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Sample records for tristeza virus isolate

  1. Molecular Characterization of Citrus tristeza virus Isolates from Panama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were collected from the main citrus growing regions in Panama and characterized at the molecular level. The CTV coat protein gene (CPG) was amplified by RT-PCR, and the amplified PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The sequences analyses showed the ...

  2. Molecular Characterization of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates from Mild Strain Cross Protection Experiments in Peru

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) collected from the Topara Nursery, Lima, Peru were established as in planta cultures in Madam Vinous sweet orange in the Exotic Citrus Pathogen Quarantine Greenhouse, Beltsville, MD. Two of the isolates were collected from non-cross protected plants; Pe...

  3. The prevalence of the citrus tristeza virus trifoliate resistant breaking genotype among Puerto Rican isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates have been grouped previously into five genotypes: T3, T30, T36, VT, B165 based on symptoms, host range and genomic sequence data. A sixth genotype has recently been identified with the novel property of replicating in trifoliate orange trees, a non host for the o...

  4. Assessment of the Citrus tristeza virus isolates detected in spring 2007 at the Lindcove Research and Extension Center, Exeter, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus was detected in at least 50 trees at the 71 ha Lindcove Research and Extension Center (LREC) near Exeter, Calif. in spring 2007. The purpose of this research was to assess genetic diversity and aphid transmissibility of these isolates. Nine representative trees were sampled o...

  5. Molecular characterization of Cirus tristeza virus isolates associated with stem pitting CTV cross-protection in Peru

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, the Peruvian citrus industry was destroyed by severe Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains spread by the brown citrus aphid. The Topara Nursery, located 180 km south of Lima Peru, selected and identified CTV isolates that confer cross-protection against virulent stem...

  6. Real-time RT-PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiplex one step real time RT-PCR assays using TaqMan probes were developed for detection and strain differentiation of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). For broad spectrum CTV detection, a TaqMan primer and Cy5-labeled probe were designed using CP gene sequences. An internal control was developed us...

  7. Molecular Marker Analysis of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from the Dominican Republic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Samples of citrus tissue infected with Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were collected from Persian lime, mandarin, Washington navel, Valencia or grapefruit trees from various locations in the Dominican Republic. Desiccated tissue samples were re-hydrated and virions extracted by grinding samples in buff...

  8. Real-time RT-PCR assay for detection and differentiation of Citrus tristeza virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For universal detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains by real time RT-PCR, a protocol was developed based on a set of primers and a Cy5-labeled TaqMan probe. This test included primers and a TET-labeled TaqMan probe selected on the mitochondrial nad5 gene for the simultaneous detection of ...

  9. HISTOLOGY OF SWEET ORANGE STEM PITTING CAUSED BY AN AUSTRALIAN ISOLATE OF CITRUS TRISTEZA VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some strains of the citrus tristeza virus (CTV) cause stem pitting in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck). This abnormality causes tree decline and reduction in fruit size and yield of affected citrus trees. Stem-pitting symptoms can occur on trunks, on all sizes of limbs, and on the twigs ...

  10. Segregation of distinct variants from Citrus tristeza virus isolate SY568 using aphid transmission.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Monreal, J J; Mathews, D M; Dodds, J A

    2009-10-01

    A well-studied severe isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) known as SY568 has previously been shown to contain multiple variants of the virus which differ in their genetic and biological characters. Aphid transmission was used in an attempt to segregate some of these variants for further characterization. Resulting infections gave symptoms which varied from asymptomatic to more severe than the inoculum source. RNase protection assays (RPAs) were used to compare nine regions of the CTV genome and determine whether unique strains could be identified. Five aphid-transmitted subcultures, with fingerprints that were different from those of the inoculum sources in at least one genomic area, were then cloned, sequenced, and compared with known isolates. An asymptomatic strain was shown to be different in every area of the CTV genome when examined by RPA and sequencing of selected regions. Mixed-infection studies using graft transmission of the asymptomatic subculture and two of the more severe aphid-transmitted subcultures showed that the mild strain was not able to compete well when in the presence of any of the severe variants tested, and its titer was significantly reduced from that seen in single infection. The mild strain and a selected severe strain were singly graft inoculated into five different citrus hosts (sweet orange, grapefruit, sour orange, lemon, and lime), where they maintained their distinct biological and genetic characteristics. PMID:19740030

  11. Characterization of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates by Single-strand Conformation Polymorphism Analysis of the Coat Protein Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method is needed to rapidly assess Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains and to identify mixed populations in tristeza-infected trees. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) can detect point mutations in DNA fragments and determine the structure of viral populations. Previous reports utili...

  12. Genetic Variation of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates from California and Spain: Evidence for Mixed Infections and Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Luis; Ayllón, María Angeles; Kong, Ping; Fernández, Andres; Polek, MaryLou; Guerri, José; Moreno, Pedro; Falk, Bryce W.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the population structure and genetic variation of four genomic regions within and between 30 Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from Spain and California. Our analyses showed that most isolates contained a population of sequence variants, with one being predominant. Four isolates showed two major sequence variants in some genomic regions. The two major variants of three of these isolates showed very low nucleotide identity to each other but were very similar to those of other isolates, suggesting the possibility of mixed infections with two divergent isolates. Incongruencies of phylogenetic relationships in the different genomic regions and statistical analyses suggested that the genomes of some CTV sequence variants originated by recombination events between diverged sequence variants. No correlation was observed between geographic origin and nucleotide distance, and thus from a genetic view, the Spanish and Californian isolates analyzed here could be considered members of the same population. PMID:11483750

  13. Complete 3' end genome analysis of the asymptomatic citrus tristeza virus isolate B192 and its eight single aphid transmitted subisolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most important viral disease of citrus is caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). CTV infection often exists in field isolates as a complex of multiple genotypes. Aphid transmission is important for CTV dispersal. The complete 3' terminal half sequences of the asymptomatic CTV isolate B192 and it...

  14. Development and application of a hexaplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for screening global Citrus tristeza virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The discovery of the diversity of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypes has complicated detection and diagnostic measures. To simplify the identification and differentiation of CTV genotypes, an efficient multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) technique for the screenin...

  15. Development and application of a hexaplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for screening global citrus tristeza virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The discovery of the diversity of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypes has complicated detection and diagnostic measures. To simplify the identification and differentiation of CTV genotypes, an efficient multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) technique for the screenin...

  16. Molecular Analysis Among MCA13-reactive Isolates Reveals a Strategy for Rapid Assessment of Citrus tristeza Virus Severity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypes vary in disease severity ranging from symptomless to virulent (stem pitting) in commercial citrus plantings. Because CTV is spread by propagation and by aphid vectors, rapid identification and virulence typing are critical for control and interdiction activitie...

  17. Molecular diversity of Citrus tristeza virus in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a serious citrus pathogen worldwide. Recent genetic studies have identified five standard CTV genotypic groups: T30, VT, T36, T3, and B165/T68. Field surveys performed in California in 2008-2010 identified primarily MCA13-negative CTV isolates with T30-like genotype. C...

  18. Citrus tristeza virus-aphid interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A review chapter on aphid transmission of Citrus tristeza virus is provided for a book on “Vector-Mediated Transmission of Plant Pathogens”. Earliest uses of citrus goes back over two millennia as items of trade, gifts and medicinal compounds. Citrus propagation during this period was by seed and si...

  19. Cross-protection by Citrus Tristeza Virus: prevention of superinfection occurs only when plants are protected by isolates of the same strain.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most important virus of citrus worldwide. CTV has a 19.3 kb RNA genome, is transmitted by aphids, and accumulates in trees predominantly in phloem-associated cells. Inoculation of trees with mild strains of CTV has been used to allow citrus production in areas wher...

  20. Evidence of Recombinant Citrus tristeza virus Isolate Occurring in Acid Lime cv. Pant Lemon Orchard in Uttarakhand Terai Region of Northern Himalaya in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaywant Kumar; Tarafdar, Avijit; Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Biswas, Kajal Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The present study for the first time describes biological and molecular characterization of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) occurring in the Terai area of Uttarakhand State in Northern Himalaya region of India. Direct antigen coated-ELISA and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected the CTV infection in Acid lime cv. Pant lemon (Citrus aurantifolia) orchards of Pantnagar with an estimated disease incidence of 16.6-20.5 %. To know the biological and genetic properties, an isolate, CTV Pant 4 was characterized. Isolate Pant 4 could be graft transmitted to Kinnow, Nagpur and Darjeeling mandarins, Mosambi sweet orange, Kagzi lime, Sweet lime, Sour orange but not to Rough lemon. The sequence analyses of the 5'ORF1a (3038 nucleotides) of LPro domain and 3'end (2058 nt) covering ORF7-ORF10 regions of the CTV genome revealed that Pant 4 was closely related to the previously reported Indian CTV isolate, Kpg3 from Northeastern Himalaya region with 97 and 98 % sequence identity, respectively. Whereas, it differed from the previously reported CTV isolate B165 from Southern India with 79 and 92 % identity, respectively for 5'ORF1a and 3' end regions. Recombination and SplitsTree decomposition analyses indicated that CTV isolate Pant 4 was a recombinant isolate originating from Kpg3 as a major and B165 as a minor donor. PMID:24426255

  1. Stem pitting Citrus tristeza virus predominantly transmitted by the brown citrus aphid from mixed infections containing non-stem pitting and stem pitting isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a phloem-limited closterovirus that produces a variety of symptoms in various Citrus spp. One of these symptoms is stem pitting (SP). SP does not occur in all Citrus spp. but when it does it may cause low tree vigor, decline and an economically-significant reduction ...

  2. Deep sequencing of viral small-RNAs of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) reveals genomic differences between two Italian isolates of CTV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) epidemic of quick decline (QD) killed many sweet orange trees grafted on sour orange rootstock in Sicily but left some asymptomatic trees in the same field. Recent reports indicated cross-protection involves exclusion of a severe CTV strain by a mild strain of th...

  3. Novel mild strains of Citrus tristeza virus from California and Peru.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) has caused great economic losses to citrus worldwide. CTV isolates from California were identified which reacted to MCA13 but were mild in biological indexing tests. Molecular markers were developed to differentiate these isolates from established CTV genotypes and the is...

  4. Genotype composition of populations of grapefruit-cross-protecting citrus tristeza virus strain GFMS12 in different host plants and aphid-transmitted sub-isolates.

    PubMed

    Scott, Katherine Anne; Hlela, Quinsile; Zablocki, Olivier; Read, David; van Vuuren, Stephanus; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes severe losses in grapefruit production in South Africa and requires mild-strain cross-protection to maintain production. Unfortunately, cross-protection breakdown of the pre-immunizing CTV grapefruit mild source GFMS12 is prevalent in grapefruit in South Africa. The CTV genotype composition of the GFMS12 population inoculated onto different hosts was determined by sequencing part of ORF1a and the p23 gene of multiple clones from each plant. Analysis of the GFMS12 population in Mexican lime and Marsh and Star Ruby grapefruit varieties revealed that at least four genotypes occur in the GFMS12 population and that genotype compositions differed amongst the populations in different host plants. Single-aphid-transmitted sub-isolates derived from the GFMS12 mother population on Mexican lime appeared to contain three populations of a mixture of VT-like and recombinant B165/VT-like genotypes; a mixture of recombinant RB/VT- and B165/VT-like genotypes; and a single recombinant B165/VT-like genotype. This study underlines the importance of determining the genotype composition of a potential CTV pre-immunizing source on a range of inoculated host species before utilization. PMID:22932923

  5. Dramatic Change in Citrus tristeza virus populations in the Dominican Republic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most destructive viral pathogen of citrus and has been an important concern for the citrus industry in the Dominican Republic. Earlier studies documented widespread distribution of mild isolates of the T30 genotype, which caused no disease in the infected trees, an...

  6. Genetic differentiation and biology of Citrus tristeza virus populations spreading in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates were collected from more than 1500 trees in citrus groves in Tulare, Kern, Ventura, Riverside and San Diego Counties for laboratory tests to assess molecular and biological properties of CTV strains currently in California. Tests included serology with MCA13 mon...

  7. Distribution, genetic diversity and recombination analysis of Citrus tristeza virus of India

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates representing all the citrus growing geographical zones of India were analyzed for sequence of the 5'ORF1a fragments of the partial LProI domain and for the coat protein (CP) gene. The sequences were compared with previously reported Indian and CTV genotypes from...

  8. Production of Polyclonal Antibodies to the Recombinant Coat Protein of Citrus tristeza virus and Their Effectiveness for Virus Detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The p25 coat protein gene of three Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates, two from Mexico and one from India, was amplified by RT-PCR and further cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The recombinant coat protein (rCP) of the three CTV isolates was injected into rabbits and goats for antibo...

  9. Transgenic Resistance to Citrus tristeza virus in Grapefruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) transgenic plants transformed with a variety of constructs derived from the Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genome were tested for their resistance to the virus. Most transgenic lines were susceptible (27 lines), a few were partially resistant (6 lines) and only one line, tr...

  10. Emergence and Phylodynamics of Citrus tristeza virus in Sicily, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Davino, Salvatore; Willemsen, Anouk; Panno, Stefano; Davino, Mario; Catara, Antonino; Elena, Santiago F.; Rubio, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) outbreaks were detected in Sicily island, Italy for the first time in 2002. To gain insight into the evolutionary forces driving the emergence and phylogeography of these CTV populations, we determined and analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the p20 gene from 108 CTV isolates collected from 2002 to 2009. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed that mild and severe CTV isolates belonging to five different clades (lineages) were introduced in Sicily in 2002. Phylogeographic analysis showed that four lineages co-circulated in the main citrus growing area located in Eastern Sicily. However, only one lineage (composed of mild isolates) spread to distant areas of Sicily and was detected after 2007. No correlation was found between genetic variation and citrus host, indicating that citrus cultivars did not exert differential selective pressures on the virus. The genetic variation of CTV was not structured according to geographical location or sampling time, likely due to the multiple introduction events and a complex migration pattern with intense co- and re-circulation of different lineages in the same area. The phylogenetic structure, statistical tests of neutrality and comparison of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates suggest that weak negative selection and genetic drift following a rapid expansion may be the main causes of the CTV variability observed today in Sicily. Nonetheless, three adjacent amino acids at the p20 N-terminal region were found to be under positive selection, likely resulting from adaptation events. PMID:23818960

  11. Current status of Citrus tristeza virus in Central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lindcove Research and Extension Center (LREC), Exeter, CA has 51 ha of citrus and is the field site and screenhouses for the University of California Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP). LREC maintains a zero tolerance of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) infected trees to protect the CCPP and re...

  12. Genetic differentiation and biology of Citrus tristeza virus populations spreading in eradicative and non-eradicative areas of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies showed Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from the 1970’s in California were closely related to the mild T30 isolate; only a few severe strains such as SY568 (Riverside) and Dekopon (Orange Cove) were found and subsequently eradicated. CTV is now spreading rapidly in so...

  13. Citrus tristeza virus: Evolution of Complex and Varied Genotypic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Harper, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the Closteroviridae, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is almost unique in possessing a number of distinct and characterized strains, isolates of which produce a wide range of phenotype combinations among its different hosts. There is little understanding to connect genotypes to phenotypes, and to complicate matters more, these genotypes are found throughout the world as members of mixed populations within a single host plant. There is essentially no understanding of how combinations of genotypes affect symptom expression and disease severity. We know little about the evolution of the genotypes that have been characterized to date, little about the biological role of their diversity and particularly, about the effects of recombination. Additionally, genotype grouping has not been standardized. In this study we utilized an extensive array of CTV genomic information to classify the major genotypes, and to determine the major evolutionary processes that led to their formation and subsequent retention. Our analyses suggest that three major processes act on these genotypes: (1) ancestral diversification of the major CTV lineages, followed by (2) conservation and co-evolution of the major functional domains within, though not between CTV genotypes, and (3) extensive recombination between lineages that have given rise to new genotypes that have subsequently been retained within the global population. The effects of genotype diversity and host-interaction are discussed, as is a proposal for standardizing the classification of existing and novel CTV genotypes. PMID:23630519

  14. Use of the Coat Protein (CP) and minor CP Intergene Sequence to Discriminate Severe Strains of Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid assay is a needed to differentiate mild vs severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). Multiple alignment performed on the coat protein (CP) and the minor coat protein (CPm) intergene sequences (~80-100 bp) from different CTV isolates revealed that severe strains generally associated wit...

  15. Citrus tristeza virus: making an ally from an enemy.

    PubMed

    Dawson, William O; Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Garnsey, Stephen M; Moreno, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Virus diseases of perennial trees and vines have characteristics not amenable to study using small model annual plants. Unique disease symptoms such as graft incompatibilities and stem pitting cause considerable crop losses. Also, viruses in these long-living plants tend to accumulate complex populations of viruses and strains. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the biology and genetics of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and in developing it into a tool for crop protection and improvement. The diseases in tree and vine crops have commonalities for which CTV can be used to develop a baseline. The purpose of this review is to provide a necessary background of systems and reagents developed for CTV that can be used for continued progress in this area and to point out the value of the CTV-citrus system in answering important questions on plant-virus interactions and developing new methods for controlling plant diseases. PMID:25973695

  16. Genetic variation and recombination of RdRp and HSP 70h genes of Citrus tristeza virus isolates from orange trees showing symptoms of citrus sudden death disease

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Clarissa PC; Nagata, Tatsuya; de Jesus, Waldir C; Neto, Carlos R Borges; Pappas, Georgios J; Martin, Darren P

    2008-01-01

    Background Citrus sudden death (CSD), a disease that rapidly kills orange trees, is an emerging threat to the Brazilian citrus industry. Although the causal agent of CSD has not been definitively determined, based on the disease's distribution and symptomatology it is suspected that the agent may be a new strain of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). CTV genetic variation was therefore assessed in two Brazilian orange trees displaying CSD symptoms and a third with more conventional CTV symptoms. Results A total of 286 RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) and 284 heat shock protein 70 homolog (HSP70h) gene fragments were determined for CTV variants infecting the three trees. It was discovered that, despite differences in symptomatology, the trees were all apparently coinfected with similar populations of divergent CTV variants. While mixed CTV infections are common, the genetic distance between the most divergent population members observed (24.1% for RdRp and 11.0% for HSP70h) was far greater than that in previously described mixed infections. Recombinants of five distinct RdRp lineages and three distinct HSP70h lineages were easily detectable but respectively accounted for only 5.9 and 11.9% of the RdRp and HSP70h gene fragments analysed and there was no evidence of an association between particular recombinant mosaics and CSD. Also, comparisons of CTV population structures indicated that the two most similar CTV populations were those of one of the trees with CSD and the tree without CSD. Conclusion We suggest that if CTV is the causal agent of CSD, it is most likely a subtle feature of population structures within mixed infections and not merely the presence (or absence) of a single CTV variant within these populations that triggers the disease. PMID:18199320

  17. Two distinct evolutionary pathways for Citrus tristeza virus: recombination defines two gene modules and provides for increased genetic diversity in a narrow host range plant virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phylogenetic analysis of the full or partial genomic sequences of the Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates T36, T68-1 and NS25 showed phylogenetic incongruities between sequences involved in viral RNA replication and those involved in movement and other viral functions. This incongruity was not fou...

  18. Citrus tristeza virus: a pathogen that changed the course of the citrus industry.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Pedro; Ambrós, Silvia; Albiach-Martí, Maria R; Guerri, José; Peña, Leandro

    2008-03-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) is the causal agent of devastating epidemics that changed the course of the citrus industry. Adapted to replicate in phloem cells of a few species within the family Rutaceae and to transmission by a few aphid species, CTV and citrus probably coevolved for centuries at the site of origin of citrus plants. CTV dispersal to other regions and its interaction with new scion varieties and rootstock combinations resulted in three distinct syndromes named tristeza, stem pitting and seedling yellows. The first, inciting decline of varieties propagated on sour orange, has forced the rebuilding of many citrus industries using tristeza-tolerant rootstocks. The second, inducing stunting, stem pitting and low bearing of some varieties, causes economic losses in an increasing number of countries. The third is usually observed by biological indexing, but rarely in the field. CTV polar virions are composed of two capsid proteins and a single-stranded, positive-sense genomic RNA (gRNA) of approximately 20 kb, containing 12 open reading frames (ORFs) and two untranslated regions (UTRs). ORFs 1a and 1b, encoding proteins of the replicase complex, are directly translated from the gRNA, and together with the 5' and 3'UTRs are the only regions required for RNA replication. The remaining ORFs, expressed via 3'-coterminal subgenomic RNAs, encode proteins required for virion assembly and movement (p6, p65, p61, p27 and p25), asymmetrical accumulation of positive and negative strands during RNA replication (p23), or suppression of post-transcriptional gene silencing (p25, p20 and p23), with the role of proteins p33, p18 and p13 as yet unknown. Analysis of genetic variation in CTV isolates revealed (1) conservation of genomes in distant geographical regions, with a limited repertoire of genotypes, (2) uneven distribution of variation along the gRNA, (3) frequent recombination events and (4) different selection pressures shaping CTV populations. Measures to control CTV damage include quarantine and budwood certification programmes, elimination of infected trees, use of tristeza-tolerant rootstocks, or cross protection with mild isolates, depending on CTV incidence and on the virus strains and host varieties predominant in each region. Incorporating resistance genes into commercial varieties by conventional breeding is presently unfeasible, whereas incorporation of pathogen-derived resistance by plant transformation has yielded variable results, indicating that the CTV-citrus interaction may be more specific and complex than initially thought. A deep understanding of the interactions between viral proteins and host and vector factors will be necessary to develop reliable and sound control measures. PMID:18705856

  19. Evaluación de Anticuerpos Desarrollados Contra la Proteína Recombinante de la Cápside del Virus Tristeza de los Cítricos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyclonal antibodies specific for the recombinant coat protein (rCP) p25 gene of (Citrus tristeza virus = CTV), were developed for isolates MX08 and MX14 from México and B227 from India. The reactivity of rCP antibodies was evaluated using healthy and CTV infected tissue. The combination of rCP ant...

  20. A 5'-proximal region of the Citrus tristeza virus genome encoding two leader proteases is involved in virus superinfection exclusion.

    PubMed

    Atallah, Osama O; Kang, Sung-Hwan; El-Mohtar, Choaa A; Shilts, Turksen; Bergua, María; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a primary virus infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed with various viruses. Earlier we demonstrated that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) requires viral p33 protein. In this work we show that p33 alone is not sufficient for virus exclusion. To define the additional viral components that are involved in this phenomenon, we engineered a hybrid virus in which a 5'-proximal region in the genome of the T36 isolate containing coding sequences for the two leader proteases L1 and L2 has been substituted with a corresponding region from the genome of a heterologous T68-1 isolate. Sequential inoculation of plants pre-infected with the CTV L1L2T68 hybrid with T36 CTV resulted in superinfection with the challenge virus, which indicated that the substitution of the L1-L2 coding region affected SIE ability of the virus. PMID:26748332

  1. Past and future of a century old Citrus Tristeza virus collection: A California citrus germplasm tale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) provides a mechanism for introduction and distribution of pathogen-free citrus varieties to California for use in research, variety improvement, or commercial production. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a serious citrus pathogen worldwide. The pr...

  2. Lateral flow immunoassay for the rapid detection of citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A lateral flow methodology was developed using gold nanoparticles for rapid detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). The test strip was based on a sandwich immunoassay and could be accomplished within 10 minutes. A sample was considered negative for CTV when only the control line appeared; whereas,...

  3. Past and future of a century old Citrus Tristeza Virus collection: A California citrus germplasm tale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP), Riverside, CA provides a mechanism for introduction and distribution of citrus germplasm from any citrus-growing area of the world to California for use in research, variety improvement, or by industry. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a serious ...

  4. Sequences of Citrus Tristeza Virus Separated in Time and Space Are Essentially Identical†

    PubMed Central

    Albiach-Martí, María R.; Mawassi, Munir; Gowda, Siddarame; Satyanarayana, Tatineni; Hilf, Mark E.; Shanker, Savita; Almira, Ernesto C.; Vives, María C.; López, Carmelo; Guerri, Jose; Flores, Ricardo; Moreno, Pedro; Garnsey, Steve M.; Dawson, William O.

    2000-01-01

    The first Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genomes completely sequenced (19.3-kb positive-sense RNA), from four biologically distinct isolates, are unexpectedly divergent in nucleotide sequence (up to 60% divergence). Understanding of whether these large sequence differences resulted from recent evolution is important for the design of disease management strategies, particularly the use of genetically engineered mild (essentially symptomless)-strain cross protection and RNA-mediated transgenic resistance. The complete sequence of a mild isolate (T30) which has been endemic in Florida for about a century was found to be nearly identical to the genomic sequence of a mild isolate (T385) from Spain. Moreover, samples of sequences of other isolates from distinct geographic locations, maintained in different citrus hosts and also separated in time (B252 from Taiwan, B272 from Colombia, and B354 from California), were nearly identical to the T30 sequence. The sequence differences between these isolates were within or near the range of variability of the T30 population. A possible explanation for these results is that the parents of isolates T30, T385, B252, B272, and B354 have a common origin, probably Asia, and have changed little since they were dispersed throughout the world by the movement of citrus. Considering that the nucleotide divergence among the other known CTV genomes is much greater than those expected for strains of the same virus, the remarkable similarity of these five isolates indicates a high degree of evolutionary stasis in some CTV populations. PMID:10888625

  5. Past and future of a century old Citrus tristeza virus collection: a California citrus germplasm tale

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinbo; Bozan, Orhan; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Dang, Tyler; Rucker, Tavia; Yokomi, Raymond K.; Lee, Richard F.; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Krueger, Robert R.; Bash, John; Greer, Greg; Diaz, James; Serna, Ramon; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from citrus germplasm, dooryard and field trees in California from 1914 have been maintained in planta under quarantine in the Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP), Riverside, California. This collection, therefore, represents populations of CTV isolates obtained over time and space in California. To determine CTV genetic diversity in this context, genotypes of CTV isolates from the CCPP collection were characterized using multiple molecular markers (MMM). Genotypes T30, VT, and T36 were found at high frequencies with T30 and T30+VT genotypes being the most abundant. The MMM analysis did not identify T3 and B165/T68 genotypes; however, biological and phylogenetic analysis suggested some relationships of CCPP CTV isolates with these two genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the CTV coat protein (CP) gene sequences classified the tested isolates into seven distinct clades. Five clades were in association with the standard CTV genotypes T30, T36, T3, VT, and B165/T68. The remaining two identified clades were not related to any standard CTV genotypes. Spatiotemporal analysis indicated a trend of reduced genotype and phylogenetic diversity as well as virulence from southern California (SC) at early (1907–1957) in comparison to that of central California (CC) isolates collected from later (1957–2009) time periods. CTV biological characterization also indicated a reduced number and less virulent stem pitting (SP) CTV isolates compared to seedling yellows isolates introduced to California. This data provides a historical insight of the introduction, movement, and genetic diversity of CTV in California and provides genetic and biological information useful for CTV quarantine, eradication, and disease management strategies such as CTV-SP cross protection. PMID:24339822

  6. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) Causing Proteomic and Enzymatic Changes in Sweet Orange Variety “Westin”

    PubMed Central

    Dória, Milena Santos; de Sousa, Aurizângela Oliveira; Barbosa, Cristiane de Jesus; Costa, Márcio Gilberto Cardoso; Gesteira, Abelmon da Silva; Souza, Regina Martins; Freitas, Ana Camila Oliveira; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho

    2015-01-01

    Citrus Tristeza disease, caused by CTV (Citrus tristeza virus), committs citrus plantations around the world and specifically attacks phloem tissues of the plant. The virus exists as a mixture of more or less severe variants, which may or may not cause symptoms of Tristeza. The objective of this study was to analyze the changes caused by CTV in the proteome of stems of sweet orange, as well as in the activity and gene expression of antioxidant enzymes. The CTV-infected sweet orange displayed mild symptoms, which were characterized by the presence of sparse stem pitting throughout their stems. The presence of virus was confirmed by RT-PCR. Proteomic analysis by 2DE-PAGE-MS / MS revealed the identity of 40 proteins differentially expressed between CTV- infected and -non-infected samples. Of these, 33 were up-regulated and 7 were down-regulated in CTV-infected samples. Among the proteins identified stands out a specific from the virus, the coat protein. Other proteins identified are involved with oxidative stress and for this their enzymatic activity was measured. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was higher in CTV-infected samples, as catalase (CAT) showed higher activity in uninfected samples. The activity of guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) did not vary significantly between samples. However, ascorbate peroxidase (APX) was more active in the infected samples. The relative expression of the genes encoding CAT, SOD, APX and GPX was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR). The CTV-infected samples showed greater accumulation of transcripts, except for the CAT gene. This gene showed higher expression in the uninfected samples. Taken together, it can be concluded that the CTV affects the protein profile and activity and gene expression of antioxidant enzymes in plants infected by this virus. PMID:26207751

  7. Simultaneous visualization of two Citrus tristeza virus genotypes provides new insights into the structure of multi-component virus populations in a host.

    PubMed

    Bergua, María; Phelan, Dane M; Bak, Aurélie; Bloom, David C; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-04-01

    Complex Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) populations composed of mixtures of different strains of the virus are commonly found in citrus trees in the field. At present, little is known about how these populations are formed, maintained, and how they are structured within a host. Here we used a novel in situ hybridization approach allowing simultaneous visualization of two different RNA targets with high sensitivity and specificity to examine the distribution of two isolates, T36 and T68-1, representing phylogenetically distinct strains of CTV, in a citrus host in single and mixed infections. Remarkably, in doubly inoculated plants the two virus variants appeared to be well mixed within the infected tissue and showed no spatial segregation. In addition, both CTV variants were often found occupying the same cells. Possible mechanisms involved in shaping CTV populations and the biological significance of the observed lack of structural separation of the individual components are discussed. PMID:26874013

  8. Differential stylet penetration behaviors of two Aphis gossypii biotypes in relation to host or vector infection with Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most important citrus disease agents worldwide. The impact of CTV on American agriculture has been significant, affecting 50 million trees with economic losses of several hundred million dollars. In California, this virus is predominantly transmitted by tw...

  9. Elevated Background in double antibody sandwich-indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of Citrus tristeza virus in mandarin cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Healthy tissue extracts from mandarin cultivars induced non-specific reaction in double antibody sandwich-indirect (DASI-) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) by the Central California Tristeza Eradication Agency (CCTEA), Tulare, CA. This probl...

  10. Elevated Background in DAS-I ELISA for the Detection of Citrus Tristeza Virus in Mandarin Varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Healthy tissue extracts from mandarin orange varieties occasionally resulted in elevated absorbance which can exceed twice that of healthy sweet orange tissue extracts in DAS-I-ELISA detection with an expressed coat protein polyclonal antiserum of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). This problem occurs se...

  11. LATENCY OF SYSTEMIC INFECTION IN YOUNG FIELD-GROWN SWEET ORANGE TREES FOLLOWING GRAFT-INOCULATION WITH CITRUS TRISTEZA VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the time required for Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) to begin migration from the site of inoculation, and the subsequent incubation period required for systemic infection to occur. Young CTV-free sweet orange trees propagated on Citrus macrophylla rootstocks wer...

  12. Studies of Seedling Yellows Amelioration of Citrus tristeza virus Strain Mixtures to Elucidate Mechanisms of Cross Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) cross-protection involves a mild strain of CTV preventing or interfering with infection or symptom expression by a severe strain. It is used to protect citrus when virulent stem pitting strains of CTV and efficient aphid vectors are endemic. However, the mode of action ...

  13. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts. PMID:26210077

  14. Enhancement or Attenuation of Disease by Deletion of Genes from Citrus Tristeza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana

    2012-01-01

    Stem pitting is a common virus-induced disease of perennial woody plants induced by a range of different viruses. The phenotype results from sporadic areas of the stem in which normal xylem and phloem development is prevented during growth of stems. These alterations interfere with carbohydrate transport, resulting in reduced plant growth and yield. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a phloem-limited closterovirus, induces economically important stem-pitting diseases of citrus. CTV has three nonconserved genes (p33, p18, and p13) that are not related to genes of other viruses and that are not required for systemic infection of some species of citrus, which allowed us to examine the effect of deletions of these genes on symptom phenotypes. In the most susceptible experimental host, Citrus macrophylla, the full-length virus causes only very mild stem-pitting symptoms. Surprisingly, we found that certain deletion combinations (p33 and p18 and/or p13) induced greatly increased stem-pitting symptoms, while other combinations (p13 or p13 plus p18) resulted in reduced stem pitting. These results suggest that the stem-pitting phenotype, which is one of more economically important disease phenotypes, can result not from a specific sequence or protein but from a balance between the expression of different viral genes. Unexpectedly, using green fluorescent protein-tagged full-length virus and deletion mutants (CTV9?p33 and CTV9?p33?p18?p13), the virus was found at pitted areas in abnormal locations outside the normal ring of phloem. Thus, increased stem pitting was associated not only with a prevention of xylem production but also with a proliferation of cells that supported viral replication, suggesting that at random areas of stems the virus can elicit changes in cellular differentiation and development. PMID:22593155

  15. Virus-Viroid Interactions: Citrus Tristeza Virus Enhances the Accumulation of Citrus Dwarfing Viroid in Mexican Lime via Virus-Encoded Silencing Suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Pedro; Bani Hashemian, Seyed M.; Fagoaga, Carmen; Romero, Juan; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Gorris, Maria T.; Bertolini, Edson

    2014-01-01

    An assay to identify interactions between Citrus Dwarfing Viroid (CDVd) and Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) showed that viroid titer was enhanced by the coinfecting CTV in Mexican lime but not in etrog citron. Since CTV encodes three RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs), p23, p20 and p25, an assay using transgenic Mexican limes expressing each RSS revealed that p23 and, to a lesser extent, p25 recapitulated the effect observed with coinfections of CTV and CDVd. PMID:24227850

  16. Calculation of diagnostic parameters of advanced serological and molecular tissue-print methods for detection of Citrus tristeza virus. A model for other plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most important virus diseases which affect citrus. Control of CTV in Spain and central California is achieved by planting virus-free citrus on CTV-tolerant or -resistant rootstocks. Quarantine and certification programs remain essential to avoid importation ...

