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1

Strength of transversely isotropic rocks  

E-print Network

This thesis proposes a new Anisotropic Matsuoka-Nakai (AMN) criterion to characterize the failure of transversely isotropic rocks under true triaxial stress states. One major obstacle in formulating an anisotropic criterion ...

Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

2008-01-01

2

Rupture Dynamics: Effect of Small Size Strength Heterogeneity on Earthquake Size, Slip Distribution and Rupture Velocity.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geological data and kinematic inversions of seismological data show that the overall shapes of slip profile along strike present long linear slopes (Manighetti et al., J. Geophys. R, 2005). Rupture dynamics of a homogeneous friction properties fault do not lead to such slip distribution. We tried to retrieve this feature using a direct modelling of earthquake rupture, performing 3D simulations with spontaneous rupture initiation, dynamic rupture propagation, and finally, self rupture arrest (without a priori knowledge of the final size of the event). This last characteristic was obtained by imposing fault resistance to be infinite on some randomly sized and localized small patches. We found that small size heterogeneities, which cannot be identified by kinematic inversions using low frequency signal and hence only describing large-scale properties of earthquakes, might have a great influence on the characteristics of the rupture: -For statistically identical random realizations of barrier distribution, we obtain a great variability of event size, with a majority of small events and a few realizations leading to the entire fault rupture. -The arrest of the rupture by the distributed barrier leads, in general, final slip distribution to decay almost linearly from the zone of maximum slip. -Whereas, on an homogeneous model, one could observe a jump from subshear to supershear rupture propagation velocity, with small barriers but the same slip-weakening law parameters (stress drop, strength excess & Dc), the rupture can keep propagating at subshear velocities.

Hok, S.; Campillo, M.; Cotton, F.; Manighetti, I.; Favreau, P.

2005-12-01

3

Stress-rupture strength of alloy 718  

SciTech Connect

Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-rupture properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.

Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M. [Teledyne Allvac, Monroe, NC (United States)

1996-03-01

4

In Vitro Study of Transverse Strength of Fiber Reinforced Composites  

PubMed Central

Objective Reinforcement with fiber is an effective method for considerable improvement in flexural properties of indirect composite resin restorations. The aim of this in-vitro study was to compare the transverse strength of composite resin bars reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Materials and Methods Thirty six bar type composite resin specimens (3󫎾5 mm) were constructed in three groups. The first group was the control group (C) without any fiber reinforcement. The specimens in the second group (P) were reinforced with pre-impregnated fibers and the third group (N) with non-impregnated fibers. These specimens were tested by the three-point bending method to measure primary transverse strength. Data were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey抯 tests. Results There was a significant difference among the mean primary transverse strength in the three groups (P<0.001). The post-hoc (Tukey) test showed that there was a significant difference between the pre-impregnated and control groups in their primary transverse strength (P<0.001). Regarding deflection, there was also a significant difference among the three groups (P=0.001). There were significant differences among the mean deflection of the control group and two other groups (PC&N<.001 and PC&P=.004), but there was no significant difference between the non-and pre-impregnated groups (PN&P=.813). Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that reinforcement with fiber considerably increased the transverse strength of composite resin specimens, but impregnation of the fiber used implemented no significant difference in the transverse strength of composite resin samples. PMID:22457836

Mosharraf, R.; Hashemi, Z.; Torkan, S.

2011-01-01

5

Stress-rupture strength and microstructural stability of W-HF-C wire reinforced superalloy composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

W-Hf-C/superalloy composites were found to be potentially useful for turbine blade applications on the basis of stress-rupture strength. The 100-and 1000-hour rupture strengths obtained for 70 volume percent fiber composites tested at 1090 C were 420 and 280 MN/sq m (61,000 and 41,000 psi). The investigation indicated that with better quality fibers, composites having 100- and 1000-hour rupture strengths of 570 and 370 MN/sq m (82,000 and 54,000 psi) may be obtained. Metallographic studies indicated sufficient fiber-matrix compatibility for long time applications at 1090 C for 1000 hours or more.

Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

1974-01-01

6

Self-healing slip pulses in dynamic rupture models due to velocity-dependent strength  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Seismological observations of short slip duration on faults (short rise time on seismograms) during earthquakes are not consistent with conventional crack models of dynamic rupture and fault slip. In these models, the leading edge of rupture stops only when a strong region is encountered, and slip at an interior point ceases only when waves from the stopped edge of slip propagate back to that point. In contrast, some seismological evidence suggests that the duration of slip is too short for waves to propagate from the nearest edge of the ruptured surface, perhaps even if the distance used is an asperity size instead of the entire rupture dimension. What controls slip duration, if not dimensions of the fault or of asperities? In this study, dynamic earthquake rupture and slip are represented by a propagating shear crack. For all propagating shear cracks, slip velocity is highest near the rupture front, and at a small distance behind the rupture front, the slip velocity decreases. As pointed out by Heaton (1990), if the crack obeys a negative slip-rate-dependent strength relation, the lower slip velocity behind the rupture front will lead to strengthening that further reduces the velocity, and under certain circumstances, healing of slip can occur. The boundary element method of Hamano (1974) is used in a program adapted from Andrews (1985) for numerical simulations of mode II rupture with two different velocity-dependent strength functions. For the first function, after a slip-weakening displacement, the crack follows an exponential velocity-weakening relation. The characteristic velocity V0 of the exponential determines the magnitude of the velocity-dependence at dynamic velocities. The velocity-dependence at high velocity is essentially zero when V0 is small and the resulting slip velocity distribution is similar to slip weakening. If V0 is larger, rupture propagation initially resembles slip-weakening, but spontaneous healing occurs behind the rupture front. The rise time and rupture propagation velocity depend on the choice of constitutive parameters. The second strength function is a natural log velocity-dependent form similar to constitutive laws that fit experimental rock friction data at lower velocities. Slip pulses also arise with this function. For a reasonable choice of constitutive parameters, slip pulses with this function do not propagate at speeds greater than the Raleighwave velocity. The calculated slip pulses are similar in many aspects to seismic observations of short rise time. In all cases of self-healing slip pulses, the residual stress increases with distance behind the trailing edge of the pulse so that the final stress drop is much less than the dynamic stress drop, in agreement with the model of Brune (1976) and some recent seismological observations of rupture.

Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.

1996-01-01

7

Stress-rupture strength and microstructural stability of tungsten-hafnium-carbon-wire reinforced superalloy composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tungsten-hafnium-carbon - superalloy composites were found to be potentially useful for turbine blade applications on the basis of stress-rupture strength. The 100- and 1000-hr rupture strengths calculated for 70 vol. % fiber composites based on test data at 1090C (2000F) were 420 and 280 MN/m2 (61,000 and 41,000 psi, respectively). The investigation indicated that, with better quality fibers, composites having 100- and 1000-hr rupture strengths of 570 and 370 MN/m2 (82,000 and 54,000 psi, respectively), may be obtained. Metallographic studies indicated sufficient fiber-matrix compatibility for 1000 hr or more at 1090C (2000F).

Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

1974-01-01

8

Rupture Strength of Several Nickel-base Alloys in Sheet Form  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 100-hour rupture strengths of Inconel X, Inconel 700, Incoloy 901, Refractaloy 26, and R-235 at 1200 and 1350 F. in both the annealed and heat-treated conditions were determined. Inconel 700 had the highest rupture strength at both temperatures; Incoloy 901 was second strongest at 1200 F, and R-235 second strongest at 1350 F. With the exception of Incoloy 901, ductility was low. Photomicrographs show that fractures are through the grain boundaries. Results are compared with published data for other sheet alloys and bar stock.

Dance, James H; Clauss, Francis J

1957-01-01

9

The Inclusion of Arbitrary Load Histories in the Strength Decay Model for Stress Rupture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stress rupture is a failure mechanism where failures can occur after a period of time, even though the material has seen no increase in load. Carbon/epoxy composite materials have demonstrated the stress rupture failure mechanism. In a previous work, a model was proposed for stress rupture of composite overwrap pressure vessels (COPVs) and similar composite structures based on strength degradation. However, the original model was limited to constant load periods (holds) at constant load. The model was expanded in this paper to address arbitrary loading histories and specifically the inclusions of ramp loadings up to holds and back down. The broadening of the model allows for failures on loading to be treated as any other failure that may occur during testing instead of having to be treated as a special case. The inclusion of ramps can also influence the length of the "safe period" following proof loading that was previously predicted by the model. No stress rupture failures are predicted in a safe period because time is required for strength to decay from above the proof level to the lower level of loading. Although the model can predict failures during the ramp periods, no closed-form solution for the failure times could be derived. Therefore, two suggested solution techniques were proposed. Finally, the model was used to design an experiment that could detect the difference between the strength decay model and a commonly used model for stress rupture. Although these types of models are necessary to help guide experiments for stress rupture, only experimental evidence will determine how well the model may predict actual material response. If the model can be shown to be accurate, current proof loading requirements may result in predicted safe periods as long as 10(13) years. COPVs design requirements for stress rupture may then be relaxed, allowing more efficient designs, while still maintaining an acceptable level of safety.

Reeder, James R.

2014-01-01

10

Creep and Rupture Strength of an Advanced CVD SiC Fiber  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the as-produced condition the room temperature strength (approx. 6 GPa) of Textron Specialty Materials' 50 microns CVD SiC fiber represents the highest value thus far obtained for commercially produced polycrystalline SiC fibers. To understand whether this strength can be maintained after composite processing conditions, high temperature studies were performed on the effects of time, stress, and environment on 1400 deg. C tensile creep strain and stress rupture on as-produced, chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers. Creep strain results were consistent, allowing an evaluation of time and stress effects. Test environment had no influence on creep strain but I hour annealing at 1600 deg. C in argon gas significantly reduced the total creep strain and increased the stress dependence. This is attributed to changes in the free carbon morphology and its distribution within the CVD SiC fiber. For the as-produced and annealed fibers, strength at 1400 deg. C was found to decrease from a fast fracture value of 2 GPa to a 100-hr rupture strength value of 0. 8 GPa. In addition a loss of fast fracture strength from 6 GPa is attributed to thermally induced changes in the outer carbon coating and microstructure. Scatter in rupture times made a definitive analysis of environmental and annealing effects on creep strength difficult.

Goldsby, J. C.; Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.

1997-01-01

11

Effects of some carbide stabilizing elements on creep-rupture strength and microstructural changes of 18-10 austenitic steel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The creep rupture test has been carried out for 18Cr-10Ni-0.1 wt pct C stainless steels bearing individually Ti, Nb(Cb), and\\u000a V, followed by the microstructural study. The highest value of 700?C-104 h rupture strength in a titanium and niobium series (the steel containing various amounts of titanium and niobium, respectively)\\u000a has been obtained at Ti\\/C and Nb\\/C atomic ratio of

Takayuki Shinoda; Tomoyuki Ishii; Ryohei Tanaka; Tohru Mimino; Kazuhisa Kinoshita; Isao Minegishi

1973-01-01

12

Transverse tensile and stress rupture properties of gamma/gamma prime-delta directionally solidified eutectic  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile and stress rupture properties were determined primarily at 760 C for specimens oriented at various angles (0 deg, 10 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg) from the solidification direction of bars and/or slabs of the Ni-20Cb-6Cr-2.5A (gamma/gamma prime-delta) eutectic. Threaded-head specimens yielded longer rupture lives with significantly less scatter than did tapered-head specimens. Miniature specimens are suitable for determining traverse tensile and rupture properties of 1.2 centimeter diameter bar stock. The 300 hour rupture stress at 760 C for specimens oriented at 10 deg from the solidification direction was reduced from 740 to 460 MPa, and to 230 MPa for material oriented at either 45 deg or 90 deg.

Gray, H. H.

1976-01-01

13

Determination of transverse shear strength through torsion testing  

SciTech Connect

The in-plane characterization of composite materials is, in general, well understood and widely utilized throughout the aerospace industry. However, the use of composites in structural elements such as fuselage frames and rotorcraft flexbeams place large out-of-plane or through-the-thickness stresses for which there is little data. Efforts to determine the interlaminar shear strength of laminated composites have been hampered due to the nonlinear behavior of test specimens and the limitations of current analysis tools. An inexpensive rectangular torsion test specimen was designed to determine the interlaminar shear strength, s{sub 23}, of composite materials. Six different layups were fabricated of AS4/2220-3 carbon/epoxy unidirectional tape and tested in pure torsion. All of the specimens failed abruptly with well-defined shear cracks and exhibited linear load-deflection behavior. A quasi-three-dimensional (Q-3-D) finite element analysis was conducted on each of the specimen configurations to determine the interlaminar shear stress at failure. From this analysis, s{sub 23} was found to be 107 MPa for this material.

Marcucelli, K.T.; Fish, J.C. [Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, Palmdale, CA (United States)

1997-12-31

14

Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on the Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter of Glass Epoxy Laminates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The influence of specimen polishing, specimen configuration, and specimen size on the transverse tension strength of two glass epoxy materials loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, and/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was sensitive to span length due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, the utility of this scaling law for predicting transverse tension strength is unclear.

OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin

1999-01-01

15

Scale effects on the transverse tensile strength of graphite epoxy composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The influence of material volume on the transverse tensile strength of AS4/3501-6 graphite epoxy composites was investigated. Tensile tests of 90 degree laminates with 3 different widths and 5 different thicknesses were conducted. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the influence of the grip on the stress distribution in the coupons and explain the tendency for the distribution of failure locations to be skewed toward the grip. Specimens were instrumented with strain gages and extensometers to insure good alignment and to measure failure strains. Data indicated that matrix dominated strength properties varied with the volume of material that was stressed, with the strength decreasing as volume increased. Transverse strength data were used in a volumetric scaling law based on Weibull statistics to predict the strength of 90 degree laminates loaded in three point bending. Comparisons were also made between transverse strength measurements and out-of-plane interlaminar tensile strength measurements from curved beam bending tests. The significance of observed scale effects on the use of tests for material screening, quality assurance, and design allowables is discussed.

Obrien, T. Kevin; Salpekar, Satish A.

1992-01-01

16

Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

2001-01-01

17

Running exercises improve the strength of a partially ruptured Achilles tendon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To examine the effects of running and swimming exercises on the functional performance and mechanical strength of a recovering Achilles tendon.Methods: 30 Sprague-Dawley rats had surgical transection of their right medial Achilles tendon. The rats were divided into running (n = 11), swimming (n = 10), and control (n = 9) groups. The running and swimming groups were given

E K N See; G Y F Ng; C O Y Ng; D T C Fung

2004-01-01

18

High-frequency spectral falloff of earthquakes, fractal dimension of complex rupture, b value, and the scaling of strength on faults  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The high-frequency falloff ??-y of earthquake displacement spectra and the b value of aftershock sequences are attributed to the character of spatially varying strength along fault zones. I assume that the high frequency energy of a main shock is produced by a self-similar distribution of subevents, where the number of subevents with radii greater than R is proportional to R-D, D being the fractal dimension. In the model, an earthquake is composed of a hierarchical set of smaller earthquakes. The static stress drop is parameterized to be proportional to R??, and strength is assumed to be proportional to static stress drop. I find that a distribution of subevents with D = 2 and stress drop independent of seismic moment (?? = 0) produces a main shock with an ??-2 falloff, if the subevent areas fill the rupture area of the main shock. By equating subevents to "islands' of high stress of a random, self-similar stress field on a fault, I relate D to the scaling of strength on a fault, such that D = 2 - ??. Thus D = 2 corresponds to constant stress drop scaling (?? = 0) and scale-invariant fault strength. A self-similar model of aftershock rupture zones on a fault is used to determine the relationship between the b value, the size distribution of aftershock rupture zones, and the scaling of strength on a fault. -from Author

Frankel, A.

1991-01-01

19

Glass rupture disk  

DOEpatents

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01

20

Experimental Determination of the In Situ Transverse Lamina Strength in Graphite\\/Epoxy Laminates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The uniaxial tensile load at which transverse cracking initiated in the 90 deg. laminae of (0 2\\/90n)s, (30\\/90n) s and (60\\/90n)s, n =1,2,4,8, T300\\/934 composite laminates was determined experimentally using DIB enhanced x-radiography. \\

Donald L. Flaggs; Murat H. Kural

1982-01-01

21

Jointing of high-loaded composite structural components. Part 3. An experimental study of strength of joints with transverse fastening microelements  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system of comprehensive experimental support for strength analysis and design of joints has been developed. It involves\\u000a an experimental procedure, special specimen designs and test setups. For joints with transverse fastening microelements, we\\u000a summarize some results of experimental determination of (i) compliance coefficients, (ii) degree of strength degradation in\\u000a embedment zones of cylindrical pins (0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0

Ya. S. Karpov

2006-01-01

22

The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study  

PubMed Central

Background: Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 10 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each), depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round), with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (?= 0.05). Results: Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group (P < 0.001) (88.77 MPa), with exception of round surface design repaired with glass fiber reinforced repair resin (89.92 MPa) which was significantly superior to the other joint surface contours (P < 0.001). Glass fiber reinforced resin significantly improved the repaired denture base resins as compared to the plain repair resin (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Specimens repaired with glass fiber reinforced resin and round surface design exhibited highest transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins. PMID:23946739

Anasane, Nayana; Ahirrao, Yogesh; Chitnis, Deepa; Meshram, Suresh

2013-01-01

23

Numerical analysis of stress distribution in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes during anvil tests for the evaluation of transverse delamination strength  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rare-earth-Ba-Cu-O (REBCO) based coated conductors (CCs) are now being used for electric device applications. For coil-based applications such as motors, generators and magnets, the CC tape needs to have robust mechanical strength along both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The CC tape in these coils is subjected to transverse tensile stresses during cool-down and operation, which results in delamination within and between constituent layers. In this study, in order to explain the behaviour observed in the evaluation of c-axis delamination strength in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes by anvil tests, numerical analysis of the mechanical stress distribution within the CC tape has been performed. The upper anvil size was varied in the analysis to understand the effect of anvil size on stress distribution within the multilayered CC tape, which is closely related to the delamination strength, delamination mode and delamination sites that were experimentally observed. The numerical simulation results showed that, when an anvil size covering the whole tape width was used, the REBCO coating film was subjected to the largest stress, which could result in low mechanical delamination and electromechanical delamination strengths. Meanwhile, when smaller-sized anvils were used, the copper stabilizer layer would experience the largest stress among all the constituent layers of the CC tape, which could result in higher mechanical and electromechanical delamination strengths, as well as high scattering of both of these delamination strengths. As a whole, the numerical simulation results could explain the damage evolution observed in CC tapes tested under transverse tensile stress, as well as the transverse tensile stress response of the critical current, Ic.

Dizon, John Ryan C.; Gorospe, Alking B.; Shin, Hyung-Seop

2014-05-01

24

Centrally-Rupturing Squib-Closure Disks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rupture-disk design makes squib action more predictable. In new design, center of rupture disk contains cruciform indentation in which thickness reduced to about 0.5 mil (0.013 mm). Reduces strength of center of rupture disk in same manner as that of pull tabs on beverage cans; therefore, disk will fail predictably in center.

Richter, R.

1986-01-01

25

Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and

Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

2009-01-01

26

Creep Ruptures in Heterogeneous Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present creep experiments on fiber composite materials with different controlled heterogeneity. All samples exhibit a power-law relaxation of the strain rate in the primary creep regime (Andrade's law) followed by a power-law acceleration up to rupture. We discover that the rupture time is proportional to the duration of the primary creep regime, showing the interplay between the two regimes and offering a method of rupture prediction. These experimental results are rationalized by a mean-field model of representative elements with nonlinear viscoelastic rheology and with a large heterogeneity of strengths.

Nechad, H.; Helmstetter, A.; El Guerjouma, R.; Sornette, D.

2005-01-01

27

Rupture Paths in Kappa-Maps: Quantitative Insights on Heterogeneous Earthquake Ruptures From Energy Arguments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Earthquake rupture is a notoriously complex process, at all observable scales. Although heterogeneities of strength and initial stress contribute to this rupture complexity, a systematic approach to quantify their effect has not yet been attempted. For instance, little is known about the relation between the final size of an earthquake and the statistical properties of initial strength excess fields. Canonical

J. Ampuero; J. Ripperger; M. Mai

2005-01-01

28

Review article: Treatment for Achilles tendon ruptures in athletes.  

PubMed

Treatment for Achilles tendon ruptures in athletes is controversial. Surgical fixation has lower rates of re-rupture and confers increased strength and function, whereas conservative treatment has lower risks of wound complications. We review the literature on the optimal treatment for Achilles tendon rupture in athletes. PMID:24014791

Stavrou, Maria; Seraphim, Andreas; Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Mordecai, Simon C

2013-08-01

29

Strength Degradation of a Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt Composite at Elevated Temperatures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this work was to investigate the transverse rupture strength behavior of tungsten carbide blended with 10wt% Co as a function of temperature. The samples were tested in three-point bending flexure in the temperature range 251000癈. Specimens were also indented at room temperature to measure the crack size and the corresponding values of hardness and toughness. The results

W. Acchar; U. U. Gomes; W. A. Kaysser; J. Goring

1999-01-01

30

Strength degradation of a tungsten carbide-cobalt composite at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to investigate the transverse rupture strength behavior of tungsten carbide blended with 10 wt% Co as a function of temperature. The samples were tested in three-point bending flexure in the temperature range 25--1000 C. Specimens were also indented at room temperature to measure the crack size and the corresponding values of hardness and toughness. The results showed that the WC-Co composite suffered a strength loss at temperatures above 600 C. The fracture analysis indicated the presence of oxidation and microstructural defects in the samples tested at the higher temperatures.

Acchar, W.; Gomes, U.U.; Kaysser, W.A.; Goring, J.

1999-07-01

31

What Is an Earthquake?: Fault-Rupture Analogies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity has two parts: the first part will demonstrate the weaknesses of simple fault models (like block diagrams) in depicting the process of fault rupture accurately; and the second part is centered around a fairly simple animation of rupture propagation, seen by an oblique map view, that attempts to show more accurately what we should envision when we think about fault rupture. This activity provides different analogies for describing the process of fault rupture, with attention paid to the strengths and weaknesses of each.

32

Creep-rupture of polymer-matrix composites. [graphite-epoxy laminates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An accelerated characterization method for resin matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep rupture analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer matrix composites. Comparisons between creep rupture experiments and analytical models are presented. The time dependent creep rupture process in graphite epoxy laminates is examined as a function of temperature and stress level.

Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.

1980-01-01

33

Supersonic Rupture of Rubber  

E-print Network

The rupture of rubber differs from conventional fracture. It is supersonic, and the speed is determined by strain levels ahead of the tip rather than total strain energy as for ordinary cracks. Dissipation plays a very important role in allowing the propagation of ruptures, and the back edges of ruptures must toughen as they contract, or the rupture is unstable. This article presents several levels of theoretical description of this phenomenon: first, a numerical procedure capable of incorporating large extensions, dynamics, and bond rupture; second, a simple continuum model that can be solved analytically, and which reproduces several features of elementary shock physics; and third, an analytically solvable discrete model that accurately reproduces numerical and experimental results, and explains the scaling laws that underly this new failure mode. Predictions for rupture speed compare well with experiment.

M Marder

2005-04-24

34

Rupture velocity inferred from near-field differential ground motion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The velocity of the rupture propagation is a fundamental source parameter that strongly affects ground motion. It is commonly assessed from kinematic inversion of strong-motion or teleseismic data, sometimes combined with InSar and/or GPS data. The obtained rupture velocity remains inevitably affected by uncertainties, mainly due to imperfect knowledge of the earth structure and tradeoffs between different source parameters. In this study we show how the analysis of differential ground-motion may help constraining the rupture velocity, without a priori information about the earth velocity structure. Our analysis is based on synthetic ground-motion simulations (0-2 Hz) for vertical strike-slip earthquakes propagating unilaterally at a fixed rupture velocity in a homogeneous elastic medium covered with a 1 km-thick low velocity layer (shear wave velocity equal to 1 km/s). We show that when the rupture reaches the bottom of the shallow layer, the phase velocity of transverse waves measured in the forward rupture direction up to a few rupture lengths is equal to the rupture velocity, for a large range of frequencies. The comparison with the phase velocity obtained for a point source then enables to retrieve the value of the rupture velocity. The phase velocity is simply computed from the ratio between the ground velocity and the shear strain or the rotation about a vertical axis. This study points out the utility of setting up dense arrays at the vicinity of major faults to retrieve rupture features such as the rupture velocity.

Causse, Mathieu; Cornou, C閏ile; B閏asse, Julie; Bouchon, Michel

2014-05-01

35

The impact of a single-layer or double-layer closure on uterine rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Our purpose was to measure the impact of a single-layer or double-layer closure on uterine rupture at subsequent delivery. Study Design: This is an observational cohort study of all women undergoing a trial of labor from 1988 to 2000 in a tertiary care center, after a single low transverse cesarean delivery. Factors most highly associated with uterine rupture were

Emmanuel Bujold; Camille Bujold; Emily F Hamilton; Fran鏾is Harel; Robert J Gauthier

2002-01-01

36

Transversity 2005  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction. Purpose and status of the Italian Transversity Project / F. Bradamante -- Opening lecture. Transversity / M. Anselmino -- Experimental lectures. Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries from polarized and unpolarized hydrogen targets at HERMES / G. Schnell (for the HERMES Collaboration). Collins and Sivers asymmetries on the deuteron from COMPASS data / I. Horn (for the COMPASS Collaboration). First measurement of interference fragmentation on a transversely polarized hydrogen target / P. B. van der Nat (for the HERMES Collaboration). Two-hadron asymmetries at the COMPASS experiment / A. Mielech (for the COMPASS Collaboration). Measurements of chiral-odd fragmentation functions at Belle / R. Seidl ... [et al.]. Lambda asymmetries / A. Ferrero (for the COMPASS Collaboration). Transverse spin at PHENIX: results and prospects / C. Aidala (for the PHENIX Collaboration). Transverse spin and RHIC / L. Bland. Studies of transverse spin effects at JLab / H. Avakian ... [et al.] (for the CLAS Collaboration). Neutron transversity at Jefferson Lab / J. P. Chen ... [et al.] (for the Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration). PAX: polarized antiproton experiments / M. Contalbrigo. Single and double spin N-N interactions at GSI / M. Maggiora (for the ASSIA Collaboration). Spin filtering in storage rings / N. N. Nikolaev & F. F. Pavlov -- Theory lectures. Single-spin asymmetries and transversity in QCD / S. J. Brodsky. The relativistic hydrogen atom: a theoretical laboratory for structure functions / X. Artru & K. Benhizia. GPD's and SSA's / M. Burkardt. Time reversal odd distribution functions in chiral models / A. Drago. Soffer bound and transverse spin densities from lattice QCD / M. Diehl ... [et al.]. Single-spin asymmetries and Qiu-Sterman effect(s) / A. Bacchetta. Sivers function: SIDIS data, fits and predictions / M. Anselmino ... [et al.]. Twist-3 effects in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering / M. Schlegel, K. Goeke & A. Metz. Quark and gluon Sivers functions / I. Schmidt. Sivers effect in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering and Drell-Yan / J. C. Collins ... [et al.]. Helicity formalism and spin asymmetries in hadronic processes / M. Anselmino ... [et al.]. Including Cahn and Sivers effects into event generators / A. Kotzinian. Comparing extractions of Sivers functions / M. Anselmino ... [et al.]. Anomalous Drell-Yan asymmetry from hadronic or QCD vacuum effects / D. Boer. "T-odd" effects in transverse spin and azimuthal asymmetries in SIDIS / L. P. Gamberg & G. R. Goldstein. T-odd effects in unpolarized Drell-Yan scattering / G. R. Goldstein & L. P. Gamberg. Alternative approaches to transversity: how convenient and feasible are they? / M. Radici. Relations between single and double transverse asymmetries / O. V. Teryaev. Cross sections, error bars and event distributions in simulated Drell-Yan azimuthal asymmetry measurements / A. Bianconi. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections for transversely polarized pp and p痯 collisions / A. Mukherjee, M. Stratmann & W. Vogelsang. Double transverse-spin asymmetries in Drell-Yan and J/[symbol] production from proton-antiproton collisions / M. Guzzi ... [et al.]. The quark-quark correlator: theory and phenomenology / E. Di Salvo. Chiral quark model spin filtering mechanism and hyperon polarization / S. M. Troshin & N. E. Tyurin -- Closing lecture. Where we've been ... and where we're going / G. Bunce.

Barone, Vincenzo; Ratcliffe, Philip G.

37

Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

1985-01-01

38

Transversity 2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Purpose and status of the Italian transversity project / F. Bradamante -- Transversity asymmetries / D. Boer -- The transverse angular momentum sum rule / E. Leader -- Measurement of Collins and Sivers asymmetries at HERMES / L. L. Pappalardo (for the HERMES collaboration) -- Review of SSA results on deuteron at COMPASS / A. Richter (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Single spin asymmetries on a transversely polarized proton target at COMPASS / S. Levorato (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- New preliminary results on the transversity distribution and the Collins fragmentation functions / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Sivers effect in SIDIS pion and kaon production / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Spin-orbit correlations / M. Burkardt -- Correlation functions in hard and (semi)-inclusive processes / M. Schlegel, S. Mei[symbol]ner and A. Metz -- Transversity via exclusive [pie symbol]-electroproduction / G. R. Goldstein, S. Liuti and S. Ahmad -- Estimate of the Sivers asymmetry at intermediate energies with rescattering extracted from exclusive processes / A. Bianconi -- Exclusively produced p[symbol] asymmetries on the deuteron and future GPD measurements at COMPASS / C. Schill (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Transversity and transverse-momentum-dependent distribution measurements from PHENIX and BRAHMS / C. Aidala (for the PHENIX and BRAHMS collaborations) -- Sivers and Collins effects in polarized pp scattering processes / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Sivers function in constituent quark models / S. Scopetta ... [et al.] -- Sivers, Boer-Mulders and transversity in Drell-Yan processes / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- TMDs and Drell-Yan experiments at Fermilab and J-PARC / J.-C. Peng -- Double polarisation observables at PAX / M. Nekipelov (for the PAX collaboration) -- Future Drell-Yan measurement @ COMPASS / M. Colantoni (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Measurements of unpolarized azimuthal asymmetries at COMPASS / W. K鋐er (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries of the unpolarized cross-section at HERMES / F. Giordano (for the HERMES collaboration) -- Measurement of transversity via an interference fragmentation function at HERMES / R. Fabbri (for the HERMES collaboration) -- Relating leading and higher twist contributions to nucleon spin structure / P. G. Ratcliffe and O. V. Teryaev -- DIS at low and high transverse momentum: matches and mismatches / A. Bacchetta ... [et al.] -- Pretzelosity distribution function h[symbol] / H. Avakian ... [et al.] -- Transverse momentum-spin correlations / L. P. Gamberg, G. R. Goldstein and M. Schlegel -- Exploring confinement with spin / J. P. Ralston -- SIDIS asymmetries in quark-diquark model / A. Kotzinian -- Parton densities in a spectator model with axial-vector diquarks / M. Radici -- Gluonic pole matrix elements in spectator models / A. Mukherjee, L. P. Gamberg and P. J. Mulders -- TMD measurements at CLAS6 and CLAS12 / H. Avakian (for the CLAS6 and CLAS12 collaborations) -- Nucleon to pion transition distribution amplitudes in a light-cone quark model / M. Pincetti, B. Pasquini and S. Boffi -- Antiproton polarization studies for FAIR (How to polarize antiprotons and what to use them for?) / H. Str鰄er, F. Rathmann and P. Lenisa -- No one can encompass the unencompassable: the highlights of transversity-2008 / N. N. Nikolaev.

Giuseppe, Ciullo; Paolo, Lenisa; Marco, Contalbrigo; Delia, Hasch

2009-04-01

39

Achilles Tendon Rupture  

PubMed Central

Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or 搃njury and 搑isk factors and 揳thletes from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

2013-01-01

40

Quantitative relations between earthquake source properties from dynamic rupture simulations incorporating off-fault plasticity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High stress concentrations at earthquake rupture fronts may generate inelastic off-fault response around the rupture tip, leading to increased energy absorption in the damage zone. Accounting for off-fault plasticity in earthquake rupture simulations imposes physical limits on extreme ground motion as plastic dissipation limits the rupture speed and peak slip rate of pulses. We present physics-based relations between earthquake source parameters derived from analytic considerations and from a consistent set of 2D dynamic rupture models that incorporate severe velocity-weakening friction and off-fault plasticity assuming homogeneous initial conditions. Specifically, we deduce a non-linear relation between the peak slip velocity and rupture speed, which holds for sub- and super-shear, crack- and pulse-like ruptures. We find that these relations are statistically consistent with the correlation of peak slip rate and rupture speed in 3D dynamic rupture models under linear slip weakening friction and highly heterogeneous initial stress. Furthermore the closeness to failure (CF) parameter introduced by Templeton and Rice (2008) is an adequate predictor of rupture speed for slow ruptures, whereas rupture speeds larger than ~80% S-wave speed have a more complicated dependence on stress orientation and the relative strength of the fault. These relations, combined with the limits on rupture speed imposed by off-fault plasticity, may encapsulate a major influence of plastic deformation on near-field ground motions. Our study captures fundamental processes governing dynamic rupture propagation coupled to self-similar off-fault energy dissipation. Thus, our results may be a suitable starting point to develop new pseudo-dynamic source parametrizations for source inversion and ground motion prediction that account for off-fault plasticity. We will report on the suitability of these relations in the presence of other sources of rupture complexity, e.g. coalescing rupture fronts.

Gabriel, Alice; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Dalguer, Luis A.; Mai, P. Martin

2013-04-01

41

Creep and creep rupture of strongly reinforced metallic composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A creep and creep damage theory is presented for metallic composites with strong fibers. Application is to reinforced structures in which the fiber orientation may vary throughout but a distinct fiber direction can be identified locally (local transverse isotropy). The creep deformation model follows earlier work and is based on a flow potential function that depends on invariants reflecting stress and the material symmetry. As the focus is on the interaction of creep and damage, primary creep is ignored. The creep rupture model is an extension of continuum damage mechanics and includes an isochronous damage function that depends on invariants specifying the local maximum transverse tension and the maximum longitudinal shear stress. It is posited that at high temperature and low stress, appropriate to engineering practice, these stress components damage the fiber/matrix interface through diffusion controlled void growth, eventually causing creep rupture. Experiments are outlined for characterizing a composite through creep rupture tests under transverse tension and longitudinal shear. Application is made to a thin-walled pressure vessel with reinforcing fibers at an arbitrary helical angle. The results illustrate the usefulness of the model as a means of achieving optimal designs of composite structures where creep and creep rupture are life limiting.

Robinson, D. N.; Binienda, W. K.; Miti-Kavuma, M.

1990-01-01

42

Creep Rupture Properties of Welded Joints of Heat Resistant Steels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, the high-temperature mechanical and creep rupture properties of Grade 91/Grade 91 (Mod. 9Cr-Mo) similar welded joints and Grade 91/Inconel 82/SUS304 dissimilar welded joints were examined. The effects of temperature and stress on the failure location in the joints were also investigated. Creep rupture tests were conducted at 823, 873, and 923 K; the applied stress ranges were 160-240, 80-160, and 40-80 MPa, respectively. The creep rupture strengths of the specimens with welded joints were lower than those of the specimens of the base metal at all temperature levels; in addition, these differences in creep strength increased with temperature. After being subjected to long-term creep rupture tests, the fracture type exhibited by the dissimilar welded joints was transformed from Types V and VII to Type IV. It was estimated that the fracture type exhibited by the dissimilar welded joints after 100,000-h rupture strength tests at 823 K and 873 K was Type IV fracture.

Yamazaki, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki

43

Dynamic Rupture Process of the 1999 Chi-Chi Earthquake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquake source dynamics provides key elements for the prediction of strong ground motion and for understanding the physics of earthquake processes. This research investigates the characteristics of dynamic source rupture process of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake by using a 3D finite difference method with variable grid spacing. A new algorithm is proposed to deal with a non-planar fault model. This approach does not require aligning the fault plane to the finite-difference grid for implementation of FDM and provide a method to deal with a more realistically irregular geometry fault model. We apply this approach to the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake with a curved fault surface and rebuild the dynamic source rupture process for this larger earthquake. Our results show that for the Chi-Chi earthquake, the behaviors of the most of the subfaults followed a slip-weakening friction law during rupture. And the distributions of the dynamic source parameters estimated from the kinematic results are quite heterogeneous. For the dynamic rupture process, this study reveals the rupture propagation jumping phenomenon which is difficult to be simulated in kinematic modeling. That is when the propagation front encountered a zone with a high strength excess, the rupture would pause to accumulate more energy to break it. Meanwhile, if there are low strength excess zones around the barrier, the propagation front would jump over the barrier to break the low strength excess zones and leave the high strength barrier unbroken. Such phenomenon of the high strength excess barriers intend to delay the propagation front can be seen clearly in the dynamic model. Using a thick fault zone model, the dynamic model discovers that the slip on the hanging-wall side is larger than that on the food-wall side and the northern parts have the longer source duration that the southern parts and these northern parts have an extreme large slip. Based on the dynamic source rupture model, the strong ground motions near the fault surface breaks are simulated in frequency range of 0.05 to 0.5 Hz. In general, the synthetic velocity waveforms agree well with the observed records for most stations. The dynamic source model successfully simulates the distinctive velocity pulse for the stations in the forward rupture direction. Also our dynamic source model successfully reproduced the waveforms as well as the distinctive velocity pulses for the station nearby or on the fault surface breaks. These results demonstrate that our dynamic source model can reproduce the main features of long period ground motions; hence, lead us to a better understanding on the source rupture process of the Chi-Chi earthquake.

Zhang, W.; Iwata, T.; Irikura, K.; Pitarka, A.; Sekiguchi, H.

2003-12-01

44

Blunt traumatic pericardial rupture.  

PubMed Central

A 28-year-old man presented with left chest, head and limb injuries following a road traffic accident (RTA). Increasing haemodynamic instability necessitated an emergency left thoracotomy at which a complete rupture of the pericardium and herniation of the heart was found. After repair, the patient made an uneventful post-operative recovery. The aetiology, investigation and management of this rare injury is discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7640832

Levine, A J; Collins, F J

1995-01-01

45

Rupture of Renal Transplant  

PubMed Central

Background. Rupture of renal allograft is a rare and serious complication of transplantation that is usually attributed to acute rejection, acute tubular necrosis, or renal vein thrombosis. Case Presentation. LD, a 26-year-old male with established renal failure, underwent deceased donor transplantation using kidney from a 50-year-old donor with acute kidney injury (Cr 430?mmol/L). LD had a stormy posttransplant recovery and required exploration immediately for significant bleeding. On day three after transplant, he developed pain/graft swelling and another significant haemorrhage with cardiovascular compromise which did not respond to aggressive resuscitation. At reexploration, the renal allograft was found to have a longitudinal rupture and was removed. Histology showed features of type IIa Banff 97 acute vascular rejection, moderate arteriosclerosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Conclusion. Possible ways of avoiding allograft rupture include use of well-matched, good quality kidneys; reducing or managing risk factors that would predispose to delayed graft function; ensuring a technically satisfactory transplant procedure with short cold and warm ischemia times; and avoiding large donor-recipient age gradients.

Baker, Shona; Popescu, Maria; Akoh, Jacob A.

2015-01-01

46

Composite Stress Rupture NDE Research and Development Project (Kevlar[R] and Carbon)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective was to develop and demonstrate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation for carbon composite pressure vessels, either in a structural health monitoring (SHM) or periodic inspection mode.

Saulsberry, Regor

2010-01-01

47

Effects of Pre-Stress State and Rupture Velocity on Dynamic Fault Branching  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a mode II rupture which propagates along a planar main fault and encounters an intersection with a branching fault that makes an angle with the main fault. Within a formulation that allows the failure path to be dynamically self-chosen, we study the following questions: Does the rupture start along the branch? Does it continue? Which side is most favored for branching, the extensional or compressional? Does rupture continue on the main fault too? What path is finally self-chosen? Failure in the modeling is described by a slip-weakening law for which the peak and residual strength, and strength at any particular amount of slip, is proportional to normal stress. We use the elastodynamic boundary integral equation method to allow simulations of rupture along the branched fault system. Our results show that dynamic stresses around the rupturing fault tip, which increase with rupture velocity at locations off the main fault plane, relative to those on it, could initiate rupture on a branching fault. As suggested by prior work [Poliakov, Dmowska and Rice, 2002, http://esag.harvard.edu/dmowska/PDR.pdf], whether a branching rupture, once begun, can be continued to a larger scale depends on principal stress directions in the pre-stress state and on rupture velocity. The most favored side for rupture transferring on a branching fault switches from the extensional side to the compressive side as we consider progressively shallower angles of the direction of maximum pre-compression with the main fault. Simultaneous rupturing on both faults is usually difficult for a narrow branching angle due to strong stress interaction between faults, which discourages rupture continuation on the other side. However, it can be activated by enhanced dynamic stressing when the rupture velocity is very near the limiting velocity (Rayleigh wave velocity for mode II). It can also be activated when the branching angle is wide because of decreasing stress interaction between faults. Natural examples seem consistent with the simulations we present.

Kame, N.; Rice, J. R.; Dmowska, R.

2002-12-01

48

D閠ermination du crit鑢e de rupture macroscopique d'un milieu poreux par homog閚閕sation non lin閍ireDetermination of the macroscopic strength criterion of a porous medium by nonlinear homogenization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A porous medium, which matrix is a perfectly plastic solid, is considered. This paper proposes a method to determine the macroscopic admissible stress states. The method is based on a homogenization technique which takes advantage of the equivalence, under certain conditions, between a problem of limit analysis and a ficticious nonlinear elastic problem. The particular case of a Drucker-Prager solid matrix is considered. The method provides an analytical expression for the complete macroscopic strength criterion. To cite this article: J.-F. Barth閘閙y, L. Dormieux, C. R. Mecanique 331 (2003).

Barth閘閙y, Jean-Fran鏾is; Dormieux, Luc

2003-04-01

49

Strength enhancement process for prealloyed powder superalloys  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technique involving superplastic processing and high pressure autoclaving was applied to a nickel base prealloyed powder alloy. Tensile strengths as high as 2865 MN/sq m at 480 C were obtained with as-superplastically deformed material. Appropriate treatments yielding materials with high temperature tensile and stress rupture strengths were also devised.

Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

1977-01-01

50

Pulse-like ruptures induced by low-velocity fault zones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low-velocity fault zones (LVFZs) are found in most mature faults. They are usually 100-400 m wide and have 20%-60% wave velocity reductions relative to the country rock. To study the effect of LVFZs on earthquake rupture and the radiated wavefield, we conducted two-dimensional (2-D) simulations of dynamic rupture on faults that bisect a LVFZ, considering a range of velocity reductions and widths. Most earthquakes apparently have slip rise times much shorter than their overall rupture duration. A number of dynamic mechanisms for such pulse-like ruptures have been proposed, including frictional self-healing, fault strength heterogeneities, and bimaterial effects. We find that ruptures in LVFZs with strong enough wave velocity contrast behave as pulses. These pulses are generated by fault locking induced by waves reflected from the boundaries of the LVFZ. This mechanism of pulse generation is robust to variations of initial stress, smoothness of the LVFZ structure, rupture mode, and exclusion of frictional healing. Moreover, we find that LVFZs can generate complex rupture patterns. LVFZs with low-velocity reduction induce multiple rupture fronts involving coexisting pulses and cracks. LVFZs with certain widths can accelerate the transition to supershear rupture speed. These additional effects of LVFZs on dynamic rupture can contribute to the complexity of high-frequency ground motions.

Huang, Yihe; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

2011-12-01

51

Ruptured Spleen as a Differential Diagnosis in Ruptured Tubal Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Two cases of traumatic biphasic or secondary splenic rupture are presented to demonstrate the clinical picture of an entity the obstetrician-gynecologist will be encountering more commonly in the future. The signs and symptoms of this condition figured prominently in the differential diagnosis of ruptured tubal pregnancy. PMID:6737489

Weekes, Leroy R.

1984-01-01

52

RBMK pressure tube rupture assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Russian RBMK reactor core design consists of multiple parallel pressure tube channels that contain Zr clad, UO{sub 2} fuel pin bundles. These parallel channels are contained within graphite moderator blocks which are, in turn, contained within a sealed core cavity. Current safety evaluation efforts of the RBMK reactors have been concentrating in the area of tube ruptures within the core cavity and, in particular, multiple tube ruptures that could threaten the reactor core integrity. Tube rupture events result in a pressurization of the reactor core cavity. The original design overpressure for the cavity region was based on a single tube rupture, resulting in considerable margin to the top plate lift pressure. The top plate lift pressure is 3.1 bar, and a single tube rupture would result in approximately 1.4 bar. RBMK plant specific cavity pressure relief designs provide for between three and in simultaneous tube ruptures before exceeding the top plate lift pressure. Thus, current safety evaluations have begun to examine the potential for multiple tube ruptures that could exceed the current cavity pressure relief designs. One such scenario being examined is a partial rupture in a group distribution header that results in stagnated (low) flow to up to 40 pressure tubes. The subsequent fuel heatup in these reduced flow tubes could result in multiple tube ruptures beyond the design relief capacity of the core cavity. This paper examines several key issues in evaluating this transient, including: (1) the effects of low flow, (2) the effects of axial peaking, and (3) the effects of radial peaking, all relative to the time to tube rupture. These issues each play a significant role in attempting to evaluate the likelihood and severity of multiple tube ruptures for a partial group distribution header break.

Schmitt, B.E.; Tsiklauri, G.V.

1994-08-01

53

Surgical treatment options for patella tendon rupture, part II: chronic.  

