Direct surgical repair of the ICA may be difficult and time-consuming in an acute setting. Urgent endovascular treatments with vascular plug or stent-graft have been the feasible options to date. We desrcibe two cases of iatrogenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of ICA during transsphenoidal surgery. In the first case we occluded the ICA with a vascular plug at the site of tear where cross circulation was adequate. In the second case we had to preserve the ICA with stent-graft since there was no adequate cross circulation. These two strategies are discussed below.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ghatge, S.B.; Modi, D.B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/886036"> <span id="translatedtitle">COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP <span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span> MODELS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> correlations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Macheret</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-06-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3666500"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pectoralis major tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Surgical procedures review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary Pectoralis major (PM) muscle is the powerful dynamic stabiliser of the shoulder that acts as a flexor, adductor and internal rotator. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the PM tendon is a relatively rare injury that was firstly described in a French boy by Patissier in 1822 and later, in 1861, by Letenneur who reported another similiar case. To date, over 200 cases have been published. In this article we describe the clinical anatomy and the mechanism of injuries of PM and we review the surgical procedures for acute and chronic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Merolla, Giovanni; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996Sci...271..482B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy Dissipation during <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Adhesive Bonds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study energy-dissipation mechanisms during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a thin adhesive bond formed by short chain molecules. The degree of dissipation and its velocity dependence varied with the state of the film. When the adhesive was in a liquid phase, dissipation was caused by viscous loss. In glassy films, dissipation occurred during a sequence of rapid structural rearrangements. Roughly equal amounts of energy were dissipated in each of three types of rapid motion: cavitation, plastic yield, and bridge <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These mechanisms have similarities to nucleation, plastic flow, and crazing in commercial polymeric adhesives.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baljon, Arlette R. C.; Robbins, Mark O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N8610770"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> Modeling Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human <span class="hlt">strength</span>, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic <span class="hlt">strength</span>; (3) effector force...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. I. Badler P. Lee S. Wong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA015385"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Experimental Investigation of Dense Ion Flow in the Presence of a <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Magnetic Field.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The interaction of dense (10 to the 8th power-10 to the 10th power ions/cc) single and counterstreaming Cs(+) ion beams with a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetic field has been examined. Magnetic field <span class="hlt">strengths</span> are in the range of 0-10 gauss, yielding electron radii of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. M. Sellen H. S. Ogawa G. K. Komatsu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40357281"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elastoplastic stress analysis in stainless steel fiber reinforced aluminum metal matrix laminated plates loaded <span class="hlt">transversely</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Metal matrix composites provide new materials with superior properties. They give high <span class="hlt">strength</span> and stiffness. In this study, a stainless steel fiber reinforced aluminum metal matrix laminated simple supported plate is loaded <span class="hlt">transversely</span>. Elasto-plastic stress analysis is carried out in the laminated plate by using finite element technique. The expansion of plastic zone and residual stresses are determined in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O. Sayman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48904992"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of plastic deformation on bimaterial fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Elastic mismatch across a fault is not sufficient to predict <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directionThe orientation of the stress state controls the location of plastic deformationStress orientation and elastic mismatch control <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nora DeDontney; Elizabeth L. Templeton-Barrett; James R. Rice; Renata Dmowska</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CMaPh.301..285J"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Laplacians for Substitution Tilings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pearson and Bellissard recently built a spectral triple - the data of Riemannian noncommutative geometry - for ultrametric Cantor sets. They derived a family of Laplace-Beltrami like operators on those sets. Motivated by the applications to specific examples, we revisit their work for the <span class="hlt">transversals</span> of tiling spaces, which are particular self-similar Cantor sets. We use Bratteli diagrams to encode the self-similarity, and Cuntz-Krieger algebras to implement it. We show that the abscissa of convergence of the ?-function of the spectral triple gives indications on the exponent of complexity of the tiling. We determine completely the spectrum of the Laplace-Beltrami operators, give an explicit method of calculation for their eigenvalues, compute their Weyl asymptotics, and a Seeley equivalent for their heat kernels.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Julien, Antoine; Savinien, Jean</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/details.jsp?query_id=0&page=0&ostiID=875102"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span>-longitudinal integrated resonator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hutchinson, Donald P [Knoxville, TN; Simpson, Marcus L [Knoxville, TN; Simpson, John T [Knoxville, TN</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/168188"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> stability of bunch trains</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> stability of bunches in a bunch train is determined by solving the equations of betatron motion for macroparticles circulating in a high energy storage ring. We ignore multibunch modes that are more likely to be serious with equal bunch spacing, and find that a nonexponential beam breakup instability may develop, which would not be found by the usual instability analysis with an exponential ansatz. In the absence of radiation or other damping mechanisms, the amplitudes of the trailing bunches would grow with a power law and would soon be lost if the first bunches perform a betatron oscillation about the closed orbit. Experimental observations on a large electron-positron collider are also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gluckstern, R.L. [Physics Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Okamoto, H. [Accelerator Laboratory Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokanoshou, Uji, Kyoto 611 (Japan); Zotter, B. [CERN-SL Division CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/details.jsp?query_id=0&page=0&ostiID=862601"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> section radionuclide scanning system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This invention provides a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuhl, David E. (Rosemont, PA); Edwards, Roy Q. (Plymouth Township, PA)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1875905"> <span id="translatedtitle">Asymptomatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the uterus: a case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the gravid uterus is a serious obstetric emergency that threatens maternal and fetal life. In certain cases the classic clinical picture may be absent. Most asymptomatic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are in the lower segment and of minor extent or are really dehiscences of scars. This paper presents a case of massive spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> involving the entire corpus diagnosed at elective postpartum sterilization. This unusual event stimulated a review of the causes and clinical presentations of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alper, M. M.; Dudley, D. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhRvL.100s8301K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Asymptotic <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Limit of Hydrogen-Bond Assemblies in Proteins at Vanishing Pulling Rates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop a fracture-mechanics-based theoretical framework that considers the free energy competition between entropic elasticity of polypeptide chains and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of peptide hydrogen bonds, which we use here to provide an explanation for the intrinsic <span class="hlt">strength</span> limit of protein domains at vanishing rates. Our analysis predicts that individual protein domains stabilized only by hydrogen bonds cannot exhibit <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forces larger than ?200pN in the asymptotic limit. This result explains earlier experimental and computational observations that indicate an asymptotical <span class="hlt">strength</span> limit at vanishing pulling rates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Keten, Sinan; Buehler, Markus J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40242135"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time-dependent effects on the tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of saturated granite at Three Gorges Project in China</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the basis of split tension tests carried out for the saturated granite in the high slope of ship lock at Three Gorges Project of Yangtze River, PR China, authors of the paper analyzed the rheological relation of 憀oading-displacement-time, time duration up to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and time dependency of the tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of granite. Empirical relations between tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> and time</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Sun; Y. Y. Hu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41017929"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of glass addition and sintering temperature on the structure, mechanical properties and dielectric <span class="hlt">strength</span> of high-voltage insulators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Soda-lime glass as a substituent for the feldspar was used to prepare high-tension electrical porcelain by standard chemical solid reaction technique. The effect of glass substitution and sintering temperature on the physical properties, microstructure, hardness, modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, flexural <span class="hlt">strength</span> and Dielectric breakdown <span class="hlt">strength</span> were examined. Zero water absorption (WA %) and apparent porosity (AP %) were achieved for the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Muthafar F. Al-Hilli; Kalid T. Al-Rasoul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v077/i011/JB077i011p02087/JB077i011p02087.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Zones of Large South American Earthquakes and Some Predictions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study attempts to forecast likely locations for large shallow South American earthquakes in the near future by examining the past space-time pattern of occurrence of large (M _ 7.7) earthquakes, the lateral extent of their <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones, and, where possible, the direction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> zones of large shallow earthquakes generally abut and do not overlap. Patterns of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John A. Kelleher</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48926202"> <span id="translatedtitle">Material contrast does not predict earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation direction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earthquakes often occur on faults that juxtapose different rocks. The result is <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior that differs from that of an earthquake occurring on a fault in a homogeneous material. Previous 2D numerical simulations have studied simple cases of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation where there is a material contrast across a fault and have come to two different conclusions: 1) earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruth A. Harris; Steven M. Day</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/p5jgh1b0vgnvnq9a.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cell membrane destabilizes progressively during repetitive mechanical <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The postfusion oscillation cycle method of electrofused cells was applied to red blood cell membranes to induce repetitive membrane <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and test the mechanical membrane resistance against sequential events of membrane strain and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After producing doublets from pairs of electrofused cells, they entered the oscillation cycle, providing a sequence of at least four consecutive colloidosmotic-driven <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events. Different gradations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martin Baumann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27099758"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quartz Crystal Microbalance Induced Bond <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Sensing for Medical Diagnostics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Disease detection at the point of care could be performed using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of antibody-antigen bonds. An integrated digital solution for smart sensing is proposed where the QCM is driven and its resonant frequency change is captured as an indication of bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After reviewing the principle of QCM induced bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, a digital transceiver system</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. J. van der Werff; Y. J. Yuan; E. R. Hirst; W. L. Xu; H. Chen; J. E. Bronlund</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55435941"> <span id="translatedtitle">Split Nodes and Fault Zone Models for Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Simulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The accuracy of numerical calculation of the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of earthquakes mainly depends on the fault boundary condition on the fault where friction is taking place. During <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the slip is calculated via the equation of motion while the shear stress is controlled by frictional sliding. Such <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models generally lead to nonlinear, mixed-boundary value problems. The boundary treatment</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. A. Dalguer; S. M. Day</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3324312"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fiber Orientation of the <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Carpal Ligament</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> carpal ligament is the volar roof of the carpal tunnel. Gross observation shows that the ligament appears to have fibers that roughly orient in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction. A closer anatomical examination shows that the ligament also has oblique fibers. Knowledge of the fiber orientation of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> carpal ligament is valuable for further understanding the ligament's role in regulating the structural function of the carpal tunnel. The purpose of this study is to quantify collagen fiber orientation within the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> carpal ligament using the small angle light scattering technique. Eight <span class="hlt">transverse</span> carpal ligament samples from cadaver hands were used in this study. Individual 20 ?m sections were cut evenly along the thickness of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> carpal ligament. Sections of three thickness levels (25%, 50%, and 75% from the volar surface) were collected for each <span class="hlt">transverse</span> carpal ligament. Fibers were grouped in the following orientation ranges: <span class="hlt">transverse</span>, longitudinal, oblique in the pisiform-trapezium (PT), and oblique in the scaphoid-hamate (SH) directions. In analyzing the fiber percentages, the orientation types for the different thickness levels of the ligament showed that the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> fibers were the most prominent (>60.7%) followed by the PT oblique (18.6%), SH oblique (13.0%), and longitudinal (8.6%) fibers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Prantil, Ryan K; Xiu, Kaihua; Kim, Kwang E; Gaitan, Diana M; Sacks, Michael S; Woo, Savio L-Y.; Li, Zong-Ming</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/161526"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> stimulated Raman scattering in KDP</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Optical components of large-aperture, high irradiance and high fluence lasers can experience significant levels of stimulated scattering along their <span class="hlt">transverse</span> dimensions. The authors have observed <span class="hlt">transverse</span> stimulated Raman scattering in large aperture KDP crystals, and have measured the stimulated gain coefficient. With sufficiently high gain, <span class="hlt">transverse</span> stimulated scattering can lead to energy loss from the main beam and, more importantly, optical damage in the components in which this scattering occurs. Thus <span class="hlt">transverse</span> stimulated,scattering is of concern in large aperture fusion lasers such as Nova and Beamlet, which is a single-aperture, full-scale scientific prototype of the laser driver for the proposed National Ignition Facility.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barker, C.E.; Sacks, R.A.; Wonterghem, B.M. Van; Caird, J.A.; Murray, J.R.; Campbell, J.H.; Kyle, K.; Ehrlich, R.E.; Nielsen, N.D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-09-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/755058"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> POLARIZATION DISTRIBUTION AND FRAGMENTATION FUNCTIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors discuss <span class="hlt">transverse</span> polarization distribution and fragmentation functions, in particular, T-odd functions with <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum dependence, which might be relevant for the description of single <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin asymmetries. The role of intrinsic <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum in the expansion in inverse powers of the hard scale is elaborated upon. The sin {phi} single spin asymmetry in the process e {rvec p} {r_arrow} e{prime} {pi}{sup +} X as recently reported by the HERMES Collaboration is investigated, in particular, by using the bag model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">BOER,D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-04-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28656194"> <span id="translatedtitle">Partial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the distal biceps tendon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on 7 cases of partial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the distal biceps tendon. The mean patient age was 52 years (range, 38-58 years). There were 5 men and 2 women. The dominant arm was affected in all 7 patients. Pain was the chief complaint in all patients. Immobilization and physiotherapy were attempted in all patients, and 4 had at least</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dimitris G. Vardakas; Douglas S. Musgrave; Sokratis E. Varitimidis; Felix Goebel; Dean G. Sotereanos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19585785"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a paratrooper.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A paratrooper presents after a parachuting accident with the inability to urinate. Initial emergency bedside ultrasound, followed by confirmatory abdominal CT, is carried out and demonstrates an intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The patient is taken to the operating room and a 3-layer closure with omental buttressing is carried out. PMID:19585785</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ford, David; Palma, James; Robinson, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pectear.com/faq/when%20to%20operate.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pectoralis major tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>: when to operate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The treatment of pectoralis major tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> has been the subject of much debate. The classical history of the injury is forced abduction and external rotation. The cases of two patients (an amateur rugby union player and a recreational snowboarder) are reported. The diagnosis was made by clinical examination in both patients, and both were operated on more than two</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J F Quinlan; M Molloy; B J Hurson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29928049"> <span id="translatedtitle">Splenic artery aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in pregnancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Splenic artery aneurysm (SAA) is the commonest visceral artery aneurysm. It is diagnosed more frequently in younger women, with up to 95% presenting during pregnancy. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> is associated with a disproportionately high maternal and fetal mortality.We performed a literature search on the patient and SAA characteristics, clinical presentations, management and outcome of this serious complication.There were 32 patients in total</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jennifer Fong Ha; Michael Phillips; Kingsley Faulkner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3727204"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical Resection of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FLH) is a rare primary tumor of the liver, which typically arises from noncirrhotic livers and affects patients below the age of 35. We report on a 29-year-old male patient who presented with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> FLH and was treated with surgical resection. Options for treatment and review of the management are described.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Minutolo, Vincenzo; Licciardello, Alessio; Arena, Manuel; Minutolo, Orazio; Lanteri, Raffaele; Arena, Goffredo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21959707"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of fetal hydronephrosis: case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hydronephrosis is the most common congenital anomaly observed with prenatal ultrasonography. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is the most common cause of prenatal hydronephrosis. Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been reported in adults with severe hydronephrosis. There is no reported spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> case in the fetus in the literature. A spontaneous ureteral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to severe UPJO was reported in this case report. Prenatal ultrasound at 33 week gestation in a 21-year-old pregnant woman, revealed a female fetus with grade IV hydronephrosis of the right kidney, suggestive of a UPJO. During the follow-up at XXXVIII week, 5 cm cystic structure was not observed in right kidney. Mild ectasia was present in pelvicalyciel part which make us think about spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Ultrasonographic examination after a week post-delivery revealed 15 mm pelvicalyciel ectasia on right side which persisted during the second control after 1 month. Vesicoureteral reflux was not detected during voiding cystourethrogram. Diuretic renography revealed loss of right renal function completely. Because there was not any complain or any clinical sign, surgery was not thought. Spontaneous follow-up was recommended. PMID:21959707</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kosus, A; Kosus, N; Duran, M; Turhan, N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005shwa.book..295T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Active diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with laser beam irradiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We performed shock tube operations with a layer of diaphragm being <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> by laser beam irradiation. Mylar or Cellophane was examined as the diaphragm material. It has been demonstrated that shock tube can be operated with this new technique. The absorbed energy depends on the material and thickness of the diaphragm and is an important control parameter.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takahashi, T.; Torikai, H.; Yang, Q. S.; Watanabe, K.; Sasoh, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.data.scec.org/Module/s1act03.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Is an Earthquake?: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this activity, the learner will watch three animations based on actual data from fault <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from the two largest Southern California earthquakes in the 1990s: Landers (1992) and Northridge (1994). In Section 3, the learner will discover more about how such data is collected and analyzed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3278820"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in acute myocardial infarction.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In two patient series including 809 and 327 patients, respectively, with acute myocardial infarction we have compared those who died in myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (verified at autopsy, Group A) with those who died without <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (autopsied, Group B), and those who survived hospitalization (Group C) with regard to previous history and clinical course in hospital. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> among autopsied patients was observed in 45% and 40% of the cases in the respective studies. Previous infarction was observed in each study as 0% and 0% in Group A compared with 25% and 31% in Group B, and 20% and 34% in Group C. Previous angina pectoris was observed in 26% and 22% in Group A compared with 50% and 54% in Group B and 52% and 54% in Group C. Maximum serum enzyme activity in Group A did not differ from Group B, but was higher than in Group C (p less than 0.001). Group A patients tended to have a higher initial pain score and a higher requirement of analgesics compared with other groups, whereas initial heart rate or systolic blood pressure did not differ in these patients compared to others. We thus conclude that patients with myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have a very low occurrence of previous myocardial infarction and angina pectoris, and that their pain course appears to be particularly severe in the acute phase. PMID:3278820</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Herlitz, J; Samuelsson, S O; Richter, A; Hjalmarson, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/65f652s5.pdf;origin=repeccitec"> <span id="translatedtitle">US Foreign Policy: Continuity or <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">James Mann refutes the idea that George W. Bush鈥檚 foreign policy was a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from previous administrations. He does find that it took previous policies much further but these trends had already been in place. He points to a number of military interventions to bolster his case including Haiti, Somalia, Panama, Iraq and Yugoslavia. He notes that previous administrations in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James Mann; John Mueller; Ronald Steel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1030718"> <span id="translatedtitle">D-Zero Cryostat Supplemental <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Disc</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The common relief and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc vent line requires a double disc assembly with vented interspace for accurate disc burst pressures. The first disc must take pump and purge vacuum loading, but be set to operate at 110% of the MAWP, 18.3 psig (ASME code). The available solution is 18.3 psig with a burst tolerance of +/- psig. The interspace should be locally vented by a flow limiting vent valve to decouple the vent line backpressure from the vessel <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc. The second disc must take the worst case vent line backpressure, the steady state value found in D-Zero engineering note 3740.000-EN-63 with all three cryostats simultaneously venting at the fire condition into the 4-inch x 6-inch and 6-inch x 8-inch sections. This value is less than 2 psid. The maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the second disc must be less than the minimum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the first disc less 2 psid i.e. < 16.3.