  17. Tissue-print real-time RT-PCR for accurate detection of Citrus tristeza virus. Validation and comparison with Tissue print-ELISA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes one of the most important virus diseases of Citrus species. The control of CTV in Spain and Central California is based on planting virus-free citrus on CTV-tolerant or -resistant rootstocks. However, quarantine and certification programs are still essential to avo...

  18. Citrus tristeza virus p23: a unique protein mediating key virus–host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ricardo; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Soler, Nuria; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús; Fagoaga, Carmen; López, Carmelo; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Peña, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    The large RNA genome of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV; ca. 20 kb) contains 12 open reading frames, with the 3′-terminal one corresponding to a protein of 209 amino acids (p23) that is expressed from an abundant subgenomic RNA. p23, an RNA-binding protein with a putative zinc-finger domain and some basic motifs, is unique to CTV because no homologs have been found in other closteroviruses, including the type species of the genus Beet yellows virus (despite both viruses having many homologous genes). Consequently, p23 might have evolved for the specific interaction of CTV with its citrus hosts. From a functional perspective p23 has been involved in many roles: (i) regulation of the asymmetrical accumulation of CTV RNA strands, (ii) induction of the seedling yellows syndrome in sour orange and grapefruit, (iii) intracellular suppression of RNA silencing, (iv) elicitation of CTV-like symptoms when expressed ectopically as a transgene in several Citrus spp., and (v) enhancement of systemic infection (and virus accumulation) in sour orange and CTV release from the phloem in p23-expressing transgenic sweet and sour orange. Moreover, transformation of Mexican lime with intron-hairpin constructs designed for the co-inactivation of p23 and the two other CTV silencing suppressors results in complete resistance against the homologous virus. From a cellular point of view, recent data indicate that p23 accumulates preferentially in the nucleolus, being the first closterovirus protein with such a subcellular localization, as well as in plasmodesmata. These major accumulation sites most likely determine some of the functional roles of p23. PMID:23653624

  19. Rapid Differentiation and Identification of Potential Severe Strains of Citrus tristeza Virus by Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiplex Taqman®-based real-time reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect all strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and to identify potentially severe strains of the virus. A CTV TaqMan probe (CTV-CY5) based on the coat protein (CP) gene sequences...

  20. Strains of Citrus tristeza virus do not exclude superinfection by other strains of the virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Superinfection exclusion or homologous interference, a phenomenon in which a primary viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely-related virus, has been observed commonly for viruses in various systems, including viruses of bacteria, plants, and animals. With plant viruse...

  1. Accumulation of a 5’ proximal subgenomic RNA of Citrus tristeza virus is correlated with encapsidation by the minor coat protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During replication, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) produces large amounts of two unusual subgenomic (sg) RNAs that are positive-stranded and 5' -coterminal. Although these RNAs are produced in similar amounts and are similar in size, with LMT1 (~750 nt) only slightly larger than LMT2 (~650), we found ...

  2. Profiling of the small RNA populations derived from sour orange seedlings cross-protected against seedling yellows strains of Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in central California changed in 2009 from removal of all CTV-infected trees to only those which react positive in tests with selective probes for potentially severe CTV strains. Therefore, new strategies for CTV control are needed. Greenhouse tests have show...

  3. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of grapefruit with the wild-type and mutant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes of Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus paradisi Macf. cv. Duncan was transformed with constructs coding for the wild-type and mutant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) for exploring replicase-mediated pathogen-derived resistance (RM-PDR). The RdRp gene was amplified from CTV genome and used to gener...

  4. The Pathogenicity Determinant of Citrus Tristeza Virus Causing the Seedling Yellows Syndrome is Located at the 3’-Terminal Region of the Viral Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) causes some of the more important viral diseases of citrus worldwide. The ability to map disease-inducing determinants of CTV is needed to develop better diagnostic and disease control procedures. A distinctive phenotype of s...

  5. Quantitative Detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in Citrus and Aphids by Real-time Reverse Transcription-PCR (TaqMan®)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is by enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) and direct tissue blot immunoassays. Reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has also been developed for CTV detection which is more sensitive than serology. We developed a quantitative an...

  6. Heterologous Minor Coat Proteins of Citrus Tristeza Virus Strains Affect Encapsidation, but the Coexpression of HSP70h and p61 Restores Encapsidation to Wild-Type Levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long flexuous bipolar virions of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a Closterovirus, are encapsidated with two capsid proteins at opposite ends: the minor coat protein (CPm) encapsidates the 5’ 630 nts of the genomic RNA and the major coat protein encapsidates the remainder of the genome. In this stud...

  7. Development and validation of a multiplex reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay for the rapid detection of Citrus tristeza virus, Citrus psorosis virus, and Citrus leaf blotch virus.

    PubMed

    Osman, Fatima; Hodzic, Emir; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Wang, Jinbo; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2015-08-01

    A single real-time multiplex reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), and Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV) was developed and validated using three different fluorescently labeled minor groove binding qPCR probes. To increase the detection reliability, coat protein (CP) genes from large number of different isolates of CTV, CPsV and CLBV were sequenced and a multiple sequence alignment was generated with corresponding CP sequences from the GenBank and a robust multiplex RT-qPCR assay was designed. The capacity of the multiplex RT-qPCR assay in detecting the viruses was compared to singleplex RT-qPCR designed specifically for each virus and was assessed using multiple virus isolates from diverse geographical regions and citrus species as well as graft-inoculated citrus plants infected with various combination of the three viruses. No significant difference in detection limits was found and specificity was not affected by the inclusion of the three assays in a multiplex RT-qPCR reaction. Comparison of the viral load for each virus using singleplex and multiplex RT-qPCR assays, revealed no significant differences between the two assays in virus detection. No significant difference in Cq values was detected when using one-step and two-step multiplex RT-qPCR detection formats. Optimizing the RNA extraction technique for citrus tissues and testing the quality of the extracted RNA using RT-qPCR targeting the cytochrome oxidase citrus gene as an RNA specific internal control proved to generate better diagnostic assays. Results showed that the developed multiplex RT-qPCR can streamline viruses testing of citrus nursery stock by replacing three separate singleplex assays, thus reducing time and labor while retaining the same sensitivity and specificity. The three targeted RNA viruses are regulated pathogens for California's mandatory "Section 3701: Citrus Nursery Stock Pest Cleanliness Program". Adopting a compatible multiplex RT-qPCR testing protocol for these viruses as well as other RNA and DNA regulated pathogens will provide a valuable alternative tool for virus detection and efficient program implementation. PMID:25907469

  8. Characterisation of isolates and strains of citrus tristeza closterovirus using restriction analysis of the coat protein gene amplified by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gillings, M; Broadbent, P; Indsto, J; Lee, R

    1993-10-01

    Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) exists as a large number of distinct strains differing in biological properties and with different distributions in citrus producing countries. Strategies such as eradication or cross protection, aimed at controlling severe variants of the pathogen, require procedures to identify virus strains accurately and reliably. To fill the need for a rapid, reproducible assay, we have investigated the use of restriction analysis of the CTV coat protein gene amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The primers 5' ATG GAC GAC GAA ACA AAG 3' and 5' TCA ACG TGT GTT GAA TTT 3' amplified a DNA copy of the CTV coat protein gene (approx. 670 base pairs) when used in a reverse transcriptase PCR assay. Amplifications were carried out using dsRNA prepared from field and indicator plants, or from single-stranded RNA prepared from crude PEG precipitates of intact virions. All 51 CTV isolates tested produced an amplified product of the same size, regardless of country of origin or biological properties. Digestion of the amplified coat protein genes with the restriction enzymes Hinf1 or Rsa1 revealed sequence variation in the PCR products. Hinf1 provided the best discrimination between strains, defining seven Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) groups, some of which circumscribed sets of isolates with similar biological properties. Limited analysis of field isolates using this method showed that individual trees could contain mixtures of CTV strains, as assessed by the recovery of several RFLP types from individual reactions. Single aphid transmissions of isolates usually, but not always, generated apparently pure single strains judged by the recovery of single RFLP groups. PMID:7903310

  9. Citrus tristeza virus: survival at the edge of the movement continuum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic invasion of plants by viruses is thought to involve two processes: cell-to-cell movement between adjacent cells and long-distance movement that allows the virus to rapidly move through sieve elements and unload at the growing parts of the plant. There is a continuum of proportions of these ...

  10. Symptoms induced by transgenic expression of p23 from Citrus tristeza virus in phloem-associated cells of Mexican lime mimic virus infection without the aberrations accompanying constitutive expression.

    PubMed

    Soler, Nuria; Fagoaga, Carmen; López, Carmelo; Moreno, Pedro; Navarro, Luis; Flores, Ricardo; Peña, Leandro

    2015-05-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is phloem restricted in natural citrus hosts. The 23-kDa protein (p23) encoded by the virus is an RNA silencing suppressor and a pathogenicity determinant. The expression of p23, or its N-terminal 157-amino-acid fragment comprising the zinc finger and flanking basic motifs, driven by the constitutive 35S promoter of cauliflower mosaic virus, induces CTV-like symptoms and other aberrations in transgenic citrus. To better define the role of p23 in CTV pathogenesis, we compared the phenotypes of Mexican lime transformed with p23-derived transgenes from the severe T36 and mild T317 CTV isolates under the control of the phloem-specific promoter from Commelina yellow mottle virus (CoYMV) or the 35S promoter. Expression of the constructs restricted to the phloem induced a phenotype resembling CTV-specific symptoms (vein clearing and necrosis, and stem pitting), but not the non-specific aberrations (such as mature leaf epinasty and yellow pinpoints, growth cessation and apical necrosis) observed when p23 was ectopically expressed. Furthermore, vein necrosis and stem pitting in Mexican lime appeared to be specifically associated with p23 from T36. Phloem-specific accumulation of the p23?158-209(T36) fragment was sufficient to induce the same anomalies, indicating that the region comprising the N-terminal 157 amino acids of p23 is responsible (at least in part) for the vein clearing, stem pitting and, possibly, vein corking in this host. PMID:25171669

  11. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) profiling of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) infection in sweet orange citrus varietals using thermal desorption gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC/TOF-MS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a plant pathogen which predominately infects economically important citrus crops such as sweet orange, clementine, lime and grapefruit varietals. Within the last 70 years, an estimated 100 million citrus trees on sour orange rootstock have been destroyed due to CTV inf...

  12. Fully "Recombinant Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays" Using Genetically Engineered Single-Chain Antibody Fusion Proteins for Detection of Citrus tristeza virus.

    PubMed

    Terrada, E; Kerschbaumer, R J; Giunta, G; Galeffi, P; Himmler, G; Cambra, M

    2000-12-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant single-chain variable fragment antibodies (scFv) that bind specifically to Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), which cause the most detrimental viral disease in the citrus industry worldwide, were obtained from the hybridoma cell lines 3DF1 and 3CA5. These scFv were genetically fused with dimerization domains as well as with alkaline phosphatase, respectively, and diagnostic reagents were produced by expressing these fusion proteins in bacterial cultures. The engineered antibodies were successfully used for CTV diagnosis in plants by tissue print enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and double antibody sandwich-ELISA. The fully recombinant ELISAs were as specific and sensitive as conventional ELISAs performed with the parental monoclonal antibodies, showing the usefulness of recombinant antibodies for routine detection of a virus in woody plants for the first time. PMID:18943374

  13. Chlorella viruses isolated in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Burbank, D.E.; Van Etten, J.L. )

    1988-09-01

    Plaque-forming viruses of the unicellular, eukaryotic, exsymbiotic, Chlorella-like green algae strain NC64A, which are common in the United States, were also present in fresh water collected in the People's Republic of China. Seven of the Chinese viruses were examined in detail and compared with the Chlorella viruses previously isolated in the United States. Like the American viruses, the Chinese viruses were large polyhedra and sensitive to chloroform. They contained numerous structural proteins and large double-stranded DNA genomes of at least 300 kilobase pairs. Each of the DNAs from the Chinese viruses contained 5-methyldeoxycytosine, which varied from 12.6 to 46.7% of the deoxycytosine, and N{sup 6}-methyldeoxyadenosine, which varied from 2.2 to 28.3% of the deoxyadenosine. Four of the Chinese virus DNAs hybridized extensively with {sup 32}P-labeled DNA from the American virus PBCV-1, and three hybridized poorly.

  14. Chlorella viruses isolated in China.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y P; Burbank, D E; Van Etten, J L

    1988-01-01

    Plaque-forming viruses of the unicellular, eucaryotic, exsymbiotic, Chlorella-like green algae strain NC64A, which are common in the United States, were also present in fresh water collected in the People's Republic of China. Seven of the Chinese viruses were examined in detail and compared with the Chlorella viruses previously isolated in the United States. Like the American viruses, the Chinese viruses were large polyhedra and sensitive to chloroform. They contained numerous structural proteins and large double-stranded DNA genomes of at least 300 kilobase pairs. Each of the DNAs from the Chinese viruses contained 5-methyldeoxycytosine, which varied from 12.6 to 46.7% of the deoxycytosine, and N6-methyldeoxyadenosine, which varied from 2.2 to 28.3% of the deoxyadenosine. Four of the Chinese virus DNAs hybridized extensively with DNA from the American virus PBCV-1, and three hybridized poorly. Images PMID:2847652

  15. 2006 University Citrus Pest Management Guide: Tristeza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a major cause of the decline and eventual death of trees on sour orange rootstocks. Initially, affected trees have small leaves and twig dieback. Diseased trees often produce a crop of very small fruit. Eventually, large limbs die back and the tree gradually declines...

  16. Citrus tristeza virus-based RNAi in citrus plants induces gene silencing in Diaphorina citri, a phloem-sap sucking insect vector of citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing).

    PubMed

    Hajeri, Subhas; Killiny, Nabil; El-Mohtar, Choaa; Dawson, William O; Gowda, Siddarame

    2014-04-20

    A transient expression vector based on Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is unusually stable. Because of its stability it is being considered for use in the field to control Huanglongbing (HLB), which is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and vectored by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. In the absence of effective control strategies for CLas, emphasis has been on control of D. citri. Coincident cohabitation in phloem tissue by CLas, D. citri and CTV was exploited to develop a novel method to mitigate HLB through RNA interference (RNAi). Since CTV has three RNA silencing suppressors, it was not known if CTV-based vector could induce RNAi in citrus. Yet, expression of sequences targeting citrus phytoene desaturase gene by CTV-RNAi resulted in photo-bleaching phenotype. CTV-RNAi vector, engineered with truncated abnormal wing disc (Awd) gene of D. citri, induced altered Awd expression when silencing triggers ingested by feeding D. citri nymphs. Decreased Awd in nymphs resulted in malformed-wing phenotype in adults and increased adult mortality. This impaired ability of D. citri to fly would potentially limit the successful vectoring of CLas bacteria between citrus trees in the grove. CTV-RNAi vector would be relevant for fast-track screening of candidate sequences for RNAi-mediated pest control. PMID:24572372

  17. Characterization of Recently Introduced HLB and CTV Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe stem-pitting isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were found in Florida citrus 5 years ago, followed by the discovery 2 years later of the citrus greening disease (huanglongbing: HLB) caused by the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. The new CTV isolates are members of the VT grou...

  18. The tail that wags the virus: recombination defines two gene modules and provides for increased genetic diversity in a narrow host range plant virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates T36, T68-1 and NS25 showed phylogenetic incongruities between sequences involved in viral RNA replication and those involved in movement and other viral functions. This incongruity was not found in the sequences of isolates T3, T30, T385, VT and T318A. Distance...

  19. Comparison of Immunohistochemistry and Virus Isolation for Diagnosis of West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Angela E.; Mead, Daniel G.; Allison, Andrew B.; Gibbs, Samantha E. J.; Gottdenker, Nicole L.; Stallknecht, David E.; Howerth, Elizabeth W.

    2005-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry and virus isolation were performed on 1,057 birds. Immunohistochemistry, virus isolation, or both found 325 birds to be West Nile virus positive. Of these, 271 were positive by both methods. These results indicate that virus isolation and immunohistochemistry are approximately equal in their ability to detect West Nile virus. PMID:15956415

  20. Comparison of camelpox viruses isolated in Dubai.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, M; Meyer, H; Wernery, U; Kaaden, O R

    1996-03-01

    Between October 1993 and March 1994, outbreaks of pox-like exanthemas were observed in several camel raising farms in Dubai. Scabs from twenty camels with either local or generalized lesions were examined, seven of them had previously been vaccinated with a modified live camelpox virus vaccine. Inspection of scabs by electron microscopy confirmed an infection with orthopox viruses (OPV) in 10 animals and with parapox virus in one camel. Investigation of the scabs by polymerase chain reaction and dot blot assay revealed the presence of OPV in 15 or 13 samples, respectively. OPV could be isolated in cell culture in 14 cases. Restriction enzyme profiles characterized all isolates as camelpox virus. Their DNA patterns were virtually identical displaying only slight variations in the terminal fragments. In contrast, the vaccine strain showed a distinct restriction enzyme profile, indicating that it was not involved in the infections. PMID:8861650

  1. Characterisation of African isolates of rinderpest virus.

    PubMed

    Wamwayi, H M; Fleming, M; Barrett, T

    1995-05-01

    Isolates of rinderpest virus (RPV) recovered from outbreaks of the disease in Kenya and Southern Sudan between 1986 and 1993 were compared to each other and to earlier isolates from East and West Africa. The recent isolates were mildly pathogenic for susceptible cattle and thus resembled other mild strains of RPV recovered from cattle and wildlife in East Africa more than 30 years ago. Monoclonal antibody analysis using a panel of 12 anti-RPV haemagglutinin protein-specific antibodies (mAbs) revealed that individual isolates were distinguishable. However, the panel of mAbs could not be used to relate the isolates on the basis of their pathogenicity or geographic origin. Immunoprecipitation of the virus-induced proteins from infected Vero cells, followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, showed that the recent mild RPV isolates from eastern Africa were closely related to each other and to their contemporary isolates from Nigeria and Egypt, but they were distinct from another mild isolate recovered from the region three decades ago. Two distinct lineages of African RPV isolates were identified by sequencing a region of the genome around the proteolytic enzyme cleavage site of the fusion protein from the old and new isolates. One lineage, which included virus isolates recovered from East and West Africa during the 1960s, showed a closer phylogenetic relationship to Asian and Middle Eastern RPV isolates. The other lineage consisted mainly of isolates recovered from East, West and North Africa between 1983 and 1993. The results showed that there was co-circulation of two different lineages of RPV in Nigeria during the epizootics of the 1980s. PMID:8588309

  2. Recombination defines two gene modules and provides for increased genetic diversity in a narrow host range plant virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates T36, T68-1 and NS25 showed phylogenetic incongruities between sequences involved in viral RNA replication and those involved in movement and other viral functions. This incongruity was not found in the sequences of isolates T3, T30, T385, VT and T318A. Distance...

  3. Dengue-type viruses isolated in Singapore*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, K. A.; Chan, Y. C.; Phoon, W. O.; Hanam, E.

    1964-01-01

    A dengue-like illness with marked haemorrhagic manifestations appeared in Singapore in 1960. Its similarity in many respects to the haemorrhagic fevers of Thailand and the Philippines led to its being described as “Singapore haemorrhagic fever”. This paper describes the isolation and identification of dengue-type viruses from patients in Singapore between 1960 and 1962. In addition to the conventional complement-fixation and neutralization tests, a new test, called the “sensitized erythrocyte agglutination test”, was employed; this test method is described. Altogether 21 dengue-type viruses were isolated, including dengue types 1, 2 and 4. Chikungunya virus, prominent in the Thailand disease, was not detected. The author suggests that study of the epidemiology of haemorrhagic fevers in South-East Asia would cast further light on the transmission of arboviruses. PMID:14153412

  4. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Banna Virus from Mosquitoes, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nabeshima, Takeshi; Nga, Phan Thi; Guillermo, Posadas; del Carmen Parquet, Maria; Yu, Fuxun; Thuy, Nguyen Thanh; Trang, Bui Minh; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Nam, Vu Sinh; Inoue, Shingo; Hasebe, Futoshi

    2008-01-01

    We isolated and characterized a Banna virus from mosquitoes in Vietnam; 5 strains were isolated from field-caught mosquitoes at various locations; Banna virus was previously isolated from encephalitis patients in Yunnan, China, in 1987. Together, these findings suggest widespread distribution of this virus throughout Southeast Asia. PMID:18680655

  5. Molecular variation of hop mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Poke, Fiona S; Crowle, Damian R; Whittock, Simon P; Wilson, Calum R

    2010-10-01

    Hop mosaic virus (HpMV), a member of the genus Carlavirus, is importance to hop production worldwide. We identified variation in nucleic and amino acid sequences among 23 HpMV isolates from Australia, the USA, the Czech Republic, South Africa and Japan using a 1,455-bp fragment covering the 3' end of the virus genome including ORFs 4, 5 and 6. Three clusters of two or more isolates were identified in phylogenies of the total nucleotide sequence and the coat protein (ORF5) amino acid sequence. Two of these clusters combined in analyses of ORF4 and ORF6 amino acid sequences. Isolates from within and outside of Australia were found in each cluster, indicating that sequence variation was not associated with geographic source. Monitoring of HpMV variants in the field and evaluation of the impact of variants on vector association, rate of spread, and hop yield and quality can now be undertaken. PMID:20680359

  6. Mild strain cross protection of tristeza: A review of research to protect against decline on sour orange in Florida and a look at the future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tristeza, caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), has long been present in Florida, but outbreaks of decline on sour orange rootstock were occasional events until the late 1970s. Sour orange rootstock was valued for the high quality of fruit produced. Research was directed towards the selection and...

  7. Characterization of rabies virus isolates in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Favi, Myriam; Nina, Aleida; Yung, Verónica; Fernández, Jorge

    2003-11-01

    In Latin America, rabies is still an important public health problem. Canine rabies, and wild animal rabies, especially transmitted by hematofagous and insectivorous bats, has become an emerging problem in the countries of this region. We received 363 samples with a laboratory-confirmed rabies diagnosis from Bolivia during l997-2001. From these, we could obtain 222 rabies virus isolates by intra-cerebral inoculation in mice. By antigenic characterization we could identify 147 isolates as variant 1, 2 isolates as variant 2, 3 isolates as variant 3, and 1 isolate as variant 5. Phylogenetic analysis of 84 isolates established that they segregated in 3 different branches, corresponding to 3 genetic variants, 78 isolates corresponding to antigenic variant 1 segregated in the same lineage as the antigenic variant 5, 2 isolates corresponding to antigenic variant 2 segregated in another lineage, and 3 isolates from antigenic variant 3 segregated in a different lineage.The genetic variant that mainly circulates in Bolivia is maintained in a cycle whose main reservoir are dogs, but it is not possible to discard the presence of other cycles, in which different species of bats or other wild mammals could be participating. PMID:14602205

  8. Mild strain cross protection of tristeza: a review of research to protect against decline on sour orange in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Richard F.; Keremane, Manjunath L.

    2013-01-01

    Tristeza, caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), has long been present in Florida but outbreaks of decline on sour orange rootstock were occasional events until the late 1970s. Sour orange rootstock was valued for the high quality of fruit produced and was widely used because of its tolerance of citrus blight, a disease of unknown etiology. Research was directed towards the selection and screening of mild strains of CTV which could protect against sour orange decline strains. Following the introduction of Toxoptera citricida (also known as the brown citrus aphid) in 1995 there was a greater concern for maintaining production of existing blocks of citrus on sour orange rootstock. Availability of the CTV genome sequence around the same time as well as molecular characterization of in planta CTV populations led to the selection of mild CTV isolates which when inoculated into existing field trees, extended the productive life of the groves and enabled a more graduate replanting of trees on CTV-tolerant rootstocks. The history of CTV in Florida and the methods developed to select mild isolates for use for mild strain cross protection will be reviewed. PMID:24046764

  9. Analysis of Iranian Potato virus S isolates.

    PubMed

    Salari, Khadijeh; Massumi, Hossein; Heydarnejad, Jahangir; Hosseini Pour, Akbar; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-10-01

    Two hundred forty potato samples with one or more symptoms of leaf mosaic, distortion, mottling and yellowing were collected between 2005 and 2008 from seven Iranian provinces. Forty-four of these samples tested positive with double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (DAS-ELISA) using a Potato virus S (PVS) polyclonal antibody. Of these 12 isolates of PVS were selected based on the geographical location for biological and molecular characterization. The full coat protein (CP) and 11K genes from 12 PVS isolates were PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced. All 12 PVS isolates showed mosaic symptoms on Nicotiana debneyii and N. tabacum cv. Whiteburly and local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor, C. quinoa and C. album. The Iranian isolates share between 93 and 100% pairwise nucleotide identity with other PVS(O) isolates. Based on maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis coupled with pairwise identity analysis, we propose 15 genotypes for the PVS(O) strain and 3 genotypes for the PVS(A) strain. PMID:21567245

  10. Phylogenetic Relationships of Southern African West Nile Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Grobbelaar, Antoinette A.; Leman, Patricia A.; Anthony, Fiona S.; Gibson, Georgina V.F.; Swanepoel, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were examined for 29 southern African West Nile virus (formal name West Nile virus [WNV]) isolates from various sources in four countries from 1958 to 2001. In addition sequence data were retrieved from GenBank for another 23 WNV isolates and Kunjin and Japanese encephalitis viruses. All isolates belonged to two lineages. Lineage 1 isolates were from central and North Africa, Europe, Israel, and North America; lineage 2 isolates were from central and southern Africa and Madagascar. No strict correlation existed between grouping and source of virus isolate, pathogenicity, geographic distribution, or year of isolation. Some southern African isolates have been associated with encephalitis in a human, a horse, and a dog and with fatal hepatitis in a human and death of an ostrich chick. PMID:12141968

  11. Mayaro virus isolated from a Trinidadian mosquito, Mansonia venezuelensis.

    PubMed

    AITKEN, T H; DOWNS, W G; ANDERSON, C R; SPENCE, L; CASALS, J

    1960-04-01

    A strain of Mayaro virus has been isolated in Trinidad from the mosquito Mansonia venezuelensis. This is the first record of isolation of this agent from naturally infected mosquitoes, caught in the wild. PMID:13792204

  12. Complete genome sequence of chikungunya virus isolated in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Kent D; Suarez, Lady-Anne C; Labayo, Hannah Karen M; Liles, Veni R; Salvoza, Noel C; Klinzing, David C; Daroy, Maria Luisa G; Matias, Ronald R; Natividad, Filipinas F

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is an alphavirus of the Togaviridae family, which causes a febrile illness with arthralgia in humans. We report here on the complete genome sequence of chikungunya virus strain CHIKV-13-112A isolated from a patient in the Philippines who was suspected to have dengue virus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strain is of the Asian genotype. PMID:24970822

  13. Variants of Triticum mosaic virus isolated from wheat in Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a recently discovered virus infecting wheat. We compared the Colorado isolates C10-492 and C11-775 with the 06-123 isolate of TriMV from Kansas (TriMV-K). Comparisons were made using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), infectivity assay, host range, dry weig...

  14. Isolation of Genetically Diverse Marburg Viruses from Egyptian Fruit Bats

    PubMed Central

    Towner, Jonathan S.; Amman, Brian R.; Sealy, Tara K.; Carroll, Serena A. Reeder; Comer, James A.; Kemp, Alan; Swanepoel, Robert; Paddock, Christopher D.; Balinandi, Stephen; Khristova, Marina L.; Formenty, Pierre B. H.; Albarino, Cesar G.; Miller, David M.; Reed, Zachary D.; Kayiwa, John T.; Mills, James N.; Cannon, Deborah L.; Greer, Patricia W.; Byaruhanga, Emmanuel; Farnon, Eileen C.; Atimnedi, Patrick; Okware, Samuel; Katongole-Mbidde, Edward; Downing, Robert; Tappero, Jordan W.; Zaki, Sherif R.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2009-01-01

    In July and September 2007, miners working in Kitaka Cave, Uganda, were diagnosed with Marburg hemorrhagic fever. The likely source of infection in the cave was Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) based on detection of Marburg virus RNA in 31/611 (5.1%) bats, virus-specific antibody in bat sera, and isolation of genetically diverse virus from bat tissues. The virus isolates were collected nine months apart, demonstrating long-term virus circulation. The bat colony was estimated to be over 100,000 animals using mark and re-capture methods, predicting the presence of over 5,000 virus-infected bats. The genetically diverse virus genome sequences from bats and miners closely matched. These data indicate common Egyptian fruit bats can represent a major natural reservoir and source of Marburg virus with potential for spillover into humans. PMID:19649327

  15. Improved methods for isolation of avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuang; Li, Yongdong; Xia, Han; Huang, Juan; Zhang, Zhong; Zhu, Na; Zhao, Jiuru; Li, Tianxian

    2014-09-27

    Isolation of viruses using chick embryos is a classical virological method. Inoculation of the allantoic cavity and use of allantoic fluid is a common method of passaging isolated avian influenza viruses. In the present study, 2490 fresh fecal samples and 4967 old fecal samples were investigated and subjected to conventional passaging (allantoic fluid method). Two newly developed methods-the allantochorion and allantoic fluid mixed method and the chick embryo and allantoic fluid mixed method-were also examined. The rates of influenza virus isolation for these three methods were compared. There appeared to be little difference among these methods when fresh fecal samples were used. However, for the old fecal samples, isolation rates for influenza virus were significantly higher for the chick embryo and allantoic fluid mixed method compared with the conventional allantoic fluid method. All viruses isolated using the conventional allantoic fluid method were isolated successfully using the two newly developed methods. These results suggest that using chick embryos in conjunction with allantoic fluid is effective for early virus isolation, especially for fecal samples that are not fresh. Additionally, practical chick embryo passage methods are described that improve significantly the rate of isolation of influenza viruses from fecal samples of migratory birds in a complex wild ecological environment. PMID:25261812

  16. Tanay virus, a new species of virus isolated from mosquitoes in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Takeshi; Inoue, Shingo; Okamoto, Kenta; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Yu, Fuxun; Uchida, Leo; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Sakaguchi, Miako; Sunahara, Toshihiko; Buerano, Corazon C; Tadena, Florencio P; Orbita, Ildefonso B; Natividad, Filipinas F; Morita, Kouichi

    2014-06-01

    In 2005, we isolated a new species of virus from mosquitoes in the Philippines. The virion was elliptical in shape and had a short single projection. The virus was named Tanay virus (TANAV) after the locality in which it was found. TANAV genomic RNA was a 9562 nt+poly-A positive strand, and polycistronic. The longest ORF contained putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP); however, conserved short motifs in the RdRP were permuted. TANAV was phylogenetically close to Negevirus, a recently proposed taxon of viruses isolated from haemophagic insects, and to some plant viruses, such as citrus leprosis virus C, hibiscus green spot virus and blueberry necrotic ring blotch virus. In this paper, we describe TANAV and the permuted structure of its RdRP, and discuss its phylogeny together with those of plant viruses and negevirus. PMID:24646751

  17. [Rapid centrifugation assay standarization for dengue virus isolation].