PubMed

Patella tendon rupture is a debilitating injury that often occurs in the setting of preexisting tendon degeneration. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent retraction of the patella with subsequent adhesions and quadriceps contractures. In the setting of a chronic rupture, augmentation with hamstring tendons or allograft reconstruction generally is necessary. Patients who undergo delayed repair are at risk for a compromised result secondary to loss of full knee flexion and decreased quadriceps strength, although a functional extensor mechanism is likely to be reestablished. Overall the results of chronic repair are less satisfactory than the acute repair, but still provide an extensor mechanism for the patient and thus provide function. PMID:16119741

Greis, Patrick E; Lahav, Amit; Holmstrom, Michael C

2005-08-01

54

Using Dynamic Rupture Models to Explore Physical Controls on the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake Rupture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismic and geodetic recordings are routinely used to invert for kinematic source models of large earthquakes, which provide us with detailed images of slip distribution and rupture evolution on causative faults. To gain insight into physical conditions that allow a fault to slip and a rupture to propagate in the way they did, we can resort to dynamic source models that obey physical laws in continuum mechanics and rock friction. Published kinematic models of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake reveal several features of the rupture. These features include 1) high static stress drop with large amounts of slip in a small area, 2) a weak initial phase, down-dip rupture for the first 40 seconds, extensive shallow rupture during 60 to 70 seconds, and continuing deeper rupture lasting more than 100 seconds, and 3) systematically down-dip high-frequency radiation with respect to the hypocenter. In this study, we use spontaneous rupture models to explore what physical conditions, including the initial stress state and friction properties on the subducting fault, can reproduce these features, so that we can gain some physical insights into controls on this megathrust earthquake. Dynamic rupture simulations of this shallow dipping megathrust faulting at reasonable spatial and temporal resolutions require parallel computing on supercomputers. Our newly parallelized finite element method algorithm EQdyna allows us to simulate a large suite of spontaneous rupture models to examine the questions. In model setup, we use depth-dependence principal stresses and take into account variations in pore fluid pressure and frictional properties associated with subducted seafloor features such as seamounts. Our preliminary results suggest followings. First, a high strength and high stress drop patch (probably a subducted seamount or seamout chain) just above the hypocenter on the fault plane can delay up-dip rupture and result in a concentrated large slip area. Second, significantly negative stress drop on the shallow portion of the subducting fault associated with the active accretionary prism is needed to reduce the amplitude of shallow slip and to confine shallow slip in a small area near the trench just up-dip of the region of maximum fault slip. Third, heterogeneities in the seismic strength parameter S down-dip of the hypocenter, probably due to both heterogeneous stresses from previous earthquakes and heterogeneous friction properties at the brittle and ductile transition zone, can produce large amounts of high-frequency radiations.

Duan, B.

2011-12-01

55

Modeling rupture of growing aneurysms.  

PubMed

Growth and rupture of aneurysms are driven by micro-structural alterations of the arterial wall yet precise mechanisms underlying the process remain to be uncovered. In the present work we examine a scenario when the aneurysm evolution is dominated by turnover of collagen fibers. In the latter case it is natural to hypothesize that rupture of individual fibers (or their bonds) causes the overall aneurysm rupture. We examine this hypothesis in computer simulations of growing aneurysms in which constitutive equations describe both collagen evolution and failure. Failure is enforced in constitutive equations by limiting strain energy that can be accumulated in a fiber. Within the proposed theoretical framework we find a range of parameters that lead to the aneurysm rupture. We conclude in a qualitative agreement with clinical observations that some aneurysms will rupture while others will not. PMID:24359675

Balakhovsky, K; Jabareen, M; Volokh, K Y

2014-02-01

56

The transition of dynamic rupture styles in elastic media under velocity-weakening friction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although kinematic earthquake source inversions show dominantly pulse-like subshear rupture behavior, seismological observations, laboratory experiments and theoretical models indicate that earthquakes can operate with different rupture styles: either as pulses or cracks, that propagate at subshear or supershear speeds. The determination of rupture style and speed has important implications for ground motions and may inform about the state of stress and strength of active fault zones. We conduct 2D in-plane dynamic rupture simulations with a spectral element method to investigate the diversity of rupture styles on faults governed by velocity-and-state-dependent friction with dramatic velocity-weakening at high slip rate. Our rupture models are governed by uniform initial stresses, and are artificially initiated. We identify the conditions that lead to different rupture styles by investigating the transitions between decaying, steady state and growing pulses, cracks, sub-shear and super-shear ruptures as a function of background stress, nucleation size and characteristic velocity at the onset of severe weakening. Our models show that small changes of background stress or nucleation size may lead to dramatic changes of rupture style. We characterize the asymptotic properties of steady state and self-similar pulses as a function of background stress. We show that an earthquake may not be restricted to a single rupture style, but that complex rupture patterns may emerge that consist of multiple rupture fronts, possibly involving different styles and back-propagating fronts. We also demonstrate the possibility of a super-shear transition for pulse-like ruptures. Finally, we draw connections between our findings and recent seismological observations.

Gabriel, A.-A.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Mai, P. M.

2012-09-01

57

Interaction of a Dynamic Rupture on a Fault Plane with Short Frictionless Fault Branches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spontaneous bilateral mode II shear ruptures were nucleated on faults in photoelastic Homalite plates loaded in uniaxial compression. Rupture velocities were measured and the interaction between the rupture front and short fault branches was observed using high-speed digital photography. Fault branches were formed by machining slits of varying lengths that intersected the fault plane over a range of angles. These branches were frictionless because they did not close under static loading prior to shear rupture nucleation. Three types of behavior were observed. First, the velocity of both rupture fronts was unaffected when the fault branches were oriented 45 to the main slip surface and the length of the branches were less than or equal to ~0.75 R 0* (where R 0* is the slip-weakening distance in the limit of low rupture speed and an infinitely long slip-pulse). Second, rupture propagation stopped at the branch on the compressive side of the rupture tip but was unaffected by the branch on the tensile side when the branches were ~1.5 R 0* in length and remained oriented 45 to the principle slip surface. Third, branches on the tensile side of the rupture tip nucleated tensile ``wing tip'' extensions when the branches were oriented at 70 to the interface. Third, when the branches were oriented at 70 to the interface, branches on the tensile side of the rupture tip nucleated tensile ``wing-crack'' extensions. We explain these observations using a model in which the initial uniaxial load produces stress concentrations at the tips of the branches, which perturb the initial stress field on the rupture plane. These stress perturbations affect both the resolved shear stress driving the rupture and the fault-normal stress that controls the fault strength, and together they explain the observed changes in rupture speed.

Biegel, Ronald L.; Sammis, Charles G.; Rosakis, Ares J.

2007-10-01

58

Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.  

PubMed

In this paper, we introduce the notion of rupture from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method. PMID:24741691

Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

2014-04-01

59

Shallow dynamic overshoot and energetic deep rupture in the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake.  

PubMed

Strong spatial variation of rupture characteristics in the moment magnitude (M(w)) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki megathrust earthquake controlled both the strength of shaking and the size of the tsunami that followed. Finite-source imaging reveals that the rupture consisted of a small initial phase, deep rupture for up to 40 seconds, extensive shallow rupture at 60 to 70 seconds, and continuing deep rupture lasting more than 100 seconds. A combination of a shallow dipping fault and a compliant hanging wall may have enabled large shallow slip near the trench. Normal faulting aftershocks in the area of high slip suggest dynamic overshoot on the fault. Despite prodigious total slip, shallower parts of the rupture weakly radiated at high frequencies, whereas deeper parts of the rupture radiated strongly at high frequencies. PMID:21596957

Ide, Satoshi; Baltay, Annemarie; Beroza, Gregory C

2011-06-17

60

Transverse plane gait problems in children with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Transverse plane deviations are significant contributors to pathologic gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Due to limitations in neuromuscular control, balance, strength and coordination, transverse plane gait deviations are poorly tolerated in these children. Transverse plane malalignment results in lever arm dysfunction and can be seen with either intoeing or out-toeing. Frequent causes of transverse plane problems and lever arm dysfunction include long bone (femoral and/or tibial) torsion, pelvic rotation, and pes varus or valgus. Computerized motion analysis facilitates accurate identification of transverse plane abnormalities. This article addresses appropriate identification and treatment of transverse plane gait deviations in children with CP. PMID:23653033

Rethlefsen, Susan A; Kay, Robert M

2013-06-01

61

Some characteristics of high strength fiber reinforced lightweight aggregate concrete  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of polypropylene and steel fibers on high strength lightweight aggregate concrete is investigated. Sintered fly ash aggregates were used in the lightweight concrete; the fines were partially replaced by fly ash. The effects on compressive strength, indirect tensile strength, modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, stress杝train relationship and compression toughness are reported. Compared to plain sintered fly ash

O Kayali; M. N Haque; B Zhu

2003-01-01

62

SPS Wideband Transverse Feedback Kicker: Design Report  

E-print Network

The SPS wideband transverse feedback system is being developed to control vertical beam instabilities arising from intensity dependent effects like electron cloud instability (ECI) and the transverse mode coupling instability (TMCI). As part of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU) project, a wideband kicker is necessary as a damper to control unstable modes within a bunch. Several types of kicker structures, including cavities, striplines, and slotted structures have been studied to evaluate the operating bandwidth, transverse shunt impedance, and beam coupling impedance. Studies and results from all structures are described below, including three potential paths to implement these structures as a wideband kicker system. A single, slotted-coaxial kicker of 1 m length provides substantial kick strength (integrated transverse voltage) over a bandwidth ranging from nearly DC to 1 GHz. An array of four 10 cm long striplines provides substantial kick strength from DC to 750 MHz. For a given amplifier power of 500 W, th...

Cesaratto, J M; Rivetta, C H; Alesini, D; Drago, A; Gallo, A; Marcellini, F; Zobov, M; De Santis, S; Paret, Z; Ratti, A; Qian, H; Bartosik, H; Hofle, W; Zannini, C

2013-01-01

63

Partial ACL rupture: an MR diagnosis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. We sought to clarify the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) to show partial ante- rior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures and to allow dis- tinction of partial from complete ACL ruptures. Materials and methods. Eighty-eight patients were stud- ied by arthroscopy and MR (36 with normal ACLs, 21 with partial ACL ruptures, and 31 with complete ACL ruptures). MR

Lawrence Yao; Amilcare Gentili; Leonard Petrus; Joong K. Lee

1995-01-01

64

EARTHQUAKE RUPTURES ON ROUGH FAULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Natural fault surfaces exhibit roughness at all scales, with root-mean-square height fluctuations of order 10??3 to 10??2 times the profile length. We study earthquake rupture propagation on such faults, using strongly rate-weakening fault friction\\u000a and off-fault plasticity. Inelastic deformation bounds stresses to reasonable values and prevents fault opening. Stress perturbations\\u000a induced by slip on rough faults cause irregular rupture propagation

Eric M. Dunham; Jeremy E. Kozdon; David Belanger; Lin Cong

65

Complex rupture during the 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Initially, the devastating Mw 7.0, 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake seemed to involve straightforward accommodation of oblique relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates along the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone. Here, we combine seismological observations, geologic field data and space geodetic measurements to show that, instead, the rupture process may have involved slip on multiple faults. Primary surface deformation was driven by rupture on blind thrust faults with only minor, deep, lateral slip along or near the main Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone; thus the event only partially relieved centuries of accumulated left-lateral strain on a small part of the plate-boundary system. Together with the predominance of shallow off-fault thrusting, the lack of surface deformation implies that remaining shallow shear strain will be released in future surface-rupturing earthquakes on the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone, as occurred in inferred Holocene and probable historic events. We suggest that the geological signature of this earthquakeg-broad warping and coastal deformation rather than surface rupture along the main fault zoneg-will not be easily recognized by standard palaeoseismic studies. We conclude that similarly complex earthquakes in tectonic environments that accommodate both translation and convergenceg-such as the San Andreas fault through the Transverse Ranges of Californiag-may be missing from the prehistoric earthquake record. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

Hayes, G.P.; Briggs, R.W.; Sladen, A.; Fielding, E.J.; Prentice, C.; Hudnut, K.; Mann, P.; Taylor, F.W.; Crone, A.J.; Gold, R.; Ito, T.; Simons, M.

2010-01-01

66

Properties of Rupture Pulses Induced by Damaged Fault Zones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low-velocity fault zones (LVFZ) are found in most mature faults. They are usually 100-400 m wide and have ~20%-60% wave velocity reductions relative to the country rock. To study the effect of LVFZs on earthquake rupture and the radiated wavefield, we conduct 2D spectral element simulations of dynamic rupture on faults that bisect a LVFZ, considering a range of velocity reductions and widths. Most earthquakes apparently have slip rise times much shorter than their overall rupture duration. A number of dynamic mechanisms for such pulse-like ruptures have been proposed, including frictional self-healing, fault strength heterogeneities and bimaterial effects. We find that ruptures in LVFZs with strong enough wave velocity contrast behave as pulses. These pulses are generated by fault locking induced by waves reflected from the boundaries of the LVFZ. Their rise time is proportional to the wave travel time across the LVFZ. Pure pulse-like rupture is favored by high velocity reduction and narrow width of the LVFZ. This mechanism of pulse generation is robust to variations of initial stress, smoothness of the LVFZ structure, rupture mode and exclusion of frictional healing. Moreover, we find that LVFZs can generate complex rupture patterns. LVFZs with low velocity reduction induce multiple rupture fronts involving co-existing pulses and cracks. LVFZs with certain widths can accelerate the transition to supershear rupture speed. The LVFZ can also induce repeated nucleation of pulses in front of a crack. These additional effects of LVFZs on dynamic rupture can have characteristic signatures on the radiated wavefield and contribute especially to high frequency ground motions. Given the natural existence of LVFZ and the generality of the pulse generation mechanism presented, it seems unlikely for earthquakes to propagate as pure cracks. However, a mixed crack-pulse rupture might not be distinguishable from a pure crack rupture at the low resolution of current seismological source observations. To further analyze the relation between wavefield and rupture healing fronts, we are analyzing the dynamic fault stresses generated by elementary kinematic sources inside a LVFZ. Our goal is to identify which wave phase (such as S or SS) plays the dominant role in the process of pulse generation and. By studying the amplitude and timing of this phase as a function of velocity reduction and width of the LVFZ we can rationalize the effect of fault zone properties on the induced pulses, including their conditions of existence, their rise time and their supershear transition. We will also report on numerical simulations including rate-and-state dependent friction with severe velocity-weakening. Our aims are to assess how frictional self-healing and the LVFZ effect compete to control the properties of pulses, and to identify possible observables that can discriminate between these two mechanisms of pulse generation. We will also investigate if the LVFZ mechanism persists across multiple earthquake cycles, using a recent extension of the spectral element method to longer time scale processes.

Huang, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.

2011-12-01

67

Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

Gumto, K. H.

1973-01-01

68

Modeling Spontaneous Generation of Off-Fault Plastic Strain Localization During Dynamic Earthquake Rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

We extend an elastodynamic finite element method to incorporate off-fault plastic yielding of Mohr-Coulomb form into a 2D spontaneous dynamic earthquake rupture model. For straight faults under uniform stress conditions, we find that rupture-induced plastic strain tends to spontaneously localize into discrete bands if the off-fault material is close to the yielding strength in the initial stress state. While fully

B. Duan; S. M. Day

2007-01-01

69

Coupling a geodynamic seismic cycling model to rupture dynamic simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relevance and results of dynamic rupture scenarios are implicitly linked to the geometry and pre-existing stress and strength state on a fault. The absolute stresses stored along faults during interseismic periods, are largely unquantifiable. They are, however, pivotal in defining coseismic rupture styles, near-field ground motion, and macroscopic source properties (Gabriel et al., 2012). Obtaining these in a physically consistent manner requires seismic cycling models, which directly couple long-term deformation processes (over 1000 year periods), the self-consistent development of faults, and the resulting dynamic ruptures. One promising approach to study seismic cycling enables both the generation of spontaneous fault geometries and the development of thermo-mechanically consistent fault stresses. This seismo-thermo-mechanical model has been developed using a methodology similar to that employed to study long-term lithospheric deformation (van Dinther et al., 2013a,b, using I2ELVIS of Gerya and Yuen, 2007). We will innovatively include the absolute stress and strength values along physically consistent evolving non-finite fault zones (regions of strain accumulation) from the geodynamic model into dynamic rupture simulations as an initial condition. The dynamic rupture simulations will be performed using SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) scheme (Pelties et al., 2012). The dynamic rupture models are able to incorporate the large degree of fault geometry complexity arising in naturally evolving geodynamic models. We focus on subduction zone settings with and without a splay fault. Due to the novelty of the coupling, we first focus on methodological challenges, e.g. the synchronization of both methods regarding the nucleation of events, the localization of fault planes, and the incorporation of similar frictional constitutive relations. We then study the importance of physically consistent fault stress, strength, and geometry input for dynamic rupture propagation in terms of rupture path and dynamics. On the other hand, it will provide the opportunity to compare slow earthquake akin events developing in quasi-static geodynamic model to fully dynamic ruptures in terms of coseismic displacements and stress changes. Gabriel, A.-A. (2012), J.-P. Ampuero, L. A. Dalguer, and P. M. Mai, The transition of dynamic rupture modes in elastic media, J. Geophys. Res., 117(B9), 01480227. Gerya, T., and D. Yuen (2007), Robust characteristics method for modelling multiphase visco-elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical problems, Phys. Earth Planet In., 163(1-4), 83-105. Pelties, C. (2012), J. De la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. B. Brietzke, and M. K鋝er Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture, Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, J. Geophys. Res., 117(B2), B02309. van Dinther, Y. (2013a), T.V. Gerya, L.A. Dalguer, F. Corbi, F. Funiciello, and P.M. Mai, The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: 2. Dynamic implications of geodynamic simulations validated with laboratory models, J. Geophys. Res., 118(4), 1502-1525. van Dinther, Y. (2013b), T.V. Gerya, L.A. Dalguer, P.M. Mai, G. Morra, and D. Giardini, The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: insights from seismo-thermo-mechanical models, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 6183-6202.

Gabriel, Alice; van Dinther, Ylona

2014-05-01

70

Transversity: Theory and phenomenology  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of transversely polarized quarks inside a transversely polarized nucleon, known as transversity, encodes a basic piece of information on the nucleon structure, sharing the same status with the more familiar unpolarized and helicity distributions. I will review its properties and discuss different ways to access it, with highlights and limitations. Recent phenomenological extractions and perspectives are also presented.

D'Alesio, Umberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Cagliari, C. P. 170, I-09042 Monserrato (Italy)

2013-04-15

71

Non-popliteal synovial rupture.  

PubMed

The ruptured popliteal synovial cyst is a common complication of chronic knee arthritis. In contrast, non-popliteal synovial rupture is less well recognized and may present a diagnostic dilemma. We report an 81-year-old woman who presented with chest wall pain and ecchymosis. Ultrasonography of the shoulder region readily diagnosed a dissecting parasynovial cyst. She developed the unusual complication of contralateral recurrence. Literature review revealed a small but important set of non-popliteal synovial ruptures in the regions of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, spine, hip, knee, and ankle. Local swelling, inflammation, ecchymosis, and nerve impingement may mimic other conditions. Awareness of the clinical presentations and a high index of suspicion are required to avoid diagnostic confusion. Management data are limited to case reports of arthrocentesis, injection, and very rarely, surgery. PMID:19390451

Sit, Michelle; Higgs, Jay B

2009-06-01

72

Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self-energizing and requires low force compared to current pyrotechnic-based burst disk hermetic valves. This is a novel design for producing a single-use, self-rupturing, hermetically sealed valve for isolation of pressurized gas and/or liquids. This design can also be applied for single-use disposable valves for chemical instruments. A welded foil diaphragm is fully supported by two mated surfaces that are machined to micron accuracies using EDM. To open the valve, one of the surfaces is moved relative to the other to (a) remove the support creating an unsupported diaphragm that ruptures due to over pressure, and/or (b) produce tension in the diaphragm and rupture it.

Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

2011-01-01

73

Ruptures of the rotator cuff.  

PubMed Central

Through the use of improved diagnostic techniques, including arthrography and arthroscopy, ruptures of the rotator cuff that previously might not have been recognized are now being identified more frequently. In most cases the symptoms are relatively mild and respond satisfactorily to rest and therapy. Occasionally, however, there is severe, persistent disability despite treatment. These ruptures require surgical repair. In such cases the data obtained from special investigations help the surgeon select the appropriate surgical approach and repair technique. An imaginative program of physiotherapy before and after the operation contributes greatly to a satisfactory result. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:7437980

Ha'eri, G B

1980-01-01

74

Spontaneous Forniceal Rupture in Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Forniceal rupture is a rare event in pregnancy. We report a case of a 26-year-old primigravid woman who experienced a forniceal rupture at 23 weeks of gestation with no inciting cause except for pregnancy. Pregnancy is associated with ureteral compression due to increase in pelvic vasculature with the right ureter more dilated due to anatomic reasons. Hormones such as prostaglandins and progesterone render the ureter more distensible to allow for pressure build-up and an obstructive picture at the collecting system. We will discuss physiologic changes in pregnancies that predispose to this uncommon phenomenon and the most up-to-date management strategies. PMID:25648411

Upputalla, Roshni; Moore, Robert M.; Jim, Belinda

2015-01-01

75

An experimental study on the ultimate strength of the adventitia and media of human atherosclerotic carotid arteries in circumferential and axial directions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atherosclerotic plaque may rupture without warning causing heart attack or stroke. Knowledge of the ultimate strength of human atherosclerotic tissues is essential for understanding the rupture mechanism and predicting cardiovascular events. Despite its great importance, experimental data on ultimate strength of human atherosclerotic carotid artery remains very sparse. This study determined the uniaxial tensile strength of human carotid artery sections

Zhongzhao Teng; Dalin Tang; Jie Zheng; Pamela K. Woodard; Allen H. Hoffman

2009-01-01

76

Shear Strength  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. John Atkinson, of the University of the West of England, developed a site for undergraduate students wanting to learn more about soil classification. His site addresses issues such as: shear strength, peak strength, and residual strength testing. Filled with charts, diagrams, statistics, the information is pertinent and easily understood by almost any audience.

Atkinson, John

2008-10-07

77

Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion  

PubMed Central

We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

2014-01-01

78

Heterogeneous rupture on homogenous faults: Three-dimensional spontaneous rupture simulations with thermal pressurization  

Microsoft Academic Search

To understand role of fluid on earthquake rupture processes, we investigated effects of thermal pressurization on spatial variation of dynamic rupture by computing spontaneous rupture propagation on a rectangular fault. We found thermal pressurization can cause heterogeneity of rupture even on a fault of uniform properties. On drained faults, tractions drop linearly with increasing slip in the same way everywhere.

Yumi Urata; Keiko Kuge; Yuko Kase

2008-01-01

79

Distal biceps and triceps ruptures.  

PubMed

Biceps and triceps tendon ruptures are rather uncommon injuries and are most commonly diagnosed clinically. Magnetic resonance imaging can help the clinician to differentiate an incomplete tear and define any degeneration of the tendon. Surgical anatomical repair is typically performed in acute complete ruptures whereas nonoperative treatment can be used for partial ruptures, as well as for patients unfit for surgery. Single incision techniques are associated with a higher rate of nerve injuries, while double incision repairs have a higher prevalence of heterotopic ossification. Although various fixation methods have been applied including bone tunnels, interference screws, suture anchors, cortical button fixation, the current evidence does not support the superiority of one method over the other. A well-planned postoperative rehabilitation programme is essential for a good final outcome. As better fixation devices are being used, more aggressive rehabilitation programmes have been applied. Epidemiology, clinical evaluation, diagnosis, surgical and conservative management of these injuries are presented in this review along with the authors' preferred technique for the anatomical repair of acute complete ruptures. PMID:23352149

Kokkalis, Zinon T; Ballas, Efstathios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Soucacos, Panayotis N

2013-03-01

80

Extracellular Matrix Dynamics and Fetal Membrane Rupture  

PubMed Central

The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in determining cell and organ function: (1) it is an organizing substrate that provides tissue tensile strength; (2) it anchors cells and influences cell morphology and function via interaction with cell surface receptors; and (3) it is a reservoir for growth factors. Alterations in the content and the composition of the ECM determine its physical and biological properties, including strength and susceptibility to degradation. The ECM components themselves also harbor cryptic matrikines, which when exposed by conformational change or proteolysis have potent effects on cell function, including stimulating the production of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Collectively, these properties of the ECM reflect a dynamic tissue component that influences both tissue form and function. This review illustrates how defects in ECM synthesis and metabolism and the physiological process of ECM turnover contribute to changes in the fetal membranes that precede normal parturition and contribute to the pathological events leading to preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). PMID:22267536

Strauss,, Jerome F.

2013-01-01

81

A Retrospective Analysis of Ruptured Breast Implants  

PubMed Central

Background Rupture is an important complication of breast implants. Before cohesive gel silicone implants, rupture rates of both saline and silicone breast implants were over 10%. Through an analysis of ruptured implants, we can determine the various factors related to ruptured implants. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 72 implants that were removed for implant rupture between 2005 and 2014 at a single institution. The following data were collected: type of implants (saline or silicone), duration of implantation, type of implant shell, degree of capsular contracture, associated symptoms, cause of rupture, diagnostic tools, and management. Results Forty-five Saline implants and 27 silicone implants were used. Rupture was diagnosed at a mean of 5.6 and 12 years after insertion of saline and silicone implants, respectively. There was no association between shell type and risk of rupture. Spontaneous was the most common reason for the rupture. Rupture management was implant change (39 case), microfat graft (2 case), removal only (14 case), and follow-up loss (17 case). Conclusions Saline implants have a shorter average duration of rupture, but diagnosis is easier and safer, leading to fewer complications. Previous-generation silicone implants required frequent follow-up observation, and it is recommended that they be changed to a cohesive gel implant before hidden rupture occurs. PMID:25396188

Baek, Woo Yeol; Lew, Dae Hyun

2014-01-01

82

Two patients with a complete proximal rupture of the hamstring.  

PubMed

Two men visited our Emergency Room because of a water-ski-accident. At physical examination, there was hematoma at the upper leg with loss of strength at extension of the hip and flexion of the knee. Both patients had a palpable gap just distal of the ischial tuberosity. Further imaging by sonography and MR-scan showed a rupture of the proximal hamstring tendon. Treatment was operative refixation of the hamstring tendons at the ischial tuberosity. After treatment consisted of brace for 4 weeks after operation. Both patients returned to their pre-operatively sports, though at a lower level. Surgical treatment of a complete proximal rupture of the hamstrings is recommended in case of sportive patients. PMID:19688217

Floor, Sebastiaan; van der Veen, Alex H; Devilee, Roger J

2010-04-01

83

Predicting the endpoints of earthquake ruptures.  

PubMed

The active fault traces on which earthquakes occur are generally not continuous, and are commonly composed of segments that are separated by discontinuities that appear as steps in map-view. Stress concentrations resulting from slip at such discontinuities may slow or stop rupture propagation and hence play a controlling role in limiting the length of earthquake rupture. Here I examine the mapped surface rupture traces of 22 historical strike-slip earthquakes with rupture lengths ranging between 10 and 420 km. I show that about two-thirds of the endpoints of strike-slip earthquake ruptures are associated with fault steps or the termini of active fault traces, and that there exists a limiting dimension of fault step (3-4 km) above which earthquake ruptures do not propagate and below which rupture propagation ceases only about 40 per cent of the time. The results are of practical importance to seismic hazard analysis where effort is spent attempting to place limits on the probable length of future earthquakes on mapped active faults. Physical insight to the dynamics of the earthquake rupture process is further gained with the observation that the limiting dimension appears to be largely independent of the earthquake rupture length. It follows that the magnitude of stress changes and the volume affected by those stress changes at the driving edge of laterally propagating ruptures are largely similar and invariable during the rupture process regardless of the distance an event has propagated or will propagate. PMID:17108963