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-08-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2425781"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a renal angiomyolipoma (hamartoma)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 54-year-old woman with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of angiomyolipoma is presented. The literature on the 2 types of angiomyolipoma, without and with association of tuberose sclerosis, their rarity and the difficulties in their diagnoses, is reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stavorovsky, M.; Irge, D.; Morag, B.; Schujman, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cardio.bjmu.edu.cn/reference/186.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">New insights into atherosclerotic plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coronary artery atherosclerosis is the major cause of mortality and morbidity in the indus- trialised world. Progressive narrowing of cor- onary arteries causes angina. However, it is <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the plaque that causes the cata- strophic consequences of atherosclerosis, such as myocardial infarction. Recent work has identified that the stability of the plaque rather than its absolute size determines the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D M Braganza; M R Bennett</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32592804"> <span id="translatedtitle">Primary obstructive megaureter with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> kidney</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department for severe left flank pain and gross hematuria 1 hour after playing basketball without significant collision. Laboratory tests showed normal renal function and massive hematuria. Abdominal computed tomography scan disclosed a primary megaureter with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> kidney. We successfully treated him with ureteral stenting followed by endoscopic ureterotomy and ureteroneocystostomy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chun-Hou Liao; H SUN; D YANG</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19041564"> <span id="translatedtitle">Primary obstructive megaureter with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> kidney.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department for severe left flank pain and gross hematuria 1 hour after playing basketball without significant collision. Laboratory tests showed normal renal function and massive hematuria. Abdominal computed tomography scan disclosed a primary megaureter with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> kidney. We successfully treated him with ureteral stenting followed by endoscopic ureterotomy and ureteroneocystostomy. PMID:19041564</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chung, Shiu-Dong; Sun, Hsu-Dong; Yang, Den-Kai; Liao, Chun-Hou</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26465607"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linear matching method for creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> assessment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The recently developed linear matching method (LMM), which is easily implemented within commercial FE codes, has been successfully used to evaluate elastic and plastic shakedown loads. In this paper, the method is extended to the prediction of the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of a structure, based upon a bounding method currently used in the life assessment method R5. The method corresponds</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. F. Chen; M. J. Engelhardt; A. R. S. Ponter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23956918"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical resection of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FLH) is a rare primary tumor of the liver, which typically arises from noncirrhotic livers and affects patients below the age of 35. We report on a 29-year-old male patient who presented with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> FLH and was treated with surgical resection. Options for treatment and review of the management are described. PMID:23956918</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Minutolo, Vincenzo; Licciardello, Alessio; Arena, Manuel; Minutolo, Orazio; Lanteri, Raffaele; Arena, Goffredo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60170726"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design procedure prevents PE pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">rupture</span> prevention design procedure for plastic gas distribution pipe is nearing completion at Southwest Research Institute (SWRI). Given the pipe size, polyethylene (PE) resin, and minimum operating temperature, the maximum safe operating pressure can be determined for which rapid crack propagation (RCP) cannot occur. A computer program, called PFRAC, has been developed for this purpose and uses Charpy energy</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grigory</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3649179"> <span id="translatedtitle">A case of splenic torsion and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> presenting as <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ectopic pregnancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Splenic torsion with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of spleen is an extremely rare phenomenon. The clinical picture mimics several common conditions which are causes of acute abdomen and so it is seldom detected pre-operatively. An 18 year old female patient was admitted with an acute abdomen and shock. The provisional diagnosis was of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ectopic pregnancy. Peri-operatively we found a spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the spleen following torsion along with early intrauterine pregnancy. Splenectomy was carried out and patient recovered well. Our report confirms that this rare entity can present as an acute abdomen which is very difficult to diagnose preoperatively and can masquerade as <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ectopic pregnancy in women of childbearing age group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lahiri, Somdatta; Dasgupta, Nabanita; Mondal, Aftab-ud-din</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6441892"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Stirling engine materials. [Iron-base NASAUT 4G-Al</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strenth properties of materials are relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-Al. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strengths</span> in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-Al has superior creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titran, R.H.; Scheuerman, C.M.; Stephens, J.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11783925"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early ankle motion after triple bundle technique repair vs. casting for acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of our study is to evaluate the triple bundle technique for acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> repair followed by early (at 14 days) postoperative ankle range of motion compared to nonoperative treatment with delayed ankle range of motion. We retrospectively reviewed 73 patients with an acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> treated with either a plantar flexed cast or surgical repair. We found operative treatment reduces immobilization time, allows safe early return to weight-bearing, and diminishes risk of rerupture compared to nonoperative treatment. However, at an average follow-up of greater than 3.5 years, there was no statistical difference in AOFAS hindfoot scores, <span class="hlt">strength</span>, or patient satisfaction between the two groups. Significant complications were higher in the nonoperative group manifested by three reruptures (7.7%) vs. one deep wound dehiscence in the operative group (3%). PMID:11783925</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jaakkola, J I; Beskin, J L; Griffith, L H; Cernansky, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhDT.......248K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of Parkfield seismicity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this dissertation the result of four studies regarding earthquake source parameter determination, and three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation are presented. I have developed finite-source models for the September 28, 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake using GPS and InSAR geodetic data, and seismic strong motion waveform data inverted both separately and jointly. The preferred model from the joint inversion shows that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is predominantly unilateral to the NW with a small component to the SE. There are two primary high slip asperities one around the hypocenter and the other between 10 and 23 km to the NW both within the depth range of 5--13 km. The results from detailed sensitivity analyses indicate that the developed finite-source slip model is stable and the kinematic parameters are well resolved. I also examined the effect of the assumed velocity structure and corresponding Green's functions on the finite source inversion for the 2004 Parkfield earthquake using near-fault strong motion data with 1D and 3D velocity models. Using either the 1D or 3D velocity structures produce similar results, however there are significant differences in detail, where slip using 3D Green's functions is more compact, and the peak slip occurs in the hypocentral asperity in contrast to the 1D case where peak slip is located in the NW asperity. A comparison of seismic waveform derived slip models reveals that the 3D Green's function model predicts the GPS data significantly better. Both 1D and 3D Green's function models failed to model the strong motion waveform data from stations located very close to or within the fault-zone. Forward modeling revealed that accounting for a narrow low-velocity zone improves the fit to the data from these near-fault sites. Synthetic tests show that the influence of such fault-zone structure decreases rapidly with distance suggesting that excluding fault-zone stations from inversions and focusing on data from more distant stations may lead to less structure biased results, though additional work is needed to confirm this. In another study I investigated the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of micro-earthquakes (M2 target events) at Parkfield using nearly collocated smaller earthquakes as empirical Green's functions (eGf). The result of synthetic tests shows that a direct eGf waveform inversion method predicts the slip model, and the target event waveforms better than a eGf deconvolution approach to invert recovered moment rate functions. I applied the direct eGf waveform inversion to the M2 SAFOD repeating earthquakes, and found that the events have a roughly circular slip distribution with small dimension, high slip amplitude, and corresponding very high stress drop that indicate that high <span class="hlt">strength</span> asperities exist on the San Andreas fault. Finally, I performed 3D ground motion simulations for 10 small to moderate earthquakes (Mw 4.1--5.4) in the San Francisco Bay Area to evaluate two versions of the USGS 3D velocity model (Brocher, 2005; Jachens et al., 2006; Brocher, 2008) in terms of modeling phase arrival timing, peak ground motion amplitudes, and the capability of the models to simulate strong ground motions for earthquake hazard scenarios. P and S wave timing are well modeled by the velocity models, however, there remain discrepancies in estimated amplitudes and durations that require further calibration. Simulated pseudo spectral acceleration at long period (1 and 3 seconds) compared well with observation. The comparison of peak ground velocity (PGV) for both models reveals that both predict the observed PGV well over four orders of magnitude, however there is an approximate 3-fold dispersion between predicted and observed values due to unaccounted for 3D structure and site effects. Keeping in mind the dispersion, due to the long-period nature of PGV the strong correlation between observed and predicted motions indicate that the 3D models are suitable for scenario earthquake PGV ground motion simulation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Ah Yi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.S21B0559B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Attenuation of Radiated Ground Motion and Stresses from Three-Dimensional Supershear <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radiating shear and Rayleigh waves from supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> form Mach fronts that transmit large-amplitude ground motion and stresses to locations far from the fault. We simulate bilateral <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on a finite-width vertical strike-slip fault (of width W and half-length L with L >> W) breaking the surface of an elastic half-space, and focus on the wavefield out to distances comparable to L. At distances much smaller than W, two- dimensional plane-strain slip-pulse models (i.e., models in which the lateral extent of the slip zone is unbounded) [Dunham, 2005; Bhat et al., 2007] accurately predict the subsurface wavefield. Amplitudes in the shear Mach wedges of those models are undiminished with distance from the fault. When viewed from distances far greater than W, the fault is accurately modeled as a line source that produces a shear Mach cone and, on the free surface, a Rayleigh Mach wedge. Geometrical spreading of the shear Mach cone occurs radially and amplitudes there decrease with the inverse square-root of distance [Ben-Menahem and Singh, 1987]. The transition between these two asymptotic limits occurs at distances comparable to W. Similar considerations suggest that Rayleigh Mach waves suffer no attenuation in the ideally elastic medium studied here. The rate at which fault <span class="hlt">strength</span> weakens at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front exerts a strong influence on the off-fault fields only in the immediate vicinity of the fault (for both sub-Rayleigh and supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>) and at the Mach fronts of supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. More rapid weakening generates larger amplitudes at the Mach fronts. A paper has been prepared on this topic, with title the same as for this abstract, by E. M. Dunham and H. S. Bhat, submitted to \\it{J. Geophys. Res.}</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhat, H. S.; Dunham, E. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/d01x18733472h54j.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> Reduction via SSAPRE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present techniques that allow <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction to be performed concurrently with partial redundancy elimination in the SSAPRE framework. By sharing the characteristics inherent to SSAPRE, the resulting <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction algorithm exhibits many interesting attributes. We compare various aspects of the new <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction algorithm with previous <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction algorithms. We also outline and discuss our implementation of the closely</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert Kennedy; Fred C. Chow; Peter Dahl; Shin-ming Liu; Raymond Lo; Mark Streich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20001726"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of forged, thick section 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detailed investigations have been performed to examine the creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of a 1,000-mm diameter and 300-mm-thick tube plate forging of 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel in quenched and tempered (Q + T), simulated postweld heat treatment (SPWHT), and thermally aged (TA) conditions. Creep tests were conducted over a wide stress range (50 to 275 MPa) at 793 and 873 K. The alloy exhibited well-defined primary, steady-state, and extended tertiary creep stages at all test conditions. At 793 K, no significant difference in the creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties was noted between Q + T, SPWHT, and TA conditions. On the other hand, SPWHT specimens exhibited lower creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> than that of Q + T specimens at 873 K. Applied stress ({sigma}{sub a}) dependence of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life (t{sub r}) exhibited two-slope behavior. Both the Monkman-Grant ({dot {epsilon}}{sub s}.t{sub r} = C{sub MG}) and modified Monkman-Grant ({dot {epsilon}}.t{sub r}/{epsilon}{sub f} = C{sub MMG}) relationships were found to be valid for 9Cr-1Mo steel, where {dot {epsilon}}{sub s} is the steady-state creep rate and {epsilon}{sub f} is the strain to failure. The two-slope behavior was also reflected as two constants in the Monkman-Grant relationship (MGR) and modified Monkman-Grant relationship (MMGR) in the two stress regimes. Further, two creep damage tolerance factors ({lambda} = 1/C{sub MMG}) of 5 and 10 were also observed in the high and low stress regimes, respectively. The alloy exhibited high creep ductility, which was retained for longer <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lives at low stresses, and the creep ductility increased with increase in test temperature. The failure mode remained transgranular under all test conditions. The extensive tertiary creep in the alloy has been attributed to microstructural degradation associated with precipitates and dislocation substructure. The creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the forging was found to be lower than that of thin section bars and tubes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Choudhary, B.K.; Saroja, S.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3658750"> <span id="translatedtitle">Noninvasive Vascular Displacement Estimation for Relative Elastic Modulus Reconstruction in <span class="hlt">Transversal</span> Imaging Planes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atherosclerotic plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can initiate stroke or myocardial infarction. Lipid-rich plaques with thin fibrous caps have a higher risk to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> than fibrotic plaques. Elastic moduli differ for lipid-rich and fibrous tissue and can be reconstructed using tissue displacements estimated from intravascular ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data acquisitions. This study investigated if modulus reconstruction is possible for noninvasive RF acquisitions of vessels in <span class="hlt">transverse</span> imaging planes using an iterative 2D cross-correlation based displacement estimation algorithm. Furthermore, since it is known that displacements can be improved by compounding of displacements estimated at various beam steering angles, we compared the performance of the modulus reconstruction with and without compounding. For the comparison, simulated and experimental RF data were generated of various vessel-mimicking phantoms. Reconstruction errors were less than 10%, which seems adequate for distinguishing lipid-rich from fibrous tissue. Compounding outperformed single-angle reconstruction: the interquartile range of the reconstructed moduli for the various homogeneous phantom layers was approximately two times smaller. Additionally, the estimated lateral displacements were a factor of 23 better matched to the displacements corresponding to the reconstructed modulus distribution. Thus, noninvasive elastic modulus reconstruction is possible for <span class="hlt">transverse</span> vessel cross sections using this cross-correlation method and is more accurate with compounding.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hansen, Hendrik H.G.; Richards, Michael S.; Doyley, Marvin M.; de Korte, Chris L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.S11E..01R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heating and Weakening of Major Faults During Seismic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The absence of significant heat flow from major fault zones, and scarcity of evidence for their seismic melting, means that during earthquake slip such zones could not retain shear <span class="hlt">strength</span> comparable to the typically high static friction <span class="hlt">strength</span> of rocks. One line of explanation is that they are actually statically weak, which could be because materials of exceptionally low friction (smectites, talc) accumulate along fault zones, or perhaps because pore pressure within the fault core is far closer to lithostatic than hydrostatic. Without dismissing either, the focus here is on how thermal processes during the rapid slips of seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can weaken a fault which is indeed statically strong. (The discussion also leaves aside another kind of non- thermal dynamic weakening, possible when there is dissimilarity in seismic properties across the fault, and/or in poroelastic properties and permeability within fringes of damaged material immediately adjoining the slip surface. Spatially nonuniform mode II slip like near a propagating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front may then induce a substantial reduction in the effective normal stress \\bar?.) The heating and weakening processes to be discussed divide roughly into two camps: (1) Those which are expected to be active from the start of seismic slip, and hence will be present in all earthquakes; and (2) Those that kick-in after threshold conditions of rise of temperature T or accumulation of slip are reached, and hence become a feature of larger, or at least deeper slipping, earthquakes. It has been argued that the two major players of (1) are as follows: (1.1) Flash heating and weakening of frictional contact asperities in rapid slip [Rice, 1999, 2006; Tullis and Goldsby, 2003; Goldsby and Hirth, 2006; Beeler et al., 2007; Yuan and Prakash, 2007]. That gives a strong velocity-weakening character to the friction coefficient, which is consistent with inducing self-healing <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes [Noda et al., 2006; Lu et al., 2007]. It is a process for which the details are still poorly understood in presence of substantial fault gouge, almost surely present in some of the large-slip experiments fitting the flash weakening theoretical model. (1.2) Thermal pressurization of pore fluid by frictional heating, a process which reduces \\bar? [Sibson, 1973; Lachenbruch, 1980; Mase and Smith, 1987], and is expected to be active wherever the fault wear products, as gouge, retain porosity of a few percent or more. At some depth and temperature they may instead sinter to a coherent solid on the interseismic time scale. Those of category (2) are as follows: (2.1) Macroscopic melting of the shear zone [Tsutsumi and Shimamoto, 1997; Hirose and Shimamoto, 2005; Fialko and Khazan, 2005; Nielsen et al., 2007], a process for which conditions may not be met if (1.1) and (1.2) kill off <span class="hlt">strength</span> rapidly enough [Rempel and Rice, 2006], or do so with the help of one of the next two items. (2.2) Thermal decomposition like in smectite or serpentine dehydration [Sulem et al., 2004, 2007; Hirose and Bystricky, 2007] or coal devolatilization [O'Hara et al., 2006], leading to a high pressure fluid phase. (2.3) Formation of a weak gel-like layer like in wet silica-rich lithologies [Goldsby and Tullis, 2002; DiToro et al., 2004]. It is argued that some large-slip experiments involving significant weakening of unsaturated specimens in lab air, and others involving dehydration, may exhibit a component of weakening from pressurization of water vapor that is desorbed from mineral surfaces or released by dehydration during frictional heating. The hydraulic diffusivity of water vapor is unexpectedly low at levels of p comparable to the low normal stresses of the experiments involved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rice, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NuPhB.875..536B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evolution of the helicity and <span class="hlt">transversity</span>. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span>-momentum-dependent parton distributions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and <span class="hlt">transversity</span> parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bacchetta, Alessandro; Prokudin, Alexei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29750482"> <span id="translatedtitle">Abdominal incisions--vertical or <span class="hlt">transverse</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two-hundred and nine patients were entered into a prospective, randomized trial in order to determine whether a vertical or <span class="hlt">transverse</span> abdominal incision is the more satisfactory in producing sound wounds. Ninety-six patients were randomized between paramedian and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> incisions, and followed up for at least 1 year. No significant difference in the incidence of wound failure could be shown between</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Ellis; P. D. Coleridge-Smith; A. D. Joyce</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/952533"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> impedance localization using intensity dependent optics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> impedance in the SPS to track the evolution over the last few years show discrepancies compared to the analytical estimates of the major contributors. Recent measurements to localize the major sources of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> impedance using intensity dependent optics are presented. Some simulations using HEADTAIL to understand the limitations of the reconstruction and related numerical aspects are also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Calaga,R.; Arduini, G.; Metral, E.; Papotti, G.; Quatraro, D.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Tomas, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15020216"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> instability at the recycler ring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sporadic <span class="hlt">transverse</span> instabilities have been observed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring leading to increase in <span class="hlt">transverse</span> emittances and beam loss. The driving source of these instabilities has been attributed to the resistive-wall impedance with space-charge playing an important role in suppressing Landau damping. Growth rates of the instabilities are computed. Remaining problems are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21035718"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transversity</span> from two pion interference fragmentation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present calculation on the azimuthal spin asymmetries for pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) process at both HERMES and COMPASS kinematics, with <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized proton, deuteron, and neutron targets. We calculate the asymmetry by adopting a set of parametrization of the interference fragmentation functions and two different models for the <span class="hlt">transversity</span>. We find that the result for the proton target is insensitive to the approaches of the <span class="hlt">transversity</span> but more helpful to understand the interference fragmentation functions. However, for the neutron target, which can be obtained through using deuteron and {sup 3}He targets, we find different predictions for different approaches to the <span class="hlt">transversity</span>. Thus probing the two pion interference fragmentation from the neutron can provide us more interesting information on the <span class="hlt">transversity</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">She Jun; Huang Yang; Barone, Vincenzo; Ma Boqiang [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Di.S.T.A., Universita del Piemonte Orientale 'A. Avogadro', 15100 Alessandria (Italy) and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Alessandria, 15100 Alessandria (Italy); School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JMEP...21.2446Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of Interfacial Stress Distribution in SiC Fiber Reinforced Titanium Matrix Composites on <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Tensile Tests</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A combination of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tensile test and the unilaterally coupled finite element method was used to evaluate the interfacial normal bond <span class="hlt">strength</span> and stress distribution of titanium matrix composites (TMCs). In addition, in order to identify the interface shear failure mode of TMCs under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> loading, both the push-out test and the finite element method have been developed to characterize the interfacial shear <span class="hlt">strength</span> of TMCs, which is the interfacial shear failure criterion. This article studies the results of the experiments, which suggested that the interfacial normal bond and shear <span class="hlt">strength</span> of SiCf/Ti-6Al-4V were 300 and 350 MPa, respectively, and the interface failure mode of TMCs under the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tensile test was radial failure rather than shear failure. Moreover, the effect of residual stress on the radial stress is also discussed in detail in this article.