    PubMed

    Palomino, Miryam; Gutierrez, Victoria; Salas, Ramses

    2010-03-01

    The plate centrifugation assay was standardized for dengue virus isolation from serum samples. C6/36-HT cells were used determining the optimal values for centrifugation spin speed, inoculum, sera dilution, and incubation time. Then, 22 positive serum samples with viral isolation and viral strains of the four reference dengue virus serotypes were tested simultaneously by the standardized plate centrifugation method and the conventional tube culture. The isolations were typified by indirect immunofluorescent test using monoclonal antibodies. The plate centrifugation method was optimized to 200 ?L of inoculum, dilution of sera 1/20, centrifugation speed at 1600 rpm/30 min, and sensitivity of 95,5% after 5 days post-inoculation. We concluded that the plate centrifugation method increased dengue virus isolation, with a significant reduction of the time of isolation for dengue virus. PMID:21072450

  18. Genome Sequences of Two Pseudorabies Virus Strains Isolated in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Konstantinos V; Suárez, Nicolás M; Wilkie, Gavin S; Filioussis, George; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Nauwynck, Hans J; Davison, Andrew J; Kritas, Spyridon K

    2016-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (species Suid herpesvirus 1) belongs to the genus Varicellovirus, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, family Herpesviridae, and is the causative agent of an acute and frequently fatal disease that affects mainly pigs. Here, we report the genome sequences of two strains of this virus isolated in Greece in 2010. PMID:26798112

  19. Genome Sequences of Two Pseudorabies Virus Strains Isolated in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Konstantinos V.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Filioussis, George; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Nauwynck, Hans J.; Kritas, Spyridon K.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (species Suid herpesvirus 1) belongs to the genus Varicellovirus, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, family Herpesviridae, and is the causative agent of an acute and frequently fatal disease that affects mainly pigs. Here, we report the genome sequences of two strains of this virus isolated in Greece in 2010. PMID:26798112

  20. Yukon isolates of snowshoe hare virus, 1972-1982.

    PubMed

    McLean, D M

    1983-01-01

    Bunyaviruses including 53 strains of snowshoe hare (SSH) and 4 of Northway (NOR) were isolated from 132,428 unengorged adult female mosquitoes of 7 species collected throughout the boreal forest of the Yukon Territory and open woodland terrain in the Mackenzie Valley, Northwest Territories, Canada during 8 of 11 arctic summers from 1972 through 1982. Isolations of SSH virus were also achieved from mosquito larvae during 1974 and 1975. Percentage virus infection rates of important vectors were Aedes communis (0.038) and Culiseta inornata (0.124). Isolations of NOR virus were achieved during 1976 and 1978 only. Infection thresholds of SSH virus for Ae. communis were 0.1 mouse LD50, when virus transmission occurred both after virus feeding and after intrathoracic injection and Cs. inornata transmitted SSH virus after intrathoracic injection. Both Ae. communis and Cs. inornata were infected after injection of 3 plaque-forming units (PFU) NOR virus, and transmitted after injection of 300 PFU, but they also became infected after feeding on 30 PFU virus. PMID:6135219

  1. Phylogenetic Analysis of Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Isolates from Florida

    PubMed Central

    White, Gregory S.; Pickett, Brett E.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Johnson, Amelia G.; Ottendorfer, Christy; Stark, Lillian M.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Florida has the highest degree of endemicity for eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) of any state in the United States and is the only state with year-round transmission of EEEV. To further understand the viral population dynamics in Florida, the genome sequence of six EEEV isolates from central Florida were determined. These data were used to identify the most polymorphic regions of the EEEV genome from viruses isolated in Florida. The sequence of these polymorphic regions was then determined for 18 additional Florida isolates collected in four geographically distinct regions over a 20-year period. Phylogenetic analyses of these data suggested a rough temporal association of the Florida isolates, but no clustering by region or by source of the isolate. Some clustering of northeastern isolates with Florida isolates was seen, providing support for the hypothesis that Florida serves as a reservoir for the periodic introduction of EEEV into the northeastern United States. PMID:21540379

  2. Isolation of border disease virus from twin lambs in Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Lees, V. Wayne; Loewen, Ken G.; Deregt, Dirk; Knudsen, Robin

    1991-01-01

    We describe herein a field case of border disease (BD) in twin lambs. Both lambs were unthrifty, stunted, and one exhibited nervous signs characteristic of BD, with tremors of the head, neck, hind legs, and pelvis. Hairiness of the coat and excessive pigmentation, often seen in lambs with BD, were not observed. A noncytopathic virus, which showed cross-reactivity with bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus antiserum and BVD virus monoclonal antibodies, was isolated repeatedly from leukocytes from one lamb and from tissues of the other. Although the source of the virus is unknown, our results suggest that the dam of the affected twins had been infected during pregnancy. We used the BD virus isolated to inoculate pregnant ewes and experimentally reproduce the disease in a newborn lamb. Our findings indicate that leukocytes, rather than serum, should be utilized for BD virus isolation. Further, it is recommended that BD virus, rather than BVD virus, be used in serum neutralization tests when screening sheep for antibody titers. PMID:17423897

  3. Isolation of genotypic variants of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H H; Miller, L K

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear polyhedrosis virus (MNPV) isolated from a lepidopteran (Noctuidae) insect, Autographa californica, was cloned by successive plaque purification using virions containing only one nucleocapsid per envelope as inoculum. The ability to clone the virus by this method was demonstrated by the isolation of nondefective, genotypic variants of the virus with similar but not identical restriction endonuclease fragment patterns. Five distinct variants were identified by genotypic analysis with HindIII, EcoRI, SalI, and Bam HI restriction endonucleases. The characteristic genotype of each variant was maintained upon passage in insect larvae. The isolation of these virus variants demonstrates (i) the heterogeneity of the uncloned virus preparation and (ii) the ability to clone MNPVs by plaque purification of media-derived nonoccluded virions. The A. californica MNPV is being considered for commercial use as a pesticide in the United States, and the cloning of the virus, in view of the heterogeneity detected, may be advisable. The cloning and genotype analyses are also significant with regard to understanding the genetic nature of multiply embedded NPVs (those NPVs containing more than one nucleocapsid per envelope in the occluded form of the virus) and indicate that further genetic analysis of these viruses is possible. Images PMID:359831

  4. Variability in alternanthera mosaic virus isolates from different hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have determined the complete genome sequences of Alternanthera mosaic virus phlox isolate PA (AltMV-PA) and four infectious clone variants derived from AltMV-SP, as well as partial sequences of other isolates from various types of phlox, and from portulaca, nandina, and cineraria. Phylogenetic co...

  5. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A New Virus Isolated From Wheat in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006 a mechanically-transmissible and previously uncharacterized virus was isolated in Kansas from wheat with mosaic symptoms. The physio-chemical properties of the virus were examined by purification on cesium chloride density gradients, electron microscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylalmid...

  6. Genetic Transformation of Citrus Paradisi with Antisense and untranslatable RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Genes of Citrus Tristeza Closterovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expression of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was studied in vivo and in vitro using a polyclonal antiserum raised against the recombinant CTV-RdRp protein. Although 56 kDa CTV-RdRp is thought to be expressed by a +1 translational frameshift at the carboxyl te...

  7. Isolated acute dysphagia due to varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Mantero, Vittorio; Rigamonti, Andrea; Valentini, Sergio; Fiumani, Anna; Piamarta, Francesca; Bonfanti, Paolo; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    We present a case of zoster sine herpete causing isolated acute dysphagia in an immunocompetent patient. The interest of this paper is the atypical presentation of varicella-zoster virus reactivation. A 77-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of fever and worsening dysphagia for both liquid and solid foods. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis and PCR amplified varicella-zoster virus DNA with high antibody titers in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The panel was suggestive of a cranial neuritis due to varicella-zoster virus, involved cranial nerves, even in the absence of a cutaneous and mucosal rash. Varicella-zoster virus reactivation should be included in the differential diagnosis of isolated or multiple cranial nerve palsies, with or without zosteriform skin lesions. A prompt etiologic diagnosis can lead to early administration of antiviral therapy. PMID:24529416

  8. A Circo-Like Virus Isolated from Penaeus monodon Shrimps

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hanh T.; Yu, Qian; Boisvert, Maude; Van, Hanh T.; Bergoin, Max

    2014-01-01

    A virus with a circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) genome (PmCV-1) was isolated from Penaeus monodon shrimps in Vietnam. The gene structure of the 1,777-nucleotide (nt) genome was similar to that of circoviruses and cycloviruses, but the nucleic acid and protein sequence identities to these viruses were very low. PMID:24435870

  9. Isolation of Lagos bat virus from water mongoose.

    PubMed

    Markotter, Wanda; Kuzmin, Ivan; Rupprecht, Charles E; Randles, Jenny; Sabeta, Claude T; Wandeler, Alexander I; Nel, Louis H

    2006-12-01

    A genotype 2 lyssavirus, Lagos bat virus (LBV), was isolated from a terrestrial wildlife species (water mongoose) in August 2004 in the Durban area of the KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa. The virus isolate was confirmed as LBV by antigenic and genetic characterization, and the mongoose was identified as Atilax paludinosus by mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated sequence homology with previous LBV isolates from South African bats. Studies performed in mice indicated that the peripheral pathogenicity of LBV had been underestimated in previous studies. Surveillance strategies for LBV in Africa must be improved to better understand the epidemiology of this virus and to make informed decisions on future vaccine strategies because evidence is insufficent that current rabies vaccines provide protection against LBV. PMID:17326944

  10. Vaccine efficacy against challenge with HPAI H5N1 virus isolates from Vietnam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple isolates of H5N1 were isolated from northern Vietnam in December of 2005. All the viruses characterized were clade 2 viruses, but phylogenetically they formed two separate sub-lineages. The isolation of clade 2 viruses was unexpected, since previous isolations from both northern and south...

  11. Isolation and characterization of H9N2 influenza virus isolates from poultry respiratory disease outbreak.

    PubMed

    Jakhesara, Subhash J; Bhatt, Vaibhav D; Patel, Namrata V; Prajapati, Kantilal S; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports isolation and characterization of H9N2 virus responsible for disease characterized by symptoms including difficulty in respiration, head swelling, nasal discharge, reduced feed intake, cyanotic comb, reduced egg production and mortality. Virus isolation from allantoic fluid inoculated with tracheal aspirates and whole genome sequencing of two isolates were performed on an Ion-Torrent sequencer. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two H9N2 isolates are reassortant viruses showing a G1-like lineage for HA, NA and NP, a Hok/49/98-like lineage for PB1 and PA, PK/UDL-01/05-like lineage for PB2, IL/90658/00-like lineage for NS and an unknown lineage for M gene. Analyses of the HA cleavage site showed a sequence of (333PARSSR↓GL340) indicating that these isolates are of low pathogenicity. Isolate 2 has leucine at amino acid position 226, a substitution which is associated with mammalian adaptation of avian influenza virus. Isolate 1 has the S31N substitution in the M2 gene that has been associated with drug resistance as well as R57Q and C241Y mutations in the NP gene which are associated with human adaptation. The result reported here gives deep insight in to H9N2 viruses circulating in domestic poultry of India and supports the policy of active efforts to control and manage H9N2 infections in Indian poultry. PMID:24790833

  12. Full Genomic Characterization of a Saffold Virus Isolated in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Leguia, Mariana; Loyola, Steev; Rios, Jane; Juarez, Diana; Guevara, Carolina; Silva, Maria; Prieto, Karla; Wiley, Michael; Kasper, Matthew R.; Palacios, Gustavo; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    While studying respiratory infections of unknown etiology we detected Saffold virus in an oropharyngeal swab collected from a two-year-old female suffering from diarrhea and respiratory illness. The full viral genome recovered by deep sequencing showed 98% identity to a previously described Saffold strain isolated in Japan. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the Peruvian Saffold strain belongs to genotype 3 and is most closely related to strains that have circulated in Asia. This is the first documented case report of Saffold virus in Peru and the only complete genomic characterization of a Saffold-3 isolate from the Americas. PMID:26610576

  13. Characterization of cytopathogenicity of classical swine fever virus isolate induced by Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Raut, S D; Rajak, K K; Kumar, R; Singh, V K; Saxena, A; Chaudhary, D; Muthuchelvan, D; Pandey, A B

    2015-06-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), the causative agent of classical swine fever, belongs to the family Flaviviridae and genus Pestivirus. Some pestiviruses exhibit cytopathic effect in cell culture but exact phenomenon is unknown. Over expression of NS2-3 gene, presence of defective interfering particle and exaltation of Newcastle disease virus (END) phenomenon could be the reasons of cytopathogenicity. In the present study, a CSFV isolate exhibiting cytopathic effect (CPE) in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line was characterized. To characterize cytopathogenicity of such isolate, END test was carried out. Interference of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in MDCK adapted CSFV was confirmed by RT-PCR and virus neutralization test. Absence of CPE and NDV specific nucleic acid after neutralization confirmed the induction of CPE by NDV. Further, identity of the CSFV isolate in MDCK cell line by immunoperoxidase test, immunoblotting and RT-PCR post NDV neutralization established the virus replication without CPE (non-cytopathic isolate). Findings suggest that, there could be a chance of mixed infection of both CSFV and NDV in the piglet from which the sample was collected for virus isolation. PMID:26436124

  14. Isolation of infectious chikungunya virus and dengue virus using anionic polymer-coated magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Patramool, Sirilaksana; Bernard, Eric; Hamel, Rodolphe; Natthanej, Luplertlop; Chazal, Nathalie; Surasombatpattana, Pornapat; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Daoust, Simon; Thongrungkiat, Supatra; Thomas, Frédéric; Briant, Laurence; Missé, Dorothée

    2013-10-01

    Mosquitoes-borne viruses are a major threat for human populations. Among them, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and dengue virus (DENV) cause thousands of cases worldwide. The recent propagation of mosquito vectors competent to transmit these viruses to temperate areas increases their potential impact on susceptible human populations. The development of sensitive methods allowing the detection and isolation of infectious viruses is of crucial interest for determination of virus contamination in humans and in competent mosquito vectors. However, simple and rapid method allowing the capture of infectious CHIKV and DENV from samples with low viral titers useful for further genetic and functional characterization of circulating strains is lacking. The present study reports a fast and sensitive isolation technique based on viral particles adsorption on magnetic beads coated with anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate) and suitable for isolation of infectious CHIKV and DENV from the four serotypes. Starting from quite reduced biological material, this method was accurate to combine with conventional detection techniques, including qRT-PCR and immunoblotting and allowed isolation of infectious particles without resorting to a step of cultivation. The use of polymer-coated magnetic beads is therefore of high interest for rapid detection and isolation of CHIKV and DENV from samples with reduced viral loads and represents an accurate approach for the surveillance of mosquito vector in area at risk for arbovirus outbreaks. PMID:23669102

  15. Aphid Transmission of the Ontario Isolate of Plum Pox Virus.

    PubMed

    Lowery, D Thomas; Vickers, Patricia M; Bittner, Lori A; Stobbs, Lorne W; Foottit, Robert G

    2015-10-01

    Utilization of timed virus acquisition access probes in studies of plum pox virus (PPV) transmission by aphids demonstrated that endemic species transmitted the virus readily from plum, Prunus domestica (L.) Batsch; peach, P. persica (L.); or dwarf flowering almond, P. glandulosa Thunberg., to peach seedlings. The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), was shown to be the most efficient vector. Acquisition of virus by green peach aphids from infected peach leaves resulted in 18-28% infected peach seedlings, while aphids previously fed on infected leaves of plum transferred virus to 36% of peach seedlings. Although the spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecola (Patch), was a less efficient vector than M. persicae it is perhaps more important for the spread of PPV due to its greater abundance and occurrence earlier in the season when peach trees are thought to be more susceptible to infection. Virus transmission rates varied depending on the virus source and healthy test plant species. In contrast to many previous studies, aphid inoculation of the experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana Domin occurred at a low rate, never exceeding 4%. Acquisition of PPV by M. persicae from infected peach fruit was greatly reduced compared with acquisition from leaves. The results of this research indicate that the Ontario isolate of PPV-D is readily transmissible by aphids to peach and natural spread of the virus needs to be considered in future management or eradication programs. PMID:26453705

  16. Isolation of Newcastle disease virus from birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Chu, H P; Trow, E W; Greenwood, A G; Jennings, A R; Keymer, I F

    1976-01-01

    In the 4 year period 1971-74 11 isolations of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) were made from 44 birds of prey that died in captivity. Three species of Falconiformes were involved, including one red-headed falcon (Falco chicquera), 5 European kestrels (F. tinnunculus), and 2 secretary birds (Sagittarius serpentarius), also 2 species of Strigiformes, comprising 2 barn owls (Tyto alba) and one little owl (Athene noctua). All NDV isolates were of the velogenic type. PMID:18777349

  17. Characterization and phylogenic analysis of Mexican Newcastle disease virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was isolated in Mexico for the first time in 1946 and the last report of a field outbreak caused by a highly virulent strain dates from year 2000, when 13.6 million birds were slaughtered and 93 farms quarantined. Mean Death Time test resulted in velogenic classificati...

  18. Neonatal herpes simplex virus presenting with isolated liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Aswad, Marwan Al; Suryadevara, Manika

    2014-01-01

    Disseminated neonatal herpes simplex virus infection usually presents with multi-organ involvement. Untreated, this disease has a mortality rate of approximately 80%. Here, we describe a well-appearing 3-week old infant with isolated compensated hepatic failure caused by HSV-2.

  19. Biological characterization of Nigerian chicken anaemia virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Oluwayelu, D O; Olaleye, O D; Todd, D

    2010-12-01

    Chicken anaemia virus (CAV) DNA was extracted from thymus, liver and bone marrow samples obtained from broiler and pullet chicken flocks in southwestern Nigeria, which presented with clinical signs and lesions suggestive of both infectious bursal disease and chicken infectious anaemia. While CAV was successfully isolated in MDCC-MSB1 cells from four of the pooled tissue samples, the remaining two samples failed to grow in cells. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) characterization using four MAbs produced against the reference Cuxhaven-1 (Cux-1) CAV isolate showed that Nigerian CAV isolates are antigenically related to each other and to the Cux-1 virus. Pathogenicity studies with the Cux-1 virus and one of the Nigerian isolates (NGR-1) revealed that NGR-1 was more pathogenic that the former. We conclude that although Nigerian CAV isolates are antigenically related to each other, they differ in terms of cell culture growth characteristics and probably pathogenicity. These findings further confirm that CAV exists and can no longer be ignored in poultry disease diagnosis in Nigeria. Cases hitherto diagnosed as IBD may actually be CIA or a co-infection of the two. PMID:22416640

  20. Isolation and Characterization of an Equine Foamy Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tobaly-Tapiero, Joelle; Bittoun, Patricia; Neves, Manuel; Guillemin, Marie-Claude; Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Gicquel, Bernard; Zientara, Stephan; Giron, Marie-Louise; de Thé, Hugues; Saïb, Ali

    2000-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FVs) are complex retroviruses which have been isolated from different animal species including nonhuman primates, cattle, and cats. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new FV isolated from blood samples of horses. Similar to other FVs, the equine foamy virus (EFV) exhibits a highly characteristic ultrastructure and induces syncytium formation and subsequent cell lysis on a large number of cell lines. Molecular cloning of EFV reveals that the general organization is that of other known FVs, whereas sequence similarity with its bovine FV counterpart is only 40%. Interestingly, EFV buds exclusively from the plasma membrane and not from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as previously shown for other FVs. The absence of the ER retrieval dilysine motif in EFV Env is likely responsible for this unexpected sorting pathway. PMID:10756018

  1. Mayaro virus fever in French Guiana: isolation, identification, and seroprevalence.

    PubMed

    Talarmin, A; Chandler, L J; Kazanji, M; de Thoisy, B; Debon, P; Lelarge, J; Labeau, B; Bourreau, E; Vié, J C; Shope, R E; Sarthou, J L

    1998-09-01

    This paper reports the first isolation of Mayaro (MAY) virus from a patient infected in French Guiana. The identification was initially performed using immunofluorescent antibody testing with specific mouse antibody, and confirmed by plaque-reduction neutralization testing and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To determine if MAY virus infection is widespread in French Guiana, a serosurvey was performed to determine the prevalence of antibody to this virus in various ethnic groups and areas of French Guiana. Human sera (n = 1,962) were screened using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. To determine whether MAY virus circulates in the rain forest, a serosurvey in monkey populations was performed. Monkey sera (n = 150) were also screened for antibody to MAY virus using HI testing. Of the human sera tested, 6.3% were positive for anti-MAY virus antibodies. Significant differences in MAY virus seroprevalence between different age groups were observed. Seroprevalence rates increased with age, with a large increase in people 10-19 years of age in comparison with those less than 10 years of age. After adjustment for age, significant differences were also found between places of residence. The prevalence of anti-MAY virus antibody was higher in people living in contact with the forest, especially in the Haut Oyapock area (odds ratio [OR] = 97.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 48.2-197.9) and along the Maroni River (OR = 39.7, 95% CI = 20.6-76.6). The ethnic differences observed in this study were probably due to differences in residence. Among monkeys, higher seroprevalence rates were found in Alouatta seniculus (66.0%) than in Saguinus midas (18.2%). Among Alouatta, the seroprevalence increased significantly with weight (and therefore with age). This study indicates that MAY virus is present in French Guiana, and human infections occur in areas where people live near the tropical rain forest. PMID:9749643

  2. Recent isolations of Lassa virus from Nigerian rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Herta; Fabiyi, A.; Monath, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    Rodents were trapped in the Benue-Plateau and North-Eastern States of Nigeria where Lassa fever had been reported in previous years. Eight Lassa virus strains were isolated from tissues and blood of rodents identified in the field as being of 3 different species: Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus, and Mus minutoides. All the infected rodents were collected in village habitats. These isolations indicate the presence of Lassa virus in wild rodents in Nigeria during periods when no human infections were evident. Prior studies in Sierra Leone have indicated that a single rodent species, M. natalensis, may be the important reservoir host of Lassa virus. Since the present study indicates that other rodent species may be involved as well, the ecology of Lassa virus may be more complicated than was heretofore supposed. In view of the importance of determining the geographic and species range of rodent hosts of Lassa virus, and because of the problems inherent in rodent identification under austere field conditions, it is urgent that further studies be conducted in the same areas of Nigeria to confirm these findings. PMID:1085216

  3. Isolation and molecular characterization of Newcastle disease viruses from raptors.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Naresh; Chander, Yogesh; Primus, Alexander; Redig, Patrick T; Goyal, Sagar M

    2010-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to detect and characterize Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in raptors. Cloacal and oropharyngeal swab samples were collected from 60 casualty raptors during January to March 2009 in Minnesota. Inoculation of all these samples (n=120) in 9-day-old embryonated hens' eggs resulted in isolation of haemagglutinating viruses in three samples from two bald eagles and one great horned owl. These three haemagglutinating viruses were confirmed as NDV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using fusion gene-specific primers, and were negative for avian influenza virus by RT-PCR. Further characterization revealed that all three possessed (112)GKQGRL(117) at the fusion gene cleavage site, indicating that they were lentogenic strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all three isolates clustered with published class II genotype II NDVs. The nucleotide sequence homology of the three NDV isolates among themselves was 98.4 to 99.6% and the sequence homology with lentogenic strains from wild birds used for comparison varied between 94.5 and 100%. Detection of NDV strains from raptors merits further epidemiological studies to determine the prevalence of different NDV strains in raptors and their impact in relation to transmission to domestic poultry. PMID:21154052

  4. Suppression of influenza virus infection by the orf virus isolated in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fong-Yuan; Tseng, Yeu-Yang; Chan, Kun-Wei; Kuo, Shu-Ting; Yang, Cheng-Hsiung; Wang, Chi-Young; Takasu, Masaki; Hsu, Wei-Li; Wong, Min-Liang

    2015-09-01

    Orf virus (ORFV), a member of parapoxvirus, is an enveloped virus with genome of double-stranded DNA. ORFV causes contagious pustular dermatitis or contagious ecthyma in sheep and goats worldwide. In general, detection of viral DNA and observing ORFV virion in tissues of afflicted animals are two methods commonly used for diagnosis of orf infection; however, isolation of the ORFV in cell culture using virus-containing tissue as inoculum is known to be difficult. In this work, the ORFV (Hoping strain) isolated in central Taiwan was successfully grown in cell culture. We further examined the biochemical characteristic of our isolate, including viral genotyping, viral mRNA and protein expression. By electron microscopy, one unique form of viral particle from ORFV infected cellular lysate was demonstrated in the negative-stained field. Moreover, immunomodulating and anti-influenza virus properties of this ORFV were investigated. ORFV stimulated human monocytes (THP-1) secreting proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-?. And, pre-treatment of ORFV-infected cell medium prevents A549 cells from subsequent type A influenza virus (IAV) infection. Similarly, mice infected with ORFV via both intramuscular and subcutaneous routes at two days prior to IAV infection significantly decreased the replication of IAV. In summary, the results of a current study indicated our Hoping strain harbors the immune modulator property; with such a bio-adjuvanticity, we further proved that pre-exposure of ORFV protects animals from subsequent IAV infection. PMID:25855509

  5. Suppression of influenza virus infection by the orf virus isolated in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Fong-Yuan; TSENG, Yeu-Yang; CHAN, Kun-Wei; KUO, Shu-Ting; YANG, Cheng-Hsiung; WANG, Chi-Young; TAKASU, Masaki; HSU, Wei-Li; WONG, Min-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Orf virus (ORFV), a member of parapoxvirus, is an enveloped virus with genome of double-stranded DNA. ORFV causes contagious pustular dermatitis or contagious ecthyma in sheep and goats worldwide. In general, detection of viral DNA and observing ORFV virion in tissues of afflicted animals are two methods commonly used for diagnosis of orf infection; however, isolation of the ORFV in cell culture using virus-containing tissue as inoculum is known to be difficult. In this work, the ORFV (Hoping strain) isolated in central Taiwan was successfully grown in cell culture. We further examined the biochemical characteristic of our isolate, including viral genotyping, viral mRNA and protein expression. By electron microscopy, one unique form of viral particle from ORFV infected cellular lysate was demonstrated in the negative-stained field. Moreover, immunomodulating and anti-influenza virus properties of this ORFV were investigated. ORFV stimulated human monocytes (THP-1) secreting proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-?. And, pre-treatment of ORFV-infected cell medium prevents A549 cells from subsequent type A influenza virus (IAV) infection. Similarly, mice infected with ORFV via both intramuscular and subcutaneous routes at two days prior to IAV infection significantly decreased the replication of IAV. In summary, the results of a current study indicated our Hoping strain harbors the immune modulator property; with such a bio-adjuvanticity, we further proved that pre-exposure of ORFV protects animals from subsequent IAV infection. PMID:25855509

  6. Rapid small-scale isolation of herpes simplex virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Kintner, R L; Brandt, C R

    1994-07-01

    A method has been developed for the rapid isolation of herpes simplex virus DNA analogous to miniprep methods for bacterial plasmid isolation. Infected Vero cells are lysed with three freeze-thaw cycles, and the nuclei are removed by centrifugation. DNA is released from the virions in the supernatant by proteinase K digestion. Then the DNA is extracted with phenol/chloroform and precipitated with ethanol. This method requires only small amounts of infected cells as a source of viral DNA, does not use radioactivity, and routinely produces DNA of sufficient purity to be used for restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis on ethidium-stained gels. PMID:7989436

  7. Molecular characterisation of virulence graded field isolates of myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Myxoma virus (MV) has been endemic in Europe since shortly after its deliberate release in France in 1952. While the emergence of more resistant hosts and more transmissible and attenuated virus is well documented, there have been relatively few studies focused on the sequence changes incurred by the virus as it has adapted to its new host. In order to identify regions of variability within the MV genome to be used for phylogenetic studies and to try to investigate causes of MV strain attenuation we have molecularly characterised nine strains of MV isolated in Spain between the years 1992 and 1995 from wide ranging geographic locations and which had been previously graded for virulence by experimental infection of rabbits. Results The findings reported here show the analysis of 16 genomic regions accounting for approximately 10% of the viral genomes. Of the 20 genes analysed 5 (M034L, M069L, M071L, M130R and M135R) were identical in all strains and 1 (M122R) contained only a single point mutation in an individual strain. Four genes (M002L/R, M009L, M036L and M017L) showed insertions or deletions that led to disruption of the ORFs. Conclusions The findings presented here provide valuable tools for strain differentiation and phylogenetic studies of MV isolates and some clues as to the reasons for virus attenuation in the field. PMID:20187925

  8. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of caprine Orf virus in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Ashwaq Ahmed; Ismail, Muhammad Farid Bin; Balakrishnan, Krishnan Nair; Bala, Jamilu Abubakar; Hani, Homayoun; Abba, Yusuf; Awang Isa, Mohd Kamaruddin; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Arshad, Siti Suri; Nazariah, Zeenatul Allaudin; Abdullah, Rasedee; Mustapha, Noordin Mohamed; Mohd-Lila, Mohd-Azmi

    2015-12-01

    Orf virus is a DNA virus that causes contiguous ecthyma in goat and sheep. Infection of animals with this virus cause high mortality in young animals resulting in huge economic losses. In this study, we investigated an outbreak of Orf in a goat farm in Malaysia. Samples were collected from infected animals and viral isolation was done using both LT and MDCK cell lines. Molecular detection was done by conventional PCR for specific primers; B2L and F1L genes and phylogenetic analysis was done on the sequence data obtained. Cytopathic effects (CPE) were observed in both cell lines after 3 days of inoculation and were 50 % by the sixth day. PCR showed positive bands for both B2L and F1L genes and phylogenetic analysis showed that the Malaysian strain had close homology to the Chinese and Indian Orf virus isolates. This study gives more insight into the existing Orf viral strains in Malaysia and their relationship with other strains globally. PMID:26645035

  9. The E116 isolate of Dutch pea early-browning virus is a recombinant virus.

    PubMed

    Swanson, M M; MacFarlane, S A

    1999-03-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of RNA2 of the E116 isolate of Dutch pea early-browning virus (PEBV-D) was obtained from overlapping cDNA clones. The RNA was found to encode three open reading frames corresponding to, in 5' to 3' order, the coat protein, the 2b nematode transmission protein and the C-terminal part of the cysteine-rich 1b protein derived from RNA1. The 3' non-coding region of PEBV-D RNA2 was also shown to be derived from RNA1. This is the first demonstration that recombination of PEBV occurs in nature. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of the PEBV-D RNA2 proteins with those of British PEBV and several isolates of tobacco rattle virus reveals complex patterns of mixing of the genomes of these two viruses. PMID:10225277

  10. A virus related to soybean mosaic virus from Pinellia ternata in China and its comparison with local soybean SMV isolates.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Zheng, H-Y; Lin, L; Adams, M J; Antoniw, J F; Zhao, M-F; Shang, Y-F; Chen, J-P

    2004-02-01

    A potyvirus isolated from Pinellia ternata in China was characterised and shown to be related to Soybean mosaic virus (SMV). The virus was pathogenic on P. ternata and some soybean cultivars, whereas the local soybean SMV isolate HH5 did not infect P. ternata. Western blot experiments demonstrated a serological relationship between the virus from Pinellia, SMV and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV). The complete nucleotide sequences of the Pinellia virus (isolate P-1, 9735 nt) and of the Chinese soybean SMV isolates HH5 (9585 nt) and HZ (9588 nt) were determined. A 1733 nt sequence at the 3'-terminus of a second isolate from Pinellia (isolate P-2) was also determined. The predicted polyprotein of isolate P-1 has 83% amino acid (aa) identity with those of published SMV sequences. In many parts of the genome, aa identity was about 90% but it was much lower in the P1 protein region (24-29%), where it more closely resembled Dasheen mosaic virus (62%). The partial sequence of isolate P-2 had 91% nt identity to P-1 and both isolates resembled a recent sequence in the public databases (AF469171) wrongly named Zantedeschia mosaic virus. The two complete SMV soybean sequences had 93-95% nt identity with those of the previously sequenced isolates and >97% amino acid identity. Phylogenetic analysis and comparisons of coat proteins suggest that the Pinellia, WMV and SMV potyviruses should probably be treated as strains of the same species. PMID:14745600

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Rat Hepatitis E Virus Strain Isolated in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Debing, Yannick; Emerson, Suzanne U.; Purcell, Robert H.; Dallmeier, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a common cause of acute hepatitis in humans. Related viruses have been isolated from multiple animal species, including rats, but their impact on human health is unclear. We present the first full-length genome sequence of a rat hepatitis E virus strain isolated in the United States (LA-B350). PMID:25377700

  12. Isolation and genetic characterization of a tembusu virus strain isolated from mosquitoes in Shandong, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Diao, Y; Chen, H; Ou, Q; Liu, X; Gao, X; Yu, C; Wang, L

    2015-04-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a flavivirus, presumed to be a mosquito-borne flavivirus of the Ntaya virus subgroup. To date, however, there have been no reports indicating that mosquitoes are involved in the spread of TMUV. In this study, we report the first isolation of TMUV from Culex mosquitoes. We describe the isolation and characterization of a field strain of TMUV from mosquitoes collected in Shandong Province, China. The virus isolate, named TMUV-SDMS, grows well in mosquito cell line C6/36, in Vero and duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cell lines, and causes significant cytopathic effects in these cell cultures. The TMUV-SDMS genome is a single-stranded RNA, 10 989 nt in length, consisting of a single open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3410 amino acids, with 5' and 3' untranslated regions of 142 and 617 nt, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the E and NS5 genes revealed that the TMUV-SDMS is closely related to the TMUV YY5 and BYD strains which cause severe egg-drop in ducks. The 3'NTR of TMUV-SDMS contains two pairs of tandem repeat CS and one non-duplicate CS, which have sequence similarities to the same repeats in the YY5 and BYD strains. Our findings indicate that mosquitoes carrying the TMUV may play an important role in the spread of this virus and in disease outbreak. PMID:23711093

  13. Restriction endonuclease analysis of infectious laryngotracheitis viruses: comparison of modified-live vaccine viruses and North Carolina field isolates.