Wesnousky, Steven G

2006-11-16

84

Rupture directivity of small earthquakes at Parkfield  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AbstractTheoretical modeling of strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> along a bimaterial interface suggests that earthquakes initiating on the interface will have a preferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. We test this model with 450 small earthquakes (2 < M < 5) from Parkfield, California, to look for evidence of consistent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity along the San Andreas Fault. We analyze azimuthal variations in earthquake source spectra after applying an iterative correction for wave propagation effects. Our approach avoids directly modeling source spectra because these models generally assume symmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; instead, we look for azimuthal variations in the amplitudes of the source spectra over specified frequency bands. Our overall results show similar proportions of events exhibiting characteristics of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity toward either the southeast or northwest. However, the proportion of events with southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity increases as we limit the data set to larger magnitudes, with 70% of the 46 events M > 3 exhibiting southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characteristics. Some spatial and temporal variability in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity is also apparent. We observe a higher proportion of northwest directivity <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> following the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake, which <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> toward the northwest. Our results are generally consistent with the preferred southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity model but suggest that directivity is likely due to several contributing factors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kane, Deborah L.; Shearer, Peter M.; Goertz-Allmann, Bettina P.; Vernon, Frank L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.S31A0181T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocities of Small Earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Whether the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of small earthquakes differs from those of large earthquakes has been a long- standing question in seismology. Recent proposals as to whether and how the physics of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may change with earthquake size have sparked interest in the energy budget, which depends strongly on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity (Vr). Small earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities have proved difficult to determine due to the strong attenuation of high-frequency waves. We analyze P and S waves of small earthquakes to detect <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity and constrain Vr. We apply the projected Landweber deconvolution (PLD) method to a data set of 30 earthquakes 3.6<M<4.5 recorded by the HiNet seismic array. We use small aftershocks as empirical Green's functions (EGF) to deconvolve from the main shocks and obtain the relative source time functions (RSTF). The EGF approach removes the effects of complex structure between the earthquakes and the stations. Variation in RSTFs with azimuth yields estimates of Vr for 6 earthquakes from 0.4 to 0.9?. Our results are broadly consistent with those of Yamada and Mori (JGR, 2005) and McGuire (BSSA, 2004). We now explore the implications of the range in Vr for static stress drop (??), and the ratio of radiated energy to seismic moment, which are interrelated. Kanamori and Rivera (BSSA, 2004) discuss how Vr and ?? must change with earthquake moment, if the ratio of energy to moment ? increases with moment, as has been suggested by various studies. There is currently no consensus that such a change in this ratio truly occurs. The increase in the energy-to- moment ratio is controlled by the relation between moment and corner frequency, which has moment inversely proportional to corner frequency raised to the power (3 + ?). Data compiled in Kanamori and Rivera suggests ? of 0.5. Then Vr of 0.4 to 0.9? for M3 events require that ?? of M3 events range from 1 to 0.1 respectively, of that of M7 events. More constraints on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities of small earthquakes will help to resolve possible changes in the energy budget, and thus earthquake physics, with earthquake size.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tomic, J.; Houston, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/33485887"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fluid杝tructure interaction within realistic three-dimensional models of the aneurysmatic aorta as a guidance to assess the risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aneurysm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease is a degenerating process whose ultimate event is the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the vessel wall. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> occurs when the stresses acting on the wall rise above the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the AAA wall tissue. The complex mechanical interaction between blood flow and wall dynamics in a three dimensional custom model of a patient AAA was studied by</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. S. Di Martino; G. Guadagni; A. Fumero; G. Ballerini; R. Spirito; P. Biglioli; A. Redaelli</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=scoliosis&pg=2&id=EJ250521"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> Testing.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Postural deviations resulting from <span class="hlt">strength</span> and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying <span class="hlt">strength</span> problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Londeree, Ben R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/864968"> <span id="translatedtitle">Method and apparatus for determining tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, whereafter the tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ratigan, Joe L. (Rapid City, SD)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20352593"> <span id="translatedtitle">Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following endoscopic polypectomy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 70-year-old man presented with two medium-sized colon polyps at the office of a gastroenterologist. After endoscopic polypectomy in a hospital, the patient was admitted to another hospital because of collapse and increasing abdominal pain. CT scan revealed hematoperitoneum and splenic subcapsular hematoma. Laparotomy with splenectomy was performed because of extended splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The postoperative course was unremarkable except late wound dehiscence. PMID:20352593</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wiedmann, M W; Kater, F; B鰄m, B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/781134"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">TRANSVERSELY</span> POLARIZED L PRODUCTION.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Transversely</span> polarized {Lambda} production in hard scattering processes is discussed in terms of a leading twist T-odd fragmentation function which describes the fragmentation of an unpolarized quark into a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized {Lambda}. We focus on the properties of this function and its relevance for the RHIC and HERMES experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">BORER,D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-05-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3015800"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Spleen Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is generally a safe and well-accepted procedure. However, in a small percentage of patients, it is associated with complications, such as bleeding and injury to the bile duct and other viscera. Splenic injury as a result of laparoscopic surgery has been reported only in the context of direct trauma, for example due to retraction in hand-assisted urologic surgery. To date, there have been no reported cases of patients requiring splenectomy following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We report an unusual case of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen presenting less than 28 days following 搖ncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Results: A 52-year-old female presented to our Accident and Emergency department 3 weeks following 搖ncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy, complaining of severe left upper quadrant pain radiating to the left shoulder tip. Clinical examination revealed a patient in hypovolemic shock, with localized left upper quadrant peritonism. Abdominal computed tomography supported a diagnosis of splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and the patient required an emergency splenectomy. Discussion: Splenic injury rarely complicates laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We postulate that either congenital or posttraumatic adhesions of the parietal peritoneum to the spleen may have caused the capsule to tear away from the spleen when the pneumoperitoneum was established, resulting in subcapsular hematoma and subsequent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in this patient. Videoscopic assessment of the spleen at the end of laparoscopic cholecystectomy might be a worthwhile exercise to aid early recognition and management in such cases. PMID:17651581</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leff, Daniel; Nortley, Mei; Melly, Lucy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036276"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ground motion hazard from supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An idealized <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, propagating smoothly near a terminal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity, radiates energy that is focused into a beam. For <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity less than the S-wave speed, radiated energy is concentrated in a beam of intense fault-normal velocity near the projection of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> trace. Although confined to a narrow range of azimuths, this beam diverges and attenuates. For <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity greater than the S-wave speed, radiated energy is concentrated in Mach waves forming a pair of beams propagating obliquely away from the fault. These beams do not attenuate until diffraction becomes effective at large distance. Events with supershear and sub-Rayleigh <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity are compared in 2D plane-strain calculations with equal stress drop, fracture energy, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length; only static friction is changed to determine the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity. Peak velocity in the sub-Rayleigh case near the termination of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is larger than peak velocity in the Mach wave in the supershear case. The occurrence of supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation reduces the most intense peak ground velocity near the fault, but it increases peak velocity within a beam at greater distances. ?? 2010.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrews, D.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720008738&hterms=seamless+pipe&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dseamless%2Bpipe"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests of internally pressurized Rene 41 tubes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Weld-drawn tubes of Rene 41 with 0.935 centimeter outside diameter and 0.064 centimeter wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1117 to 1233 K and internal helium pressures from 5.5 to 12.4 meganewtons per square meter. Lifetimes ranged from 5 to 2065 hours. The creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the tubes was 50 percent lower than that of unwelded, thick sheet specimens, and 20 percent lower than that of unwelded, thin sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gumto, K. H.; Weiss, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24326433"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early second trimester uterine scar <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous uterine scar <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be lethal in pregnant women. A spontaneous uterine scar <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the early mid-trimester is rare and difficult to diagnose. This is a case of a 30-year-old woman (G2P1L1) at 19 weeks of gestation and having undergone a previous caesarean section presented with acute abdomen in shock. Laparotomy revealed a uterine scar <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which was resutured after evacuation of products of conception. This case merits that the uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should be considered as a differential diagnosis in pregnant women presenting with acute abdomen. In this case, although there was uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the second trimester and a complete placental separation, fetus was alive which is quite unusual in patients presenting with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> uterus. PMID:24326433</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad; Shyamala, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23157060"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of splenic hemangioma in puerperium.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atraumatic splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare clinical entity and in the absence of trauma, the diagnosis and treatment are often delayed. In this article the authors discuss a case of a 45-year-old woman, gravida 5, para 4, with spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on her second postpartum day. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was related to a splenic hemangioma that is a vascular malformation and the most common neoplasm of the spleen. Despite the fact that hemangiomas are the most common primary neoplasms of the spleen, only few cases of splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have been described in pregnancy or puerperium. However, spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare event and the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should be suspected in woman with unexplained abdominal pain or with clear signs of haemorrhage. PMID:23157060</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carta, G; D'Alfonso, A; Nallbani, A; Palermo, P; Franchi, V; Patacchiola, F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4205863"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following perforating trauma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The immediate death rate for aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> caused by pointed and sharp-edged instruments is very high; however, delayed aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following the trauma is rarely reported. A patient who had an upper abdominal stab wound was sent to our hospital, and an emergency exploratory laparotomy was performed. No traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was found at that time. However, on the fifth day after surgery, aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred, and a large retroperitoneal hematoma was formed. The patient eventually died. Aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was confirmed by a second emergency exploratory laparotomy and the autopsy. The information from exploratory laparotomies, post-operative observations and treatments, medical imaging reports, and reasons for delayed aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as well as the underlying pathophysiological processes, are discussed in this case report. PMID:25405156</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1109.4822v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> instability of dunes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The simplest type of dune is the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show numerically and with a linear stability analysis that <span class="hlt">transverse</span> dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eric J. R. Parteli; Jos S. Andrade Jr.; Hans J. Herrmann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730014827&hterms=sigma+nickel&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D%257Bsigma%257D5%2Bnickel"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of cryogenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc design</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55514236"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantifying uncertainty in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using dynamic and kinematic models, we analyze the ability of GPS and strong-motion data to recover the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history of earthquakes. By analyzing the near-source ground-motion generated by earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> through barriers and asperities, we determine that both the prestress and yield stress of a frictional inhomogeneity can be recovered. In addition, we find that models with constraints on <span class="hlt">rupture</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morgan T. Page</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JMEP...23.2858O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Material Parameters for Creep <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Austenitic Stainless Steel Foils</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of austenitic stainless steel foil, 347SS, used in compact recuperators have been evaluated at 700 癈 in the stress range of 54-221 MPa to establish the baseline behavior for its extended use. Creep curves of the foil show that the primary creep stage is brief and creep life is dominated by tertiary creep deformation with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lives in the range of 10-2000 h. Results are compared with properties of bulk specimens tested at 98 and 162 MPa. Thin foil 347SS specimens were found to have higher creep rates and higher <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ductility than their bulk specimen counterparts. Power law relationship was obtained between the minimum creep rate and the applied stress with stress exponent value, n = 5.7. The value of the stress exponent is indicative of the rate-controlling deformation mechanism associated with dislocation creep. Nucleation of voids mainly occurred at second-phase particles (chromium-rich M23C6 carbides) that are present in the metal matrix by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. The improvement in <span class="hlt">strength</span> is attributed to the precipitation of fine niobium carbides in the matrix that act as obstacles to the movement of dislocations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Osman, H.; Borhana, A.; Tamin, M. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22004171"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neck curve polynomials in neck <span class="hlt">rupture</span> model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Neck <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of {sup 280}X{sub 90} with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25199188"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of uterine leiomyoma during labour.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in labour requires an emergency caesarean section. In women with a uterine scar, either from gynaecological surgery or from a previous caesarean section, it is well documented that the risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is higher than in those without. Spontaneous uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a uterus with fibroids during pregnancy or labour is extremely rare. We present a case of a 33-year-old, unbooked pregnant woman from Nigeria who had a uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> secondary to fibroids. She required an emergency caesarean section in labour. The fibroids were not removed. Her baby was born alive and in good condition and she made an uneventful recovery. PMID:25199188</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ramskill, Nikki; Hameed, Aisha; Beebeejaun, Yusuf</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23707180"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in athletes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The incidence of AT <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has increased in recent decades. AT <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> frequently occur in the third or fourth decade of life in sedentary individuals who play sport occasionally. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> also occur in elite athletes. Clinical examination must be followed by imaging. Conservative management and early mobilization can achieve excellent results, but the rerupture rate is not acceptable for the management of young, active, or athletic individuals. Open surgery is the most common option for AT <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, but there are risks of superficial skin breakdown and wound problems. These problems can be prevented with percutaneous repair. PMID:23707180</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3214190"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intestinal adhesion due to previous uterine surgery as a risk factor for delayed diagnosis of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: a case report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a life-threatening condition both to mothers and fetuses. Its early diagnosis and treatment may save their lives. Previous myomectomy is a high risk factor for uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Intestinal adhesion due to previous myomectomy may also prevent early diagnosis of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Case presentation A 38-year-old primiparous non-laboring Japanese woman with a history of myomectomy was admitted in her 34th week due to lower abdominal pain. Although the pain was slight and her vital signs were stable, computed tomography revealed massive fluid collection in her abdominal cavity, which led us to perform a laparotomy. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> had occurred at the site of the previous myomectomy; however, the small intestine was adhered tightly to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, thus masking it. The baby was delivered through a low uterine segment <span class="hlt">transverse</span> incision. The <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> uterine wall was reconstructed. Conclusion Intestinal adhesion due to a prior myomectomy occluded a uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, possibly masking its symptoms and signs, which may have prevented early diagnosis. PMID:22018094</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28704905"> <span id="translatedtitle">Loop <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colostomy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">All large-bowel stomas (198) performed between 1970 and 1980 in a community hospital were reviewed. Twenty-nine stomas were\\u000a loop <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colostomies. There were five deaths, a complication rate related to the stoma of 28 per cent, and only 18\\u000a patients ever achieved colostomy closure. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colostomy is a holdover from the\\u000a past; (2) 搕emporary</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martin J. Winkler; Peter A. Volpe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980STIN...8119354C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microcracking and engineering properties of high-<span class="hlt">strength</span> concrete</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An X-ray technique was used to study internal microcracking. Two classification systems were developed to analyze the microcracks: bond-mortar crack analysis and simple-combined crack analysis. Internal microcracks were observed at four strain levels. The observed microcracking mechanism is related to the failure mode in uniaxial compression. The results of the mechanical properties study are presented including data on compressive <span class="hlt">strength</span>, <span class="hlt">strength</span> gain with age, specimen size effect, static modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, tensile splitting <span class="hlt">strength</span>, unit weight, and drying effect on compressive and flexural <span class="hlt">strength</span> of normal- and high-<span class="hlt">strength</span> concretes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carrasquillo, R. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860011370&hterms=concrete+strength&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dconcrete%2Bstrength"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cryogenic insulation <span class="hlt">strength</span> and bond tester</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method and apparatus for testing the tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> and bonding <span class="hlt">strength</span> of sprayed-on foam insulation attached to metal cryogenic fuel tanks is described. A circular cutter is used to cut the insulation down to the surface of the metal tank to form plugs of the insulation for testing in situ on the tank. The apparatus comprises an electromechanical pulling device powered by a belt battery pack. The pulling device comprises a motor driving a mechanical pulling structure comprising a horizontal shaft connected to two bell cracks which are connected to a central member. When the lower end of member is attached to a fitting, which in turn is bonded to a plug, a pulling force is exerted on the plug sufficient to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> it. The force necessary to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the plug or pull it loose is displayed as a digital read-out.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schuerer, P. H.; Ehl, J. H.; Prasthofer, W. P. (inventors)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28948520"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical repair of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We evaluated the surgical results of 42 consecutive patients with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the Achilles ten don treated from 1973 to 1984 to determine the causes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and to evaluate our treatment methods. Patients were divided into early and late repair groups and their charts reviewed to determine common clinical features. A new method of repair with early functional</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James L. Beskin; Richard A. Sanders; Stephen C. Hunter; Jack C. Hughston</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54098453"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predicting the endpoints of earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The active fault traces on which earthquakes occur are generally not continuous, and are commonly composed of segments that are separated by discontinuities that appear as steps in map-view. Stress concentrations resulting from slip at such discontinuities may slow or stop <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and hence play a controlling role in limiting the length of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Here I examine the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steven G. Wesnousky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Geomo.216...53X"> <span id="translatedtitle">Do buried-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes trigger less landslides than surface-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes for reverse faults?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gorum et al. (2013, Geomorphology 184, 127-138) carried out a study on inventory compilation and statistical analyses of landslides triggered by the 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake. They revealed that spatial distribution patterns of these landslides were mainly controlled by complex <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanism and topography. They also suggested that blind-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes trigger fewer landslides than surface-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes on thrust reverse faults. Although a few lines of evidence indicate that buried-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes might trigger fewer landslides than surface-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes on reverse faults, more careful comparisons and analyses indicate that it is not always true. Instead, some cases show that a buried-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquake can trigger a larger quantity of landslides that are distributed in a larger area, whereas surface-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes can trigger larger but a fewer landslides distributed in a smaller area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, Chong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19843435"> <span id="translatedtitle">Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in athletes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> commonly affect middle-aged athletes and can result in considerable functional impairment. While the cause is multifactorial, the greatest risk is present for athletes involved in sports that involve sudden acceleration and deceleration. A thorough history and physical examination can accurately yield a diagnosis, but when question remains, magnetic resonance imaging is superior to ultrasound-guided evaluation. The best evidence available suggests that operative treatment has a lower rate of rerupture, a higher rate of return to the same level of sport participation, and a higher complication rate, if an open technique is used. Percutaneous methods of fixation have lower complication rates without an increase in the rate of rerupture when compared with open methods. Augmentation of an Achilles tendon repair has demonstrated no clinical benefit. Rehabilitation with early mobilization leads to improved patient-reported outcomes. PMID:19843435</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deangelis, Joseph P; Wilson, Kristina M; Cox, Charles L; Diamond, Alex B; Thomson, A Brian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2777620"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Surgery of traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes the clinical presentation, diagnosis, surgery and results of patients with acute traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aorta in a series of 21 consecutive patients. Direct cross-clamping without additional methods of spinal cord protection was used in 18/21 patients (86%). Direct suture was possible in 12/21 patients (60%). In the remaining patients, the repair was carried out by interposition of a Dacron graft. Overall mortality was 7/21 patients (33%). However, in 3 patients with severe polytrauma irreversible brain damage was the cause of death whereas 2 patients died from septicemia and myocardial infarction, respectively. No paraplegia nor paraparesis occurred in the surviving patients which were operated by direct cross-clamping of the aorta and rapid reanastomosis without additional methods of spinal cord protection. PMID:2777620</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">von Segesser, L; Schneider, K; Siebenmann, R; Glinz, W; Turina, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830027838&hterms=after+cauti+response&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dafter%2Bcauti%2Bresponse"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of thermally-induced <span class="hlt">transverse</span> cracks in graphite epoxy composite laminates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The characteristics of thermally induced <span class="hlt">transverse</span> cracks in T300/5208 graphite-epoxy cross-ply and quasi-isotropic laminates were investigated both experimentally and analytically. The formation of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> cracks and the subsequent crack spacing present during cool down to -250 F (116K) and thermal cycling between 250 and -250 F (116 and 394K) was investigated. The state of stress in the vicinity of a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> crack and the influence of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> cracking on the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was predicted using a generalized plane strain finite element analysis and a modified shear lag analysis. A majority of the cross-ply laminates experienced <span class="hlt">transverse</span> cracking during the initial cool down to -250 F whereas the quasi-isotropic laminates remained uncracked. The in situ <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the 90 degree layers was more than 1.9 times greater than the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the unidirectional 90 degree material for all laminates investigated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adams, D. S.; Bowles, D. E.; Herakovich, C. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70137547"> <span id="translatedtitle">Metrics for comparing dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earthquakes are complex events that involve a myriad of interactions among multiple geologic features and processes. One of the tools that is available to assist with their study is computer simulation, particularly dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation. A dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation is a numerical model of the physical processes that occur during an earthquake. Starting with the fault geometry, friction constitutive law, initial stress conditions, and assumptions about the condition and response of the near?fault rocks, a dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation calculates the evolution of fault slip and stress over time as part of the elastodynamic numerical solution (?爏ee the simulation description in the electronic supplement to this article). The complexity of the computations in a dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation make it challenging to verify that the computer code is operating as intended, because there are no exact analytic solutions against which these codes results can be directly compared. One approach for checking if dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> computer codes are working satisfactorily is to compare each code抯 results with the results of other dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> codes running the same earthquake simulation benchmark. To perform such a comparison consistently, it is necessary to have quantitative metrics. In this paper, we present a new method for quantitatively comparing the results of dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> computer simulation codes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barall, Michael; Harris, Ruth A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1409.2868v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deconstructed <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Mass Variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditional searches for R-parity conserving natural supersymmetry (SUSY) require large <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mass and missing energy cuts to separate the signal from large backgrounds. SUSY models with compressed spectra inherently produce signal events with small amounts of missing energy that are hard to explore. We use this difficulty to motivate the construction of "deconstructed" <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mass variables which are designed preserve information on both the norm and direction of the missing momentum. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these variables in searches for the pair production of supersymmetric top-quark partners which subsequently decay into a final state with an isolated lepton, jets and missing energy. We show that the use of deconstructed <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mass variables extends the accessible compressed spectra parameter space beyond the region probed by traditional methods. The parameter space can further be expanded to neutralino masses that are larger than the difference between the stop and top masses. In addition, we also discuss how these variables allow for novel searches of single stop production, in order to directly probe unconstrained stealth stops in the small stop- and neutralino-mass regime. We also demonstrate the utility of these variables for generic gluino and stop searches in all-hadronic final states. Overall, we demonstrate that deconstructed <span class="hlt">transverse</span> variables are essential to any search wanting to maximize signal separation from the background when the signal has undetected particles in the final state.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahmed Ismail; Reinhard Schwienhorst; Joseph S. Virzi; Devin G. E. Walker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PApGe.171.2867S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupturing</span> in Fluid-Overpressured Crust: How Common?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Whether or not <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> nucleate in fluid-overpressured crust ( ? v = P f/ ? v > 0.4) is important because pore-fluids overpressured above hydrostatic lower fault frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span> and may also vary through the earthquake cycle, acting as an independent variable affecting fault failure. Containment of fluid overpressure is precarious because pressure-dependent activation of faults and fractures allows drainage from overpressured portions of the crust. Discharge of fluids through activated fault-fracture permeability (fault-valve action) decreases overpressure so that subsequent failure depends on the cycling of both overpressure and frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span> as well as tectonic stress. Geometric and mechanical considerations suggest that fluid overpressures are more likely to develop and be sustained in compressional/transpressional regimes as opposed to extensional/transtensional tectonic settings. On the basis of geophysical observations and force-balance analyses, subduction interface shear zones appear to be strongly but variably overpressured to near-lithostatic levels ( ? v > 0.9) over the full depth range of seismogenic megathrusts. Strong overpressuring at seismogenic depths is also documented in active fold-thrust belts and in areas of ongoing compressional inversion (e.g., northern Honshu) where inherited normal faults are reactivated as steep reverse faults, requiring near-lithostatic overpressures ( ? v ? 1.0) at depths of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation. Evidence for overpressuring around strike-slip faults is less clear but tends to be strongest in areas of transpression. In areas of extensional tectonics coincident with particularly high fluid discharge, there is some evidence of overpressuring concentrated towards the base of the seismogenic zone. In general, because of the limited resolution of geophysical techniques, it is easier to make the case for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation through overpressured crust than to make a definitive case for the direct involvement of overpressured fluids in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> nucleation, though in some instances the circumstantial evidence is compelling. An unresolved related issue is the heterogeneity of overpressuring. Do the active fault zones themselves serve as fluid conduits that are locally overpressured with respect to the surrounding crust?</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sibson, Richard H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5805L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of high-velocity friction experiments to the shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a fault in an elastic half-space</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We developed a physics-based model for earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by numerically simulating shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along a 2D vertical fault with the dynamic frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span> of granite under high slip velocity. Recent experimental observations indicated that the steady-state frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span> of silica-rich igneous rocks (granite, syenite, diorite) alternate between dynamic-weakening under low velocity (V < 0.03 m/s) and dynamic-strengthening under higher velocities (V > 0.03 m/s). This <span class="hlt">strength</span> alternation was attributed to powder-lubrication (weakening), and powder dehydration (strengthening) (Sammis et al., 2011). We used the dynamic friction law which was determined on samples of Sierra White granite under experimental velocities approaching 1 m/s (Reches and Lockner, 2010). We converted their observed friction-distance-velocity relations into an empirical friction model referred to as WEST (WEakening - STrengthening). For the simulation calculations, we used the spectral element code of Ampuero (web.gps.caltech.edu/~ampuero/software), which computes the spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation along an anti-plane shear (mode III) fracture in an elastic half-space. In the present analysis, the WEST friction model is used as the fault <span class="hlt">strength</span> while keeping all other parameters (crust properties and stresses) the same as Version 3 of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) benchmark problem (Harris et al., 2004). This approach allows for direct comparison between the WEST <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the benchmark <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with a fault of slip-weakening friction model (Rojas et al., 2008). We found the following differences between the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the two models: (1) WEST-based <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs earlier at all observation points away from the nucleation zone; (2) WEST-based model has lower (~ 35%) peak velocity and shorter rise-time; and (3) WEST-based <span class="hlt">rupture</span> shows rich, frequent alteration of slip velocity, and consequently, the simulated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is more complex in stress drop, displacements, and friction recovery. We discuss the significant contribution of this experimentally-based friction model to the understanding of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models with emphasis on slip-pulse behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liao, Zonghu; Reches, Zeev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25527320"> <span id="translatedtitle">Progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm towards <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: refining clinical risk assessment using a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction method.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is associated with high mortality rates. Risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is multi-factorial involving AAA geometric configuration, vessel tortuosity, and the presence of intraluminal pathology. Fluid structure interaction (FSI) simulations were conducted in patient based computed tomography scans reconstructed geometries in order to monitor aneurysmal disease progression from normal aortas to non-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and contained <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> AAA (rAAA), and the AAA risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was assessed. Three groups of 8 subjects each were studied: 8 normal and 16 pathological (8 non-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and 8 rAAA). The AAA anatomical structures segmented included the blood lumen, intraluminal thrombus (ILT), vessel wall, and embedded calcifications. The vessel wall was described with anisotropic material model that was matched to experimental measurements of AAA tissue specimens. A statistical model for estimating the local wall <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution was employed to generate a map of a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> potential index (RPI), representing the ratio between the local stress and local <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution. The FSI simulations followed a clear trend of increasing wall stresses from normal to pathological cases. The maximal stresses were observed in the areas where the ILT was not present, indicating a potential protective effect of the ILT. Statistically significant differences were observed between the peak systolic stress and the peak stress at the mean arterial pressure between the three groups. For the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms, where the geometry of intact aneurysm was reconstructed, results of the FSI simulations clearly depicted maximum wall stress at the a priori known location of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The RPI mapping indicated several distinct regions of high RPI coinciding with the actual location of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The FSI methodology demonstrates that the aneurysmal disease can be described by numerical simulations, as indicated by a clear trend of increasing aortic wall stresses in the studied groups, (normal aortas, AAAs and rAAAs). Ultimately, the results demonstrate that FSI wall stress mapping and RPI can be used as a tool for predicting the potential <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an AAA by predicting the actual <span class="hlt">rupture</span> location, complementing current clinical practice by offering a predictive diagnostic tool for deciding whether to intervene surgically or spare the patient from an unnecessary risky operation. PMID:25527320</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xenos, Michalis; Labropoulos, Nicos; Rambhia, Suraj; Alemu, Yared; Einav, Shmuel; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Bluestein, Danny</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24730200"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Treatment of anterior cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anterior cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the knee is a common knee injury associated with sports and exercise. The injury typically arises when the foot is tightly locked against the floor or ground, whereby a sudden change of direction combined with the slowed motion causes a rotary motion of the upper part of the tibia and a force <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> the cruciate ligament. Approximately 30% of the injuries take place during a situation of direct contact. The instability of the knee due to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be strongly invalidizing. In such case surgical therapy is required, if appropriate conservative treatment does not lead to a good result. PMID:24730200</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suomalainen, Piia; Sillanp滗, Petri; J鋜vel, Timo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Icar..232....1S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> motion of fragmenting faint meteors observed with the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nine fragmenting, faint meteors (peak magnitude ?+1, mass <10-4 kg) were observed with the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO). Fragments for eight of the nine meteors exhibited significant <span class="hlt">transverse</span> motion, perpendicular to the meteor velocity. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> speeds of the order 100 m s were observed, while models of aerodynamic loading predict speeds of the order 0.5 m s. Acceleration of the fragments in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction was negligible. Alternate methods of fragmentation, namely rotation and electrostatic charge accumulation, were examined through basic models to explain the observed <span class="hlt">transverse</span> speeds. Meteoroid <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of the order 106 Pa were derived, matching observed <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of larger, brighter meteors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940013179&hterms=Molybdenum+alloyed+Zr&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DMolybdenum%2Balloyed%2BZr"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tensile and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of hafnium carbide dispersed molybdenum and tungsten base alloy wires</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tensile strain rate sensitivity and the stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of Mo-base and W-base alloy wires, 380 microns in diameter, were determined over the temperature range from 1200 K to 1600 K. Three molybdenum alloy wires; Mo + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC), Mo + 25w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+25W) and Mo + 45w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+45W), and a W + 0.4w/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) tungsten alloy wire were evaluated. The tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of all wires studied was found to have a positive strain rate sensitivity. The strain rate dependency increased with increasing temperature and is associated with grain broadening of the initial fibrous structures. The hafnium carbide dispersed W-base and Mo-base alloys have superior tensile and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties than those without HfC. On a density compensated basis the MoHfC wires exhibit superior tensile and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strengths</span> to the WHfC wires up to approximately 1400 K. Addition of tungsten in the Mo-alloy wires was found to increase the long-term stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> at temperatures above 1400 K. Theoretical calculations indicate that the <span class="hlt">strength</span> and ductility advantage of the HfC dispersed alloy wires is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yun, Hee Mann; Titran, Robert H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T41D..03X"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fault barriers favor activation of backthrusts near segment ends of megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Increasing evidence indicates that backthrusts may become active during or after megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in subduction zones, such as in Chile and Sumatra areas (Melnick et al., 2012; Singh et al., 2011). Previous studies on relevant mechanisms mainly focused on the interaction between forethrusts and the megathrust. Here we aim to investigate through dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations how backthrusts may be activated by megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in subduction zone environment. Assuming a single backthrust branch, our preliminary results show that the activation of backthrust is difficult if the megathrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can easily pass through the fault junction, owing to a quickly established stress shadow zone in the wake of the megathrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front. In contrast, if the megathrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is arrested or delayed around the junction, a resultant backward stress lobe of the type discussed by Xu and Ben-Zion (2013) can load the backthrust over a considerable amount of time and facilitates <span class="hlt">rupture</span> activation along the backthrust. A number of candidates can serve to arrest or delay megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, such as the velocity-strengthening frictional behavior and off-fault weak materials in the shallow portion of subduction zones, fault bend or ramp, and subducted seamount. Moreover, these features are also found capable of generating backthrusts during the long-term quasi-static process, which provide pre-existing weakness to be reactivated by later dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Our results agree, from a different point of view, with the study based on the critical taper theory (Cubas et al., 2013) that an increase of friction towards the trench favors the activation of backthrusts near the up-dip limit of megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. The results highlight the role of fault geometric or <span class="hlt">strength</span> heterogeneities in controlling the strain partitioning on and off the main fault plane. Accordingly, activated backthrusts may be treated as markers that reflect the limits of seismogenic zones, and thus may be used to characterize segmentation of subduction zones. Backthrusts can contribute, like forethrusts, to local tsunami generation, intra-plate seismicity, etc., and should be examined in further detail in future studies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1523..188I"> <span id="translatedtitle">New STAR <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New measurements of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> single spin asymmetries at midrapidity of single hadrons and di-hadrons produced in jets are reported. They provide data on quark <span class="hlt">transversity</span> in p+p collisions at RHIC. Pushing out to the Forward Meson Spectrometer (FMS) rapidities in future measurements will probe quark <span class="hlt">transversity</span> at high x. Another <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin result from STAR is also reported: It is found that the ?0 <span class="hlt">transverse</span> single spin asymmetries at 2.5<?<4 extend to very high <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum with no observed decrease.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Igo, George; STAR Collaboration</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.inria.fr/docs/00/38/82/34/PDF/157b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comptes Rendus des JNC 16 Toulouse 2009 Dtermination l'aide d'un essai de flexion de la rsistance la <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">approach at the determination of brittle filaments fracture <span class="hlt">strength</span>, are unsuitable for acceptance testing r茅sistance 脿 la <span class="hlt">rupture</span> en tension de renforts filamentaires fragiles Determination of brittle filament device have been proposed to obtain much quickly tensile fracture <span class="hlt">strength</span> of filaments about 100-150 碌m</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyer, Edmond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840017725&hterms=hardness+inconel+718&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dhardness%2Binconel%2B718"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of candidate Stirling engine alloys after long-term aging at 760 deg C in low-pressure hydrogen</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nine candidate Stirling automotive engine alloys were aged at 760 C for 3500 hr in low pressure hydrogen or argon to determine the resulting effects on mechanical behavior. Candidate heater head tube alloys were CG-27, W545, 12RN72, INCONEL-718, and HS-188 while candidate cast cylinder-regenerator housing alloys were SA-F11, CRM-6D, XF-818, and HS-31. Aging per se is detrimental to the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and tensile <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of the iron base alloys. The presence of hydrogen does not significantly contribute to <span class="hlt">strength</span> degradation. Based percent highway driving cycle; CG-27 has adequate 3500 hr - 870 C creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> and SA-Fll, CRM-6D, and XF-818 have adequate 3500 hr - 775 C creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titran, R. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3604295"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plantaris <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: why is it important?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plantaris muscle is accessory plantar flexor of calf, a vestigial muscle of triceps surae complex. Its importance lies in the fact that its <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cans mimic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Sometimes when there is <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of Achilles tendon, intact plantaris can still cause plantar flexion at ankle presenting a confusing picture. We present one such case of plantaris <span class="hlt">rupture</span> confused by radiology resident with DVT. A 51-year-old man had a feeling as if kicked in back of calf along with a snapping sound and severe pain while playing tennis. On seeing fluid between muscle plane and a hypoechoic structure radiology resident labelled it DVT. MRI suggested <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> plantaris as fluid and muscle stump were seen between gastronemius and soleus. Patient was treated conservatively with rest, ice compression and elevated leg and showed significant reduction in pain and swelling. PMID:23345486</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rohilla, Seema; Jain, Nitin; Yadav, Rohtas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/343749"> <span id="translatedtitle">Renal allograft <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with iliofemoral thrombophlebitis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a renal allograft in the early posttransplant period is associated with tachycardia, hypotension, oliguria, swelling, pain, a falling hematocrit level, and tenderness at the transplant site. Occasionally, the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> allograft can be saved by control of the hemorrhage. Deep vein thrombophlebitis, a common occurrence after prolonged surgery and cortocosteroid therapy, is less common in renal allograft transplantation, but may be associated with renal vein thrombosis. The simultaneous occurrence of deep vein thrombophlebitis, renal vein thrombosis, and allograft <span class="hlt">rupture</span> contraindicates anticoagulent therapy. We present a patient in whom ipsilateral deep vein thrombophlebitis developed eight days after a cadaveric renal allograft, followed in two days by hypotension, a falling hematocrit level, oliguria, and a painfall mass at the allograft site. Surgical exploration revealed a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> allograft with iliofemoral and renal vein thrombosis and profuse hemorrhage. A transplant nephrectomy was performed. PMID:343749</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goldman, M H; Leapman, S B; Handy, R D; Best, D W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21091032"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute Iliac Artery <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Endovascular Treatment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span> over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V., E-mail: bill_skiadas@yahoo.gr; Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L. [University of Athens, Radiology Department, Areteion Hospital (Greece)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.1177P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Finite <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Process of Izmit (turkey) Earthquake</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the Izmit (Turkey) earthquake of 17 August 1999 (Mw=7.6), have been analysed using the wave form of P and S waves and the directivity function of Rayleigh waves recorded at teleseismic distances. The source model is a unilateral rectangular fault of finite dimensions (Haskell model). Initial values of orientation and sense <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, fault length and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity have been obtained from first motion of P wave and directivity function of Rayleigh waves. Depth and focal mechanism have been obtained from wave form of P and SH waves using a finite dimension source. The obtained solution is a strike slip mechanism with fault orientation : strike 270z, dip 80z and rake -180z, focal depth 10 km, fault length 120 km, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity 3 km/s and seismic moment 1.66 x 10^20 Nm. This solution agrees with the North Anatolia Fault tectonics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pro, C.; Buforn, E.; Udias, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1610355"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> waves in chromospheric mottles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using data obtained by the high temporal and spatial resolution Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope, we investigate at an unprecedented level of detail <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations in chromospheric fine structures near the solar disk center. The oscillations are interpreted in terms of propagating and standing magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Wave characteristics including the maximum <span class="hlt">transverse</span> velocity amplitude and the phase speed are measured as a function of distance along the structure's length. Solar magneto-seismology is applied to these measured parameters to obtain diagnostic information on key plasma parameters (e.g., magnetic field, density, temperature, flow speed) of these localised waveguides. The magnetic field <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the mottle along the $\\sim$2 Mm length is found to decrease by a factor of 12, while the local plasma density scale height is $\\sim280\\pm$80 km.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuridze, D; Mathioudakis, M; Erd閘yi, R; Jess, D B; Morton, R J; Christian, D J; Keenan, F P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34631161"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cognitive Frames in Psychology: Demarcations and <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">As there seems to be a recurrent feeling of crisis in psychology, its present state is analyzed in this article. The author\\u000a believes that in addition to the traditional manifestations that have dogged psychology since it emerged as an independent\\u000a science some new features of the crisis have emerged. Three fundamental <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are identified: the 揾orizontal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>\\u000a between various schools</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrey V. Yurevich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AIPC..969..439B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Tested Neutron Irradiated Tantalum Alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Irradiation of metals with high-energy particles produces nano-scale defects that act as obstacles to dislocation glide. This paper presents the effects of low-level neutron radiation on the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and microstructural properties of two tantalum alloys, Ta-10%W and Ta-8%W-2%Hf (T-111), which have been used to encapsulate radioactive fuel for space Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). Ta-10%W and T-111 test specimens were exposed to a neutron fluence level (1.21015nvt) at temperatures less than <0.2 Tm, which is equivalent to the cumulative fluence associated with the 30-year mission life of a RPS. This fluence level results in an atomic displacement damage of approximately 3.010-7 dpa in both alloys. The atomic displacement damage produces an approximate two-order of magnitude increase in the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time, and a two-order of magnitude reduction in steady state creep rate. These observations are statistically significant at the 0.05 significance level. Transmission electron microscopy of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> specimens reveals that the interaction of the irradiation produced defects with ao/2<111> screw dislocations results in a five-fold increase in dislocation density and a pronouncement of the ordering of dislocations into mosaic patterns of cellular or subgranular arrangements. The results of this research are significant because they provide a basic understanding of the <span class="hlt">strength</span> mechanisms in two tantalum alloys (Ta-10%W and T-111) resulting from neutron irradiation at temperatures <0.2 Tm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barklay, Chadwick D.; Howe, Jane Y.; Kramer, Daniel P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730008902&hterms=seamless+pipe&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dseamless%2Bpipe"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests of internally pressurized Hastelloy-X tubes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seamless Hastelloy-X tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1400 to 1650 F and internal helium pressures from 800 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 58 to 3600 hr. The creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the tubes was from 20 to 40 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gumto, K. H.; Colantino, G. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39857201"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fatigue and stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of silicon carbide fibre-reinforced glass-ceramics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fatigue and stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> testing of unidirectional Nicalon-type silicon carbide fibre-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composites is described. Tensile fatigue testing was performed at 22癈 on two different composite systems to contrast the behaviour under applied stresses above and below the levels necessary to cause matrix cracking. The higher <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the two composites was then also tested in flexural fatigue</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karl M. Prewo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51726813"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal regime from bottom simulating reflectors along the N Ecuador - S Colombia margin: relation between tectonic segmentation, thermal variation and the limit of the seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the North Ecuador South Columbian (NESC) convergent margin (0癗) three megathrust events, in 1942, 1958 and 1979, present <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones that abut one another. Multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection and bathymetric data acquired during the SISTEUR (2000) and AMADEUS (2005) cruises highlighted that the margin comprises four <span class="hlt">transverse</span> segments (called, from south to north, the Esmeraldas, Manglares, Tumaco and Patia</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Marcaillou; G. Spence; J. Collot; K. Wang; A. Ribodetti</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39765024"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of some technological factors on the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of metal-glass seals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The article deals with the adhesive <span class="hlt">strength</span> of metal-glass systems. It establishes correlations between the specific <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> and the temperature-time conditions; this makes it possible to compare different technologies of obtaining seals, evaluate their durability, work out optimal sealing conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. I. Zhuravlev; A. A. Borisenko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/859284"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neutron <span class="hlt">Transversity</span> at Jefferson Lab</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nucleon <span class="hlt">transversity</span> and single <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron <span class="hlt">transversity</span> and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-09-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970010494&hterms=Al2O3&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DAl2O3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time/Temperature Dependent Tensile <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of SiC and Al2O3-Based Fibers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to understand and model the thermomechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced composites, stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span>, fast-fracture, and warm-up <span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies were conducted on various advanced SiC and Al2O3-based fibers in the,temperature range from 20 to 1400 C in air as well as in inert environments. The measured stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span>, fast fracture, and warm-up <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strengths</span> were correlated into a single master time/temperature-dependent <span class="hlt">strength</span> plot for each fiber type using thermal activation and slow crack growth theories. It is shown that these plots are useful for comparing and selecting fibers for CMC and MMC reinforcement and that, in comparison to stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests, the fast-fracture and warm-up tests can be used for rapid generation of these plots.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/865853"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> field focused system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">transverse</span> field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, Oscar A. (Berkeley, CA)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25360971"> <span id="translatedtitle">Entangled <span class="hlt">transverse</span> optical vortex.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss a new kind of optical vortex with the angular momentum perpendicular to the flow direction and entangled in that it is a coherent combination of different orbital angular momentum states of the same sign. This entangled state exhibits many unexpected physical properties. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> optical vortex can be generated from the reflection of an electromagnetic wave off an array of ferrite rods. Its vorticity can be reversed by switching the direction of the magnetization of the rods, which usually takes only a nanosecond. PMID:25360971</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chui, S T; Lin, Zhifang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MPAG...17..341G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transversality</span> for Holomorphic Supercurves</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Holomorphic supercurves are motivated by supergeometry as a natural generalisation of holomorphic curves. In the characterisation as a tuple consisting of a holomorphic curve and certain sections, we consider a slightly weaker form of the defining equations. This is such that, upon perturbing them to depend on a connection, the corresponding linearised operator is generically surjective. By this <span class="hlt">transversality</span> result, we show that the resulting moduli spaces are oriented finite dimensional smooth manifolds. Finally, we examine how they depend on the choice of generic data. A companion article establishes compactness results in this context.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Groeger, Josua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050201897&hterms=High+compressive+stresses&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DHigh%2Bcompressive%2Bstresses"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ceramic Composite Intermediate Temperature Stress-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Properties Improved Significantly</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Silicon carbide (SiC) composites are considered to be potential materials for future aircraft engine parts such as combustor liners. It is envisioned that on the hot side (inner surface) of the combustor liner, composites will have to withstand temperatures in excess of 1200 C for thousands of hours in oxidizing environments. This is a severe condition; however, an equally severe, if not more detrimental, condition exists on the cold side (outer surface) of the combustor liner. Here, the temperatures are expected to be on the order of 800 to 1000 C under high tensile stress because of thermal gradients and attachment of the combustor liner to the engine frame (the hot side will be under compressive stress, a less severe stress-state for ceramics). Since these composites are not oxides, they oxidize. The worst form of oxidation for <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction occurs at these intermediate temperatures, where the boron nitride (BN) interphase oxidizes first, which causes the formation of a glass layer that strongly bonds the fibers to the matrix. When the fibers strongly bond to the matrix or to one another, the composite loses toughness and <span class="hlt">strength</span> and becomes brittle. To increase the intermediate temperature stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties, researchers must modify the BN interphase. With the support of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, significant improvements were made as state-of-the-art SiC/SiC composites were developed during the Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program. Three approaches were found to improve the intermediate-temperature stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties: fiber-spreading, high-temperature silicon- (Si) doped boron nitride (BN), and outside-debonding BN.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhDT.......289M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanical properties of high-<span class="hlt">strength</span> concrete</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes an experimental program conducted to investigate production techniques and mechanical properties of high <span class="hlt">strength</span> concrete in general and to provide recommendations for using these concretes in manufacturing precast/prestressed bridge girders. Test variables included total amount and composition of cementitious material (portland cement, fly ash, and silica fume), type and brand of cement, type of silica fume (dry densified and slurry), type and brand of high-range water-reducing admixture, type of aggregate, aggregate gradation, maximum aggregate size, and curing. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of these variables on changes in compressive <span class="hlt">strength</span> and modulus of elasticity over time, splitting tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>, modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, creep, shrinkage, and absorption potential (as an indirect indicator of permeability). Also investigated were the effects of test parameters such as mold size, mold material, and end condition. Over 6,300 specimens were cast from approximately 140 mixes over a period of 3 years.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mokhtarzadeh, Alireza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3510519"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of echinococcal cysts: diagnosis, classification, and clinical implications.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors classify <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of echinococcal cysts into three types: contained, communicating, and direct. Contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs when only the parasitic endocyst <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and the cyst contents are confined within the host-derived pericyst. When cyst contents escape via biliary or bronchial radicles that are incorporated in the pericyst, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is communicating. Direct <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs when both the endocyst and the pericyst tear, spilling cyst contents directly into the peritoneal or pleural cavities or occasionally into other structures. Communicating and direct forms have more serious clinical implications than contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, but even contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should have prompt surgical attention to prevent it from developing into one of the other forms. Untreated communicating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a liver cyst can lead to obstruction of the biliary system with a 50% mortality rate. Direct <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may cause anaphylaxis, and it should be managed surgically, possibly with adjunctive treatment with antihelminthic drugs to decrease the possibility of metastatic hydatosis. PMID:3510519</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lewall, D B; McCorkell, S J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/132202"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of virgin 1-1/4Cr-1/2Mo plate and submerged arc weldments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The submerged arc welding process was used to join 19mm thick 1-1/4Cr-1/2Mo steel plate material. Following welding, the weldment was given a renormalizing and tempering heat treatment. Chemical analysis, metallurgical examination, tensile testing and creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> testing were performed. For the weld metal, the carbon content was 0.069% and the oxygen content was 0.081%. The measured tensile properties for the base material were within the scatter band for virgin plate material. Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> testing was performed at stresses from 41.4 MPa to 137 MPa and temperatures from 600 C to 680 C. The measured <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time for the renormalized and tempered SAW weldment was approximately equal to that for minimum <span class="hlt">strength</span> unexposed base metal. The failure path was the weld metal remote from the fusion interface. The measured <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> for the base material was above average compared to that for unexposed base metal. The minimum creep rate and 0.2% offset tertiary time and strain data were determined. Power law, exponential and rational polynomial primary plus steady state creep equations were fit to the data. The minimum creep rate was correlated using a Dorn parameter and the primary creep coefficients were correlated with the minimum creep rate and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time. Tertiary creep was described using the exponential strain softening creep equation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ellis, F.V.; Lin, Y.C. [Tordonato Energy Consultants, Inc., Chattanooga, TN (United States); Tordonato, S. [Tordonato Energy Consultants, Inc., Clifton, VA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T41A2550H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of stress state on slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation in subduction fault zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Slow slip events (SSEs) in subduction zones are characterized by a low <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity (~1-10 km/day), long duration (days to years), and no measurable radiating seismic energy. In southwest Japan, short-term SSEs have been observed to occur preferentially along the plate interface beneath the serpentinized mantle wedge. The existence of high Poisson's ratios (~0.4) in these areas suggests that aqueous fluids are present under conditions of near-lithostatic pore pressure. These geophysical observations suggest that fluids play an important role in facilitating slow slip under low stress conditions. However, the physical mechanisms underlying the generation of SSEs are not yet fully understood. To explore the influence of stress state on the process of slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along the plate interface, unstable slip experiments on simulated fault zones of serpentines (lizardite/chrysotile and antigorite) and olivine were performed in a gas-medium triaxial apparatus at room temperature and confining pressures of 60-170 MPa. We show that antigorite and olivine have friction coefficients that agree with Byerlee's law (? ~0.7), while liz/ctl has a lower friction coefficient of ~0.5. During a single unstable slip, we clearly observe an initial quasi-static slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> phase that is almost always followed by an unstable, high-speed <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We find that the velocity and duration of slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation become lower and longer, respectively, with decreasing confining pressure (at least from 140 down to 60 MPa) and in the case of lower fault-zone <span class="hlt">strength</span> (i.e., lizardite/chrysotile). Our experimental results suggest that the generation of SSEs is facilitated by conditions of low normal stress and low fault-zone <span class="hlt">strength</span> along the plate interface, which may be weakened by metamorphic reactions that result in the production of hydrous phases (e.g., serpentines and talc) and/or the direct involvement of fluid itself, leading to a reduction in the effective normal stress.