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yanfang, Xu; Tiexiong, Su; Meini, Yuan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70042554"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> directivity of moderate earthquakes in northern California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We invert peak ground velocity and acceleration (PGV and PGA) to estimate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity for 47 moderate earthquakes (3.5?M?5.4) in northern California. We correct sets of PGAs and PGVs recorded at stations less than 55125 km, depending on source depth, for site amplification and source杛eceiver distance, then fit the residual peak motions to the unilateral directivity function of Ben-Menahem (1961). We independently invert PGA and PGV. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction can be determined using as few as seven peak motions if the station distribution is sufficient. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is unstable, however, if there are no takeoff angles within 30 of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> velocities are generally subsonic (0.5?0.9?); for stability, we limit the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity at v=0.92?, the Rayleigh wave speed. For 73 of 94 inversions, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction clearly identifies one of the nodal planes as the fault plane. The 35 strike-slip earthquakes have <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directions that range from nearly horizontal (6 events) to directly updip (5 events); the other 24 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> partly along strike and partly updip. Two strike-slip earthquakes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> updip in one inversion and downdip in the other. All but 1 of the 11 thrust earthquakes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predominantly updip. We compare the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directions for 10 M?4.0 earthquakes to the relative location of the mainshock and the first two weeks of aftershocks. Spatial distributions of 8 of 10 aftershock sequences agree well with the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity calculated for the mainshock.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seekins, Linda C.; Boatwright, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990JCrGr.100..233W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Melt motion in a Czochralski puller with a weak <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetic field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The melt motion in a Czochralski silicon crystal puller with a uniform <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetic field is intrinsically three-dimensional. When the magnetic field is relatively weak, the motion consists of an axisymmetric base solution, plus two perturbations which behave as sin 2? and cos 2?, neglecting terms which are proportional to the fourth power of the magnetic field <span class="hlt">strength</span>. A 700 G magnetic field stabilizes a melt motion which is unsteady without a magnetic field. As the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the magnetic field increases, the magnitudes of the axial and radial velocities increase to maxima at some field <span class="hlt">strength</span> above 1000 G. This contrasts with an axial magnetic field for which the axial and radial velocities always decrease as the field <span class="hlt">strength</span> increases. We estimate that 1500 G is the maximum field <span class="hlt">strength</span> for which our weak-field asymptotic solution is valid.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Williams, M. G.; Walker, J. S.; Langlois, W. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE88754025"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep and Creep-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Behavior of the SNR-300-Permanent-Structure-Material X6CrNi 1811 (DIN 1.4948).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Six SNR-specified melts of the austenitic structure-material of the German Fast Breeder Reactor SNR 300 were investigated on their creep-<span class="hlt">rupture-strength</span> and creep-behavior in a temperature range lasting from 500-800 deg C; in particular the time range 10...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Schirra</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB94146750"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating Out-of-Plane <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Cracked Masonry Infills.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary objective of the research project was to determine the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> (out-of-plane) seismic <span class="hlt">strength</span> of unreinforced masonry infill panels that have been cracked with in-plane lateral forces. The goal of the research was to develop a simple metho...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Abrams D. Shapiro J. Uzarski M. Webster R. Angel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.S31A1700B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Apparent Supersonic <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> for Strike-slip <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Should We Consider it in the Seismic Hazard Analysis?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent numerical studies indicated that the supersonic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> could produce larger off-fault damage at distant sites than the sub-shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, due to the famous "mach cone" effect (Dunham and Archuleta, 2005; Bhat et al, 2007). These results were obtained using the steady-state <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations in a half-space earth. For more realistic layered or 3D earth models, we should also consider the effects of apparent supersonic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, i.e., the deep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is still in a speed slower than the local shear velocity, but faster than the near surface S or even the P wave velocity. The apparent super-shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> could excite the mach effect, but how large it is has not yet been quantitatively addressed. In this study, we explore this possibility by performing numerical simulations for pure strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on a vertical fault inside various layered earth models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barrows, M. B.; Shao, G.; Ji, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7163E..19S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computational model of retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In patterned scanning laser photocoagulation, shorter duration (< 20 ms) pulses help reduce thermal damage beyond the photoreceptor layer, decrease treatment time and minimize pain. However, safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> threshold power to that of light coagulation) decreases for shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of thermal damage in the retina, and maximize the therapeutic window, we developed a computational model of retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Model parameters were adjusted to match measured thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Computed lesion width agreed with histological measurements in a wide range of pulse durations and power. Application of ring-shaped beam profile was predicted to double the therapeutic window width for exposures in the range of 1 - 10 ms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60433983"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> disc. [LMFBR intermediate heat transport system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a <span class="hlt">rupturable</span> member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/46502154"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the short time creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Short time tensile creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests were made on 7 mil lamp filament wire and on 7 mil undoped tungsten wire in the temperature\\u000a range 2500 to 3100 K. Steady-state creep rate was described by an expression having the form: ? =AD?\\/E)m whereA is a constant,D is the self-diffusion coefficient, ? is the creep stress,E is the elastic modulus, andm</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. W. Pugh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9244805"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fatigue <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of wallaby tail tendons.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wallaby tail tendons fail after repeated application of stresses much lower than would be needed to break them in a single pull. We show that this a fatigue phenomenon, distinct from the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that occurs after prolonged application of a constant stress. The two phenomena are disctinguished by experiments in which tensile stress is cycled at different frequencies, ranging from 1 to 50 Hz. PMID:9244805</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, X T; Ker, R F; Alexander, R M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/86168152phh41134.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: CT imaging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Blunt abdominal aortic trauma is a rare but potentially lethal event. It is commonly associated with high-speed motor vehicle\\u000a accidents. Intimal flap, thrombosis, and pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta are the more common findings. We present a\\u000a case of blunt abdominal aortic trauma in which CT disclosed free aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with intraabdominal bleeding and a huge retroperitoneal\\u000a hematoma, an extremely</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gaetano Nucifora; Fjoralba Hysko; Annarosa Vasciaveo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47936851"> <span id="translatedtitle">Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Intracranial Aneurysm: Our Approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">There have been revolutionary developments in surgical clipping and endovascular coiling for the treatment of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms.\\u000a Surgical clipping as a treatment modality has been developed since the past 100 years. Endovascular coiling of intracranial\\u000a aneurysms is a technique that has been available for the past 10 years and widely accepted throughout the world. Guglielmi\\u000a detachable coil treatment is becoming</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoko Kato; Hirotoshi Sano; Minoru Yoneda; Sadayoshi Watanabe; Shamsul Alam; Khandelwal Prashant; Shamson Sharad Rajamani; Tetsuo Kanno</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26118565"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coupled processes of deformation and damage of composites with orthotropic inclusions and unbounded <span class="hlt">rupture</span>-stress function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The theory of long-term damage of homogeneous materials, which is based on the equations of the mechanics of stochastically\\u000a inhomogeneous materials, is generalized to composite materials reinforced with orthotropic ellipsoidal inclusions. The microdamage\\u000a of the composite components is modeled by randomly dispersed micropores. The failure criterion for a microvolume is characterized\\u000a by its stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>. It is determined by the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. P. Khoroshun; L. V. Nazarenko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60515881"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of addition of molybdenum or niobium on creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of Fe sub 3 Al</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent alloy development efforts have shown that Fe釧l-based alloys can have room temperature tensile ductilities of 10--20% and yield <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of 500 MPa at temperatures to 600 掳C. These property improvements are important for enabling the use of iron-aluminides for structural applications that require their excellent corrosion resistance. New data are presented here from creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies on Fe釧l and on</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. G. McKamey; P. J. Maziasz; J. W. Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608792"> <span id="translatedtitle">Liver Hydatid Cyst with Transdiaphragmatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Lung Hydatid Cyst <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> into Bronchi and Pleural Space</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this case study is to present effectiveness of percutaneous drainage as a treatment option of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> lung and liver hydatid cysts. A 65-year-old male patient was admitted with complicated liver and lung hydatid cysts. A liver hydatid cyst had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> transdiaphragmatically, and a lung hydatid cyst had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> both into bronchi and pleural space. The patient could not undergo surgery because of decreased respiratory function. Both cysts were drained percutaneously using oral albendazole. Povidone-iodine was used to treat the liver cyst after closure of the diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The drainage was considered successful, and the patient had no recurrence of signs and symptoms. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic recovery was observed during 2.5 months of catheterization. The patient was asymptomatic after catheter drainage. No recurrence was detected during 86 months of follow-up. For inoperable patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> liver and lung hydatid cysts, percutaneous drainage with oral albendazole is an alternative treatment option to surgery. The percutaneous approach can be life-saving in such cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas, Bilgin Kadri, E-mail: bilginaribas@hotmail.com; Dingil, Guerbuez [A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Koeroglu, Mert [Sueleyman Demirel University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Uenguel, Uemit; Zaral Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Aliye Ceylan [A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21897194"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after intentional medication overdose.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the case of a 51-year-old woman who had a medical history of diabetes, depression with past suicide attempts, and suicidal ideation. She was found unresponsive in a motel with multiple bottles of medicines (melatonin, carisoprodol, ativan, and clonazepam) and an unopened bottle of wine. She was transported to the local hospital and treated for benzodiazepine toxicity and aspiration pneumonitis.The decedent gradually became more alert and was extubated 3 days after hospital admission. The decedent was reportedly getting up to use the restroom when she became tachypneic and diaphoretic and complained of generalized body pain. Her condition quickly declined, and she was pronounced deceased. A postmortem examination revealed an acute bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and soft tissue hemorrhage.A review of the literature reveals that isolated bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after minimal or no trauma in association with alcohol or drug ingestion is an infrequently reported, but recognized, injury. The diagnosis of bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should be considered in a patient with lower abdominal pain, even without a history of trauma. A history of voiding or bladder dysfunction should increase the suspicion for this injury. If suspected, a retrograde cystogram should be obtained promptly. Failure to consider and recognize this injury may lead to significant morbidity. PMID:21897194</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huston, Butch; Mills, Kelly; Froloff, Victor; McGee, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JBO....14c4007S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamics of retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In laser retinal photocoagulation, short (<20 ms) pulses have been found to reduce thermal damage to the inner retina, decrease treatment time, and minimize pain. However, the safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of power for producing a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to that of mild coagulation) decreases with shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of retinal heating and maximize the therapeutic window, a computational model of millisecond retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was developed. Optical attenuation of 532-nm laser light in ocular tissues was measured, including retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) pigmentation and cell-size variability. Threshold powers for vaporization and RPE damage were measured with pulse durations ranging from 1 to 200 ms. A finite element model of retinal heating inferred that vaporization (<span class="hlt">rupture</span>) takes place at 180-190癈. RPE damage was accurately described by the Arrhenius model with activation energy of 340 kJ/mol. Computed photocoagulation lesion width increased logarithmically with pulse duration, in agreement with histological findings. The model will allow for the optimization of beam parameters to increase the width of the therapeutic window for short exposures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Brown, Jefferson; Palanker, Daniel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JInst...7C2002E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single Event Gate <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in EMCCD technology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The high electric fields (typically 3 MV/cm2 interpoly field) utilised in Electron Multiplying Charged Coupled Devices (EMCCDs) reveal a potential vulnerability from Single Event Phenomena (SEP), in particular Single Event Gate <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> (SEGR). SEGR is where a conduction path between two conductive areas of the CCD is produced, causing device failure. If EMCCDs are to be used for space applications the susceptibility to these events needs to be explored. A positive result from such an investigation can increase the technology readiness level of the device moving it another step closer to being used in space. Testing undertaken at the CYClotron of LOuvain la NEuve (CYCLONE), using the Heavy Ion Facility (HIF), conclusively showed EMCCD technology to have resilience to heavy ions that surpassed initial expectations. The simulations undertaken prior to experiment suggested gate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would occur at 20-40 MeV cm2/mg, however Linear Energy Transfers (LETs) greater than 100 MeV cm2/mg proved to not cause a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> event. Within the radiation belts heavy ions with an LET greater than 60 MeV cm2/mg are not very common when compared to the fluxes used at the HIF. Possible reasons for this result are discussed in this work, leading to a conclusion that EMCCD technology is a secure choice for space flight.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evagora, A. M.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Burt, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8079227"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of fetal membranes and chorioamnionitis].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The article presents a survey of preterm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the amniotic membranes at term (more than 1 hour prior to uterine contractions) and preterm (< 37 weeks). The diagnosis of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be suspected from the history alone in 90% of the cases, and confirmed by inspection. In doubtful cases the pH in fluid from the posterior fornix of the vagina is determined and microscopy is performed. Amniotic fluid is alkaline. Microscopy of a dried specimen shows "ferning" when amniotic fluid is present (crystallization test). Staining with Nil blue will reveal orange foetal cells in fresh specimens, usually only late in pregnancy (after the 38 week). The crystallization test is useful, however, in all three trimesters. The cause of membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and of chorioamnionitis may be infection. Chorioamnionitis is a serious clinical condition, but can be subclinical and may occur with intact membranes. It can lead to preterm delivery. It is important that chorioamnionitis be diagnosed (maternal fever, tachycardia, uterine contractions, abdominal pain, foul smelling vaginal discharge and elevated C-reactive protein). The condition is treated with antibiotics and labour must be induced. PMID:8079227</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haram, K; Daugaard, H O</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-05-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....4462B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> along a Material Interface: Background, Implications, and Recent Seismological Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Natural fault systems have interfaces that separate different media. There are fundamental differences between in-plane <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on planar faults that separate similar and dissimilar elastic solids. In a linear isotropic homogeneous solid, slip does not change the normal stress on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane. However, if the fault separates different materials in-plane slip can produce strong variations of normal stress on the fault. The interaction between slip and normal stress along a material interface can reduce dynamically the frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span>, making material interfaces mechanically favored surfaces for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. Analytical and numerical works (Weertman, 1980; Adams, 1995; Andrews and Ben-Zion, 1997; Ben-Zion and Andrews, 1998) have shown that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along a material interface occurs as a narrow wrinkle-like pulse propagating spontaneously only in one direction, that of slip in the more compliant medium. Characteristic features of the wrinkle-like pulse include: (1) Strong correlation between variations of normal stress and slip. (2) Asymmetric motion on different sides of the fault. (3) Preferred direction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. (4) Self-sharpening and divergent behavior with propagation distance. These characteristics can be important to a number of fundamental issues, including trapping of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in structures with material interfaces, the heat flow paradox, short rise-time of earthquake slip, possible existence of tensile component of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and spatial distribution of seismic shaking. Rubin and Gillard (2000), Rubin (2002) and McGuire et al. (2002) presented some seismological evidence that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation along the San Andreas and other large faults is predominantly unidirectional. Features (1)-(4) are consistent with observations from lab sliding and fracture experiments (Anooshehpoor and Brune, 1999; Schallamach, 1971; Samudrala and Rosakis, 2000). Cochard and Rice (2000) performed calculations of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along a material interface governed by a regularized friction having a gradual response of <span class="hlt">strength</span> to an abrupt variation of normal stress. Their calculations confirmed features (1)-(3) and showed hints of feature (4). The latter was not fully developed in their results because the calculations did not extend long enough in time. Ben-Zion and Huang (2002) simulated dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on an interface governed by the regularized friction between a low velocity layer and a surrounding host rock. The results show that the self-sharpening and divergent behavior exists also with the regularized friction for large enough propagation distance. The simulations of Ben-Zion and Huang suggest that in fault structures having a low velocity layer, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiated by failing of an asperity with size not larger than the layer width can become a self-sustaining wrinkle-like pulse. However, if the initial asperity is much larger than the layer width, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> will not propagate as a self-sustaining pulse (unless there is also an overall contrast across the fault). The Bear Valley section of the San Andreas Fault separates high velocity block on the SW from a low-velocity material on the NE. This contrast is expected to generate a preference for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to the SE and fault zone head-waves on the NE block. Using seismograms from a high density temporary array (Thurber et al., 1997), we measured differential travel-times of head-waves along with the geometrical distribution of the stations at which they arrive prior to the direct P-wave. The travel-time data and spatial distribution of events and stations associated with headwave first arrivals are compatible with the theoretical results of Ben-Zion (1989). We are now modeling waveforms to obtain high resolution image of the fault-zone structure. To test the prediction of unidirectional <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, we estimate the space-time variances of the moment-release distribution of magnitude 2.5-3.0 events using a variation of the Empirical Green's Function technique. Initial results for a few small events indicate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation in both directions. We are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ben-Zion, Y.; McGuire, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19268049"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Evaluation of surgical repair of distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">PURPOSE OF THE STUDY To present the results of surgical repair of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii muscle and thus show the adequacy of this treatment. MATERIAL Between 1987 and 2006, 19 patients had surgery for distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Only one side was affected in each patient. All patients were men between 28 and 69 years (average age, 47.5 years) at the time of injury (surgery). When the patients were evaluated at the end of 2007, 18 patients were included, because one died a year after surgery. METHODS The surgical repair always included a single-incision anatomical reattachment into the radial tuberosity. In 11 patients, a modified Mac Reynolds method with screw and washer fixation was used; in seven patients the insertion was fixed with Mitek anchors and, in one, it was sutured to the adjacent soft tissues. The average follow-up was 7 years (range, 1 to 20.5 years). The patients were evaluated for the cause of injury, their physical activity, age, dominance of the injured arm, surgical procedure and complications. RESULTS In 18 patients surgical repair was done early and, in one, at 16 days after injury. In all of them the tendon was detached from its site of insertion, but never torn. The intra-operative complications included, in one patient, bleeding owing to iatrogenic damage to a branch of the brachial artery, and difficult separation of the tendon due to its previous healed injury in another patient. Early post-operative complications included superficial skin necrosis in one patient and transient neurological deficit of the dorsal brand of the radial nerve and of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm in two and one patient, respectively. The late complications were heterotropic ossification in three patients and screw migration in the one treated by the Mac Reynolds method. Excellent results were recorded in 11 patients (61 %), and good outcomes with a slight restriction of motion or muscle <span class="hlt">strength</span> not limiting the patient's physical activities were in six (33.5 %) patients; only one patient (5.5 %) experienced pain on moderate exercise and had recurrent heterotropic ossification. Apart from this condition, there was no difference in the frequency of complications associated with the method used. DISCUSSION Only sparse information on distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> has been available in the relevant Czech literature and, if so, only small groups with short follow-ups have been involved. Conservative treatment or the methods of non-anatomical reattachment have poor functional outcomes. Much better results are achieved by anatomical reattachment. Based on our experience with the Mac Reynolds technique, an anterior single-incision approach using fixation with Mitek anchors can be recommended. CONCLUSIONS Early surgical repair involving anatomical reattachment from the anterior singleincision approach with two Mitek anchors is recommended when a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the distal tendon insertion of the biceps brachii is diagnosed. Key words: biceps radii muscle, biceps tendon injury, tendon fixation, bone screw and washer use. PMID:19268049</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Behounek, J; Hrubina, M; Skot醟, M; Krumpl, O; Zah醠ka, M; Dvor醟, J; Fuc韐, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18415792"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurement of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin correlations in the decay Z ? ? + ? ?