    PubMed

    Guy, J S; Barnes, H J; Munger, L L; Rose, L

    1989-01-01

    Six modified-live (ML) infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) vaccine viruses, three reference strains, and 18 field isolates were compared by restriction endonuclease analysis of their DNA. Viral DNA digestion patterns were established for vaccine viruses using restriction endonucleases PstI, BamHI, KpnI, and HindIII. Using these enzymes, five of six ML vaccine viruses had identical restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns. Vaccine viruses had distinct patterns compared with ILT virus reference strains Illinois-N71851, Cover, and NVSL. Restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of 18 field isolates of ILT virus, obtained from ILT outbreaks in North Carolina, were indistinguishable from vaccine viruses. These results suggest a possible role of vaccine or vaccine-like viruses in recent ILT outbreaks. PMID:2546530

  14. Isolation of seven respiratory viruses in shell vials: a practical and highly sensitive method.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, M A; Shuck, K M; Sambol, A R; Flor, S M; O'Brien, J; Cabrera, B J

    1993-01-01

    The isolation of respiratory viruses in shell vials was compared with isolation in tube cultures in order to determine the sensitivity of the former, rapid method. Twenty of 21 influenza virus and 15 of 15 parainfluenza virus isolates were recovered in shell vials. One hundred twenty-seven of 138 respiratory syncytial virus isolates were detected in shell vials, but only 10 of 21 adenovirus isolates were positive by the rapid method. Shell vials are very effective for the diagnosis of respiratory viral infections, except for those caused by adenovirus. PMID:8381816

  15. Isolation of seven respiratory viruses in shell vials: a practical and highly sensitive method.

    PubMed

    Olsen, M A; Shuck, K M; Sambol, A R; Flor, S M; O'Brien, J; Cabrera, B J

    1993-02-01

    The isolation of respiratory viruses in shell vials was compared with isolation in tube cultures in order to determine the sensitivity of the former, rapid method. Twenty of 21 influenza virus and 15 of 15 parainfluenza virus isolates were recovered in shell vials. One hundred twenty-seven of 138 respiratory syncytial virus isolates were detected in shell vials, but only 10 of 21 adenovirus isolates were positive by the rapid method. Shell vials are very effective for the diagnosis of respiratory viral infections, except for those caused by adenovirus. PMID:8381816

  16. Phylogenetic and serological analysis of turnip ringspot virus and radish mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Koloniuk, Igor; Petrzik, Karel

    2012-03-01

    Turnip ringspot virus (TuRSV) has been proposed to be a member of a new species in the genus Comovirus. Its remarkable host-range similarity to radish mosaic virus (RaMV) may have led to its misrecognition in the past. Findings from both sequence analysis and serological tests support the assignment of TuRSV to a new comovirus species. In addition, phylogenetic analysis suggests that the two genome segments of some TuRSV isolates have a heterogeneous origin. PMID:22160585

  17. Genomic characterization of pseudorabies virus strains isolated in Italy.

    PubMed

    Sozzi, E; Moreno, A; Lelli, D; Cinotti, S; Alborali, G L; Nigrelli, A; Luppi, A; Bresaola, M; Catella, A; Cordioli, P

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we undertook the genomic characterization of 54 pseudorabies virus (PRV) strains isolated in Italy during 1984-2010. The characterization was based on partial sequencing of the UL44 (gC) and US8 (gE) genes; 44 strains (38 for gene gE and 36 for gC) were isolated on pig farms; 9 originated from dogs and 1 from cattle. These porcine PRV strains, which were closely related to those isolated in Europe and America in the last 20 years, and the bovine strain bovine/It/2441/1992 belong to cluster B in both phylogenetic trees. Six porcine strains that do not belong to cluster B are related in both gE and gC phylogenetic trees to the 'old' porcine PRV strains isolated in the 1970s and 1980s. In the last two decades, the presence of these strains in domestic pig populations has been reduced drastically, whereas they are prevalent in wild boar. The two remaining strains have an interesting genomic profile, characterized by the gC gene being closely related to the old porcine PRV strains, and the gE gene being similar to that of recently isolated strains. Three strains originating from working dogs on pig farms are located in cluster B in both phylogenetic trees. Five strains isolated from hunting dogs have a high degree of correlation with PRV strains circulating in wild boar. The last isolate has a gC gene similar to that in the two porcine strains mentioned previously, and the gE gene is correlated with the strains isolated from hunting dogs. These results provide interesting insight into the genomic characterization of PRV strains and reveal a clear differentiation between the strains isolated from hunting dogs that are related to the wild boar strains and those originating from domestic pigs. PMID:23331342

  18. Isolation, Genetic Characterization, and Seroprevalence of Adana Virus, a Novel Phlebovirus Belonging to the Salehabad Virus Complex, in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Cigdem; Alwassouf, Sulaf; Piorkowski, Géraldine; Bichaud, Laurence; Tezcan, Seda; Dincer, Ender; Ergunay, Koray; Ozbel, Yusuf; Alten, Bulent; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A new phlebovirus, Adana virus, was isolated from a pool of Phlebotomus spp. (Diptera; Psychodidae) in the province of Adana, in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. Genetic analysis based on complete coding of genomic sequences indicated that Adana virus belongs to the Salehabad virus species of the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. Adana virus is the third virus of the Salehabad virus species for which the complete sequence has been determined. To understand the epidemiology of Adana virus, a seroprevalence study using microneutralization assay was performed to detect the presence of specific antibodies in human and domestic animal sera collected in Adana as well as Mersin province, located 147 km west of Adana. The results demonstrate that the virus is present in both provinces. High seroprevalence rates in goats, sheep, and dogs support intensive exposure to Adana virus in the region, which has not been previously reported for any virus included in the Salehabad serocomplex; however, low seroprevalence rates in humans suggest that Adana virus is not likely to constitute an important public health problem in exposed human populations, but this deserves further studies. IMPORTANCE Until recently, in the genus Phlebovirus, the Salehabad virus species consisted of two viruses: Salehabad virus, isolated from sand flies in Iran, and Arbia virus, isolated from sand flies in Italy. Here we present the isolation and complete genome characterization of the Adana virus, which we propose to be included in the Salehabad virus species. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation and complete genome characterization, from sand flies in Turkey, of a Salehabad virus-related phlebovirus with supporting seropositivity in the Mediterranean, Aegean, and Central Anatolia regions, where phleboviruses have been circulating and causing outbreaks. Salehabad species viruses have generally been considered to be a group of viruses with little medical or veterinary interest. This view deserves to be revisited according to our results, which indicate a high animal infection rate of Adana virus and recent evidence of human infection with Adria virus in Greece. PMID:25653443

  19. Characterization of a Siberian Virus Isolated from a Patient with Progressive Chronic Tick-Borne Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Gritsun, T. S.; Frolova, T. V.; Zhankov, A. I.; Armesto, M.; Turner, S. L.; Frolova, M. P.; Pogodina, V. V.; Lashkevich, V. A.; Gould, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    A strain of Tick-borne encephalitis virus designated Zausaev (Za) was isolated in Siberia from a patient who died of a progressive (2-year) form of tick-borne encephalitis 10 years after being bitten by a tick. The complete genomic sequence of this virus was determined, and an attempt was made to correlate the sequence with the biological characteristics of the virus. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this virus belongs to the Siberian subtype of Tick-borne encephalitis virus. Comparison of Za virus with two related viruses, a Far Eastern isolate, Sofjin, and a Siberian isolate, Vasilchenko, revealed differences among the three viruses in pathogenicity for Syrian hamsters, cytopathogenicity for PS cells, plaque morphology, and the electrophoretic profiles of virus-specific nonstructural proteins. Comparative amino acid alignments revealed 10 individual amino acid substitutions in the Za virus polyprotein sequence that were different from those of other tick-borne flaviviruses. Notably, the dimeric form of the Za virus NS1 protein migrated in polyacrylamide gels as a heterogeneous group of molecules with a significantly higher electrophoretic mobility than those of the Sofjin and Vasilchenko viruses. Two amino acid substitutions, T277?V and E279?G, within the NS1 dimerization domain are probably responsible for the altered oligomerization of Za virus NS1. These studies suggest that the patient from whom Za virus was isolated died due to increased pathogenicity of the latent virus following spontaneous mutagenesis. PMID:12477807

  20. Application of the "best fit" pathotyping assay for evaluation of Russian isolates of Marek's disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the validity of the "best fit" pathotyping assay for testing of field isolates of Marek's disease (MD) virus. Twenty serotype 1 MD viruses were isolated from breeder and commercial flocks in 8 regions of the Russian Federation. These isolates were pat...

  1. Characterisation of potato virus Y isolates from Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Atefe; Massumi, Hossein; Heydarnejad, Jahangir; Hosseini Pour, Akbar; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-02-01

    A survey of Potato virus Y (PVY) was conducted in cultivated fields in six Iranian provinces between January 2005 to July 2007. Two hundred samples from potato and tomato were collected and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for potyviruses. Almost one fourth of the samples were found to be infected by PVY. Analysis of these PVY-positive samples using three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) facilitating the simultaneous detection of three main strains namely the ordinary (PVY(O)), strain (PVY(N)) and C (PVY(C)) strains. However, the fourth strain (PVY(NTN)) and some others recombinant isolates were also identified by molecular methods. Host range and symptoms analysis using sap inoculation of four different strains of PVY onto a range of plants revealed that the four strains showed biological properties that seemed to be consistent with their molecular grouping. Fourteen isolates of PVY were chosen based on the host and geographical location, primer specificity and serology for further biological and molecular characterisation. The coat protein (CP) and P1 genes and 3'-non-translated region (3'NTR) from 14 representative isolates were sequenced and analysed with the sequences available in GenBank. Composite analysis of the P1, CP and 3'-UTR sequences with all full genome sequences of PVY revealed that there are three potential strains of PVY in Iran, PVY(O), PVY(N)-W and PVY(NTN). Isolate KER.SA(N) was the most divergent of all the 14 isolates reacted with PVY(N) specific MAbs but grouped with PVY(O) strains in maximum likelihood phylogentic analysis. The PVY(NTN) isolates from Iran more closely related to the European than North American PVY(NTN) isolates. PMID:21082231

  2. Isolation of Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus from a Horse with Neurological Disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Roberta; Costa, Erica Azevedo; Marques, Rafael Elias; Oliveira, Taismara Simas; Furtini, Ronaldo; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Quaresma; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2013-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a causative agent of encephalitis in humans in the Western hemisphere. SLEV is a positive-sense RNA virus that belongs to the Flavivirus genus, which includes West Nile encephalitis virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Dengue virus and other medically important viruses. Recently, we isolated a SLEV strain from the brain of a horse with neurological signs in the countryside of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The SLEV isolation was confirmed by reverse-transcription RT-PCR and sequencing of the E protein gene. Virus identity was also confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence using commercial antibodies against SLEV. To characterize this newly isolated strain in vivo, serial passages in newborn mice were performed and led to hemorrhagic manifestations associated with recruitment of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system of newborns. In summary this is the first isolation of SLEV from a horse with neurological signs in Brazil. PMID:24278489

  3. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of Canine distemper virus from India.

    PubMed

    Swati; Deka, Dipak; Uppal, Sanjeev Kumar; Verma, Ramneek

    2015-09-01

    Canine distemper (CD), caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious disease that infects a variety of carnivores. Sequence analysis of CDVs from different geographical areas has shown a lot of variation in the genome of the virus especially in haemagglutinin gene which might be one of the causes of vaccine failure. In this study, we isolated the virus (place: Ludhiana, Punjab; year: 2014) and further cloned, sequenced and analyzed partial haemagglutinin (H) gene and full length genes for fusion protein (F), phosphoprotein (P) and matrix protein (M) from an Indian wild-type CDV. Higher sequence homology was observed with the strains from Switzerland, Hungary, Germany; and lower with the vaccine strains like Ondersteport, CDV3, Convac for all the genes. The multiple sequence alignment showed more variation in partial H (45 nucleotide and 5 amino acid substitutions) and complete F (79 nucleotide and 30 amino acid substitutions) than in complete P (44 nucleotide and 22 amino acid substitutions) and complete M (22 nucleotide and 4 amino acid substitutions) gene/protein. Predicted potential N-linked glycosylation sites in H, F, M and P proteins were similar to the previously known wild-type CDVs but different from the vaccine strains. The Indian CDV formed a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree clearly separated from the previously known wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26396979

  4. Isolation & molecular characterization of human parainfluenza virus in Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Indumathi, C.P.; Gunanasekaran, P.; Kaveri, K.; Arunagiri, Kavita; Mohana, S.; Sheriff, A. Khaleefathullah; SureshBabu, B.V.; Padmapriya, P.; Senthilraja, R.; Fathima, Gracy

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) accounts for a significant proportion of lower respiratory tract infections in children as well as adults. This study was done to detect the presence of different subtypes of HPIV from patients having influenza like illness (ILI). Methods: Throat and nasal swabs from 232 patients with ILI who were negative for influenza viruses were tested by multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(mRT-PCR) for the detection of human parainfluenza virus. All samples were inoculated in rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK2) cell line. Results: Of the 232 samples, 26(11.2%) were positive by mRT-PCR and nine (34.6%) showed cytopathic effect with syncytium formation for HPIV and all were HPIV-3 serotype, other serotypes like 1,2,4 were negative. The HPIV-3 strains (HN gene) were sequenced and analysed. Two novel mutations were identified at amino acid residues 295 and 297. Interpretation & conclusions: The mRT-PCR assay offers a rapid, sensitive and accurate diagnostic method for detection of HPIV which enables early detection and control. In our study there was a predominance of HPIV among 1-5 yr age group and the school going age group was less affected. Further studies need to be done to characterize HPIV isolated from different parts of the country. PMID:26658594

  5. Identification of Asian genotype of chikungunya virus isolated in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Ortíz-Alcántara, Joanna; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; de la Luz Torres-Rodríguez, María; Nuñez-León, Alma; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruiz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-02-01

    We identified 25 autochthonous chikungunya virus cases in Mexico, initially detected by RT-PCR targeting the E1 gene and propagated in C6/36 Aedes albopictus cells, in 2014. To determine the type of virus found, in a previous report, the genomes of 2 CHIKV strains were fully sequenced. Genome sequence analysis revealed that these isolates from Mexico belonged to the Asian genotype, and a phylogenetic association with the circulating strain in the British Virgin Islands was also established in the same year. This was further supported by changes in specific amino acids, E2-V368A and 6K-L20M. For these reasons, it can be inferred that the route of virus entry to Mexico was held across the countries in the Caribbean and Central America. The presence of E1-A226V mutation associated with more efficient replication in the salivary gland of the A. albopictus mosquito was not observed. Interestingly, a newly acquired NSP4-S399C mutation was observed; however, the significance of changes in amino acid found in non-structural proteins in autochthonous strains remains to be elucidated. PMID:26781948

  6. Peruvian horse sickness virus and Yunnan orbivirus, isolated from vertebrates and mosquitoes in Peru and Australia.

    PubMed

    Attoui, Houssam; Mendez-Lopez, Maria Rosario; Rao, Shujing; Hurtado-Alendes, Ana; Lizaraso-Caparo, Frank; Jaafar, Fauziah Mohd; Samuel, Alan R; Belhouchet, Mourad; Pritchard, Lindsay I; Melville, Lorna; Weir, Richard P; Hyatt, Alex D; Davis, Steven S; Lunt, Ross; Calisher, Charles H; Tesh, Robert B; Fujita, Ricardo; Mertens, Peter P C

    2009-11-25

    During 1997, two new viruses were isolated from outbreaks of disease that occurred in horses, donkeys, cattle and sheep in Peru. Genome characterization showed that the virus isolated from horses (with neurological disorders, 78% fatality) belongs to a new species the Peruvian horse sickness virus (PHSV), within the genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae. This represents the first isolation of PHSV, which was subsequently also isolated during 1999, from diseased horses in the Northern Territory of Australia (Elsey virus, ELSV). Serological and molecular studies showed that PHSV and ELSV are very similar in the serotype-determining protein (99%, same serotype). The second virus (Rioja virus, RIOV) was associated with neurological signs in donkeys, cattle, sheep and dogs and was shown to be a member of the species Yunnan orbivirus (YUOV). RIOV and YUOV are also almost identical (97% amino acid identity) in the serotype-determining protein. YUOV was originally isolated from mosquitoes in China. PMID:19766284

  7. Isolation and molecular characterization of nephropathic infectious bronchitis virus isolates of Gujarat state, India.

    PubMed

    Patel, B H; Bhimani, M P; Bhanderi, B B; Jhala, M K

    2015-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) is a common, highly contagious, acute, and economically important viral disease of chickens caused by Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV, sp. Avian coronavirus). Five pooled tissue suspensions of 50 layer birds and one reference Massachusetts vaccine strain were inoculated into specific pathogen free (SPF) chicken egg for isolation of IBV. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was carried out using post inoculated allontoic fluid to amplify the spike (S) glycoprotein of S1 subunit of IBV. All the eggs inoculated with five pooled tissue samples and vaccine sample showed dwarfing and curling of SPF embryos indicative of IBV. All the five samples and the vaccine sample produced the expected amplicons of 466 bp by RT-PCR. The sequencing of five isolates revealed that all the five sequences were 99.09-100 % similar among themselves and showed 99.10-100 % nucleotide identity with the vaccine strain. On multiple sequence alignment it was found that our isolates were more similar at S1 subunit nucleotide level with the reference Ma5 and H120 vaccine strains than the reference Mass41 strain. The sequences of Anand isolates revealed further genetic changes in the circulating IBV in comparison to previous isolate of Gujarat as well as higher differences with the strains isolated in other states showing substantial changes at genetic level in Indian IBV isolates, which may partially explain the increasing incidences of IB in the country in spite of the vaccination. PMID:26436120

  8. Characterization of reticuloendotheliosis virus isolates obtained from chickens, turkeys and prairie chickens in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) isolates obtained from chickens, turkeys and prairie chickens in the United States were characterized using ploymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect immunofluoresence (IFA) assays. This study included five REV isolates from Prairie chickens in Texas, two ...

  9. Genotyping of Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) based on the glycoprotein gene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, W.-S.; Oh, M.-J.; Nishizawa, T.; Park, J.-W.; Kurath, G.; Yoshimizu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein (G) gene nucleotide sequences of four Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) were analyzed to evaluate their genetic relatedness to worldwide isolates. All Korean isolates were closely related to Japanese isolates of genogroup JRt rather than to those of North American and European genogroups. It is believed that Korean IHNV has been most likely introduced from Japan to Korea by the movement of contaminated fish eggs. Among the Korean isolates, phylogenetically distinct virus types were obtained from sites north and south of a large mountain range, suggesting the possibility of more than one introduction of virus from Japan. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of Bunyamwera and Ngari viruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus) isolated in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odhiambo, C; Venter, M; Lwande, O; Swanepoel, R; Sang, R

    2016-01-01

    Orthobunyaviruses, tri-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses, have long been associated with mild to severe human disease in Africa, but not haemorrhagic fever. However, during a Rift Valley fever outbreak in East Africa in 1997-1998, Ngari virus was isolated from two patients and antibody detected in several others with haemorrhagic fever. The isolates were used to identify Ngari virus as a natural Orthobunyavirus reassortant. Despite their potential to reassort and cause severe human disease, characterization of orthobunyaviruses is hampered by paucity of genetic sequences. Our objective was to obtain complete gene sequences of two Bunyamwera virus and three Ngari virus isolates from recent surveys in Kenya and to determine their phylogenetic positioning within the Bunyamwera serogroup. Newly sequenced Kenyan Bunyamwera virus isolates clustered closest to a Bunyamwera virus isolate from the same locality and a Central African Republic isolate indicating that similar strains may be circulating regionally. Recent Kenyan Ngari isolates were closest to the Ngari isolates associated with the 1997-1998 haemorrhagic fever outbreak. We observed a temporal/geographical relationship among Ngari isolates in all three gene segments suggesting a geographical/temporal association with genetic diversity. These sequences in addition to earlier sequences can be used for future analyses of this neglected but potentially deadly group of viruses. PMID:26118981

  11. Isolation of swine influenza virus in cell cultures and embryonated chicken eggs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqiang; Gauger, Phillip C

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus isolation is a procedure to obtain a live and infectious virus that can be used for antigenic characterization, pathogenesis investigation, and vaccine production. Embryonated chicken egg inoculation is traditionally considered the "gold standard" method for influenza virus isolation and propagation. However, many primary cells and continuous cell lines have also been examined or developed for influenza virus isolation and replication. Specifically, swine influenza virus (SIV) isolation and propagation have been attempted and compared in embryonated chicken eggs, some primary porcine cells, and a number of continuous cell lines. Currently Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells remain the most commonly used cell line for isolation, propagation, and titration of SIV. Virus isolation in embryonated chicken eggs or in different cell lines offers alternative approaches when SIV isolation in MDCK cells is unsuccessful. Nasal swabs, lung tissues, and oral fluids are three major specimen types for SIV isolation. In this chapter, we describe the procedures of sample processing, SIV isolation in MDCK cells and in embryonated chicken eggs, as well as methods used for confirming the virus isolation results. PMID:24899436

  12. Mystery swine disease in The Netherlands: the isolation of Lelystad virus.

    PubMed

    Wensvoort, G; Terpstra, C; Pol, J M; ter Laak, E A; Bloemraad, M; de Kluyver, E P; Kragten, C; van Buiten, L; den Besten, A; Wagenaar, F

    1991-07-01

    In early 1991, the Dutch pig-industry was struck by the so-called mystery swine disease. Large-scale laboratory investigations were undertaken to search for the etiological agent. We focused on isolating viruses and mycoplasmas, and we tested paired sera of affected sows for antibodies against ten known pig viruses. The mycoplasmas M. hyosynoviae, M. hyopneumoniae, and Acholeplasma laidlawii, and the viruses encephalomyocarditis virus and porcine enterovirus types 2 and 7 were isolated from individual pigs. An unknown agent, however, was isolated from 16 of 20 piglets and from 41 of 63 sows. This agent was characterised as a virus and designated Lelystad virus. No relationship between this virus and other viruses has yet been established. Of 165 sows reportedly afflicted by the disease, 123 (75 per cent) seroconverted to Lelystad virus, whereas less than 10 per cent seroconverted to any of the other virus isolates or to the known viral pathogens. Antibodies directed against Lelystad virus were also found in pigs with mystery swine disease in England, Germany, and in the United States. We conclude that infection with Lelystad virus is the likely cause of mystery swine disease. PMID:1835211

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a Street Rabies Virus Isolated from a Dog in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Zutao; Kia, Grace S. N.; Gnanadurai, Clement W.; Leyson, Christina M.; Umoh, Jarlath U.; Kwaga, Jacob P.; Kazeem, Haruna M.

    2013-01-01

    A canine rabies virus (RABV) was isolated from a trade dog in Nigeria. Its entire genome was sequenced and found to be closely related to canine RABVs circulating in Africa. Sequence comparison indicates that the virus is closely related to the Africa 2 RABV lineage. The virus is now termed DRV-NG11. PMID:23469344

  14. Isolation of Kyasanur Forest Disease Virus from Febrile Patient, Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinglin; Zhang, Hailin; Fu, Shihong; Wang, Huanyu; Ni, Daxin; Nasci, Roger; Tang, Qing

    2009-01-01

    We recently determined that Nanjianyin virus, isolated from serum of a patient in Yunnan Province, China, in 1989, is a type of Kyasanur Forest disease virus. Results of a 1987–1990 seroepidemiologic investigation in Yunnan Province had shown that residents of the Hengduan Mountain region had been infected with Nanjianyin virus. PMID:19193286

  15. Complete Coding Sequences of Three Toscana Virus Strains Isolated from Sandflies in France

    PubMed Central

    Leparc Goffard, Isabelle; Piorkowski, Geraldine; Coutard, Bruno; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; De Lamballerie, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV) is an arthropod-borne virus belonging to the sandfly fever Naples virus species within the genus Phlebovirus. We report here the complete coding sequences of three TOSV strains belonging to lineage B and isolated from sandflies trapped in the Southeast of France between 2009 and 2013. PMID:26868387

  16. Isolation of transforming murine leukemia viruses from mice with a high incidence of spontaneous lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Staal, S P; Hartley, J W; Rowe, W P

    1977-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses capable of malignant transformation of mink tissue culture cells have been isolated from an AKR thymoma cell line and from a spontaneous reticulum cell sarcoma in an NIH Swiss mouse partially congenic for the AKR ecotropic virus-inducing locus Akv-2. In contrast to the recently described mink cell focus-inducing strains of murine leukemia virus, at least one of the two transforming strains is replication defective. Nonproducer mink cells carrying the genome of the transforming virus of AKR origin have been isolated, and pseudotype transforming viruses generated. Images PMID:197531

  17. Genetic relationships between southern African SAT-2 isolates of foot-and-mouth-disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Vosloo, W.; Knowles, N. J.; Thomson, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    Sequencing of part of the 1D gene of foot-and-mouth disease virus was used to determine the relationships between SAT-2 viruses isolated from outbreaks which occurred in cattle in Zimbabwe and Namibia and in impala in South Africa between 1979 and 1989. The results demonstrated that the outbreaks in different countries were unrelated. Surprisingly close relationships were shown between all SAT-2 viruses isolated from cattle in Zimbabwe since 1983 but the two major epizootics which occurred in 1989 were caused by viruses which were clearly different. Conversely, two apparently unrelated outbreaks in impala in South Africa were caused by viruses which could not be distinguished. PMID:1334842

  18. Isolation and characterisation of an H3N8 equine influenza virus in Australia, 2007.

    PubMed

    Watson, J; Halpin, K; Selleck, P; Axell, A; Bruce, K; Hansson, E; Hammond, J; Daniels, P; Jeggo, M

    2011-07-01

    Before 2007, equine influenza had never been diagnosed in Australia. On 22 August 2007, infection was confirmed in horses at Eastern Creek Animal Quarantine Station near Sydney. The virus subsequently isolated (A/equine/Sydney/2888-8/2007) was confirmed by sequence analysis of the haemagglutinin (HA) gene as an H3 virus of the variant American Florida lineage that is now referred to as Clade 1. The HA sequence of the virus was identical to that of a virus isolated from a contemporaneous outbreak in Japan and showed high homology to viruses circulating in North America. PMID:21711282

  19. New procedure for isolation of Rous sarcoma virus-specific RNA from infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, P A; Spahr, P F; Darlix, J L

    1979-01-01

    The use of mercurated "strong stop" complementary DNA (complementary to the 5'-terminal 101 nucleotides of Rous sarcoma virus RNA) in the isolation of virus-specific RNA from infected chicken embryo fibroblasts is described. Strong stop Rous sarcoma virus complementary DNA was mercurated chemically, and, as a result of the low complexity of this DNA, short hybridization times (up to 15 min) and heating in the absence of formamide were found to be adequate conditions for the isolation of virus-specific RNA. The purity of the isolated RNA was demonstrated by analysis of labeled RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated RNA could be translated in the in vitro protein synthesis system derived from rabbit reticulocytes, and an analysis of polypeptides programmed by isolated RNA before and after immunoprecipitation further demonstrated both the purity of the isolated mRNA and the quantitative nature of the isolation procedure. Images PMID:228062

  20. Comparison of mosquito densoviruses: two clades of viruses isolated from indigenous mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Sangdee, Kusavadee; Pattanakitsakul, Sa-Nga

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed the phylogenetic tree of densoviruses isolated from indigenous mosquitoes and mosquito cell lines. Our findings suggest two distinct clades of densovirus. The viruses in the first clade were isolated from an indigenous mosquito which had the Aedes aegypti densovirus (AaeDNV) as a representative virus. The other clade of viruses was isolated from mosquito indigenous cell line which had the Aedes albopictus densovirus (AalDNV) as the representative virus. The origin of the two clades of DNVs is unclear but the phylogenetic trees were significantly different from each other. The two major densoviruses, AaeDNV and AalDNV, that infect mosquitoes that are known to carry viruses responsible for dengue hemorrhagic fever and yellow fever. Understanding the evolution of these two clades of densoviruses is important for studying the distribution of these viruses in mosquito cell lines and the information gained may be applied to understanding other viruses in various mosquito cell lines. PMID:24050091

  1. Complete genome sequencing and comparative analysis of three dengue virus type 2 Pakistani isolates.

    PubMed

    Akram, Madiha; Idrees, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Dengue is currently one of the most important arthropod borne human viral diseases caused by a flavivirus named as dengue virus. It is now endemic in Pakistan since many dengue fever outbreaks have been observed in Pakistan during the last three decades. Major serotype of dengue virus circulating in Pakistan is serotype 2. Complete genome sequences of three Pakistani dengue virus serotype 2 isolates were generated. Analysis of complete genome sequences showed that Pakistani isolates of dengue virus serotype 2 belonged to cosmopolitan genotype. This study identifies a number of amino acid substitutions that were introduced in local dengue virus serotype 2 isolate over the years. The study provides a significant insight into the evolution of serotype 2 of dengue virus in Pakistan. This is the first report of complete genome sequence information of dengue virus from the most recent outbreak (2013) in Punjab, Pakistan. PMID:26925441

  2. Acquistion and transmissibility of United States Soybean dwarf virus isolates by the soybean aphid Aphis glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV) exists as several distinct strains based on symptomatology, vectors, and host range. Original Japanese isolates of SbDV were specifically transmitted by Aulacorthum solani. More recently Japanese isolates, other exotic isolates, and endemic U.S. isolates have been shown ...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Papaya Ringspot Virus Isolated from Genetically Modified Papaya in Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyuan; Yan, Pu; Shen, Wentao; Tuo, Decai; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence (10,326 nucleotides) of a papaya ringspot virus isolate infecting genetically modified papaya in Hainan Island of China was determined through reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The virus shares 92% nucleotide sequence identity with the isolate that is unable to infect PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya. PMID:26358610

  4. Genetic characterization of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus strains isolated from cattle in Israel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), an Orbivirus not previously reported in Israel, was isolated from Israeli cattle during a “bluetongue like” disease outbreak in 2006. To ascertain the origin of this new virus, three isolates from the outbreak were fully sequenced and compared with availab...

  5. Isolation of West Nile virus from the brains of children who had died of encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    George, Samuel; Gourie-Devi, M.; Rao, J. A.; Prasad, S. R.; Pavri, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The isolation of West Nile virus from the brain tissue of three children who died of encephalitis in Mysore and Kolar districts of Karnataka State, India, is reported. This is the first such report from India. The significance of these isolations with reference to the role of West Nile virus in encephalitis in children in southern India is discussed. PMID:6099760

  6. Molecular-genetic analysis of field isolates of Avian Leucosis Viruses in the Russian Federation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial poultry farms in 14 regions of Russian Federation were monitored for avian leukosis virus (ALV) infection using virus isolation tests and serology. Results indicated the presence of two subgroups of ALV in farms located in 11 of 14 regions. Analysis of the genomes of 12 field isolates of...

  7. Matrix Gene of Influenza A Viruses Isolated from Wild Aquatic Birds: Ecology and Emergence of Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Widjaja, Linda; Krauss, Scott L.; Webby, Richard J.; Xie, Tao; Webster, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    Wild aquatic birds are the primary reservoir of influenza A viruses, but little is known about the viruses' gene pool in wild birds. Therefore, we investigated the ecology and emergence of influenza viruses by conducting phylogenetic analysis of 70 matrix (M) genes of influenza viruses isolated from shorebirds and gulls in the Delaware Bay region and from ducks in Alberta, Canada, during >18 years of surveillance. In our analysis, we included 61 published M genes of isolates from various hosts. We showed that M genes of Canadian duck viruses and those of shorebird and gull viruses in the Delaware Bay shared ancestors with the M genes of North American poultry viruses. We found that North American and Eurasian avian-like lineages are divided into sublineages, indicating that multiple branches of virus evolution may be maintained in wild aquatic birds. The presence of non-H13 gull viruses in the gull-like lineage and of H13 gull viruses in other avian lineages suggested that gulls' M genes do not preferentially associate with the H13 subtype or segregate into a distinct lineage. Some North American avian influenza viruses contained M genes closely related to those of Eurasian avian viruses. Therefore, there may be interregional mixing of the two clades. Reassortment of shorebird M and HA genes was evident, but there was no correlation among the HA or NA subtype, M gene sequence, and isolation time. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that influenza viruses in wild waterfowl contain distinguishable lineages of M genes. PMID:15280485

  8. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction method for reliable, sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple viruses in citrus trees.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avijit; Fayad, Amer; Barthe, G; Brlansky, R H

    2005-10-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assay was developed to detect six RNA and one DNA citrus virus: Citrus leaf rugose virus (CLRV), Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), Citrus tatter leaf virus (CTLV), Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), Citrus variegation virus (CVV), Citrus yellow mosaic virus (CYMV), and Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV) from citrus plants. These seven viruses are classified in six different virus genera. Degenerate primers were designed based on the respective virus isolate sequence data available from the GenBank and were used for reliable detection of the different viruses by simplex- and mPCR. The sensitive and simultaneous detection of RNA and DNA viruses using the mPCR decreases the risk of contamination, saves time and reduces the cost as compared to other conventional methods for citrus virus detection. Seven different fragments (245-942 bp) specific to the viruses were simultaneously amplified using mPCR and were identified on the basis of their molecular sizes. The consistent results of the mPCR were compared with simplex PCR for detection of each virus pathogen. The mPCR results were confirmed with sequencing analysis. The mPCR provides a useful rapid method for detecting multiple viruses in citrus plants that will aid in the production of virus-free citrus plants for certification programs. PMID:15951030

  9. Severe acute measles pneumonitis: virus isolation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed

    Suter, Cosima; Buergi, Urs; Eigenmann, Katja; Franzen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, several endemic outbreaks of measles have been recognised, not only in children but also in adults, with severe and, occasionally, even fatal complications, possibly due to delayed diagnosis of the disease in adult medicine and decreasing vaccination rates. Furthermore, the treatment consists of supportive measures only. We present a case of severe measles pneumonitis in a 42-year-old man, a travel returnee, proven by direct virus isolation with PCR from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. CT findings and pulmonary function testing revealed features of obstructive bronchiolitis; the patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids. He fully recovered, and lung function measurement returned to normal values. We conclude that acute measles can present as obstructive bronchiolitis and may be successfully treated with corticosteroids. PMID:26508116

  10. Rapid typing of herpes simplex virus isolates by deoxyribonucleic acid:deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, A R; Richman, D D; Oxman, M N

    1980-01-01

    A method for typing clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus was developed. It utilizes hybridization between unlabeled deoxyribonucleic acid from infected cultures and tritium-labeled virus deoxyribonucleic acid, and it can be completed within a day using a single roller-tube culture of the clinical isolated. The data obtained are inherently quantitative, and the method yields unequivocal identification and typing. Thirty-nine coded clinical isolates were all correctly typed by this method. PMID:6262368

  11. Detection, isolation, and persistence of viruses within bivalve mollusks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norovirus (NV), hepatitis A virus (HAV), and other virus transmission by molluscan shellfish is a significant issue. Research at the ARS-Dover DE laboratory has led to the development of improved methods for detecting these viruses. To identify pathogenic viruses within mollusks, a rapid highly-se...