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hirauchi, K.; Muto, J.; Otsuki, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3141706"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute abdomen caused by bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> attributable to neurogenic bladder dysfunction following a stroke: a case report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction Spontaneous bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare and serious event with high mortality. It is not often considered in the patient presenting with peritonitis. This often leads to delays in diagnosis. There are very few case reports of true spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the literature. This is the first such reported case in which bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was attributable to neurogenic bladder dysfunction following a stroke. Case presentation We report the case of a 67-year-old Caucasian man who presented with lower abdominal pain and a peritonitic abdomen. He had a long-term urethral catheter because of urinary retention following a previous stroke. He was treated conservatively with antibiotics before a surgical opinion was sought. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After repair of the defect, he eventually made a full recovery. Conclusion In this unusual case report, we describe an example of a serious event in which delays in diagnosis may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. To date, no unifying theory explaining why <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs has been postulated. We conducted a thorough literature search to examine the etiological factors in other published cases. These etiological factors either increase intra-vesical pressure or decrease the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the bladder wall. We hope that by increasing awareness of these etiological factors, spontaneous bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be diagnosed earlier and appropriate therapy started. PMID:21714888</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRB..118..646E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Along-strike variability of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration in subduction zone earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Subduction zone earthquakes exhibit a wide spectrum of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> times that reflect conditions on the megathrust fault. Tsunami earthquakes are examples of slower than expected <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> that produce anomalously large tsunamis relative to the surface-wave magnitude. One model explaining tsunami earthquakes suggests slip within patches of low rigidity material at shallow depths. Heterogeneous fault conditions, such as having patches of low rigidity material surrounded by higher <span class="hlt">strength</span> material, should produce heterogeneous earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> parameters. Here we investigate along-strike variation in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration for 427 shallow thrust earthquakes (Mw = 5.0-7.0) in the Peru, Chile, Alaska, Tonga, Kuril, Izu, and Java-Sumatra subduction zones to explore how heterogeneous seismic and tectonic characteristics, such as differences in sediment type, thickness, and roughness of subducting bathymetry, affect earthquake properties. Earthquake source parameters, including <span class="hlt">rupture</span> durations, are estimated using multi-station deconvolution of teleseismic P and SH waves to solve for earthquake source time functions, and all events are relocated using additional depth phase information. We classify events into shallow (?26 km) and deep (>26 km and ?61 km) groups based on the overall mean depth and focus on the longest duration events with moment normalized <span class="hlt">rupture</span> durations of >1 standard deviation above the mean duration for each group. We find long-duration events at all depths within the study regions except Peru and Chile. We find no correlation with incoming sediment thickness or type, and limited spatial correlation with regions of past tsunami earthquakes, regions of observed afterslip, and subducting bathymetric features.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">El Hariri, Maya; Bilek, Susan L.; Deshon, Heather R.; Engdahl, E. Robert; Bisrat, Shishay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.200..890G"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the initiation of sustained slip-weakening <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> by localized stresses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerical simulations of dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> require an artificial initiation procedure, if they are not integrated in long-term earthquake cycle simulations. A widely applied procedure involves an `overstressed asperity', a localized region stressed beyond the static frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span>. The physical properties of the asperity (size, shape and overstress) may significantly impact <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. In particular, to induce a sustained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the asperity size needs to exceed a critical value. Although criteria for estimating the critical nucleation size under linear slip-weakening friction have been proposed for 2-D and 3-D problems based on simplifying assumptions, they do not provide general rules for designing 3-D numerical simulations. We conduct a parametric study to estimate parameters of the asperity that minimize numerical artefacts (e.g. changes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> shape and speed, artificial supershear transition, higher slip-rate amplitudes). We examine the critical size of square, circular and elliptical asperities as a function of asperity overstress and background (off-asperity) stress. For a given overstress, we find that asperity area controls <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation while asperity shape is of lesser importance. The critical area obtained from our numerical results contrasts with published theoretical estimates when background stress is low. Therefore, we derive two new theoretical estimates of the critical size under low background stress while also accounting for overstress. Our numerical results suggest that setting the asperity overstress and area close to their critical values eliminates strong numerical artefacts even when the overstress is large. We also find that properly chosen asperity size or overstress may significantly shorten the duration of the initiation. Overall, our results provide guidelines for determining the size of the asperity and overstress to minimize the effects of the forced initiation on the subsequent spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galis, M.; Pelties, C.; Kristek, J.; Moczo, P.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Mai, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ltn.lv/~ryabov/paper3.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ON THE TECHNIQUE OF CORONAL MAGNETOGRAPHY THROUGH QUASI-<span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> PROPAGATION OF MICROWAVES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 ON THE TECHNIQUE OF CORONAL MAGNETOGRAPHY THROUGH QUASI-<span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> PROPAGATION OF MICROWAVES D <span class="hlt">strength</span> is found using the theory of wave mode coupling in the region of quasi-<span class="hlt">transverse</span> (QT) propagation active region are of great interest for the studies of solar flares. Microwave observations are supposed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryabov, Boris I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20130001714&hterms=effect+nuclear+energy+environment&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Deffect%2Bnuclear%2Benergy%2Benvironment"> <span id="translatedtitle">Large-Scale Weibull Analysis of H-451 Nuclear- Grade Graphite Specimen <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Weibull analysis was performed of the <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution and size effects for 2000 specimens of H-451 nuclear-grade graphite. The data, generated elsewhere, measured the tensile and four-point-flexure room-temperature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of specimens excised from a single extruded graphite log. <span class="hlt">Strength</span> variation was compared with specimen location, size, and orientation relative to the parent body. In our study, data were progressively and extensively pooled into larger data sets to discriminate overall trends from local variations and to investigate the <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution. The CARES/Life and WeibPar codes were used to investigate issues regarding the size effect, Weibull parameter consistency, and nonlinear stress-strain response. Overall, the Weibull distribution described the behavior of the pooled data very well. However, the issue regarding the smaller-than-expected size effect remained. This exercise illustrated that a conservative approach using a two-parameter Weibull distribution is best for designing graphite components with low probability of failure for the in-core structures in the proposed Generation IV (Gen IV) high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. This exercise also demonstrated the continuing need to better understand the mechanisms driving stochastic <span class="hlt">strength</span> response. Extensive appendixes are provided with this report to show all aspects of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data and analytical results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nemeth, Noel N.; Walker, Andrew; Baker, Eric H.; Murthy, Pappu L.; Bratton, Robert L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70035044"> <span id="translatedtitle">Validation of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of the 2001 Kunlun, China (Ms = 8.1), earthquake from seismological and geological observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We determine the finite-fault slip distribution of the 2001 Kunlun earthquake (Ms = 8.1) by inverting teleseismic waveforms, as constrained by geological and remote sensing field observations. The spatial slip distribution along the 400-km-long fault was divided into five segments in accordance with geological observations. Forward modelling of regional surface waves was performed to estimate the variation of the speed of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation during faulting. For our modelling, the regional 1-D velocity structure was carefully constructed for each of six regional seismic stations using three events with magnitudes of 5.1-5.4 distributed along the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> portion of the Kunlun fault. Our result shows that the average <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is about 3.6 km s-1, consistent with teleseismic long period wave modelling. The initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was almost purely strike-slip with a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of 1.9 km s-1, increasing to 3.5 km s-1 in the second fault segment, and reaching a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of about 6 km s-1 in the third segment and the fourth segment, where the maximum surface offset, with a broad fault zone, was observed. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity decelerated to a value of 3.3 km s-1 in the fifth and final segment. Coseismic slip on the fault was concentrated between the surface and a depth of about 10 km. We infer that significant variations in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and the observed fault segmentation are indicative of variations in <span class="hlt">strength</span> along the interface of the Kunlun fault, as well as variations in fault geometry. ?? 2009 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2009 RAS.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wen, Y.-Y.; Ma, K.-F.; Song, T.R.-A.; Mooney, W.D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10818980"> <span id="translatedtitle">Partial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the distal biceps tendon.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Partial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the distal biceps tendon is a relatively rare event, and various degrees of partial tendon tears have been reported. In the current study four patients with partial atraumatic distal biceps tendon tears (mean age, 59 years; range, 40-82 years) are reported. In all four patients, a common clinical pattern emerged. Pain at the insertion of the distal biceps tendon in the radius unrelated to any traumatic event was the main symptom. In all patients the diagnosis was based on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography imaging. In three of four patients the partial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the tendon caused a significant bursalike lesion. The typical appearance was a partially <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> biceps tendon, with contrast enhancement signaling the degree of degeneration, tenosynovitis, and soft tissue swelling extending along the tendon semicircular to the proximal radius. In three patients, conservative treatment was successful. Only one patient needed surgery, with reinsertion of the tendon resulting in total functional recovery. PMID:10818980</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D黵r, H R; St鋌ler, A; Pfahler, M; Matzko, M; Refior, H J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18090814"> <span id="translatedtitle">The diagnosis of silicone breast implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast in the diagnosis of silicone breast implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is widely accepted to be the imaging study of choice for most women. Magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of silicone implant failure has been shown to have the highest sensitivity and specificity and has the ability to image the entire implant without the use of ionizing radiation. Unfortunately, some women are unable to have a magnetic resonance imaging examination of the breast because of contraindications such as cardiac pacemakers, aneurysm clips, and claustrophobia. Therefore, mammography, ultrasonography, and computed tomography will have roles in the diagnosis of silicone breast implant <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. This article illustrates the spectrum of imaging appearances of normal silicone gel implants and the appearances of silicone breast implant <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. PMID:18090814</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gorczyca, David P; Gorczyca, Stephanie M; Gorczyca, Kathryn L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23622472"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acoustic levels of heavy truck tire <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Transportation vehicles, whether they are passenger vehicles or heavy trucks and transport vehicles, rely upon rubber tires to negotiate the roadways and surfaces on which they are driven. These tires have the potential of sudden <span class="hlt">rupture</span> resulting from various causes including but not limited to over-pressurization, sidewall failures, or punctures from roadway debris. These <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events can and do occur while the vehicles are stationary (e.g., during servicing) or are being driven, and often occur without notice. While the phenomenon of sudden tire failure has been documented for several decades, the potential bodily injury which can occur when an individual is in close proximity to such a sudden <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has only more recently been documented. Aside from anecdotal mention in case studies, there has been little quantitative information available on the acoustic levels during these failures. Our study provides measured acoustic levels as a function of distance for such catastrophic tire failures. PMID:23622472</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wood, Matthew; Woodruff, William</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5461408"> <span id="translatedtitle">Component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequency estimates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to perform detailed internal flooding risk analyses of nuclear power plants, external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies are needed for various types of components - piping, valves, pumps, flanges, and others. However, there appears to be no up-to-date, comprehensive source for such frequency estimates. This report attempts to fill that void. Based on a comprehensive search of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) contained in Nuclear Power Experience (NPE), and estimates of component populations and exposure times, component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies were generated. The remainder of this report covers the specifies of the NPE search for external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events, analysis of the data, a comparison with frequency estimates from other sources, and a discussion of the results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Johnson, D.A.; Marteeny, M.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6862348"> <span id="translatedtitle">Consequences of expansion joint bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Expansion joints are used in piping systems to accommodate pipe deflections during service and to facilitate fitup. Typically, the expansion joint bellows is the thinnest part of the pressure boundary, bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies are typically several orders of magnitude higher than pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies. This paper reviews an effort to estimate the flow rates associated with bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The Level I PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) for the Savannah River Site production reactors made the bounding assumption that bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would produce the maximum possible leakage - that of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB). This assumption resulted in predictions of flooding of the reactor building with a high conditional probability that a Loss of Pumping Accident and core melting would follow. This paper describes analyses that were performed to develop a realistic break area and leak rate resulting from bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and therefore reduce the impact that bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can have on the estimated total core melt frequency. In the event of a 360 degree circumferential break of the bellows the resulting two sections will separate to the point where the force from the internal pressure acting to push the bellows open is just balanced by the spring force of the bellows itself. For the bellows addressed in this analysis, the equilibrium separation distance is 0.7 inches with normal pump lineup. The opening area is influenced by any initial compression or extension due to installation alignment, and by any operational displacements such as thermal expansion of the adjoining pipe. The influence of such factors is considered and the impact on the flooding rate and, hence, core melt frequency is reviewed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daugherty, W.L.; Miller, R.F.; Cramer, D.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10191106"> <span id="translatedtitle">Consequences of expansion joint bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Expansion joints are used in piping systems to accommodate pipe deflections during service and to facilitate fitup. Typically, the expansion joint bellows is the thinnest part of the pressure boundary, bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies are typically several orders of magnitude higher than pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies. This paper reviews an effort to estimate the flow rates associated with bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The Level I PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) for the Savannah River Site production reactors made the bounding assumption that bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would produce the maximum possible leakage - that of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB). This assumption resulted in predictions of flooding of the reactor building with a high conditional probability that a Loss of Pumping Accident and core melting would follow. This paper describes analyses that were performed to develop a realistic break area and leak rate resulting from bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and therefore reduce the impact that bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can have on the estimated total core melt frequency. In the event of a 360 degree circumferential break of the bellows the resulting two sections will separate to the point where the force from the internal pressure acting to push the bellows open is just balanced by the spring force of the bellows itself. For the bellows addressed in this analysis, the equilibrium separation distance is 0.7 inches with normal pump lineup. The opening area is influenced by any initial compression or extension due to installation alignment, and by any operational displacements such as thermal expansion of the adjoining pipe. The influence of such factors is considered and the impact on the flooding rate and, hence, core melt frequency is reviewed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daugherty, W.L.; Miller, R.F.; Cramer, D.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12038119"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Intrabiliary <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatic hydatid cyst].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous hepatic hydatid cyst <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into the biliary tract is unusual. The authors describe a case of a 62-year-old man with a hepatic hydatid cyst, showing that it is possible to confirm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into the biliary system with cholangiography-MRI. Surgical treatment remains the best form of management. Endoscopic management is a therapeutic possibility in all cases in which surgery is contraindicated. In the case observed endoscopic sphinctererotomy resolved the biliary obstruction, while the hydatid cyst was treated by transbiliary irrigation with scolicidal solutions and pharmacological therapy. The treatment permitted complete clinical resolution of the hepatic hydatosis. PMID:12038119</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cucinotta, Eugenio; Palmeri, Renato; Lazzara, Salvatore; Melita, Giuseppinella; Melita, Paolo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1797221"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed gallbladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following percutaneous cholecystostomy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Percutaneous cholecystostomy has become an accepted therapeutic alternative for high-risk patients with acute cholecystitis. However, some authors have cautioned that patients with gallbladder wall necrosis and gangrene may not be effectively treated by means of percutaneous drainage alone. A case is reported in which gallbladder wall necrosis progressed following technically successful percutaneous drainage. Spontaneous gallbladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ensued, necessitating emergent cholecystectomy. Cholecystography 2 weeks following tube placement and 1 week prior to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> showed a markedly abnormal, irregular gallbladder lumen. The authors suggest that follow-up cholecystography may be a useful tool for evaluating patient response to percutaneous cholecystostomy and for determining subsequent patient management. PMID:1797221</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LaBerge, J M; Gordon, R L; Kerlan, R K; Ring, E J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3531040"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> rudimentary horn at 22 weeks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rudimentary horn is a developmental anomaly of the uterus. Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. A case of undiagnosed rudimentary horn pregnancy at 22 weeks presented to Nizwa regional referral hospital in shock with features of acute abdomen. Chances of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in first or second trimester are increased with catastrophic haemorrhage leading to increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Management of such cases is a challenge till today due to diagnostic dilemma. Expertise in ultrasonography and early resort to surgical management is life saving in such cases. PMID:23293421</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dhar, Hansa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25110594"> <span id="translatedtitle">Myocardial <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> following Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first case of severe cardiotoxicity of carbon monoxide leading to myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and fatal outcome. 83-year-old woman was hospitalized 4 hours after the fire in her house with no respiratory or cardiac symptoms. After two days, she has suffered sudden collapse leading to cardiac arrest. Postmortem examination revealed intramural haemorrhage with myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the apex of the left ventricle. Minimal stenosis was noted in the proximal coronary arteries with no evidence of distal occlusion or any other long-standing heart disease. This case supports recommendations for targeted cardiovascular investigations in cases of CO poisoning. PMID:25110594</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dragelyt?, Gabija; Plenta, J?ris; Chmieliauskas, Sigitas; Jasulaitis, Algimantas; Raudys, Romas; Jovai歛, Tomas; Badaras, Robertas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4119647"> <span id="translatedtitle">Myocardial <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> following Carbon Monoxide Poisoning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first case of severe cardiotoxicity of carbon monoxide leading to myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and fatal outcome. 83-year-old woman was hospitalized 4 hours after the fire in her house with no respiratory or cardiac symptoms. After two days, she has suffered sudden collapse leading to cardiac arrest. Postmortem examination revealed intramural haemorrhage with myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the apex of the left ventricle. Minimal stenosis was noted in the proximal coronary arteries with no evidence of distal occlusion or any other long-standing heart disease. This case supports recommendations for targeted cardiovascular investigations in cases of CO poisoning. PMID:25110594</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dragelyt?, Gabija; Plenta, J?ris; Chmieliauskas, Sigitas; Jasulaitis, Algimantas; Raudys, Romas; Jovai歛, Tomas; Badaras, Robertas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JNuM..440..272K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> and conductivity of unidirectional copper composites reinforced by continuous SiC fibers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A SiC long fiber-reinforced copper composite offers a beneficial combination of high <span class="hlt">strength</span> and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. Both properties make the composite a promising material for the heat sink of high-heat-flux components. In this work, we developed a novel Cu/SiCf composite using the Sigma fiber. Based on HIP technique, a metallurgical process was established for fabricating high quality specimens using a TiC interface coating. Extensive tensile tests were conducted on the unidirectionally reinforced composite at 20 癈 and 300 癈 for a wide range of fiber volume fraction (Vf). In this paper, a large amount of test data is presented. The <span class="hlt">transversal</span> thermal conductivity varies from 260 to 130 W/mK at 500 癈 as Vf is increased from 13% to 37%. The tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> reached up to 1246 MPa at 20 癈 for Vf = 37.6%, where the fracture strain was limited to 0.8%. The data of both elastic modulus and ultimate <span class="hlt">strength</span> exhibited a good agreement with the rule-of-mixture predictions indicating a high quality of the materials. The <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the composite with the Sigma fibers turned out to be superior to those of the SCS6 fibers at 300 癈, although the SCS6 fiber actually has a higher <span class="hlt">strength</span> than the Sigma fiber. The fractographic pictures of tension test and fiber push-out test manifested a sufficient interfacial bonding. Unidirectional copper composite reinforced by long SiC fibers was fabricated using the Sigma SM1140+ fiber for a wide range of fiber volume fraction from 14% to 40%. Extensive tensile tests were carried out at RT and 300 癈. The data of ultimate <span class="hlt">strength</span> as well as elastic modulus exhibited a good agreement with the rule-of-mixture predictions indicating a high quality of the materials. In terms of the tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>, the Cu/Sigma composite turned out to be superior to the previous Cu/SCS6 composite at 300 癈, while comparable at RT, although the SCS6 fiber has a higher <span class="hlt">strength</span> than the Sigma fiber. Such a beneficial outcome of the Sigma fiber may be attributed to its smaller radius leading to a larger total interface area for a given fiber content. The fractographic images after tensile <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and fiber push-out test manifested a solid interfacial bonding via the thin TiC film. The weakest site was identified to be the internal interface between the outer carbon coating and the inner SiC layer. Numerous voids were observed in the plastically <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> matrix after tensile fracture. The density of the voids was larger at 300 癈 than RT. The distributed voids are the evidence of ductile damage affecting the plastic work of the composite.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kimmig, S.; Allen, I.; You, J. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930085099&hterms=carbonitrides&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dcarbonitrides"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Overheating on Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> Properties of S-816 Alloy at 1,500 F</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of overheats to temperatures of 1650, 1800, 1900, and 2000 F were evaluated in terms of the changes in creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> characteristics at 1500 F of S-816 alloy under stresses within the range of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strengths</span> of the alloy for 100 to 1000 hours. Overheat periods were predominantly of 2-minute duration and were applied cyclically at approximately 5- or 12-hour intervals. The possible damage from overheating was believed to include internal metal structure changes induced by exposure to the higher temperatures and loss of life by creep if stress was present during the overheats.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1957-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPS...245..787L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the joint of a solid oxide fuel cell glass-ceramic sealant with metallic interconnect</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Creep properties of sandwich joint specimens made of a newly developed BaO-B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glass-ceramic sealant (GC-9) and a ferritic-stainless-steel interconnect (Crofer 22 H) for planar solid oxide fuel cells (pSOFCs) are investigated at 800牥C under constant shear and tensile loadings. The creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of Crofer 22 H/GC-9/Crofer 22 H joint specimens is increased with a decrease in applied load for both shear and tensile loading modes. The given metal/sealant/metal joint has a greater degradation of joint <span class="hlt">strength</span> at 800牥C under prolonged, constant tensile loading as compared to shear loading. The tensile creep <span class="hlt">strength</span> at a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of 1000爃 is about 9% of the average tensile joint <span class="hlt">strength</span>, while the shear creep <span class="hlt">strength</span> at 1000爃 is about 23% of the average shear joint <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Failure patterns of both shear and tensile joint specimens are similar regardless of the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time. In general, creep cracks initiate at the interface between the (Cr,Mn)3O4 spinel layer and the BaCrO4 chromate layer, penetrate through the BaCrO4 layer, and propagate along the interface between the chromate layer and glass-ceramic substrate until final fracture. Final, fast fracture occasionally takes place within the glass-ceramic layer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin, Chih-Kuang; Lin, Kun-Liang; Yeh, Jing-Hong; Wu, Si-Han; Lee, Ruey-Yi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020028707&hterms=SiC+mirrors+silicon+carbide+mirror&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DSiC%2Bmirrors%2B%2522silicon%2Bcarbide%2522%2Bmirror"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intermediate Temperature <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Degradation in SiC/SiC Composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Woven silicon carbide fiber-reinforced, silicon carbide matrix composites are leading candidate materials for an advanced jet engine combustor liner application. Although the use temperature in the hot region for this application is expected to exceed 1200 C, a potential life-limiting concern for this composite system exists at intermediate temperatures (800 +/- 200 C), where significant time-dependent <span class="hlt">strength</span> degradation has been observed under stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> loading. A number of factors control the degree of stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> degradation, the major factor being the nature of the interphase separating the fiber and the matrix. BN interphases are superior to carbon interphases due to the slower oxidation kinetics of BN. A model for the intermediate temperature stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> of SiC/BN/SiC composites is presented based on the observed mechanistic process that leads to <span class="hlt">strength</span> degradation for the simple case of through-thickness matrix cracks. The approach taken has much in common with that used by Curtin and coworkers, for two different composite systems. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data for stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> of both precracked and as-produced composites. Also, three approaches that dramatically improve the intermediate temperature stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties are described: Si-doped BN, fiber spreading, and 'outside debonding'.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morscher, Gregory N.; Cawley, James D.; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1982554"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Wobbling in $^{135}$Pr</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A pair of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> wobbling bands has been observed in the nucleus $^{135}$Pr. The wobbling is characterized by $\\Delta I$ =1, E2 transitions between the bands, and a decrease in the wobbling energy confirms its <span class="hlt">transverse</span> nature. Additionally, a transition from <span class="hlt">transverse</span> wobbling to a three-quasiparticle band comprised of strong magnetic dipole transitions is observed. These observations conform well to results from calculations with the Tilted Axis Cranking (TAC) model and the Quasiparticle Triaxial Rotor (QTR) Model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matta, J T; Li, W; Frauendorf, S; Ayangeakaa, A D; Patel, D; Schlax, K W; Palit, R; Saha, S; Sethi, J; Trivedi, T; Ghugre, S S; Raut, R; Sinha, A K; Janssens, R V F; Zhu, S; Carpenter, M P; Lauritsen, T; Seweryniak, D; Chiara, C J; Kondev, F G; Hartley, D J; Petrache, C M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Lakshmi, D Vijaya; Raju, M Kumar; Rao, P V Madhusudhana; Tandel, S K; Ray, S; D鰊au, F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1041632"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linker Dependent Bond <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Force Measurements in Single-Molecule Junctions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use a modified conducting atomic force microscope to simultaneously probe the conductance of a single-molecule junction and the force required to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the junction formed by alkanes terminated with four different chemical link groups which vary in binding <span class="hlt">strength</span> and mechanism to the gold electrodes. Molecular junctions with amine, methylsulfide, and diphenylphosphine terminated molecules show clear conductance signatures and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at a force that is significantly smaller than the measured 1.4 nN force required to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the single-atomic gold contact. In contrast, measurements with a thiol terminated alkane which can bind covalently to the gold electrode show conductance and force features unlike those of the other molecules studied. Specifically, the strong Au-S bond can cause structural rearrangements in the electrodes, which are accompanied by substantial conductance changes. Despite the strong Au-S bond and the evidence for disruption of the Au structure, the experiments show that on average these junctions also <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at a smaller force than that measured for pristine single-atom gold contacts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frei M.; Hybertsen M.; Aradhya S.V.; Venkataraman L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11494836"> <span id="translatedtitle">Upper extremity injuries associated with <span class="hlt">strength</span> training.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most injuries sustained during <span class="hlt">strength</span> training are mild strains that resolve with appropriate rest. More severe injuries include traumatic shoulder dislocations, tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the pectoralis major, biceps, and triceps; stress fractures of the distal clavicle, humerus, radius, and ulna; traumatic fractures of the distal radius and ulna in adolescent weightlifters; and compressive and stretch neuropathies. These more severe injuries are usually the result of improperly performing a <span class="hlt">strength</span> training exercise. Educating athletes regarding proper <span class="hlt">strength</span>-training techniques serves to reverse established injury patterns and to prevent these injuries in the first place. Recognizing the association of anabolic steroid use to several of the injury patterns further reinforces the need for medical specialists to counsel athletes against their use. With the increasing use of supplements such as creatine, the incidence and nature of <span class="hlt">strength</span>-training injuries may change further. Greater emphasis on the competitive performance of younger athletes undoubtedly will generate enthusiasm for <span class="hlt">strength</span> training at earlier ages in both sexes. The importance of proper supervision of these young athletes by knowledgeable persons will increase. As the popularity of <span class="hlt">strength</span> training grows, there will be ample opportunity to continue to catalog the injury patterns associated with this activity. PMID:11494836</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haupt, H A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0711.2033v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> geometry and physical observers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is proposed that the mathematical formalism that is most appropriate for the study of spatially non-integrable cosmological models is the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> geometry of a one-dimensional foliation (congruence) defined by a physical observer. By that means, one can discuss the geometry of space, as viewed by that observer, without the necessity of introducing a complementary sub-bundle to the line bundle of the observer or a codimension-one foliation <span class="hlt">transverse</span> to the foliation of the observer. The concept of groups of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> isometries acting on such a spacetime and the relationship of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> geometry to spacetime threadings (1+3 decompositions) is also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Delphenich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-11-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800023980&hterms=800H&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3D800H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of seven iron-base alloys after long term aging at 760 deg in low pressure hydrogen</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seven candidate iron-base alloys for heater tube application in the Stirling automotive engine were aged for 3500 hours at 760 C in argon and hydrogen. Aging degraded the tensile and creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties. The presence of hydrogen during aging caused additional degradiation of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> in fine grain alloys. Based on current design criteria for the Mod 1 Stirling engine, N-155 and 19-9DL are considered the only alloys in this study with <span class="hlt">strengths</span> adequate for heater tube service at 760 C.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Witzke, W. R.; Stephens, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1110153B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> tracking with different seismological methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spatial length, time duration, and direction of an earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are important parameters for an early warning of a potential tsunami. With different seismological methods namely polarization analysis of incoming compressional waves (P-waves), directivity effect, and wavelet transform these parameters are tried to estimate from recordings of broadband three-component-seismometers. One important requirement for a successful tsunami warning is a very fast (real time) investigation of seismograms. For some of the methods a dense station network and especially a wide backazimuthal distribution is necessary. The latter is a premise for the investigation of the directivity effect of an earthquake (in the literature this effect is often compared with a kind of doppler-effect). We show for some earthquakes e.g. Sichuan of May 2008, great Andaman of December 2004, and Pakistan of October 2005, that with a simple integration of regional and teleseismic recordings and subsequently plotting them sorted by the azimuth, stations can easily splitted into stations, from which the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> went away and stations, which lie in the direction of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. With this investigation, the question of the direction of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can quickly be answered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bayer, B.; Yuan, X.; Saul, J.; Kind, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.141p4907G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Star polymers <span class="hlt">rupture</span> induced by constant forces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Garc韆, N. A.; Febbo, M.; Vega, D. A.; Milchev, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1030718"> <span id="translatedtitle">D-Zero Cryostat Supplemental <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Disc</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The common relief and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc vent line requires a double disc assembly with vented interspace for accurate disc burst pressures. The first disc must take pump and purge vacuum loading, but be set to operate at 110% of the MAWP, 18.3 psig (ASME code). The available solution is 18.3 psig with a burst tolerance of +/- psig. The interspace should be locally vented by a flow limiting vent valve to decouple the vent line backpressure from the vessel <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc. The second disc must take the worst case vent line backpressure, the steady state value found in D-Zero engineering note 3740.000-EN-63 with all three cryostats simultaneously venting at the fire condition into the 4-inch x 6-inch and 6-inch x 8-inch sections. This value is less than 2 psid. The maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the second disc must be less than the minimum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the first disc less 2 psid i.e. < 16.3.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-08-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26599285"> <span id="translatedtitle">Steam generator tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (SGTR) scenarios</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The steam generator tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (SGTR) scenarios project was carried out in the EU 5th framework programme in the field of nuclear safety during years 20002002. The first objective of the project was to generate a comprehensive database on fission product retention in a steam generator. The second objective was to verify and develop predictive models to support accident management</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Auvinen; J. K. Jokiniemi; A. L鋒de; T. Routamo; P. Lundstr鰉; H. Tuomisto; J. Dienstbier; S. G黱tay; D. Suckow; A. Dehbi; M. Slootman; L. Herranz; V. Peyres; J. Polo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2568237"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occult uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: role of ultrasonography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article presents a case of occult spontaneous uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complicated by pelvic infection and peritonitis in the postpartum period. Ultrasonography played a primary role in the diagnosis of this complication and clearly demonstrated the uterine wall defect. This finding was confirmed later by computed tomography and by surgery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9640909</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cadet, J. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.data.scec.org/Module/s1act03.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Is an Earthquake?: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this activity, the learner will watch three animations based on actual data from fault <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from the two largest Southern California earthquakes in the 1990s: Landers (1992) and Northridge (1994). In Section 3, the learner will discover more about how such data is collected and analyzed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/09_28_2010_otk7Nay4LH_09_28_2010_1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Northwest Saudi Arabia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wendy McCausland of the USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program and Hani Zahran of the Saudi Geological Survey view the southern end of the surface fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> caused by a M5.4 earthquake in the Saudi Arabian desert on May 19, 2009. The ground displacements in the soft sediments of the foreground...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29864197"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the membranes and postpartum infection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The greatest risk of preterm prelabour <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes (PPROM) is preterm delivery. According to the Perinatal Information System of Slovenia there were 5.92% preterm deliveries in 1994. We studied 809 deliveries of less than 34 weeks of gestation in the Ljubljana Maternity, from 1992 to 1994; 33.7% of these started with PPROM. Risk factors for PPROM were conization, cerclage</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marjan Pajntar; Ivan Verdenik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23889586"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular repair of iatrogenic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has been used for traumatic and acute spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the descending thoracic aorta with good results. We present the case of a 40-year-old male whose thoracic spinal prosthesis eroded through the descending thoracic aorta; the aortic disruption was successfully managed with emergent deployment of an endovascular stent. PMID:23889586</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lo, Casey; Galvin, Sean D; Barnett, Stephen; Seevanayagam, Siven</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2728191"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical Management of Spontaneous <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Hepatocellular Adenoma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">AIMS Spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular adenoma (SRHA) is a rare life-threatening condition that may require surgical treatment to control hemorrhaging and also stabilize the patient. We report a series of emergency surgeries performed at our institution for this condition. METHODS We reviewed medical records and radiology files of 28 patients (from 1989 to 2006) with a proven diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma (HA). Three (10.7%) of 28 patients had spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular adenoma, two of which were associated with intrahepatic hemorrhage while one had intraperitoneal bleeding. Two patients were female and one was male. Both female patients had a background history of oral contraceptive use. Sudden abdominal pain associated with hemodynamic instability occurred in all patients who suffered from spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular adenoma. The mean age was 41.6 years old. The preoperative assessment included liver function tests, ultrasonography and computed tomography. RESULTS The surgical approaches were as follows: right hemihepatectomy for controlling intraperitoneal bleeding, and right extended hepatectomy and non-anatomic resection of the liver for intrahepatic hemorrhage. There were no deaths, and the postoperative complications were bile leakage and wound infection (re-operation), as well as intraperitoneal abscess (re-operation) and pleural effusion. CONCLUSION Spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular adenoma may be treated by surgery for controlling hemorrhages and stabilizing the patient, and the decision to operate depends upon both the patient抯 condition and the expertise of the surgical team. PMID:19690662</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ribeiro Junior, Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle; Chaib, Eleazar; Saad, William Abr鉶; D扐lbuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Cecconello, Ivan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51328197"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supershear <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Transition on Fault Stepovers using Different Friction Parameterizations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is well known that fault stepovers can under some circumstances allow through-going <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and under other circumstances cause <span class="hlt">rupture</span> termination (e.g., Harris and Day 1993; Kase and Kuge, 1998; Duan and Oglesby, 2006). However, the effect of the stepover on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity has not been investigated, and there has also not been an investigation of how different frictional parameterizations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. J. Ryan; D. D. Oglesby</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4268758"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> rectal duplication with urogenital abnormality: Unusual presentation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rectal duplication (RD) accounts for 5% of alimentary tract duplication. A varied presentation and associated anomalies have been described in the literature. Antenatal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the RD is very rare. We present an unusual case of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> RD associated with urogenital abnormalities in newborn male. We are discussing diagnosis, embryology, management and literature review of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> RD. PMID:25552833</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Shankar, Gowri; Santhanakrishnan, Ramesh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v077/i011/JB077i011p02087/JB077i011p02087.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Zones of Large South American Earthquakes and Some Predictions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study attempts to forecast likely locations for large shallow South American earthquakes in the near future by examining the past space-time pattern of occurrence of large (M _ 7.7) earthquakes, the lateral extent of their <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones, and, where possible, the direction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> zones of large shallow earthquakes generally abut and do not overlap. Patterns of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John A. Kelleher</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.seismo.ethz.ch/staff/martin/papers/AGUMonograph_Ampueroetal.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Properties of Dynamic Earthquake <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> With Heterogeneous Stress Drop</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a notoriously complex process, at all observable scales. We introduce a simplified semi-dynamic crack model to investigate the connec - tion between the statistical properties of stress and those of macroscopic source parameters such as <span class="hlt">rupture</span> size, seismic moment, apparent stress drop and radiated energy. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> initiation is treated consistently with nucleation on a linear slip- weakening</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J.-P. Ampuero; J. Ripperger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54619313"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process of the great 1963 Kurile Islands earthquake sequence: Asperity interaction and multiple event <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The great Kurile Islands underthrusting earthquake (Mw=8.5) of October 13, 1963, was accompanied by a large foreshock and an aftershock. This sequence allows us to investigate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process and faul heterogeneities along a subduction zone. We have characterized the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the main shock event by deconvolving long-period P wave seismograms from azimuthally well-distributed stations to obtain source</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Susan L. Beck; Larry J. Ruff</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ajnr.org/cgi/reprint/17/6/1151.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Idiopathic <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Myelitis: MR Characteristics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">PURPOSE: To describe the MR characteristics that can distinguish idiopathic <span class="hlt">transverse</span> myelitis from other intramedullary lesions. METHODS: A total of 32 initial and follow-up MR studies in 17 patients with clinically proved <span class="hlt">transverse</span> myelitis were reviewed retrospectively. The location, size, pattern, and segmental length of areas of hyperintensity were estimated on T2-weighted axial and sagittal images. In 15 of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kyu Ho Choi; Kwang Soo Lee; Sun Ok Chung; Jung Mee Park; Young Joo Kim; Hyun Sook Kim; Kyung Sub Shinn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3844589"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reconstruction of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> patellar tendon using ipsilateral semitendinosus and gracilis tendons with preserved distal insertions: two case reports</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Acute patellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> with poor tissue quality. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> that have been neglected are difficult to repair. Several surgical techniques for the repair of the patellar tendon have been reported, however, these techniques remain difficult because of contractures, adhesions, and atrophy of the quadriceps muscle after surgery. Case presentation We report the cases of 2 Japanese patients (Case 1: a 16-year-old male and Case 2: a 43-year-old male) with patellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> who were treated by reconstruction using semitendinosus-gracilis (STG) tendons with preserved distal insertions. Retaining the original insertion of the STG appears to preserve its viability and provide the revascularization necessary to accelerate healing. Both tendons were placed in front of the patella, in a figure-of-eight fashion, providing stability to the patella. Conclusion Both patients recovered near normal <span class="hlt">strength</span> and stability of the patellar tendon as well as restoration of function after the operation. PMID:24010848</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40448597"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> terminations and size of segment boundaries from historical earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in the Basin and Range Province</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fault-segmentation method is commonly used to estimate the potential earthquake size. Segment boundaries play an important role in arresting earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from event to event. In the Basin and Range Province, earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> terminations are commonly associated with structural discontinuities, but not all-structural discontinuities have the capability to terminate an earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The size of structural discontinuities with respect</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peizhen Zhang; Fengying Mao; D. B. Slemmons</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3897339"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Colon Progressed Rapidly After Hepatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Report of a Case</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a metastatic mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) has not been previously reported, although the neuroendocrine cell carcinoma is often associated with a high incidence of hepatic metastases. The patient was a 39-year-old male who presented with upper abdominal pain over 3 months. Computed tomography showed multiple tumors in both hepatic lobes, while lower gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a tumor in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colon. Histopathologic examination of the tumor revealed it to be a neuroendocrine cell carcinoma. After the resection of the primary tumor, hepatic metastases rapidly increased, and one of them in the left lateral segment was <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> with significant hemorrhage. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> led us to undertake the emergency operation to stop the bleeding. Histology showed a high-grade large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma associated with moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. The Ki-67 labeling index was 80% (G3). The diagnosis was mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma according to the 2010 World Health Organization guidelines. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization did not decrease the tumor progress, and the patient died on postoperative day 110. Reporting this highly malignant case, I hope all doctors can be interested in MANEC. PMID:24444267</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ito, Hiromitsu; Kudo, Atsushi; Matsumura, Satoshi; Ban, Daisuke; Irie, Takumi; Ochiai, Takanori; Nakamura, Noriaki; Tanaka, Shinji; Tanabe, Minoru</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1944661"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the tendon of the biceps muscle of the thigh].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the tendon of the M. biceps femoris proximal to its insertion is a rare occurrence. Relatively few patients have been recorded. We describe a patient with a complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> sustained as a result of a water skiing accident, viz. a fall over the stern wave. The case history was in accordance with a theory about the cause of this lesion--sudden overstretching of the hamstrings. The diagnosis was made by physical examination in the acute phase. With the patient in supine, 90 degrees flexed knees position and with isometric contraction of his hamstrings it is easy to mark and palpate a defect of the tendon just proximal to the caput fibulae. After operative reconstruction, a plaster cylinder was used for five weeks' postoperative immobilization. Five weeks after surgery, physical therapy was started, first to regain knee motion, and later to regain <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Twelve weeks after surgery, the patient resumed working and recreational sports. PMID:1944661</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Verburg, H; Keeman, J N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-10-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.S21B0559B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Attenuation of Radiated Ground Motion and Stresses from Three-Dimensional Supershear <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radiating shear and Rayleigh waves from supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> form Mach fronts that transmit large-amplitude ground motion and stresses to locations far from the fault. We simulate bilateral <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on a finite-width vertical strike-slip fault (of width W and half-length L with L >> W) breaking the surface of an elastic half-space, and focus on the wavefield out to distances comparable to L. At distances much smaller than W, two- dimensional plane-strain slip-pulse models (i.e., models in which the lateral extent of the slip zone is unbounded) [Dunham, 2005; Bhat et al., 2007] accurately predict the subsurface wavefield. Amplitudes in the shear Mach wedges of those models are undiminished with distance from the fault. When viewed from distances far greater than W, the fault is accurately modeled as a line source that produces a shear Mach cone and, on the free surface, a Rayleigh Mach wedge. Geometrical spreading of the shear Mach cone occurs radially and amplitudes there decrease with the inverse square-root of distance [Ben-Menahem and Singh, 1987]. The transition between these two asymptotic limits occurs at distances comparable to W. Similar considerations suggest that Rayleigh Mach waves suffer no attenuation in the ideally elastic medium studied here. The rate at which fault <span class="hlt">strength</span> weakens at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front exerts a strong influence on the off-fault fields only in the immediate vicinity of the fault (for both sub-Rayleigh and supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>) and at the Mach fronts of supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. More rapid weakening generates larger amplitudes at the Mach fronts. A paper has been prepared on this topic, with title the same as for this abstract, by E. M. Dunham and H. S. Bhat, submitted to \\it{J. Geophys. Res.}</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhat, H. S.; Dunham, E. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRB..119.3133H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> modulated by waves in damaged fault zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">are usually surrounded by damaged zones of lower elastic moduli and seismic wave velocities than their host rocks. If the interface between the damaged rocks and host rocks is sharp enough, earthquakes happening inside the fault zone generate reflected waves and head waves, which can interact with earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and modulate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties such as <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, slip rate, and rise time. We find through 2-D dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations the following: (1) Reflected waves can induce multiple slip pulses. The rise time of the primary pulse is controlled by fault zone properties, rather than by frictional properties. (2) Head waves can cause oscillations of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed and, in a certain range of fault zone widths, a permanent transition to supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with speeds that would be unstable in homogeneous media. (3) Large attenuation smears the slip rate function and delays the initial acceleration of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed but does not affect significantly the rise time or the period of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed oscillations. (4) Fault zones cause a rotation of the background stress field and can induce plastic deformations on both extensional and compressional sides of the fault. The plastic deformations are accumulated both inside and outside the fault zone, which indicates a correlation between fault zone development and repeating <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Spatially periodic patterns of plastic deformations are formed due to oscillating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, which may leave a permanent signature in the geological record. Our results indicate that damaged fault zones with sharp boundaries promote multiple slip pulses and supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Yihe; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Helmberger, Don V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950021870&hterms=life+prediction+methods+composites&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dlife%2Bprediction%2Bmethods%2Bcomposites"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design prediction for long term stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> service of composite pressure vessels</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extensive stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies on glass composites and Kevlar composites were conducted by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory beginning in the late 1960's and extending to about 8 years in some cases. Some of the data from these studies published over the years were incomplete or were tainted by spurious failures, such as grip slippage. Updated data sets were defined for both fiberglass and Kevlar composite stand test specimens. These updated data are analyzed in this report by a convenient form of the bivariate Weibull distribution, to establish a consistent set of design prediction charts that may be used as a conservative basis for predicting the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of composite pressure vessels. The updated glass composite data exhibit an invariant Weibull modulus with lifetime. The data are analyzed in terms of homologous service load (referenced to the observed median <span class="hlt">strength</span>). The equations relating life, homologous load, and probability are given, and corresponding design prediction charts are presented. A similar approach is taken for Kevlar composites, where the updated stand data do show a turndown tendency at long life accompanied by a corresponding change (increase) of the Weibull modulus. The turndown characteristic is not present in stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test data of Kevlar pressure vessels. A modification of the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> equations is presented to incorporate a latent, but limited, <span class="hlt">strength</span> drop, and design prediction charts are presented that incorporate such behavior. The methods presented utilize Cartesian plots of the probability distributions (which are a more natural display for the design engineer), based on median normalized data that are independent of statistical parameters and are readily defined for any set of test data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robinson, Ernest Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992fcsd.conf.1589R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design prediction for long term stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> service of composite pressure vessels</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extensive stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies on glass composites and Kevlar composites were conducted by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory beginning in the late 1960's and extending to about 8 years in some cases. Some of the data from these studies published over the years were incomplete or were tainted by spurious failures, such as grip slippage. Updated data sets were defined for both fiberglass and Kevlar composite stand test specimens. These updated data are analyzed in this report by a convenient form of the bivariate Weibull distribution, to establish a consistent set of design prediction charts that may be used as a conservative basis for predicting the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of composite pressure vessels. The updated glass composite data exhibit an invariant Weibull modulus with lifetime. The data are analyzed in terms of homologous service load (referenced to the observed median <span class="hlt">strength</span>). The equations relating life, homologous load, and probability are given, and corresponding design prediction charts are presented. A similar approach is taken for Kevlar composites, where the updated stand data do show a turndown tendency at long life accompanied by a corresponding change (increase) of the Weibull modulus. The turndown characteristic is not present in stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test data of Kevlar pressure vessels. A modification of the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> equations is presented to incorporate a latent, but limited, <span class="hlt">strength</span> drop, and design prediction charts are presented that incorporate such behavior. The methods presented utilize Cartesian plots of the probability distributions (which are a more natural display for the design engineer), based on median normalized data that are independent of statistical parameters and are readily defined for any set of test data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robinson, Ernest Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12392137"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fragmentation of <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized quarks probed in <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum distributions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is shown that the azimuthal dependence of the distribution of hadrons in a quark jet is a probe of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> spin of the quark initiating the jet. This results in a new spin-dependent fragmentation function that acts at the twist-2 level. One example of a process where it contributes is semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering with a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John Collins</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70023642"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solving the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> problem with different numerical approaches and constitutive laws</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the dynamic initiation, propagation and arrest of a 2-D in-plane shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by solving the elastodynamic equation by using both a boundary integral equation method and a finite difference approach. For both methods we adopt different constitutive laws: a slip-weakening (SW) law, with constant weakening rate, and rate- and state-dependent friction laws (Dieterich-Ruina). Our numerical procedures allow the use of heterogeneous distributions of constitutive parameters along the fault for both formulations. We first compare the two solution methods with an SW law, emphasizing the required stability conditions to achieve a good resolution of the cohesive zone and to avoid artificial complexity in the solutions. Our modelling results show that the two methods provide very similar time histories of dynamic source parameters. We point out that, if a careful control of resolution and stability is performed, the two methods yield identical solutions. We have also compared the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> evolution resulting from an SW and a rate- and state-dependent friction law. This comparison shows that despite the different constitutive formulations, a similar behaviour is simulated during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and arrest. We also observe a crack tip bifurcation and a jump in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity (approaching the P-wave speed) with the Dieterich-Ruina (DR) law. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> arrest at a barrier (high <span class="hlt">strength</span> zone) and the barrier-healing mechanism are also reproduced by this law. However, this constitutive formulation allows the simulation of a more general and complex variety of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behaviours. By assuming different heterogeneous distributions of the initial constitutive parameters, we are able to model a barrier-healing as well as a self-healing process. This result suggests that if the heterogeneity of the constitutive parameters is taken into account, the different healing mechanisms can be simulated. We also study the nucleation phase duration Tn, defined as the time necessary for the crack to reach the half-length Ic. We compare the Tn values resulting from distinct simulations calculated using different constitutive laws and different sets of constitutive parameters. Our results confirm that the DR law provides a different description of the nucleation process than the SW law adopted in this study. We emphasize that the DR law yields a complete description of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process, which includes the most prominent features of SW.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bizzarri, A.; Cocco, M.; Andrews, D.J.; Boschi, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25547556"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early diagnosis and management of myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Left ventricular free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a catastrophic mechanical complication of myocardial infarction. We present an 82-year-old woman with an anterolateral ST segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with thrombolysis. Because of unexplained hypotension, echocardiography was performed and contrast (Definity; Lantheus Medical Imaging) was used to improve visualization. Findings included a small- to moderate-sized circumferential pericardial effusion without frank tamponade, however, there was significant intramyocardial tracking of the contrast into the epicardial space, localized to the mid to apical portion of the anterior septum, consistent with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or disruption of the wall segment. The patient was promptly taken to the operating room where fresh blood and clots were evacuated from the pericardial space with immediate hemodynamic improvement. The patient underwent successful surgical repair. PMID:25547556</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Shuangbo; Glavinovic, Tamara; Tam, James W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23109311"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment of gastrocnemius muscle <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the medial head of the gastrocnemius, known as "tennis leg", typically occurs when the muscle has been overstretched by dorsiflexion of the ankle with full knee extension. The classic clinical presentation is a middle-aged person who complains of sports-related acute pain in the mid portion of the calf, associated with a snapping sensation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound is often required to evaluate patients with this condition. This injury is usually managed non-operatively, surgical treatment rarely being indicated according to published reports. One case of longstanding and one of recent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the musculotendinous junction of the medial head of the gastrocnemius that were successfully treated by surgical repair are presented here and the MRI characteristics and indications for surgery are discussed. PMID:23109311</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cheng, Yu; Yang, Hui-lin; Sun, Zhi-yong; Ni, Li; Zhang, Hong-tao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4091436"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in Plasmodium vivax malaria</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Malaria can present with various clinical symptoms and complications. While a tertian malaria form that is especially prevalent in Korea is characterized by mild clinical progression, occasional splenic complications are known to occur. A 26-year-old Korean male soldier without prior medical history visited The Armed Forces Capital Hospital with left upper quadrant abdominal pain one day ago. Hemostasis under laparoscopic approach was attempted. The operation was converted into laparotomy due to friable splenic tissue and consequently poor hemostasis. Splenectomy was performed. The patient was discharged at postoperative day 17 without complication. While numerous diseases can result in splenic complications, such as splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, malarial infection is known as the most common cause. The incidence of malarial infection in Korea is increasing annually, and there are occasional reports of splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to the infection, which requires attention. PMID:25025027</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Kwang Min; Bae, Byung Koo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28941058"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment of partial Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fifty-four patients with a total of 58 partial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the Achilles tendon were treated surgically. The postoperative observation time ranged from 8 months to 7 years. Forty-six patients indicated that they were pleased with the results, 8 were satisfied, and 3 were unsatisfied (one died during the interim). Thirty-seven of the 44 patients who had been engaged in competitive</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tor Finn Denstad; Asbj鴕n Roaas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900000179&hterms=burnout&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dburnout"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wrapped Wire Detects <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Of Pressure Vessel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hunt, James B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3951965"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Repetition of Large-Earthquake <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This survey of well-documented repeated fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> confirms that some faults have exhibited a ``characteristic'' behavior during repeated large earthquakes--that is, the magnitude, distribution, and style of slip on the fault has repeated during two or more consecutive events. In two cases faults exhibit slip functions that vary little from earthquake to earthquake. In one other well-documented case, however, fault</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kerry Sieh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/d01x18733472h54j.