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For ? leptons produced in e+e? ? ?+?? interactions there are, in addition to the longitudinal spin correlations, two independent <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin correlations associated with the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> (within the production plane) and normal (to the production plane) polarization components. A measurement of the <span class="hlt">transverse-transverse</span> and <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-normal ? spin correlations in the decay Z ? ?+??, CTT and CTN, is presented</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Barate; D. Buskulic; D. Decamp; P. Ghez; C Goy; J.-P Lees; A. Lucotte; M.-N Minard; J.-Y Nief; B. Pietrzyk; M. P Casado; M. Chmeissani; P. Comas; J. M Crespo; M. Delfino; E. Fernandez; M. Fernandez-Bosman; Ll. Garrido; A. Juste; M. Martinez; R. Miquel; Ll. M Mir; S. Orteu; C. Padilla; I. C Park; A. Pascual; J. A Perlas; I. Riu; F. Sanchez; F. Teubert; A. Colaleo; D. Creanza; M de Palma; G. Gelao; G. Iaselli; G. Maggi; M. Maggi; N. Marinelli; S. Nuzzo; A. Ranieri; G. Raso; F. Ruggieri; G. Selvaggi; L. Silvestris; P. Tempesta; A. Tricomi; G. Zito; X. Huang; J. Lin; Q. Ouyang; T. Wang; Y. Xie; R. Xu; S. Xue; J. Zhang; L. Zhang; W. Zhao; D. Abbaneo; R. Alemany; U. Becker; A. O Bazarko; P. Bright-Thomas; M. Cattaneo; F. Cerutti; G. Dissertori; H. Drevermann; R. W Forty; M. Frank; R. Hagelberg; J. B Hansen; J. Harvey; P. Janot; B. Jost; E. Kneringer; J. Knobloch; I. Lehraus; G. Lutters; P. Mato; A. Minten; L. Moneta; A. Pacheco; J.-F Pusztaszeri; F. Ranjard; G. Rizzo; L. Rolandi; D. Rousseau; D. Schlatter; M. Schmitt; O. Schneider; W. Tejessy; I. R Tomalin; H. Wachsmuth; A. Wagner; Z. Ajaltouni; A. Barr鑣; C. Boyer; A. Falvard; C. Ferdi; P. Gay; C. Guicheney; P. Henrard; J. Jousset; B. Michel; S. Monteil; J-C Montret; D. Pallin; P. Perret; F. Podlyski; J. Proriol; P. Rosnet; J.-M Rossignol; T. Fearnley; J. D Hansen; P. H Hansen; B. S Nilsson; B. Rensch; A. W滗n鋘en; G. Daskalakis; A. Kyriakis; C. Markou; E. Simopoulou; I. Siotis; A. Vayaki; A. Blondel; G. Bonneaud; J. C Brient; P. Bourdon; A. Roug; M. Rumpf; A. Valassi; M. Verderi; H. Videau; D. J Candlin; M. I. Parsons; E. Focardi; G. Parrini; K. Zachariadou; M. Corden; C. Georgiopoulos; D. E Jaffe; A. Antonelli; G. Bencivenni; G. Bologna; F. Bossi; P. Campana; G. Capon; D. Casper; V. Chiarella; G. Felici; P. Laurelli; G. Mannocchi; F. Murtas; G. P Murtas; L. Passalacqua; M. Pepe-Altarelli; L. Curtis; S. J Dorris; A. W Halley; I. G Knowles; J. G Lynch; V O'Shea; C. Raine; J. M Scarr; K. Smith; P. Teixeira-Dias; A. S Thompson; E. Thomson; F. Thomson; R. M Turnbull; C. Geweniger; G. Graefe; P. Hanke; G. Hansper; V. Hepp; E. E. Kluge; A. Putzer; M. Schmidt; J. Sommer; K. Tittel; S. Werner; M. Wunsch; R. Beuselinck; D. M Binnie; W. Cameron; P. J Dornan; M. Girone; S. Goodsir; E. B Martin; A. Moutoussi; J. Nash; J. K Sedgbeer; P. Spagnolo; A. M Stacey; M. D Williams; V. M Ghete; P. Girtler; D. Kuhn; G. Rudolph; A. P Betteridge; C. K Bowdery; P. Colrain; G. Crawford; A. J Finch; F. Foster; G. Hughes; R. W Jones; T. Sloan; M. I. Williams; A. Galla; I. Giehl; A. M Greene; C. Hoffmann; K. Jakobs; K. Kleinknecht; G. Quast; B. Renk; E. Rohne; H.-G Sander; P van Gemmeren; C. Zeitnitz; J. J. Aubert; C. Benchouk; A. Bonissent; G. Bujosa; D. Calvet; J. Carr; P. Coyle; C. Diaconu; F. Etienne; N. Konstantinidis; O. Leroy; F. Motsch; P. Payre; M. Talby; A. Sadouki; M. Thulasidas; K. Trabelsi; M. Aleppo; F. Ragusa; R. Berlich; W. Blum; V. B黶cher; H. Dietl; G. Ganis; C. Gotzhein; H. Kroha; G. L黷jens; G. Lutz; W. M鋘ner; H.-G Moser; R. Richter; A. Rosado-Schlosser; S. Schael; R. Settles; H. Seywerd; R. St Denis; H. Stenzel; W. Wiedenmann; G. Wolf; J. Boucrot; O. Callot; S. Chen; Y. Choi; A. Cordier; M. Davier; L. Duflot; J.-F Grivaz; Ph. Heusse; A. H鯿ker; A. Jacholkowska; M. Jacquet; D. W Kim; F Le Diberder; J. Lefran鏾is; A.-M Lutz; I. Nikolic; M.-H Schune; S. Simion; E. Tournefier; J.-J. Veillet; I. Videau; D. Zerwas; P. Azzurri; G. Bagliesi; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; C. Bozzi; G. Calderini; M. Carpinelli; M. A Ciocci; V. Ciulli; R Dell'Orso; R. Fantechi; I. Ferrante; L. Fo; F. Forti; A. Giassi; M. A Giorgi; A. Gregorio; F. Ligabue; A. Lusiani; P. S Marrocchesi; A. Messineo; F. Palla; G. Sanguinetti; A. Sciab; J. Steinberger; R. Tenchini; G. Tonelli; C. Vannini; A. Venturi; P. G Verdini; G. A Blair; L. M Bryant; J. T Chambers; Y. Gao; M. G Green; T. Medcalf; P. Perrodo; J. A Strong; J. H von Wimmersperg-Toeller; D. R Botterill; R. W Clifft; T. R Edgecock; S. Haywood; P. Maley; P. R Norton; J. C Thompson; A. E Wright; B. Bloch-Devaux; P. Colas; S. Emery; W. Kozanecki; E. Lan鏾n; M. C Lemaire; E. Locci; P. Perez; J. Rander; J.-F Renardy; A. Roussarie; J.-P Schuller; J. Schwindling; A. Trabelsi; B. Vallage; S. N Black; J. H Dann; R. P Johnson; H. Y Kim; A. M Litke; M. A McNeil; G. Taylor; C. N Booth; R. Boswell; C. A. J Brew; S. Cartwright; F. Combley; M. S Kelly; M. Lehto; W. M Newton; J. Reeve; L. F Thompson; A. B鰄rer; S. Brandt; G. Cowan; C. Grupen; P. Saraiva; L. Smolik; F. Stephan; M. Apollonio; L. Bosisio; R Della Marina; G. Giannini; B. Gobbo; G. Musolino; J. Rothberg; S. Wasserbaech; S. R Armstrong; E. Charles; P. Elmer; D. P. S Ferguson; S. Gonz醠ez; T. C Greening; O. J Hayes; H. Hu; S. Jin; P. A McNamara; J. M Nachtman; J. Nielsen; W. Orejudos; Y. B Pan; Y. Saadi; I. J Scott; J. Walsh; Sau Lan Wu; X. Wu; J. M Yamartino; G. Zobernig</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.S21E..10L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Irregularities in Early Seismic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Propagation for Large Events in a Crustal Earthquake Model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study early seismic propagation of model earthquakes in a 2-D model of a vertical strike-slip fault with depth-variable rate and state friction properties. Our model earthquakes are obtained in fully dynamic simulations of sequences of instabilities on a fault subjected to realistically slow tectonic loading (Lapusta et al., JGR, 2000). This work is motivated by results of Ellsworth and Beroza (Science, 1995), who observe that for many earthquakes, far-field velocity seismograms during initial stages of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation have irregular fluctuations which constitute a "seismic nucleation phase". In our simulations, we find that such irregularities in velocity seismograms can be caused by two factors: (1) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation over regions of stress concentrations and (2) partial arrest of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in neighboring creeping regions. As <span class="hlt">rupture</span> approaches a region of stress concentration, it sees increasing background stress and its moment acceleration (to which velocity seismographs in the far field are proportional) increases. After the peak in stress concentration, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> sees decreasing background stress and moment acceleration decreases. Hence a fluctuation in moment acceleration is created. If <span class="hlt">rupture</span> starts sufficiently far from a creeping region, then partial arrest of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the creeping region causes a decrease in moment acceleration. As the other parts of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> continue to develop, moment acceleration then starts to grow again, and a fluctuation again results. Other factors may cause the irregularities in moment acceleration, e.g., phenomena such as branching and/or intermittent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation (Poliakov et al., submitted to JGR, 2001) which we have not studied here. Regions of stress concentration are created in our model by arrest of previous smaller events as well as by interactions with creeping regions. One such region is deep in the fault zone, and is caused by the temperature-induced transition from seismogenic to creeping behavior at depth. Small events appear in our model at that transition as we decrease the characteristic slip distance for evolution of frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span> (but not if that distance is unrealistically large). Such clustering of small events at transitions from seismogenic to creeping behavior seems to occur on real faults as well, as we show in examples. To compute moment acceleration that can be compared with data, we translate the results of our 2-D fault model to a 3-D model with essentially radial symmetry on the fault plane. We will discuss limitations of that interpretation; in particular, it may overestimate the effect of partial arrest of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in creeping regions. Our present work cannot resolve whether there are any differences in the early phases of seismic moment release, i.e. in the seismic nucleation phase, that would make the beginning of larger events look different from smaller ones that are about to arrest. We have shown that the aseismic nucleation phase and the earliest phases of dynamic breakout are virtually identical for small and large events in our simulations. If early moment release is mostly affected by stress heterogeneities left by previous small events and by creep processes, as our present study suggests, then any such differences would have to be related to as yet unidentified properties of the pre-stress field that might determine the ultimate event size. See http://esag.harvard.edu/lapusta/Lapusta_Rice_Jun01.pdf, Lapusta and Rice, submitted to JGR, 2001.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lapusta, N.; Rice, J. R.; Rice, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.S42A0610L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental study on the hierarchical <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of faults having heterogeneous asperities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earthquake faulting is characterized by nonuniform distributions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity, stress drop as well as co-seismic slip, indicating nonuniform distribution of local <span class="hlt">strength</span> over the earthquake fault. Strong seismic wave is generally radiated from where the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity or stress drop changes rapidly. Many after shocks, especially strong ones, may take place at the unbroken barriers on the earthquake fault. Therefore, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of coupled fault asperities is an important rule for understanding the source preparation of earthquake. The authors studied the detailed faulting process (from quasi-static to dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>) of several naturally healed faults having heterogeneous asperities in rock samples based on the hypocenter distribution of acoustic emission (AE) events. The initial phase of microcracking is also examined with high-dynamic range waveforms. Experimental results indicate that the quasi-static nucleation of the geometrically heterogeneous fault is, in fact, the fracture process of several asperities. Fracture of a asperity contains 1) foreshocks initiated at one or several positions along the edge of the asperity, 2) a few main shocks started at also the edge of the asperity, and 3) after shocks fill out the whole asperity area. The seismic b-value of foreshocks is high ( ~1.0). However, the period of the main shocks shows the minimum b-value around 0.6. Finally, the after shocks associated with an increasing b-value (to 1.0). After the main shocks, local stress around the asperity is partially releases and thus stress redistribution occurs. As a result, the fracture of the neighbor asperities may be initiated or promoted. Fractures of several asperities in the nucleation zone are associated with the short-term precursory fluctuations in the b-value as well as event rate. Since fracturing of an asperity shows a dense spatial clustering, a maximum event rate, and a minimum b-value, multiple minima of b-value can be observed associated with a fault of multiple asperities. These facts indicate that detailed time-space distribution of hypocenter and b-value can be used to identify asperities. However, a careful analysis is required since an asperity may show high and low b-values at different stress stages. High-dynamic range waveform data shows microcracking in mm scale has similar dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior to earthquakes. Initial phase associated with the quasi-static to quasi-dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth were observed for some events. The critical size of the nucleation zone can be estimated from the initial phase or pre-events. The power law relation between the duration of the initial phase and the critical nucleation size is consistent with the data obtained from friction test as well as some large earthquakes. It was found that the quasi-static <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth in a specific scale consists of dynamic fractures of asperities in a smaller scale, and so on. Therefore, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is considered to be hierarchical and it is expected that the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a small scale can map out the quasi-static nucleation process of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a larger scale. Since dynamic motions are easier to detect remotely than static ones, the dialectic relationship between _gstatic_h and _gdynamic_h is thus very helpful for understanding the source preparing of large earthquakes. >http://staff.aist.go.jp/xinglin-lei/Studies/Hasperity.htm</a></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lei, X.; Kusunose, K.; Satoh, T.; Nishizawa, O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47595887"> <span id="translatedtitle">Is Percutaneous Repair Better Than Open Repair in Acute Achilles Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background牋Open repair of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been associated with higher levels of wound complications than those associated\\u000a with percutaneous repair. However, some studies suggest there are higher rerupture rates and sural nerve injuries with percutaneous\\u000a repair.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Questions\\/purposes 牋We compared the two types of repairs in terms of (1) function (muscle <span class="hlt">strength</span>, ankle ROM, calf and ankle perimeter, single\\u000a heel</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hugo Henr韖uez; Roberto Mu駉z; Giovanni Carcuro; Christian Bast韆s</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14992708"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recovery of the posterior tibial muscle after late reconstruction following tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this study was to determine the recovery potential of the posterior tibial muscle after late reconstruction following tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in stage II of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Fourteen patients (18 women, 6 men; mean age 59.8 years) were investigated 47 months (range, 24-76 months) after surgical reconstruction of a completely <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> posterior tibial tendon (end-to-end anastomosis, side-to-side augmentation with the flexor digitorum longus tendon) in combination with a distal calcaneal osteotomy with a tricortical iliac crest bone graft for lengthening of the lateral column. At follow-up, clinical and radiological investigations were performed, including <span class="hlt">strength</span> measurement and qualitative and quantitative MRI investigation. The overall clinical results were graded excellent in 12 patients, good in one, fair in one, and poor in none. The average ankle-hindfoot score (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society) improved from preoperatively 49.1 (range, 32-60) to 93.1 (range, 76-100) at follow-up. The functional result correlated with patient's satisfaction and sports activities (p <.05). All patients showed a significant <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the posterior tibial muscle on the affected side, but it was smaller than on non-affected side (p <.05). The mean posterior tibial muscle <span class="hlt">strength</span> was 75.1 N on affected and 104.9 N on nonaffected side, corresponding to a ratio of 0.73 between the two legs. The mean area of the posterior tibial muscle was 1.89 cm(2) on affected side, and 3.48 cm(2) on nonaffected side, corresponding to a ratio of 0.55 between the two legs. While fatty degeneration for the posterior tibial muscle was found in all patients, it was found to decrease with increasing <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the posterior tibial muscle (p <.05) and muscular size (p <.05). On postoperative MRI, the posterior tibial tendon could be found to be intact in all patients. The recovery potential of the posterior tibial muscle was shown to be significant even after delayed repair of its <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon. A <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and/or diseased posterior tibial tendon should not be transected as it excludes any recovery possibilities of the posterior tibial muscle. PMID:14992708</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Valderrabano, Victor; Hintermann, Beat; Wischer, Thorsten; Fuhr, Peter; Dick, Walter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.316a2004V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forward <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Single Spin Asymmetries at PHENIX</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent measurements of single <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin asymmetries in proton-proton collisions measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC are presented. The focus is on the single particle left-right asymmetry AN for ?0 at ?s = 200 GeV and ?s = 62.4 GeV and the measurement of di-hadron correlations at ?s = 200 GeV which are produced by the fragmentation of a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized quark via the Interference Fragmentation Function (IFF) H1< and thus provide a probe for the quark <span class="hlt">transversity</span> distribution function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vossen, Anselm; PHENIX Collaboration</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3467377"> <span id="translatedtitle">Congenital Osseus Bridging of Lumbar <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Osseous bridging between lumbar <span class="hlt">transverse</span> processes is an uncommon condition that may cause low back pain. In most cases, its etiology is alleged to be trauma to the back and only rarely has a congenital origin been indicated. Furthermore, most reported cases involved adults, the majority of whom were middle-aged. Here, the authors describe the case of the youngest girl reported to date with congenital <span class="hlt">transverse</span> process bridging. As far as the authors' knowledge, there has been no report of congenital bridging of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> processes in children or adolescents in Korea.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyeun Sung</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/806863"> <span id="translatedtitle">SCALING PROPERTIES OF THE <span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> MASS SPECTRA.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Motivated from the formation of an initial state of gluon-saturated matter, we discuss scaling relations for the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mass spectra at BNL's Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). We show on linear plots, that the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mass spectra for various hadrons can be described by an universal function in m{sub t}. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mass spectra for different centralities can be rescaled into each other. Finally, we demonstrate that m{sub t}-scaling is also present in proton-antiproton collider data and compare it to m{sub t}-scaling at RHIC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">SCHAFFNER-BIELICH,J.; KHARZEEV,D.; MCLERRAN,L.; VENUGOPALAN,R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9766363"> <span id="translatedtitle">Volvulus of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colon in children.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Volvulus of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colon is extremely rare in children. A case report of this unusual condition in a 9-year-old girl is presented together with a review of the literature. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colon volvulus was managed operatively by detorsion. Four and half months later, she had a similar attack. Colonoscopic detorsion was performed with elective resection of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colon and primary anastomosis. Recovery was uneventful. Possible factors of pathogenesis are discussed, and an outline of diagnostic and therapeutic measures are included. PMID:9766363</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houshian, S; S鴕ensen, J S; Jensen, K E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15011208"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> SPIN AT PHENIX AND FUTURE PLANS.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The PHENIX experiment took data with <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized proton beams in 2001-2002 and measured the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> single spin asymmetries in inclusive neutral pion and non-identified charge hadrons at midrapidity and {radical} s = 200 GeV. The data near X{sub F} {approx} 0 cover a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum range from 0.5 to 5.0 GeV/c. The observed asymmetries are consistent with zero with good statistical accuracy. This paper presents the current work in light of earlier measurements at lower energies in this kinematic region and the future plans of the PHENIX detector.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MAKDISI,Y. (FOR THE PHENIX COLLABORATION)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22lower+back+pain%22&id=EJ383134"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flexibility and Muscular <span class="hlt">Strength</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This definition of flexibility and muscular <span class="hlt">strength</span> also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular <span class="hlt">strength</span> can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liemohn, Wendell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23015276"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of multiple receptor-ligand bonds: bimodal distribution of bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Monte Carlo simulation of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of multiple receptor-ligand bonds between two PMN cells suspended in a Newtonian fluid is performed. In the presence of a hydrodynamic drag force acting on two PMN cells the interplay of multiple receptor-ligand bonds between these cells leads to a bimodal distribution of the bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force at certain loading rates. Specifically, it is found that the interplay of multiple bonds between two PMN cells in the presence of hydrodynamic drag force acting on these cells modifies the bond energy landscape in such a way as to lead to a bimodal distribution of the bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force where a low force peak switches to a high force peak as the loading rate is increased progressively, characteristics of two-state systems. PMID:23015276</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gupta, V K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD700874"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Repeatability of <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Toughened Clear White Plate and Twin Ground Plate Glass.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A total of 1250 glasses, each 12 in. square were toughened and burst under hydraulic pressure, to investigate the repeatability of <span class="hlt">strength</span> of toughened Clear White Plate and Twin Ground Plate glass. Modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> determinations were carried out on e...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. L. A. Hand W. G. Roberts</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=strength+AND+training&id=EJ638408"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> Training for Girls.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|<span class="hlt">Strength</span> training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' <span class="hlt">strength</span> training are discussed, presenting general principles of <span class="hlt">strength</span> training for children</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD824304"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-<span class="hlt">Strength</span> Steels.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent steel developments indicate that <span class="hlt">strength</span> and toughness requirements for 150 ksi yield-<span class="hlt">strength</span> steel essentially have been met, that the requirements for the 200 ksi yield-<span class="hlt">strength</span> steel are a near-term probability, and that the requirements for t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. P. Groeneveld</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17701152"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Successive <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his <span class="hlt">strength</span>. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. PMID:17701152</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22913994"> <span id="translatedtitle">Late reconstruction of chronic distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> using fascia lata autograft and suture anchor fixation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are a rare injury, and surgical reconstruction is typically recommended for chronic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. There is no consensus regarding the most appropriate reconstruction technique. We present our experience with reconstruction of chronic distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> with fascia lata autograft, secured to the bicipital tuberosity with suture anchors. A single anterior incision is used for all patients. Tension is set with the elbow in 50 degrees of flexion. Ninety-two percent of our patients reported improvement in elbow flexion and supination and were pleased with the surgery. Range of motion and isokinetic flexion and supination <span class="hlt">strength</span> after this procedure was comparable with other distal biceps tendon reconstruction options using tendon grafts and suture anchor fixation from a single anterior approach. Furthermore, common complications associated with distal biceps tendon repair and reconstruction can be avoided with this technique. We therefore feel that this technique is a viable surgical treatment alternative with good subjective and objective outcomes.Level of Evidence: Level IV. PMID:22913994</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morrell, Nathan T; Mercer, Deana M; Moneim, Moheb S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1086..433J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Modes Damped DLA Structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As the dimensions of accelerating structures become smaller and beam intensities higher, the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> wakefields driven by the beam become quite large with even a slight misalignment of the beam from the geometric axis. These deflection modes can cause inter-bunch beam breakup and intra-bunch head-tail instabilities along the beam path, and thus BBU control becomes a critical issue. All new metal based accelerating structures, like the accelerating structures developed at SLAC or power extractors at CLIC, have designs in which the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> modes are heavily damped. Similarly, minimizing the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> wakefield modes (here the HEMmn hybrid modes in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures) is also very critical for developing dielectric based high energy accelerators. In this paper, we present the design of a 7.8 GHz <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mode damped DLA structure currently under construction, along with plans for the experimental program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA158988"> <span id="translatedtitle">Limit Analysis of <span class="hlt">Transversely</span> Loaded Grillages.