  12. Isolation of Bunyamwera serogroup viruses (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus) in New York state.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Kiet A; Maffei, Joseph G; Dupuis, Alan P; Kauffman, Elizabeth B; Backenson, P Bryon; Kramer, Laura D

    2006-09-01

    During routine arbovirus surveillance from 2000 to 2004 in New York state (NYS), 14,788 mosquito pools making up 36 species and nine genera were inoculated onto Vero cell cultures to test for abroad spectrum of viruses. Forty-six percent of viruses isolated in cell culture from species, excluding Culex pipiens L. and Culex restuans Theobald, were identified as Bunyamwera serogroup viruses. Here, we report the distribution and level of Bunyamwera activity in NYS detected during this period. We developed specific primers for Cache Valley virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus, CVV) and Potosi virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus, POTV), to facilitate rapid molecular identification of these viruses. Viral RNA was detected in 12 mosquito species by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, with the majority isolated from Aedes trivittatus (Coquillet). We report the first POTV isolation in NYS and describe the development of specific primers to identify both POTV and CVV. PMID:17017240

  13. Isolation of a new simian foamy virus from a spider monkey brain culture.

    PubMed

    Hooks, J J; Gibbs, C J; Chou, S; Howk, R; Lewis, M; Gajdusek, D C

    1973-11-01

    A syncytium-forming (foamy) virus was isolated from a spider monkey brain cell culture. Cytopathic effect was observed both in the brain culture and in human embryonic kidney cells. Neutralizing antibody was present in the sera of the spider monkey from whom the isolation was made. The virus was inhibited by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (20 mug/ml), contained a ribonucleic acid-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase, and had an infectivity peak at 1.15 g/cm(3) in a sucrose density gradient. The virus passed through a 220-nm but not a 100-nm membrane filter, was chloroform sensitive, and was inactivated at 56 C in 30 min. Hemagglutinating and hemadsorption activity was not noted with a variety of erythrocytes. The virion was spherical, formed in the cytoplasm, and was 105 to 115 nm in diameter. Ring-shaped nucleoids, 45 to 50 nm in diameter, were associated with tubular profiles. The virus was not neutralized by sera prepared against known viruses, including simian foamy virus types 1 through 7, Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, and bovine syncytial and measles viruses. Sera from a rabbit hyperimmunized with the isolate and sera from 19 spider monkeys had neutralizing antibody to the isolate; however, these sera did not cross-react with simian foamy virus types 1 through 7. Neutralizing antibody to the isolate was not detected in sera from 16 humans, 9 rhesus monkeys, and 10 chimpanzees. PMID:4201323

  14. Isolation of a new herpes virus from human CD4 sup + T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, N.; Schirmer, E.C.; Wyatt, L.S.; Katsafanas, G.; Roffman, E.; Danovich, R.M. ); June, C.H. )

    1990-01-01

    A new human herpes virus has been isolated from CD4{sup +} T cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy individual (RK), following incubation of the cells under conditions promoting T-cell activation. The virus could not be recovered from nonactivated cells. Cultures of lymphocytes infected with the RK virus exhibited a cytopathic effect, and electron microscopic analyses revealed a characteristic herpes virus structure. RK virus DNA did not hybridize with large probes derived from herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus. The genetic relatedness of the RK virus to the recently identified T-lymphotropic human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) was investigated by restriction enzyme analyses using 21 different enzymes and by blot hydridization analyses using 11 probes derived from two strains of HHV-6 (Z29 and U1102). Whereas the two HHV-6 strains exhibited only limited restriction enzyme polymorphism, cleavage of the RK virus DNA yielded distinct patterns. Of the 11 HHV-6 DNA probes tested, only 6 cross-hybridized with DNA fragments derived from the RK virus. Taken together, the maximal homology amounted to 31 kilobases of the 75 kilobases tested. The authors conclude that the RK virus is distinct from previously characterized human herpesviruses. The authors propose to designate it as the prototype of a new herpes virus, the seventh human herpes virus identified to date.

  15. A-549 is a suitable cell line for primary isolation of coxsackie B viruses.

    PubMed

    Otero, J R; Folgueira, L; Trallero, G; Prieto, C; Maldonado, S; Babiano, M J; Martinez-Alonso, I

    2001-11-01

    A common receptor for coxsackie B virus and adenovirus has been described recently in cells of human and murine origin. Since the established cell line A-549 is suitable for adenoviruses, the potential use of A-549 cells for the isolation of coxsackie B viruses from clinical samples was investigated. All throat swabs sent to the laboratory between April 1998 and June 1999 were inoculated onto monolayers of MRC-5 and A-549 cells in tubes, and the enterovirus isolates obtained were typed. From April to June 1999, A-549 cells were compared prospectively to Buffalo green monkey (BGM) cells, considered as the most susceptible cell line for isolating coxsackie B viruses. Fifty-six out of 171 enterovirus isolates (33%) displayed a cytopathic effect (CPE) in the A-549 monolayer only, 48 isolates (28%) in the MRC-5 monolayer only, and 67 isolates (39%) in both cell lines. Most isolates that showed CPE in A-549 cells only (48 out of 56, 86%) were coxsackie B viruses, belonging to four different serotypes (B1, B2, B4, and B6). When BGM and A-549 cells were inoculated in parallel, both recovered the same number of coxsackie B isolates (n = 20), and the CPE was noted on approximately the same day. In conclusion, growth in A-549 but not MRC-5 cells identified coxsackie B viruses in most cases. A-549 was comparable to BGM for primary isolation of coxsackie B viruses. PMID:11596090

  16. Rabies virus isolates of India - simultaneous existence of two distinct evolutionary lineages.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R V Chandrasekhar; Mohana Subramanian, B; Surendra, K S N L; Babu, R P Aravindh; Rana, S K; Manjari, K Sunitha; Srinivasan, V A

    2014-10-01

    Rabies is a fatal viral disease of serious public health implication. The disease is enzootic in India. In the present study, thirty six rabies virus isolates were obtained from terrestrial mammals of India during 2002-2012. Ecto-domain coding region of the glycoprotein gene from all the isolates were sequenced and the phylogenetic analysis was performed in relation to the global rabies and rabies related virus isolates. The Indian isolates grouped into two distinctly separate lineages with majority of the Indian isolates in Arctic like 1 lineage and the remaining isolates in sub-continental lineage. Isolates of the two distinct lineages were identified simultaneously from the same geographical region. Time scaled phylogenetic tree indicated that the sub-continental lineage of the virus is one of the earliest clade of rabies virus that diverged from bat rabies virus. On the contrary, the Arctic-like 1 lineage of India appeared to be a more recent divergence event. The amino acid sequence comparison revealed that all the major antigenic sites were almost conserved among the Indian isolates whereas few amino acid variations could be identified around site IIa, minor site I and IV. The dN/dS study based on G ecto-domain is in support of the earlier reports of strong purifying selection. In conclusion, it is evident that the Indian rabies virus isolates are of two major distinct lineages with distant phylogenetic and evolutionary relationship. PMID:25077994

  17. Isolation of new Brazilian giant viruses from environmental samples using a panel of protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Dornas, Fábio P.; Khalil, Jacques Y. B.; Pagnier, Isabelle; Raoult, Didier; Abrahão, Jônatas; La Scola, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The Megavirales are a newly described order capable of infecting different types of eukaryotic hosts. For the most part, the natural host is unknown. Several methods have been used to detect these viruses, with large discrepancies between molecular methods and co-cultures. To isolate giant viruses, we propose the use of different species of amoeba as a cellular support. The aim of this work was to isolate new Brazilian giant viruses by comparing the protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii, A. polyphaga, A. griffini, and Vermamoeba vermiformis (VV) as a platform for cellular isolation using environmental samples. One hundred samples were collected from 3 different areas in September 2014 in the Pampulha lagoon of Belo Horizonte city, Minas Gerais, Brazil. PCR was used to identify the isolated viruses, along with hemacolor staining, labelling fluorescence and electron microscopy. A total of 69 viruses were isolated. The highest ratio of isolation was found in A. polyphaga (46.38%) and the lowest in VV (0%). Mimiviruses were the most frequently isolated. One Marseillevirus and one Pandoravirus were also isolated. With Brazilian environmental samples, we demonstrated the high rate of lineage A mimiviruses. This work demonstrates how these viruses survive and circulate in nature as well the differences between protozoa as a platform for cellular isolation. PMID:26500630

  18. Genetic characterization of swine influenza viruses isolated in Japan between 2009 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Matsuu, Aya; Uchida, Yuko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Mawatari, Takahiro; Yoneyama, Shuji Kasai; Kasai, Tomoe; Nakamura, Ryoko; Eto, Mariko; Saito, Takehiko

    2012-11-01

    Eleven swine influenza viruses (SIVs) isolated from pigs in Japanese institutions between 2009 and 2012 were genetically characterized. Seven H1N1 were shown to have originated from A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Two H1N2 viruses contained H1 and N2 genes of Japanese H1N2 SIV origin together with internal genes of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Two H3N2 viruses isolated during animal quarantine were identified as triple reassortant H3N2 viruses maintained among pigs in North America. This study shows that A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses and their reassortant strains are already present in domestic pigs in Japan and that novel SIVs are possibly being imported from abroad. PMID:22924526

  19. Adaptive evolution of simian immunodeficiency viruses isolated from two conventional progressor macaques with neuroaids

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian T; Korber, Bette T

    2008-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques may result in neuroAIDS, a feature more commonly observed in macaques with rapid progressive disease than in those with conventional disease. This is the first report of two conventional progressors (H631 and H636) with encephalitis in rhesus macaques inoculated with a derivative of SIVsmES43-3. Phylogenetic analyses of viruses isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from both animals demonstrated tissue compartmentalization. Additionally, virus from the central nervous system (CNS) was able to infect primary macaque monocyte-derived macrophages more efficiently than virus from plasma. Conversely, virus isolated from plasma was able to replicate better in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than virus from CNS. We speculate that these viruses were under different selective pressures in their separate compartments. Furthermore, these viruses appear to have undergone adaptive evolution to preferentially replicate in their respective cell targets. Analysis of the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in gp160 showed that there was a statistically significant loss of PNGS in viruses isolated from CNS in both macaques compared to SIVsmE543-3. Moreover, virus isolated from the brain in H631, had statistically significant loss of PNGS compared to virus isolated from CSF and plasma of the same animal. It is possible that the brain isolate may have adapted to decrease the number of PNGS given that humoral immune selection pressure is less likely to be encountered in the brain. These viruses provide a relevant model to study the adaptations required for SIV to induce encephalitis.

  20. Avian influenza virus isolation, propagation and titration in embryonated chicken eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) virus is usually isolated, propagated, and titrated in embryonated chickens eggs (ECE). Most any sample type can be accommodated for culture with appropriate processing. Isolation may also be accomplished in cell culture particularly if mammalian lineage isolates are suspected, ...

  1. Isolation of West Nile Virus from Urine Samples of Patients with Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pacenti, Monia; Franchin, Elisa; Squarzon, Laura; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Ulbert, Sebastian; Cusinato, Riccardo; Palù, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrated that West Nile virus (WNV) excreted in the urine of patients with acute infection can be isolated in cell cultures. In addition, the protocols for WNV isolation from urine samples were standardized, and factors that may affect the efficiency of WNV isolation were identified. PMID:24951801

  2. PATHOGENESIS OF CHICKEN-PASSAGED NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUSES ISOLATED FROM CHICKENS, WILD, AND EXOTIC BIRDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogenesis of six Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates recovered from chickens and wild (anhinga) and exotic (yellow nape parrot, pheasant, and dove isolate) birds was examined after four passages of the isolates in domestic chickens. Groups of four-week-old specific-pathogen-free White Legh...

  3. Nucleotide sequence analysis of virus isolates indicates the presence of three potyvirus species in Allium plants.

    PubMed

    Tsuneyoshi, T; Matsumi, T; Natsuaki, K T; Sumi, S

    1998-01-01

    cDNAs of potyviruses from Allium plants cultivated in different parts of the world were cloned by RT-PCR with a common primer for amplifying the 3' terminal genomic RNAs of onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV), leek yellow stripe virus (LYSV) and, probably, of closely related potyviruses. Their nucleotide sequences bearing the viral coat protein (CP) gene and the 3' non-coding sequence were determined and compared. The degree of their sequence similarities clearly differentiated the respective viruses into 3 groups, namely OYDV "garlic-type", "wakegi-type" and LYSV group. The "garlic-type" included all the garlic isolates and two Indonesian shallot isolates. The "wakegi-type" group consisted of the isolates from Indonesian shallot and previously reported ones from Japanese Allium plants excluding garlic. The LYSV group was represented by LYSV isolates from garlic and leek. The CP sequences of LYSV group viruses differed from those of OYDV "garlic-type" and "wakegi-type" viruses (less than 60% similarities). In contrast, the sequence similarities between the OYDV "wakegi-type" and "garlic-type" isolates were 73.5 to 76.7%, suggesting they were closely related but should be discriminated as distinct species. These findings indicate that at least three distinct potyviruses, clearly distinguishable by the viral CP sequence, are present in Allium species. Finally, we concluded that the "garlic-type" viruses correspond to the typical OYDV and the "wakegi-type" viruses represent the viruses previously identified as Welsh onion yellow stripe virus (WoYSV) and shallot yellow stripe virus (SYSV). We propose the name wakegi yellow dwarf virus (WYDV) for the "wakegi-type" viruses. PMID:9505969

  4. Detection and isolation of H5N1 influenza virus from large volumes of natural water.

    PubMed

    Khalenkov, Alexey; Laver, W Graeme; Webster, Robert G

    2008-04-01

    Various species of aquatic or wetlands birds can be the natural reservoir of avian influenza A viruses of all hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. Shedding of the virus into water leads to transmission between waterfowl and is a major threat for epidemics in poultry and pandemics in humans. Concentrations of the influenza virus in natural water reservoirs are often too low to be detected by most methods. The procedure was designed to detect and isolate low concentrations of the influenza virus in large volumes of water without the need for costly installations and reagents. The virus was adsorbed onto formalin-fixed erythrocytes and subsequently isolated in chicken embryos. Sensitivity of the method was determined using a reverse-genetic H5N1 virus. A concentration as low as 0.03 of the 50% egg infection dose per milliliter (EID50/ml) of the initial volume of water was effectively detected. The probability of detection was approximately 13%, which is comparable to that of detecting the influenza virus M-gene by PCR amplification. The method can be used by field workers, ecologists, ornithologists, and researchers who need a simple method to isolate H5N1 influenza virus from natural reservoirs. The detection and isolation of virus in embryonated chicken eggs may help epidemiologic, genetic, and vaccine studies. PMID:18325605

  5. Isolation of Tacaribe Virus, a Caribbean Arenavirus, from Host-Seeking Amblyomma americanum Ticks in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Sayler, Katherine A.; Barbet, Anthony F.; Chamberlain, Casey; Clapp, William L.; Alleman, Rick; Loeb, Julia C.; Lednicky, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Arenaviridae are a family of single stranded RNA viruses of mammals and boid snakes. Twenty-nine distinct mammalian arenaviruses have been identified, many of which cause severe hemorrhagic disease in humans, particularly in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, and in Central and South America. Humans typically become infected with an arenavirus through contact with excreta from infected rodents. Tacaribe virus (TCRV) is an arenavirus that was first isolated from bats and mosquitoes during a rabies surveillance survey conducted in Trinidad from 1956 to 1958. Tacaribe virus is unusual because it has never been associated with a rodent host and since that one time isolation, the virus has not been isolated from any vertebrate or invertebrate hosts. We report the re-isolation of the virus from a pool of 100 host-seeking Amblyomma americanum (lone star ticks) collected in a Florida state park in 2012. TCRV was isolated in two cell lines and its complete genome was sequenced. The tick-derived isolate is nearly identical to the only remaining isolate from Trinidad (TRVL-11573), with 99.6% nucleotide identity across the genome. A quantitative RT-PCR assay was developed to test for viral RNA in host-seeking ticks collected from 3 Florida state parks. Virus RNA was detected in 56/500 (11.2%) of surveyed ticks. As this virus was isolated from ticks that parasitize humans, the ability of the tick to transmit the virus to people should be evaluated. Furthermore, reservoir hosts for the virus need to be identified in order to develop risk assessment models of human infection. PMID:25536075

  6. VIRULENCE OF HETEROGENEOUS-ORIGIN NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS ISOLATES BEFORE AND AFTER SEQUENTIAL PASSAGES IN DOMESTIC CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four serial passages of six Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates were performed in 2-week-old White Leghorns. The viruses were recovered from chickens (Ckn-Live Bird Market and Ckn-Australia isolates), exotic (Yellow Nape [YN] Parrot, Pheasant, and Dove isolates) and wild birds (Anhinga isolate). ...

  7. Virus isolation, genetic characterization and seroprevalence of Toscana virus in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Alkan, C; Allal-Ikhlef, A B; Alwassouf, S; Baklouti, A; Piorkowski, G; de Lamballerie, X; Izri, A; Charrel, R N

    2015-11-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV; Bunyaviridae, Phlebovirus) is transmitted by sandflies of the genus Phlebotomus in the Mediterranean area. One strain of TOSV was isolated from a total of almost 23?000 sandflies collected in Kabylia, Algeria. The complete genome was sequenced, and phylogenetic studies indicated that it was most closely related with TOSV strain from Tunisia within lineage A, which also includes Italian, French and Turkish strains. A seroprevalence study performed on 370 sera collected from people living in the same area showed that almost 50% possessed neutralizing antibodies against TOSV, a rate much higher than that observed in Southern Europe. Sandfly species distribution in the study area suggests that the vector of TOSV in this region belongs to the subgenus Larroussius. These data support the rapid implementation of the diagnosis of TOSV in clinical microbiology laboratories to estimate the burden in patients presenting with neuroinvasive infections and febrile illness. PMID:26235198

  8. Replication kinetics of Marek's disease vaccine virus in feathers and lymphoid tissues using PCR and virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Baigent, Susan J; Smith, Lorraine P; Currie, Richard J W; Nair, Venugopal K

    2005-11-01

    CVI988 (Rispens), an avirulent strain of Marek's disease virus, is the most widely used vaccine against Marek's disease. The kinetics of replication of CVI988 was examined in tissues of chickens vaccinated at either 1 day or 14 days of age and sampled regularly up to 28 days post-vaccination. Age at vaccination had no significant effect on the kinetics of CVI988 virus replication. During the cytolytic phase of infection (1-7 days), virus levels peaked in the spleen, bursa and thymus with very close correlation among these organs. Virus load in peripheral blood lagged behind and did not reach high levels. Significant numbers of virus genomes were detected in the feather tips only after 7 days, but subsequently rose to levels almost 10(3)-fold greater than in the other tissues. This is the first accurate quantitative data for kinetics of CVI988 replication in a variety of tissues. There was good correlation between data from virus isolation and PCR, with real-time PCR being the preferred method for rapid, accurate and sensitive quantification of virus. Feathers were ideal for non-invasive sampling to detect and measure CVI988 in live chickens and, from 10 days onwards, virus load in feather tips was predictive of virus load in lymphoid tissues where immune responses will occur. The potential for real-time PCR analysis of feather samples for further investigation of the mechanism of vaccinal protection, and to assist optimization of vaccination regimes, is discussed. PMID:16227220

  9. Neurological lesions in chickens experimentally infected with virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropil reaction was evaluated in chickens inoculated with four different Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates, including Texas GB, Turkey North Dakota, Nevada Cormorant (velogenic neurotropic) and Anhinga (mesogenic). Tissues for this study included archived formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded br...

  10. Use of muscovy duck embryo fibroblasts for the isolation of viruses from wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Slota, Paul G.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques are described for the preparation, cryopreservation, and inoculation of Muscovy duck embryo cell cultures. The procedure yields a susceptible reproducible cell culture system for the isolation and cultivation of viruses from wild birds.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Strain MD-2, Isolated from a Contaminated Turkey Herpesvirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junping; Yang, Chenghuai; Li, Qihong; Li, Huijiao; Xia, Yecai; Liu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genomic sequence of a reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) isolated from a contaminated turkey herpesvirus (HVT) vaccine. This report will be helpful for epidemiological studies on REV infection in avian flocks. PMID:24092783

  12. Characterization of a U.S. isolate of beet black scorch virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first reported U.S. isolate of beet black scorch necrovirus (BBSV) was obtained and characterized. Host range of the virus for localized, and occasionally systemic, infection included the Chenopodiaceae and Tetragonia expansa; Nicotianiana benthamiana supported systemic, symptomless infection ...

  13. West Nile Virus Isolated from a Virginia Opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in Northwestern Missouri, USA, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Harmon, Jessica R.; Lash, R. Ryan; Weiss, Sonja; Langevin, Stanley; Savage, Harry M.; Godsey, Marvin S.; Burkhalter, Kristen; Root, J. Jeffrey; Gidlewski, Thomas; Nicholson, William L.; Brault, Aaron C.; Komar, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    We describe the isolation of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) from blood of a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) collected in northwestern Missouri, USA in August 2012. Sequencing determined that the virus was related to lineage 1a WNV02 strains. We discuss the role of wildlife in WNV disease epidemiology. PMID:25098303

  14. Characterization of low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds in Mongolia 2005 through 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2005, 2006 and 2007 2,139 specimens representing 4,077 individual birds of 45 species were tested for avian influenza virus (AIV) as part of a wild bird AIV monitoring program conducted in Mongolia. Samples collected in 2005 were tested by virus isolation directly, samples from 2006 and 2007...

  15. Characterization of the Taura syndrome virus isolate originating from the 2004 Texas Epizootic in cultured shrimp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Taura syndrome virus (TSV) is a major viral pathogen of penaeid shrimp worldwide. A comprehensive investigation of the Texas isolate of TSV that caused epizootics in shrimp farms in Texas in 2004 (Us04Pv1) revealed that the virus was highly virulent in laboratory bioassays causing severe symptom dev...

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a Hepatitis D Virus Genotype 1 Strain Isolated in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Liao, Baolin; Chen, Weilie; Ping, Qu; Shi, Haiyan; He, Haolan; Liu, Huiyuan; Tan, Yizhou; Lei, Chunliang; Cai, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a hepatitis D virus genotype 1 strain, GZ37, isolated in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China, in 2014. The sequence information provided here will help us understand the molecular epidemiology of hepatitis D virus and contribute to disease control in mainland China. PMID:26701082

  17. West Nile virus isolated from Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in Northwest Missouri 2012

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Harmon, Jessica; Lash, R. Ryan; Weiss, Sonja; Langevin, Stanley; Savage, Harry; Marvin S. Godsey, Jr.; Burkhalter, Kristen; Root, J. Jeffrey; Gidlewski, Thomas; et al

    2014-12-01

    We describe the isolation of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, flavivirus) from blood of a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) collected in northwestern Missouri, USA in August 2012. Furthermore, sequencing determined that the virus was related to lineage 1a WNV02 strains. We discuss the role of wildlife in WNV disease epidemiology.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Hepatitis D Virus Genotype 1 Strain Isolated in Guangdong, China

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Baolin; Chen, Weilie; Ping, Qu; Shi, Haiyan; He, Haolan; Liu, Huiyuan; Tan, Yizhou

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a hepatitis D virus genotype 1 strain, GZ37, isolated in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China, in 2014. The sequence information provided here will help us understand the molecular epidemiology of hepatitis D virus and contribute to disease control in mainland China. PMID:26701082

  19. Complete genome sequence of Tomato mosaic virus isolated from jasmine in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) was first identified in jasmine in the U.S. in Florida in 1999. This report provides the first full genome sequence of a ToMV isolate from jasmine. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional specific diagnostic tests for ...

  20. First Complete Genome Sequence of an Emerging Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus Isolate in North America

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rugang; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence (6,423 nucleotides [nt]) of an emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate on cucumber in North America was determined through deep sequencing of small (sRNA) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The virus shares 99% nucleotide sequence identity with the Asian genotype but only 90% with the European genotype. PMID:25953166

  1. Squash vein yellowing virus, a novel ipomovirus, isolated from squash and watermelon in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel whitefly-transmitted member of the family Potyviridae was isolated from a squash plant (Cucurbita pepo) with vein yellowing symptoms in Florida. The virus, for which the name Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is proposed, has flexuous rod-shaped particles of ~840 nm in length. SqVYV was ...

  2. Full-Genome Sequence of a Novel Varicella-Zoster Virus Clade Isolated in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra Ivette; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family, which causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles) in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of varicella-zoster virus, isolated from a vesicular fluid sample, revealing the circulation of VZV clade VIII in Mexico. PMID:26159533

  3. Full-Genome Sequence of a Novel Varicella-Zoster Virus Clade Isolated in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra Ivette; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Ramirez-González, José Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family, which causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles) in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of varicella-zoster virus, isolated from a vesicular fluid sample, revealing the circulation of VZV clade VIII in Mexico. PMID:26159533

  4. Evolutionary changes affecting rapid identification of 2008 Newcastle disease viruses isolated from double-crested cormorants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An outbreak of virulent Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in wild double-breasted cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) occurred in North America in the summer of 2008. All ten viruses isolated from cormorants were positively identified by the USDA validated real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chai...

  5. West Nile virus isolated from a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in northwestern Missouri, USA, 2012.

    PubMed

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Harmon, Jessica R; Lash, R Ryan; Weiss, Sonja; Langevin, Stanley; Savage, Harry M; Godsey, Marvin S; Burkhalter, Kristen; Root, J Jeffrey; Gidlewski, Thomas; Nicholson, William L; Brault, Aaron C; Komar, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    We describe the isolation of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) from blood of a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) collected in northwestern Missouri, USA in August 2012. Sequencing determined that the virus was related to lineage 1a WNV02 strains. We discuss the role of wildlife in WNV disease epidemiology. PMID:25098303

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a Street Rabies Virus Isolated from a Rabid Dog in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fulai; Zhang, Guoqing; Xiao, Shaobo; Fang, Liurong; Xu, Gelin; Yan, Jiaxing; Chen, Huanchun

    2012-01-01

    A rabies virus (RABV) was isolated from a dog in Anhui Province, China, in 2008. The virus was designated DRV-AH08. Its entire genome was sequenced and found to be closely related to RABV recently isolated in China and other Asian countries (homology of 87 to 98%) but distantly related to RABV in the “cosmopolitan” group (homology of 84 to 85%) in the clade I of RABV. PMID:22966185

  7. Genetic characterization and evolutionary analysis of Newcastle disease virus isolated from domestic duck in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Satish; Kim, Ji-Ye; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Jung, Suk Chan; Choi, Kang-Seuk

    2016-03-15

    Domestic ducks are considered a potential reservoir of Newcastle disease virus. In the study, a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from a domestic duck during surveillance in South Korea was characterized. The complete genome of the NDV isolate was sequenced, and the phylogenetic relationship to reference strains was studied. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strain clustered in genotype I of Class II ND viruses, has highly phylogenetic similarity to NDV strains isolated from waterfowl in China, but was distant from the viruses isolated in chickens and vaccine strains used in South Korea. Pathogenicity experiment in chickens revealed it to be a lentogenic virus. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cleavage site of the fusion (F) protein confirmed that the isolate contained the avirulent motif (112)GKQGRL(117) at the cleavage site and caused no apparent disease in chickens and ducks. With phylogeographic analysis based on fusion gene, we estimate the origin of an ancestral virus of the isolate and its sister strain located in China around 1998. It highlights the need of continuous surveillance to enhance current understanding of the molecular epidemiology and evolution of the pathogenic strains. PMID:26721461

  8. Characterization of a new Marburg virus isolated from a 1987 fatal case in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E D; Johnson, B K; Silverstein, D; Tukei, P; Geisbert, T W; Sanchez, A N; Jahrling, P B

    1996-01-01

    In 1987, an isolated case of fatal Marburg disease was recognized during routine clinical haemorrhagic fever virus surveillance conducted in Kenya. This report describes the isolation and partial characterization of the new Marburg virus (strain Ravn) isolated from this case. The Ravn isolate was indistinguishable from reference Marburg virus strains by cross-neutralization testing. Virus particles and aggregates of Marburg nucleocapsid matrix in Ravn-infected vero cells, were visualized by immunoelectron microscopic techniques, and also in tissues obtained from the patient and from inoculated monkeys. The cell culture isolate produced a haemorrhagic disease typical of Marburg virus infection when inoculated into rhesus monkeys. Disease was characterized by the sudden appearance of fever and anorexia within 4 to 7 days, and death by day 11. Comparison of nucleotide sequences for portions of the glycoprotein genes of Marburg-Ravn were compared with Marburg reference strains Musoki (MUS) and Popp (POP). Nucleotide identity in this alignment between RAV and MUS is 72.3%, RAV and POP is 71%, and MUS and POP is 91.7%. Amino acid identity between RAV and MUS is 72%, RAV and POP is 67%, and MUS and POP is 93%. These data suggest that Ravn is another subtype of Marburg virus, analogous to the emerging picture of a spectrum of Ebola geographic isolates and subtypes. PMID:8800792

  9. Characterization of an H4N2 avian influenza virus isolated from domestic duck in Dongting Lake wetland in 2009.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Chen, Quanjiao; Chen, Ze

    2012-02-01

    In January 2009, an H4N2 subtype of avian influenza virus [A/duck/Hunan/8-19/2009 (H4N2)] was isolated from domestic ducks in Dongting Lake wetland. The whole genome of the virus was sequenced and the results indicated that multiple gene segments of the virus had a high homology with viruses isolated from wild waterfowl, which indicated that the virus was probably transmitted from wild waterfowl to domestic ducks. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the each gene belonged to the Eurasian lineage of avian influenza viruses, but genetic reassortment occurs between viruses of different subtypes. PMID:21853331

  10. Isolation of cis-acting vaccinia virus DNA fragments promoting the expression of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase by recombinant viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Vassef, A; Mars, M; Dru, A; Plucienniczak, A; Streeck, R E; Beaud, G

    1985-01-01

    Recombinant TK- vaccinia viruses containing the pBR322 sequence inserted in either orientation within the coding sequence of the viral thymidine kinase gene were constructed. They were characterized by genomic analysis, hybridization studies, reversion to wild-type virus by in vivo recombination, and rescue from their genomes of plasmids which contained all or parts of the pBR322 sequence. TK- cells were infected with one of these recombinant viruses and then transfected with pools of chimeric plasmids composed of a cloned herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene which contained upstream inserts of different vaccinia DNA fragments prepared by restriction or sonication. Recombination between homologous pBR322 sequences within infected cells generated selectable recombinant viruses in which expression of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene was promoted by the upstream vaccinia insert. These viruses were characterized by genomic analysis, hybridization, and in vivo or in vitro phosphorylation of (5-[125I]deoxycytidine as a specific assay for the expressed herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase. Vaccinia DNA inserts were isolated conveniently for transfer to bacteria by rescuing appropriate plasmids from the genome of recombinant viruses. The sequence of 100 nucleotides adjacent to the upstream region of the herpes simplex virus gene was determined in nine different inserts measuring 0.17 to 1.07 kilobase pairs. Images PMID:2989553

  11. Genetic and antigenic relatedness of H3 subtype influenza A viruses isolated from avian and mammalian species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turkeys are susceptible to some swine influenza viruses based on natural and experimental transmissions of H1 and H3 subtype viruses from swine to turkeys. In 2004, we isolated triple reassortant H3N2 viruses from turkey breeder hens in Ohio and Illinois. These H3N2 viruses are currently the domin...

  12. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuri; Tamura, Tomokazu; Torii, Shiho; Wakamori, Shiho; Nagai, Makoto; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Mine, Junki; Fujimoto, Yuri; Nagashima, Naofumi; Yoshino, Fumi; Sugita, Yukihiko; Nomura, Takushi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    In our previous study, we genetically analyzed bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) isolated from 2000 to 2006 in Japan and reported that subgenotype 1b viruses were predominant. In the present study, 766 BVDVs isolated from 2006 to 2014 in Hokkaido, Japan, were genetically analyzed to understand recent epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the 5'-untranslated region of viral genome revealed that 766 isolates were classified as genotype 1 (BVDV-1; 544 isolates) and genotype 2 (BVDV-2; 222). BVDV-1 isolates were further divided into BVDV-1a (93), 1b (371) and 1c (80) subgenotypes, and all BVDV-2 isolates were grouped into BVDV-2a subgenotype (222). Further comparative analysis was performed with BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a viruses isolated from 2001 to 2014. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the viral glycoprotein E2 gene, a major target of neutralizing antibodies, revealed that BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were further classified into several clusters. Cross-neutralization tests showed that BVDV-1b isolates were antigenically different from BVDV-1a isolates, and almost BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were antigenically similar among each subgenotype and each E2 cluster. Taken together, BVDV-1b viruses are still predominant, and BVDV-2a viruses have increased recently in Hokkaido, Japan. Field isolates of BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a show genetic diversity on the E2 gene with antigenic conservation among each subgenotype during the last 14 years. PMID:26400674

  13. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan

    PubMed Central

    ABE, Yuri; TAMURA, Tomokazu; TORII, Shiho; WAKAMORI, Shiho; NAGAI, Makoto; MITSUHASHI, Kazuya; MINE, Junki; FUJIMOTO, Yuri; NAGASHIMA, Naofumi; YOSHINO, Fumi; SUGITA, Yukihiko; NOMURA, Takushi; OKAMATSU, Masatoshi; KIDA, Hiroshi; SAKODA, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we genetically analyzed bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) isolated from 2000 to 2006 in Japan and reported that subgenotype 1b viruses were predominant. In the present study, 766 BVDVs isolated from 2006 to 2014 in Hokkaido, Japan, were genetically analyzed to understand recent epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the 5′-untranslated region of viral genome revealed that 766 isolates were classified as genotype 1 (BVDV-1; 544 isolates) and genotype 2 (BVDV-2; 222). BVDV-1 isolates were further divided into BVDV-1a (93), 1b (371) and 1c (80) subgenotypes, and all BVDV-2 isolates were grouped into BVDV-2a subgenotype (222). Further comparative analysis was performed with BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a viruses isolated from 2001 to 2014. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the viral glycoprotein E2 gene, a major target of neutralizing antibodies, revealed that BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were further classified into several clusters. Cross-neutralization tests showed that BVDV-1b isolates were antigenically different from BVDV-1a isolates, and almost BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were antigenically similar among each subgenotype and each E2 cluster. Taken together, BVDV-1b viruses are still predominant, and BVDV-2a viruses have increased recently in Hokkaido, Japan. Field isolates of BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a show genetic diversity on the E2 gene with antigenic conservation among each subgenotype during the last 14 years. PMID:26400674

  14. Characterization of a Tembusu virus isolated from naturally infected house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Diao, Y; Yu, C; Gao, X; Ju, X; Xue, C; Liu, X; Ge, P; Qu, J; Zhang, D

    2013-04-01

    The house sparrow (Passer domesticus) is one of the most widely distributed wild birds in China. Tembusu virus (TMUV) strain, TMUV-SDHS, was isolated from house sparrows living around the poultry farms in Shandong Province, Northern China. Genetic analysis of E and NS5 genes showed that it had a close relationship with that of the YY5 strain, which can cause severe egg drop in ducks. Pathogenicity studies showed that the virus is highly virulent when experimentally inoculated into the ducks. These findings show that house sparrows carrying the Tembusu virus may play an important role in transmitting the virus among other species. PMID:22515847

  15. Characterisation of an isolate of Narcissus degeneration virus from Chinese narcissus (Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis).