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> Reduction via SSAPRE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present techniques that allow <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction to be performed concurrently with partial redundancy elimination in the SSAPRE framework. By sharing the characteristics inherent to SSAPRE, the resulting <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction algorithm exhibits many interesting attributes. We compare various aspects of the new <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction algorithm with previous <span class="hlt">strength</span> reduction algorithms. We also outline and discuss our implementation of the closely</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert Kennedy; Fred C. Chow; Peter Dahl; Shin-ming Liu; Raymond Lo; Mark Streich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026606"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> models with dynamically determined breakdown displacement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The critical breakdown displacement, Dc, in which friction drops to its sliding value, can be made dependent on event size by specifying friction to be a function of variables other than slip. Two such friction laws are examined here. The first is designed to achieve accuracy and smoothness in discrete numerical calculations. Consistent resolution throughout an evolving <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is achieved by specifying friction as a function of elapsed time after peak stress is reached. Such a time-weakening model produces Dc and fracture energy proportional to the square root of distance <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has propagated in the case of uniform stress drop. The second friction law is more physically motivated. Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone has the effect of increasing Dc and limiting peak slip velocity (Andrews, 1976). This article demonstrates a converse effect, that artificially limiting slip velocity on a fault in an elastic medium has a toughening effect, increasing fracture energy and Dc proportionally to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation distance in the case of uniform stress drop. Both the time-weakening and the velocity-toughening models can be used in calculations with heterogeneous stress drop.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrews, D.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JBO....14c4007S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamics of retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In laser retinal photocoagulation, short (<20 ms) pulses have been found to reduce thermal damage to the inner retina, decrease treatment time, and minimize pain. However, the safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of power for producing a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to that of mild coagulation) decreases with shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of retinal heating and maximize the therapeutic window, a computational model of millisecond retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was developed. Optical attenuation of 532-nm laser light in ocular tissues was measured, including retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) pigmentation and cell-size variability. Threshold powers for vaporization and RPE damage were measured with pulse durations ranging from 1 to 200 ms. A finite element model of retinal heating inferred that vaporization (<span class="hlt">rupture</span>) takes place at 180-190癈. RPE damage was accurately described by the Arrhenius model with activation energy of 340 kJ/mol. Computed photocoagulation lesion width increased logarithmically with pulse duration, in agreement with histological findings. The model will allow for the optimization of beam parameters to increase the width of the therapeutic window for short exposures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Brown, Jefferson; Palanker, Daniel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JInst...7C2002E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single Event Gate <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in EMCCD technology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The high electric fields (typically 3 MV/cm2 interpoly field) utilised in Electron Multiplying Charged Coupled Devices (EMCCDs) reveal a potential vulnerability from Single Event Phenomena (SEP), in particular Single Event Gate <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> (SEGR). SEGR is where a conduction path between two conductive areas of the CCD is produced, causing device failure. If EMCCDs are to be used for space applications the susceptibility to these events needs to be explored. A positive result from such an investigation can increase the technology readiness level of the device moving it another step closer to being used in space. Testing undertaken at the CYClotron of LOuvain la NEuve (CYCLONE), using the Heavy Ion Facility (HIF), conclusively showed EMCCD technology to have resilience to heavy ions that surpassed initial expectations. The simulations undertaken prior to experiment suggested gate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would occur at 20-40 MeV cm2/mg, however Linear Energy Transfers (LETs) greater than 100 MeV cm2/mg proved to not cause a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> event. Within the radiation belts heavy ions with an LET greater than 60 MeV cm2/mg are not very common when compared to the fluxes used at the HIF. Possible reasons for this result are discussed in this work, leading to a conclusion that EMCCD technology is a secure choice for space flight.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evagora, A. M.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Burt, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20506939"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous reconstruction of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after TKA and neglected Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report a case of simultaneous reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and neglected Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which occurred before TKA with an ipsilateral hamstring autograft. A 64-year-old woman presented with persistent right knee pain. She also had right heel pain and had received multiple steroid injections at the knee joint and heel. On examination, she showed osteoarthritis in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee joint and an Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the ipsilateral limb. There was skin dimpling and the proximal portion of tendon was migrated. We performed TKA, and the postoperative course was satisfactory. She returned 3 months postoperatively, however, with skin dimpling around the suprapatellar area and weakness of knee extension. Her ankle symptoms were also aggravated because she could not use the knee joint freely. We performed simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps tendon and the Achilles tendon using an ipsilateral hamstring autograft.Hamstring autograft offers a good alternative treatment option for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> repair, particularly with concommitant <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of multiple sites when primary repair is not possible or the viability of repaired tissue is poor. PMID:20506939</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Yong Seuk; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Han, Kyeong-Jin; Cho, Jae Ho; Han, Seung Hwan; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Oh, Kyung Soo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608792"> <span id="translatedtitle">Liver Hydatid Cyst with Transdiaphragmatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Lung Hydatid Cyst <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> into Bronchi and Pleural Space</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this case study is to present effectiveness of percutaneous drainage as a treatment option of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> lung and liver hydatid cysts. A 65-year-old male patient was admitted with complicated liver and lung hydatid cysts. A liver hydatid cyst had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> transdiaphragmatically, and a lung hydatid cyst had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> both into bronchi and pleural space. The patient could not undergo surgery because of decreased respiratory function. Both cysts were drained percutaneously using oral albendazole. Povidone-iodine was used to treat the liver cyst after closure of the diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The drainage was considered successful, and the patient had no recurrence of signs and symptoms. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic recovery was observed during 2.5 months of catheterization. The patient was asymptomatic after catheter drainage. No recurrence was detected during 86 months of follow-up. For inoperable patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> liver and lung hydatid cysts, percutaneous drainage with oral albendazole is an alternative treatment option to surgery. The percutaneous approach can be life-saving in such cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas, Bilgin Kadri, E-mail: bilginaribas@hotmail.com; Dingil, Guerbuez [A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Koeroglu, Mert [Sueleyman Demirel University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Uenguel, Uemit; Zaral Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Aliye Ceylan [A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9005905"> <span id="translatedtitle">Familial calcification of the superior <span class="hlt">transverse</span> scapular ligament causing neuropathy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two patients, members of the same family, were found to have entrapment of the suprascapular nerve from a calcified superior <span class="hlt">transverse</span> scapular ligament. The chief complaint in both cases was pain and weakness and atrophy of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles. The nerve entrapment was confirmed by electromyographic studies and required surgical decompression to relieve the symptoms in both patients. Release of the entrapped nerve resulted in complete pain relief and full return of <span class="hlt">strength</span> at 1-year followup. PMID:9005905</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cohen, S B; Dines, D M; Moorman, C T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5820986"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitudinal and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> response functions for quasielastic electron scattering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider the longitudinal and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> response functions for quasielastic electron scattering from /sup 56/Fe. In a previous work we showed that the longitudinal response is overestimated by about forty percent in the impulse approximation. We argued that short-range correlations, among other effects, could shift transition <span class="hlt">strength</span> to higher energies. To account for these features we multiplied the cross sections by a factor Z/sup 2/, where Z is a measure of the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the quasiparticle pole. The model we proposed then led to a significant underestimate of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> response. In this work we concentrate on the analysis of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> response and consider the electromagnetic properties of an interacting system of nucleons and deltas. Specific assumptions concerning the transition amplitudes NN/sup -1/..-->..NN/sup -1/ and NN/sup -1/..--> delta..N/sup -1/ allow for a simultaneous fit to both the longitudinal and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> response functions. In our model the amplitude NN/sup -1/..--> delta..N/sup -1/ is governed by rho exchange with no additional correlation corrections. The model further requires that the NN/sup -1/..-->..NN/sup -1/ amplitude be small for the momentum transfers considered here: 210 MeV/c< or =Vertical BarqVertical Bar< or =410 MeV/c. Some theoretical support is offered for these small values of the latter amplitude.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Celenza, L.S.; Pong, W.S.; Shakin, C.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22034601"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> OSCILLATIONS IN CHROMOSPHERIC MOTTLES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A number of recent investigations have revealed that <span class="hlt">transverse</span> waves are ubiquitous in the solar chromosphere. The vast majority of these have been reported in limb spicules and active region fibrils. We investigate long-lived, quiet-Sun, on-disk features such as chromospheric mottles (jet-like features located at the boundaries of supergranular cells) and their <span class="hlt">transverse</span> motions. The observations were obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope. The data set is comprised of simultaneous imaging in the H{alpha} core, Ca II K, and G band of an on-disk quiet-Sun region. Time-distance techniques are used to study the characteristics of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations. We detect over 40 <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations in both bright and dark mottles, with periods ranging from 70 to 280 s, with the most frequent occurrence at {approx}165 s. The velocity amplitudes and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> displacements exhibit characteristics similar to limb spicules. Neighboring mottles oscillating in-phase are also observed. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations of individual mottles are interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Their estimated periods and damping times are consistent with phase mixing and resonant mode conversion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Dorrian, G. D., E-mail: dkuridze01@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Observatory of Athens, Lofos Nymfon, Thiseio, P.O. Box 20048, GR-11810 Athens (Greece)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000054540&hterms=SiC+mirrors+silicon+carbide+mirror&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DSiC%2Bmirrors%2B%2522silicon%2Bcarbide%2522%2Bmirror"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intermediate Temperature Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Woven SiC Fiber, BN Interphase, SiC Matrix Composites in Air</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tensile stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments were performed on woven Hi-Nicalon reinforced SiC matrix composites with BN interphases in air. Modal acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the damage accumulation in the composites during the tests and microstructural analysis was performed to determine the amount of matrix cracking that occurred for each sample. Fiber fractograph), was also performed for individual fiber failures at the specimen fracture surface to determine the <span class="hlt">strengths</span> at which fibers failed. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strengths</span> were significantly worse than what would have been expected front the inherent degradation of the fibers themselves when subjected to similar <span class="hlt">rupture</span> conditions. At higher applied stresses the rate of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> "?as larger than at lower applied stresses. It was observed that the change in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate corresponded to the onset of through-thickness cracking in the composites themselves. The primary cause of the sen,ere degradation was the ease with which fibers would bond to one another at their closest separation distances, less than 100 nanometers, when exposed to the environment. The near fiber-to-fiber contact in the woven tows enabled premature fiber failure over large areas of matrix cracks due to the stress-concentrations created b), fibers bonded to one another after one or a few fibers fail. i.e. the loss of global load sharing. An@, improvement in fiber-to-fiber separation of this composite system should result in improved stress- <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties. A model was den,eloped in order to predict the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life-time for these composites based on the probabilistic nature of indin,idual fiber failure at temperature. the matrix cracking state during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test, and the rate of oxidation into a matrix crack. Also incorporated into the model were estimates of the stress-concentration that would occur between the outer rim of fibers in a load-bearing bundle and the unbridged region of a matrix crack after Xia et al. For the lower stresses, this source of stress-concentration was the likely cause for initial fiber failure that would trigger catastrophic failure of the composite.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morscher, Gregory N.; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhDT.......164S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes and seismic radiation in models of earthquake faults separating similar and dissimilar solids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This thesis examines dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> along frictional interfaces and seismic radiation in models of earthquake faults separating similar and dissimilar solids with the goal of advancing the understanding of earthquake physics. The dynamics of Mode-II <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along an interface governed by slip-weakening friction between dissimilar solids are investigated. The results show that the wrinkle-like <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along such interfaces evolves to unilateral propagation in the slip direction of the compliant side for a broad range of conditions, and the closer the initial shear stress is to the static friction the smaller degree of material contrast is needed for this evolution to occur. Transition of the wrinkle-like pulse to crack-like <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs when the reduction of friction coefficient is sufficiently large. Energy partition associated with various <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes along an interface governed by rate- and state-dependent friction between identical solids is investigated. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode changes with varying velocity dependence of friction, <span class="hlt">strength</span> excess parameter and length of the nucleation zone. High initial shear stress and weak velocity dependence of friction favor crack-like <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, while the opposite conditions favor the pulse-like mode. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode can switch from a subshear single pulse to a supershear train of pulses when the width of the nucleation zone is increased. The elastic strain energy released over the same propagation distance by the different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes has the order: supershear crack, subshear crack, supershear train-of-pulses and subshear single-pulse. General considerations and observations suggest that the subshear pulse and supershear crack are, respectively, the most and least common modes of earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. The effect of plasticity and interface elasticity on dynamic frictional sliding along an interface induced by edge impact loading between two identical elastic-viscoplastic solids is analyzed. The material on each side is isotropically strain-hardening. The interface is characterized as having an elastic response together with an inelastic response characterized by rate- and state-dependent friction. The results show that bulk material plasticity tends to smooth out oscillations. Larger impact velocity induces more extensive plastic dissipation and larger effect on slip mode and energy partition. Also larger values of the interface shear stiffness tend to favor crack-like mode of sliding. The last part of we examine the characteristics of seismic radiation from localized fault-opening and shear motions and the effect of having dissimilar solids across the fault on seismic radiation by employing calculations of synthetic seismograms generated at various receiver locations by shear and tensile dislocation sources. The existence of a velocity contrast across the fault produces complexities that mask somewhat the polarity and amplitude signals of body waves characteristic of the tensile dislocation. The recording and analysis of the discussed signals for regular earthquakes that are dominated by shear motion will require high-resolution receivers located very close to the fault.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shi, Zheqiang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvC..84d5205M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Realizing vector meson dominance with <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge densities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density in a fast-moving nucleon is represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the Dirac form factor in the timelike region (spectral function). At a given <span class="hlt">transverse</span> distance b the integration effectively extends over energies in a range t?1/b, with exponential suppression of larger values. The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density at peripheral distances thus acts as a low-pass filter for the spectral function and allows one to select energy regions dominated by specific t-channel states, corresponding to definite exchange mechanisms in the spacelike form factor. We show that distances b0.5-1.5fm in the isovector density are maximally sensitive to the ? meson region, with only a 10% contribution from higher-mass states. Soft-pion exchange governed by chiral dynamics becomes relevant only at larger distances. In the isoscalar density higher-mass states beyond the ? are comparatively more important. The dispersion approach suggests that the positive <span class="hlt">transverse</span> charge density in the neutron at b1fm, found previously in a Fourier analysis of spacelike form factor data, could serve as a sensitive test of the the isoscalar <span class="hlt">strength</span> in the 1GeV mass region. In terms of partonic structure, the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> densities in the vector meson region b1fm support an approximate mean-field picture of the motion of valence quarks in the nucleon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, G. A.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/863664"> <span id="translatedtitle">High <span class="hlt">strength</span> nickel-chromium-iron austenitic alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A solid solution strengthened Ni-Cr-Fe alloy capable of retaining its <span class="hlt">strength</span> at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 42 to 48% nickel, 11 to 13% chromium, 2.6 to 3.4% niobium, 0.2 to 1.2% silicon, 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium, 2.6 to 3.4% molybdenum, 0.1 to 0.3% aluminum, 0.1 to 0.3% titanium, 0.02 to 0.05% carbon, 0.002 to 0.015% boron, up to 0.06 zirconium, and the balance iron. After solution annealing at 1038.degree. C. for one hour, the alloy, when heated to a temperature of 650.degree. C., has a 2% yield <span class="hlt">strength</span> of 307 MPa, an ultimate tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of 513 MPa and a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> of as high as 400 MPa after 100 hours.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gibson, Robert C. (Ringwood, NJ); Korenko, Michael K. (Richland, WA)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28964611"> <span id="translatedtitle">End-to-End Operative Repair of Achilles Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the long-term results of operative repair in 23 consecutive patients with Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, treated between 1984 and 1991, to evaluate our treat ment method and determine the clinical causes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Fifty-four percent of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred in peo ple in their 30s; 90% occurred during participation in acceleration-deceleration sports. All but three patients were treated within 1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeffery J. Soldatis; Donald B. Goodfellow; John H. Wilber</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17701152"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Successive <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his <span class="hlt">strength</span>. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. PMID:17701152</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790004034&hterms=CuCl2&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DCuCl2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a directionally solidified eutectic gamma/gamma prime - alpha (Mo) alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Directionally solidified Mo alloys are evaluated to determine the shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> and to possibly improve it by microstructural and heat treatment variations. Bars of the alloy containing nominally 5.7% Al and 33.5% Mo by weight with balance Ni were directionally solidified at rates between 10 and 100 mm per hour in furnaces with thermal gradients at the liquid-solid interface of 250 or 100 C per cm. A limited number of longitudinal shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests were conducted at 760 C and 207 MPa in the as - solidified and in several heat treated conditions. It is shown that shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> failures are partly transgranular and that resistance to failure is prompted by good fiber alignment and a matrix structure consisting mainly of gamma prime. Well aligned as - solidified specimens sustained the shear stress for an average of 81 hours. A simulated coating heat treatment appeared to increase the transformation of gamma to gamma prime and raised the average shear life of aligned specimens to 111 hours. However, heat treatments at 1245 C and especially at 1190 C appeared to be detrimental by causing partial solutioning of the gamma prime, and reducing lives to 47 and 10 hours, respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harf, F. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23530530"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laser welding of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> intestinal tissue using plasmonic polypeptide nanocomposite solders.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Approximately 1.5 million people suffer from colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease in the United States. Occurrence of leakage following standard surgical anastomosis in intestinal and colorectal surgery is common and can cause infection leading to life-threatening consequences. In this report, we demonstrate that plasmonic nanocomposites, generated from elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) cross-linked with gold nanorods, can be used to weld <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> intestinal tissue upon exposure to near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. Mechanical properties of these nanocomposites can be modulated based on the concentration of gold nanorods embedded within the ELP matrix. We employed photostable, NIR-absorbing cellularized and noncellularized GNR-ELP nanocomposites for ex vivo laser welding of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> porcine small intestines. Laser welding using the nanocomposites significantly enhanced the tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>, leakage pressure, and bursting pressure of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> intestinal tissue. This, in turn, provided a liquid-tight seal against leakage of luminal liquid from the intestine and resulting bacterial infection. This study demonstrates the utility of laser tissue welding using plasmonic polypeptide nanocomposites and indicates the translational potential of these materials in intestinal and colorectal repair. PMID:23530530</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Huang-Chiao; Walker, Candace Rae; Nanda, Alisha; Rege, Kaushal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EPJWC..8502025R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dihadron Fragmentation Functions and <span class="hlt">Transversity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present preliminary results for an updated extraction of the <span class="hlt">transversity</span> parton distribution based on the analysis of pion-pair production in deep-inelastic scattering off <span class="hlt">transversely</span> polarized targets in collinear factorization. Data for proton and deuteron targets by HERMES and COMPASS allow for a flavor separation of the valence components of <span class="hlt">transversity</span>, while di-hadron fragmentation functions are taken from the semi-inclusive production of two pion pairs in back-to-back jets in e+e- annihilation. The latter data from Belle have been reanalyzed using the replica method and a more realistic estimate of the uncertainties on the chiral-odd interference fragmentation function has been obtained. After encoding this piece of information into the deep-inelastic scattering cross section, the <span class="hlt">transversity</span> has been re-extracted by using the most recent and more precise COMPASS data for proton target. This picture represents the current most realistic estimate of the uncertainties on our knowledge of <span class="hlt">transversity</span>. The preliminary results indicate that the valence up component seems smaller and with a narrower error band than in previous extraction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Radici, Marco; Courtoy, A.; Bacchetta, Alessandro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23464778"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: case report and literature review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is extremely rare. Usually a diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is trauma induced. We describe a case of an 18-year old patient admitted 2 hours after onset, presenting severe epigastric and left sided chest pain without any trauma history. Upright chest x-ray revealed displaced stomach and colon into the left pleural cavity with a collapsed left lung. Surgery for a left-sided diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with stomach, spleen and colon splenic flexure herniation was undertaken. We present a brief review regarding the aetiology, diagnostic and treatment policy of spontaneous diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:23464778</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ghidirim, Gh; Mishin, I; Condratsky, E; Zastavnitsky, Gh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21276522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute and chronic Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in athletes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Achilles tendon is the most injured tendon of athletes in the lower extremities and is the most common tendon to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> spontaneously. Operative repair provides earlier return to sporting activities and lesser rate of rerupture. The general goal is to attempt anastomosis of the acute <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ends; however, delayed <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> may require more extensive procedures. New surgical approaches, including percutaneous and mini-open techniques, are being introduced to potentially diminish perioperative complications. Advent of early protective range of motion and rehabilitation has shown a potential for earlier return to sporting activities for Achilles <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. PMID:21276522</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, Jonathan; Baravarian, Bob</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982STIN...8410387M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short-term mechanical properties of high-<span class="hlt">strength</span> light-weight concrete</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An experimental investigation was undertaken to establish the mechanical properties of high-<span class="hlt">strength</span> light-weight concrete. Concretes having compressive <span class="hlt">strengths</span> ranging from 2,564 to 8,585 psi, and densities between 90 and 103 pcf were tested. The results include a comprehensive study of the engineering properties of light-weight concrete. Data are presented on compressive <span class="hlt">strength</span> gain with age, speciment size effect, static modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, splitting tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>, and drying effects. Results are compared to data on normal-weight concrete. The deformation characteristics of light-weight concrete are studied in detail.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morales, S. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54001169"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ground Motion Simulations of Scenario Earthquake <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> of the Hayward Fault</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We compute ground motions in the San Francisco Bay area for a suite of 35 magnitude 6.7--7.2 scenario earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> involving the Hayward fault. The suite of scenarios encompasses variability in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length, hypocenter, distribution of slip, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, and rise time. The five <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lengths include the Hayward fault and portions thereof, as well as combined <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Aagaard; R. Graves; S. Larsen; S. Ma; A. Rodgers; T. Brocher; R. Graymer; R. Harris; J. Lienkaemper; D. Ponce; D. Schwartz; R. Simpson; P. Spudich; D. Dreger; A. Petersson; J. Boatwright</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52626305"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fault length, multi-fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and relations to earthquakes in California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fault length is used to estimate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length of future earthquakes. However, fault length is often poorly defined, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> often breaks beyond the mapped faults. Furthermore, multiple faults often <span class="hlt">rupture</span> together in a single earthquake. In this work I quantify how to use fault length to infer future <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length. I used observations of previous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> breaking multiple</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Natanya Maureen Black</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3182099"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinetics of Hole Nucleation in Biomembrane <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The core component of a biological membrane is a fluid-lipid bilayer held together by interfacial-hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions, which are balanced for the most part by acyl chain entropy confinement. If biomembranes are subjected to persistent tensions, an unstable (nanoscale) hole will emerge at some time to cause <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Because of the large energy required to create a hole, thermal activation appears to be requisite for initiating a hole and the activation energy is expected to depend significantly on mechanical tension. Although models exist for the kinetic process of hole nucleation in tense membranes, studies of membrane survival have failed to cover the ranges of tension and lifetime needed to critically examine nucleation theory. Hence, <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> giant (~20 ?m) membrane vesicles ultra-slowly to ultra-quickly with slow to fast ramps of tension, we demonstrate a method to directly quantify kinetic rates at which unstable holes form in fluid membranes, at the same time providing a range of kinetic rates from < 0.01 s?1 to > 100 s?1. Measuring lifetimes of many hundreds of vesicles, each tensed by precision control of micropipet suction, we have determined the rates of failure for vesicles made from several synthetic phospholipids plus 1:1 mixtures of phospho- and sphingo-lipids with cholesterol, all of which represent prominent constituents of eukaryotic cell membranes. Plotted on a logarithmic scale, the failure rates for vesicles are found to rise dramatically with increase of tension. Converting the experimental profiles of kinetic rates into changes of activation energy versus tension, we show that the results closely match expressions for thermal activation derived from a combination of meso-scale theory and molecular-scale simulations of hole formation. Moreover, we demonstrate a generic approach to transform analytical fits of activation energies obtained from <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments into energy landscapes characterizing the process hole nucleation along the reaction coordinate defined by hole size. PMID:21966242</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, Evan; Smith, Benjamin A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24902970"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanisms of plaque formation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atherosclerosis causes clinical disease through luminal narrowing or by precipitating thrombi that obstruct blood flow to the heart (coronary heart disease), brain (ischemic stroke), or lower extremities (peripheral vascular disease). The most common of these manifestations is coronary heart disease, including stable angina pectoris and the acute coronary syndromes. Atherosclerosis is a lipoprotein-driven disease that leads to plaque formation at specific sites of the arterial tree through intimal inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis, and calcification. After decades of indolent progression, such plaques may suddenly cause life-threatening coronary thrombosis presenting as an acute coronary syndrome. Most often, the culprit morphology is plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with exposure of highly thrombogenic, red cell-rich necrotic core material. The permissive structural requirement for this to occur is an extremely thin fibrous cap, and thus, <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occur mainly among lesions defined as thin-cap fibroatheromas. Also common are thrombi forming on lesions without <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (plaque erosion), most often on pathological intimal thickening or fibroatheromas. However, the mechanisms involved in plaque erosion remain largely unknown, although coronary spasm is suspected. The calcified nodule has been suggested as a rare cause of coronary thrombosis in highly calcified and tortious arteries in older individuals. To characterize the severity and prognosis of plaques, several terms are used. Plaque burden denotes the extent of disease, whereas plaque activity is an ambiguous term, which may refer to one of several processes that characterize progression. Plaque vulnerability describes the short-term risk of precipitating symptomatic thrombosis. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of atherosclerotic plaque initiation and progression; how plaques suddenly precipitate life-threatening thrombi; and the concepts of plaque burden, activity, and vulnerability. PMID:24902970</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bentzon, Jacob Fog; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Virmani, Renu; Falk, Erling</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1615127E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Capturing Continental <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Processes in Afar</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Both continental and oceanic rifting processes are highly 3D, but the stability of the along-axis segmentation from rifting to breakup, and its relationship to seafloor spreading remains debated. Three-dimensional models of the interactions of faults and magmatism in time and space are in development, but modelling and observations suggest that magmatic segments may propagate and/or migrate during periods of magmatism. Our ability to discriminate between the various models in large part depends on the quality of data in the ocean-transition zone, or, observations from zones of incipient plate <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Largely 2D crustal-scale seismic data from magmatic passive margins reveal large magmatic additions to the crust, but the timing of this heat and mass transfer is weakly constrained. Thus, the lack of information on the across rift breadth of the deforming zone at <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and the relationship between the early rift segmentation and the seafloor spreading segmentation represent fundamental gaps in knowledge. Our study of Earth's youngest magmatic margin, the superbly exposed, tectonically active southern Red Sea, aims to answer the following questions: What are the geometry and kinematics of active fault systems across the 'passive margin' to zone of incipient plate <span class="hlt">rupture</span>? What is the relationship between the initial border fault segmentation, and the breakup zone segmentation? What is the distribution of active deformation and magmatism, and how does it compare to time-averaged strain patterns? We integrate results of recent experiments that suggest widespread replacement of crust and mantle lithosphere beneath the 'passive' margin, and explain the ongoing seismic deformation as a consequence of bending stresses across the ocean-continent transition, with or without a dynamic component.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ebinger, Cynthia; Belachew, Manahloh; Tepp, Gabrielle; Keir, Derek; Ayele, Atalay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24679079"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolated unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the alar ligament.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment. PMID:24679079</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25355741"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1?week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (linear whole wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span>). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:25355741</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25361560"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1?week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (linear whole wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span>). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:25361560</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1409.3028v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Missing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy significance at CMS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Missing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy significance may be used to help distinguish real missing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy due to undetected particles from spurious missing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy due to resolution smearing. We present a description of the missing <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy significance variable, and assess its performance in Z$\\rightarrow\\mu\\mu$, dijet, and W$\\rightarrow e\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nathan Mirman; Yimin Wang; James Alexander</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70044050"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> history of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan, China, earthquake: Evaluation of separate and joint inversions of geodetic, teleseismic, and strong-motion data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">earthquake. A linear multiple-time-window approach is used to parameterize the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Because of the complexity of the Wenchuan faulting, three separate planes are used to represent the <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> surfaces. This earthquake clearly demonstrates the <span class="hlt">strengths</span> and limitations of geodetic, teleseismic, and strong-motion data sets. Geodetic data (static offsets) are valuable for determining the distribution of shallower slip but are insensitive to deeper faulting and reveal nothing about the timing of slip. Teleseismic data in the distance range 30皷90 generally involve no modeling difficulties because of simple ray paths and can distinguish shallow from deep slip. Teleseismic data, however, cannot distinguish between different slip scenarios when multiple fault planes are involved because steep takeoff angles lead to ambiguity in timing. Local strong-motion data, on the other hand, are ideal for determining the direction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from directivity but can easily be over modeled with inaccurate Green抯 functions, leading to misinterpretation of the slip distribution. We show that all three data sets are required to give an accurate description of the Wenchuan <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The moment is estimated to be approximately 1:01021 N m with the slip characterized by multiple large patches with slips up to 10 m. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> initiates on the southern end of the Pengguan fault and proceeds unilaterally to the northeast. Upon reaching the cross-cutting Xiaoyudong fault, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the adjacent Beichuan fault starts at this juncture and proceeds bilaterally to the northeast and southwest.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hartzell, Stephen; Mendoza, Carlos; Ram韗ez-Guzm醤, Leonardo; Zeng, Yuesha; Mooney, Walter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22048747"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anterior cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in gouty arthritis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 34-year-old male presented with right knee instability without any trauma. He had been diagnosed with right knee gouty arthritis 2爕ears prior. An arthroscopic examination revealed abundant calcific material deposited around the knee joint, including in the ACL tissue, and that the ACL was torn at the femoral attachment site. Treatment involved a synovectomy to remove calcific material, followed by an ACL reconstruction. Histology evaluation revealed gouty arthritis with the presence of tophi in the synovium, soft tissue, and ACL tissue. The case presented here indicates the possibility of pathologic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the ACL associated with gouty tophus infiltration of that ligament. Level of evidence IV. PMID:22048747</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hwang, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Soon-Hyuck; Han, Seung-Beom; Park, Si-Young; Jeong, Woong-Kyo; Kim, Chul-Hwan; Lee, Dae-Hee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvE..90e2710T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of lipid vesicles near solid surfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The behavior of lipid vesicles near solid surfaces, despite its scientific and technological significance, is poorly understood. By simultaneously taking into account (i) the dynamics of spontaneous pore opening and closing in surface bound vesicles; (ii) their volume loss via leakage through the pores; (iii) and the propagation of their contact line, we have developed a simple model that can fully describe the detailed mechanism of and provide the necessary conditions for the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of vesicles and the subsequent formation of supported lipid bilayers. The predictions of the model are in qualitative agreement with many of the experimental observations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tak醫s-Nyeste, Annam醨ia; Der閚yi, Imre</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70024680"> <span id="translatedtitle">Complex earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and local tsunamis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a factor of 3 or more. These results indicate that there is substantially more variation in the local tsunami wave field derived from the inherent complexity subduction zone earthquakes than predicted by a simple elastic dislocation model. Probabilistic methods that take into account variability in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes are likely to yield more accurate assessments of tsunami hazards.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Geist, E.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/831681"> <span id="translatedtitle">Idiopathic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the iliac vein.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Idiopathic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of large veins is very rare. There has been one report in the Portugese literature of such an instance involving the iliac vein. Our patient was an elderly woman in whom evidence of intra-abdominal hemorrhage developed. There was no clinical evidence of trauma. At laparotomy a large retroperitoneal hematoma secondary to an 8-mm tear in the left common iliac vein was found. The tear occurred adjacent to where the right common iliac artery passes over the vein. Repair was followed by uneventful recovery. Results of the pathological examination showed nonspecific information. PMID:831681</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, L; Sanchez, F; Mannix, H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=back+AND+pain&pg=4&id=EJ383134"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flexibility and Muscular <span class="hlt">Strength</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This definition of flexibility and muscular <span class="hlt">strength</span> also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular <span class="hlt">strength</span> can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liemohn, Wendell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=womens+AND+fitness&pg=4&id=EJ638408"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> Training for Girls.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' <span class="hlt">strength</span> training are discussed, presenting general principles of <span class="hlt">strength</span> training for children</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/25138774"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Human Pulleys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The length, breaking <span class="hlt">strength</span>, and tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of each of the annular fibro-osseous pulleys of digital flexor sheath in ten fresh human cadaver specimens were measured. The first annular pulley and the fourth annular pulley were found to be the strongest, while the second annular pulley was the weakest. The design of artificial pulleys should reproduce the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">PAUL R. MANSKE; PEGGY A. LESKER</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EP%26S...66..152Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Teleseismic inversion of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process using complete Green's functions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spatial and temporal variations in coseismic slip distribution are often obtained by <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process analyses using teleseismic body waves. Many analyses using teleseismic body waves were based on the ray theory because of the very efficiently computable direct P-, S-, and major reflected waves near the source. The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake was one of the largest earthquakes recorded in history, and the data that are required for the entire <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process analysis include later phases such as PP waves and a very long period phase called a W phase. However, calculating these later phases using the conventional ray theoretical method is difficult. Here we investigate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake using complete Green's functions, including all later phases such as PP waves and W phase. We use the direct solution method, which computes complete synthetic seismograms up to 2 Hz for <span class="hlt">transversely</span> isotropic spherically symmetric media, to calculate the Green's functions. The obtained synthetic seismograms generated fit the observed seismograms quite well from a short period to a long period. The estimated slip distribution consists of four large slip areas: the largest slip occurred in the shallow part off the Sumatra west coast with a maximum slip of approximately 29 m, the second and third largest slips occurred in the shallow and deep parts of the Nicobar region with maximum slips of approximately 8 m and 7 m, respectively, and the fourth slip occurred in the middle Andaman region with a maximum slip of approximately 6 m. The estimated average <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is 2.8 km/s, but the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may have slowed between the Sumatra and the shallow Nicobar slip areas, and between the Nicobar and the middle Andaman slip areas. The delayed initiation of the shallow slips in the Nicobar region may possibly have been triggered by the deeper slip in the Nicobar region. There were no distinct depth-varying properties for the shallow and deep slips in the Nicobar region, as were reported for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki and 2010 Chile earthquake.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Yoshiko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009A%26A...501.1113K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic field <span class="hlt">strength</span> of active region filaments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aims: We study the vector magnetic field of a filament observed over a compact active region neutral line. Methods: Spectropolarimetric data acquired with TIP-II (VTT, Tenerife, Spain) of the 10 830 spectral region provide full Stokes vectors that were analyzed using three different methods: magnetograph analysis, Milne-Eddington inversions, and PCA-based atomic polarization inversions. Results: The inferred magnetic field <span class="hlt">strengths</span> in the filament are around 600-700 G by all these three methods. Longitudinal fields are found in the range of 100-200 G whereas the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> components become dominant, with fields as high as 500-600 G. We find strong <span class="hlt">transverse</span> fields near the neutral line also at photospheric levels. Conclusions: Our analysis indicates that strong (higher than 500 G, but below kG) <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetic fields are present in active region filaments. This corresponds to the highest field <span class="hlt">strengths</span> reliably measured in these structures. The profiles of the helium 10 830 lines observed in this active region filament are dominated by the Zeeman effect.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuckein, C.; Centeno, R.; Mart韓ez Pillet, V.; Casini, R.; Manso Sainz, R.; Shimizu, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JGRB..111.3307S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear thermoporoelastic effects on dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study we theoretically examine thermohydraulic effects on dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We first derive the system of governing equations assuming a thermoporoelastic medium and then conduct numerical calculations based on these equations. Nonlinear feedback between changes in temperature, fluid pressure, and fault slip are shown to play an important role in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics. For example, these feedbacks produce a longer duration of fault slip than that predicted by the classical Griffith crack model assumed in an elastic medium; deviation of our results from those of the Griffith crack model increases with increased thickness of the heated fault zone. The feedback effects also produce slip-weakening behavior and gradual slip onset. The slip-weakening distance increases with increased rate of fluid outflow from the heated fault zone. Our simulations demonstrate that smaller events record smaller static stress drops, consistent with seismological observations. This relationship occurs because ongoing fault slip tends to result in increased fluid pressure. Our simulations also indicate that scaling relationships between small and large earthquakes are complicated by thermohydraulic effects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suzuki, Takehito; Yamashita, Teruo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24637031"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complicating aortitis: a case report].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tropical aortitis is a rare and poorly described aortic disease, sometimes confounded with Takayasu's disease, mainly in people from Africa. In this case report, the panaortic aneurysmal disease in a young woman from Haiti, first diagnosed after a work-up on renovascular hypertension, would appear to approach this particular arterial disease with no clinical, radiological or biological argument for an infectious etiology. The initially suspected diagnosis of Takayasu's disease had to be rethought because of the presence of several saccular aneurysms extending from the aortic arch to the infrarenal aorta, rarely described in Takayasu's aortitis. Expert opinions from vascular surgeons and clinicians tagged this aortic disease as similar to tropical aortitis which remained asymptomatic for more than a decade. Hypertension was managed with successful balloon angioplasty of the left renal artery stenosis and anti-hypertensive combination therapy. Surgical management of the extended aortic aneurysms was not proposed because of the stability and asymptomatic nature of the aneurysmal disease and the high risk of surgical morbidity and mortality. More than ten years after diagnosis, the course was marked with inaugural and sudden-onset chest pain concomitant with contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. This case report underlines the persistent risk of aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the importance of an anatomopathological study for the diagnosis of complex aortic disease. PMID:24637031</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yannoutsos, A; Mercier, O; Messas, E; Safar, M E; Blacher, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25279443"> <span id="translatedtitle">False vs True <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New medical nomenclature: False <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes or False ROM and Double <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes or Double ROM are being introduced into the English language. A single caregiver found about 1% of term births and 10% of term PROM involved False ROM, in which the chorion breaks while the amnion remains intact. Diagnostically, if meconium or vernix is observed, then both the chorionic and amniotic sacs have broken. In the absence of detection of vernix or meconium, an immediate accurate diagnostic test for False ROM is lacking and differentiating between True ROM from False ROM is possible only after leaking stops, which takes hours to days. The obvious benefit of differentiating between 'True' and 'False' ROM, is that in the case of False ROM, the amnion is intact and ascending infections are likely not at increased risk, although research is lacking as to whether False ROM is associated with an increased rate of ascending infection. Three cases of False ROM are presented and avenues for future research are enumerated. PMID:25279443</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cohain, J S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870004080&hterms=gordon+moore+1965&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dgordon%2Bmoore%2B1965"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effect of electron beam welding on the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of a Nb-Zr-C alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests of electron beam welded PWC-11 sheet were conducted at 1350 K. Full penetration, single pass welds were oriented <span class="hlt">transverse</span> to the testing direction in 1 mm thick sheet. With this orientation, stress was imposed equally on the base metal, weld metal, and heat-affected zone. Tests were conducted in both the postweld annealed and aged conditions. Unwelded specimens with similar heat treatments were tested for comparative purposes. It was found that the weld region is stronger than the base metal for both the annealed and aged conditions and that the PWC-11 material is stronger in the annealed condition than in the aged condition.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moore, T. J.; Titran, R. H.; Grobstein, T. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T33C2644F"> <span id="translatedtitle">How is a stick slip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiated?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the initiation process of stick slip events that occurred during large scale rock friction experiments conducted on the large scale shaking table at NIED (Fukuyama et al., 2012, AGU Fall meeting). We used a pair of Indian gabbro rock samples stacked vertically and applied normal and shear forces. The sliding area between the samples is 1.5m in length and 0.1m in width. We conducted a sequence of experiments using the same rock sample, and before each experiment we removed gouge particles created during the previous experiment by a brush and a cleaner. Here, we show the experiments under constant slip velocity of 0.1mm/s with constant normal stress of 2.7MPa (LB04-003) or 6.7MPa (LB04-005); the final displacement reached 0.04m. We used 44 acoustic sensors (PZT, vertical mode, 0.5MHz resonance frequency), 32 2-comp strain gouges (SGs) for shear strain and 16 1-comp SGs for normal strain measurements, with 48 0.5MHz dynamic SG amplifiers. We also used a 2MN load cell for shear force measurement and three 0.4MN load cells for vertical forces. Data are recorded continuously at an interval of 10MHz for PZT and 1MHz for other sensors. Just after the shear force applied, many stick slip events (SEs) occurred at an interval of a few seconds. By looking carefully at the PZT and SG array data during an SE, we found that one SE consists of many micro stick slip events (MSEs), which can be grouped into two (the former and the latter). These two groups correspond to the acceleration and deceleration stage of the SE. In LB04-005 (6.7MPa normal stress), a clear nucleation phase can be detected that initiated at a narrow area, propagate slowly (~20m/s) and accelerated. Then, a seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> started to propagate at a velocity of ~3km/s (subshear) or ~6.5km/s (supershear). Detailed features are shown in Mizoguchi et al. (this meeting). It should be noted that this seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiated at a narrow area inside the nucleation zone and sometimes after a certain amount of time; it does not seem a smooth transition process from the acceleration to the seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as proposed in Ohnaka and Shen (1999, JGR). In contrast, under low normal stress case (LB04-003, 2.7MPa), there were no visible nucleation phases but a sequence of foreshocks was observed, which was not dominant in LB04-005. The foreshock slip area was typically around 10cm long. Again, we could not see any visible correlation between the location and preceding time of foreshocks and that of seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation. By looking at the fault surface topography that was recorded as photograph images before and after the experiment, in the nucleation zone, grooves are not developed, while outside the nucleation area, grooves are well developed. Grooves are caused by the creation of gouge particles during the sliding. It could be interesting to note that outside the groove, the sliding surface looks very smooth and shiny, indicating that this area was polished but did not create gouge particles. Therefore, we might speculate that this shiny fault area is responsible for the initiation phase and when the stress state becomes critical, seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> starts around one of the grooves. And in LB04-003, the shiny area might not support the shear stress so that the foreshock releases the strain around the grooves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fukuyama, E.; Mizoguchi, K.; Yamashita, F.; Kawakata, H.; Takizawa, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998GeoJI.132...14S"> <span id="translatedtitle">RESEARCH PAPERS : Transition process from nucleation to high-speed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation: scaling from stick-slip experiments tonatural earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The process of earthquake generation is governed by a coupled non-linear system consisting of the equation of motion in elastodynamics and a fault constitutive relation. On the basis of the results of stick-slip experiments we constructed a theoretical source model with a slip-dependent constitutive law. Using the theoretical source model, we simulated the transition process numerically from quasi-static nucleation to high-speed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and succeeded in quantitatively explaining the three phases observed in stick-slip experiments, that is very slow (1 cm s-1 ) quasi-static nucleation preceding the onset of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, dynamic but slow (10 m s-1 ) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth without seismic-wave radiation, and subsequent high-speed (2 km s-1 ) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. Theoretical computation of far-field waveforms with this model shows that a slow initial phase preceding the main P phase expected from a classical source model is radiated in the accelerating stage from the slow dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth to the high-speed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. On the assumption that the physical law governing <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes in natural earthquakes is essentially the same as that in stick-slip events, we scaled the theoretical source model explaining the stick-slip experiments to the case of natural earthquakes so that the scaled source model explains the observed average stress drop, the critical nucleation-zone size, and the duration of the slow initial phase well. The physical parameters prescribing the source model are the weak-zone size L , the critical weakening displacement Dc , the breakdown <span class="hlt">strength</span> drop ?b , and the rigidity ? of the surrounding elastic medium. In scaling these parameters, we held a non-dimensional controlling parameter ?' = (?Dc )/(?b L ) in numerical simulation constant. From the results of scaling we found the following fundamental relations between the source parameters: (1) the critical weakening displacement Dc is in proportion to the weak-zone size L , but (2) the breakdown <span class="hlt">strength</span> drop ?b is independent of L .</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shibazaki, Bunichiro; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860001303&hterms=chick+fil&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dchick%2Bfil"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> Modeling Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human <span class="hlt">strength</span>, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic <span class="hlt">strength</span>; (3) effector force versus joint torque; (4) instantaneous versus steady force; (5) active force versus reactive force; (6) presence or absence of gravity; (7) body somatotype and composition; (8) body (segment) masses; (9) muscle group envolvement; (10) muscle size; (11) fatigue; and (12) practice (training) or familiarity. In surveying the available literature on <span class="hlt">strength</span> measurement and modeling an attempt was made to examine as many of these parameters as possible. The conclusions reached at this point toward the feasibility of implementing computationally reasonable human <span class="hlt">strength</span> models. The assessment of accuracy of any model against a specific individual, however, will probably not be possible on any realistic scale. Taken statistically, <span class="hlt">strength</span> modeling may be an effective tool for general questions of task feasibility and <span class="hlt">strength</span> requirements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Badler, N. I.; Lee, P.; Wong, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www-hermes.desy.de/notes/pub/TALK/korotkov.transversity2000.ps.gz"> <span id="translatedtitle">Future <span class="hlt">Transversity</span> Measurements with HERMES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">density distribution q(x; Q 2 ) 颅 quark helicity distribution \\Deltaq(x; Q 2 ) 颅 quark <span class="hlt">transversity</span> MAGNET PROP. CHAMBERS FIELD CLAMPS PRESHOWER (H2) STEEL PLATE CALORIMETER DRIFT CHAMBERS TRIGGER (relatively low Q 2 颅values at HERMES) Q 2 = 2:5 GeV 2 (average value for the HERMES) GS LO parameterization</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.kettering.edu/~drussell/Demos/waves/wavemotion.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitudinal and <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Wave Motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mechanical Waves are waves which propagate through a material medium (solid, liquid, or gas) at a wave speed which depends on the elastic and inertial properties of that medium. There are two basic types of wave motion for mechanical waves: longitudinal waves and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> waves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1022029"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Energy Measurements with ALICE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ALICE is an ideal detector to measure <span class="hlt">transverse</span> energy using the combined information of the calorimeters and the tracking detectors to give insight into the energy densities reached at the LHC. We discuss the status of studies in proton+proton collisions and the outlook for heavy-ion collisions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Silvermyr, David O [ORNL; ALICE, Collaboration [The</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.acs.psu.edu/drussell/Demos/waves/wavemotion.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitudinal and <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Wave Motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This group of animations with accompanying text illustrates the difference between the two primary types of mechanical waves: longitudinal and <span class="hlt">transverse</span>. It is part of a larger collection of resources on wave motion, acoustics, and sound authored by Dan Russell of Kettering University.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Russell, Dan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31797659"> <span id="translatedtitle">Posttraumatic free intraperitoneal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liver cystic echinococcosis: a case series and review of literature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BackgroundA serious complication of cystic echinococcus (CE) is the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the cysts. Free intra-abdominal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs in approximately 3.2% of all cases. Posttraumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liver CE is very rare.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gurkan Ozturk; Bulent Aydinli; M. Ilhan Yildirgan; Mahmut Basoglu; S. Selcuk Atamanalp; K. Yalcin Polat; Fatih Alper; Bulent Guvendi; M. Nuran Akcay; Durkaya Oren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26173142"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biomechanics of Plaque <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Progress, Problems, and New Frontiers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has become identified as a critical step in the evolution of arterial plaques, especially as clinically significant events occur in critical arteries. It has become common in the past dozen years or so to consider which plaques are vulnerable, even though not yet <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. Thrombotic events have remained significant, but in a context where they are seen as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter D. Richardson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19642345"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Late diagnosed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm --a case review].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors describe a case of the patient with late diagnosis of the diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. There was a bowel obstruction found in X-ray scan. After endotracheal intubation was complicated of tension pneumotorax. Laparotomy was found <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm. PMID:19642345</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sim醤ek, V; Treska, V; Klecka, J; Spidlen, V; Vodicka, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2604640"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intracranial aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and ventricular opacification during carotid angiography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of intra-angiography <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an aneurysm, a rarity, is reported. It was confirmed by CT Scan and autopsy. The aneurysm <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> despite taking all precautions recommended in the literature. This complication may be reduced by the use of non-ionic contrast media and slow flow rate injections. PMID:2604640</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jayakumar, P N; Jain, V K; Rao, T V; Arya, B Y</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6577844"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tracheobronchial and oesophageal <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> caused by blunt injury.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the period 1968-1982, six patients with tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> following chest injury were treated in the Royal Newcastle Hospital Intensive Care Unit. In one there was associated oesophageal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The management of these patients is described and recommendations regarding management are made. PMID:6577844</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James, O F; Moore, P G; Gillies, J R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53072436"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristic scales of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from numerical models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerical models of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are used to investigate characteristic length scales and size distributions of repeated earthquakes on vertical, planar fault segments. The models are based on exact solutions of static three-dimensional (3-D) elasticity. Dynamical <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is approximated by allowing the static stress field to expand from slip motions at a single velocity. To show how the vertical fault</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. H. Heimpel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.5421G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process of the 2000 and 2008 謑fus (Iceland) earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of three earthquakes occurred in 2000 (17-06, Mw=6.5 and 21-06, Mw=6.4) and 2008 (29-05, Mw=6.2) in Iceland, with epicentres very close. We have estimated focal mechanism from inversion of body waves at teleseismic distances (30-90) using the algorithm developed by Kikuchi and Kanamori for a kinematic source. In a second step, the slip distribution over the fault-plane has been estimated. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and direction of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have been estimated from Rayleigh waves using the directivity function. The obtained results show similar focal mechanism for the three earthquakes corresponding to strike-slip motion. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane is oriented in all cases in NS direction, which agrees with tectonics of the area. The slip distribution obtained for the three shocks, shows a single process that starts at shallow depth (5 to 7 km), with the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagating to the south and parallel to the surface. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity estimated from body waves and Rayleigh waves is very low: 1.5 km/s. In order to confirm these low values, we have estimated the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process using strong motion data recorded by Icelandic Strong-Motion Network. Accelerograms were converted to displacement by double integration and filtered. We have carried out a kinematic inversion of these data in order to constraint the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Girona, T醨silo; Pro, Carmen; Buforn, Elisa; Peyrat, Sophie; Sigbj鰎nsson, Ragnar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47267936"> <span id="translatedtitle">Survivors of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm: the iceberg's tip</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In four and a half years 25 patients in one community suffered a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm. Eleven died at home, nine died without operation in hospital, and only five had the aneurysm removed. There were four survivors. A further seven patients might have lived had they had a prompt operation. The average operative mortality for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms among series</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R H Armour</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/219465"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computation of initial stage of RBMK reactor fuel channel vessel <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective of this work is estimation of temperature and time characteristics for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the zirconium pipe which is the RBMK reactor fuel channel (FC) vessel under emergencies. As an emergency the zirconium pipe temperature rise process is considered which results in loss of pipe material <span class="hlt">strength</span> properties and pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> under the action of internal pressure P=80MPa. The work was carried out under Task Order 007 of University of California - VNIIEF Subcontract No. 0002P0004-95. The problem formulation is stated in Protocol (Task 3, Appendix 3) of the Russian-American Workshop which was held in December, 1994 in Los Alamos. Physical-mechanical and geometry characteristics of structure elements (FC vessel with graphite ring and graphite slug) are presented by NIKIET. The temperature mode of the structure is taken in conformity with the NIKIET data obtained with the RELAP5/MOD3 code. Numerical simulation of structure element behavior in an emergency is performed using the DRAKON program comlex oriented to solving <span class="hlt">strength</span> problems for complex spatial structures at intense dynamic loading. The {open_quotes}DRAKON{close_quotes} program complex is described and compared with similar western codes in its capabilities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pevnitsky, A.V.; Solovyev, V.P.; Abakumov, A.I. [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4133426"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distal biceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> reconstruction using muscle-splitting double-incision approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">AIM: To evaluate the clinical and functional results after repair of distal biceps tendon tears, following the Morrey抯 modified double-incision approach. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients with distal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of biceps brachii treated between 2003 and 2012 in our Orthopedic Department with muscle-splitting double-incision technique. Outcome measures included the Mayo elbow performance, the DASH questionnaire, patient抯 satisfaction, elbow and forearm motion, grip <span class="hlt">strength</span> and complications occurrence. RESULTS: At an average 18 mo follow-up (range, 7 mo-10 years) the average Mayo elbow performance and DASH score were respectively 97.2 and 4.8. The elbow flexion range was 94%, extension was -2, supination was 93% and pronation 96% compared with the uninjured limb. The mean grip <span class="hlt">strength</span>, expressed as percentage of respective contralateral limb, was 83%. The average patient satisfaction rating on a Likert scale (from 0 to 10) was 9.4. The following complications were observed: 3 cases of heterotopic ossification (6.4%), one (2.1%) re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the tendon at the site of reattachment and 2 cases (4.3%) of posterior interosseous nerve palsy. No complication required further surgical treatment. CONCLUSION: This technique allows an anatomic reattachment of distal biceps tendon at the radial tuberosity providing full functional recovery with low complication rate. PMID:25133147</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tarallo, Luigi; Mugnai, Raffaele; Zambianchi, Francesco; Adani, Roberto; Catani, Fabio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43521615"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Porosity on <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Carbon-Carbon Composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Filament wound\\/CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) carbon-carbon composites have received considerable attention and application within the past few years because of their desirable characteristics such as high heat of ablation, thermal shock resistance, high <span class="hlt">strength</span> at elevated temperatures, and chemical inertness. However, poor mechanical properties in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction have hampered the total effectiveness of these composites in some applications and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gilbert William Brassell; James A. Horak; Barry Lynn Butler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4010050"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contained Left Ventricular Free Wall <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> following Myocardial Infarction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the free wall of the left ventricle occurs in approximately 4% of patients with infarcts and accounts for approximately 20% of the total mortality of patients with myocardial infractions. Relatively few cases are diagnosed before death. Several distinct clinical forms of ventricular free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have been identified. Sudden <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with massive hemorrhage into the pericardium is the most common form; in a third of the cases, the course is subacute with slow and sometimes repetitive hemorrhage into the pericardial cavity. Left ventricular pseudoaneurysms generally occur as a consequence of left ventricular free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> covered by a portion of pericardium, in contrast to a true aneurysm, which is formed of myocardial tissue. Here, we report a case of contained left ventricular free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following myocardial infarction. PMID:24804119</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shiyovich, Arthur; Nesher, Lior</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5528696"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of high-energy pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments: Final report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fracture mechanics and thermal hydraulic evaluations of the EPRI high energy pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments have been carried out. The purpose of these evaluations was to benchmark analytical methods with prototypical pipe leak and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior. Fracture mechanics predictions were made using methods and materials property data available in the literature. Conditions which were predicted to produce a pipe leak did result in a leak while conditions expected to result in pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> did <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Further, system blowdown following breaching of the pipe wall does not appear to influence the pipe leak or <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior except for long axial defects. The thermal hydraulic behavior of the EPRI high energy pipe tests was typical of system blowdowns from an initial subcooled condition. Predictions of vessel depressurization, discharge flow rate from the final crack opening area, and blowdown thrust forces are consistent with observations. 22 refs., 18 figs., 12 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerber, T.L.; Kuo, A.Y.; Copeland, J.F.; Abdollahian, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22007028"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinical features of early myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of acute myocardial infarction.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We assessed the clinical features of patients with myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> within 48 to 72 hours, defined as early myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). Six patients (4 men, 66 13 years) with early myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> were identified from 1252 consecutive patients undergoing PCI for STEMI. We evaluated the degree of microvascular reperfusion using thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) myocardial perfusion (TMP) grade and a resolution of sum of ST-segment elevation in a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). Time from PCI to myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 11 7 hours. All patients showed TMP grade 0 or 1 and an increase in sum of ST-segment elevation after PCI (1.9 0.5 vs 2.5 0.7 mV; P = .032), suggesting severely failed reperfusion at the level of microcirculation as the common feature to develop early myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after PCI for STEMI. PMID:22007028</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suzuki, Makoto; Enomoto, Daijiro; Seike, Fumiyasu; Fujita, Shimpei; Honda, Kazuo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21130725"> <span id="translatedtitle">A novel indirect tensile test method to measure the biaxial tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of concretes and other quasibrittle materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A novel indirect tensile test method, the biaxial flexure test (BFT) method, has been developed to measure the biaxial tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of concretes. The classical modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (MOR) test has been generalized to three dimensions. In this method, we use a circular plate as the new test specimen. This plate is supported by an annular ring. We apply an external load to this specimen through a circular edge. The centers of the specimen, the loading device and the support are identical. The biaxial tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> measured by this new method is about 19% greater than the uniaxial tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> obtained from the classical modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test as reported by other researchers. However, at the same time, we also found that the stochastic deviation of the biaxial tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> is about 63% greater than the uniaxial <span class="hlt">strength</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zi, Goangseup [Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea, University, 5 Ga 1, An-Am Dong, Sung-Buk Gu, Seoul, 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: g-zi@korea.ac.kr; Oh, Hongseob [Department of Civil Engineering, Jinju National University, 150 Chilam Dong, Jinju, Kyongnam, 660-758 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun-Kyu [Department of Civil Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Cheoncheon Dong, Jangan Gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S53D..05G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macroscopic Source Properties from Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Styles in Plastic Media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High stress concentrations at earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts may generate an inelastic off-fault response at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tip, leading to increased energy absorption in the damage zone. Furthermore, the induced asymmetric plastic strain field in in-plane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes may produce bimaterial interfaces that can increase radiation efficiency and reduce frictional dissipation. Off-fault inelasticity thus plays an important role for realistic predictions of near-fault ground motion. Guided by our previous studies in the 2D elastic case, we perform <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics simulations including rate-and-state friction and off-fault plasticity to investigate the effects on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties. We quantitatively analyze macroscopic source properties for different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles, ranging from cracks to pulses and subshear to supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, and their transitional mechanisms. The energy dissipation due to off-fault inelasticity modifies the conditions to obtain each <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style and alters macroscopic source properties. We examine apparent fracture energy, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and healing front speed, peak slip and peak slip velocity, dynamic stress drop and size of the process and plastic zones, slip and plastic seismic moment, and their connection to ground motion. This presentation focuses on the effects of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style and off-fault plasticity on the resulting ground motion patterns, especially on characteristic slip velocity function signatures and resulting seismic moments. We aim at developing scaling rules for equivalent elastic models, as function of background stress and frictional parameters, that may lead to improved "pseudo-dynamic" source parameterizations for ground-motion calculation. Moreover, our simulations provide quantitative relations between off-fault energy dissipation and macroscopic source properties. These relations might provide a self-consistent theoretical framework for the study of the earthquake energy balance based on observable earthquake source parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Mai, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3836932"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of De Novo Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm 8 Days after the Clipping of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rapidly developed de novo aneurysm is very rare. We present a rapidly developed and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> de novo anterior communicating aneurysm 8 days after the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of another aneurysm. This de novo aneurysm was not apparent in the initial 3-dimensional computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography. We reviewed the literature and discussed possible mechanisms for the development of this de novo aneurysm. PMID:24278654</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1646059"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expansion and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of charged microcapsules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the deformations of pH-responsive spherical microcapsules -- micrometer-scale liquid drops surrounded by thin, solid shells -- under the influence of electrostatic forces. When exposed to a large concentration of NaOH, the microcapsules become highly charged, and expand isotropically. We find that the extent of this expansion can be understood by coupling electrostatics with shell theory; moreover, the expansion dynamics is well described by Darcy's law for fluid flow through the microcapsule shell. Unexpectedly, however, below a threshold NaOH concentration, the microcapsules begin to disintegrate, and eventually <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; they then expand non-uniformly, ultimately forming large, jellyfish-like structures. Our results highlight the fascinating range of behaviors exhibited by pH-responsive microcapsules, driven by the interplay between electrostatic and mechanical forces.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Datta, Sujit S; Weitz, David A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1401.8270v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expansion and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of charged microcapsules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the deformations of pH-responsive spherical microcapsules -- micrometer-scale liquid drops surrounded by thin, solid shells -- under the influence of electrostatic forces. When exposed to a large concentration of NaOH, the microcapsules become highly charged, and expand isotropically. We find that the extent of this expansion can be understood by coupling electrostatics with shell theory; moreover, the expansion dynamics is well described by Darcy's law for fluid flow through the microcapsule shell. Unexpectedly, however, below a threshold NaOH concentration, the microcapsules begin to disintegrate, and eventually <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; they then expand non-uniformly, ultimately forming large, jellyfish-like structures. Our results highlight the fascinating range of behaviors exhibited by pH-responsive microcapsules, driven by the interplay between electrostatic and mechanical forces.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sujit S. Datta; Alireza Abbaspourrad; David A. Weitz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800067706&hterms=hanford&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dhanford"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep and stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion and precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The creep and stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of a mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and gamma-prime precipitation strengthened nickel-base alloy (alloy MA 6000E) was studied at intermediate and elevated temperatures. At 760 C, MA 6000E exhibits the high creep <span class="hlt">strength</span> characteristic of nickel-base superalloys and at 1093 C the creep <span class="hlt">strength</span> is superior to other ODS nickel-base alloys. The stress dependence of the creep rate is very sharp at both test temperatures and the apparent creep activation energy measured around 760 C is high, much larger in magnitude than the self-diffusion energy. Stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in this large grain size material is transgranular and crystallographic cracking is observed. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ductility is dependent on creep strain rate, but usually is low. These and accompanying microstructural results are discussed with respect to other ODS alloys and superalloys and the creep behavior is rationalized by invoking a recently-developed resisting stress model of creep in materials strengthened by second phase particles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Mervyn, D. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830002977&hterms=hot+pepper&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dhot%2Bpepper"> <span id="translatedtitle">Alumina fiber <span class="hlt">strength</span> improvement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effective fiber <span class="hlt">strength</span> of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span>. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhRvA..81e3838A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> angular momentum of photons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop the quantum theory of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasiparaxial photon beams in vacuum and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular-momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order <span class="hlt">transverse</span> derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular-momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aiello, Andrea; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760006133&hterms=impact+toughness&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dimpact%2Btoughness"> <span id="translatedtitle">Composite impact <span class="hlt">strength</span> improvement through a fiber/matrix interphase</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Research was conducted to improve the impact <span class="hlt">strength</span> and toughness of fiber/resin composites by means of a fiber coating interphase. Graphite fiber/epoxy resin composites were fabricated with four different fiber coating systems introduced in a matrix-fiber interphase. Two graphite fibers, a high <span class="hlt">strength</span> and a high modulus type, were studied with the following coating systems: chemical vapor deposited boron, electroless nickel, a polyamide-imide resin and a thermoplastic polysulfone resin. Evaluation methods included the following tests: Izod, flexure, shear fracture toughness, longitudinal and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tensile, and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> and longitudinal compression. No desirable changes could be effected with the high <span class="hlt">strength</span> fiber, but significant improvements in impact performance were observed with the polyamide-imide resin coated high modulus fiber with no loss in composite modulus.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Nanot..25K1001M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of carbyne chains in varied chemical environments and structural lengths</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbyne and carbyne-based low-dimensional structures are promising for several applications including ultra-compact circuits and purification devices. Designing any applied carbyne-based structure requires a fundamental understanding of the mechanical <span class="hlt">strength</span> of carbyne chains with different lengths at different temperatures and operating chemical environment. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of carbyne chains with different lengths at different temperatures. A theoretical framework based on statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics results is presented, proving a fast and insightful method for predicting the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force and its physical mechanism. The effect of water molecules interaction is also studied on the mechanical properties and it is shown that both the tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strain are improved by the water interaction. The results of this work can be used for designing and analyzing the robustness and reliability of various carbyne-based materials and applied devices for varies working conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25148690"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of carbyne chains in varied chemical environments and structural lengths.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbyne and carbyne-based low-dimensional structures are promising for several applications including ultra-compact circuits and purification devices. Designing any applied carbyne-based structure requires a fundamental understanding of the mechanical <span class="hlt">strength</span> of carbyne chains with different lengths at different temperatures and operating chemical environment. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of carbyne chains with different lengths at different temperatures. A theoretical framework based on statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics results is presented, proving a fast and insightful method for predicting the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force and its physical mechanism. The effect of water molecules' interaction is also studied on the mechanical properties and it is shown that both the tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strain are improved by the water interaction. The results of this work can be used for designing and analyzing the robustness and reliability of various carbyne-based materials and applied devices for varies working conditions. PMID:25148690</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25036206"> <span id="translatedtitle">Perianeurysmal edema as a predictive sign of aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Subarachnoid hemorrhage following intracranial aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Several factors may affect the probability of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, such as tobacco and alcohol use; size, shape, and location of the aneurysm; presence of intraluminal thrombus; and even the sex of the patient. However, few data correlate such findings with the timing of aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The authors report 2 cases of middle-age women with headache and MRI findings of incidental aneurysms. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of surrounding parenchymal edema, and in one case there was a clear increase in edema during follow-up, suggesting a progressive inflammatory process that culminated with <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These findings raise the possibility that bleb formation and an enlargement of a cerebral aneurysm might be associated with an inflammatory reaction of the aneurysm wall resulting in perianeurysmal edema and subsequent aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. There may be a temporal link between higher degree of edema and higher risk for <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, including risk for immediate <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:25036206</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pahl, Felix Hendrik; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes; Ferreira, Nelson Paes Fortes Diniz; de Macedo, Leonardo Lopes; Brock, Roger Schmidt; de Souza, Val閞ia Cardoso</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMOS11D1674A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Time-dependent <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> on Tsunami Generation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Differential GPS data from the recent Chile 2009 and Japan 2011 seismic events have unveiled complex time-dependent ground motion dynamics during seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Current tsunami modeling techniques usually ignore this time-dependent behavior in tsunami sources by assuming an instantaneous initial deformation field. Initial attempts to include time-dependent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior have motivated scientists to simulate this phenomenon as a series of instantaneous changes in the sea-floor. The present study investigates the effect of dynamic ground motion <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on tsunami generation by including the time-dependent initial conditions in the derivation of the linear shallow-water wave equations. We then study the sensitivity of initial water surface deformation to time-dependent seafloor <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by performing a parametric study of varying speed and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction, while assuming a monotonic deformation from an initial pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> state to a post-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> final state. Numerical results for some selected scenarios are validated by comparing with analytical solutions of the non-homogeneous linear shallow-water equations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arcas, D.; Kanoglu, U.; Moore, C. W.; Aydin, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.S12B1207G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ground Motion Levels From Deeper Versus Shallower Fault <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Somerville (2000) found a systematic difference in the level of earthquake ground motions for three M 7.2-7.6 earthquakes with large surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, and three M 6.7-7.0 earthquakes on buried faults. He found that the acceleration spectra of the smaller events are much larger than the 1994 UCB code spectrum for soil site conditions in the intermediate period range of 0.5-2.5 seconds, but similar to the UCB code spectrum at longer periods. He pointed out that this is contrary to all current earthquake source models and ground motion spectral scaling with magnitude. We have tested the results by Somerville using dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling. We compare a 45o-dipping, 5 km buried thrust fault to a 30o-dipping thrust fault that breaks the surface in a halfspace model with uniform dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> parameters on the faults. The seismic moments of the two dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> amount to 3.4 ? 1019 Nm (M 7.0) in the first, and 5.3 ? 1019 Nm (M 7.1) in the latter case. The increased seismic moment for the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is due to the time-dependent normal-stress interaction of the wavefield with the free surface. We find that, compared to those for the buried <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> shows larger spectral accelerations for periods between 0.33 and 5 seconds. Thus, our dynamic simulations can not confirm the observations from Somerville (2000), and we conclude that his results are not a first-order dynamic effect related to the depth of burial of the fault. Finally, we test whether dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling can explain the differences by in ground motion levels from a combination of smaller fault areas and larger slip velocities for buried faults relative to those for scenarios with surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (Somerville et al., 2002).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gottschaemmer, E.; Olsen, K. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6261G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interaction of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with small-scale heterogeneities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Broadband ground motion simulations, with frequencies up to 10Hz, are important for engineering purposes, in particular for seismic hazard assessment for critical facilities. One problem in such simulations is the generation of high frequency radiation emitted during the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. Ad-hoc kinematic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characterizations can be tweaked through empirical models to radiate over the desired frequency range, but their physical consistency remains questionable. In contrast, for physically self-consistent dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling, controlled by friction, material parameters and the adopted physical laws, the mechanism that may lead to appropriate high-frequency radiation require heterogeneity in friction, stress, or fault geometry (or even all three quantities) at unknown but small length scales. Dunham at al. (2011) studied dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on rough faults in 2D, and described how fault roughness excites high-frequency radiation. In our study, we focus on the interaction of the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with small-scale heterogeneities on planar faults in 3D. We study effects of the interaction of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with 1) small-scale heterogeneities in the medium (that is, randomized 3D wave speed and density variations), and 2) small-scale heterogeneities in the frictional parameters. Our numerical results show significant variations in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity or peak slip velocity if small-scale heterogeneities are present. This indicates that the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is sensitive to both types of spatial inhomogeneity. At the same time we observe that the resulting near-source seismic wave fields are not very sensitive to these <span class="hlt">rupture</span> variations, indicating that wavefront healing effects may "simplify" the complex seismic radiation once the waves propagated several wave-lengths away from the fault.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galis, Martin; Mai, P. Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4261674"> <span id="translatedtitle">Repairing an Achilles Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Using the Partial Lindholm Technique Augmented by the Plantaris Tendon: A Case Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many techniques have been described for the treatment of an acute achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, but there is unfortunately no agreement between orthopedic surgeons regarding the best repair technique and post-treatment rehabilitation protocol. Overall, the surgical methods can be classified as either an open procedure or as a percutaneous procedure. While numerous techniques have been described for open surgical procedures, the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the repaired tendon, the healing time, the rerupture rates, and the changes in the range of motion due to adhesions may be the ultimate determining factors of the success of the procedure. In this case study, we report the results of treating a 35-year-old patient who suffered an achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by combining two recently described surgical methods into a novel repair technique.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Toker, Serdar; Kilincoglu, Volkan; Yurtgun, M.Fahri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.me.sc.edu/Research/lamss/pdf/CONFERENCES/C17%20AIAA-95-1212%2082825-122.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">INFLUENCE OF FIBER COATING AND INTERPHASE ON THE DESIGN OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITE <span class="hlt">STRENGTH</span> -ANALYTICAL PREDICTIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">INFLUENCE OF FIBER COATING AND INTERPHASE ON THE DESIGN OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITE <span class="hlt">STRENGTH</span> thermoplastic fiber coatings on the composite <span class="hlt">strength</span> under tension, compression, shear, <span class="hlt">transverse</span> to induce tough behavior in carbon fiber epoxy composites and to increase their durability. The purpose</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giurgiutiu, Victor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1116343"> <span id="translatedtitle">QCD Evolution of Helicity and <span class="hlt">Transversity</span> TMDs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and <span class="hlt">transversity</span> parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Prokudin, Alexei [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21599415"> <span id="translatedtitle">Minimum energy path to membrane pore formation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We combine dynamic self-consistent field theory with the string method to calculate the minimum energy path to membrane pore formation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In the regime where nucleation can occur on experimentally relevant time scales, the structure of the critical nucleus is between a solvophilic stalk and a locally thinned membrane. Classical nucleation theory fails to capture these molecular details and significantly overestimates the free energy barrier. Our results suggest that thermally nucleated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be an important factor for the low <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strains observed in lipid membranes. PMID:21599415</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ting, Christina L; Appel, Daniel; Wang, Zhen-Gang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3241991"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gastric <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Necrosis in Prader-Willi Syndrome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hyperphagia and obesity are common features in individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Demographic and cause of death data from individuals with PWS were obtained through a national support organization. Four reports of unexpected mortality due to gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and necrosis were found in 152 reported deaths, accounting for 3% of the causes of mortality. Four additional individuals were suspected to have gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Vomiting and abdominal pain, although rare in PWS, were frequent findings in this cohort. The physician should consider an emergent evaluation for gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and necrosis in individuals with PWS who present with vomiting and abdominal pain. PMID:17667731</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stevenson, David A.; Heinemann, Janalee; Angulo, Moris; Butler, Merlin G.; Loker, Jim; Rupe, Norma; Kendell, Patrick; Cassidy, Suzanne B.; Scheimann, Ann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984PhDT.........3Q"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Effects of Friction on the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Earthquake Faults</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The role of friction in the earthquake fault process is studied in this thesis. The frictional breakage criterion on the fault surface is simple. Portions of the fault at rest are held at rest by a static frictional stress. If the local stress at a point on the fault exceeds a static frictional limit, that portion of the fault yields, and subsequent motion is retarded by a dynamic frictional stress. The local, finite, and non-linear character of the boundary conditions on the fault require a model based on finite differences. The model is two-dimensional and scalar, so that calculations may be minimized and the model retain physical meaning. The processes and effects of the genesis and cessation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are not considered. A "standard" model with given grid spacing and fixed initial conditions is used for the bulk of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations. The parameter space of two dimensionless ratios R and S is investigated. R is the ratio of the static frictional limit to the elasticity of the medium and S is the ratio of the difference in the static frictional limit and the applied tectonic stress to the stress drop. It is found that the particle velocities scale with R, and that there are two distinct modes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> depending on the value of S. For S > S(,c) (where 2.0 < S(,c) < 2.25), the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is stick-slip, and for S < S(,c) the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is smooth. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed is found to be a monotonically decreasing function of S, and has a subsonic/supersonic transition around S(,c). The energy flow in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> region is illustrated for both modes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and found to be fundamentally different for the two <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes. Solitary waves pinned to the fault surface are observed in the stick-slip case. The grid spacing and initial conditions are altered to test the model-dependence of the results. It is found that while the details of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are model-dependent, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and S(,c) are model-independent, suggesting these results reflect real physical phenomena. These results may help explain variable <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and multiple events in large earthquakes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quist, Gregory Matthew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17143686"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous "spaghetti" flexor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in the rheumatoid wrist.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 54-year-old woman who had been treated for rheumatoid arthritis for 12 years developed spontaneous multiple flexor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> during a 5-month period. Radiography revealed volar subluxation of the lunate bone. Surgery was performed 5 months after the first onset of tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. All eight flexors, except the flexor pollicis longus tendons, had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, and the damage resembled spaghetti. Four flexor digitorum profundus tendons were reconstructed by bridge graft using their respective sublimis tendons. Wrist joint fusion and tenolysis were performed 3 months after the first operation. Each finger achieved a good range of motion 2 years and 6 months after the second operation. PMID:17143686</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hashizume, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keiichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Inoue, Hajime</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24854899"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a single liquid aluminium alloy film.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present study is based on the idea of understanding the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of films in metal foams by studying free standing metallic films as a model system. Liquid dynamics, the velocity of the <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> material as well as the behaviour of ceramic particles inside the melt were analysed optically ex situ and by synchrotron X-ray radiography in situ. It was found that the resistance of films to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is mainly based on the interaction between solid particles and an immobile oxide skin, the formation of which depends on the oxygen content of the surrounding atmosphere and the presence of magnesium. PMID:24854899</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heim, K; Garc韆-Moreno, F; Vinod Kumar, G S; Rack, A; Banhart, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3059863"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isokinetic muscle assessment after treatment of pectoralis major muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> using surgical or non-surgical procedures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">INTRODUCTION: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the pectoralis major muscle appears to be increasing in athletes. However, the optimal treatment strategy has not yet been established. OBJECTIVES: To compare the isokinetic shoulder performance after surgical treatment to that after non-surgical treatment for pectoralis major muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. METHODS: We assessed 33 pectoralis major muscle <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> (18 treated non-surgically and 15 treated surgically). Horizontal abduction and adduction as well as external and internal rotation at 60 and 120燿egrees/s were tested in both upper limbs. Peak torque, total work, contralateral deficiency, and the peak torque agonist-to-antagonist ratio were measured. RESULTS: Contralateral muscular deficiency did not differ between the surgical and non-surgical treatment modalities. However, the surgical group presented twice the number of athletes with clinically acceptable contralateral deficiency (<20%) for internal rotators compared to the non-surgical group. The peak torque ratio between the external and internal rotator muscles revealed a similar deficit of the external rotation in both groups and on both sides (surgical, 61.60% and 57.80% and non-surgical, 62.06% and 54.06%, for the dominant and non-dominant sides, respectively). The peak torque ratio revealed that the horizontal adduction muscles on the injured side showed similar weakness in both groups (surgical, 86.27%; non-surgical, 98.61%). CONCLUSIONS: This study included the largest single series of athletes reported to date for this type of injury. A comparative analysis of muscular <span class="hlt">strength</span> and balance showed no differences between the treatment modalities for pectoralis major muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. However, the number of significant clinical deficiencies was lower in the surgical group than in the non-surgical group, and both treatment modalities require greater attention to the rehabilitation process, especially for the recovery of muscle <span class="hlt">strength</span> and balance. PMID:21484052</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fleury, Anna Maria; da Silva, Antonio Carlos; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; dos Santos Andrade, Marilia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhyC..494..163G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delamination behaviour of GdBCO coated conductor tapes under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tension</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electromechanical property behaviour of 2G coated conductor (CC) tapes fabricated by multi-layer deposition process both in the in-plane and <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction should be understood. The CC tapes are used in the fabrication of epoxy resin-impregnated coils. In such case, the Lorentz force due to the high magnetic field applied as well as the thermal stress due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) among constituent layers during cooling to cryogenic temperature will induce <span class="hlt">transversely</span> applied load to the surface of CC tapes in coils. Hence, the CC tape should have a good mechanical property in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction in order to maintain its superior performance under magnetic field. In this study, a test frame which gives precisely aligned <span class="hlt">transverse</span> load was devised. Using the fixture, the delamination behaviours including the delamination <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the GdBCO CC tapes under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> tensile loading were investigated. Large variation on the delamination <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the CC tapes was recorded and might have resulted from the slit edge effect and the inhomogeneity of the CC tapes. The Ic degradation behaviour under <span class="hlt">transverse</span> load was related to the location where delamination occurred in the sample.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gorospe, A.; Nisay, A.; Dizon, J. R.; Shin, H. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S51B2375M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Synchronicity in Complex Fault Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While most investigators would agree that the timing of large earthquakes within a fault system depends on stress-mediated interactions among its elements, much of the debate relevant to time-dependent forecasting has been centered on single-fault concepts, such as characteristic earthquake behavior. We propose to broaden this discussion by quantifying the multi-fault concept of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> synchronicity. We consider a finite set of small, fault-spanning volumes {Vk} within a fault system of arbitrary (fractal) complexity. We let Ck be the catalog of length tmax comprising Nk discrete times {ti(k)} that mark when the kth volume participates in a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of magnitude > M. The main object of our analysis is the complete set of event time differences {?ij(kk') = ti(k) - tj(k')}, which we take to be a random process with an expected density function ?kk'(t). When k = k', we call this function the auto-catalog density function (ACDF); when k ? k', we call it the cross-catalog density function (CCDF). The roles of the ACDF and CCDF in synchronicity theory are similar to those of autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions in time-series analysis. For a renewal process, the ACDF can be written in terms of convolutions of the interevent-time distribution, and many of its properties (e.g., large-t asymptote) can be derived analytically. The interesting information in the CCDF, like that in the ACDF, is concentrated near t = 0. If two catalogs are completely asynchronous, the CCDF collapses to an asymptote given by the harmonic mean of the ACDF asymptotes. Synchronicity can therefore be characterized by the variability of the CCDF about this asymptote. The brevity of instrumental catalogs makes the identification of synchronicity at large M difficult, but we will illustrate potentially interesting behaviors through the analysis of a million-year California catalog generated by the earthquake simulator, RSQSim (Deiterich & Richards-Dinger, 2010), which we sampled at a dozen fault-spanning volumes. At the magnitude threshold M = 7, the ACDF can be well fit by renewal models with fairly small aperiodicity parameters (? < 0.2) for all fault volumes but one (on the San Jacinto fault). At interseismic (Reid) time scales, we observe pairs of fault segments that are tightly locked, such as the Cholame and Carrizo sections of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), where the CCDF and two ACDFs are nearly equal; segments out of phase (Carrizo-SAF/Coachella-SAF and Coachella-SAF/San Jacinto), where the CCDF variation is an odd function of time; and segments where events are in phase with integer ratios of recurrence times (2:1 synchronicity of Coachella-SAF/Mojave-SAF and Carrizo-SAF/Mojave-SAF). At near-seismic (Omori) time scales, we observe various modes of clustering, triggering, and shadowing in RSQSim catalogs; e.g., events on Mojave-SAF trigger Garlock events, and events on Coachella-SAF shut down events on San Jacinto. Therefore, despite its geometrical complexity and multiplicity of time scales, the RSQSim model of the San Andreas fault system exhibits a variety of synchronous behaviors that increase the predictability of large <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> within the system. A key question for earthquake forecasting is whether the real San Andreas system is equally, or much less, synchronous.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Milner, K. R.; Jordan, T. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70016332"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process of a multiple main shock sequence: analysis of teleseismic, local and field observations of the Tennant Creek, Australia, earthquakes of January 22, 1988</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On January 22, 1988, three large intraplate earthquakes (with MS 6.3, 6.4 and 6.7) occurred within a 12-hour period near Tennant Creek, Australia. Broadband displacement and velocity records of body waves from teleseismically recorded data are analyzed to determine source mechanisms, depths, and complexity of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of each of the three main shocks. Hypocenters of an additional 150 foreshocks and aftershocks constrained by local arrival time data and field observations of surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are used to complement the source characteristics of the main shocks. The interpretation of the combined data sets suggests that the overall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process involved unusually complicated stress release. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> characteristics suggest that substantial slow slip occurred on each of the three fault interfaces that was not accompanied by major energy release. Variation of focal depth and the strong increase of moment and radiated energy with each main shock imply that lateral variations of <span class="hlt">strength</span> were more important than vertical gradients of shear stress in controlling the progression of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. -from Authors</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Choy, G.L.; Bowman, J.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.H13F1045G"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Controllable Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Experiment on the Homestake Fault</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fault-slip is typically simulated in the laboratory at the cm-to-dm scale. Laboratory results are then up-scaled by orders of magnitude to understand faulting and earthquakes processes. We suggest an experimental approach to reactivate faults in-situ at scales ~10-100 m using thermal techniques and fluid injection to modify in situ stresses and the fault <span class="hlt">strength</span> to the point where the rock fails. Mines where the modified in-situ stresses are sufficient to drive faulting, present an opportunity to conduct such experiments. During our recent field work in the former Homestake gold mine in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota, we found a large fault present on multiple mine levels. The fault is subparallel to the local foliation in the Poorman formation, a Proterozoic metamorphic rock deformed into regional-scale folds with axes plunging ~40 to the SSE. The fault extends at least 1.5 km along strike and dip, with a center ~1.5 km deep. It strikes ~320-340 N, dips ~45-70 NE, and is recognized by a ~0.3-0.5 m thick distinct gouge that contains crushed host rock and black material that appears to be graphite. Although we could not find clear evidence for fault displacement, secondary features suggest that it is a normal fault. The size and distinct structure of this fault make it a promising target for in-situ experimentation of fault <span class="hlt">strength</span>, hydrological properties, and slip nucleation processes. Most earthquakes are thought to be the result of unstable slip on existing faults, Activation of the Homestake fault in response to the controlled fluid injection and thermally changing background stresses is likely to be localized on a crack-like patch. Slow patch propagation, moderated by the injection rate and the rate of change of the background stresses, may become unstable, leading to the nucleation of a small earthquake (dynamic) <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This controlled instability is intimately related to the dependence of the fault <span class="hlt">strength</span> on the slip process and has been analyzed for the Homestake fault conditions. Scale analyses indicate that this transition occurs for the nucleation patch size ~1 m. This represents a fundamental limitation for laboratory experiments, where the induced dynamic patch could be tractable, and necessitates larger scale field tests ~10-100 m. The ongoing dewatering is expected to affect displacements in the fault vicinity. This poroelastic effect can be used to better characterize the fault. Nucleation, propagation, and arrest of dynamic fault slip is governed by fluid overpressure source, diffusion, and the magnitude of the background loading in relation to the peak and residual <span class="hlt">strength</span> in the fault zone at the ambient pore pressure level. More information on in-situ stresses than currently available is required to evaluate the fault state. Yet, initial modeling suggests that a suitable place for such an experiment is where the Homestake fault intersects the 4850-ft mine level or at greater depths.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Germanovich, L. N.; Murdoch, L. C.; Garagash, D.; Reches, Z.; Martel, S. J.; Gwaba, D.; Elsworth, D.; Lowell, R. P.; Onstott, T. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56014119"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geomorphic Signals for Preferred Propagation Direction of Earthquake <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> on North Anatolian Fault System, TURKEY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The North Anatolian Fault <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> in a sequence of large earthquakes between 1939 and 1999, generally progressing from east to west. The 1943 and 1944 <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagated unilateraly in opposite directions. Preliminary analysis of the geomorphology along these <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> shows distinct differences that may reflect repeated <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> with similar propagation directions. A persistent preferred propagation direction should produce asymmetric damage</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Yildirim; O. Dor; T. Rockwell; O. Emre; Y. Ben-Zion; M. Sisk; T. Duman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4236745"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between High-frequency Radiation and Asperity <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span>, Revealed by Hybrid Back-projection with a Non-planar Fault Model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-frequency seismic waves are generated by abrupt changes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and slip-rate during an earthquake. Therefore, analysis of high-frequency waves is crucial to understanding the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. Here, we developed a hybrid back-projection method that considers variations in focal mechanisms by introducing a non-planar fault model that reflects the subducting slab geometry. We applied it to teleseismic P-waveforms of the Mw 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake to estimate the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.52.0?Hz) radiation. By comparing the result with the coseismic slip distribution obtained by waveform inversion, we found that strong high-frequency radiation can precede and may trigger a large asperity <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Moreover, in between the large slip events, high-frequency radiation of intermediate <span class="hlt">strength</span> was concentrated along the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front. This distribution suggests that by bridging the two large slips, this intermediate-<span class="hlt">strength</span> high-frequency radiation might play a key role in the interaction of the large slip events. PMID:25406638</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Hirano, Shiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25406638"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between High-frequency Radiation and Asperity <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span>, Revealed by Hybrid Back-projection with a Non-planar Fault Model.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-frequency seismic waves are generated by abrupt changes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and slip-rate during an earthquake. Therefore, analysis of high-frequency waves is crucial to understanding the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. Here, we developed a hybrid back-projection method that considers variations in focal mechanisms by introducing a non-planar fault model that reflects the subducting slab geometry. We applied it to teleseismic P-waveforms of the Mw 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake to estimate the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.5-2.0?Hz) radiation. By comparing the result with the coseismic slip distribution obtained by waveform inversion, we found that strong high-frequency radiation can precede and may trigger a large asperity <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Moreover, in between the large slip events, high-frequency radiation of intermediate <span class="hlt">strength</span> was concentrated along the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front. This distribution suggests that by bridging the two large slips, this intermediate-<span class="hlt">strength</span> high-frequency radiation might play a key role in the interaction of the large slip events. PMID:25406638</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Hirano, Shiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/891912"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> ECHO MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular they examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">FISCHER, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-09-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997JAP....81.3803P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> susceptibility of magnetic inks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">transverse</span> susceptibility, ?t, of a suspension of single-domain ferromagnetic particles in a viscous fluid is calculated. The yield stress is introduced to describe the structure formation. Magnetic interactions are taken into account through the mean-field model. Calculations are compared to experiments in which a dc field, H, is slowly increased. The experiments were performed on a model iron oxide dispersion. The function ?t(H) goes through a maximum which decreases and shifts to a higher field when the pigment concentration is increased. This is attributed to an increase of the yield stress and the mean-field interaction parameter in our model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Potanin, Andrei A.; Shrauti, Suresh M.; Arnold, David W.; Lane, Alan M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.U21B..02B"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 2010 Chile Earthquake - Variations in the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Mode</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The magnitude 8.8, February 27, 2010 Chile, that occurred along the south central Nazca/South American plate boundary was an underthrusting event with an aftershock length of ~600 km along strike, with a bi-lateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that started near Cobquecura and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> north to Valparaiso and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> 100 km south of Concepcion. This segment of the south central coast of Chile has a long record of damaging underthrusting earthquakes dating back to 1570 that based on intensity and tsunami reports show variations in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode between earthquake cycles. In light of the recent 2010 Chile earthquake we review the historic earthquake record along this segment of the subduction zone and compare it to the slip distribution determined during the 2010 mainshock. The 2010 earthquake appears to have failed at least 2 segments of the plate boundary that failed previously in multiple earthquakes with different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lengths. The southern region of the 2010 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> last failed in 1835, 1751, 1657 and 1570. The northern segment of the 2010 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> last failed in 1928 (Ms=8.0), 1751, and in 1730. The 1751 earthquake probably <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> both the 1928 and 1835 earthquake zones based on intensities and tsunami reports. The 1751 earthquake had intensity 9 in Concepcion, Talcahuano, Chillan, and Talca, and intensity 6 at Valparaiso (Askew and Algermissen, 1985). The northern termination of the 2010 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> appears to end near 33.5癝 to ~34癝 which coincides with the southern portion of the 1985 (Mw=8.0) zone that previously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> in 1906 (Ms=8.4). Modeling of teleseismic P, SH and R1 waveforms show a bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with the largest patch of slip ~ 100 km north and updip of the epicenter with smaller patches of slip to the south and down dip of the epicenter (Lay et al., 2010). As expected the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is difficult to constrain with teleseismic data. Recent results from back projecting the P-waves recorded using Transportable Array data in the U.S. also show a bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with the location of the highest slip region north of the epicenter. All of these methods show significant mainshock slip in the 1928 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone and lesser amounts of slip in the part of the 1835 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone that did not fail in 1928, despite the longer time since 1835. The aftershocks of the 2010 and 1985 earthquakes overlap but the high slip region of the 2010 earthquakes does not appear to overlap significantly with the high slip region of the 1985 earthquake and the latter may have contributed to the termination of the 2010 earthquake. The 2010 Chile earthquake segment along the south central Chile subduction shows large variations in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode in previous earthquakes. What controls the size of the earthquake (i.e. how many segments fail in a given event) is still uncertain but important in understanding the potential hazard of the Chile subduction zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beck, S. L.; Comte, D.; Lay, T.; Kiser, E.; Ishii, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9211611"> <span id="translatedtitle">Etiology and pathophysiology of tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in sports.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Of all spontaneous tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, complete Achilles tendon tears are most closely associated with sports activities (1-3). Sch鰊bauer (3) reported that 75% of all <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the Achilles tendon are related to sports. In Plecko & Passl (2) the number was 60%. In our material of 430 cases, the number of sports-related Achilles <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> was very similar (62%), while only 2% of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of other tendons were sports-related (P < 0.001) (1). Also, the majority of Achilles reruptures occurred in sports. The <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred most often in soccer (34%), track and field (16%) and basketball (14%). The distribution of Achilles <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> according to different sports varies considerably from country to country, according to the national sport traditions. For example, in northern and middle Europe, soccer, tennis, track and field, indoor ball games, downhill skiing, and gymnastics are the most common; and in North America, football, basketball, baseball, tennis and downhill skiing dominate the statistics (1, 2, 4). In sports, some Achilles <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are not spontaneous or degeneration-induced but may occur as a consequence of the remarkably high forces that are involved in the performance (2). <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> in the high jump or triple jump are good examples. In such cases, failure in the neuromuscular protective mechanisms due to fatigue or disturbed co-ordination can frequently be found. The spontaneous complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the supraspinatus tendon of the rotator cuff does not occur very frequently in sports. Those sports that include high-energy throwing movements, such as American and Finnish baseball, American football, rugby and discuss and javelin throwing, may, however, produce this injury. Partial tears and inflammations of the rotator cuff complex are much more frequent in throwing sports. The complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the proximal long head of the biceps brachii tendon is rare among competitive and recreational athletes. In our material, under 2% of these <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were associated with sports activities (5). The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (avulsion) of the distal tendon of the biceps muscle is rare. In sports, gymnastics, body building and weight lifting have been said to be able to produce this injury (6). In general, complete <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the quadriceps tendon and the patellar tendon occur most often in older individuals. In our study, the mean age of these patients was 65 years (5). However, these injuries do also occur in younger age groups, especially in athletes. In athletes, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> most frequently occurs in high-power sports events, such as high jump, basketball and weight lifting, at the age of 15-30 years. A chronic-patellar apicitis (jumper's knee) may predispose <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the tendon (7). As is the case with the rotator cuff complex, overuse inflammation and partial tears of the quadriceps and patellar tendons are one of the most characteristic athletic injuries. Complete spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of other tendons in sports are rare, although the literature does provide case studies from almost every tendon the human body possesses (8-18). PMID:9211611</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kannus, P; Natri, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20538732"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stent grafting a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> para-anastomotic iliac aneurysm.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this case report, we present an 83-year-old man with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> para-anastomotic aneurysm who underwent a stent graft in spite of his condition of acute shock. Our patient presented at the emergency room (ER) with acute abdominal pain. Shortly after arrival, he collapsed because of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> para-anastomotic aneurysm after the previous aorto-bi-iliac aneurysm repair in 1984. He was charged with a cardiac history that made him unsuitable for surgery. We chose for resuscitation followed by inflation of an aortic balloon that made the patient hemodynamically stable. He then underwent iliac stent grafting and was discharged from the hospital at 22 days after the procedure. The mortality rate of patients with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> para-anastomotic aortic aneurysm arriving at hospital ranges from 32% to 70%. Endovascular stent placement for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> iliac aneurysmal arteries can be a safe treatment in selected patients. PMID:20538732</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Menke, Vivianda; Castenmiller, Peter H; Versteijlen, Rob J; Van der Laan, Lijckle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4320801"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a Mesodiverticular Band to a Meckel's Diverticulum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band has not previously been reported in the clinical literature. We are reporting a case of hemoperitoneum in a 51-year-old male after an aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band. This case demonstrates that in rare instances, a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the mesodiverticular band leading to Meckel's diverticulum can lead to significant hemoperitoneum. This is usually caused by a traumatic injury but in our case was apparently caused by an aneurysm of the mesodiverticular artery. Patients with known Meckel's diverticula should be aware of the possibility of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as should clinicians treating those with a history of this usually benign congenital abnormality. Rapid surgical intervention is necessary to repair the source of bleeding, as massive blood loss was encountered in this case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sommerhalder, Christian; Fretwell, Kenneth R.; Salzler, Gregory G.; Creasy, John M.; Robitsek, R. Jonathan; Schubl, Sebastian D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16119282"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment options for patella tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, Part I: Acute.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Patella tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a debilitating injury. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent retraction of the patella with subsequent adhesions and quadriceps contractures. In a young patient with an acute <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, primary repair usually is possible with various methods described to protect the repair. In acute injuries with inadequate tissue, augmentation with hamstring tendons or allograft generally is necessary. Because of the different types of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the possibility for poor quality tissue, the surgeon should always be prepared to combine different techniques to obtain tthe best repair. Continuous passive motion generally can be initiated early with a secure repair. In patients with a patella tendon <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> that is promptly diagnosed, securely repaired, and followed closely through their rehabilitation, good results can be expected. PMID:16119282</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greis, Patrick E; Holmstrom, Michael C; Lahav, Amit</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011TRACE..10..383O"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Cylindrical Ice Model and Tuna Fish during Freezing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The gape and heave produced on the surface of tuna fish during freezing were confirmed by <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of cylindrical type ice model. The results of experiment were shown as summarized below; 1) in case of restraining the progress of ice formation of model during freezing,any <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was produced at not only slow freezing but also quick freezing. It was the same as tuna fish; 2) in case of closing surface of ice model covered perfectly by outside shell ice during slow freezing,it was not <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> at not only ice model but also tuna fish. On the contrary it was cracked at quick freezing not only ice model but also tuna fish; 3) therefore it was confirmed that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of tuna fish during freezing had been easy to produce at quick freezing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ogawa, Yutaka; Uno, Mitsuyo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6709557"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occult <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen--two unusual clinical presentations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Case reports of two patients with occult <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the spleen are presented. In one, blunt trauma appeared to involve only the neck and upper chest, resulting in two distinct tracheal injuries and no clinical indication of abdominal injury. On the 5th day after injury this patient strangulated an indirect inguinal hernia. At subsequent surgery, a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen was also found. The second patient gave no history of trauma and presented in cardiac and respiratory failure after a 2-month illness characterized by abdominal pain. On clinical and biochemical assessments, he was considered to have pancreatitis complicated by pseudocyst formation. Laparotomy revealed intra-abdominal haemorrhage and a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen. The diagnosis and complications of occult <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen are discussed. PMID:6709557</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moore, P G; Gillies, J G; James, O F; Saltos, N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/59743"> <span id="translatedtitle">Controls on earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and triggering mechanisms in subduction zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Large earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and triggering mechanisms that drive seismicity in subduction zones are investigated in this thesis using a combination of earthquake observations, statistical and physical modeling. A comparison ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Llenos, Andrea Lesley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17294088"> <span id="translatedtitle">Capillary cohesion and mechanical <span class="hlt">strength</span> of polydisperse granular materials.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of wet polydisperse granular media. Capillary bonding between two grains of unequal diameters is described by a realistic force law implemented in a molecular-dynamics algorithm together with a protocol for the distribution of water in the bulk. Axial-compression tests are simulated for granular samples at different levels of water content, and compared to experiments performed in similar conditions. We find good agreement between numerical and experimental data in terms of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> as a function of water content. Our results show the importance of the distribution of water for the mechanical behaviour. PMID:17294088</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Souli, F; El Youssoufi, M S; Cherblanc, F; Saix, C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.S21B0576B"> <span id="translatedtitle">3D Dynamic Crack <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> by a Finite Volume Method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a 3D spontaneous crack of arbitrary shape has been investigated using a Finite Volume (FV) approach. The full domain is decomposed in tetrahedra while the surface on which the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is supposed to take place is discretized with triangles which are faces of tetrahedra. Because of this meshing strategy, any shape of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> surface could be designed and is performed once before simulations start. First of all, the elastodynamic equations are described into a pseudo-conservative form for easy application of the FV discretisation. Explicit boundary conditions are given using criteria based on the conservation of discrete energy through the crack surface. Using a stress-threshold criterion, these conditions specify fluxes through those triangles which have suffered <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. On these broken surfaces, stress follows A linear slip-weakening law although other friction laws can be implemented as well. Numerical solutions on a planar fault are achieved for the problem version 3 of the SCEC community dynamic-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> benchmark exercise (Harris and Archuleta, 2004) and compared with those provided by a Finite Difference (FD) technique (Day et al, 2005). Another benchmark problem is also tackled involving a nonplanar curved fault (Cruz-Atienza et al, 2007). Solutions for this difficult exercise are compared with those computed with a Boundary Integral (BI) method (Aochi et al, 2000). In both benchmarck problems, comparisons show that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts are well modelled with a slight delay in time especially along the antiplane direction related to the low-order interpolation of the FV approach which requires further mesh refinement or/and an higher-order interpolation strategy as for Galerkin Discontinuous approach. Slip-rate and shear stress amplitudes are well modelled as well as stopping phases and stress overshoots. We expect this method, which is well adapted to multi-preocessor parallel computing to be competitive with others for solving large scale dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> scenario of seismic sources in the near future. References : Aochi, H., E. Fukuyama and M. Matsuura, 2000. Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation of a non-planar fault in 3D elastic medium, PAGEOPH, 157, 2003-2027. Cruz-Atienza, V.M., J. Virieux, J. and H. Aochi, 3D finite-difference dynamic-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling along nonplanar faults, Geophysics, 72, SM123-SM137. Day, S. M., L.A. Dalguer, N. Lapusta and Y. Liu, 2005, Comparison of finite difference and boundary integral solutions to three-dimensional spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: Journal of Geophysical Research, 110, B12307, http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2005JB003813. Harris, R. A. and R. J. Archuleta, 2004, Earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics: Comparing the numerical simulation methods: EOS, 85, 321.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ben Jemaa, M.; Glinsky-Olivier, N.