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A computer program that can determine the collapse load of a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> loaded grillage that allows for various types of loading and failure modes is presented. The program allows the user to constrain particular grillage members to have fully developed...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. A. Harvey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/275964"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simulation of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> coupled bunch instabilities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerical simulations of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> coupled bunch instabilities caused by the resistive wall of the vacuum chamber are presented. These simulations confirm the results obtained analytically and extend them to cases which are not easily accessible by analytical methods</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Khan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N9121097"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Simulation of <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Fuel Injection.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A review of recent work at NASA Langley Research Center to compare the predictions of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> fuel injector flow fields and mixing performance with experimental results is presented. Various cold (non-reactive) mixing studies were selected for code cal...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Mao D. W. Riggins C. R. Mcclinton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6506269"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> impedances of cavities and collimators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Field matching has been used to compute the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> impedance of simple, cylindrically symmetric, perfectly conducting structures, the subregions of which are separated by radial cuts. The method is briefly described, and some early results are presented. (LEW)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kheifets, S.A.; Bane, K.L.F.; Bizek, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004NuPhS.129..889P"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">transverse</span> lattice QCD model for mesons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">QCD is analysed with two light-front continuum dimensions and two <span class="hlt">transverse</span> lattice dimensions. In the limit of large number of colours and strong <span class="hlt">transverse</span> gauge coupling, the contributions of light-front and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> directions factorise in the dynamics, and the theory can be analytically solved in a closed form. An integral equation is obtained, describing the properties of mesons, which generalises the 't Hooft equation by including spin degrees of freedom. The meson spectrum, light-front wavefunctions and form factors can be obtained by solving this equation numerically. These results would be a good starting point to model QCD observables which only weakly depend on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> directions, e.g. deep inelastic scattering structure functions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Patel, Apoorva D.; Ratabole, Raghunath</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22706937"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of brace design on patients with ACL-<span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Different designs of functional knee braces for ACL-injury rehabilitation exist. In addition to the mechanical stabilization provided by rigid shell braces, sleeve braces also address proprioceptive mechanisms, but little is known if this leads to benefits for ACL-deficient subjects. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 2 different functional brace designs (shell and sleeve brace) on functional achievements in ACL-deficient patients. 28 subjects with ACL-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> knees performed tests for knee joint laxity, joint position sense, static and dynamic balance and isometric and dynamic lower limb extension <span class="hlt">strength</span> in non-braced, sleeve braced and shell braced condition. The results showed a significant decrease in knee joint laxity for sleeve (33%; p<0.001) and rigid shell bracing (14%, p=0.039). The sleeve brace revealed a significant increase in dynamic balance after perturbation (20%; p=0.024) and a significant increase in dynamic lower limb peak rate of force development (17%; p=0.015) compared to the non-braced condition. The effects might be caused by the flexible area of support and the incorporated mechanisms to address proprioceptive aspects. Braces might not be needed in simple daily life tasks, but could provide beneficial support in more dynamic settings when patients return to sporting activities after an ACL-injury. PMID:22706937</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strutzenberger, G; Braig, M; Sell, S; Boes, K; Schwameder, H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1303459"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic Tension Spectroscopy and <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Biomembranes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupturing</span> fluid membrane vesicles with a steady ramp of micropipette suction produces a distribution of breakage tensions governed by the kinetic process of membrane failure. When plotted as a function of log(tension loading rate), the locations of distribution peaks define a dynamic tension spectrum with distinct regimes that reflect passage of prominent energy barriers along the kinetic pathway. Using tests on five types of giant phosphatidylcholine lipid vesicles over loading rates(tension/time) from 0.01100 mN/m/s, we show that the kinetic process of membrane breakage can be modeled by a causal sequence of two thermally-activated transitions. At fast loading rates, a steep linear regime appears in each spectrum which implies that membrane failure starts with nucleation of a rare precursor defect. The slope and projected intercept of this regime are set by defect size and frequency of spontaneous formation, respectively. But at slow loading rates, each spectrum crosses over to a shallow-curved regime where <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tension changes weakly with rate. This regime is predicted by the classical cavitation theory for opening an unstable hole in a two-dimensional film within the lifetime of the defect state. Under slow loading, membrane edge energy and the frequency scale for thermal fluctuations in hole size are the principal factors that govern the level of tension at failure. To critically test the model and obtain the parameters governing the rates of transition under stress, distributions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tension were computed and matched to the measured histograms through solution of the kinetic master (Markov) equations for defect formation and annihilation or evolution to an unstable hole under a ramp of tension. As key predictors of membrane <span class="hlt">strength</span>, the results for spontaneous frequencies of defect formation and hole edge energies were found to correlate with membrane thicknesses and elastic bending moduli, respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, Evan; Heinrich, Volkmar; Ludwig, Florian; Rawicz, Wieslawa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10211195"> <span id="translatedtitle">The epidemiology of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a Danish county.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The epidemiology of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> was examined during the 13-year period 1984-1996 in a Danish county. Five hospitals, serving a population of 220,000 cooperated. There were 718 <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, 544 men (75.8%) and 174 women (24.2%). The male to female ratio was 3:1. The average age was 42.1 years (3-82) and 62% were between 30-49 years. 74.2% of the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were sport-related and 89% of these occurred in ball and racket games. The annual incidence of achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> increased from 18.2/10(5) inhabitants in 1984 to 37.3/10(5) in 1996. The peak incidence in sport-related <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred in the age group 30-49 years, but <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> not related to sport occurred in older patients with a peak incidence in those 50-59 years. PMID:10211195</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houshian, S; Tscherning, T; Riegels-Nielsen, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvL.109s8302S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring Thermal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Force Distributions from an Ensemble of Trajectories</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span>, bond breaking, or extraction from a deep and narrow potential well requires considerable force while producing minimal displacement. In thermally fluctuating systems, there is not a single force required to achieve <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, but a spectrum, as thermal forces can both augment and inhibit the bond breaking. We demonstrate measurement and interpretation of the distribution of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forces between pairs of colloidal particles bonded via the van der Waals attraction. The otherwise irreversible bond is broken by pulling the particles apart with optical tweezers. We show that an ensemble of the particle trajectories before, during and after the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> event may be used to produce a high fidelity description of the distribution of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forces. This analysis is equally suitable for describing <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forces in molecular and biomolecular contexts with a number of measurement techniques.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swan, J. W.; Shindel, M. M.; Furst, E. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53443149"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of interlaminar shear <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of composites determined by some conventional methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Shear <span class="hlt">strength</span> values obtained by test methods based on different loading schemes are analyzed, and the influence of specimen parameters on the shear <span class="hlt">strength</span> is studied. Loading schemes under consideration include loading a rectangular waisted prism under forces applied at an angle to its base and torsion; loading specimens notched in two cross sections; <span class="hlt">transverse</span> bending of a freely supported</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V. I. Zhigun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5572001"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> momentum signatures for heavy Higgs bosons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Heavy Higgs bosons produced by WW fusion at the SSC will have <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mementum of order M/sub w/. The background due to q anti q ..-->.. ZZ will produce pairs with characteristically less <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum. This provides a useful discriminator. It may be possible to tag the WW fusion events in a manner analogous to that used in two photon physics. 12 refs., 4 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cahn, R.N.; Ellis, S.D.; Kleiss, R.; Stirling, W.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S51F..08M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Insight into the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of a rare tsunami earthquake from near-field high-rate GPS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration and velocity of the October 25, 2010 Mentawai earthquake by examining high-rate GPS displacement data. This Mw=7.8 earthquake appears to have <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> either an up-dip part of the Sumatran megathrust or a fore-arc splay fault, and produced tsunami run-ups on nearby islands that were out of proportion with its magnitude. It has been described as a so-called "slow tsunami earthquake", characterised by a dearth of high-frequency signal and long <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration in low-<span class="hlt">strength</span>, near-surface media. The event was recorded by the Sumatran GPS Array (SuGAr), a network of high-rate (1 sec) GPS sensors located on the nearby islands of the Sumatran fore-arc. For this study, the 1 sec time series from 8 SuGAr stations were selected for analysis due to their proximity to the source and high-quality recordings of both static displacements and dynamic waveforms induced by surface waves. The stations are located at epicentral distances of between 50 and 210 km, providing a unique opportunity to observe the dynamic source processes of a tsunami earthquake from near-source, high-rate GPS. We estimated the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration and velocity by simulating the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> using the spectral finite-element method SPECFEM and comparing the synthetic time series to the observed surface waves. A slip model from a previous study, derived from the inversion of GPS static offsets and tsunami data, and the CRUST2.0 3D velocity model were used as inputs for the simulations. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> duration and velocity were varied for a suite of simulations in order to determine the parameters that produce the best-fitting waveforms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Macpherson, K. A.; Hill, E. M.; Elosegui, P.; Banerjee, P.; Sieh, K. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21503683"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> structure of the QCD string</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The characterization of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> structure of the QCD string is discussed. We formulate a conjecture as to how the stress-energy tensor of the underlying gauge theory couples to the string degrees of freedom. A consequence of the conjecture is that the energy density and the longitudinal-stress operators measure the distribution of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> position of the string, to leading order in the string fluctuations, whereas the <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-stress operator does not. We interpret recent numerical measurements of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> size of the confining string and show that the difference of the energy and longitudinal-stress operators is a particularly natural probe at next-to-leading order. Second, we derive the constraints imposed by open-closed string duality on the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> structure of the string. We show that a total of three independent ''gravitational'' form factors characterize the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> profile of the closed string, and obtain the interpretation of recent effective string theory calculations: the square radius of a closed string of length {beta} defined from the slope of its gravitational form factor, is given by (d-1/2{pi}{sigma})log({beta}/4r{sub 0}) in d space dimensions. This is to be compared with the well-known result that the width of the open string at midpoint grows as (d-1/2{pi}{sigma})log(r/r{sub 0}). We also obtain predictions for transition form factors among closed-string states.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Meyer, Harvey B. [Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, 55099 Mainz (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3350117"> <span id="translatedtitle">Misdiagnosed Uterine <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an Advanced Cornual Pregnancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cornual pregnancy is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge with potential severe consequences if uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs with following massive intraabdominal bleeding. We report a case of a misdiagnosed <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cornual pregnancy occurring at 21 weeks of gestation. Ultrasound examination and computer tomography revealed no sign of abnormal pregnancy. The correct diagnosis was first made at emergency laparotomy. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should be considered in pregnant women presenting with abdominal pain and haemodynamic instability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sant, Christian Linus Hastrup; Andersen, Poul Erik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/ug8agrq49rqh0a5c.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">MRI of complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the pectoralis major muscle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the pectoralis major muscle is a rare clinical entity. Only few reports have discussed its MRI or CT features.\\u000a We have reviewed the imaging features of four cases of complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the pectoralis major muscle. One case of acute\\u000a injury underwent surgical repair. MRI is useful in delineating the site and extent of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in relation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Ohashi; G. Y. El-Khoury; John P. Albright; David S. Tearse</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19318288"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the unscarred uterus during labor. Case report].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report a case of spontaneous uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a 19 year-old patient Gravida 1 para 2 with no past history of uterine surgery. The diagnosis of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, evoked in the early post-partum in the presence of acute abdominal pain, collapsus and haemoperitoneum on ultrasonography, was confirmed by laparotomy. Treatment consisted in hysterorrhaphy. The etiopathogenesis, clinical and therapeutical aspects of spontaneous unscarred uterine <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are discussed throughout a literature review. PMID:19318288</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leung, F; Courtois, L; Aouar, Z; Bourtembourg, A; Eckman, A; Terzibachian, J J; Maillet, R; Riethmuller, D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16131683"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of Achilles tendons: a case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of Achilles tendon is rare. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Achilles tendon has been described in patients on oral corticosteroid therapy. The sudden dorsiflexion of the plantar-flexed foot is the usual mechanism of injury. Spontaneous bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is common in the degenerated tendon, which is often seen in patients with long-term corticosteroid therapy. This case is unusual because the patient has never taken steroids. We discuss the mechanism of injury and other probable causes. PMID:16131683</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rao, S K; Navadgi, B C; Vasdev, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51927880"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 2010 Chile Earthquake - Variations in the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Mode</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The magnitude 8.8, February 27, 2010 Chile, that occurred along the south central Nazca\\/South American plate boundary was an underthrusting event with an aftershock length of ~600 km along strike, with a bi-lateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that started near Cobquecura and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> north to Valparaiso and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> 100 km south of Concepcion. This segment of the south central coast of Chile has</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. L. Beck; D. Comte; T. Lay; E. Kiser; M. Ishii</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.H11M..02M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigating Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Processes in a Deep South African Gold Mine (Invited)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A primary objective of the NELSAM (Natural Earthquake Laboratory in South African Mines) Project was to record the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes in the near field of a mining-induced earthquake of M>3. When this project was initiated, it seemed likely that an earthquake this large would <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the ancient Pretorius fault where it intersected the gold-bearing reef at a depth of 3600 m, near the bottom of TauTona Mine. To prepare, a small-scale network of borehole seismic and strain instrumentation was installed. Also, much effort was expended in geologic investigations in the immediate environs of the portion of the Pretorius fault where earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was expected. Contrary to expectations, the M>3, earthquake never occurred, at least as of this writing. Nonetheless, this project has provided many insights regarding earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> because of an opportunity that came up during the initial field investigations of the Pretorius fault. That is, a M2.2 earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> the Pretorius fault in December 2004, before the NELSAM borehole instrumentation was installed. This earthquake was, however, well recorded by the mine-wide seismic network and so these seismograms, together with the extensive mapping of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> within the Pretorius fault zone, have enhanced considerably our understanding of earthquake source processes and the conditions causing an earthquake. The initial field studies revealed that the Pretorius fault is about 10 km long and dips nearly vertically, on average, with oblique slip up to 200 m. This slip occurred more than 2 billion years ago during the Archean. In the meantime, the Pretorius fault has been inactive until affected by mining operations. This extensive period of inactivity has allowed the fault zone material to recover much of its initial <span class="hlt">strength</span>; thus, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> across this fault is probably more like fresh rock fracture than frictional slip. After the M2.2 earthquake in December 2004, a comprehensive study of its effects on the Pretorius fault revealed oblique-normal slip across four non-parallel segments of the fault zone, with a maximum observed slip of 25 mm. The ambient state of stress measured in the environs of this study area is extensional with a vertically oriented, maximum principal stress due to the overburden that is about twice the minimum horizontal principal stress. These ambient stresses were altered substantially by the nearby mining so as to induce this M2.2 earthquake. Analysis of the ground motion data from the mine-wide seismic network indicated a seismic moment tensor with a shear component of 2.3e12 N-m as well as an implosive component, associated with coseismic collapse of the nearby mine stopes. Laboratory rock mechanics results were used to interpret the seismic moment and the maximum slip to infer a failure stress in the seismogenic zone of about 120 MPa. This high failure stress is consistent with the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the Pretorius fault zone material measured in the laboratory as well as with the radiated energy, 5.4e8 J, which is quite high for an earthquake of M2.2. In short, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone of this well-recorded earthquake was studied in detail to reveal many important insights concerning the source mechanics of earthquakes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McGarr, A.; Fletcher, J. B.; Boettcher, M. S.; Heesakkers, V.; Johnston, M. J.; Reches, Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/266754"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of heat treatment at 1150 C on creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of alloy FA-180</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The alloy FA-180, with a composition of Fe-28Al-5Cr-0.5Nb-0.8Mo-0.025Zr-0.05C-0.005B (at.%), is of interest because of its improved creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> resistance when compared to alloy FA-129 (Fe-28Al-5Cr-0.5Nb-0.2C). At a temperature of 593 C and under a stress of 207 MPa, the creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of FA-129 heat treated for 1 h at 750 C is about 20 h while the FA-180 alloy lasts approximately 100 h. Heat treatment at 1,150 C has been shown to further improve the creep life of FA-180 and creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> lives of approximately 2,000 h have been attained. This strengthening was attributed to the presence of fine matrix and grain boundary Zr-rich MC precipitates that were produced by the heat treatment. The current study continues the investigation of the effect of heat treatment at 1,150 C on the improvement of creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> life in alloy FA-180. As part of the effort to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved with heat treatment at 1,150 C, transmission electron microscopy was used to correlate the microstructure with the improved creep resistance. Results indicate that heat treatment at 1,150 C for 1 h, followed by rapid quenching in water or mineral oil, produces even further improvements in the creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of this alloy. A specimen being tested at 593 C and 207 MPa was stopped after over 6000 h of life, while another specimen lasted over 1,600 h at 650 C and 241 MPa. The microstructure of the oil-quenched specimen contained many dislocation loops which were not present in the air-cooled specimens. These loops pinned dislocations during creep testing at temperatures of 593--700 C, resulting in stabilized deformation microstructure and increased creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22959496"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinical outcomes after repair of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: a systematic review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The existing evidence regarding the management of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> remains obscure. The aim of the current review is to investigate the characteristics, the different techniques employed and to analyse the clinical outcomes following surgical repair of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. An Internet based search of the English literature of the last 25 years was carried out. Case reports and non-clinical studies were excluded. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Coleman Methodology Score. All data regarding mechanism and site of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, type of treatment, time elapsed between diagnosis and repair, patients' satisfaction, clinical outcome, return to pre-injury activities, complications and recurrence rates were extracted and analysed. Out of 474 studies identified, 12 met the inclusion criteria. The average of Coleman Methodology Score was 50.46/100. In total 319 patients were analysed with a mean age of 57 years (16-85). The mean time of follow-up was 47.5 months (3 months to 24 years). The most common mechanism of injury was simple fall (61.5%). Spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were reported in 3.2% of cases. The most common sites of tear were noted between 1cm and 2 cm of the superior pole of the patella and, in the older people, at the osseotendinous junction. The most frequently used repair technique was patella drill holes (50% of patients). Simple sutures were used in mid-substance <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Several reinforcement techniques were employed in case of poor quality or retraction of the torn ends of tendon. The affected limb was immobilised in a cast for a period of 3-10 weeks. Quadriceps muscular atrophy and muscle <span class="hlt">strength</span> deficit were present in most of the cases. Worst results were noted in delayed repairs. Reported complications included heterotopic ossifications in 6.9% of patients, deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in 2.5%, superficial infection in 1.2% and deep infection in 1.1%. It appears that the type of surgical repair does not influence the clinical results. The majority of the studies reported good or excellent ROM and return to the pre-injury activities. The overall rate of re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 2%. PMID:22959496</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ciriello, Vincenzo; Gudipati, Suribabu; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Soucacos, P N; Giannoudis, Peter V</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S43C2267E"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Method for Earthquake Cycle Simulations: Quasi-static Evolution to Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of our project has been the development of a time-stepping methodology to understand and simulate full earthquake cycles with multiple events on geometrically complex faults, with rate-and-state friction and off-fault plasticity. This framework requires numerical methods to advance the model over long interseismic periods using the quasi-static equations, and through dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> using the elastodynamic formulation. In order to handle geometric complexities and off-fault plasticity, a volume discretization is required. During the quasi-static phase, we neglect inertia and the system evolves due to slow tectonic loading. Once inertial effects become significant we switch to solving the equations of elastodynamics. This switching method has been implemented in 1D, taking large time steps through the interseismic period and much smaller time steps in order to fully resolve coseismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In 2D we have solved the quasi-static equations for the antiplane problem by imposing constant creep at the downdip extension of the fault, intended to capture the effect of slow loading during the interseismic period. We have concurrently begun to use 2D plane strain models with off-fault plasticity to approximate multiple earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on rough faults. The initial conditions prior to the first event are sufficient to immediately nucleate dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Once the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has terminated and slip velocity is sufficiently small, fault <span class="hlt">strength</span> evolves according to the aging law and the system is loaded by a constant increment in shear stress in the medium. This incremental method is an easy implementation that allows us to generate earthquake cycles on rough faults, but it is an approximation in the sense that it may overlook effects such as creep and afterslip during an interseismic time step. For the time being it may be a useful tool for incorporating the basic effects of interseismic load accumulation and to study how heterogenous residual stresses affect subsequent <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. However, it will be important to see what additional effects are captured once we implement the quasi-static evolution on rough faults with off-fault plasticity via our switching method.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Erickson, B. A.; Dunham, E. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608072"> <span id="translatedtitle">Guide to <span class="hlt">transverse</span> projections and mass-constraining variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper seeks to demonstrate that many of the existing mass-measurement variables proposed for hadron colliders (m{sub T}, m{sub eff}, m{sub T2}, missing p-vector{sub T}, h{sub T}, {radical}(s-circumflex){sub min}, etc.) are far more closely related to each other than is widely appreciated, and indeed can all be viewed as a common mass-bound specialized for a variety of purposes. A consequence of this is that one may understand better the <span class="hlt">strengths</span> and weaknesses of each variable, and the circumstances in which each can be used to best effect. In order to achieve this, we find it necessary first to revisit the seemingly empty and infertile wilderness populated by the subscript 'T' (as in 'pe{sub T}') in order to remind ourselves what this process of transversification actually means. We note that, far from being simple, transversification can mean quite different things to different people. Those readers who manage to battle through the barrage of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> notation distinguishing 'T' from 'v' or or from 'o', and 'early projection' from 'late projection', will find their efforts rewarded towards the end of the paper with (i) a better understanding of how collider mass variables fit together, (ii) an appreciation of how these variables could be generalized to search for things more complicated than supersymmetry, (iii) will depart with an aversion to thoughtless or naieve use of the so-called '<span class="hlt">transverse</span> methods' of any of the popular computer Lorentz-vector libraries, and (iv) will take care in their subsequent papers to be explicit about which of the 61 identified variants of the '<span class="hlt">transverse</span> mass' they are employing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barr, A. J. [Department of Physics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Khoo, T. J.; Lester, C. G. [Department of Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Konar, P. [Theoretical Physics Group, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, Gujarat - 380 009 (India); Kong, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KA 66045 (United States); Matchev, K. T.; Park, M. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvD..84i5031B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Guide to <span class="hlt">transverse</span> projections and mass-constraining variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper seeks to demonstrate that many of the existing mass-measurement variables proposed for hadron colliders (mT, meff, mT2, missing p?T, hT, s^min?, etc.) are far more closely related to each other than is widely appreciated, and indeed can all be viewed as a common mass-bound specialized for a variety of purposes. A consequence of this is that one may understand better the <span class="hlt">strengths</span> and weaknesses of each variable, and the circumstances in which each can be used to best effect. In order to achieve this, we find it necessary first to revisit the seemingly empty and infertile wilderness populated by the subscript 揟 (as in 損?T) in order to remind ourselves what this process of transversification actually means. We note that, far from being simple, transversification can mean quite different things to different people. Those readers who manage to battle through the barrage of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> notation distinguishing ? from ? or from ?, and 揺arly projection from 搇ate projection, will find their efforts rewarded towards the end of the paper with (i) a better understanding of how collider mass variables fit together, (ii) an appreciation of how these variables could be generalized to search for things more complicated than supersymmetry, (iii) will depart with an aversion to thoughtless or na飗e use of the so-called <span class="hlt">transverse</span> methods of any of the popular computer Lorentz-vector libraries, and (iv) will take care in their subsequent papers to be explicit about which of the 61 identified variants of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mass they are employing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barr, A. J.; Khoo, T. J.; Konar, P.; Kong, K.; Lester, C. G.; Matchev, K. T.; Park, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvS..16d4201X"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single-knob beam line for <span class="hlt">transverse</span> emittance partitioning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Flat beams feature unequal emittances in the horizontal and vertical phase space. Such beams were created successfully in electron machines by applying effective stand-alone solenoid fringe fields in the electron gun. Extension of this method to ion beams was proposed conceptually. The present paper is on the decoupling capabilities of an ion beam emittance transfer line. The proposed beam line provides a single-knob tool to partition the horizontal and vertical rms emittances, while keeping the product of the two emittances constant as well as the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> rms Twiss parameters (?x,y and ?x,y) in both planes. It is shown that this single knob is the solenoid field <span class="hlt">strength</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiao, C.; Kester, O. K.; Groening, L.; Leibrock, H.; Maier, M.; Rottl鋘der, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoRL..38.8310L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> directivity of microearthquake sequences near Parkfield, California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The direction of propagation is an important factor that affects the pattern of ground motion generated by an earthquake. Characterizing factors favoring a potential <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation direction is thus an important task. Here we analyze the earthquake directivity of repeating earthquake sequences located on the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. All earthquakes of a sequence have very similar waveforms and have overlapping surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. We show that subtle variations of the transfer function between earthquakes of a common sequence can be interpreted as a change of apparent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration. Relative apparent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> durations are computed for all pairs of events at all available stations and for each sequence. We invert these measurements to obtain an estimation of the apparent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration for each individual event of the sequence relative to a reference event. Variation of apparent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration with azimuth attests for the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity. We show that the majority of analyzed microearthquakes presents a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the south-east direction. We also show that, on a given repeating sequence, most earthquakes tend to show the same <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lenglin, O.; Got, J.-L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AIPC..907.1466Q"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Modulus of <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> from a Mathematical Point of View</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this work is to present a complete mathematical study about the three-point bending experiments and the modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of brittle materials. We will present the mathematical model associated to three-point bending experiments and we will use the asymptotic expansion method to obtain a new formula to calculate the modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We will compare the modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of porcelain obtained with the previous formula with that obtained by using the classic theoretical formula. Finally, we will also present one and three-dimensional numerical simulations to compute the modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quintela, P.; S醤chez, M. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23464778"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: case report and literature review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is extremely rare. Usually a diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is trauma induced. We describe a case of an 18-year old patient admitted 2 hours after onset, presenting severe epigastric and left sided chest pain without any trauma history. Upright chest x-ray revealed displaced stomach and colon into the left pleural cavity with a collapsed left lung. Surgery for a left-sided diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with stomach, spleen and colon splenic flexure herniation was undertaken. We present a brief review regarding the aetiology, diagnostic and treatment policy of spontaneous diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:23464778</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ghidirim, Gh; Mishin, I; Condratsky, E; Zastavnitsky, Gh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011NJPh...13i5010E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinetics of hole nucleation in biomembrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The core component of a biological membrane is a fluid-lipid bilayer held together by interfacial-hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions, which are balanced for the most part by acyl chain entropy confinement. If biomembranes are subjected to persistent tensions, an unstable (nanoscale) hole will emerge at some time to cause <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Because of the large energy required to create a hole, thermal activation appears to be requisite for initiating a hole and the activation energy is expected to depend significantly on mechanical tension. Although models exist for the kinetic process of hole nucleation in tense membranes, studies of membrane survival have failed to cover the ranges of tension and lifetime needed to critically examine nucleation theory. Hence, <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> giant (~20 ?m) membrane vesicles ultra-slowly to ultra-quickly with slow to fast ramps of tension, we demonstrate a method to directly quantify kinetic rates at which unstable holes form in fluid membranes, at the same time providing a range of kinetic rates from <0.01 to >100 s-1. Measuring lifetimes of many hundreds of vesicles, each tensed by precision control of micropipette suction, we have determined the rates of failure for vesicles made from several synthetic phospholipids plus 1:1 mixtures of phospho- and sphingo-lipids with cholesterol, all of which represent prominent constituents of eukaryotic cell membranes. Plotted on a logarithmic scale, the failure rates for vesicles are found to rise dramatically with an increase in tension. Converting the experimental profiles of kinetic rates into changes of activation energy versus tension, we show that the results closely match expressions for thermal activation derived from a combination of meso-scale theory and molecular-scale simulations of hole formation. Moreover, we demonstrate a generic approach to transform analytical fits of activation energies obtained from <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments into energy landscapes characterizing the process of hole nucleation along the reaction coordinate defined by hole size.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, Evan; Smith, Benjamin A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3620434"> <span id="translatedtitle">Migraine before <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of intracranial aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA. Methods In a prospective case朿ontrol study 199 consecutive patients with SIA (103 females and 96 males, mean age: 43.2爕ears) received a semistructured face to face interview focusing on past headaches. All were admitted to hospital mostly because of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (177) or for unruptured aneurysm (22). In parallel we interviewed 194 blood donors (86 females, 108 males, mean age: 38.4爕ears). Diagnoses were made according to the International Headache Society criteria. Aneurysms were diagnosed by conventional cerebral angiography. Results During the year before <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, 124 (62.3%) had one or more types of headache. These headaches included: migraine without aura (MO): 78 (39.2%), migraine with aura (MA): 2 (1%), probable migraine (PM): 4 (2%), tension-type headache (TTH): 39 (19.6%), cluster headache (CH): 2 (1%), posttraumatic headaches (PH): 2 (1%). 1-year prevalence of headaches in controls was 32.5% (63 patients out of 194), they included: TTH: 45 (23.1%), MO: 17(8.8%), PH: 1(0.5%). Only the prevalence of MO was significantly higher in patients with SIA (OR 6.7, 95% CI 3.8-11.9, p?<?0.0001). Conclusions Unruptured SIA cause a marked increase in the prevalence of migraine without aura but not in the prevalence of other types of headache.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.T54B..08P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Characteristics and <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Mechanics of the Yushu Earthquake (Ms7.1), 14/04/2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On April 14th 2010, a disastrous earthquake (Ms 7.1) struck Yushu County, Qinghai Province, China, killing thousands of people. This earthquake occurred as a result of sinistral strike-slip faulting on the western segment of the Xianshuihe Fault zone in eastern Tibetan Plateau. Our group conducted scientific investigation in the field on co-seismic surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and active tectonics in the epicenter area immediately after the earthquake. Here, we introduce our preliminary results on the surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanics of the Yushu Earthquake. The surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone of Yushu earthquake, which is about 49 km-long, consists of 3 discontinuous left stepping <span class="hlt">rupture</span> segments, which are 19 km, 22 km, and about 8 km, respectively, from west to east. Each segment consists of a series of right stepping en-echelon branch <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. The branch <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> consist of interphase push-up and tension fissures or simply en-echelon tension fissures. The co-seismic displacements had been surveyed with a total station in detail on landmarks such as rivers, gullies, roads, farmlands, wire poles, and fences. The maximum offset measured is 2.3m, located near the Guoyangyansongduo Village. There are 3 offset peaks along the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone corresponding to the 3 segments of the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone. The maximum offsets in the west, central, and east segment <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones are 1.4m, 2.3m, and 1.6m respectively. The surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone of Yushu earthquake strikes in a 310癗W direction. The fault plane dips to the northeast and the dip angle is about 81. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone is developed in transtension setting. Tension normal fault developed during the sinistral strike-slip process of the fault. The valley west of Yushu City and the Longbao Lake are both pull-apart basins formed during the transtension activity of the fault.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pan, J.; Li, H.; Xu, Z.; Li, N.; Wu, F.; Guo, R.; Zhang, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T21E..03S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation beneath potential landslide wedge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0), much larger slip and tsunami occurred than expectation at outer-wedge (toe of the trench landward slope) of Japan trench (eg. Ide et al., 2011). Similarly, outer-wedge deformation was pointed out in northern segment of 1986 Meiji-Sanriku earthquake (Ms 7.2), and it was discussed that earthquake-related landslide induced large tsunami (eg. Kanamori, 1972; Tanioka and Satake, 1996). Many landslides and normal faults, potential tsunami genesis, are developed at outer-wedge of Japan trench (Henry et al., 1989). Some steep normal-faults turn to horizon at deep portion, and land sliding may be prevented by basal friction. If seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagates to basal fault of the outer-wedge, triggered gravity collapse will enlarge deformation of the outer-wedge to cause large tsunamis. It was considered that seismogenic fault locks at deep portion under inner-wedge of the plate subduction zone, and outer-wedge was classified into aseismic zone classically. Seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation to outer-wedge is still uncertain. Seismic slip at the outer-wedge was found from the drilled core during IODP Nankai trough seismogenic zone drilling project (NanTroSEIZE) in Nankai trough, southwest Japan. Samples were obtained from the frontal thrust (438 mbsf), which connects the deep plate boundary to the seafloor at the toe of the accretionary wedge, and from a megasplay fault (271 mbsf) that branches from the plate boundary d閏ollement. Higher vitrinite reflectance of 0.57 % and 0.37 % than the host rock of 0.24 % were found at splay and plate boundary faults zones respectively. These correspond with 300-400 癈 and > 20癈 of host rock. Local high temperature zone less than several cm thick may be caused by frictional shear heat at fault zone (Sakaguchi, et al., 2011). Shear velocity and durations can be estimated from thermal property of the sediment and distribution of the vitrinite anomaly (Hamada et al., 2011). This result shows that seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been propagated to outer-wedge of the plate subduction zone. Such a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation probably trigger gravity collapse of the outer-wedge.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sakaguchi, A.; Kawamura, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1073757"> <span id="translatedtitle">Embolisation of recently <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> intracranial aneurysms.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage due to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of aneurysms unsuitable for craniotomy and clipping have been treated by coil embolisation within three weeks. Sixty nine of 75 consecutive patients were successfully treated. Procedure related complications occurred in 10 patients, resulting in permanent neurological deficits in three and one death (4.8%). The Glasgow outcome scores at six weeks were 53 grade 1, seven grade 2, four grade 3, and five grade 5. These results are comparable with surgical series despite a high proportion of aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Byrne, J V; Molyneux, A J; Brennan, R P; Renowden, S A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16089834"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anisotropy in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lines of paper sheets.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have experimentally investigated the fracture process in paper samples submitted to a uniaxial force. Five types of paper sheets (newsprint, towel, sulfite, silk, and couche papers) were fractured along two orthogonal orientations. In order to characterize the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lines of the paper sheets we utilized the Hurst exponent. Our results indicate a dependence of the Hurst exponent on the orientation of the paper sheets for samples of newsprint and, probably, towel and silk papers. For the other types of paper the Hurst exponent does not depend on the direction of crack propagation. PMID:16089834</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Menezes-Sobrinho, I L; Couto, M S; Ribeiro, I R B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-06-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhRvE..71f6121M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anisotropy in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lines of paper sheets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have experimentally investigated the fracture process in paper samples submitted to a uniaxial force. Five types of paper sheets (newsprint, towel, sulfite, silk, and couche papers) were fractured along two orthogonal orientations. In order to characterize the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lines of the paper sheets we utilized the Hurst exponent. Our results indicate a dependence of the Hurst exponent on the orientation of the paper sheets for samples of newsprint and, probably, towel and silk papers. For the other types of paper the Hurst exponent does not depend on the direction of crack propagation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Menezes-Sobrinho, I. L.; Couto, M. S.; Ribeiro, I. R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22914234"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an unscarred uterus diagnosed in the puerperium: a rare occurrence.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe a rare case report of unscarred uterus <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (UR) diagnosed in the puerperium after a vacuum extraction (VE) delivery of a healthy newborn. In this instance, no risk factors were found apart from the use of VE in the setting of prolonged deceleration. The suspicion of the diagnosis was made because of the patient's constant distressing abdominal pain with peritoneal signs as well as a drop in haemoglobin. In the exploratory laparotomy, a 2000 ml haemoperitoneum and a complete <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tear of the uterine fundus 10 cm long was found in a structurally normal uterus. Peritoneal lavage was effected and the tear was repaired. A very high index of suspicion is needed and the longer the delay in making the diagnosis, and starting treatment, the greater the clinical risk. Since the risk of UR in subsequent pregnancies is very high, caesarean delivery is recommended in any future pregnancy, after fetal pulmonary maturity is confirmed. PMID:22914234</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faria, Joana; Henriques, C閘ia; Silva, Maria do Carmo; Mira, Ricardo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA281587"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deformation, <span class="hlt">Strength</span>, and Failure Modes of Laminated Conventional and Hybrid Polymer-Matrix Composites Loaded in the Thickness Direction.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thickness properties of laminated composites have not been as thoroughly investigated as in plane properties. Previous work by this investigator indicated that these properties, both elastic and <span class="hlt">strength</span>, differ significantly from the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> propertie...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. A. Fahmy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/383009"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> match of high peak-current beam into the LANSCE DTL using PARMILA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new algorithm that uses a multiparticle PARMILA-based code to match high peak current H{sup +} beam ({approx}21 mA) into the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) drift tube linac (DTL) has been developed. Two single cell rf bunchers in the low energy beam transport (LEBT) prepare the initially unbunched beam for DTL capture. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> distribution at the entrance to the DTL is set with four quadrupoles in the 1.26 m between the last <span class="hlt">transverse</span> emittance measuring station and the DTL entrance. Previous matching algorithms used TRACE and TRACE 3-D to determine these quadrupole <span class="hlt">strengths</span>. PARMILA simulation show this procedure produces non-zero mismatch and additional emittance growth through the DTL for high current beams. Because of strong space-charge forces and a rapidly forming longitudinal bunch, simple envelope calculations do not model the beam evolution in the LEBT well. A PARMILA model of this region was combined with ant iterative search routine to set the LEBT quadrupole <span class="hlt">strengths</span> to achieve a better <span class="hlt">transverse</span> match into the DTL. Simulations predict a significant reduction in <span class="hlt">transverse</span> emittance at the exit of the DTL over the typical TRACE 3-D result.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Merrill, F.E.; Rybarcyk, L.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhSS...55.2182Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasi-stationary electron states in a multilayered structure in longitudinal electric and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetic fields</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A theory of spectral parameters, dynamic conductivity, and relative integrated emission intensity has been proposed in the model of the open resonant-tunneling structure as a separate cascade of a quantum cascade laser in a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetic field. It has been shown that, according to the experiment by Blaser and colleagues, as the magnetic field <span class="hlt">strength</span> increases to 8 T, the emission peak shifts to higher energies, while its relative integrated intensity in the <span class="hlt">strength</span> range of 0-14 T decreases abruptly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zegrya, G. G.; Tkach, N. V.; Boiko, I. V.; Seti, Yu. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=481840"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the myocardium. Occurrence and risk factors.