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Shi, Y-H; Adams, M J; Zheng, H-Y; Qin, B-X; Chen, J-P

    2007-02-01

    A potyvirus from Chinese narcissus was transmitted mechanically to three species of Narcissus and to Lycoris radiata but not to 22 other test species. In western blot, the coat protein reacted strongly with Narcissus degeneration virus (UK isolate) antiserum. Antiserum raised to the Chinese virus did not react with eighteen other potyviruses. The complete nucleotide sequence (9816 nt) had the typical genome organisation for a member of the genus Potyvirus. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis showed that the Chinese virus was different from all previously sequenced potyviruses but distantly related to onion yellow dwarf and shallot yellow stripe viruses. PMID:16932980

  16. Genetic diversity of fusion gene (ORF 117), an analogue of vaccinia virus A27L gene of capripox virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Dashprakash, M; Venkatesan, Gnanavel; Ramakrishnan, Muthannan Andavar; Muthuchelvan, Dhanavelu; Sankar, Muthu; Pandey, Awadh Bihari; Mondal, Bimelendu

    2015-04-01

    The fusion gene (ORF 117) sequences of twelve (n = 12) capripox virus isolates namely sheeppox (SPPV) and goatpox (GTPV) viruses from India were demonstrated for their genetic and phylogenetic relationship among them. All the isolates were confirmed for their identity by routine PCR before targeting ORF 117 gene for sequence analysis. The designed primers specifically amplified ORF 117 gene as 447 bp fragment from total genomic DNA extracted from all the isolates. Sequence analysis revealed a significant percentage of identity among GTPV, SPPV and between them at both nucleotide and amino acid levels. The topology of the phylogenetic tree revealed that three distinct clusters corresponding to SPPV, GTPV and lumpy skin disease virus was formed. However, SPPV Pune/08 and SPPV Roumanian Fanar isolates were clustered into GTPV group as these two isolates showed a 100 and 99.3 % identity with GTPV isolates of India at nt and aa levels, respectively. Protein secondary structure and 3D view was predicted and found that it has high antigenic index and surface probability with low hydrophobicity, and it can be targeted for expression and its evaluation to explore its diagnostic potential in epidemiological investigation in future. PMID:25663144

  17. Archaeal Viruses of the Sulfolobales: Isolation, Infection, and CRISPR Spacer Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Susanne; Garrett, Roger A

    2015-01-01

    Infection of archaea with phylogenetically diverse single viruses, performed in different laboratories, has failed to activate spacer acquisition into host CRISPR loci. The first successful uptake of archaeal de novo spacers was observed on infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 with an environmental virus mixture isolated from Yellowstone National Park (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012). Experimental studies of isolated genetic elements from this mixture revealed that SMV1 (S ulfolobus Monocauda Virus 1), a tailed spindle-shaped virus, can induce spacer acquisition in CRISPR loci of Sulfolobus species from a second coinfecting conjugative plasmid or virus (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012; Erdmann et al. Mol Microbiol 91:900-917, 2014). Here we describe, firstly, the isolation of archaeal virus mixtures from terrestrial hot springs and the techniques used both to infect laboratory strains with these virus mixtures and to obtain purified virus particles. Secondly, we present the experimental conditions required for activating SMV1-induced spacer acquisition in two different Sulfolobus species. PMID:25981476

  18. Nhumirim virus, a novel flavivirus isolated from mosquitoes from the Pantanal, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Owen; Couto-Lima, Dinair; Kenney, Joan; Serra-Freire, Nicolau; Brault, Aaron; Nogueira, Rita; Langevin, Stanley; Komar, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    We describe the isolation of a novel flavivirus, isolated from a pool of mosquitoes identified as Culex (Culex) chidesteri collected in 2010 in the Pantanal region of west-central Brazil. The virus is herein designated Nhumirim virus (NHUV) after the name of the ranch from which the mosquito pool was collected. Flavivirus RNA was detected by real-time RT-PCR of homogenized mosquitoes and from the corresponding C6/36 culture supernatant. Based on full-genome sequencing, the virus isolate was genetically distinct from but most closely related to Barkedji virus (BJV), a newly described flavivirus from Senegal. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that NHUV grouped with mosquito-borne flaviviruses forming a clade with BJV. This clade may be genetically intermediate between the Culex-borne flaviviruses amplified by birds and the insect-only flaviviruses. PMID:25252815

  19. Nhumirim virus, a novel flavivirus isolated from mosquitoes from the Pantanal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Solberg, Owen; Couto-Lima, Dinair; Kenney, Joan; Serra-Freire, Nicolau; Brault, Aaron; Nogueira, Rita; Langevin, Stanley; Komar, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    We describe the isolation of a novel flavivirus, isolated from a pool of mosquitoes identified as Culex (Culex) chidesteri collected in 2010 in the Pantanal region of west-central Brazil. The virus is herein designated Nhumirim virus (NHUV) after the name of the ranch from which the mosquito pool was collected. Flavivirus RNA was detected by real-time RT-PCR of homogenized mosquitoes and from the corresponding C6/36 culture supernatant. Based on full-genome sequencing, the virus isolate was genetically distinct from but most closely related to Barkedji virus (BJV), a newly described flavivirus from Senegal. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that NHUV grouped with mosquito-borne flaviviruses forming a clade with BJV. This clade may be genetically intermediate between the Culex-borne flaviviruses amplified by birds and the insect-only flaviviruses. PMID:25252815

  20. Swine influenza viruses isolated in 1983, 2002 and 2009 in Sweden exemplify different lineages.

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Bálint, Adám; Metreveli, Giorgi; Emmoth, Eva; Widén, Frederik; Belák, Sándor; Wallgren, Per

    2010-01-01

    Swine influenza virus isolates originating from outbreaks in Sweden from 1983, 2002 and 2009 were subjected to nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The aim of the studies was to obtain an overview on their potential relatedness as well as to provide data for broader scale studies on swine influenza epidemiology. Nonetheless, analyzing archive isolates is justified by the efforts directed to the comprehension of the appearance of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Interestingly, this study illustrates the evolution of swine influenza viruses in Europe, because the earliest isolate belonged to 'classical' swine H1N1, the subsequent ones to Eurasian 'avian-like' swine H1N1 and reassortant 'avian-like' swine H1N2 lineages, respectively. The latter two showed close genetic relatedness regarding their PB2, HA, NP, and NS genes, suggesting common ancestry. The study substantiates the importance of molecular surveillance for swine influenza viruses. PMID:21156041

  1. MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF VIRUS ISOLATES CAUSING MOSAIC IN LOUISIANA SUGARCANE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten strains of sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and three strains sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) have been reported to cause mosaic in Louisiana; however, only strains H, I, and M of SrMV were recovered from commercial fields during surveys conducted between 1973 and 1995. Annual surveys were discontinue...

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF VIRUS ISOLATES CAUSING MOSAIC OF SUGARCANE IN LOUSIANA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten strains of sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and three strains of sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) have been shown to cause sugarcane mosaic in Louisiana, USA; however, surveys conducted between the 1970s and 1995 identified strains of SrMV only. In 2001 and 2002, approximately 350 leaf samples from pla...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF VIRUS RESISTANT TRANSGENIC PAPAYAS EXPRESSING THE COAT PROTEIN FROM A BRAZILIAN ISOLATE OF PAPAYA RINGSPOT VIRUS (PRSV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Translatable and untranslatable versions of the coat protein (cp) gene of a Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) isolate collected in the State of Bahia, Brazil, were engineered for expression in Sunrise and Sunset Solo varieties of Carica papaya L. The biolistic system was used to transform secondary soma...

  4. Phylogenetic Characterization of Genotype 4 Hepatitis C Virus Isolates from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Victoria; Flichman, Diego; Sookoian, Silvia; Mbayed, Viviana Andrea; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2001-01-01

    Among 114 patients infected with hepatitis C virus, three genotype 4 isolates, unusual in Argentina, were detected by phylogenetic analysis over different genomic regions. The patients were not related. One sample was associated with Egyptian sequences, and the others were associated with a Zairean isolate, a fact which reinforces the idea that they are from independent sources. PMID:11326031

  5. Biological and molecular characterization of a reticuloendotheliosis virus isolated from turkeys with lymphomas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) isolates termed AF-140-11 and AF-140-12 were obtained from turkeys with increased mortality, disseminated lymphoblastoid neoplasia, and decreased egg production. The REV isolates were propagated and titrated in chicken-embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) obtained from a s...

  6. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Sweet Potato Chlorotic Stunt Virus Isolates from China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yanhong; Qiao, Qi; Zhang, Desheng; Tian, Yuting; Wang, Yongjiang; Wang, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV) was first detected in China in 2010, and several partial sequences have been determined for Chinese SPCSV isolates. This report describes the complete genome sequences of two SPCSV isolates from the Guangdong and Jiangsu provinces and will be valuable for understanding the characteristics of SPCSVs in China. PMID:23661487

  7. Complete genome sequence analysis of an American isolate of Grapevine virus E

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence of an isolate of Grapevine virus E (GVE) collected from a red-berried wine grape cultivar (Cabernet Sauvignon) in Washington State was determined. The 7,568 nt long genome of GVE is similar in size and sequence identity with a GVE isolate from a wine grape cv. Shiraz fro...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Alternanthera mosaic virus, Isolated from Achyranthes bidentata in Asia.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yusa, Akira; Nishida, Shuko; Tanno, Kazuyuki; Keima, Takuya; Nijo, Takamichi; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) infecting Achyranthes bidentata was first detected in Asia, and the complete genome sequence (6,604 nucleotides) was determined. Sequence identity analysis and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that this isolate is the most phylogenetically distant AltMV isolate worldwide. PMID:26988034

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Alternanthera mosaic virus, Isolated from Achyranthes bidentata in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yusa, Akira; Nishida, Shuko; Tanno, Kazuyuki; Keima, Takuya; Nijo, Takamichi; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) infecting Achyranthes bidentata was first detected in Asia, and the complete genome sequence (6,604 nucleotides) was determined. Sequence identity analysis and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that this isolate is the most phylogenetically distant AltMV isolate worldwide. PMID:26988034

  10. Population Structure of Blueberry Mosaic Associated Virus: Evidence of Genetic Exchange in Geographically Distinct Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), a putative member of the family Ophioviridae, was examined using 59 isolates collected from North America and Slovenia. The studied isolates displayed low genetic diversity in the movement and nucleoprotein regions and low ratios...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tomato Isolate of Parietaria Mottle Virus from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Carolina; Aramburu, José; Rubio, Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of isolate T32 of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) infecting tomato plants in Turin, Italy, obtained by Sanger sequencing. T32 shares 90.48 to 96.69% nucleotide identity with other two PoMV isolates, CR8 and Pe1, respectively, whose complete genome sequences are available. PMID:26679580

  12. Complete nucleotide sequence of a maize chlorotic mottle virus isolate from Nebraska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome of a maize chlorotic mottle virus isolate from Nebraska (MCMV-NE) was cloned and sequenced. The MCMV-NE genome consists of 4,436 nucleotides and shares 99.5% nucleotide sequence identity with an MCMV isolate from Kansas (MCMV-KS). Of 22 polymorphic sites, most resulted from t...

  13. Vector competence of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) for West Nile virus isolates from Florida

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Stephanie L.; Anderson, Sheri L.; Lord, Cynthia C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess vector competence (infection, dissemination and transmission) of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus for Florida (FL) West Nile virus (WNV) isolates. METHODS West Nile virus isolates (WN-FL-03: NY99 genotype; WN-FL-05-558, WN-FL-05-2186, WN-FL-05-510: WN02 genotype) collected from different regions of FL were used for vector competence experiments in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus from Alachua County and Indian River County in FL. Mosquitoes from both colonies were fed blood containing 7.9 ± 0.2 log10 plaque-forming units WNV/ml ± SE and incubated at 28 °C for 14 days. Vector competence, including rates of infection, dissemination, and transmission, was compared between colonies for WN-FL-03 using chi-squared. Virus titres in bodies, legs and saliva were compared using ANOVA. Daily measurements of in vitro replication of WNV isolates were evaluated in Vero cells so that a standardised virus dose for each isolate could be delivered to mosquitoes. RESULTS Infection and dissemination rates were high (≥95%) and not affected by isolate or colony (infection, P = 0.679; dissemination, P = 0.799). Transmission rates were low (≤20%), detected in one colony and affected by isolate (P = 0.008). Body and leg titres differed between isolates (body titre, P = 0.031; leg titre, P = 0.044) and colonies (body titre, P = 0.001; leg titre, P = 0.013) while saliva titre did not differ between isolates (P = 0.462). CONCLUSIONS Variation in vector competence of mosquito populations may be attributed, in part, to exposures to WNV with genetic differences leading to different rates of replication in mosquitoes. Evaluation of vector competence for different WNV isolates may help us understand vector–virus interactions and, hence, the role of vectors in complex virus transmission cycles in nature. PMID:24898274

  14. Respiratory transmission of an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from a harbour seal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Ip, Hon S.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Yoon, Sun W.; Johnson, Jordan; Beck, Melinda A.; Webby, Richard J.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing human H7N9 influenza infections highlight the threat of emerging avian influenza viruses. In 2011, an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from moribund New England harbour seals was shown to have naturally acquired mutations known to increase the transmissibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses. To elucidate the potential human health threat, here we evaluate a panel of avian H3N8 viruses and find that the harbour seal virus displays increased affinity for mammalian receptors, transmits via respiratory droplets in ferrets and replicates in human lung cells. Analysis of a panel of human sera for H3N8 neutralizing antibodies suggests that there is no population-wide immunity to these viruses. The prevalence of H3N8 viruses in birds and multiple mammalian species including recent isolations from pigs and evidence that it was a past human pandemic virus make the need for surveillance and risk analysis of these viruses of public health importance.

  15. Respiratory transmission of an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from a harbour seal

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Ip, Hon S.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Yoon, Sun Woo; Johnson, Jordan; Beck, Melinda A.; Webby, Richard J.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing human H7N9 influenza infections highlight the threat of emerging avian influenza viruses. In 2011, an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from moribund New England harbour seals was shown to have naturally acquired mutations known to increase the transmissibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses. To elucidate the potential human health threat, here we evaluate a panel of avian H3N8 viruses and find that the harbour seal virus displays increased affinity for mammalian receptors, transmits via respiratory droplets in ferrets and replicates in human lung cells. Analysis of a panel of human sera for H3N8 neutralizing antibodies suggests that there is no population-wide immunity to these viruses. The prevalence of H3N8 viruses in birds and multiple mammalian species including recent isolations from pigs and evidence that it was a past human pandemic virus make the need for surveillance and risk analysis of these viruses of public health importance. PMID:25183346

  16. How Does Sampling Methodology Influence Molecular Detection and Isolation Success in Influenza A Virus Field Studies?

    PubMed

    Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Avril, Alexis; Tolf, Conny; Olsen, Björn; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Wild waterfowl are important reservoir hosts for influenza A virus (IAV) and a potential source of spillover infections in other hosts, including poultry and swine. The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, such as H5N1 and H5N8, and subsequent spread along migratory flyways prompted the initiation of several programs in Europe, North America, and Africa to monitor circulation of HPAI and low-pathogenicity precursor viruses (low-pathogenicity avian influenza [LPAI] viruses). Given the costs of maintaining such programs, it is essential to establish best practice for field methodologies to provide robust data for epidemiological interpretation. Here, we use long-term surveillance data from a single site to evaluate the influence of a number of parameters on virus detection and isolation of LPAI viruses. A total of 26,586 samples (oropharyngeal, fecal, and cloacal) collected from wild mallards were screened by real-time PCR, and positive samples were subjected to isolation in embryonated chicken eggs. The LPAI virus detection rate was influenced by the sample type: cloacal/fecal samples showed a consistently higher detection rate and lower cycle threshold (Ct) value than oropharyngeal samples. Molecular detection was more sensitive than isolation, and virus isolation success was proportional to the number of RNA copies in the sample. Interestingly, for a given Ct value, the isolation success was lower in samples from adult birds than in those from juveniles. Comparing the results of specific real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCRs and of isolation, it was clear that coinfections were common in the investigated birds. The effects of sample type and detection methods warrant some caution in interpretation of the surveillance data. PMID:26655759

  17. Complete Genome and Clinicopathological Characterization of a Virulent Newcastle Disease Virus Isolate from South America

    PubMed Central

    Diel, Diego G.; Susta, Leonardo; Cardenas Garcia, Stivalis; Killian, Mary L.; Brown, Corrie C.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2012-01-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is one of the most important diseases of poultry, negatively affecting poultry production worldwide. The disease is caused by Newcastle disease virus (NDV) or avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1), a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus of the genus Avulavirus, family Paramyxoviridae. Although all NDV isolates characterized to date belong to a single serotype of APMV-1, significant genetic diversity has been described between different NDV isolates. Here we present the complete genome sequence and the clinicopathological characterization of a virulent Newcastle disease virus isolate (NDV-Peru/08) obtained from poultry during an outbreak of ND in Peru in 2008. Phylogenetic reconstruction and analysis of the evolutionary distances between NDV-Peru/08 and other isolates representing established NDV genotypes revealed the existence of large genomic and amino differences that clearly distinguish this isolate from viruses of typical NDV genotypes. Although NDV-Peru/08 is a genetically distinct virus, pathogenesis studies conducted with chickens revealed that NDV-Peru/08 infection results in clinical signs characteristic of velogenic viscerotropic NDV strains. Additionally, vaccination studies have shown that an inactivated NDV-LaSota/46 vaccine conferred full protection from NDV-Peru/08-induced clinical disease and mortality. This represents the first complete characterization of a virulent NDV isolate from South America. PMID:22135263

  18. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies recognize antigenic variants among isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.; Arakawa, C.N.; Lannan, C.N.; Fryer, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    eutralizing monoclonal antibodies were developed against strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from steelhead trout Salmo gairdneri in the Deschutes River of Oregon, chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Sacramento River of California, and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri reared in the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, USA. These antibodies were tested for neutralization of 12 IHNV isolates obtained from salmonids in Japan, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho. The antibodies recognized antigenic variants among the isolates and could be used to separate the viruses into 4 groups. The members of each group tended to be related by geographic area rather than by source host species, virulence, or date of isolation.

  19. [Isolation of an arbovirus antigenically related to Issyk-Kul virus from the blood of a human patient].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D K; Kostiukova, M A; Pak, T P; Gromashevski?, V L

    1980-01-01

    The first isolation from a human being of a virus strain antigenically related to Issyk-Kul virus is reported. The virus was isolated from a staff member of Dushanbe institute who had contracted the infection during field works carried out in the Kumsangir district of southern Tajikistan. The etiological role of the virus in the developing disease was confirmed by the examinations of paired sera in the complement fixation and neutralization tests. PMID:6774483

  20. Isolation and immunisation studies of a canine parco-like virus from dogs with haemorrhagic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Appel, M J; Scott, F W; Carmichael, L E

    1979-08-25

    A newly recognised canine parvo like virus was isolated from faeces of dogs with haemorrhagic enteritis. Cell cultures from several species were susceptible to it. Virus infected cells could be demonstrated by staining with fluorescent antibody reagents (prepared against canine virus or feline panleucopenia virus) or by haemagglutination with pig or rhesus monkey red blood cells. Inhibition of haemagglutination by specific antiserum prepared in specific-pathogen-free beagles provided a convenient method for viral identification. Experimental inoculation of specific-pathogen-free beagles resulted in elevated body temperatures and caused lymphopenia lasting one to three days. Feline panleucopenia virus vaccines protected dogs against challenge with virulent canine parvo-like virus. PMID:516347

  1. Isolation of the Thogoto virus from a Haemaphysalis longicornis in Kyoto City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Kentaro; Okamoto, Natsumi; Nakao, Ryo; Klaus Hofstetter, Robert; Yabu, Tomoko; Masumoto, Hiroki; Someya, Azusa; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Maeda, Akihiko

    2015-08-01

    Ticks transmit viruses responsible for severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, some of which have a significant impact on public health. In Japan, little is known about the distribution of tick-borne viruses. In this study, we collected and tested ticks to investigate the distribution of tick-borne arboviruses in Kyoto, Japan, and isolated the first Thogoto virus (THOV) to our knowledge from Haemaphysalis longicornis in far-eastern Asia. The Japanese isolate was genetically distinct from a cluster of other isolates from Africa, Europe and the Middle East. Various cell lines derived from mammals and ticks were susceptible to the isolate, but it was not pathogenic in mice. These results advance understanding of the distribution and ecology of THOV. PMID:25957096

  2. Characterization of West Nile viruses isolated from captive American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) in Medellin, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Jorge E; Ciuoderis, Karl A; Lopera, Juan G; Piedrahita, Leidy D; Murphy, Darby; Levasseur, James; Carrillo, Lina; Ocampo, Martha C; Hofmeister, Erik

    2012-09-01

    Serum samples from a total of 71 healthy captive birds belonging to 18 species were collected in July of 2008 in Medellin (Colombia) and tested for flaviviruses. Eighteen of 29 samples from American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) were positive for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Selected positive samples were serially passaged and WNV was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Two isolates (524/08, 9835/08) were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analysis revealed WNV with 16 nucleotide substitutions resulting in six amino acid changes when compared with the NY99 strain. Colombian (COL) viruses were more closely related to Louisiana isolates from 2001. When compared with attenuated strains isolated from Texas, COL isolates differed in their plaque size and temperature sensitivity phenotype. The COL viruses were pathogenic in embryonated chicken eggs and Balb/c mice. PMID:22802436

  3. Characterization of West Nile Viruses Isolated from Captive American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) in Medellin, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Ciuoderis, Karl A.; Lopera, Juan G.; Piedrahita, Leidy D.; Murphy, Darby; LeVasseur, James; Carrillo, Lina; Ocampo, Martha C.; Hofmeister, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Serum samples from a total of 71 healthy captive birds belonging to 18 species were collected in July of 2008 in Medellin (Colombia) and tested for flaviviruses. Eighteen of 29 samples from American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) were positive for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Selected positive samples were serially passaged and WNV was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Two isolates (524/08, 9835/08) were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analysis revealed WNV with 16 nucleotide substitutions resulting in six amino acid changes when compared with the NY99 strain. Colombian (COL) viruses were more closely related to Louisiana isolates from 2001. When compared with attenuated strains isolated from Texas, COL isolates differed in their plaque size and temperature sensitivity phenotype. The COL viruses were pathogenic in embryonated chicken eggs and Balb/c mice. PMID:22802436

  4. Characterization of West Nile viruses isolated form captive American flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) in Medellin, Colombia.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Ciuoderis, Karl A.; Lopera, Juan G.; Piedrahita, Leidy D.; Murphy, Darby; LeVasseur, James; Carrillo, Lina; Ocampo, Martha C.; Hofmeister, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Serum samples from a total of 71 healthy captive birds belonging to 18 species were collected in July of 2008 in Medellin (Colombia) and tested for flaviviruses. Eighteen of 29 samples from American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) were positive for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Selected positive samples were serially passaged and WNV was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Two isolates (524/08, 9835/08) were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analysis revealed WNV with 16 nucleotide substitutions resulting in six amino acid changes when compared with the NY99 strain. Colombian (COL) viruses were more closely related to Louisiana isolates from 2001. When compared with attenuated strains isolated from Texas, COL isolates differed in their plaque size and temperature sensitivity phenotype. The COL viruses were pathogenic in embryonated chicken eggs and Balb/c mice.

  5. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Clinical Isolates of Dengue Virus Serotype 1 from South Korean Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eunhye; Jeong, Young Eui; Balasuriya, Udeni B. R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report the complete genome sequences of three clinical isolates of dengue virus serotype 1 isolated from South Korean travelers returning from different countries in Southeast Asia. The nucleotide sequence identities ranged from 91.5 to 92.2%, while the amino acid sequence identities ranged from 97.5 to 97.9% among the three clinical isolates. PMID:26607895

  6. Genetic characterization of dengue virus type 1 isolated in Brunei in 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Osman, Osmali; Fong, Mun Yik; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2009-03-01

    The full-length genomes of two DENV-1 viruses isolated during the 2005-2006 dengue incidents in Brunei were sequenced. Twenty five primer sets were designed to amplify contiguous overlapping fragments of approximately 500-600 base pairs spanning the entire sequence of the genome. The amplified PCR products were sent to a commercial laboratory for sequencing and the nucleotides and the deduced amino acids were determined. Sequence analysis of the envelope gene at the nucleotide and amino acid levels between the two isolates showed 92 and 96 % identity, respectively. Comparison of the envelope gene sequences with 68 other DENV-1 viruses of known genotypes placed the two isolates into two different genotypic groups. Isolate DS06/210505 belongs to genotype V together with some of the recent isolates from India (2003) and older isolates from Singapore (1990) and Burma (1976), while isolate DS212/110306 was clustered in genotype IV with the prototype Nauru strain (1974) and with some of the recent isolates from Indonesia (2004) and the Philippines (2002, 2001). In the full-length genome analysis at the nucleotide level, isolate DS06/210505 showed 94 % identity to the French Guyana strain (1989) in genotype V while isolate DS212/110306 had 96 % identity to the Nauru Island strain (1974) in genotype IV. This work constitutes the first complete genetic characterization of not only Brunei DENV-1 virus isolates, but also the first strain from Borneo Island. This study was the first to report the isolation of dengue virus in the country. PMID:19218214

  7. Amantadine resistance among highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) isolated from India.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Aron; Sood, Richa; Chanu, Kh Victoria; Bhatia, Sandeep; Khandia, Rekha; Pateriya, A K; Nagarajan, S; Dimri, U; Kulkarni, D D

    2016-02-01

    Emergence of antiviral resistance among H5N1 avian influenza viruses is the major challenge in the control of pandemic influenza. Matrix 2 (M2) inhibitors (amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir) are the two classes of antiviral agents that are specifically active against influenza viruses and are used for both treatment and prophylaxis of influenza infections. Amantadine targets the M2 ion channel of influenza A virus and interrupts virus life cycle through blockade of hydrogen ion influx. This prevents uncoating of the virus in infected host cells which impedes the release of ribonucleoprotein required for transcription and replication of virion in the nucleus. The present study was carried out to review the status of amantadine resistance in H5N1 viruses isolated from India and to study their replicative capability. Results of the study revealed resistance to amantadine in antiviral assay among four H5N1 viruses out of which two viruses had Serine 31 Asparagine (AGT-AAT i.e., S31N) mutation and two had Valine 27 Alanine (GTT-GCT i.e., V27A) mutation. The four resistant viruses not only exhibited significant difference in effective concentration 50% (EC50) values of amantadine hydrochloride from that of susceptible viruses (P < 0.0001) but also showed significant difference between two different types (S31N and V27A) of mutant viruses (P < 0.05). Resistance to amantadine could also be demonstrated in a simple HA test after replication of the viruses in MDCK cells in presence of amantadine. The study identifies the correlation between in vitro antiviral assay and presence of established molecular markers of resistance, the retention of replicative capacity in the presence of amantadine hydrochloride by the resistant viruses and the emergence of resistant mutations against amantadine among avian influenza viruses (H5N1) without selective drug pressure. PMID:26639679

  8. Antigenic and Morphological Similarities of Progressive Pneumonia Virus, a Recently Isolated “Slow Virus” of Sheep, to Visna and Maedi Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, K. K.; Mattern, C. F. T.; Stone, L. B.; Coe, J. E.; Lavelle, G.

    1971-01-01

    Progressive pneumonia virus, the causative agent of a slow, pulmonary disease of Montana sheep, was shown to be antigenically related to two other slow viruses of sheep, visna and maedi. Electron microscopic examination of infected cells revealed that the virus matures by a budding process and that the budding particles as well as the mature, extracellular virions bear striking resemblances to the oncogenic ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses. Recent findings of an RNA-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase associated with the virions of this group of slow viruses lend further support to the notion that they may tentatively be classified with the oncogenic RNA tumor viruses. Images PMID:4101223

  9. A molecular epidemiological study targeting the glycoprotein gene of rabies virus isolates from China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Sheng-Li; Yan, Jia-Xin; Xu, Ge-Lin; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Ming, Ping-Gang; Liu, Sheng-Ya; Wu, Jie; Ming, He-Tian; Zhu, Feng-Cai; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Xiao, Qi-You; Dong, Guan-Mu; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2007-03-01

    A group of 31 rabies viruses (RABVs), recovered primarily from dogs, one deer and one human case, were collected from various areas in China between 1989 and 2006. Complete G gene sequences determined for these isolates indicated identities of nucleotide and amino acid sequences of >or=87% and 93.8%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of these and some additional Chinese isolates clearly supported the placement of all Chinese viruses in Lyssavirus genotype 1 and divided all Chinese isolates between four distinct groups (I-IV). Several variants identified within the most commonly encountered group I were distributed according to their geographical origins. A comparison of representative Chinese viruses with other isolates retrieved world-wide indicated a close evolutionary relationship between China group I and II viruses and those of Indonesia while China group III viruses formed an outlying branch to variants from Malaysia and Thailand. China group IV viruses were closely related to several vaccine strains. The predicted glycoprotein sequences of these RABVs variants are presented and discussed with respect to the utility of the anti-rabies biologicals currently employed in China. PMID:17129631

  10. Genetic characterization and pathogenicity assessment of Newcastle disease virus isolated from wild peacock.

    PubMed

    Khulape, Sagar A; Gaikwad, Satish S; Chellappa, Madhan Mohan; Mishra, Bishnu Prasad; Dey, Sohini

    2014-12-01

    The continued spread and occurrence of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has posed potential threat to domestic poultry industry around the globe. Mainly, wild avian species has always been implicated for the natural reservoir for virus and spread of the disease. In the present study, we report the isolation of Newcastle disease virus (NDV/Peacock/India/2012) in necropsy brain tissue sample of wild peacock from North India. Complete genome of the virus was found to be 15,186 nucleotides (nts) with six genes in order of 3'-N-P-M-F-HN-L-5', which was limited by 55-nts leader region at the 3' end and a 114-nts trailer sequence at 5' end. Sequence analysis of fusion protein revealed the dibasic amino acid cleavage site (112)R-R-Q-K-R-F(117), a characteristic motif of virulent virus. Phylogenetic analysis placed the isolate in genotype II of Newcastle disease virus showing the lowest mean percent divergence (6 %) with other genotype II counterparts. The isolate was characterized as mesogenic (intermediate pathotype) based on the mean death time (63 h) in embryonated chicken eggs and the intra-cerebral pathogenicity index (1.40) in day-old chicks. The report emphasizes the dynamic ecology of NDV strains circulating in a wild avian host during the outbreak of 2012 in North India. Further the genotypic and pathotypical characterizations of the isolate could help in development of homologous vaccine against NDV strain circulating in avian population. PMID:25260553

  11. Characterization of Influenza A (H7N9) Viruses Isolated from Human Cases Imported into Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Huang, Yi-Lung; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Su, Yu-Ting; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    A novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus causes severe human infections and was first identified in March 2013 in China. The H7N9 virus has exhibited two epidemiological peaks of infection, occurring in week 15 of 2013 and week 5 of 2014. Taiwan, which is geographically adjacent to China, faces a large risk of being affected by this virus. Through extensive surveillance, launched in April 2013, four laboratory-confirmed H7N9 cases imported from China have been identified in Taiwan. The H7N9 virus isolated from imported case 1 in May 2013 (during the first wave) was found to be closest genetically to a virus from wild birds and differed from the prototype virus, A/Anhui/1/2013, in the MP gene. The other three imported cases were detected in December 2013 and April 2014 (during the second wave). The viruses isolated from cases 2 and 4 were similar in the compositions of their 6 internal genes and distinct from A/Anhui/1/2013 in the PB2 and MP genes, whereas the virus isolated from case 3 exhibited a novel reassortment that has not been identified previously and was different from A/Anhui/1/2013 in the PB2, PA and MP genes. The four imported H7N9 viruses share similar antigenicity with A/Anhui/1/2013, and their HA and NA genes grouped together in their respective phylogenies. In contrast with the HA and NA genes, which exhibited a smaller degree of diversity, the internal genes were heterogeneous and provided potential distinctions between transmission sources in terms of both geography and hosts. It is important to strengthen surveillance of influenza and to share viral genetic data in real-time for reducing the threat of rapid and continuing evolution of H7N9 viruses. PMID:25748033

  12. Sunguru virus: a novel virus in the family Rhabdoviridae isolated from a chicken in north-western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Jeremy P; Zeidner, Nord; Borland, Erin M; Mutebi, John-Paul; Lanciotti, Robert S; Miller, Barry R; Lutwama, Julius J; Tendo, Joseph M; Andama, Vincent; Powers, Ann M

    2014-07-01

    Sunguru virus (SUNV), a novel virus belonging to the highly diverse Rhabdoviridae family, was isolated from a domestic chicken in the district of Arua, Uganda, in 2011. This is the first documented isolation of a rhabdovirus from a chicken. SUNV is related to, but distinct from, Boteke virus and other members of the unclassified Sandjimba group. The genome is 11056 nt in length and contains the five core rhabdovirus genes plus an additional C gene (within the ORF of a phosphoprotein gene) and a small hydrophobic protein (between the matrix and glycoprotein genes). Inoculation of vertebrate cells with SUNV resulted in significant viral growth, with a peak titre of 7.8 log10 p.f.u. ml(-1) observed in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Little to no growth was observed in invertebrate cells and in live mosquitoes, with Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes having a 47.4% infection rate in the body but no dissemination of the virus to the salivary glands; this suggests that this novel virus is not arthropod borne as some other members of the family Rhabdoviridae. PMID:24718834

  13. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: genetic diversity of recent British isolates.