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Virieux, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4255892"> <span id="translatedtitle">Soft, Brown <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Clinical Signs and Symptoms Associated with <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> PIP Breast Implants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Preoperative signs and symptoms of patients with Poly Implant Prothese (PIP) implants could be predictive of device failure. Based on clinical observation and intraoperative findings 4 hypotheses were raised: (1) Preoperative clinical signs including acquired asymmetry, breast enlargement, fullness of the lower pole, decreased mound projection, and change in breast consistency could be indicative of implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. (2) Device failure correlates with a low preoperative Baker grade of capsule. (3) Brown-stained implants are more prone to implant failure. (4) The brown gel could be indicative of iodine ingression through a substandard elastomer shell. Methods: Preoperative clinical signs were compared with intraoperative findings for 27 patients undergoing PIP implant explantation. Results: Acquired asymmetry (P = 0.0003), breast enlargement (P = 0.0002), fuller lower pole (P < 0.0001), and loss of lateral projection (P < 0.0001) were all significantly predictive of device failure. Capsule Baker grade was lower preoperatively for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> implants. The lack of palpable and visible preoperative capsular contracture could be secondary to the elastic nature of the capsular tissue found. Brown implants failed significantly more often than white implants. Analysis of brown gel revealed the presence of iodine, suggesting povidone iodine ingression at implantation. Conclusions: Preoperative signs can be predictive of PIP implant failure. Brown-stained implants are more prone to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The presence of iodine in the gel suggests unacceptable permeability of the shell early in the implant抯 life span. A noninvasive screening test to detect brown implants in situ could help identify implants at risk of failure in those who elect to keep their implants. PMID:25506532</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duncan, Robert T.; Feig, Christine; Reintals, Michelle; Hill, Sarah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930090539&hterms=Pierce&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DPierce%2BB"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relation of Engine Turbine-blade Life to Stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> Properties of the Alloys, Stellite 21, Hastelloy B, Cast S-816, Forged S-816, X-40, Nimonic 80, Refractaloy 26, N-155, and Inconel X</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An investigation was conducted to relate the engine performance of the heat-resistant alloys, Stellite 21, Hastelloy B, cast S-816, forged S-816, X-40, Nimonic 80, Refractory 26, N-155, and Iconel X to their stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties. The engine test consisted of the repetition of a 20-minute cycle, 15 minutes at rated speed and approximately 5 minutes at idle. The results of the investigation indicated a direct correlation between stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> life and blade life for the relatively low-<span class="hlt">strength</span> alloys. The stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> life and blade life for the relatively high-<span class="hlt">strength</span> alloys did not correlate because of the effects of the vibratory stresses and the corrosive-gas atmosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Garrett, F B; Yaker, C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1951-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3884862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Ureteral <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Diagnosis and Treatment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the urinary collecting system associated with perinephric or retroperitoneal extravasation of the urine is an unusual condition and it is commonly associated with renal obstructing disease. Perforation could occur at any level from the calix to the bladder but it is usually seen at the fornices and upper ureter. It may lead to several serious consequences including urinoma, abscess formation, urosepsis, infection, and subsequent irreversible renal impairment. We report a case of a 69-year-old woman who presented at the emergency department of our institution with severe abdominal pain. Due to symptomatology worsening, complete laboratory evaluation was performed and the patient underwent abdominal contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) evaluation which showed contrast agent extravasation outside the excretory system without any evidence of renal calculi at basal acquisition. It was decided to perform a double-J stent placement which was followed by complete healing of the ureter and its removal was performed 8 weeks later. Diagnosis and therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:24455381</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pampana, E.; Altobelli, S.; Morini, M.; Ricci, A.; D'Onofrio, S.; Simonetti, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3388513"> <span id="translatedtitle">Size-Dependent <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Strain of Elastically Stretchable Metal Conductors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experiments show that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strain of gold conductors on elastomers decreases as the conductors are made long and narrow. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> is caused by the irreversible coalescence of microcracks into one long crack. A mechanics model identifies a critical crack length ?cr, above which the long crack propagates across the entire conductor width. ?cr depends on the fracture toughness of the gold film and the width of the conductor. The model provides guidance for the design of highly stretchable conductors. PMID:22773917</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Graudejus, O.; Jia, Z.; Li, T.; Wagner, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3418044"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intraperitoneal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Peritonitis due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liver hydatid cyst secondary to blunt abdominal trauma can present with fatal consequences. Timely diagnosis and appropriate surgical management can be life saving. We report a case of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> liver hydatid cyst in the peritoneal cavity following trauma and its successful operative management in a preadolescent previously asymptomatic boy. Importance of detailed physical examination and early diagnosis by using appropriate radiological investigations is highlighted. PMID:22953304</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dhua, Anjan Kumar; Sharma, Akshay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4080494"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm diagnosed through non-contrast MRI</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an aneurysm is a rare complication although it is considered a common cause of death. Some of these patients present with the classic triad of symptoms such as abdominal pain, pulsatile abdominal mass and shock. Most symptoms are misleading and will only present as vague abdominal pain. Here we describe one such patient with an unusual presentation of a misleading abdominal mass which was eventually diagnosed as a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm after an emergency MRI. PMID:25003065</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chatra, Priyank S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24882658"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atraumatic splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after coagulopathy owing to a snakebite.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Among the many complications that may follow envenomation by some species of venomous snakes, coagulopathy is common and well known. However, hemoperitoneum induced by coagulopathy after a snakebite is rare. Atraumatic spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is also an uncommon and life-threatening condition. Here, we report a case of presumptive envenomation by Gloydius spp. that resulted in atraumatic splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a probable manifestation of coagulopathy, which has not been previously reported. PMID:24882658</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kang, Changwoo; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong Chun; Kim, Dong Seob; Jeong, Chi-Young</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9595238"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the thoracic aorta into the esophagus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the thoracic aorta into the esophagus after blunt thoracic injury is reported. It involved a hemodynamically stable 18-year-old male patient without any clinical or radiological signs to indicate aortic injury. Aortoesophageal fistula presented in the fifth post traumatic day, with a sudden dyspnea episode, intraperitoneal hemorrhage and lower gastrointestinal bleeding, due to intraperitoneal and intragastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of intramural esophageal hematoma. PMID:9595238</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Komborozos, V A; Belenis, I; Malagari, C; Yannopoulos, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24347218"> <span id="translatedtitle">Iliopsoas hematoma due to muscular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following defibrillation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe a 62 year old patient who presented with acute anterior ischemia and subsequently developed an iliopsoas hematoma. The patient was treated surgically due to rapid progression and femoral neuropathy, and the iliopsoas muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was diagnosed intraoperatively. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was related to the external electrical defibrillation the patient had on admission. This was a rare case, and we hope the report would help to raise physicians' awareness regarding this complication and treatment. PMID:24347218</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jahollari, Artan; Cavolli, Raif; Tavlasoglu, Murat; Sallahu, Ferat; Muriqi, Shkelzen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23161834"> <span id="translatedtitle">Continuous microwire patterns dominated by controllable <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liquid films.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Controllable microwire patterns are prepared by dominating the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liquid films. Regular rhombic-shaped micropillar arrays serve as wetting defects to pin or depin liquids, yielding continuous, herringbone, bead-shaped polystyrene microwire patterns or bead arrays. The results provide a deeper understanding of the controllable <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liquid films and offer a general strategy for the organization of polymers into structures needed for wiring, interconnects, and functional devices for future microfabrication. PMID:23161834</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xin, Zhiqing; Su, Bin; Wang, Jianjun; Zhang, Xingye; Zhang, Zhiliang; Deng, Mengmeng; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55187036"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Modeling With Stochastic Fault Stress</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate how the evolution of dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is controlled by heterogeneous stress distributions on the fault plane. A 3D finite difference code is used to model <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on a single vertical fault plane obeying a slip-weakening friction law. The friction parameters (critical slip-weakening distance, coefficients of friction) are kept homogeneous over the fault plane, whereas the distributions of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. M. Mai; J. Ripperger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/gl0421/2004GL021030/2004GL021030.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Slip tapers at the tips of faults and earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Slip gradients near the tips of earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and faults are typically linear. For non-interacting faults or earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, tip tapers are scale invariant, and about 12 orders of magnitude larger for faults than for earthquakes. For fault tips interacting with other faults, the taper can be as much as a factor of 10 greater than for non-interacting faults. For</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christopher H. Scholz; Theresa M. Lawler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40031702"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aqueous solvents for extracting glanded cottonseed protein without gland <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The presence of pigment glands has thwarted attempts to extract edible cottonseed protein aqueously from glanded seeds or\\u000a gland-rich meals, probably because of the widely held belief that glands <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on contact with aqueous media. We found several\\u000a aqueous salt solutions in which glands did not <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Glands remained intact in saturated (2m) sodium sulfate, but not in saturated 2m</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. L. Muller; T. J. Jacks; T. P. Hensarling</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Geomo.173..149O"> <span id="translatedtitle">A wind tunnel study of particle kinematics during crust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and erosion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sediments with protective crusts of varying type were subjected to particles fed from an upwind source during wind tunnel experiments carried out to compare their ability to resist erosion and alter the kinematics of the saltation cloud. A laser Doppler anemometer measured the distribution of particle velocity for saltators impacting each crusted surface and for particles ejected from this same surface, inclusive of ricochets. Biotic crusts grown on sand in an environmental chamber were able to withstand erosion over several hours of continuous particle impact, as compared to brittle salt crusts, which, regardless of wind speed or sodium chloride concentration, eroded fully within one half hour. Despite the appearance of deep pits and grooves on the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> crusts, loss of mass dominated over particle trapping on these rough surfaces. While decreasing salt concentration between 320 g kg- 1 and 80 g kg- 1 generally was found to be associated with an increase in the mass flux of particles ejected from the surface, little to no correlation with either wind speed or particle impact speed was observed. The range over which varying salt concentration affects the momentum of ejected particles is rather narrow, within 160 g kg- 1. Temporal changes in the velocity distribution of ejected particles with crust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and deflation are complicated by variations in crust <span class="hlt">strength</span> with depth. This is especially true of biotic crusts and weak salt crusts. Fast moving particles associated with the upper 40% of the cumulative velocity distribution generally demonstrate little variation from the control surfaces, and probably represent ricochets. In comparison, those within the lower 60% of the distribution are significantly affected by crust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and erosion, and may include low energy rebounds as well as the entrainment of new particles loosened from within the crust. While such measurements are exceedingly rare, they are needed for the validation of physically based models of crust erosion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O'Brien, Patrick; McKenna Neuman, Cheryl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70017559"> <span id="translatedtitle">The temporal distribution of seismic radiation during deep earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The time history of energy release during earthquakes illuminates the process of failure, which remains enigmatic for events deeper than about 100 kilometers. Stacks of teleseismic records from regional arrays for 122 intermediate (depths of 100 to 350 kilometers) and deep (depths of 350 to 700 kilometers) earthquakes show that the temporal pattern of short-period seismic radiation has a systematic variation with depth. On average, for intermediate depth events more radiation is released toward the beginning of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> than near the end, whereas for deep events radiation is released symmetrically over the duration of the event, with an abrupt beginning and end of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These findings suggest a variation in the style of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> related to decreasing fault heterogeneity with depth.The time history of energy release during earthquakes illuminates the process of failure, which remains enigmatic for events deeper than about 100 kilometers. Stacks of teleseismic records from regional arrays for 122 intermediate (depths of 100 to 350 kilometers) and deep (depths of 350 to 700 kilometers) earthquakes show that the temporal pattern of short-period seismic radiation has a systematic variation with depth. On average, for intermediate depth events more radiation is released toward the beginning of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> than near the end, whereas for deep events radiation is released symmetrically over the duration of the event, with an abrupt beginning and end of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These findings suggest a variation in the style of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> related to decreasing fault heterogeneity with depth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houston, H.; Vidale, J.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991AIPC..217..165S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predictions for tantalum alloy T-111</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A knowledge of the short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (<span class="hlt">rupture</span> times up to 𩛵03 hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of approximately 100 hrs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stephens, John J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvE..85c1905B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a biomembrane under dynamic surface tension</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">How long will a fluid membrane vesicle stressed with a steady ramp of micropipette last before <span class="hlt">rupture</span>? Or conversely, how high should the surface tension be to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> such a membrane? To answer these challenging questions we developed a theoretical framework that allows for the description and reproduction of dynamic tension spectroscopy (DTS) observations. The kinetics of the membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> under ramps of surface tension is described as a succession of an initial pore formation followed by the Brownian process of the pore radius crossing the time-dependent energy barrier. We present the formalism and a derive (formal) analytical expression of the survival probability describing the fate of the membrane under DTS conditions. Using numerical simulations for the membrane prepared in an initial state with a given distribution of times for pore nucleation, we study the membrane lifetime (or inverse of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate) and distribution of membrane surface tension at <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a function of membrane characteristics like pore nucleation rate, the energy barrier to failure, and tension loading rate. It is found that simulations reproduce the main features of DTS experiments, particularly the pore nucleation and pore-size diffusion-controlled limits of membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics. This approach can be adapted and applied to processes of permeation and pore opening in membranes (electroporation, membrane disruption by antimicrobial peptides, vesicle fusion).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bicout, D. J.; Kats, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6769137"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> analogue tomography in radiotherapy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes the design and development of a single unit to combine the advantages of precision high-energy simulation and X-ray body scanning. Good detail <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-axial-tomograms are produced on the basis of analogue technology where the X-ray density values of the slice of the object are produced in analogue instead of digital form. In broad terms, the development of this unit now for the first time enables the radiotherapist (after localising the tumour site by conventional diagnostic X-ray screening on the simulator) to proceed immediately (without moving the patient) to <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-axial-tomography, slicing the target volume to give three dimensional evidence of the spread and position of the growth relative to adjacent normal structures. This information is fed into a computer-controlled treatment-planning system quickly to facilitate the preparation of precise treatment presciriptions. The running costs and the staff needed to operate and maintain this dual-function machine do not appear greater than the normally accepted requirements for a conventional radiotherapy simulator. PMID:6769137</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crooks, S H; Hanna, F A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://tstark.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/CP88.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> Difference between Clam-Shell and Long-Reach Excavator Constructed Cement-Bentonite Self-Hardening Slurry Walls</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Difference between Clam-Shell and Long-Reach Excavator Constructed Cement-Bentonite Self-b <span class="hlt">transverse</span> shear walls. The two methods tested were a crane-operated mechanical clam-shell excavator (CS</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23431525"> <span id="translatedtitle">Alcoholic extract of tarantula cubensis improves sharp <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon healing after primary repair in rabbits.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study was designed to investigate the effects of tarantula cubensis (TC) on the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after surgical anastomosis, on day 84-postinjury (DPI) in rabbits. Forty white New Zealand, mature, male rabbits were randomly and evenly divided into treated and control groups. After tenotomy and primary repair, the injured legs were immobilized for 2 weeks. TC was injected subcutaneously over the lesion on 3, 7, and 10 DPI. The control animals received subcutaneous injections of normal saline similarly. Animal's weight, tendon diameter, clinical status, radiographic and ultrasonographic evaluations were recorded at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized on 84 DPI and the injured tendons and their normal contralaterals were evaluated for histopathologic, histomorphometric, ultrastructural, biomechanical, and percentage dry weight parameters. Treatment significantly improved the clinical performance, cell, collagen and tissue maturation, tissue alignment and remodeling, ultimate <span class="hlt">strength</span>, stiffness, maximum stress, and dry weight content and decreased the tendon diameter, inflammation, adhesions and degeneration of the injured treated tendons compared to the injured control ones. The present findings showed that TC is effective on sharp <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> SDFT in rabbits and it could be one of the novel therapeutic options in clinical trial studies. PMID:23431525</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Meimandi Parizi, Abdolhamid</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoRL..41.6367W"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Mw 6.5 offshore Northern California earthquake of 10 January 2010: Ordinary stress drop on a high-<span class="hlt">strength</span> fault</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">10 January 2010 Mw 6.5 earthquake offshore Northern California is one of the first intraplate earthquakes in oceanic lithosphere to be well captured by a GPS network. It presents an opportunity to evaluate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanics on a high-<span class="hlt">strength</span> fault. Static inversion of the coseismic displacements shows that the slip peaks at the same depth as the expected <span class="hlt">strength</span> envelope, where the differential stresses can be as high as 600 MPa. Laboratory experiments on peridotite predict dramatic dynamic weakening at these conditions. The observed ordinary stress drop, 2-20 MPa, may indicate that the lithosphere is much weaker than <span class="hlt">strength</span> envelope predicts or that the failure mechanisms seen in the laboratory are not occurring during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The GPS observations show very little postseismic signal indicating that if a shear zone exists beneath the coseismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, it operates at significantly greater stress levels than the coseismic stress change.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wei, Meng; McGuire, Jeffrey J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51623628"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forearc Rigidity and <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> During Great Earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mapping along-strike variations in subduction zone rigidity is useful for understanding great megathrust earthquakes. This is because: 1) the integrated long-term <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the coupled slab-forearc system, which is reflected in rigidity, should be an important control on earthquake frequency and magnitude distribution; and 2) forearc rigidity is likely to play a role in the generation of great earthquakes through</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Hackney; A. Tassara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53179488"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forearc Rigidity and <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> During Great Earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mapping along-strike variations in subduction zone rigidity is useful for understanding great megathrust earthquakes. This is because: 1) the integrated long-term <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the coupled slab-forearc system, which is reflected in rigidity, should be an important control on earthquake frequency and magnitude distribution; and 2) forearc rigidity is likely to play a role in the generation of great earthquakes through</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Hackney; A. Tassara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2900591"> <span id="translatedtitle">Carotid Atheroma <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Observed In Vivo and FSI-Predicted Stress Distribution Based on Pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> Imaging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atherosclerosis at the carotid bifurcation is a major risk factor for stroke. As mechanical forces may impact lesion stability, finite element studies have been conducted on models of diseased vessels to elucidate the effects of lesion characteristics on the stresses within plaque materials. It is hoped that patient-specific biomechanical analyses may serve clinically to assess the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> potential for any particular lesion, allowing better stratification of patients into the most appropriate treatments. Due to a sparsity of in vivo plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data, the relationship between various mechanical descriptors such as stresses or strains and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vulnerability is incompletely known, and the patient-specific utility of biomechanical analyses is unclear. In this article, we present a comparison between carotid atheroma <span class="hlt">rupture</span> observed in vivo and the plaque stress distribution from fluid杝tructure interaction analysis based on pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> medical imaging. The effects of image resolution are explored and the calculated stress fields are shown to vary by as much as 50% with sub-pixel geometric uncertainty. Within these bounds, we find a region of pronounced elevation in stress within the fibrous plaque layer of the lesion with a location and extent corresponding to that of the observed site of plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:20232151</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Soares, Bruno; Wintermark, Max; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Saloner, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840020892&hterms=800H&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3D800H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of candidate Stirling engine iron supperalloys in high-pressure hydrogen. Volume 2: Hydrogen creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of nine iron base and one cobalt base candidate Stirling engine alloys is evaluated. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% strain data are analyzed. The 3500 h <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life stress and stress to obtain 1% strain in 3500 h are also estimated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.; Hales, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.........3T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vortex dynamics in <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and unruptured intracranial aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are a potentially devastating pathological dilation of brain arteries that affect 1.5-5 % of the population. Causing around 500 000 deaths per year worldwide, their detection and treatment to prevent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is critical. Multiple recent studies have tried to find a hemodynamics predictor of aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, but concluded with distinct opposite trends using Wall Shear Stress (WSS) based parameters in different clinical datasets. Nevertheless, several research groups tend to converge for now on the fact that the flow patterns and flow dynamics of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms are complex and unstable. Following this idea, we investigated the vortex properties of both unruptured and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysms. A brief comparison of two Eulerian vortex visualization methods (Q-criterion and lambda 2 method) showed that these approaches gave similar results in our complex aneurysm geometries. We were then able to apply either one of them to a large dataset of 74 patient specific cases of intracranial aneurysms. Those real cases were obtained by 3D angiography, numerical reconstruction of the geometry, and then pulsatile CFD simulation before post-processing with the mentioned vortex visualization tools. First we tested the two Eulerian methods on a few cases to verify their implementation we made as well as compare them with each other. After that, the Q-criterion was selected as method of choice for its more obvious physical meaning (it shows the balance between two characteristics of the flow, its swirling and deformation). Using iso-surfaces of Q, we started by categorizing the patient-specific aneurysms based on the gross topology of the aneurysmal vortices. This approach being unfruitful, we found a new vortex-based characteristic property of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms to stratify the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk of IAs that we called the Wall-Kissing Vortices, or WKV. We observed that most <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms had a large amount of WKV, which appears to agree with the current hypothesized biological triggers of pathological remodeling of the artery walls. Having a good natural ratio of statuses in our IA cohort (55 unruptured vs. 19 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>), we were able to test the statistical significance of our predictor to fortify our findings. We also performed a distribution analysis of our cohort with respect to the number of WKV to strengthen the encouraging statistical analysis result; both analyses provided a clear good separation of the status of the aneurysms based on our predictor. Lastly, we constructed a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to analyze the power different thresholds of WKV had in splitting the data in a binary way (unruptured/<span class="hlt">ruptured</span>). The number of WKV was efficaciously able to stratify the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status, identifying 84.21 % of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms (with 25.45 % of false positives, i.e. unruptured IAs tagged as <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>) when using a threshold value of 2. Our novel work undertaken to study the vortex structures in IAs brought to light interesting characteristics of the flow in the aneurysmal sac. We found that there are several distinct categories in which the aneurysm vortex topologies can be put in without relationship to the aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status. This first finding was in contradiction with available already-published results. Nonetheless, <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs had a statistically significant larger amount of WKV as opposed to unruptured aneurysms. This new predictor we propose to the community could very well clear a new path among the currently controversial WSS-based parameters. Although it needs to be improved to be more resilient, the first results obtained by the WKV-based parameter are promising when applied to a large dataset of 74 IAs patient-specific transient CFD simulations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trylesinski, Gabriel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890010000&hterms=hassen&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dhassen"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tensile and creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of P/M processed Nb-base alloy, WC-3009</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Due to its high <span class="hlt">strength</span> at temperatures up to 1600 K, fabrication of niobium base alloy WC-3009 (Nb30Hf9W) by traditional methods is difficult. Powder metallurgy (P/M) processing offers an attractive fabrication alternative for this high <span class="hlt">strength</span> alloy. Spherical powders of WC-3009 produced by electron beam atomizing (EBA) process were successfully consolidated into a one inch diameter rod by vacuum hot pressing and swaging techniques. Tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> of the fully dense P/M material at 300-1590 K were similar to the arc-melted material. Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests in vacuum indicated that WC-3009 exhibits a class 1 solid solution (glide controlled) creep behavior in the 1480 to 1590 K temperature range and stress range of 14 to 70 MPa. The creep behavior was correlated with temperature and stress using a power law relationship. The calculated stress exponent n, was about 3.2 and the apparent activation energy, Q, was about 270 kJ/mol. The large creep ductility exhibited by WC-3009 was attributed to its high strain rate sensitivity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hebsur, Mohan G.; Titran, Robert H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/875102"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span>-longitudinal integrated resonator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hutchinson, Donald P. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, Marcus L. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, John T. (Knoxville, TN)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRB..118.5530H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Downdip landward limit of Cascadia great earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">paper examines the constraints to the downdip landward limit of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> for the Cascadia great earthquakes off western North America. This limit is a primary control for ground motion hazard at near-coastal cities. The studies also provide information on the physical controls of subduction thrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> globally. The constraints are (1) "locked/transition" zones from geodetic deformation (GPS, repeated leveling, tide gauges); (2) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone from paleoseismic coastal marsh subsidence, "paleogeodesy"; (3) temperature on the thrust for the seismic-aseismic transition; (4) change in thrust seismic reflection character downdip from thin seismic to thick ductile; (5) fore-arc mantle corner aseismic serpentinite and talc overlying the thrust; (6) updip limit of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) slow slip; (7) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area associations with shelf-slope basins; (8) depth limit for small events on the thrust; and (9) landward limit of earthquakes on the Nootka transform fault zone. The most reliable constraints for the limit of large <span class="hlt">rupture</span> displacement, >10 m, are generally just offshore in agreement with thermal control for this hot subduction zone, but well-offshore central Oregon and near the coast of northern Washington. The limit for 1-2 m <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that can still provide strong shaking is less well estimated 25-50 km farther landward. The fore-arc mantle corner and the updip extent of ETS slow slip are significantly landward from the other constraints. Surprisingly, there is a downdip gap between the best other estimates for the great earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone and the ETS slow slip. In this gap, plate convergence may occur as continuous slow creep.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hyndman, R. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3872822"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> potential</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aortic aneurysm is a leading cause of death in adults, often taking lives without any premonitory signs or symptoms. Adverse clinical outcomes of aortic aneurysm are preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. The objective of this study was to perform a predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) tissue to assess <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk on a patient-specific level. AsAA tissues, obtained intra-operatively from 50 patients, were subjected to biaxial mechanical and uniaxial failure tests to obtain their passive elastic mechanical properties. A novel analytical method was developed to predict the AsAA pressure-diameter response as well as the aortic wall yield and failure responses. Our results indicated that the mean predicted AsAA diameter at <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 5.6 0.7 cm, and the associated blood pressure to induce <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 579.4 214.8 mmHg. Statistical analysis showed significant positive correlation between aneurysm tissue compliance and predicted risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, where patients with a pressure-strain modulus ?100 kPa may be nearly twice as likely to experience <span class="hlt">rupture</span> than patients with more compliant aortic tissue. The mechanical analysis of pre-dissection patient tissue properties established in this study could predict the 揻uture onset of yielding and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in AsAA patients. The analysis results implicate decreased tissue compliance as a risk factor for AsAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The presented methods may serve as a basis for the development of a pre-operative planning tool for AsAA evaluation, a tool currently unavailable. PMID:23948500</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Pham, Thuy; Elefteriades, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3021316"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hemodynamic-Morphologic Discriminants for Intracranial Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background and Purpose To identify significant morphologic and hemodynamic parameters that discriminate intracranial aneurysm (IA) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status using 3D angiography and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Methods 119 IAs (38 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, 81 unruptured) were analyzed from 3D angiographic images and CFD. Six morphologic and seven hemodynamic parameters were evaluated for significance with respect to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis identified area under the curve (AUC) and optimal thresholds separating <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> from unruptured aneurysms for each parameter. Significant parameters were examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis in 3 predictive models梞orphology only, hemodynamics only, and combined梩o identify independent discriminants, and the AUC-ROC of the predicted probability of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status was compared among these models. Results Morphologic parameters (Size Ratio [SR], Undulation Index, Ellipticity Index, and Nonsphericity Index) and hemodynamic parameters (Average Wall Shear Stress [WSS], Maximum intra-aneurysmal WSS, Low WSS Area, Average Oscillatory Shear Index [OSI], Number of Vortices, and Relative Resident Time) achieved statistical significance (p<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated SR to be the only independently significant factor in the morphology model (AUC=0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.750.91), whereas WSS and OSI were the only independently significant variables in the hemodynamics model (AUC=0.85, 95% CI 0.780.93). The combined model retained all three variables, SR, WSS, and OSI (AUC=0.89, 95% CI 0.820.96). Conclusion All three models梞orphological (based on SR), hemodynamic (based on WSS and OSI), and combined梔iscriminate IA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status with high AUC values. Hemodynamics is as important as morphology in discriminating aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status. PMID:21106956</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiang, Jianping; Natarajan, Sabareesh K.; Tremmel, Markus; Ma, Ding; Mocco, J; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Meng, Hui</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S32B..08V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Element simulation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics on curvilinear faults</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerical simulation of fault <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> process requires today the resolution of several time and space scales, to capture the nucleation, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front propagation, and the short wave radiation associated with heterogeneous fault systems of complexgeometries. Two classes of methods are usually used in seismology: finite differences and boundary integral equations. Classical mixed formulation of finite differences suffers from smoothing and smearing of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front due to the inherent interpolation of staggered schemes. Although if extensions to curved faults have recently been proposed (Cruz-Atienza and Virieux, 2004), using Saenger's stencils, up to now applications of FD methods have been mostly restricted to planar faults. On the other hand, boundary integral equations (Andrews, 1976; Fukuyama and Madariaga, 2000) have been shown to accurately model 3D curvilinear fault segments but are is restricted to homogeneous or layered elastic media. A important issue, still be correctly resolved is the physics of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation when reaching the surface. In this framework, Spectral Element method, combining both the geometrical flexibility of finite elements and convergence rate of high-order spectral methods is an attractive tool for numerical simulation of earthquake dynamic <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> on realistic fault segments in complex geological media. We present numerical simulations of 2D inplane dynamic faulting using the SE method. The results are discussed paying a special attention to the sub- to super-shear transition for both planar and non planar faults, to the influence of different frictional laws on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and to the influence of layered geolgical media both on the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process and the short wave radiation. On going work on two main extensions will be discussed : interactions as the faulting process reach the surface and 3D geometries of faults.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vilotte, J.; Festa, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3965944"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synthetic Augmented Suture Anchor Reconstruction for a Complete Traumatic Distal Triceps Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in a Male Professional Bodybuilder with Postoperative Biomechanical Assessment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bodybuilding is a high-risk sport for distal triceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Management, especially in high-demanding athletes, is operative with suture anchor refixation technique being frequently used. However, the rate of rerupture is high due to underlying poor tendon quality. Thus, additional augmentation could be useful. This case report presents a reconstruction technique for a complete traumatic distal triceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a bodybuilder with postoperative biomechanical assessment. A 28-year-old male professional bodybuilder was treated with a synthetic augmented suture anchor reconstruction for a complete triceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of his right dominant elbow. Postoperative biomechanical assessment included isokinetic elbow <span class="hlt">strength</span> and endurance testing by using multiple angular velocities to simulate the 搊ff-season and 損recompetition phases of training. Eighteen months postoperatively and after full return to training, the biomechanical assessment indicated that the <span class="hlt">strength</span> and endurance of the operated elbow joint was fully restored with even higher ratings compared to the contralateral healthy arm. The described reconstruction technique can be considered as an advisable option in high-performance athletes with underlying poor tendon quality due to high tensile <span class="hlt">strength</span> and lack of donor site morbidity, thus enabling them to restore preinjury status and achieve safe return to sports. PMID:24711944</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nikolaidou, Maria-Elissavet; Banke, Ingo J.; Laios, Thomas; Petsogiannis, Konstantinos; Mourikis, Anastasios</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3597089"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quadriceps Activation Failure After Anterior Cruciate Ligament <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Is Not Mediated by Knee Joint Effusion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">STUDY DESIGN Descriptive prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVES To investigate the relationships between knee joint effusion, quadriceps activation, and quadriceps <span class="hlt">strength</span>. These relationships may help clinicians better identify impaired quadriceps activation. BACKGROUND After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, the involved quadriceps may demonstrate weakness. Experimental data have shown that quadriceps activation and <span class="hlt">strength</span> may be directly mediated by intracapsular joint pressure created by saline injection. An inverse relationship between quadriceps activation and the amount of saline injected has been reported. This association has not been demonstrated for traumatic effusion. We hypothesized that traumatic joint effusion due to ACL <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and postinjury quadriceps <span class="hlt">strength</span> would correlate well with quadriceps activation, allowing clinicians to use effusion and <span class="hlt">strength</span> measurement as a surrogate for electrophysiological assessment of quadriceps activation. METHODS Prospective data were collected on 188 patients within 100 days of ACL injury (average, 27 days) referred from a single surgeon. A complete clinical evaluation of the knee was performed, including ligamentous assessment and assessment of range of motion and effusion. Quadriceps function was electrophysiologically assessed using maximal volitional isometric contraction and burst superimposition techniques to quantify both <span class="hlt">strength</span> and activation. RESULTS Effusion grade did not correlate with quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) (zero effusion: mean SD CAR, 93.5% 5.8%; trace effusion: CAR, 93.8% 9.5%; 1+ effusion: CAR, 94.0% 7.5%; 2+/3+ effusion: CAR, 90.6% 11.1%). These values are lower than normative data from healthy subjects (CAR, 98% 3%). CONCLUSION Joint effusion after ACL injury does not directly mediate quadriceps activation failure seen after injury. Therefore, it should not be used as a clinical substitute for electrophysiological assessment of quadriceps activation. Patients presenting to physical therapy after ACL injury should be treated with high-intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation to help normalize this activation. PMID:22523081</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LYNCH, ANDREW D.; LOGERSTEDT, DAVID S.; AXE, MICHAEL J.; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002ApPhL..81.4523G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> mode-locking in microcavity lasers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We experimentally demonstrate mode-locking between the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> modes of a laser. A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with evenly-spaced <span class="hlt">transverse</span> modes is shown to emit a train of 2.10.1 ps pulses with an 11 ps repetition rate and a timing jitter of 23530 fs. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> mode-locking in microcavity lasers has potential to improve the compactness, stability, integrability, repetition rate tunability, and efficiency of ultrafast optical communication sources.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gordon, R.; Heberle, A. P.; Cleaver, J. R. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.2593O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental investigations on the brittleness and slowness of shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation in porous saturated rocks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pore fluid pressure and shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are long known to be interwoven: an increase in pore fluid pressure can unclamp a fault by reducing the effective normal stress and thus cause the fault to slip at lower shear stress. This mechanism is well illustrated by induced seismicity near fluid injection. More recently, several lines of evidence suggest that pore fluid pressure play a significant role in slow slip phenomena, which include non-volcanic tremors, low to very low frequency earthquakes, episodic tremor and slip. However, the differences in seismic signals between the induced but regular seismicity and the slow slips indicate different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes which question our understanding of the source processes. In this study, we designed loading configurations and conducted triaxial deformation experiments to investigate how the reduction of effective normal stress affects slip instability and fracture propagation. Water saturated porous sedimentary rocks were deformed at constant strain rates and under fully drained conditions. Using the existing theoretical framework (bifurcation model, slip weakening model), we provide quantitative measure of the differences between slow and regular slip behaviors. In the brittle faulting regime, generally considered to allow the dynamic propagation of a shear fracture which produces regular earthquakes, excess pore pressure does not induce any change in slip behavior but enhanced seismic slip by lowering the shear <span class="hlt">strength</span> which can explain the increased seismicity associated with elevated pore pressure near reservoirs. In the transitional regime where aseismic creep takes place instead, failure process should lead to a diffused, velocity strengthening aseismic fault. However, in these conditions, excess pore pressure enables slip to occur with quantifiable differences from that in brittle regime, showing a slower slip rate and smaller stress drop. A decrease of normal stress only produces similar <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characteristics than observed in the brittle faulting regime. Microstructural observations highlight that increasing pore pressure allows overcoming the dilatancy strengthening. Moreover, our data show that if a rock already <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in a slow manner in the brittle regime, increasing pore pressure allows sustaining a more brittle slip behavior. Further observations even suggest that there may exist a continuous spectrum of slip rate and energy budget between ordinary earthquake (rapid slip) and slow slip phenomena.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Zhu, Wenlu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000056990&hterms=stress+academic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dstress%2Bacademic"> <span id="translatedtitle">Growth of Matrix Cracks During Intermediate Temperature Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a SiC/SiC Composite in Air</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The crack density of woven Hi-Nicalon(sup TM) (Nippon Carbon, Japan) fiber, BN interphase, melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites was determined for specimens subjected to tensile stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at 815 C. A significant amount of matrix cracking occurs due to the growth of fiber-bridged microcracks even at stresses below the run-out condition. This increased cracking corresponded to time dependent strain accumulation and acoustic emission activity during the constant load test. However, the portion of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> specimens subjected to cooler temperatures (< 600 C than the hot section had significantly lower crack densities compared to the hotter regions. From the acoustic emission and time dependent strain data it can be inferred that most of the matrix crack growth occurred within the first few hours of the tensile <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiment. The crack growth was attributed to an interphase recession mechanism that is enhanced by the presence of a thin carbon layer between the fiber and the matrix as a result of the composite fabrication process. One important consequence of matrix crack growth at the lower stresses is poor retained <span class="hlt">strength</span> at room temperature for specimens that did not fail.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morscher, Gregory N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020025578&hterms=stress+relief&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dstress%2Brelief"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stress-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Stress-Relaxation of SiC/SiC Composites at Intermediate Temperature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tensile static stress and static strain experiments were performed on woven Sylramic (Dow Corning, Midland, MI) and Hi-Nicalon (Nippon Carbon, Japan) fiber reinforced, BN interphase, melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites at 815 C. Acoustic emission was used to monitor the damage accumulation during the test. The stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of Sylramic composites were superior to that of Hi-Nicalon Tm composites. Conversely, the applied strain levels that Hi-Nicalon composites can withstand for stress-relaxation experiments were superior to Sylramic composites; however, at a cost of poor retained <span class="hlt">strength</span> properties for Hi-Nicalon composites. Sylramic composites exhibited much less stress-oxidation induced matrix cracking compared to Hi-Nicalon composites. This was attributed to the greater stiffness and roughness of Sylramic fibers themselves and the lack of a carbon layer between the fiber and the BN interphase for Sylramic composites, which existed in Hi-Nicalon composites. Due to the lack of stress-relief for Sylramic composites, time to failure for Sylramic composite stress-relaxation experiments was not much longer than for stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments when comparing the peak stress condition for stress-relaxation with the applied stress of stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987PhDT........96L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Mode Evolution in a Free Electron Laser Oscillator.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Focusing of light by the electron beam in a Free Electron Laser has been predicted for several years. In a high gain system, complete cancellation of diffractive spreading within the interaction region may be possible, resulting in an optical beam that can be guided and amplified for many tens of meters. Until now, no direct experimental evidence for FEL self-focusing has existed in support of the theory. In this dissertation I report measurements made of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mode evolution in the Stanford Photon Research Lab Free Electron Laser oscillator--the Mark III. <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> mode characteristics were obtained by sampling the beam in the far field with small apertures which could be positioned freely in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> plane. Time-resolved signals received by the sampling system were analyzed to infer mode changes that occur in the laser between small signal, where the influence of the electron beam is strongest, and saturation, where the gain has fallen to cavity loss levels. The data indicate that intracavity focusing of the light occurs in small signal, and diminishes as the laser approaches saturation. After the light decouples from the electrons at the end of the current pulse, symmetric <span class="hlt">transverse</span> oscillations are observed in the ringdown, providing evidence of residual focusing in saturation. The data are compared to theory in the form of an FEL simulation code. Agreement between data and theory is found for both the change of the <span class="hlt">strength</span> of self-focusing between small signal and saturation, and for the characteristics of the ringdown oscillations observed in the Mark III FEL. It is concluded that self-focusing occurs at the level and in the form expected by theory, providing experimental support for the theory of optical guiding.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">La Sala, John Edward</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JAP...103l3527Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of surface stress on the asymmetric yield <span class="hlt">strength</span> of nanowires</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While it is widely known that nanowires show strong size dependence on their elastic modulus and yield <span class="hlt">strength</span>, the study on the asymmetric tensile and compressive yield <span class="hlt">strengths</span> is scarce. In particular, the effect of the surface stress needs to be clearly revealed. In this paper, a theoretical framework is proposed to study the effect of surface stress on the elastic property and yield <span class="hlt">strength</span> of nanowires. Both the surface residual stress and surface elasticity are taken into account, and the constraint of surface stress in the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> direction is incorporated. For a representative aluminum nanowire with the decrease in the nanowire radius, the surface elasticity causes both the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio to increase, and the surface stress causes the tensile yield <span class="hlt">strength</span> to increase and the magnitude of compressive yield <span class="hlt">strength</span> to decrease, leading to tension-compression asymmetry. The effect of surface elasticity is relatively small whereas the effect of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> surface stress is important.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Weixu; Wang, Tiejun; Chen, Xi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S43C2259K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> scenarios for strong ground motion prediction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models provide physically reasonable <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes under presumed fault geometry and stress field. We propose that dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models based on geological or geomorphological data are used as earthquake scenarios for strong ground motion prediction. We apply our method to possible sources of earthquake occurring on the Uemachi fault systems. The Uemachi fault system runs just underneath the western part of Osaka plain, extends about 45 km, and dips 60 degrees to the east. We model the fault geometry from the surface traces and the shape of the Osaka basin-floor. The stress condition is presumed based on slip distributions on the fault. Spatially varied cumulative slip distribution along the strike of the Uemachi fault system was obtained by reflection surveys, borehole data, etc. The borehole data at a site along the fault showed that the vertical slip on the earth's surface due to the last event was between 1.6 to 2.4 m (Sugiyama et al., 2003). Combining these data, we presume an prototype of the slip distribution along strike. The slip distribution along dip is modeled through simulations of spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> under vertically depth-dependent stress conditions to realize spontaneously stopping <span class="hlt">rupture</span> near the bottom of the seismogeneic zone. Onto this large-scale heterogeneous slip distribution model, we add fractal heterogeneities in small-scale created from different random numbers. These slip distributions are converted to the distributions of static stress drop. For each stress drop model, some hypocenter locations are assumed. We calculate dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes by the finite-difference method (Kase, 2010), assuming the slip-weakening friction law. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> area and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time on each point depend on stress model and hypocenter location. Based on these <span class="hlt">rupture</span> scenarios, we simulate lower frequency components of ground motion by the finite-difference method (Pitarka, 1999) excluding the shallow sediment above the engineering basement. Higher frequency components are computed by the stochastic Green's function method (Onishi and Horike, 2000). Effects of the shallow alluvium layers are calculated by 1D multi-reflection theory considering nonlinear effect by equivalent linear technique using a computer code DYNEQ (Yoshida and Suetomi, 1996).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kase, Y.; Sekiguchi, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S14A..07G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Near-Source Shaking and Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Plastic Media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent well recorded earthquakes show a high degree of complexity at the source level that severely affects the resulting ground motion in near and far-field seismic data. In our study, we focus on investigating source-dominated near-field ground motion features from numerical dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations in an elasto-visco-plastic bulk. Our aim is to contribute to a more direct connection from theoretical and computational results to field and seismological observations. Previous work showed that a diversity of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles emerges from simulations on faults governed by velocity-and-state-dependent friction with rapid velocity-weakening at high slip rate. For instance, growing pulses lead to re-activation of slip due to gradual stress build-up near the hypocenter, as inferred in some source studies of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. Moreover, off-fault energy dissipation implied physical limits on extreme ground motion by limiting peak slip rate and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity. We investigate characteristic features in near-field strong ground motion generated by dynamic in-plane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations. We present effects of plasticity on source process signatures, off-fault damage patterns and ground shaking. Independent of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style, asymmetric damage patterns across the fault are produced that contribute to the total seismic moment, and even dominantly at high angles between the fault and the maximum principal background stress. The off-fault plastic strain fields induced by transitions between <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles reveal characteristic signatures of the mechanical source processes during the transition. Comparing different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles in elastic and elasto-visco-plastic media to identify signatures of off-fault plasticity, we find varying degrees of alteration of near-field radiation due to plastic energy dissipation. Subshear pulses suffer more peak particle velocity reduction due to plasticity than cracks. Supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are affected even more. The occurrence of multiple <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts affect seismic potency release rate, amplitude spectra, peak particle velocity distributions and near-field seismograms. Our simulations enable us to trace features of source processes in synthetic seismograms, for example exhibiting a re-activation of slip. Such physical models may provide starting points for future investigations of field properties of earthquake source mechanisms and natural fault conditions. In the long-term, our findings may be helpful for seismic hazard analysis and the improvement of seismic source models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, A.; Mai, P. M.; Dalguer, L. A.; Ampuero, J. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6205G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical size and overstress of the initiation zone for spontaneous dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation with a linear slip-weakening friction law</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerical simulations of dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> require an artificial initiation procedure. Under linear slip-weakening friction, the concept of a stress asperity is often applied, in which the asperity is characterized by its size, shape, and overstress (difference between static <span class="hlt">strength</span> and initial stress inside the asperity). However, the physical properties of this initiation zone may have significant impact on the resulting dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. Criteria for estimating the critical size of the initiation zone (the minimum size of the initiation zone leading to spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation) have been proposed for 2D and 3D problems based on simplifying assumptions. However, these estimates do not provide general rules for designing 3D numerical simulations, and hence a trial and-error approach is often necessary. Therefore, it is desirable to define guidelines to estimate the size of the initiation zone and the overstress such that the effects of the artificial initiation are minimized when generating realistic dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> scenarios. We perform an extensive parameter study in terms of numerical simulations of 3D dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation to examine the critical size of square, circular and elliptical initiation zones as a function of asperity overstress and background (off-asperity) stress. For fixed overstress, we find that the area of the initiation zone controls the nucleation process. Comparing our numerical results with published theoretical estimates, we discover that the estimates by Uenishi & Rice (2004) are applicable to configurations with low background stress and small overstress. None of the published estimates are consistent with numerical results for configurations with high background stress. We therefore derive new equations to estimate the initiation zone size in environments with high background stress. Our results provide guidelines to appropriately define the size of the initiation zone and overstress to minimize effects of the forced initiation on the subsequent spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galis, Martin; Pelties, Christian; Kristek, Jozef; Moczo, Peter; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Mai, P. Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24650079"> <span id="translatedtitle">Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> - treatment and complications: A systematic review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a frequent injury with an increasing incidence. Until now, there is no consensus regarding optimal treatment. The aim of this review was to illuminate and summarize randomized controlled trials comparing surgical and non-surgical treatment of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> during the last 10 years. Seven articles were found and they were all acceptable according to international quality assessment guidelines. Primary outcomes were re-<span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, other complications, and functional outcomes. There was no significant difference in re-<span class="hlt">ruptures</span> between the two treatments, but a tendency to favoring surgical treatment. Further, one study found an increased risk of soft-tissue-related complications after surgery. Patient satisfaction and time to return to work were significantly different in favor of surgery in one study, and there was also better functional outcome after surgery in some studies. These seven studies indicate that surgical patients have a faster rehabilitation. However, the differences between surgical and non-surgical treatment appear to be subtle and it could mean that rehabilitation is more important, rather than the actual initial treatment. Therefore, further studies will be needed in regard to understanding the interplay between acute surgical or non-surgical treatment, and the rehabilitation regimen for the overall outcome after Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. PMID:24650079</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Holm, C; Kjaer, M; Eliasson, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AcGeo..62.1087M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an evaporating liquid bridge between two grains</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study examines <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of evaporating liquid bridges between two glass spheres. Evolution of the bridge profile has been recorded with the use of high-speed camera. Geometrical characteristics of the bridge were then used to calculate evolution of the variables during the process: Laplace pressure, capillary force, and surface tension force. For the purpose of reference, the bridge evolution is followed also during kinematic extension. During both processes the diameter of the neck decreases, with an acceleration of about 1-2 ms before the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Two distinct <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes are observed, depending on the bridge aspect ratio. After the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the mass of liquid splits, forming two separate oscillating drops attached to the spheres, and a suspended satellite droplet. Just before the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, an increasing repulsive Laplace pressure, and decreasing negative surface tension force develop. Capillary force follows the trend of the surface tension force, with an accelerating decline. Duration of the whole process and liquid mass stabilization is from 10 to 60 ms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mielniczuk, Boleslaw; El Youssoufi, Moulay Said; Sabatier, Laurent; Hueckel, Tomasz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4275862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous ureteric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> secondary to an invasive desmoid tumour</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">INTRODUCTION Spontaneous ureteric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare entity that presents as an extravasation of urine from the ureter without previous surgery, ureteric manipulation and external trauma of the ureter. We report the case of a desmoid tumour presenting as spontaneous ureteric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> which was managed in our institution. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 28 years old healthy male presented with a four day history of generalised abdominal pain secondary to spontaneous right ureteric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Patient was initially managed via insertion of nephrostomy tube and antibiotics. After unsuccessful attempts of retrograde and antegrade ureteric stent insertion, patient was subsequently managed via elective surgical intervention. The excised specimen revealed desmoid tumour as cause of the ureteric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. DISCUSSION Desmoid tumours are rare benign tumours arising from fascial or musculoaponeurotic structures that do not metastasise, but tend to invade locally. It is often initially managed medically prior to undertaking a definitive surgical intervention. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of ureteric perforation secondary to a desmoid tumour of the mesentery. CONCLUSION Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the ureter is often misdiagnosed as other conditions. History taking and examination can be unreliable, hence a high level of suspicion and further investigations should be utilised. Once the diagnosis is made, treatment can be individualised based on aetiology. PMID:25460442</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoon, Peter Daechul; Ahmadi, Nariman; Strahan, Stephen; Wang, Audrey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3352434"> <span id="translatedtitle">The prevention of carotid artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carotid artery exposure and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is one of the most feared complications of head and neck surgery. The ideal method for preventing <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an exposed artery should be easy to perform, safe, effective and should spare local and regional flaps for later use in reconstruction. Isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Bucrylate) is a commercially available compound that appears to meet these criteria. Test animals were divided into two groups. The carotid arteries of 12 dogs (group A) were exteriorized bilaterally and coated with Bucrylate unilaterally. Group B (four dogs) underwent the same procedure except that the vessels were bilaterally coated. Wounds were dressed twice daily with moist-to-dry gauze. No antibiotics were given. Nine of the 12 unprotected arteries in group A <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> within 2 weeks, and one unprotected artery <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> on postoperative day (POD) 29. Two dogs healed over both vessels. In group B, three dogs <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> their arteries within 2 weeks. One dog healed over both vessels. Gross and histologic examination of the arteries showed a striking difference between coated and uncoated vessels. We believe that Bucrylate and cyanoacrylate adhesives hold promise in the clinical protection of exposed carotid arteries. PMID:3352434</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Costantino, P D; Atiyah, R A; Mico, A S; Sisson, G A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110011347&hterms=aggressive&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Daggressive"> <span id="translatedtitle">Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Test</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of a COPV has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. The more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval of the model. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21191518"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatic hemangiomas: A review of the literature.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hepatic hemangiomas are congenital vascular malformations, considered the most common benign mesenchymal hepatic tumors, composed of masses of blood vessels that are atypical or irregular in arrangement and size. Hepatic hemangiomas can be divided into two major groups: capillary hemangiomas and cavernous hemangiomas These tumors most frequently affect females (80%) and adults in their fourth and fifth decades of life. Most cases are asymptomatic although a few patients may present with a wide variety of clinical symptoms, with spontaneous or traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> being the most severe complication. In cases of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, clinical manifestations consist of sudden abdominal pain, and anemia secondary to a haemoperitoneum. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy can also occur. Haemodynamic instability and signs of hypovolemic shock appear in about one third of cases. As the size of the hemangioma increases, so does the chance of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Imaging studies used in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas include ultrasonography, dynamic contrast-enchanced computed tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, hepatic arteriography, digital subtraction angiography, and nuclear medicine studies. In most cases hepatic hemangiomas are asymptomatic and should be followed up by means of periodic radiological examination. Surgery should be restricted to specific situations. Absolute indications for surgery are spontaneous or traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with hemoperitoneum, intratumoral bleeding and consumptive coagulopathy (Kassabach-Merrit syndrome). In a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain due to unknown abdominal disease, spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a hepatic tumor such as a hemangioma should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis. PMID:21191518</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jr, Marcelo Af Ribeiro; Papaiordanou, Francine; Gon鏰lves, Juliana M; Chaib, Eleazar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3010512"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatic hemangiomas: A review of the literature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hepatic hemangiomas are congenital vascular malformations, considered the most common benign mesenchymal hepatic tumors, composed of masses of blood vessels that are atypical or irregular in arrangement and size. Hepatic hemangiomas can be divided into two major groups: capillary hemangiomas and cavernous hemangiomas These tumors most frequently affect females (80%) and adults in their fourth and fifth decades of life. Most cases are asymptomatic although a few patients may present with a wide variety of clinical symptoms, with spontaneous or traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> being the most severe complication. In cases of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, clinical manifestations consist of sudden abdominal pain, and anemia secondary to a haemoperitoneum. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy can also occur. Haemodynamic instability and signs of hypovolemic shock appear in about one third of cases. As the size of the hemangioma increases, so does the chance of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Imaging studies used in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas include ultrasonography, dynamic contrast-enchanced computed tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, hepatic arteriography, digital subtraction angiography, and nuclear medicine studies. In most cases hepatic hemangiomas are asymptomatic and should be followed up by means of periodic radiological examination. Surgery should be restricted to specific situations. Absolute indications for surgery are spontaneous or traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with hemoperitoneum, intratumoral bleeding and consumptive coagulopathy (Kassabach-Merrit syndrome). In a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain due to unknown abdominal disease, spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a hepatic tumor such as a hemangioma should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis. PMID:21191518</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jr, Marcelo AF Ribeiro; Papaiordanou, Francine; Gon鏰lves, Juliana M; Chaib, Eleazar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4177807"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radiographic Risk Factors for Contralateral <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Dogs with Unilateral Cranial Cruciate Ligament <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Complete cranial cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (CR) is a common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Dogs with unilateral CR often develop contralateral CR over time. Although radiographic signs of contralateral stifle joint osteoarthritis (OA) influence risk of subsequent contralateral CR, this risk has not been studied in detail. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of client-owned dogs with unilateral CR to determine how severity of radiographic stifle synovial effusion and osteophytosis influence risk of contralateral CR over time. Detailed survival analysis was performed for a cohort of 85 dogs after case filtering of an initial sample population of 513 dogs. This population was stratified based on radiographic severity of synovial effusion (graded on a scale of 0, 1, and 2) and severity of osteophytosis (graded on a scale of 0, 1, 2, and 3) of both index and contralateral stifle joints using a reproducible scoring method. Severity of osteophytosis in the index and contralateral stifles was significantly correlated. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the contralateral cranial cruciate ligament was significantly influenced by radiographic OA in both the index and contralateral stifles at diagnosis. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral radiographic stifle effusion was 13.4 at one year after diagnosis and 11.4 at two years. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral osteophytosis was 9.9 at one year after diagnosis. These odds ratios were associated with decreased time to contralateral CR. Breed, age, body weight, gender, and tibial plateau angle did not significantly influence time to contralateral CR. Conclusion Subsequent contralateral CR is significantly influenced by severity of radiographic stifle effusion and osteophytosis in the contralateral stifle, suggesting that synovitis and arthritic joint degeneration are significant factors in the disease mechanism underlying the arthropathy. PMID:25254499</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chuang, Connie; Ramaker, Megan A.; Kaur, Sirjaut; Csomos, Rebecca A.; Kroner, Kevin T.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Muir, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2930608"> <span id="translatedtitle">The impact of Vitamin C supplementation in pregnancy and in-vitro upon fetal membrane <span class="hlt">strength</span> and remodeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Generation of reactive-oxygen species (ROS) has been suggested as a mechanism of fetal membrane (FM) weakening leading to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, particularly with preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the fetal membranes (preterm PROM). In vitro, FM incubation with Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mimics physiological FM weakening, concomitant with generation of ROS and collagen remodeling. Proinflammatory cytokines are also postulated to have a role in the development of the FM physiological weak zone where <span class="hlt">rupture</span> normally initiates in term gestations. We hypothesized that antioxidant treatment may block ROS development and resultant FM weakening. Two studies examining antioxidant effects upon FM <span class="hlt">strength</span> were conducted, one in vivo and the other in vitro. FM of patients enrolled in a multicenter placebo-controlled trial to determine the effect of Vitamin C (1 gm/day) and Vitamin E (400IU/day) upon complications of preeclampsia were examined for FM biomechanical properties and biochemical remodeling at birth. Separately, biomechanics and biochemical markers of remodeling were determined in FM fragments incubated with TNF with or without Vitamin C pre-incubation. Supplemental dietary Vitamin C in combination with Vitamin E did not modify <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span>, work to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, or MMP9 (protein or activity) either within or outside the term FM physiological weak zone. In vitro, TNF decreased FM <span class="hlt">rupture</span> <span class="hlt">strength</span> by 50% while increasing MMP9 protein. Vitamin C did not inhibit these TNF-induced effects. Vitamin C alone had a weakening effect on FM in vitro. We speculate that vitamin C supplementation during pregnancy will not be useful in the prevention of preterm PROM. PMID:20581351</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mercer, Brian M.; Abdelrahim, Adli; Moore, Robert M.; Novak, Jillian; Kumar, Deepak; Mansour, Joseph M.; Perez-Fournier, Marina; Milluzzi, Cynthia J.; Moore, John J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25130942"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in complicated delivery: a case report and review of the literature.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of distal tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is described, literature review reveals two previously reported cases of neonatal distal tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as well as 14 cases of anterior subglottic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. All patients had shoulder dystocia, and 59% had associated brachial plexus injury. Delayed diagnosis (>3 days) was common in the distal tracheal group (66%), compared to 0% in the anterior subglottic group. The 2 distal tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> patients were initially managed conservatively, but ultimately required open repair. Distal tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is exceedingly rare and more difficult to diagnose and manage than the more common anterior subglottic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:25130942</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siegel, Bianca; Bent, John P; Weinstein, Samuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1091801"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evolution of the helicity and <span class="hlt">transversity</span> <span class="hlt">Transverse</span>-Momentum-Dependent parton distributions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and <span class="hlt">transversity</span> parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Prokudin, Alexey [JLAB; Bacchetta, Alessandro [INFN-PAVIA</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1110316"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evolution of the helicity and <span class="hlt">transversity</span> <span class="hlt">Transverse</span>-Momentum-Dependent parton distributions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and <span class="hlt">transversity</span> parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized <span class="hlt">transverse</span> momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Prokudin, Alexei [JLAB; Bacchetta, Alessandro [INFN-PAVIA</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=work+AND+risk&pg=5&id=EJ725757"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of Vulnerability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many aspects of our work with at-risk children are spiritual by nature. A whole generation of at-risk children are crying out and asking hard questions. Although we certainly will not have all the answers, a shared experience of the very vulnerability of our human condition can turn this into a <span class="hlt">strength</span> for us and our children. The authors propose</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gilliam, Bobby; Franklin, John Travis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15020216"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> instability at the recycler ring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sporadic <span class="hlt">transverse</span> instabilities have been observed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring leading to increase in <span class="hlt">transverse</span> emittances and beam loss. The driving source of these instabilities has been attributed to the resistive-wall impedance with space-charge playing an important role in suppressing Landau damping. Growth rates of the instabilities are computed. Remaining problems are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/309597"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Modes of Microchip Solid State Lasers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a model for an end pumped microchip solid state laser with plane-parallel cavity mirrors. Our model has a <span class="hlt">transversely</span> varying gain and gives the laser threshold, output intensity, frequency and the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> mode profiles in terms of the cavity detuning, cavity losses and other relevant parameters. We have also adapted the model to derive the pump threshold for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. K. Harkness; W. J. Firth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www-hermes.desy.de/notes/pub/TALK/fabbri.menu07.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Latest HERMES Results on <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Spin in</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Latest HERMES Results on <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Spin in Hadron Structure and Formation hermesRiccardo Fabbri Riccardo Fabbri MENU07, 11 Sept. 2007 <span class="hlt">Transversity</span> at HERMES 颅 p.1 #12;Proton Structure in HEP 3 Proton: inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (lP lX) u d u * (E, k )' ' P l (E, k) Riccardo Fabbri MENU07, 11 Sept</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890000168&hterms=laser+cladding&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dlaser%2Bcladding"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cladding For <span class="hlt">Transversely</span>-Pumped Laser Rod</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Combination of suitable dimensioning and cladding of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet of similar solid-state laser provides for more efficient utilization of <span class="hlt">transversely</span>-incident pump light from diode lasers. New design overcomes some of limitations of longitudinal- and older <span class="hlt">transverse</span>-pumping concepts and promotes operation at higher output powers in TEM00 mode.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Tso Yee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23879415"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laparoscopic correction of right <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colostomy prolapse.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Colostomy prolapse is a frequently seen complication of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colostomy. In one child with recurrent stoma prolapse, we performed a loop-to-loop fixation and peritoneal tethering laparoscopically. No prolapse had recurred at follow-up. Laparoscopic repair of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colostomy prolapse seems to be a less invasive method than other techniques. PMID:23879415</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gundogdu, Gokhan; Topuz, Ufuk; Umutoglu, Tarik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ltn.lv/~ryabov/poster2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CORONAL MAGNETOGRAPHY FROM QUASI -<span class="hlt">TRANSVERSE</span> PROPAGATION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of quasi-<span class="hlt">transverse</span> (QT-) propagation of microwaves in the low solar corona and some coronal magnetograms the determination of the distance between the microwave source and the coronal region of QT-propagation from the polarization inversion which is due to the quasi-<span class="hlt">transverse</span> (QT) propagation of microwaves</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryabov, Boris I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19225999"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of latissimus dorsi muscle in a tennis player.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the latissimus dorsi muscle is a rare injury, and few reported cases were avulsion injuries at their humeral insertion. Seven cases of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the latissimus dorsi muscle have been reported, but only 1 occurred at the myotendinous junction. The mechanism of this injury is reported to be forceful resisted arm adduction or extension, and reported injuries were rock climbing and attempting to pull up on an overhead handhold, waterskiing injury during pull-up with ski rope, overuse in golf in the leading arm, and abduction-external rotation with horizontally extended arm during a professional steer wrestling performance. The latissimus dorsi muscle is not a critical muscle for activities of daily living; however, the significance of the muscle is increased in professional or elite athletes. This article presents a case of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the latissimus dorsi muscle at the myotendinous junction that occurred during a sports activity. PMID:19225999</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, Jin-Young; Lhee, Sang-Hoon; Keum, Jeong-Sup</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8775340"> <span id="translatedtitle">Repair of ventricular septal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> through the right atrium.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The right atrial approach for repair of ventricular septal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with myocardial infarction is an alternative technique to the conventional approach of exposing the septum through the left ventricle. This technique may be combined with mitral valve replacement, infarct excision, or aneurysm resection, by avoiding a direct incision in the ventricle reduce postrepair bleeding and impairment of ventricular contractile function. We present a case of ventricular septal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> repaired through the right atrium and review our surgical technique. This technique may be applied to most cases of ventricular septal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and is particularly useful when the ventricular wall is not infarcted or aneurysmal, and the defect involves the central portion of the muscular septum, the inlet septum, and the subaortic and membranous area. PMID:8775340</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berrizbeitia, L D; McGrath, L B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10181223"> <span id="translatedtitle">Engineering evaluation of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> strainer in Building 309</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report deals with the consequences of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> steam strainer and is divided into two sections. Section 1 evaluates the engineering aspects of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> steam strainer, investigates the events that culminated in the damage and considers factors that may have contributed to the incident. Recommendations are presented to upgrade the system in Building 309 by incorporating hardware changes and proposes a change in operating procedures. Section 2 utilizes the findings presented in Section 1 as a basis for conducting a review on the remainder of the 300 Area steam system, in order to identify similar problem areas. Corrective action recommendations to reduce the risk of repeating component <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from water hammer conditions were developed out of the survey and the associated review.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Papenfuss, J.N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25516684"> <span id="translatedtitle">Emergency laparoscopic partial splenectomy for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen: a case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a common consequence of blunt abdominal trauma. Emergency splenectomy is indicated when conservative management is not effective. With better understanding of the immunologic function of the spleen, surgeons have begun to perform the splenic-preserving surgery. However, it is technical challenge to perform emergency laparoscopic partial splenectomy for patient with spleen <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. A 15-year-old male patient suffered from grade III spleen injury basing on the American association for the surgery of trauma splenic injury scale. Conservative treatment failed to success basing on the dramatically decreased hemoglobin level. During the laparoscopic exploration, we found that two individual <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were associated with the upper pole of spleen. An emergency laparoscopic partial splenectomy was successfully carried out. The operative time was approximate 150 min and the estimated blood loss was 200 mL. The post-operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 7(th) post-operative day. PMID:25516684</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cai, Yun-Qiang; Li, Chun-Lin; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xin; Peng, Bing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026333"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard for strike-slip earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present fault displacement data, regressions, and a methodology to calculate in both a probabilistic and deterministic framework the fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard for strike-slip faults. To assess this hazard we consider: (1) the size of the earthquake and probability that it will <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to the surface, (2) the rate of all potential earthquakes on the fault (3) the distance of the site along and from the mapped fault, (4) the complexity of the fault and quality of the fault mapping, (5) the size of the structure that will be placed at the site, and (6) the potential and size of displacements along or near the fault. Probabilistic fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard analysis should be an important consideration in design of structures or lifelines that are located within about 50m of well-mapped active faults.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petersen, M.; Cao, T.; Dawson, T.; Frankel, A.; Wills, C.; Schwartz, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2589064"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in infectious mononucleosis: a review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the spleen is a rare complication of infectious mononucleosis (IM) occurring in 0.1-0.5 percent of patients with proven IM [1]. Although splenectomy has been advocated as the definitive therapy in the past, numerous recent reports have documented favorable outcomes with non-operative management. A review of the literature suggests that non-operative management can be successful if appropriate criteria, such as hemodynamic stability and transfusion requirements are applied in patient selection. We report the case of a 36 year old man with infectious mononucleosis who had a spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and who was successfully managed by splenectomy. Based on review of the literature, an approach to management of a spontaneously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen secondary to IM is suggested. PMID:9493849</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Asgari, M. M.; Begos, D. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4276298"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Case of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Splenic Artery Aneurysm in Pregnancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a splenic artery aneurysm is rare complication of pregnancy that is associated with a significant maternal and fetal mortality. Case. A multiparous female presented in the third trimester with hypotension, tachycardia, and altered mental status. A <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> splenic artery aneurysm was discovered at the time of laparotomy and cesarean delivery. The patient made a full recovery following resection of the aneurysm. The neonate survived but suffered severe neurologic impairment. Conclusion. The diagnosis of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> splenic artery aneurysm should be considered in a pregnant woman presenting with signs of intra-abdominal hemorrhage. Early intervention by a multidisciplinary surgical team is key to preserving the life of the mother and fetus. PMID:25574408</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corey, Elizabeth K.; Harvey, Scott A.; Sauvage, Lynnae M.; Bohrer, Justin C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970027545&hterms=heusler&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dheusler"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Hf-Rich Particles on the Creep Life of a High-<span class="hlt">strength</span> Nial Single Crystal Alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Additions of small amounts of Hf and Si to NiAl single crystals significantly improve their high-temperature <span class="hlt">strength</span> and creep properties. However, if large Hf-rich dendritic particles formed during casting of the alloyed single crystals are not dissolved completely during homogenization heat treatment, a large variation in creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life can occur. This behavior, observed in five samples of a Hf containing NiAl single crystal alloy tested at 1144 K under an initial stress of 241.4 MPa, is described in detail highlighting the role of interdendritic Hf-rich particles in limiting creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Garg, A.; Raj, S. V.; Darolia, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4321505"> <span id="translatedtitle">PIP breast implants: <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate and correlation with breast cancer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim To evaluate the incidence of Poly Implant Prosth閟e (PIP) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the prevalence of the detected signs and the potential correlation with breast carcinoma. Patients and methods 67 patients with silicone breast implants and clinical indications for breast MRI were evaluated for a total of 125 implants: 40 (32%) PIP in 21 patients and 85 non-PIP in 46 patients (68%), the latest considered as control group. A 1.5-T MR imaging device was used in order to assess implant integrity with dedicated sequences and in 6 cases a dynamic study was performed for characterizing breast lesions. Two radiologists with more than 5 years experience in the field of MRI evaluated in consensus all MR images searching for the presence of clear signs of intra or extra-capsular implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Results 20/40 (50%) PIP implants presented signs of intra-capsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: linguine sign in 20 cases (100%), tear-drop sign in 6 (30%). In 12/20 cases (60%), MRI signs of extra-capsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> were detected. In the control group, an intra-capsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was diagnosed in 12/85 cases (14%) associated with extra-capsular one in 5/12 cases (42%). Among the six cases with suspected breast lesions, in 2/21 patients with PIP implants (10%) a breast carcinoma was diagnosed (mucinous carcinoma, n=1; invasive ductal carcinoma, n=1). In 4/46 patients (9%) with non-PIP implants, an invasive ductal carcinoma was diagnosed. Conclusion The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate of PIP breast implants is significantly higher than non-PIP (50% vs 14%). MRI represents the most accurate imaging tool for evaluating breast prostheses and the linguine sign is the most common MRI sign to be searched. The incidence of breast carcinoma does not significantly differ between the PIP and non-PIP implants and a direct correlation with breast cancer can not been demonstrated. PMID:25644728</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MOSCHETTA, M.; TELEGRAFO, M.; CORNACCHIA, I.; VINCENTI, L.; RANIERI, V.; CIRILLI, A.; RELLA, L.; IANORA, A.A. STABILE; ANGELELLI, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4310132"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rapid aneurysm growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in systemic lupus erythematosus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to intracranial aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a major neurosurgical emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Rapid aneurysm growth is associated with <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disorder whose complications can include cerebral vasculitis and vasculopathy. Intracranial aneurysms are not known to occur more frequently in SLE patients than the general population; however, aneurysm growth rates have not been studied in SLE. Case Description: We present a 43-year-old female with SLE on prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, and azathioprine with moderate disease activity who presented with severe, acute-onset headache and was found to have Hunt and Hess grade II SAH due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an 8 mm saccular anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm. The patient developed severe vasospasm, re-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, and was taken for angiography and embolization, which was challenging due to a high degree of vasospasm and arterial stenosis. Review of imaging from less than 2 years prior demonstrated a normal ACoA complex without evidence of an aneurysm. Conclusion: We review the literature and discuss the risk factors and pathophysiology of rapid aneurysm growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as well as the pathologic vascular changes associated with SLE. Although SLE patients do not develop intracranial aneurysm at an increased rate, these changes may predispose them to higher incidence of growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This possibility-coupled with increased morbidity and mortality of SAH in SLE-suggests that SAH should be considered in SLE patients presenting with headache, and advocates for more aggressive treatment of SLE patients with unruptured aneurysms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Graffeo, Christopher S.; Tanweer, Omar; Nieves, Cesar Fors; Belmont, H. Michael; Izmirly, Peter M.; Becske, Tibor; Huang, Paul P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3862203"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinical Characteristics and Surgical Problems of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Globe Injury?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Ocular trauma is a major cause of vision loss, especially in the young patients, and is the leading cause of unilateral blind in China. Objective The aims of this report are to analyze ciliary and choroidal lesion characteristics and outcomes of a group of patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globe injuries and discuss finding a more effective treatment protocol. Here we report our experience treating <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globe injuries. Methods Seventy-five patients (75 eyes) with a diagnosis of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globe injuries were selected from 264 patients with open globe injuries at the Shierming Eye Hospital of Shandong Province between January 2009 and December 2011. General information and clinical characteristics such as ciliary and choroidal lesion features were reviewed. Results Of the 75 patients, 85.3% were men, and the average age of the patients was 37.2 years (range, 663 years). The right eye was injured in 52.0%; enucleation was performed in 9 patients. There was no light perception, in the final corrected visual acuity in another 3 patients. The ratio of better visual acuity (better than 0.1) increased from 0 preoperatively to 16.0% postoperatively. Among the 75 patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globe injuries, 13 had ciliary injury and 47 (62.7%) had choroidal injuries. Both ciliary and choroidal injuries were detected in 15 patients. Retinal tissue incarceration during sclera suturing was usually the vital point leading to unfavorable results. Conclusions <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> globe injury usually results in severe visual acuity damage. Active treatment could help to restore visual acuity in patients to some degree. Some effective treatment protocols for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globe injuries could be followed. Some unsuitable procedures in primary treatment should be avoided to achieve a better prognosis. PMID:24385006</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bi, Hongsheng; Cui, Yan; Li, Yang; Wang, Xingrong; Zhang, Jianhua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23622508"> <span id="translatedtitle">A broken heart: right ventricular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after blunt cardiac injury.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 68 year old woman who was a restrained driver was brought to the hospital after sustaining severe motor vehicle accident. She underwent CT of the chest demonstrating pulmonary infiltrates, multiple rib fractures, bilateral hemo- and pneumothoraces. Subsequent review of the images noted contrast extravasating from the apical portion of the right ventricle into the pericardial space, demonstrating a confined <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of right ventricle. Cardiac <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a common complication of a rare event and there are few examples in the imaging literature capturing such event. PMID:23622508</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nabeel, Muhammad; Williams, Kim Allan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24292386"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supraspinatus <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the musculotendinous junction in a young woman.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The vast majority of rotator cuff tears occur within the tendon or as an avulsion from the greater tuberosity. Supraspinatus injury at the musculotendinous junction is a very uncommon event. We describe a case of supraspinatus <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the musculotendinous junction, with successful conservative treatment. It occurred in a 23-year-old woman, the youngest patient with this uncommon type of injury. To our knowledge, this is the first case of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the supraspinatus muscle at the musculotendinous junction in a young woman and the second in a woman. PMID:24292386</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benazzo, Francesco; Marullo, Matteo; Pietrobono, Luigi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4216311"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seminoma presented as testicular <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: Case report and literature review</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the testis as a result of blunt trauma is rarely seen in daily urological practice. We report an unusual case of incidental seminoma diagnosed after surgical exploration and subsequent orchidectomy of a severed testis following testicular injury as a result of trivial blunt trauma. This case highlights the inability of investigative tools, such as a scrotal ultrasound, in distinguishing an underlying tumour in the presence of testicular parenchymal damage. We therefore advocate a high index of clinical suspicion for co-existing pathology in cases of testicular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> secondary to an insignificant blunt trauma to the scrotum. PMID:25408819</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lunawat, Rahul; Craciun, Marius; Omorphos, Savvas; Weston, Philip M.T.; Biyani, Shekhar C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25410030"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of sternocleidomastoid muscle following an epileptic seizure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 29-year-old man, a known epileptic, presented to an accident and emergency department following a tonic-clonic seizure, suffering a second seizure in the department. Subsequently, he reported neck pain, swelling and stiffness. An otorhinolaryngology neck examination revealed a tender left side with two palpable masses and a reduced range of movement. Ultrasound confirmed a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> middle third of the left sternocleidomastoid muscle, which was successfully treated non-surgically with analgaesia and intensive physiotherapy. Uncommonly, sternocleidomastoid muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been reported following high-velocity trauma, but to the best of our knowledge this is the first case described in the literature following an epileptic seizure. PMID:25410030</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wooles, Nicola Rachel; Bell, Philip Robert; Korda, Marian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3680613"> <span id="translatedtitle">Massive Spontaneous Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Induced by a Squatting Position</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While a diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> commonly results from trauma to the abdomen and chest, a spontaneous diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is very rare. A 68-year-old male presented with chest pain that had originated while doing farm work in a squatting position. Images revealed a 5 cm defect of the left diaphragmatic dome, and the entire stomach was displaced into the thorax. The diaphragmatic defect was round and half had a well-demarcated margin. The remaining fragile tissue was completely excised and was closed primarily. The patient was uneventfully discharged and resumed with a normal diet 10 days after the operation. PMID:23772415</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Su Wan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4293197"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Intercostal Arterial <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Restrained by Conservative Management</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A spontaneous intercostal arterial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in patients without associated illness or trauma is extremely rare. We present a 58-year-old man with an idiopathic and spontaneous arterial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> restrained by conservative management. He was admitted to our institute with an intermittent back pain lasting for 3 days. His past history included no notable diseases and chest trauma. An enhanced computed tomography revealed an effusion of blood around the descending aorta and hematoma from right 10th intercostal artery. Management of blood pressure and administration of tranexamic acid were performed and he was uneventfully discharged at 11 days after onset.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ishida, Atsuhisa; Chikazawa, Genta; Maeda, Kazuki; Yoshitaka, Hidenori</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24386587"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> common femoral artery aneurysm or abdominal aortic aneurysm?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We encountered a patient with a large retroperitoneal hematoma due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a common femoral artery aneurysm. A 77-year-old man was transferred to our hospital with left groin pain and shock. Computed tomography demonstrated a large retroperitoneal hematoma involving the left iliofemoral segment with extravasation of contrast into the left groin from a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> left common femoral artery aneurysm. The patient also had an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Reconstruction of the common femoral artery with a graft was performed successfully. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and subsequently underwent Y-graft replacement of the abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:24386587</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Niino, Tetsuya; Unosawa, Satoshi; Kimura, Haruka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608624"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Liver <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> After Treatment With Drug-Eluting Beads</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a rare and life-threatening complication. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are not yet fully known; it is suggested that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is preceded by reactive tissue edema and intratumerous bleeding, leading to a rapid expansion of tumour mass with risk of extrahepatic bleeding in the case of subcapsular localisation. This case report discusses a sudden, unexpected lethal complication in a 74 year-old male patient treated with TACE using DC Bead loaded with doxorubicin (DEBDOX) in a progressive multifocal HCC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ritter, C. O., E-mail: ritter@roentgen.uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology (Germany); Wartenberg, M.; Mottok, A. [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Steger, U. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of General, Visceral, Vascular, and Pediatric Surgery (Germany); Goltz, J. P.; Hahn, D.; Kickuth, R. [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/274278"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of the geometrical structural paramaters on the <span class="hlt">strength</span> properties of hard alloys based on titanium carbide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experimental data on the <span class="hlt">strength</span> properties of titanium carbide hard alloys prepared under different sintering conditions were obtained. The relationship of properties to the geometrical structural parameters is elucidated. It was established that the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> bend <span class="hlt">strength</span> increases with decrease in the degree of contact of the carbide grains.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koval`chenko, M.S.; Laptev, A.V.; Sverdel, V.V.; Yurchuk, N.A. [Institute of Materials Science Problems, Kiev (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.S23A2118N"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> propagation patterns of deep low-frequency earthquakes depending on source structure and frictional property: numerical analysis based on dynamic model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Deep nonvolcanic tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurred along the subduction zones in southwest Japan and Cascadia are explained as shear slips on the plate interface [Ide et al., 2007a], and are considered as <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of relatively unstable patches within the region where slow slip event (SSE) occurs [Ito et al., 2007]. The tremor sources migrate with the velocity of about 10 km/day along strike [Obara, 2002], and 100 km/hour along dip [Shelly et al., 2007]. Further, the moment rate spectra of the LFEs have a tendency that decay at the inverse proportional to the frequency [Ide et al., 2007b]. To explain these anisotropies of migration speed and spectral property, Ando et al. [2010] proposed a dynamic model that unstable patches <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by passing stress pulse of SSE over the patches. The aim of this study is to investigate the frictional properties and detailed structure of LFE source to explain the spectral characteristics and moment rate function based on their model. The LFE source model comprises clustered unstable patches. To model the source process, which radiates seismic waves, we employed the dynamic boundary integral equation method [Ando and Yamashita, 2007] in a 3D full space with a triangular mesh [Tada, 2006]. Within these clusters, some fluctuations are added so that the locations and sizes of their constituent patches follow a Gaussian distribution. We present physical quantities in nondimensionalized form. In this study, we modeled an LFE source with many small patches or large several patches distributed in dense or sparse. For each patch distributions, we calculated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation with various values of the patch viscosity, background viscosity, and background frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span>. In the simulations, both passive and spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> appear depending on the viscosity, frictional <span class="hlt">strength</span>, and patch distribution. The former is caused by the assumed stress pulse and the latter is by interaction between the patches and/or stress relaxation on the background. In spite of such various <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation style, the spectral property of the observed LFEs and tremor can be explained by calculated moment rate functions when the patch distribution is sparse enough or the background viscosity and/or <span class="hlt">strength</span> are high enough. On the other hand, these variations in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation style were reflected in the shape of the moment rate functions. Some moment rate functions with various background viscosities showed similar characteristics to observed waveforms of isolated LFEs and long-duration tremor. Therefore the observed waveforms may provide us information about source structure and frictional properties of LFEs and tremor based on our dynamic model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nakata, R.; Ando, R.; Hori, T.; Ide, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3927114"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transcatheter closure of sinus of Valsalva aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a young patient</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare cardiac anomaly and demands prompt treatment. We present a case of a young patient who underwent transcatheter closure due to a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> sinus of Valsalva aneurysm. PMID:24570758</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sat?lm??, Se鏺in; Bozbeyo?lu, Emrah; Y?ld?r?mt黵k, 謟lem; Y?ld?r?m, Ayd?n</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/fitexplorer/train/N_CrewStrength_detail.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crew <span class="hlt">Strength</span> Training</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this activity, learners will train to develop upper and lower body <span class="hlt">strength</span> in their muscles and bones by performing body-weight squats and push-ups. Learners perform the exercises over time (week or month) and record and graph their observations. This activity simulates how astronauts must participate in <span class="hlt">strength</span> training prior to missions in order to compensate for the weakening of muscles and bones in the reduced gravity environment of space. An embedded video on this page showcases the activity. Learners can complete this activity as part of NASA's Fit Explorer Challenge, in which learners train like astronauts, set goals, track their progress, and accumulate points to progress through Exploration Levels and earn certificates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Center, Nasa J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930084914&hterms=CHROMIUM+CARBIDE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DCHROMIUM%2BCARBIDE"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Surface Treatment on the <span class="hlt">Strength</span> of a Titanium Carbide - 30 Percent Nickel Base Cermet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Specimens of a nickel-bonded titanium carbide cermet were given the following surface treatments: (1) grinding, (2) lapping, (3) blast cleaning, (4) acid roughening, (5) oxidizing, and (6) oxidizing and refinishing. Room-temperature modulus-of-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> and impact <span class="hlt">strength</span> varied with the different surface treatments. Considerable <span class="hlt">strength</span> losses resulted from the following treatments: (1) oxidation at 1600 F for 100 hours, (2) acid roughening, and (3) severe grinding with 60-grit silicon carbide abrasive. The <span class="hlt">strength</span> loss after oxidation was partially recovered by grit blasting or diamond grinding.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robins, Leonard; Grala, Edward M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1957-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3485682"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Strength</span> and Fracture Origins of a Feldspathic Porcelain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objectives To identify the <span class="hlt">strength</span> limiting flaws in in-vitro test specimens of a fine-grained feldspathic dental porcelain. Methods Four-point flexural <span class="hlt">strengths</span> were measured for 26 test specimens. The fracture origin site of every test specimen was studied using stereoptical and scanning electron microscopy. A fractographically-labeled Weibull <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution graph was prepared. Results The complex microstructure of the feldspathic dental porcelain included a variety of feldspars, tridymite, and a feldspathoid as well as pores/bubbles and residual glass. The relatively high flexural <span class="hlt">strength</span> is due in part to the fine grain size. Fractography revealed five flaw types that controlled <span class="hlt">strength</span>: baseline microstructural flaws, pores/bubbles, side wall grinding damage, corner machining damage, and inclusions. The baseline microstructural flaws probably were clusters of particular crystalline phases. Significance Each flaw type probably has a different severity and size distribution, and hence has a different <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution. The Weibull <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution graph blended the <span class="hlt">strength</span> distributions of the five flaw types and the apparent good fit of the combined data to a unimodal <span class="hlt">strength</span> distribution was misleading. Polishing failed to eliminate deeper <span class="hlt">transverse</span> grinding cracks and corner damage from earlier preparation steps in many of the test pieces. Bend bars should be prepared carefully with longitudinal surface grinding whenever possible and edge chamfers should be carefully applied. If the grinding and preparation flaws were eliminated, the Weibull modulus for this feldspathic porcelain would be greater than 30. Pores/bubbles sometimes controlled <span class="hlt">strength</span>, but only if they touched each other or an exposed surface. Isolated interior bubble/pores were harmless. PMID:22217606</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quinn, George D.; Hoffman, Kathleen; Quinn, Janet B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24950170"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous flexor tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous flexor tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is an unusual complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has not previously been reported. While tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in association with SLE have been focused on the previous studies, upper extremity tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we present an uncommon case of spontaneous flexor tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the ring and little fingers in a patient with SLE and discuss the mechanism of injury and its surgical treatment. PMID:24950170</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Kishida, Aiko; Taniguchi, Daigo; Seno, Takahiro; Kawahito, Yutaka; Kubo, Toshikazu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23493342"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computational fluid dynamics simulation of an anterior communicating artery <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> during angiography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the hemodynamic environment of an anterior communicating artery that spontaneously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> immediately following three-dimensional rotational angiography. Subsequent digital subtraction angiography allowed for the localization of the point of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> within the aneurysm dome. CFD analysis demonstrated a concentrated jet that impinged directly at the site of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Peak systolic pressure and wall shear stress were both maximal near the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> location. PMID:23493342</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hodis, Simona; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Kallmes, David F; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4261494"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Colon Diverticulitis with Calcified Fecalith</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Left colonic diverticula are common in Western populations, whereas right colonic diverticulosis primarily occurs in Oriental populations. Diverticulitis of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colon is very rare, with very few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of <span class="hlt">transverse</span> colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone in a 69-year-old female. This was a solitary diverticulum. The signs and symptoms of the disease are similar to acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings of a patient with <span class="hlt">trans-verse</span> colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Solak, Aynur; Solak, Ilhami; Gen, Berhan; Sahin, Neslin; Yalaz, Seyhan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/808378"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ferroelectric Cathodes in <span class="hlt">Transverse</span> Magnetic Fields</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the <span class="hlt">transverse</span> magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-07-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1410.4859v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Properties and applications of <span class="hlt">transversal</span> operators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents some properties and applications of "<span class="hlt">transversal</span> operators". Two <span class="hlt">transversal</span> operators are presented: a "translation" operator T and a "dilation" operator D. Such operators are used in common analysis systems including Fourier series analysis, Fourier analysis, Gabor analysis, multiresolution analysis (MRA), and wavelet analysis. Like the unitary Fourier transform operator F, the <span class="hlt">transversal</span> operators T and D are unitary. Demonstrations of the usefulness of these three unitary operators are found in the proofs of results found in some common analytic systems including MRA analysis and wavelet analysis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daniel J. Greenhoe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3387331"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the subscapularis tendon in an arm wrestler.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rotator cuff injuries, especially in athletes, can be very disabling. A case of an isolated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the subscapularis tendon in an arm wrestler is reported. Preoperative arthrogram and CT scan with intraoperative pictures are used to illustrate the pathology. Recommendation for treatment is surgical repair. PMID:3387331</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biondi, J; Bear, T F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000755&hterms=metal-oxide-semiconductor+transistors&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dmetal-oxide-semiconductor%2Btransistors"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analyzing Single-Event Gate <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> In Power MOSFET's</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Susceptibilities of power metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) to single-event gate <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> analyzed by exposing devices to beams of energetic bromine ions while applying appropriate bias voltages to source, gate, and drain terminals and measuring current flowing into or out of each terminal.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zoutendyk, John A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/464297"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Loop Annex (RLA) ion exchange vault entry and characterization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This engineering report documents the entry and characterization of the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located near the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns were found in the vault. Some of which contained transuranics, Cs 137, and Co 60. The characterization information is necessary for future vault cleanout and column disposal.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ham, J.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6644869"> <span id="translatedtitle">New finding in the radiographic diagnosis of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors describe a new radiographic sign of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the Achilles tendon system. It is a fracture, with separation through an osteophyte at the insertion of this tendon. Previously reported signs are also discussed as well as the present case report.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newmark, H.; Mellon, W.S. Jr.; Malhotra, A.K.; Olken, S.M.; Halls, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139f5101N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anthrax toxin-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of artificial lipid bilayer membranes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=35622"> <span id="translatedtitle">PROTOTYPE SYSTEM FOR PLUGGING LEAKS IN <span class="hlt">RUPTURED</span> CONTAINERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A development program was performed successfully to develop and test a prototype system for temporarily stopping the flow of hazardous materials spilling on land or underwater from <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> or damaged containers. The prototype system is portable, integrated, and field-operable by...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24286667"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolated splenic peliosis with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after a viperine bite.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Isolated splenic peliosis is an extremely uncommon condition that can present with atraumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and potential fatal outcome. We here report 1 such case that developed after a viperine bite in a 21-year-old woman. The case highlights the diagnostic findings on computed tomographic (CT) scan and its potential complications. PMID:24286667</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lal, Anupam; Singhal, Manphool; Sharma, Navneet; Bhalla, Ashish; Khandelwal, Niranjan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800024516&hterms=Griffith+Observatory&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DGriffith%2BObservatory"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theory of time-dependent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the Earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fracture mechanics is used to develop a theory of earthquake mechanism which includes the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth. The following phenomena are predicted: slow earthquakes, multiple events, delayed multiple events (doublets), postseismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth and afterslip, foreshocks, and aftershocks. The theory predicts a nucleation stage prior to an earthquake, and suggests a physical mechanism by which one earthquake may 'trigger' another.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Das, S.; Scholz, C. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25368704"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous postpartum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an intact uterus: a case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of uterus is an obstetrical complication characterized by a breach in the uterine wall and the overlying serosa. We report an unusual case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an unscarred uterus in a 33-year-old woman, a day after her third successful vaginal delivery. A 33-year-old pregnant woman, gravid 3, para 3, was referred to our department at 39 gestational week because of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes. Despite tocolysis administration, her pregnancy was delivered vaginally after 2 days, giving birth to a male neonate of 3,020 g with normal Apgar scores at first and fifth minute. Her uterus was intact and gynecological examination after delivery was normal without any potential signs or symptoms of pathology. However, the day following her labor, patient complained of left iliac fossa pain. Her blood tests revealed a CRP value at 27.6 mg/L, whereas the X-rays revealed an extensive impacted fecal mass in the colon. MRI revealed that the left lower myometrial part of the uterus was depicted abrupt, with simultaneous presence of hemorrhagic stuff. The decision of laparotomy was therefore made in order to further evaluate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of uterus and properly treat patient. And subtotal hysterectomy was performed. Postoperative follow-up period was not characterized by any complications and patient was finally discharged 4 days after hysterectomy. PMID:25368704</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mavromatidis, George; Karavas, George; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Petousis, Stamatios; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Rousso, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/jb0711/2007JB005027/2007JB005027.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Role of fault branches in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagating along a straight 搈ain fault and encountering a finite-length branch fault. Such intersections are often observed in natural fault systems. The predicted effects of the interaction with the branch that we report can be remarkable; they can strongly perturb the propagation velocity on the main fault and, in some cases, even arrest that propagation. Earlier</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harsha S. Bhat; Marion Olives; Renata Dmowska; James R. Rice</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40385788"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnitude scaling of the near fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity pulse</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current ground motion models all assume monotonically increasing spectral amplitude at all periods with increasing magnitude. However, near fault recordings from recent earthquakes confirm that the near fault fault-normal forward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity velocity pulse is a narrow band pulse whose period increases with magnitude. This magnitude dependence of the period of the near fault pulse is expected from theory, because</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul G. Somerville</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870006230&hterms=Victor+Bautista&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DVictor%2BBautista"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanics of shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> applied to earthquake zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The mechanics of shear slippage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in rock masses are reviewed. The essential ideas in fracture mechanics are summarized emphasizing the interpretation and relation among the fracture parameters in shear cracks. The slip-weakening model is described. The general formulation of the problem of nonuniform slip distribution in a continuum is covered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Victor C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31740748"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of aortic aneurysms following endovascular stent grafting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Deployment of transfemoral, endovascular stent grafts for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms is appealing for several reasons: avoidance of abdominal incision, lack of aortic cross-clamping, potential for regional anesthesia, and shortened hospital stay. Concerns remain, however, regarding the ability of these devices to completely exclude the aneurysm and prevent aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the long-term integrity of the device. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alan B. Lumsden; Robert C. Allen; Elliot L. Chaikof; Michael Resnikoff; Mark W. Moritz; Harvey Gerhard; John J. Castronuovo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.tecn.upf.es/~jbisbal/publications/DEXA2011.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of Cerebral Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> using Hemodynamic, Morphologic and Clinical</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prediction of Cerebral Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> using Hemodynamic, Morphologic and Clinical Features赂cats (ICREA), Barcelona, Spain jesus.bisbal@upf.edu Abstract. Cerebral aneurysms pose a major clinical threat of the patient and characteristics of the aneurysm. The dataset used included 157 cases, with 294 features each</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Riera, Jes煤s Bisbal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1502.03623.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Force-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a DNA duplex</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article we consider the shear-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> a duplex within a given experiment depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to demonstrate that this approach naturally captures the experimentally observed dependence of the critical force on duplex length for a given observation time. In particular, the critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mosayebi, Majid; Doye, Jonathan P K; Ouldridge, Thomas E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mutation&pg=7&id=EJ780661"> <span id="translatedtitle">"The Little Gray Book": Pedagogy, Discourse and <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in 1937</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1937, the Ministry of Education in Ontario published a document entitled "Programme of Studies for Grades 1 to VI of Public and Separate Schools" that became known amongst teachers as the "little gray book". The curriculum and pedagogy in the document enunciated a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or mutation in pedagogical discourse that broke with previously existing</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Milewski, Patrice</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25544065"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessing the potential risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysms.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) involve complex interplays between inflammatory and biomechanical factors that can be elucidated with anatomical and functional imaging. Although AAA size has been well-established in the literature to correlate with risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (and subsequent need for vascular intervention), there are other less-well-known characteristics about AAAs that also contribute to higher risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This review focuses on biomechanical, radiological, and epidemiological characteristics of AAAs that are associated with higher <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk. For clinicians, knowing and considering a wide variety of risk factors in addition to AAA size is important to initiate early and proper intervention for AAA repair. Although there is no official quantitative risk score of AAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk that takes other non-size-related variables into account, if clinicians are aware of these other parameters, it is hoped that intervention can be appropriately performed for higher-risk AAAs that have not met the size-threshold for elective repair. PMID:25544065</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khan, S; Verma, V; Verma, S; Polzer, S; Jha, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://esag.harvard.edu/dmowska/DeDontneyTeRiDm_BimatDirectiv_JGR11.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of plastic deformation on bimaterial fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">accumulate in either the stiffer or the more compliant material. For high angles of most compressive stress predominately accumulates. The orientation of the most compressive principal stress is the controlling factor reverse that direction for low angles of most compressive stress so that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> will preferentially</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dmowska, Renata</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70022078"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of moderate earthquakes by inverting accelerograms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a waveform inversion method that uses recordings of small events as Green's functions to map the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth of moderate earthquakes. The method fits P and S waveforms from many stations simultaneously in an iterative procedure to estimate the subevent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time and amplitude relative to the Green's function event. We invert the accelerograms written by two moderate Parkfield earthquakes using smaller events as Green's functions. The first earthquake (M = 4.6) occurred on November 14, 1993, at a depth of 11 km under Middle Mountain, in the assumed preparation zone for the next Parkfield main shock. The second earthquake (M = 4.7) occurred on December 20, 1994, some 6 km to the southeast, at a depth of 9 km on a section of the San Andreas fault with no previous microseismicity and little inferred coseismic slip in the 1966 Parkfield earthquake. The inversion results are strikingly different for the two events. The average stress release in the 1993 event was 50 bars, distributed over a geometrically complex area of 0.9 km2. The average stress release in the 1994 event was only 6 bars, distributed over a roughly elliptical area of 20 km2. The <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of both events appear to grow spasmodically into relatively complex shapes: the inversion only constrains the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> to grow more slowly than the S wave velocity but does not use smoothness constraints. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hellweg, M.; Boatwright, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29798953"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular Repair of Nontraumatic <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Thoracic Aortic Pathologies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Endovascular repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is receiving increased attention as the number of experienced users increases. Development of thoracic aortic stent grafts has lagged behind infrarenal advancements because of the reported prevalence of disease. In a few centers, however, the experience in performing thoracic stent graft procedures is quite substantial, such that endovascular therapy has been</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mark A. Farber; Frank J. Criado</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30772933"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advances in the surgical repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the past two decades, the mortality rate for elective repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms has improved to an acceptable level (<5%). However, surgical results of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms have remained fairly constant with about 50% in hospital mortality rates. Growing experience with the use of the left retroperitoneal exposure for elective aortic surgery allowed the authors to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. C Darling; J. A Cordero; B. B Chang; D. M Shah; P. S. K Paty; W. E Lloyd; R. P Leather</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61350953"> <span id="translatedtitle">Semiscale steam-generator tube-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> test results. [PWR</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Semiscale Program and Test facility are located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and operated by EG and G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. The system is a small-scale model of the primary coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear generating plant. An experimental program designed to provide data from steam generator tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dimenna</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4217756"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Postpartum <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an Intact Uterus: A Case Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of uterus is an obstetrical complication characterized by a breach in the uterine wall and the overlying serosa. We report an unusual case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an unscarred uterus in a 33-year-old woman, a day after her third successful vaginal delivery. A 33-year-old pregnant woman, gravid 3, para 3, was referred to our department at 39 gestational week because of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes. Despite tocolysis administration, her pregnancy was delivered vaginally after 2 days, giving birth to a male neonate of 3,020 g with normal Apgar scores at first and fifth minute. Her uterus was intact and gynecological examination after delivery was normal without any potential signs or symptoms of pathology. However, the day following her labor, patient complained of left iliac fossa pain. Her blood tests revealed a CRP value at 27.6 mg/L, whereas the X-rays revealed an extensive impacted fecal mass in the colon. MRI revealed that the left lower myometrial part of the uterus was depicted abrupt, with simultaneous presence of hemorrhagic stuff. The decision of laparotomy was therefore made in order to further evaluate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of uterus and properly treat patient. And subtotal hysterectomy was performed. Postoperative follow-up period was not characterized by any complications and patient was finally discharged 4 days after hysterectomy. PMID:25368704</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mavromatidis, George; Karavas, George; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Petousis, Stamatios; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Rousso, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29553805"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early aortic valve cusp <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in relapsing polychondritis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aortic regurgitation associated with relapsing polychondritis usually occurs late in the disease as a result of aortic root dilatation. A case where aortic regurgitation occurred early and was due to cusp <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with a normal aortic root is reported. The patient required urgent aortic valve replacement within six weeks of developing a murmur despite apparent control of inflammation with immunosuppressive</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D A Marshall; R Jackson; A P Rae; H A Capell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/33839836"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synchronous moyamoya syndrome and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysm in Alagille syndrome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Moyamoya syndrome and cerebral aneurysm formation are rare cerebrovascular manifestations of Alagille syndrome. Although previously reported in isolation, occurrence of these complications in a single patient has not been described. We report clinical and imaging features of synchronous moyamoya syndrome and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysm in a patient with Alagille syndrome.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ron C. Gaba; Rajesh P. Shah; Andrew A. Muskovitz; Grace Guzman; Edward A. Michals</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53248494"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predictions for tantalum alloy T-111</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A knowledge of the short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John J. Stephens</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1523371"> <span id="translatedtitle">Splenic peliosis with spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: report of two cases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Peliosis is a rare condition characterised by multiple cyst-like, blood-filled cavities within the parenchyma of solid organs. Most commonly affecting the liver, isolated splenic peliosis is an even more unique phenomenon. Patients with the condition are often asymptomatic. However, this potentially lethal condition can present with spontaneous organ <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We present two such cases, discuss their management and review what is currently known in the existing literature. Case presentation A previously well twenty-six year old woman presented with abdominal pain following a trivial episode of coughing. A diagnosis of spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was made following clinical and radiological examination. She underwent emergency splenectomy and made a full, uneventful recovery. Histopathological examination confirmed splenic peliosis. The second case describes an eighty six year old lady who sustained a trivial fall and developed pain in her left side. A CT confirmed splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. She became haemodynamically unstable during her admission and underwent emergency splenectomy. Histopathological examination revealed splenic peliosis. She went on to make an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Splenic peliosis is very rare. It has a number of associations including immunosuppression, drug therapy and infection. Although patients are often asymptomatic, life-threatening spontaneous organ <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may occur. If the diagnosis of peliosis is confirmed, additional investigations should be considered to detect its presence in other organs. Furthermore, the presence of the condition may be relevant if further medical or surgical intervention is planned. PMID:16800889</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lashbrook, Daniel J; James, Roger W; Phillips, Andrea J; Holbrook, Anthony G; Agombar, Andrew C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52929383"> <span id="translatedtitle">Role of fault branches in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagating along a straight ``main'' fault and encountering a finite-length branch fault. Such intersections are often observed in natural fault systems. The predicted effects of the interaction with the branch that we report can be remarkable; they can strongly perturb the propagation velocity on the main fault and, in some cases, even arrest that propagation. Earlier</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harsha S. Bhat; Marion Olives; Renata Dmowska; James R. Rice</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29145937"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fungal bezoar and bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> secondary to Candida tropicalis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Candidal urinary tract infections typically occur in a host with compromised immune function. Although usually associated with aerobic bacterial infections, emphysematous cystitis occasionally complicates fungal infections of the lower urinary tract, especially in diabetics. Another uncommon occurrence is formation of a 揻ungus ball leading to obstructive uropathy. We present a case of bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a patient with emphysematous cystitis</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Craig V Comiter; Michael McDonald; Jane Minton; Subbarao V Yalla</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www5.pbrc.hawaii.edu/faculty/former/gbg/me/pdf/09.Human%20Fetal%20Membranes.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Human Fetal Membranes: Their Preterm Premature <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>1 [Create Reference</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">difficulties for the family unit. Preterm birth can occur secondary to preterm labor, preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> labor, defined as regular uterine contractions with progressive cervical dilatation [1] . Preterm birth Reference] TABLE OF CONTENTS [INTRODUCTION] [PRETERM LABOR...] [DECIDUAL/PLACENTAL RELAXINS, A FOCUSED STUDY</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bryant-Greenwood, Gillian D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://rses.anu.edu.au/~nick/teachdoc/papers/Lomax_Michelini_2009.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tsunami early warning