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The occurrence of myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was studied in a well defined unselected population of patients with acute myocardial infarction, and the group of patients who died of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the heart were compared with two control groups. Of a total of 3960 patients, 1746 (44%) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for acute myocardial infarction. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> was defined solely on the basis of the presence of a pathological passage through part of the myocardium, either the free wall of the left ventricle or the septum, found at necropsy or during operation. Two controls were selected for each patient and matched for age and sex, one (control group A) with acute myocardial infarction having died in hospital but not of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (non-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> cardiac death) and one (control group B) with acute myocardial infarction having survived the hospital stay. Necropsy was performed in 75% of all fatal cases with acute myocardial infarction. The total hospital mortality was 19%, the highest mortality being among women over 70 years (29%). <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> (n = 56) were found in 17% of the hospital deaths, or 3.2% of all cases of acute myocardial infarction. Women aged less than 70 had the highest incidence of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, 42% of deaths being due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The mean age for patients with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and controls was 70.5 years. The median time after admission to death was approximately 50 hours for patients and control group A. Thirty per cent of the patients with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred within 24 hours of the initial symptoms occurring. Angina and previous acute myocardial infarction were more common among control group A. Patients with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and control group B were mostly relatively free of previous cardiovascular or other diseases (chronic angina pectoris ( > 2 months) and previous myocardial infarction). Sustained hypertension during admission to the coronary care unit was more common in patients than in control group A. Hypotension and shock were more common among control group A. Most (79%) of the patients who subsequently <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> did not receive any corticosteroids at all during the hospital stay. Severe heart failure and antiarrhythmic treatment were more uncommon among patients than among control group A. Patients with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> received analgesics approximately three times a day throughout their stay. Control group B received analgesics mostly during the first 24 hours. Thus female patients, patients with first infarcts, and patients with sustained chest pain should be investigated for the possibility of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. As many as one third (32%) of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> may be subacute, and therefore time is available for diagnosis and surgery.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dellborg, M; Held, P; Swedberg, K; Vedin, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40360583"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of mechanical behavior of CFRC <span class="hlt">transverse</span> to the fiber direction at room and cryogenic temperature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Interface behavior and mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> to fiber direction were studied at room and liquid nitrogen temperature to investigate their applicability for cryogenic use. An attempt has been made to improve the properties of the composites by means of incorporating nano-sized Al2O3 filler into the matrix. Young's modulus and interlaminar shear <span class="hlt">strength</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M Hussain; A Nakahira; S Nishijima; K Niihara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JPES....2..620I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Method of In-pile Creep <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Behavior of ODS Cladding Materials in the Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An in-pile creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiment was conducted in the experimental fast reactor Joyo to evaluate the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel under neutron irradiation. ODS has been developed as a most promising fuel cladding material for the next generation fast reactor because of its high temperature resistance and low swelling properties. The irradiation test device MAterial testing RIg with temperature COntrol (MARICO) was developed for the in-pile experiment in Joyo with a temperature control precision of 4癈. Twenty four ODS specimens with no fuel were pressurized by helium gas up to 22 MPa to accelerate the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> testing. The specimen temperature in the MARICO is controlled by changing the ratio of argon and helium fill gases, which changes the gas gap thermal conductivity between the double walled capsule containing the specimen. The experiment was carried out in the Joyo MK-III core from April 2006 until May 2007. Each creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> event was successfully detected by the temperature change at the exit of the capsule and by gamma-ray spectrometry of the reactor cover gas when the filled gas was released from the specimen. The specimen was then identified by analyzing the tag gas isotopic ratio using laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ito, Chikara; Kagota, Eiichi; Aoyama, Takafumi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22487903"> <span id="translatedtitle">Outcomes After Knee Joint Extensor Mechanism Disruptions: Is It Better to Fracture the Patella or <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> the Tendon?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to compare the outcome after the operative treatment of patella fractures (PFs) as compared with those of quadriceps tendon and patella tendon (PT) <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. DESIGN: This pertains to a retrospective case control. SETTING: The setting was in academic teaching hospitals. PATIENTS: Ninety-four patients with 99 extensor mechanism disruptions were treated operatively. Of these, 50 (50%) were PFs; 36 (37%) were quadriceps <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>; and 13 (13%) were PT <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The patients were evaluated at 6 and 12 months and were tested for range of motion, quadriceps circumference and <span class="hlt">strength</span>, SF36, Lysholm, and Tegner outcome scores by independent observers. Radiographs of the knee were obtained to assess bony healing, posttraumatic arthritis, and heterotopic ossification RESULTS: A minimum of 12-month follow-up (range 12-81 months) was available for 76 patients (77%). PFs were seen more commonly in women (P < 0.001) and PT <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> tended to occur in younger males (P < 0.001), with no difference in the body mass index. Thigh circumference was significantly smaller than normal in PFs at 1 year as compared with tendon injuries. At latest follow-up, there were no significant differences noted with respect to knee range of motion, radiographic arthritis, Tegner, Lysholm, or SF36 scores. CONCLUSIONS: There were no significant differences with regard to outcome in patients sustaining these injuries. PMID:22487903</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tejwani, Nirmal C; Lekic, Nikola; Bechtel, Christopher; Montero, Nicole; Egol, Kenneth A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8480668"> <span id="translatedtitle">From <span class="hlt">strength</span> to <span class="hlt">strength</span>: "inner <span class="hlt">strength</span>" with immature ego states.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ego-strengthening literature concentrates on the use of hypnotic techniques with the entire or total personality. Ego-state therapy conceptualizes the ego as a system of subpersonalities or ego states that have shifting energies. At any particular time the ego state with the most energy is dominant or executive. Any technique that can be used with an individual patient can also be used with an identified ego state. The "inner-<span class="hlt">strength</span>" hypnotic technique has been used for ego strengthening and mobilization of inner resources. In this paper the "inner-<span class="hlt">strength</span>" technique is used with ego states that have been identified as responsible for specific symptoms. We will discuss indications for the appropriate use of this technique in ego-state therapy and the mechanisms of its role in the resolution of symptoms in the cases presented. PMID:8480668</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frederick, C; McNeal, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/687958"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> fields in dielectric wake field accelerators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Theory is presented for excitation of hybrid electric/magnetic ({ital HEM}) wake-field modes by passage of an electron drive bunch in a dielectric-lined cylindrical waveguide. The drive bunch is moving parallel to the waveguide axis, but is displaced by a radial increment r{sub 0}. Knowledge of the amplitudes of all {ital HEM} modes allows calculation of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> forces on a bunch or bunches that follow the displaced drive bunch. Approximate formulas for the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> forces on a trailing bunch are given, valid in the limit of small r{sub 0}. These <span class="hlt">transverse</span> forces can lead to beam instability, if cumulative <span class="hlt">transverse</span> motion is significant on the time-scale of passage of the bunch through the accelerator module. Constructive interference can be present amongst TM{sub 0m} monopole modes that produce highly-peaked spatiotemporally-localized axial wake-fields, with peak fields at the locations of trailing bunches in a multi-bunch train. In this case, the spectrum of dipole (and higher order) {ital HEM} modes may not enjoy the same degree of constructive interference, and may not have the same axial periodicity as the monopole modes. Further analytical and computational study is needed to determine the limitations that <span class="hlt">transverse</span> wake fields may impose on a multi-bunch dielectric wake-field accelerator. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hirshfield, J.L.; Park, S.Y.; Zhang, T. [Omega-P, Inc. 202008 Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-2008 (United States); Hirshfield, J.L.; Park, S.Y. [Department of Physics, Yale University, POB 8120, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8120 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1041537"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nucleon Spin Structure: Longitudinal and <span class="hlt">Transverse</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments have provided us with the most extensive information on the unpolarized and longitudinal polarized parton (quark and gluon) distributions in the nucleon. It has becoming clear that <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum dependent distributions (TMDs) study are crucial for a more complete understanding of the nucleon structure and the dynamics of the strong interaction. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin structure and the TMDs are the subject of increasingly intense theoretical and experimental study recently. With a high luminosity electron beam facility, JLab has played a major role in the worldwide effort to study both the longitudinal and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin structure. Highlights of recent results will be presented. With 12-GeV energy upgrade, JLab will provide the most precise measurements in the valence quark region to close a chapter in longitudinal spin study. JLab will also perform a multi-dimensional mapping of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin structure and TMDs in the valence quark region through Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments, providing a 3-d partonic picture of the nucleon in momentum space and extracting the u and d quark tensor charges of the nucleon. The precision mapping of TMDs will also allow a detailed study of the quark orbital motion and its dynamics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jian-Ping Chen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRB..116.2310B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic seismic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on melting fault zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a physical model that describes the behavior of spontaneous earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> dynamically propagating on a fault zone and that accounts for the presence of frictional melt produced by the sliding surfaces. First, we analytically derive the solution for the temperature evolution inside the melt layer, which generalizes previous approximations. Then we incorporate such a solution into a numerical code for the solution of the elastodynamic problem. When a melt layer is formed, the linear slip-weakening law (initially governing the fault and relying on the Coulomb friction) is no longer valid. Therefore we introduce on the fault a linearly viscous rheology, with a temperature-dependent dynamic viscosity. We explore through numerical simulations the resulting behavior of the traction evolution in the cohesive zone before and after the transition from Coulomb friction and viscous rheology. The predictions of our model are in general agreement with the data from exhumed faults. We also find that the fault, after undergoing the breakdown stress drop controlled by the slip-weakening constitutive equation, experiences a second traction drop controlled by the exponential weakening of fault resistance due to the viscous rheology. This further drop enhances the instability of the fault, increasing the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds, the peaks in fault slip velocity, and the fracture energy density.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bizzarri, Andrea</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsads.u-strasbg.fr/abs/2003PhDT.......144G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behavior of grid-stiffened composite structures under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> loading</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The energy absorption characteristics and failure modes of grid-stiffened composite plates under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> load were studied in detail. Several laboratory scale composite grid plates were fabricated by using co-mingled E-glass fiber/polypropylene matrix and carbon/nylon composites in a thermoplastic stamping process. Both experimental and finite element approaches were used to evaluate and understand the role of major failure modes on the performance of damaged grid-stiffened composite plates under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> load. The load-deflection responses of grid-stiffened composite plates were determined and compared with those of sandwich composite plates of the same size. The failure modes of grid-stiffened composite plates under different load conditions were investigated and used as the basis for FEA models. The intrinsic <span class="hlt">strength</span> properties of constituent composite materials were measured by using either three point bending or tensile test and were used as input data to the FEA models. Several FEA models including the major failure modes based on the experimental results were built to simulate the damage processes of grid-stiffened composite plates under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> load. A FORTRAN subroutine was implemented within the ABAQUS code to incorporate the material failure models. Effects of damage on the modal frequencies and loss factors of grid-stiffened composite plates were also investigated experimentally. Experimental and simulation results showed that sandwich composite specimens failed catastrophically with the load dropping sharply at the displacement corresponding to initial and final failure. However, grid-stiffened composite specimens failed in a more gradual and forgiving way in a sequence of relatively small load drops. No catastrophic load drops were observed in the grid structures over the range of displacements investigated here. The SEA values of the grid composite specimens are typically higher than those of the sandwich specimens with the same boundary conditions. The energy absorption capability was significantly improved when loading was applied on the rib side for the grid-stiffened composite plates. It is possible to use vibration tests as a nondestructive means of inspecting for damage and/or defects of grid-stiffened composite specimens. Finite element models were found to be capable of simulating the damage process of grid-stiffened composite plates under quasi-static <span class="hlt">transverse</span> loading.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gan, Changsheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12603988"> <span id="translatedtitle">The spin glass-antiferromagnetism competition in Kondo-lattice systems in the presence of a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> applied magnetic field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A theory is proposed to describe the competition among antiferromagnetism (AF), spin glass (SG) and Kondo effect. The model describes two Kondo sublattices with an intrasite Kondo interaction <span class="hlt">strength</span> JK and a random Gaussian interlattice interaction in the presence of a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> field ?. The ? field is introduced as a quantum mechanism to produce spin flipping and the random</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. G. MagalhaesF; F. M. Zimmer; B. Coqblin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55982436"> <span id="translatedtitle">The spin glass-antiferromagnetism competition in Kondo-lattice systems in the presence of a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> applied magnetic field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A theory is proposed to describe the competition among antiferromagnetism (AF), spin glass (SG) and Kondo effect. The model describes two Kondo sublattices with an intrasite Kondo interaction <span class="hlt">strength</span> J and a random Gaussian interlattice interaction in the presence of a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> field Gamma. The Gamma field is introduced as a quantum mechanism to produce spin flipping and the random</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. G. Magalhaes; F. M. Zimmer; B. Coqblin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31106043"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diabetes mellitus with left <span class="hlt">transverse</span> sinus thrombosis and right <span class="hlt">transverse</span> sinus aplasia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 67-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus was hospitalized due to a throbbing headache. She appeared neurologically normal, except for meningeal irritation. The cerebrospinal fluid pressure was high. There was increased fluid protein without an increased cell count. Brain CT scan showed no abnormality, however, brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed complete right <span class="hlt">transverse</span> sinus stasis and partial left <span class="hlt">transverse</span> sinus</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takashi Nagai; Takashi Tomizawa; Naoko Tonooka; Yoshinori Mita; Shuzou Misumi; Masatomo Mori</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/t3u346n3u43qtm4k.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aortic isthmus: An emergency?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objectives of this study were to explore the hypotheses that: (1) patients with traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aortic isthmus (TRA) who have not exsanguinated into the pleural cavity upon hospital presentation are unilikely to develop <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the hematoma during the time necessary to investigate all injuries and attend to those of more immediate danger; and (2) appropriate medical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James W. Pate; Timothy C. Fabian; William Walker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32875810"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monochorionic Twins with <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Vasa Previa: Double Trouble!</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Velamentous cord insertion and vasa previa occur more frequently in monochorionic twin pregnancies than in singleton pregnancies. Both have been linked with poor perinatal outcome due to the increased risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the velamentous vessels. We present a case of acute fetal distress in 2 fetuses in a monochorionic twin pregnancy caused by <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vasa previa that was not</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Papathanasiou; R. Witlox; D. Oepkes; F. J. Walther; K. W. M. Bloemenkamp; E. Lopriore</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34938741"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonoxidative modification of low density lipoprotein by <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> myocytes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, the interaction of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cardiac myocytes with low density lipoprotein (LDL) has been investigated and the consequent extent of uptake by macrophages. The results show that lysate released from <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> myocytes is capable of inducing LDL oxidation and that the resulting modified form is recognised and degraded by macrophages. Peroxyl radical scavengers inhibit the LDL oxidation but</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Louise C Bourne; David J Lamb; Cliff S Collis; Michael O'Brien; David S Leake; Catherine Rice-Evans</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23008157"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aortocoronary saphenous vein graft <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during diagnostic angiography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coronary saphenous vein graft (SVG) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during diagnostic angiography is a very rare but known complication of the procedure. It has typically been reported to occur at the site of pseudoaneurysms or secondary to an interventional procedure involving the graft. We present a case of SVG mid-body <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during diagnostic angiography that occurred without evidence of pseudoaneurysmal changes. PMID:23008157</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salcedo, Jonathan D; Bhakta, Mayurkumar D; Kern, Morton J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31498569"> <span id="translatedtitle">Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a presenting feature of endocarditis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe the first case of infective endocarditis presenting with spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Our patient, a known intravenous drug user presented with hypovolaemic shock secondary to splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The patient was resuscitated and underwent an emergency splenectomy. Subsequent clinical examination revealed a systolic murmur and a diagnosis of mitral valve infective endocarditis was made after echocardiography. Splenic tissue, blood cultures</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James Roger Winearls; Steven McGloughlin; John F Fraser</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v104/iB04/98JB02412/98JB02412.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of moderate earthquakes by inverting accelerograms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a waveform inversion method that uses recordings of small events as Green's functions to map the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth of moderate earthquakes. The method fits P and S waveforms from many stations simultaneously in an iterative procedure to estimate the subevent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time and amplitude relative to the Green's function event. We invert the accelerograms written by two moderate</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Margaret Hellweg; John Boatwright</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1550485"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cardiac <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from blunt trauma with atrial septal defect.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A review of the literature disclosed 63 survivors of cardiac chamber <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from blunt trauma, with no mention of associated atrial septal defect. I treated a 17-year-old girl and a 33-year-old man who survived cardiac <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from motor vehicle accidents, both of whom were discovered postoperatively on echocardiography to have atrial septal defects. PMID:1550485</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baumgartel, E D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10678647"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: recent outcome with regard to neurologic deficit</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background. Traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is highly lethal, and its surgical treatment is complicated by a high rate of paraplegia.Methods. The charts of 263 patients with traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from vehicular accidents treated between 1971 and 1998 were reviewed. Patients were grouped according to four periods: group 1, 1971 to 1975, (n = 31); group 2, 1976 to 1985, (n =</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Safuh Attar; Marcelo G. Cardarelli; Stephen W. Downing; Aurelio Rodriguez; Douglas C. Wallace; Robert S. West; Joseph S. McLaughlin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48955098"> <span id="translatedtitle">Depth dependence of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity in deep earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Explaining deep seismicity is a long-standing challenge in earth science. Between 300 and 700 km depth, earthquakes are scarce except between ?530 and ?600 km, where the majority of events occur. By imaging the seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process for a set of recent deep earthquakes using the back projection of teleseismic P-waves, we found that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities are less than</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mitsuru Suzuki; Yuji Yagi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41269107"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effect of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on fetal heart rate patterns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The high success rate of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and its low association with complications has led to VBACs being attempted at all types of facilities, including birth centers. It must be kept in mind that unpredictable uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can occur and that uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> necessitates emergency intervention. The only reported predictable feature of fetal heart rate patterns</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cydney Afriat Menihan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32419400"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: a considerable risk for young teenagers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tracheobronchial (TB) <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are ten times lower in children than in adults. Despite its rarity in the literature, we found that it is as common as in adults in our series. We investigated TB <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in childhood regarding age, trauma presentation, injury localization and treatment options. From 1994 through 2001, eight children (six male, two female) were admitted to our</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Melih Kaptanoglu; Kasim Dogan; Aydin Nadir; Ugur Gonlugur; Ibrahim Akkurt; Zehra Seyfikli; Ilhan Gunay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5859631"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predicting the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Probabilities of Molecular Bonds in Series</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An assembly of two receptor ligand bonds in series will typically break at the weaker complex upon application of an external force. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site depends highly on the binding potentials of both bonds and on the loading rate of the applied force. A model is presented that allows simulations of force-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of bonds in series at a given</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gregor Neuert; Christian H. Albrecht; Hermann E. Gaub</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.5421G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process of the 2000 and 2008 謑fus (Iceland) earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of three earthquakes occurred in 2000 (17-06, Mw=6.5 and 21-06, Mw=6.4) and 2008 (29-05, Mw=6.2) in Iceland, with epicentres very close. We have estimated focal mechanism from inversion of body waves at teleseismic distances (30-90) using the algorithm developed by Kikuchi and Kanamori for a kinematic source. In a second step, the slip distribution over the fault-plane has been estimated. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and direction of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have been estimated from Rayleigh waves using the directivity function. The obtained results show similar focal mechanism for the three earthquakes corresponding to strike-slip motion. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane is oriented in all cases in NS direction, which agrees with tectonics of the area. The slip distribution obtained for the three shocks, shows a single process that starts at shallow depth (5 to 7 km), with the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagating to the south and parallel to the surface. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity estimated from body waves and Rayleigh waves is very low: 1.5 km/s. In order to confirm these low values, we have estimated the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process using strong motion data recorded by Icelandic Strong-Motion Network. Accelerograms were converted to displacement by double integration and filtered. We have carried out a kinematic inversion of these data in order to constraint the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Girona, T醨silo; Pro, Carmen; Buforn, Elisa; Peyrat, Sophie; Sigbj鰎nsson, Ragnar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/e376641g7828m7t6.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> renal artery aneurysm during pregnancy, a clinical dilemma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a renal artery aneurysm (RAA) during pregnancy is a rare event, with a high mortality rate for both mother and fetus. Increased blood flow and intra-abdominal pressure, and vascular changes secondary to increased steroid production are postulated as contributory to the increased risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy. CASE PRESENTATION: We present here a case report of total</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khaled B Soliman; Yaser Shawky; Mohamed M Abbas; Mohamed Ammary; Allaa Shaaban</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9447366"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the uterine artery in pregnancy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the uterine artery in the third trimester of pregnancy is described. Review of the literature reveals only three similar cases. Clinical signs are sudden abdominal pain with hemodynamic collapse and a decrease in the level of hemoglobin. Treatment consists in performing a laparotomy with suturing of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> artery. PMID:9447366</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swaegers, M C; Hauspy, J J; Buytaert, P M; De Maeseneer, M G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30740210"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the anterior cruciate ligament after anabolic steroids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anabolic steroids remain popular among body builders and power athletes despite numerous warning about their side effects. A case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the anterior cruciate ligament is reported in a bodybuilder taking steroids. While there are many published reports of tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with steroid intake, the authors could find no report relating to ligament disruption.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B J Freeman; G D Rooker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8808545"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the anterior cruciate ligament after anabolic steroids.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anabolic steroids remain popular among body builders and power athletes despite numerous warning about their side effects. A case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the anterior cruciate ligament is reported in a bodybuilder taking steroids. While there are many published reports of tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with steroid intake, the authors could find no report relating to ligament disruption. PMID:8808545</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Freeman, B J; Rooker, G D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60682516"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into the inferior vena</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giuseppe Guzzardi; Rita Fossaceca; Ignazio Divenuto; Antonello Musiani; Piero Brustia; Alessandro Carriero</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2496021"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the stomach following mouth-to-mouth respiration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Successful repair and survival after <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the stomach in a patient who received mouth-to-mouth respiration is presented. We were able to find only one report in the literature where <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the stomach occurred following this manoeuvre梩he patient did not survive. The possible aetiological factors and measures designed to avoid this complication are discussed. ImagesFig. 1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Solowiejczyk, M.; Wapnick, S.; Koren, E.; Mandelbaum, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EGGLTR1127"> <span id="translatedtitle">Offsite Exposure from <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Waste Gas Decay Tank.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The offsite exposure resulting in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the waste gas decay (storage) tank has been calculated. The tank <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is assumed to occur following a 20% fuel pin perforation blowdown experiment from which the gaseous fission products have been transf...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. A. Dinneen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59275619"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> while playing basketball</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M Shah; N Jooma</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40786419"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in materials containing an amorphous phase</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experimental observations of creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in materials containing an amorphous second phase are presented. Based on these and other observations, a theoretical model is developed for a dominant aspect of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: creep crack growth. According to the model the crack extends into a damage zone consisting of cavities in the second phase. Two limiting solutions are presented. One occurs when</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. D. Thouless; A. G. Evans</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26173142"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biomechanics of Plaque <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Progress, Problems, and New Frontiers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has become identified as a critical step in the evolution of arterial plaques, especially as clinically significant events occur in critical arteries. It has become common in the past dozen years or so to consider which plaques are vulnerable, even though not yet <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. Thrombotic events have remained significant, but in a context where they are seen as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter D. Richardson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/ag8p5j9ajdgwc0xj.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Emergent endovascular treatment of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of endovascular and surgical treatments for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs) to determine which treatment is preferable. We evaluated the cases of 25 consecutive patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> VADAs treated in our institution. From 1992 to 1997, five patients were treated surgically. Since 1998, 20 patients with VADAs have been</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Sugiu; K. Tokunaga; K. Watanabe; W. Sasahara; S. Ono; T. Tamiya; I. Date</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dredizaltinli.com/isolated_duodenal_rupture.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolated duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to blunt abdominal trauma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following blunt abdominal trauma is rare and it usually seen with other abdominal organ injuries. It represents approximately 2% to 20% of patients with blunt abdominal injury and often occurs after blows to the upper abdomen, or abdominal compression from high-riding seat belts. Two cases of blunt duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> successfully treated surgically, are presented with their preoperative diagnosis</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Atilla Celik; Ediz Altinli; Ender Onur; Aziz Sumer; Neset Koksal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S14A..07L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Depth-varying <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Properties of Subduction Zone Megathrust Faults</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earth's largest earthquakes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> megathrust faults at subduction zone plate boundaries. The 2004 Sumatra (Mw 9.2), 2010 Chile (Mw 8.8) and 2011 Tohoku (Mw 9.0) great earthquakes exhibit similarities in spatial variations of seismic wave radiation from their <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones, with coherent short-period radiation preferentially emanating from the deeper portion of the megathrust while the largest fault displacements occur at shallower megathrust depths with relatively less short-period radiation. In numerous regions, large tsunami earthquakes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the shallowest region of the plate boundary with large displacements and very low short-period radiation, while low-frequency earthquakes, seismic tremor and slow slip events occur down-dip of the primary seismogenic portion of some megathrusts. These observations indicate that interplate thrust faults <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with systematic depth-variations characterized by four distinct domains from the trench to the down-dip edge of the seismogenic zone. Attributes of large <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> such as seismic moment scaled radiated energy vary with the domain or domains <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. Fundamental differences in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior exist between these domains, with variations in frictional properties, pore fluids, sediments, mineral phase, rock-type contrast, and temperature likely contributing to depth-dependent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lay, T.; Kanamori, H.; Ammon, C. J.; Yue, H.; Koper, K. D.; Hutko, A. R.; Brodsky, E. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993emti.rept.....A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Efficient modeling in <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic inhomogeneous media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An efficient modeling technique for <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic, inhomogeneous media is developed using a mix of analytical equations and numerical calculations. The analytic equation for the ray path in a factorized <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic (FTI) media with linear velocity variation, derived by Shearer and Chapman, is used to trace between two points. In addition, an analytical equation is derived for geometrical spreading in FTI media that aids in preserving program efficiency; however, the travel time is calculated numerically. The method is generalized to treat general <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic (TI) media that are not factorized anisotropic inhomogeneous by perturbing the FTI travel times, following the perturbation ideas of Cerveny and Filho. A Kirchhoff summation based program relying on Trorey's diffraction method is used to generate synthetic seismograms for such a medium. For the type of velocity models treated, the program is much more efficient than finite difference and general ray-trace modeling techniques.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alkhalifah, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57201904"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Short Term Lathyrogen Treatment on the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Healing Wounds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">SYNOPSIS IN INTERLINGUA LE EFFECTOS DE BREVE PERIODOS DE TRACTAMENTO CON LATHYROGENO SUPER LE FORTIA DE RESISTENTIA CONTRA RUPTURAS IN VULNERES DURANTE LE PROCESSO GUARITORI.桳e alterationes de tissu conjunctive incontrate in lathyrismo experimental es possibilemente mediate per le liberation de collagenase tissular. Iste hypothese esseva testate indirectemente per un analyse del fortia tensile de vulneres cutanee in stato guaritori in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harmon C. Bickley; James W. Little; Thomas J. Blevins</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1966-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB90257676"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> and Creep-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Properties of Adhesive-Bonded EPDM Joints Stressed in Peel.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The most frequently reported defect in ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer (EPDM) single-ply roofing systems is in field-formed joints. The causes of these joint defects are largely unknown, but they tend to occur a short time after a roof is installed. T...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. W. Martin E. Embree P. E. Stutzman J. A. Lechner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40286810"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructural stability and creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the martensitic steel P92 for advanced power plant</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Japanese 9% Cr steel containing 0.5% Mo and 1.8% W (P92) has been investigated. Quantitative microstructural analyses using TEM of thin foils and extraction double replicas have been carried out after different austenitization and tempering treatments and after creep deformation at 600 and 650癈. Statistical quantitative analyses were undertaken to determine the dislocation density within the martensite laths, the width</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. J. Ennis; A. Zielinska-Lipiec; O. Wachter; A. Czyrska-Filemonowicz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010APS..DFD.GY006B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of thin liquid films with Plateau borders</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In metal foams there is fluid flow from a lamella into the Plateau borders resulting in lamellar thinning. Since surfactants are not used to slow the flow, instability of a lamella quickly leads to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, bubble coalescence and overall coarsening of the foam. This talk presents the results of numerical calculations of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of a lamellar film with Plateau borders in a gas-liquid metallic foam. The numerical calculations show the evolution of a lamella from the initiation of an instability up to the time just prior to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> times and locations are monitored as a function of the Plateau border radius of curvature. The effect of symmetry-breaking configurations in which a lamella spans two Plateau borders having different radii of curvature shows that the location of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be near the thin film - Plateau border junction. Solutions at late times are compared to the similarity solutions for the case of free films without Plateau borders.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brush, Lucien; McIntyre, Alan; Roper, Steven</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3151209"> <span id="translatedtitle">A brachialis muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> diagnosed by ultrasound; case report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Trauma to the elbow caused by lifting heavy objects frequently involves <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the tendon of the biceps brachii muscle. Less frequently a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the brachialis muscle occurs. To our knowledge, only five cases involving traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the brachialis muscle were described in the past 20 years. We will briefly report these cases. To demonstrate and evaluate muscle injuries, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the most sensitive and specific method of choice. We report an isolated brachialis muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> caused by resisted flexion and pronation of the lower arm. Physical examination combined with ultrasound evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> brachialis muscle. Treatment was non-operative with full restoration of function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JMMM..336...75B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phase diagrams of diluted <span class="hlt">transverse</span> Ising nanowire</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, the phase diagrams of diluted Ising nanowire consisting of core and surface shell coupling by Jcs exchange interaction are studied using the effective field theory with a probability distribution technique, in the presence of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> fields in the core and in the surface shell. We find a number of characteristic phenomena. In particular, the effect of concentration c of magnetic atoms, the exchange interaction core/shell, the exchange in surface and the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> fields in core and in surface shell of phase diagrams are investigated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bouhou, S.; Essaoudi, I.; Ainane, A.; Saber, M.; Ahuja, R.; Dujardin, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22072205"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transversely</span> stable soliton trains in photonic lattices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the existence of <span class="hlt">transversely</span> stable soliton trains in optics. These stable soliton trains are found in two-dimensional square photonic lattices when they bifurcate from X-symmetry points with saddle-shaped diffraction inside the first Bloch band and their amplitudes are above a certain threshold. We also show that soliton trains with low amplitudes or bifurcated from edges of the first Bloch band ({Gamma} and M points) still suffer <span class="hlt">transverse</span> instability. These results are obtained in the continuous lattice model and are further corroborated by the discrete model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang Jianke [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17376720"> <span id="translatedtitle">Propagator resolved <span class="hlt">transverse</span> relaxation exchange spectroscopy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present in this communication a novel propagator-resolved <span class="hlt">transverse</span> relaxation exchange experiment. This experiment enhances the previous technique of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> relaxation exchange by enabling spatial resolution. Hence, we are able to obtain separate, and remarkably different, T2-T2 exchange plots, corresponding to different spatial displacement of the spin bearing water molecules in a porous sand matrix. This experiment is the first to combine two inverse Laplace dimensions with a Fourier dimension, opening the door to a host of new experiments combining Fourier and inverse Laplace spectroscopy. PMID:17376720</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Washburn, K E; Callaghan, P T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-02-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JFS....25.1236B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> galloping at low Reynolds numbers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The possibility of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> galloping of a square cylinder at low Reynolds numbers (Re?200, so that the flow is presumably laminar) is analysed. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> galloping is here considered as a one-degree-of-freedom oscillator subjected to fluid forces, which are described by using the quasi-steady hypothesis (time-averaged data are extracted from previous numerical simulations). Approximate solutions are obtained by means of the method of Krylov-Bogoliubov, with two major conclusions: (i) a square cylinder cannot gallop below a Reynolds number of 159 and (ii) in the range 159?Re?200 the response exhibits no hysteresis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barrero-Gil, A.; Sanz-Andr閟, A.; Roura, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.S13A1059Y"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Process of the 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake Inferred From Local P-wave Records: Second hypocenter, Initial <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>, Main <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>, Asperity and Killer Pulse</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 2007 Noto Hanto earthquake (Mjma6.9; Mw6.7) occurred on 25 March 2007 (JST) in the Noto Peninsula area of central Japan, which shook strongly the near-source region. Many strong-motion stations recorded the seismic motion near the source region. In this study we analyzed the P-wave part of such records. In the waveform a typical characteristic can be seen. That is an emergent onset. The strong-motion records at local stations except the three nearest stations show nearly two seconds of small but increasing amplitude arrival (hereafter, called "initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> phase") followed by the onset of the main energy release (hereafter, called "main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> phase"). Such an emergent onset is seen on strong-motion records of other earthquakes (e.g., the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake; the 2005 West Off Fukuoka Prefecture earthquake; the 2007 Niigataken Chuetsu-oki earthquake). For the three nearest stations, S wave may have masked the main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> phase with the lager amplitudes. The P- wave part of the records has another remarkable feature. In the first P onset part of the initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> phase two events can be seen. The difference between the two arrivals is about 0.5 s. Using a master-event technique (Takenaka et al., 2006, EPS) we determined the location of the second event (hereafter called "the second hypocenter") relative to the location of the first event (i.e. hypocenter), and then estimated the relative location and time of the onset of the main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with respect to the second hypocenter. We furthermore mapped the asperity area on the main fault plane using a source imaging technique based on the back-projection (Yamamoto and Takenaka, 2006, AGU Fall Meeting). From these analyses, we derived the following <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history of this earthquake: The initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane and the main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane are different as suggested by the focal mechanism solutions of the P-wave polarities (JMA, 2007) and the CMT (F-net, NIED, 2007). The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> first propagated toward the direction of strike of the initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane for 0.5 seconds and changed to the main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane, where this changing point is the second hypocenter. It located at about 1 km apart from the hypocenter. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> then restarted toward the direction of Wajima City along the main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane. The main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (breaking of the asperity) began at a time of 2.4 s after the second hypocenter onset at a position of 1.0 km and 1.4 km in the strike and updip directions, respectively, from the second hypocenter. The asperity distributes along an updip and strike direction from the second hypocenter and the imaging peak locates around the coast near Monzen-cho, Wajima city in the Noto Peninsula. This estimated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history is consistent with damage distribution and spatial pattern of the observed killer pulse (forward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity pulse) in S-wave portion of the strong-motion records. (Acknowledgements) We used the strong-motion records supplied by the National Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED; K-NET, KiK-net, F-net), and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yamamoto, Y.; Takenaka, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/33929858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous bilateral Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> associated with statin medication despite regular rock climbing exercise</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction<span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> of the Achilles tendon are common however simultaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occur less frequently. Eccentric loading exercise programmes have been used to successfully treat Achilles tendinopathy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael R. Carmont; Adrian M. Highland; Christopher M. Blundell; Mark B. Davies</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S53D..05G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macroscopic Source Properties from Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Styles in Plastic Media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High stress concentrations at earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts may generate an inelastic off-fault response at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tip, leading to increased energy absorption in the damage zone. Furthermore, the induced asymmetric plastic strain field in in-plane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes may produce bimaterial interfaces that can increase radiation efficiency and reduce frictional dissipation. Off-fault inelasticity thus plays an important role for realistic predictions of near-fault ground motion. Guided by our previous studies in the 2D elastic case, we perform <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics simulations including rate-and-state friction and off-fault plasticity to investigate the effects on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties. We quantitatively analyze macroscopic source properties for different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles, ranging from cracks to pulses and subshear to supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, and their transitional mechanisms. The energy dissipation due to off-fault inelasticity modifies the conditions to obtain each <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style and alters macroscopic source properties. We examine apparent fracture energy, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and healing front speed, peak slip and peak slip velocity, dynamic stress drop and size of the process and plastic zones, slip and plastic seismic moment, and their connection to ground motion. This presentation focuses on the effects of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style and off-fault plasticity on the resulting ground motion patterns, especially on characteristic slip velocity function signatures and resulting seismic moments. We aim at developing scaling rules for equivalent elastic models, as function of background stress and frictional parameters, that may lead to improved "pseudo-dynamic" source parameterizations for ground-motion calculation. Moreover, our simulations provide quantitative relations between off-fault energy dissipation and macroscopic source properties. These relations might provide a self-consistent theoretical framework for the study of the earthquake energy balance based on observable earthquake source parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Mai, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div