    PubMed

    Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Hughes, Gareth J; Westcott, David G; Naidu, Brindha; Williamson, Susanna; Woodger, Nicholas G A; Steinbach, Falko; Drew, Trevor W

    2013-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) continues to be a significant problem for European pig producers, contributing to porcine respiratory disease complex, neonatal piglet mortality, infertility and occasional abortion storms. PRRS virus (PRRSV), a member of the arterivirus family with two defined major genotypes, has been shown to be quite genetically diverse. In the present study, genetic analysis of multiple gene regions of over 100 viruses isolated in Britain between 2003 and 2007 revealed that the diversity of British strains is now far greater than during the early 1990s. All isolates belong to genotype 1 (European). While some recent isolates are still very similar to early isolates, a wide range of more diverse viruses is now also circulating. Interestingly, some isolates were found to be very similar to a modified-live vaccine strain, and it is suggested that use of the vaccine has affected the evolution pattern of PRRS virus strains in Britain. Evidence of deletions in one viral gene, ORF3, and of genome recombination was also seen. A molecular clock model using the ORF7 sequences estimates the rate of substitution as 3.8 × 10(-3) per site per year, thereby dating the most recent common ancestor of all British viruses to 1991, coincident with the first outbreak of disease. Our findings therefore have implications for both the diagnostic and prophylactic methods currently being used, which are discussed. PMID:23218831

  14. Comparison of monoclonal antibody-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus isolation for detection of peste des petits ruminants virus in goat tissues and secretions.

    PubMed Central

    Saliki, J T; House, J A; Mebus, C A; Dubovi, E J

    1994-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (S-ELISA) was developed for specific detection of peste des petits ruminants virus. Compared with virus isolation in Vero cell cultures using 89 paired tissue and secretion samples from six experimentally infected goats, S-ELISA was significantly more sensitive (71.9% versus 65.2%; P < 0.05). The S-ELISA is a suitable alternative to virus isolation. PMID:8051266

  15. Nucleotide sequencing and serologic analysis of Cache Valley virus isolates from the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Blitvich, Bradley J; Loroño-Pino, Maria A; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E; Farfan-Ale, Jose A; Dorman, Karin S

    2012-08-01

    Nucleotide sequencing was performed on part of the medium and large genome segments of 17 Cache Valley virus (CVV) isolates from the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Alignment of these sequences to all other sequences in the Genbank database revealed that they have greatest nucleotide identity (97-98 %) with the equivalent regions of Tlacotalpan virus (TLAV), which is considered to be a variety of CVV. Next, cross-plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNTs) were performed using sera from mice that had been inoculated with a representative isolate from the Yucatan Peninsula (CVV-478) or the prototype TLAV isolate (61-D-240). The PRNT titers exhibited a twofold difference in one direction and no difference in the other direction suggesting that CVV-478 and 61-D-240 belong to the same CVV subtype. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the CVV isolates from the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico are genetically and antigenically similar to the prototype TLAV isolate. PMID:22467180

  16. The preparation of chicken tracheal organ cultures for virus isolation, propagation, and titration.

    PubMed

    Hennion, Ruth M

    2015-01-01

    Chicken tracheal organ cultures (TOCs), comprising transverse sections of chick embryo trachea with beating cilia, have proved useful in the isolation of several respiratory viruses and as a viral assay system, using ciliostasis as the criterion for infection. A simple technique for the preparation of chicken tracheal organ cultures in glass test tubes, in which virus growth and ciliostasis can be readily observed, is described. PMID:25720470

  17. Inhangapi Virus: Genome Sequencing of a Brazilian Ungrouped Rhabdovirus Isolated in the Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Wanzeller, Ana Lucia M; Nunes, Márcio R T; Tavares, Fernando N; Pinto, Walber V M; Júnior, Edivaldo C; de Lima, Clayton P S; de Oliveira, Layanna F; Júnior, João Lídio S G V; Cardoso, Jedson F; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2016-01-01

    We report here nearly complete genome sequence of Inhangapi virus (INHV) strain BEAR177325, which was isolated from a pool of sandflies (Lutzomyia flaviscutellata) in the Utinga neighborhood, Belém (01º28´S 48°27'W), State of Pará, Brazil, in 1969. The genome of this virus showed similarity with members belonging to the family Rhabdoviridae. PMID:26798091

  18. Isolation and characterization of a Korean porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strain KNU-141112.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunhee; Kim, Youngnam; Lee, Changhee

    2015-10-01

    Severe outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) have re-emerged in Korea and rapidly swept across the country, causing tremendous economic losses to producers and customers. Despite the availability of PEDV vaccines in the domestic market, the disease continues to plague the Korean pork industry, raising issues regarding their protective efficacy and new vaccine development. Therefore, PEDV isolation in cell culture is urgently needed to develop efficacious vaccines and diagnostic assays and to conduct further studies on the virus biology. In the present study, one Korean PEDV strain, KOR/KNU-141112/2014, was successfully isolated and serially propagated in Vero cells for over 30 passages. The in vitro and in vivo characteristics of the Korean PEDV isolate were investigated. Virus production in cell culture was confirmed by cytopathology, immunofluorescence, and real-time RT-PCR. The infectious virus titers of the viruses during the first 30 passages ranged from 10(5.1) to 10(8.2) TCID50 per ml. The inactivated KNU-141112 virus was found to mediate potent neutralizing antibody responses in immunized guinea pigs. Animal studies showed that KNU-141112 virus causes severe diarrhea and vomiting, fecal shedding, and acute atrophic enteritis, indicating that strain KNU-141112 is highly enteropathogenic in the natural host. In addition, the entire genomes or complete S genes of KNU-141112 viruses at selected cell culture passages were sequenced to assess the genetic stability and relatedness. Our genomic analyses indicated that the Korean isolate KNU-141112 is genetically stable during the first 30 passages in cell culture and is grouped within subgroup G2b together with the recent re-emergent Korean strains. PMID:26196056

  19. Inhangapi Virus: Genome Sequencing of a Brazilian Ungrouped Rhabdovirus Isolated in the Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Fernando N.; Pinto, Walber V. M.; Júnior, Edivaldo C.; de Lima, Clayton P. S.; de Oliveira, Layanna F.; Júnior, João Lídio S. G. V.; Cardoso, Jedson F.; Vasconcelos, Pedro F. C.

    2016-01-01

    We report here nearly complete genome sequence of Inhangapi virus (INHV) strain BEAR177325, which was isolated from a pool of sandflies (Lutzomyia flaviscutellata) in the Utinga neighborhood, Belém (01º28´S 48°27′W), State of Pará, Brazil, in 1969. The genome of this virus showed similarity with members belonging to the family Rhabdoviridae. PMID:26798091

  20. Analysis of new aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV) isolates suggests evolution of two ALPV species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sijun; Vijayendran, Diveena; Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Miller, W Allen; Bonning, Bryony C

    2014-12-01

    Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV; family Dicistroviridae) was first isolated from the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi. ALPV-like virus sequences have been reported from many insects and insect predators. We identified a new isolate of ALPV (ALPV-AP) from the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and a new isolate (ALPV-DvV) from western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. ALPV-AP has an ssRNA genome of 9940 nt. Based on phylogenetic analysis, ALPV-AP was closely related to ALPV-AM, an ALPV isolate from honeybees, Apis mellifera, in Spain and Brookings, SD, USA. The distinct evolutionary branches suggested the existence of two lineages of the ALPV virus. One consisted of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM, whilst all other isolates of ALPV grouped into the other lineage. The similarity of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was up to 88 % at the RNA level, compared with 78-79 % between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. The sequence identity of proteins between ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was 98-99 % for both ORF1 and ORF2, whilst only 85-87 % for ORF1 and 91-92 % for ORF2 between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. Sequencing of RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) products and cDNA clones of the virus genome revealed sequence variation in the 5' UTRs and in ORF1, indicating that ALPV may be under strong selection pressure, which could have important biological implications for ALPV host range and infectivity. Our results indicated that ALPV-like viruses infect insects in the order Coleoptera, in addition to the orders Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, and we propose that ALPV isolates be classified as two separate viral species. PMID:25170050

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of dengue virus types 1 and 3 isolated in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988.

    PubMed

    Sjatha, Fithriyah; Takizawa, Yamato; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Konishi, Eiji

    2012-12-01

    Dengue viruses are mosquito-borne viruses that cause dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, both of which are globally important diseases. These viruses have evolved in a transmission cycle between human hosts and mosquito vectors in various tropical and subtropical environments. We previously isolated three strains of dengue type 1 virus (DENV1) and 14 strains of dengue type 3 virus (DENV3) during an outbreak of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988. Here, we compared the nucleotide sequences of the entire envelope protein-coding region among these strains. The isolates were 97.6-100% identical for DENV1 and 98.8-100% identical for DENV3. All DENV1 isolates were included in two different clades of genotype IV and all DENV3 isolates were included in a single clade of genotype I. For DENV1, three Yap Island strains isolated in 2004 were the only strains closely related to the present isolates; the recently circulated Indonesian strains were in different clades. Molecular clock analyses estimated that ancestors of the genotype IV strains of DENV1 have been indigenous in Indonesia since 1948. We predict that they diverged frequently around 1967 and that their offspring distributed to Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific, and Africa. For DENV3, the clade containing all the present isolates also contained strains isolated from other Indonesian regions and other countries including Malaysia, Singapore, China, and East Timor from 1985-2010. Molecular clock analyses estimated that the common ancestor of the genotype I strains of DENV3 emerged in Indonesia around 1967 and diverged frequently until 1980, and that their offspring distributed mainly in Southeast Asia. The first dengue outbreak in 1968 and subsequent outbreaks in Indonesia might have influenced the divergence and distribution of the DENV1 genotype IV strains and the DENV3 genotype I strains in many countries. PMID:22959957

  2. New Genotype of Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses Isolated from Tree Sparrows in China

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Z.; Lei, F. M.; Yu, J.; Fan, Z. J.; Yin, Z. H.; Jia, C. X.; Xiong, K. J.; Sun, Y. H.; Zhang, X. W.; Wu, X. M.; Gao, X. B.; Li, T. X.

    2005-01-01

    The 2004 outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 disease in China led to a great poultry loss and society attention. A survey of avian influenza viruses was conducted on tree sparrows (Passer montanus) collected in China in 2004. Four viruses were isolated from free-living tree sparrows. The results of the whole-genome analysis indicated that an H5N1 virus with a new genotype is circulating among tree sparrows. The hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of the new genotype were derived from Gs/Gd/96-like viruses and the nuclear protein gene descended from the 2001 genotype A H5N1 viruses, while the other inner genes originated from an unknown influenza virus. In experimental infection, all four viruses were highly pathogenic to chickens but not pathogenic to ducks or mice. The four tree sparrow viruses were different from the 2003 tree sparrow strain (genotype Z) in Hong Kong. The results suggested that H5N1 viruses might be distributed widely in tree sparrows. PMID:16306617

  3. Isolation of an exotic serotype of bluetongue virus from imported cattle in quarantine.

    PubMed Central

    Groocock, C M; Campbell, C H

    1982-01-01

    In 1980, 60 zebu cattle from Brazil were admitted into quarantine in Florida for 150 days. During the 30 days between their last test in Brazil and their first test in Florida, four animals developed antibody to bluetongue virus detectable by agar gel immunodiffusion test. Within 62 days after arrival in Florida, three more seroconverted and one more was positive by the 86th day. Virus neutralizing titers of serums from the first four cattle were highest against bluetongue virus serotype 4 and 20; both of these serotypes are exotic to the United States. A bluetongue virus serotype 4 was isolated from one of these animals. The eight positive reactors were slaughtered; the other 52 cattle, which did not develop detectable antibody titers to bluetongue virus, were released into the United States. PMID:6284326

  4. Opium poppy mosaic virus, a new umbravirus isolated from Papaver somniferum in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joe; Lebas, Bénédicte; Liefting, Lia; Veerakone, Stella; Wei, Ting; Ward, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A novel virus, tentatively named "opium poppy mosaic virus" (OPMV), was isolated from Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) with leaf mosaic and mottling symptoms in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2006. The virus was mechanically transmitted to herbaceous plants of several species, in which it induced local and/or systemic symptoms. No virus particles were observed by electron microscopy in the diseased P. somniferum or any of the symptomatic herbaceous plants. The complete genomic sequence of 4230 nucleotides contains four open reading frames (ORF) and is most closely related (59.3 %) to tobacco bushy top virus, a member of the genus Umbravirus. These data suggest that OPMV is a new umbravirus. PMID:26514844

  5. Genome characterisation of two Ljungan virus isolates from wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus) in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Pounder, Kieran C; Watts, Phillip C; Niklasson, Bo; Kallio, Eva R K; Marston, Denise A; Fooks, Anthony R; Begon, Michael; McElhinney, Lorraine M

    2015-12-01

    Ljungan virus (LV) (family Picornaviridae, genus Parechovirus) is a suspected zoonotic pathogen with associations to human disease in Sweden. LV is a single-stranded RNA virus with a positive sense genome. There are five published Ljungan virus strains, three isolated from Sweden and two from America, and are classified into four genotypes. A further two strains described here were isolated from wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus) caught in Västmanlands county, Sweden in 1994. These strains were sequenced using next generation pyrosequencing technology on the GS454flx platform. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of the obtained genomes confirms isolates LV340 and LV342 as two new putative members of genotype 2 along with LV145SL, with 92% and 99% nucleotide identities respectively. Only two codon sites throughout the entire genome were identified as undergoing positive selection, both situated within the VP3 structural region, in or near to major antigenic sites. Whilst these two strains do not constitute new genotypes they provide evidence, though weakly supported, which suggests the evolution of Ljungan viruses to be relatively slow, a characteristic unlike other picornaviruses. Additional genomic sequences are urgently required for Ljungan virus strains, particularly from different locations or hosts, to fully understand the evolutionary and epidemiological properties of this potentially zoonotic virus. PMID:26375731

  6. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus stability in environmental and clinical substrates: implications for virus detection and isolation.

    PubMed

    Dornas, Fábio P; Silva, Lorena C F; de Almeida, Gabriel M; Campos, Rafael K; Boratto, Paulo V M; Franco-Luiz, Ana P M; La Scola, Bernard; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are extremely diverse and abundant and are present in countless environments. Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have emerged as a fascinating research topic for virologists around the world. As evidence of their ubiquity and ecological impact, mimiviruses have been found in multiple environmental samples. However, isolation of these viruses from environmental samples is inefficient, mainly due to methodological limitations and lack of information regarding the interactions between viruses and substrates. In this work, we demonstrate the long-lasting stability of mimivirus in environmental (freshwater and saline water) and hospital (ventilator plastic device tube) substrates, showing the detection of infectious particles after more than 9 months. In addition, an enrichment protocol was implemented that remarkably increased mimivirus detection from all tested substrates, including field tests. Moreover, biological, morphological and genetic tests revealed that the enrichment protocol maintained mimivirus particle integrity. In conclusion, our work demonstrated the stability of APMV in samples of environmental and health interest and proposed a reliable and easy protocol to improve giant virus isolation. The data presented here can guide future giant virus detection and isolation studies. PMID:24498379

  7. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus Stability in Environmental and Clinical Substrates: Implications for Virus Detection and Isolation

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Gabriel M.; Campos, Rafael K.; Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Franco-Luiz, Ana P. M.; La Scola, Bernard; Ferreira, Paulo C. P.; Kroon, Erna G.; Abrahão, Jônatas S.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are extremely diverse and abundant and are present in countless environments. Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have emerged as a fascinating research topic for virologists around the world. As evidence of their ubiquity and ecological impact, mimiviruses have been found in multiple environmental samples. However, isolation of these viruses from environmental samples is inefficient, mainly due to methodological limitations and lack of information regarding the interactions between viruses and substrates. In this work, we demonstrate the long-lasting stability of mimivirus in environmental (freshwater and saline water) and hospital (ventilator plastic device tube) substrates, showing the detection of infectious particles after more than 9 months. In addition, an enrichment protocol was implemented that remarkably increased mimivirus detection from all tested substrates, including field tests. Moreover, biological, morphological and genetic tests revealed that the enrichment protocol maintained mimivirus particle integrity. In conclusion, our work demonstrated the stability of APMV in samples of environmental and health interest and proposed a reliable and easy protocol to improve giant virus isolation. The data presented here can guide future giant virus detection and isolation studies. PMID:24498379

  8. Resistance breaking tomato spotted wilt virus isolates on resistant pepper varieties in Italy.

    PubMed

    Crescenzi, A; Viggiano, A; Fanigliulo, A

    2013-01-01

    In spring 2012, resistance breaking (RB) isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) that overcome the resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in different pepper hybrids have been recovered in different locations in southern Italy (Campania and Apulia regions) in protected cultivation, about one month after transplant. The percentage of symptomatic plants was 5-10% and, only in particular cases of advanced stage of cultivation, it reached 30-50% at the end of cycle. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in all resistant infected pepper hybrids: yellowing or browning of apical leaves, which later become necrotic, long necrotic streakson stems, extending to the terminal shoots, complete necrosis of younger fruits and large necrotic streaks and spots on fruits formed after infection. On ripe fruits, yellow spots with concentric rings or necrotic streaks could be observed. Leaf extracts of these samples were tested in ELISA for the detection of TSWV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), Potato virus Y (PVY), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and Pepper Mottle Virus (PepMoV). Only TSWV was detected in all the field samples tested. The correspondent virus isolates were inoculated mechanically and by Frankliniella occidentalis on to a set of different pepper and tomato hybrids, as well as on some herbaceous test plants, in order to investigate for their ability to overcome the resistance genes Tsw and Sw5, respectively. Tomato hybrids carrying the Sw5 gene were uninfected by all RB isolates, whereas all resistant pepper hybrids became systemically infected. RB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when they were tested with the thrips F. occidentalis. Obtained results demonstrate that evolved strains of TSWV have emerged, that they are able to overcome the Tsw resistance gene in pepper plants experimentally inoculated both by mechanical infection and by the vector F. accidentalis. Moreover, evolved strains, here indicated as TSWV-RB-PI (Pepper, Italy), are not able to infect tomato plants carrying the Sw5 gene, confirming that distinct viral gene products control the outcome of infection in plants carrying Sw5 and Tsw. The simultaneous presence of evolved TSWV strains, showing the same biological characteristics (such as host range and symptomatology on different hosts) in two geographic areas of southern Italy, very far each other, let us hypothesize a unique focus of infection. Only subsequently, infected plants, through trade of plant material, have been diffused in locations so far apart. Further molecular studies are underway to assess the possible correlation between the different isolates in different geographical areas. PMID:25151838

  9. Complete nucleotide sequence of a Japanese isolate of Chrysanthemum virus B (genus Carlavirus).

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, A; Yamada, M; Sayama, H; Sugiyama, N; Okuda, S; Natsuaki, T

    2007-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a Chrysanthemum virus B isolate from Japan (CVB-S) has been determined. The genomic RNA of CVB-S is 8,990 nucleotides long, excluding the poly(A) tail and, like that of other carlaviruses, contains six open reading frames (ORFs). Multiple alignment and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the phylogenetic relationship among members of the genus Carlavirus is very diverse, with phlox virus S being the closest relative of CVB. In aphid transmission tests, CVB-S was transmitted at a very low rate by Aphis gossypii, a new vector of the virus. PMID:17726637

  10. Isolation of a protein kinase induced by herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, W.T.; Stobbs, D.G.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have isolated a new cyclic AMP-independent protein kinase activity induced in HeLa cells by infection with herpes simplex virus type 1. Induction of the enzyme does not occur in cells treated with cycloheximide at the time of infection, or in cells infected with UV-inactivated herpes simplex virus type 1. The amount of enzyme induced in infected cells is dependent upon the multiplicity of infection. An enzyme with identical properties to the appearing in infected HeLa cells is also induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 in BHK cells.

  11. Rapid identification of dengue virus isolates by using monoclonal antibodies in an indirect immunofluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Henchal, E A; McCown, J M; Seguin, M C; Gentry, M K; Brandt, W E

    1983-01-01

    Type-specific monoclonal antibodies prepared against the four dengue (DEN) virus serotypes were evaluated for their ability to identify low-passage human and mosquito isolates from Jamaica and West Africa by an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Serotyped human isolates from Jamaican dengue fever patients included 12 DEN-1, two DEN-2, and five DEN-4 viruses. Viruses from West Africa included 84 DEN-2 mosquito strains as well as two DEN-1 and one DEN-2 from humans. Results obtained using the immunofluorescence assay were consistent with virus identifications obtained using the more classical but costly and time-consuming plaque-reduction neutralization test. More viral isolates and higher virus yields were obtained using the C6/36 clone of Aedes albopictus cells rather than LLC-MK2 (monkey kidney) cells. Dengue type-specific monoclonal antibodies detected prototype viral antigens 24-48 hours postinfection in C6/36 cells. This is the first time that monoclonal antibodies have been used to serotype low-passage flavivirus isolates. PMID:6401944

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of surface proteins of novel H1N1 virus isolated from 2009 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Danishuddin, Mohd; Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2009-01-01

    Swine Influenza Virus (H1N1) is a known causative agent of swine flu. Transmission of Swine Influenza Virus form pig to human is not a common event and may not always cause human influenza. The 2009 outbreak by subtype H1N1 in humans is due to transfer of Swine Influenza Virus from pig to human. Thus to analyze the origin of this novel virus we compared two surface proteins (HA and NA) with influenza viruses of swine, avian and humans isolates recovered from 1918 to 2008 outbreaks. Phylogenetic analyses of hemagglutinin gene from 2009 pandemic found to be clustered with swine influenza virus (H1N2) circulated in U.S.A during the 1999-2004 outbreaks. Whereas, neuraminidase gene was clustered with H1N1 strains isolated from Europe and Asia during 1992-2007 outbreaks. This study concludes that the new H1N1 strain appeared in 2009 outbreak with high pathogenicity to human was originated as result of re-assortment (exchange of gene). Moreover, our data also suggest that the virus will remain sensitive to the pre-existing therapeutic strategies. PMID:20198180

  13. Virus isolations from sewage and from a stream receiving effluents of sewage treatment plants*

    PubMed Central

    Grinstein, Saul; Melnick, Joseph L.; Wallis, Craig

    1970-01-01

    In order to detect viruses in sewage or streams, it is first necessary to concentrate the virus present in the fluid sample. Available methods are not readily manageable for concentrating virus from large volumes of fluid, and have not always yielded high recovery rates. In the study described in this paper, a method for concentration of viruses by adsorption on insoluble cross-linked maleic anhydride polyelectrolytes has been utilized to survey the viral flora of sewage and of a stream receiving sewage effluents, in a residential area of Houston, Texas. On a single day the virus flow at different points along the stream varied from 304 000 to 6 014 000 PFU/min. From 84 samples each of 1 US gal, 14 520 isolates were obtained, chiefly echovirus type 7 and polioviruses of all 3 types, some of them with characteristics of virulent wild strains. With virus isolation rates as high as those achieved, it is now possible to monitor virus in natural waters more effectively. PMID:4315865

  14. [Genetic characterisation of Powassan virus (POWV) isolated from Haemophysalis longicornis ticks in Primorye and two strains of Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus): Alma-Arasan virus (AAV) isolated from Ixodes persulcatus ticks in Kazakhstan and Malyshevo virus isolated from Aedes vexans nipponii mosquitoes in Khabarovsk kray].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovski?, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Botikov, A G; Aristova, V A

    2014-01-01

    The complete genomes of the three tick-borne flaviviruses (genus Flavivirus, fam. Bunyaviridae) were sequenced: Povassan virus (POWV, strain LEIV-3070Prm, isolated from Haemophysalis logicornis in Primorsky Krai, Russia in 1977), Alma-Arasan virus (AAV, strain LEIV-1380Kaz, isolated from Ixodes persulcatus ticks in Kazakhstan in 1977) and Malyshevo virus (isolated from a pool of Aedes vexans nipponii mosquitoes, in the Khabarovsk Krai, Russia in 1978). It is shown that AAV and Malyshevo virus are the strains of Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and belong to Sibirian and Far-Eastern genotypes, respectively (GenBank ID: AAV KJ744033; strain Malyshevo KJ744034). Phylogenetically AAV is closest related (94,6% nt and 98,3% aa identity) to TBEV strains, isolated in Sibiria (Vasilchenko, Aino, Chita-653, Irkutsk-12). Malyshevo virus is closest related (96,4% nt and 98,3% nt identity) to strains of TBEV, isolated in Far Eastern part of Russia (1230, Spassk-72, Primorye-89). POWV LEIV-3070Prm has 99.7% identity with the prototype strain POWV LB, isolated in Canada and 99.5% of isolates with Far-Eastern strains of POWV (Spassk-9 and Nadezdinsk-1991). PMID:25895206

  15. Molecular Characteristics of H6N6 Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigeons in Guangxi, Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Xie, Zhiqin; Luo, Sisi; Xie, Liji; Huang, Li; Deng, Xianwen; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an H6N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) isolated from a pigeon in Guangxi, southern China, in 2014. The eight RNA segment genes shared a high nucleotide identity (97 to 99%) with H6N6 subtypes of AIV isolated from ducks in the regions around Guangxi Province. The finding of this study will help us understand the ecology and molecular characteristics of H6 avian influenza virus in wild birds in southern China. PMID:26634763

  16. Molecular Characteristics of H6N6 Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigeons in Guangxi, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Xie, Zhixun; Xie, Zhiqin; Luo, Sisi; Xie, Liji; Huang, Li; Deng, Xianwen; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an H6N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) isolated from a pigeon in Guangxi, southern China, in 2014. The eight RNA segment genes shared a high nucleotide identity (97 to 99%) with H6N6 subtypes of AIV isolated from ducks in the regions around Guangxi Province. The finding of this study will help us understand the ecology and molecular characteristics of H6 avian influenza virus in wild birds in southern China. PMID:26634763

  17. Characterisation of the welsh onion isolate of Shallot yellow stripe virus from China.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Wei, C-B; Zheng, H-Y; Shi, Y-H; Adams, M J; Lin, L; Zhang, Q-Y; Wang, S-J; Chen, J-P

    2005-10-01

    The host range and nucleotide sequence of shallot yellow stripe virus (SYSV) from welsh onion in Shandong province, China is described. Of the plants tested, only shallot and welsh onion became infected but most shallot plants were symptomless. The complete sequence of one isolate (10429 nt) and the 3'-terminal 3540 nts of a second isolate were determined. They had c. 90% nt identity to one another and to published (partial) sequences of SYSV. SYSV was most closely related to onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV) and resembled it in having a much larger P3 protein than other species in the genus. PMID:15968472

  18. Pathogenesis and Transmission of Feral Swine Pseudorabies Virus Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Aujesky’s Disease or pseudorabies, is one of the oldest recognized swine diseases. It is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV), an alpha-herpesvirus that can induce respiratory disease, reproductive failure, and affect the central nervous system. PRV vaccines, in conjunction with serologi...

  19. Genetic Characterization of the Influenza A Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus Isolates from India

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Varsha A.; Chadha, Mandeep S.; Jadhav, Santosh M.; Mullick, Jayati; Cherian, Sarah S.; Mishra, Akhilesh C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Influenza A pandemic H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm) virus appeared in India in May 2009 and thereafter outbreaks with considerable morbidity and mortality have been reported from many parts of the country. Continuous monitoring of the genetic makeup of the virus is essential to understand its evolution within the country in relation to global diversification and to track the mutations that may affect the behavior of the virus. Methods H1N1pdm viruses were isolated from both recovered and fatal cases representing major cities and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of six concatenated whole genomes and the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of seven more isolates from May-September 2009 was performed with reference to 685 whole genomes of global isolates available as of November 24, 2009. Molecular characterization of all the 8 segments was carried out for known pathogenic markers. Results The first isolate of May 2009 belonged to clade 5. Although clade 7 was the dominant H1N1pdm lineage in India, both clades 6 and 7 were found to be co-circulating. The neuraminidase of all the Indian isolates possessed H275, the marker for sensitivity to the neuraminidase inhibitor Oseltamivir. Some of the mutations in HA are at or in the vicinity of antigenic sites and may therefore be of possible antigenic significance. Among these a D222G mutation in the HA receptor binding domain was found in two of the eight Indian isolates obtained from fatal cases. Conclusions The majority of the 13 Indian isolates grouped in the globally most widely circulating H1N1pdm clade 7. Further, correlations of the mutations specific to clade 7 Indian isolates to viral fitness and adaptability in the country remains to be understood. The D222G mutation in HA from isolates of fatal cases needs to be studied for pathogenicity. PMID:20300625

  20. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: Monophyletic origin of European isolates from North American Genogroup M

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enzmann, P.-J.; Kurath, G.; Fichtner, D.; Bergmann, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was first detected in Europe in 1987 in France and Italy, and later, in 1992, in Germany. The source of the virus and the route of introduction are unknown. The present study investigates the molecular epidemiology of IHNV outbreaks in Germany since its first introduction. The complete nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein (G) and non-virion (NV) genes from 9 IHNV isolates from Germany have been determined, and this has allowed the identification of characteristic differences between these isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of partial G gene sequences (mid-G, 303 nucleotides) from North American IHNV isolates (Kurath et al. 2003) has revealed 3 major genogroups, designated U, M and L. Using this gene region with 2 different North American IHNV data sets, it was possible to group the European IHNV strains within the M genogroup, but not in any previously defined subgroup. Analysis of the full length G gene sequences indicated that an independent evolution of IHN viruses had occurred in Europe. IHN viruses in Europe seem to be of a monophyletic origin, again most closely related to North American isolates in the M genogroup. Analysis of the NV gene sequences also showed the European isolates to be monophyletic, but resolution of the 3 genogroups was poor with this gene region. As a result of comparative sequence analyses, several different genotypes have been identified circulating in Europe. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  1. Receptor specificity of subtype H1 influenza A viruses isolated from swine and humans in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evolution of receptor specificity of classical swine influenza viruses leading to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was analyzed in glycan microarrays. Classical influenza viruses from the alpha, beta, and gamma antigenic clusters isolated between 1945 and 2009 revealed a binding profile very simila...

  2. Biological and molecular variation of Iranian Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) isolates.

    PubMed

    Farzadfar, Shirin; Pourrahim, Reza

    2013-10-01

    Seventeen provinces of Iran were surveyed during 2003-2012 to find Brassicaceae hosts of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV). A total 397 samples were collected from plants with virus-like symptoms. Among those tested by ELISA, 255 samples (67.2 %) were found to be infected with CaMV. Mechanical transmission tests showed that the Iranian isolates have similar biological properties on a number of Brassica and Raphanus plant species and cultivars tested. However, the isolates varied in the severity of symptoms they induced and in the capacity to infect B. oleracea var. capitata, on the basis of which they were grouped into two distinct biotypes L/MMo (latent/mild mottle) and severe (S) infection. The molecular diversity of natural population of CaMV were investigated based on the complete sequences of OFR 6 of 36 Iranian isolates collected from different geographically distant regions in Iran alongside the sequences of 14 previously reported isolates. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Iranian CaMV isolates belong to two groups (GI and GII). Most of the Iranian isolates fell into GI with other exotic isolates; however, the isolates from North-East Iran with Xinjiang from China fell into GII. The phylogenetic group GII (the North-East Iranian isolates) closely corresponded to the S biological group however other Iranian isolates corresponded to the L/MMo biological group. The within-population diversity was lower than the between population diversity suggesting the contribution of a founder effect on diversification of CaMV isolates. The Iranian isolates were differentiated from other exotic CaMV isolates and clustered into two RFLP groups using Hpy99I which closely corresponded to the biological and phylogenetic groups. This study showed the evolutionary process in CaMV isolates is shaped by a combination of host range differentiation and nucleotide substitution using the approach of population genetics. PMID:23828619

  3. Use of ultrafiltration to isolate viruses from seawater which are pathogens of marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Suttle, C A; Chan, A M; Cottrell, M T

    1991-03-01

    Viruses may be major structuring elements of phytoplankton communities and hence important regulators of nutrient and energy fluxes in aquatic environments. In order to ascertain whether viruses are potentially important in dictating phytoplankton community structure, it is essential to determine the extent to which representative phytoplankton taxa are susceptible to viral infection. We used a spiral ultrafiltration cartridge (30,000-molecular-weight cutoff) to concentrate viruses from seawater at efficiencies approaching 100%. Natural virus communities were concentrated from stations in the Gulf of Mexico, a barrier island pass, and a hypersaline lagoon (Laguna Madre) and added to cultures of potential phytoplankton hosts. By following changes in in vivo fluorescence over time, it was possible to isolate several viruses that were pathogens to a variety of marine phytoplankton, including a prasinophyte (Micromonas pusilla), a pennate diatom (likely a Navicula sp.), a centric diatom (of unknown taxa), and a chroococcoid cyanobacterium (a Synechococcus sp.). As well, we observed changes in fluorescence in cultures of a cryptophyte (a Rhodomonas sp.) and a chlorophyte (Nannochloropsis oculata) which were consistent with the presence of viral pathogens. Although pathogens were isolated from all stations, all the pathogens were not isolated from every station. Filterability studies on the viruses infecting M. pusilla and the Navicula sp. showed that the viruses were consistently infective after filtration through polycarbonate and glass-fiber filters but were affected by most other filter types. Establishment of phytoplankton-pathogen systems will be important in elucidating the effect that viruses have on primary producers in aquatic systems. PMID:16348439

  4. Isolation and characterization of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) was isolated from dairy buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) naturally affected with respiratory and reproductive clinical conditions. Results Examination of nasal and vaginal swabs collected from 12 diseased buffaloes led to the isolation of three paramyxovirus isolates from two animals. Antigenic, morphological and biological characteristics of these three isolates were essentially similar to those of members of the Paramyxoviridae family. Antigenic analysis by direct immunofluorescence and cross neutralization test placed these isolates together with bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3). Nucleotide and amino acid phylogenetic analysis of partial matrix gene sequences of the buffalo isolates and six field BPIV3 isolates from bovines in Argentina were studied. Buffalo isolates were similar to genotype B (BPIV3b) while the six BPIV3 isolates were similar to genotypes A (BPIV3a) and C (BPIV3c). Conclusions This is the first characterization of BPIV3 in water buffalo. According to the samples analyzed, in Argentina, the genotype B was found in buffalo and the genotypes A and C were found in cattle. PMID:22716217

  5. Isolation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Novel Viruses Infecting the Phytoplankton Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Brussaard, C. P. D.; Short, S. M.; Frederickson, C. M.; Suttle, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    Viruses infecting the harmful bloom-causing alga Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae) were readily isolated from Dutch coastal waters (southern North Sea) in 2000 and 2001. Our data show a large increase in the abundance of putative P. globosa viruses during blooms of P. globosa, suggesting that viruses are an important source of mortality for this alga. In order to examine genetic relatedness among viruses infecting P. globosa and other phytoplankton, DNA polymerase gene (pol) fragments were amplified and the inferred amino acid sequences were phylogenetically analyzed. The results demonstrated that viruses infecting P. globosa formed a closely related monophyletic group within the family Phycodnaviridae, with at least 96.9% similarity to each other. The sequences grouped most closely with others from viruses that infect the prymnesiophyte algae Chrysochromulina brevifilum and Chrysochromulina strobilus. Whether the P. globosa viruses belong to the genus Prymnesiovirus or form a separate group needs further study. Our data suggest that, like their phytoplankton hosts, the Chrysochromulina and Phaeocystis viruses share a common ancestor and that these prymnesioviruses and their algal host have coevolved. PMID:15184176

  6. Isolation of virus from brain after immunosuppression of mice with latent herpes simplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastrukoff, Lorne; Long, Carol; Doherty, Peter C.; Wroblewska, Zofia; Koprowski, Hilary

    1981-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is usually present in a latent form in the trigeminal ganglion of man1-3. Various stress factors may induce virus reactivation, which is manifest by a lip lesion (innervated from the trigeminal ganglion) and the production of infectious virus. The considerable experimental efforts to define the conditions that lead to the reactivation of latent HSV have concentrated on isolating virus either from the original extraneural site of virus inoculation, or from cell-free homogenates of sensory ganglia from latently infected animals4-15. Recent DNA hybridization experiments resulted in the demonstration of the presence of HSV genomes in the brain tissue of both latently infected mice, and of humans who showed no clinical symptoms of HSV (ref. 16 and N. Fraser, personal communication). This led us to consider the possibility that HSV may be present in brain tissue as the result of either reactivation of the virus in brain cells or the passage of reactivated virus from trigeminal ganglia through the brain stem to the brain. The presence of infectious HSV in brain tissue has not previously been demonstrated; yet this could be a factor in chronic, relapsing neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis. We have now shown experimentally that mice carrying latent HSV in their trigeminal ganglia may, following massive immunosuppression, express infectious virus in the central nervous system (CNS).

  7. FBJ osteosarcoma virus in tissue culture. III. Isolation and characterization of non-virus-producing FBJ-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A; Kazan, P L; Reilly, C A; Finkel, M P

    1978-01-01

    Hamster and rat cell lines have been established that have been transformed by FBJ murine sarcoma virus (FBJ-MuSV) but that do not produce virus. The hamster cell line originated from an osteosarcoma that appeared in a hamster inoculated at birth with an extract of a CFNo1 mouse FBJ-osteosarcoma. The rat cell line was obtained by transferring the FBJ-MuSV genome to normal rat kidney cells in the absence of the FBJ type C virus (FBJ-MuLV), which, usually in high concentration, accompanies the FBJ-MuSV. Both transformed hamster and rat cell lines contain the FBJ-MuSV genome, which can be rescued by ecotropic and xenotropic murine type C viruses. This rescued genome produces characteristic FBJ-MuSV foci in tissue culture and, in appropriate animal hosts, induces osteosarcomas typical of those induced by FBJ-MuSV. FBJ-MuSV was isolated originally from a parosteal osteosarcoma that occurred naturally in a mouse. Since there was no previous history of passage of the agent through any other animal species, these non-virus-producing hamster and rat cells transformed by FBJ-MuSV should be very helpful in molecular studies examining the origin of spontaneous sarcoma genomes in mice. PMID:206718

  8. 'Kwanzan Stunting' syndrome: detection and molecular characterization of an Italian isolate of Little cherry virus 1.

    PubMed

    Matic, Slavica; Minafra, Angelantonio; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A; Pallás, Vicente; Myrta, Arben; Martelli, Giovanni P

    2009-07-01

    Evident stunting was observed for the first time on Prunus serrulata 'Kwanzan' indicator trees in Southern Italy during the indexing of two sour cherry accessions from cultivars 'Marasca di Verona' and 'Spanska'. Bud break and shooting were delayed and the developing leaves remained small. During the third year many Kwanzan plants died, regardless of the indexed cultivar. Electrophoretic analysis showed the presence of dsRNA pattern in extracts of stunted Kwanzan with a similar size to that of viruses of the family Closteroviridae. An identical pattern of more abundant dsRNA bands was obtained from GF305 seedlings grafted with the same sour cherry accessions. Observations by electron microscopy revealed the presence of long flexuous virus particles in both indicators (Kwanzan and GF305), characteristic of closteroviruses. Subsequent cloning work, starting from the dsRNA extracts of cultivar Marasca di Verona grafted on GF305 indicator, yielded 7 different clones, all showing high identity to the Little cherry virus 1 genome. Full sequencing of this virus isolate (ITMAR) was then done resulting in a complete genome composed of 16,936nt. Primers designed on the obtained sequences for RT-PCR detection confirmed the presence of Little cherry virus 1 in Kwanzan and GF305 trees, inoculated with both sour cherry cultivars. Phylogenetic analysis of the minor coat protein grouped virus isolates into two clusters: one including Italian isolates of sweet cherry, Japanese plum, peach and almond, together with German sweet cherry UW1 isolate, and a second one containing the Italian isolates of sour cherry (ITMAR and ITSPA), that were found associated with strong symptoms of 'Kwanzan Stunting'. PMID:19463722

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Human Isolate from the 2000 Israel West Nile virus Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Rambaut, Andrew; Pathmajeyan, Melissa; Bishara, Jihad; Weinberger, Miriam; Pitlik, Silvio; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2002-01-01

    Specimens from a patient of the 2000 Israel West Nile virus epidemic were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Products corresponding to E, NS3, and NS5 sequences were amplified from cerebellar but not from cortical samples. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a closer relationship of this isolate to 1996 Romanian and 1999 Russian than to 1998-99 Israeli or 1999 New York isolates. PMID:11996693

  10. Isolation and Genetic Characterization of Mangshi Virus: A Newly Discovered Seadornavirus of the Reoviridae Family Found in Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinglin; Li, Huachun; He, Yuwen; Zhou, Yang; Meng, Jingxing; Zhu, Wuyang; Chen, Hongyu; Liao, Defang; Man, Yunping

    2015-01-01

    Background Seadornavirus is a genus of viruses in the family Reoviridae, which consists of Banna virus, Kadipiro virus, and Liao ning virus. Banna virus is considered a potential pathogen for zoonotic diseases. Here, we describe a newly discovered Seadornavirus isolated from mosquitos (Culex tritaeniorhynchus) in Yunnan Province, China, which is related to Banna virus, and referred to as Mangshi virus. Methods and Results The Mangshi virus was isolated by cell culture in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells, in which it replicated and caused cytopathic effects, but not in mammalian BHK-21 or Vero cells. Polyacrylamide gel analysis revealed a genome consisting of 12 segments of double-stranded RNA, with a “6–4–2” pattern in which the migrating bands were different from those of the Banna virus. Complete genome sequencing was performed by full-length amplification of cDNAs. Sequence analysis showed that seven highly conserved nucleotides and three highly conserved nucleotides were present at the ends of the 5′- and 3′-UTRs in each of 12 genome segments. The amino acid identities of Mangshi virus shared with Balaton virus varied from 27.3% (VP11) to 72.3% (VP1) with Banna virus varying from 18.0% (VP11) to 63.9% (VP1). Phylogenetic analysis based on amino acid sequences demonstrated that Mangshi virus is a member of the genus Seadornavirus and is most closely related to, but distinct from, Balaton virus and Banna virus in the genus Seadornavirus of the family Reoviridae. Conclusion Mangshi virus isolated from mosquitoes (C. tritaeniorhynchus) was identified as a newly discovered virus in the genus Seadornavirus and is phylogenetically close to Banna virus, suggesting that there is genetic diversity of seadornaviruses in tropical and subtropical areas of Southeast Asia. PMID:26630378

  11. Ilheus Virus Isolation in the Pantanal, West-Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Kenney, Joan L.; Couto-Lima, Dinair; Campos, Zilca M. S.; Nogueira, Rita M. R.; Brault, Aaron C.; Komar, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The wetlands of the Brazilian Pantanal host large concentrations of diverse wildlife species and hematophagous arthropods, conditions that favor the circulation of zoonotic arboviruses. A recent study from the Nhecolândia sub-region of Pantanal reported serological evidence of various flaviviruses, including West Nile virus and Ilheus virus (ILHV). According to the age of seropositive horses, at least three flaviviruses, including ILHV, circulated in the Brazilian Pantanal between 2005 and 2009. To extend this study, we collected 3,234 adult mosquitoes of 16 species during 2009 and 2010 in the same sub-region. Mosquito pool homogenates were assayed for infectious virus on C6/36 and Vero cell monolayers and also tested for flaviviral RNA by a group-specific real-time RT-PCR. One pool containing 50 non-engorged female specimens of Aedes scapularis tested positive for ILHV by culture and for ILHV RNA by real-time RT-PCR, indicating a minimum infection rate of 2.5 per 1000. Full-length genomic sequence exhibited 95% identity to the only full genome sequence available for ILHV. The present data confirm the circulation of ILHV in the Brazilian Pantanal. PMID:23875051

  12. Isolations of Potosi virus from mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) collected in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Philip M; Andreadis, Theodore G; Anderson, John F; Main, Andrew J

    2005-09-01

    Potosi virus (POTV) (Bunyaviridae: Orthobunyavirus) was first isolated from Aedes albopictus (Skuse) collected in Potosi, MO, in 1989, and subsequent isolations were reported from Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, and the Carolinas. To determine whether the distribution of this virus extends into the northeastern United States, we analyzed arboviruses acquired from mosquitoes collected in Connecticut from 1998 to 2004. In 2001, a bunyavirus was isolated from Aedes vexans (Meigen) that was different from other arboviruses known to occur in Connecticut by cross-neutralization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. Nucleotide and encoded amino acid sequences of a portion of the G2 envelope gene were 99 and 100% similar to POTV, respectively, yet distinct from indigenous strains of Jamestown Canyon (JCV), Cache Valley (CVV), and Trivittatus virus (TVTV). Viral isolates obtained from the statewide surveillance program were retested by RT-PCR coupled with restriction enzyme analysis to distinguish POTV from other bunyaviruses. POTV isolates, previously typed by neutralization, were correctly identified by RT-PCR; however, many isolates classified as JCV or CVV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay proved to be POTV by molecular assays. In total, 92 strains of POTV were isolated from 12 mosquito species in 2000, 2001, and 2003, whereas POTV was not detected in mosquitoes sampled during 1998, 1999, 2002, and 2004. Viral isolation rates were highest for Anopheles punctipennis (Say) (3.2-11.3 infection rate per 1,000 mosquitoes), whereas the greatest number of isolates came from Ochlerotatus trivittatus (Coquillett) (8-16 isolates). This finding represents the first detection of POTV in the northeastern United States where it infects a diverse array of mosquito species. PMID:16363172

  13. Differential pathogenicity among Tomato leaf curl Gujarat virus isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Punam; Kumar, R Vinoth; Chakraborty, S

    2013-12-01

    Tomato leaf curl Gujarat virus (ToLCGV) has been identified as one of the most destructive pathogens causing tomato leaf curl disease (ToLCD) in India. In the tomato growing regions of Dhanbad and Ramgarh, plants bearing severe symptoms of ToLCD such as leaf curling, leaf crinkling, yellowing and leaf rolling was observed in the farmer fields. The association of begomovirus in these samples was confirmed by PCR and the causal viruses were identified as the isolates of ToLCGV. However, association of cognate DNA B component could not be ascertained from these samples. Indeed, like other Old World begomoviruses, the present ToLCGV isolates were found to be associated with a particular betasatellite, Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand betasatellite (TYLCTHB). Although DNA A of both ToLCGV isolates could alone infect tomato inducing systemic symptoms, the difference in virulence was observed. Co-inoculation of TYLCTHB reduced the incubation period without influencing the accumulation of helper virus DNA and hence, differential pathogenesis among ToLCGV isolates was governed by the helper component rather than betasatellite. ToLCGV infection with DNA B increases the accumulation of DNA A component of Dhanbad isolate but not of Ramgarh isolate. Results indicated that the begomovirus identified from Ramgarh sample was a mild strain of ToLCGV. PMID:24026875

  14. Molecular typing and phylogenetic analysis of classical swine fever virus isolates from Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Nimisha; Ravishankar, Chintu; Rajasekhar, R; Sumod, K; Sumithra, T G; John, Koshy; Mini, M; Ravindran, Reghu; Shaji, Shiju; Aishwarya, J

    2015-12-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically important disease of pigs caused by CSF virus (CSFV) belonging to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. The disease is endemic in many countries including India. A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the type of CSFV circulating in the South Indian state of Kerala. During the period 2013-2014, clinical samples were collected from 19 suspected CSF outbreaks of domestic pigs in different districts of Kerala. The samples were tested using nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) targeting the E2 gene and RT-PCR for 5'UTR of the virus. Partial 5' UTR and E2 gene regions of six CSFV isolates were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the CSFV isolates belonged to subgroup 2.2. The isolates showed close resemblance to the other CSFV isolates circulating in India. It was also observed that the CSFV viruses from Kannur district were distinct from those circulating in the other districts as evidenced by their divergence from other Kerala isolates in the phylogenetic tree. Close relationship was seen to the CSFV isolates from South East Asian countries. PMID:26645036

  15. Specific Insect-Virus Interactions Are Responsible for Variation in Competency of Different Thrips tabaci Isolines to Transmit Different Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Alana L.; Kennedy, George G.

    2013-01-01

    Local adaptation between sympatric host and parasite populations driven by vector genetics appears to be a factor that influences dynamics of disease epidemics and evolution of insect-vectored viruses. Although T. tabaci is the primary vector of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in some areas of the world, it is not an important vector of this economically important plant virus in many areas where it occurs. Previous studies suggest that genetic variation of thrips populations, virus isolates, or both are important factors underlying the localized importance of this species as a vector of TSWV. This study was undertaken to quantify variation in transmissibility of TSWV isolates by T. tabaci, in the ability of T. tabaci to transmit isolates of TSWV, and to examine the possibility that genetic interactions and local adaptation contribute to the localized nature of this species as a vector of TSWV. Isofemale lines of Thrips tabaci from multiple locations were tested for their ability to transmit multiple TSWV isolates collected at the same and different locations as the thrips. Results revealed that the probability of an isofemale line transmitting TSWV varied among virus isolates, and the probability of an isolate being transmitted varied among isofemale lines. These results indicate that the interaction of T. tabaci and TSWV isolate genetic determinants underlie successful transmission of TSWV by T. tabaci. Further analysis revealed sympatric vector-virus pairing resulted in higher transmission than allopatric pairing, which suggests that local adaptation is occurring between T. tabaci and TSWV isolates. PMID:23358707

  16. Fractionation of DNA nucleotide transcripts from Moloney sarcoma virus and isolation of sarcoma virus-specific complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, A E; Neubauer, R L; Fischinger, P J

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive DNA complementary to nucleotide sequences in Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MSV) and Moloney leukemia virus (M-MuLV) complex was made by the endogenous reverse transcriptase reaction. These virus stocks contained a threefold excess of MSV over M-MuLV as measured by biological assay. The complementary DNA was an accurate copy of the viral RNA in that 86% of 35S viral RNA hybridized with complementary (cDNA) DNA at a 1.5 to 1 cDNA-RNA molar ratio. The complementary DNA, of a 4-6S size, was fractionated by sequential absorptions with MulV and the feline leukemia virus pseudotype of MSV, [MSV(FeLV)] RNA. In this manner three sets of nucleotide sequences whichrepresent different portions of the MSV viral complex were obtained: a sarcoma virus-specific fraction (cDNAsarc) with sequences that had no homology to M-MuLV RNA but which hybridized to MSV (FeLV) RNA, a sarcoma-leukemia fraction (cDNA common) with sequences common to MSV as well as M-MuLV viral RNA, and a cDNAleuk representing those nucleotide sequences found only in M-MuLV. Hybridization of MSV-MuLV viral 35S RNA with a threefold molar excess of cDNA's revealed that approximately 20% was hybridized with cDNAsarc, whereas approximately 75% was hybridized with cDNAcommon. M-MuLV 35S RNA alone did not hybridize with cDNAsarc but did hybridize 40 and 50% with cDNAleuk and cDNAcommon, respectively. The cDNAsarc represents about 25% of the total MSV sequences, whereas the cDNAcommon represents the remainder of the MSV virus genome. Some cDNAcommon sequences were shared by two other sarcoma viruses and several distinctly different isolates of MulV. In contrast, the MSV "sarc" sequences had little or no homology with two other murine sarcoma virus isolates. PMID:178890

  17. Isolation of mixed subtypes of influenza A virus from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sagar M; Jindal, Naresh; Chander, Yogesh; Ramakrishnan, Muthanan A; Redig, Patrick T; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2010-01-01

    From April 2007 to March 2008, cloacal swabs were obtained from 246 casualty raptors recovered by various wildlife rehabilitation centers in the United States. The swabs were placed in a virus transport medium and transported to the laboratory on ice packs. At the laboratory, the samples were pooled with each pool consisting of five samples. All pools (n = 50) were screened for the presence of avian influenza virus (AIV) using a real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR); one of the pools was found positive. All five samples in this pool were tested individually by rRT-PCR; one sample from a bald eagle was found positive. This sample was inoculated in embryonated chicken eggs for virus isolation and a hemagglutinating virus was isolated. Complete genome sequencing of the isolate revealed a mixed infection with H1N1 and H2N1 subtypes. Further analysis revealed that the PB1-F2 gene sequence of H1N1 virus had the N66S virulence-associated substitution. Further studies on ecology and epidemiology of AIV in raptors are needed to help understand their role in the maintenance and evolution of AIV. PMID:20667110

  18. Complete genome sequence of nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus reveals its relationship to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ravendra P; Rajakaruna, Punsasi; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2015-03-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained from nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus (CaYSV). CaYSV belongs to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses with johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) as its closest relative. Multiple sequence alignments showed a pattern of amino acid substitutions in the CP sequences, which enabled us to relate these isolates to South East Asian or European isolates. Biological characterization of CaYSV identified Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa and Phaseolus vulgaris as experimental hosts. Given the popularity and global trade of cannas, a clear picture of the genetic diversity of CaYSV is critical to disease management. PMID:25567205

  19. Genetic relationship between the HA genes of type A influenza viruses isolated in off-seasons and later epidemic seasons.

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nishikawa, F.; Nakajima, K.

    1991-01-01

    From January 1985 to March 1989, off-season viruses of H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes of influenza A viruses were isolated on five occasions in Japan. The HA gene sequences of the influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) viruses isolated in Japan from 1985-9 were analysed and the phylogenetic tree for each subtype virus was constructed to determine any genetic relationship between viruses isolated in off-seasons and the epidemic viruses of the following influenza seasons. In one instance with H1N1 viruses in 1986 and in two instances with H3N2 viruses in 1985 and 1987, the spring isolates were genetically close to some of the winter isolates and were considered to be the parental viruses of the following influenza seasons. However, even in these cases, influenza viruses of the same subtype with different lineages co-circulated in Japan. PMID:2019304

  20. Isolation of animal viruses from farm livestock waste, soil and water.

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, J. B.; Brown, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    Ten porcine enteroviruses, 2 porcine adenoviruses and 1 coronavirus were isolated directly from 32 samples of slurry collected from a pig fattening house. Concentration of the same samples by adsorption with the polyelectrolyte PE-60 yielded 24 porcine enteroviruses and 3 porcine adenoviruses. A porcine enterovirus was isolated, following PE-60 concentration, from 1 to 6 slurry samples from a sow farrowing house. No virus was isolated from 12 samples of slurry from dairy cows nor from 6 slurry samples from a calf-rearing unit. A porcine enterovirus was isolated from soil samples, after concentration with PE-60, collected 1, 2 and 8 days after pig slurry was spread on hay stubble. Two porcine enteroviruses were isolated by membrane filtration from 26 samples of surface run-off from land on which pig slurry was routinely spread, and 2 bovine enteroviruses were isolated from cattle feedlot run-off after adsorption to layers of talc and celite followed by hydroextraction. A porcine enterovirus was also isolated from 1 of 33 samples of surface water collected on farms on which pig slurry was routinely spread on the land, but no virus was isolated from 36 samples of ground water from the same farms. The surface water and ground water samples were concentrated by talc-celite adsorption and hydroextraction. PMID:100551

  1. Genetic characterization of Arrabida virus, a novel phlebovirus isolated in South Portugal.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Fátima; Hanke, Dennis; Zé-Zé, Líbia; Alves, Maria João; Becker, Stefanie C; Höper, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    In order to detect phleboviruses' natural infection in sandflies, an entomological survey was carried out, from May to October in 2007 and 2008, in Arrábida region in the south of Portugal. The isolation of a new phlebovirus was achieved after inoculation of a sandfly pool homogenate in Vero E6 cells. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome sequences from the Small, Medium and Large, segments obtained with Next Generation sequencing, we can assume that the new phlebovirus, provisionally named Arrabida virus, is closely related to Massilia, Granada and Punique viruses. This is the first isolation of a sandfly-borne phlebovirus from the Sandfly Naples Fever Virus group in Portugal. Further investigation is needed in order to assess the importance of this phlebovirus for Public Health. PMID:26795868

  2. Complete genome sequences of new emerging Newcastle disease virus strains isolated from China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains were isolated from geese in China during 2010 to 2011. The complete sequences of two NDV strains and the sequences of the envelop glyprotein genes (F and HN) of three other strains were determined. Phylogenetic analysis classified then into a new g...

  3. Neurological lesions in chickens experimentally infected with virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distribution, character, and severity of lesions were evaluated in tissues from the central nervous system of chickens inoculated with 10 different Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates: CA 1083, Korea 97-147, Australia (all velogenic viscerotropic); Texas GB and Turkey North Dakota (both velogenic...

  4. Complete genome sequence of an Argentinean isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of an Argentinean isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3ArgSF) obtained from the Santa Fe region of Argentina was sequenced in entirety. Assembly of 9 overlapping fragments yielded a consensus genome sequence 10,386 nucleotides long, excluding the poly(A) tail present on the 3' en...

  5. Avian influenza virus with Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase combination H8N8, isolated in Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the genome sequence of an avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H8N8 isolated in Russia. The genome analysis shows that all genes belong to AIV Eurasian lineages. The PB2 gene was similar to a Mongolian low pathogenic (LP) AIV H7N1 and a Chinese high pathogenic (HP) AIV H5N2....

  6. Hemagglutinin Receptor Binding of a Human Isolate of Influenza A(H10N8) Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Mena; Wohlbold, Teddy J.; Ermler, Megan E.; Hirsh, Ariana; Runstadler, Jonathan A.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Three cases of influenza A(H10N8) virus infection in humans have been reported; 2 of these infected persons died. Characterization of the receptor binding pattern of H10 hemagglutinin from avian and human isolates showed that both interact weakly with human-like receptors and maintain strong affinity for avian-like receptors. PMID:26079843

  7. Molecular analysis of complete genomic sequences of four isolates of Gooseberry vein banding associated virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presence of Gooseberry vein banding associated virus (GVBaV), a badnavirus in the family Caulimoviridae, is strongly correlated with gooseberry vein banding disease in Ribes spp. In this study, full-length genomic sequences of four GVBaV isolates from different hosts and geographic regions were det...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Novel Pseudorabies Virus Strain HNB Isolated in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Teng; Chen, Fangzhou; Ku, Xugang; Zhu, Yinxing; Ma, Hailong; Li, Subei

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel pseudorabies virus, strain HNB, isolated from a dead weaned pig in China, was determined using next-generation sequencing. The viral genome sequence of HNB shared 90.6% nucleotide similarity with that of the traditional vaccine strain, the Bartha strain. PMID:26823587

  9. Biological and molecular characterization of a US isolate of Hosta virus X

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hosta virus X (HVX) is rapidly becoming a serious pathogen of commercially important hosta plants worldwide. We report here a biological and molecular characterization of a US isolate of HVX, HVX-37. HVX-37 infectivity was tested in 21 hosta cultivars over three growth seasons, and three types of re...

  10. H7 avian influenza virus vaccines protect chickens against challenge with antigenically diverse isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination has been a critical tool in the control of some avian influenza viruses (AIV) and has been used routinely in Pakistan to help control sporadic outbreaks of highly pathogenic (HP) H7 AIV since 1995. During that time, several AIV isolates were utilized as inactivated vaccines with varying...

  11. Molecular detection and characterization of Chinese Yam mild mosaic virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An improved RT-PCR was developed and validated to be sensitive and reliable for the detection of Yam mild mosaic virus (YMMV). Sequences of coat protein core region of 19 Chinese isolates were obtained, and analysis indicated the presence of different genetic variants. Phylogenetic analyses showed t...

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Japanese Eel Endothelial Cell-Infecting Virus Strains Isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Yuki; Okazaki, Sachiko; Katayama, Yukie; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Ono, Shin-Ichi; Mizutani, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Japanese eel endothelial cell-infecting virus (JEECV) causes viral endothelial cell necrosis of eel (VECNE), resulting in severe economic losses in eel aquaculture in Japan. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two new JEECV strains isolated from farmed Japanese eels. PMID:26564031

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Isolated in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Medina, J. E.; Monroy-Muñoz, I. E.; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, A.; Meza-Chávez, A.; Ángeles-Martínez, J.; Anguiano-Hernández, Y. M.; Santacruz-Tinoco, C. E.; González-Ibarra, J.; Martínez-Miguel, B.; Alvarado-Yaah, J. E.; Palomec-Nava, I. D.; Ortiz-Alcántara, J. M.; Garcés-Ayala, F.; Díaz-Quiñonez, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, which causes lower respiratory tract infections in neonates and children younger than 5 years. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of HRSV, isolated from a nasopharyngeal swab of a pregnant woman with cardiac complications. PMID:26769933

  14. Molecular Diversity of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus-2 Isolates in Pacific Northwest Vineyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One hundred and five isolates of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus-2 (GLRaV-2) collected from vineyard blocks located in different geographical regions of Washington and Oregon states were characterized based on coat protein (CP) and heat-shock protein 70 homologue (HSP-70h) gene sequences. The re...

  15. Genome Sequence and Attenuating Mutations in West Nile Virus Isolate from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. Todd; Estrada-Franco, Jose; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Campomanes-Cortes, Arturo; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Barrett, Alan D.T.

    2004-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a Mexican West Nile virus isolate, TM171-03, included 46 nucleotide (0.42%) and 4 amino acid (0.11%) differences from the NY99 prototype. Mouse virulence differences between plaque-purified variants of TM171-03 with mutations at the E protein glycosylation motif suggest the emergence of an attenuating mutation. PMID:15663867

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a Variant Pseudorabies Virus Strain Isolated in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shuangshuang; Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Xule; Li, Yingying; Zhang, Chaolin; Wang, Juan; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) variants have been prevalent in China since 2011 and have caused huge economic losses to the Chinese pig industry. Here, we report the genome sequence of a PRV variant HN1201 that was isolated from diseased animals in central China in 2011. PMID:26988055

  17. First complete genome sequence of an emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus isolate in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence (6,423 nt) of an emerging Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate on cucumber in North America was determined through deep sequencing of sRNA and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. It shares 99% nucleotide sequence identity to the Asian genotype, but only 90% t...

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolate from an Outbreak in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Polakshee; Morla, Sudhir; Kaore, Megha; Kurkure, Nitin Vasantrao

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain NDV/Chicken/Nagpur/01/12 was isolated from vaccinated chicken farms in India during outbreaks in 2012. The genome is 15,192 nucleotides in length and is classified as genotype VII in class II. PMID:25593257

  19. Complete nucleotide sequence of encephalomyocarditis virus isolated from South china tigers in china.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Yan, Qi; He, Hongxuan

    2013-01-01

    A strain of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), strain FJ13, has been isolated from South China tigers in China, and its complete genome has been sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that FJ13 belongs to the EMCV-1 serotype, and it is highly prevalent in China. PMID:23990575

  20. Sequence and virulence comparison of four North American isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considerable genetic, antigenic and virulence differences exist among porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates and depending on strain, dose and immune status, some farms may be subclinically infected with PRRSV while others experience severe reproductive and/or respirato...

  1. First Complete Coding Sequence of a Spanish Isolate of Swine Vesicular Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Sobrino, Francisco; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a porcine pathogen and a member of the Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family. The SVDV genome is composed of a single-stranded RNA molecule of positive polarity. Here, we report the first complete sequence of the coding region of a Spanish SVDV isolate (SPA/1/'93). PMID:26941157

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from Wild Peacock (Pavo cristatus) in India

    PubMed Central

    Khulape, Sagar A.; Gaikwad, Satish S.; Chellappa, Madhan Mohan; Mishra, Bishnu Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from a wild peacock. Phylogenetic analysis showed that it belongs to genotype II, class II of NDV strains. This study helps to understand the ecology of NDV strains circulating in a wild avian host of this geographical region during the outbreak of 2012 in northwest India. PMID:24903868

  3. First Complete Coding Sequence of a Spanish Isolate of Swine Vesicular Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a porcine pathogen and a member of the Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family. The SVDV genome is composed of a single-stranded RNA molecule of positive polarity. Here, we report the first complete sequence of the coding region of a Spanish SVDV isolate (SPA/1/'93). PMID:26941157

  4. Induction of type I interferons by a novel porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) inhibits synthesis of type I interferons (IFNs) in infected pigs and in cultured cells. Here we report that one PRRSV mutant A2MC2 induces type I IFNs in cultured cells and has no effect on IFN downstream signaling. The mutant isolate was p...

  5. Isolation of vaccine-derived measles viruses from children with acute respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoko; Mizuta, Katsumi; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Abiko, Chieko; Itagaki, Tsutomu; Ahiko, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    The measles elimination project led by the World Health Organization (WHO) has been moving toward the target of eliminating measles in the WHO Western Pacific Region. In Japan, prefectural public health institutes play a key role for the laboratory diagnosis of measles virus (MV) infection, which is based on PCR, virus isolation, and genotyping. Microscopic examination of viral-sensitive cell lines during routine virus isolation from nasopharyngeal specimens has been used to detect the morphological changes typical for the growth of respiratory viruses. Here, we describe the unexpected isolation of vaccine-derived MVs from the two unrelated 1-year-old boys with acute respiratory infection. The nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained from one patient in February 2007 and from another in December 2012. Incidentally, the two children had received measles-rubella vaccination 9 or 11 days before the sampling. The isolates from two children induced morphological changes of the viral-sensitive cell lines, such as syncythia formation (cell fusion). We finally identified the isolates as vaccine-derived MVs by sequence analysis and immunological methods with anti-measles nucleoprotein antibodies. As no typical symptoms of MV infection were observed in either patient, the vaccine-derived MVs were isolated not as causative pathogens but by chance. In fact, there was no suspected case of secondary MV infection in either patient, thereby excluding the possibility that vaccine-derived MVs spread from human to human. Our experiences suggest the possibility of vaccine-derived MV isolation by cell cultures and the difficulty in identifying MVs in specimens from patients other than clinically suspected measles cases. PMID:23782719

  6. Phylogeography of rabies virus isolated from herbivores and bats in the Espírito Santo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luiz Fernando Pereira; Pereira, Sílvia Regina Ferreira Gonçalves; Carnieli, Pedro; Tavares, Luiz Carlos Barbosa; Kotait, Ivanete

    2013-04-01

    Rabies is enzootic in the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Every year, cattle and horses die from rabies that is transmitted by the vampire bat Desmodus rotundus. This paper describes the spread of the rabies virus by the continuous diffusion model using relaxed random walks with BEAST software. Forty-one (41) sequences of gene G from the rabies virus that was isolated from bats and domestic herbivores from several areas of the state between 2006 and 2010 were analyzed. The phylogenetic tree showed three main clusters as well as two sub-clusters under cluster 2. A spatial analysis showed that three strains of the rabies virus spread independently. In general, central Espírito Santo, which is mountainous, was the area where separation of the virus strains occurred. This physical barrier, however, was overcome at some point in time, as samples from different lineages were found in the same microarea. PMID:23264105

  7. Isolation and identification of a novel rabies virus lineage in China with natural recombinant nucleoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    He, Cheng-Qiang; Meng, Sheng-Li; Yan, Hong-Yan; Ding, Nai-Zheng; He, Hong-Bin; Yan, Jia-Xin; Xu, Ge-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) causes severe neurological disease and death. As an important mechanism for generating genetic diversity in viruses, homologous recombination can lead to the emergence of novel virus strains with increased virulence and changed host tropism. However, it is still unclear whether recombination plays a role in the evolution of RABV. In this study, we isolated and sequenced four circulating RABV strains in China. Phylogenetic analyses identified a novel lineage of hybrid origin that comprises two different strains, J and CQ92. Analyses revealed that the virus 3' untranslated region (UTR) and part of the N gene (approximate 500 nt in length) were likely derived from Chinese lineage I while the other part of the genomic sequence was homologous to Chinese lineage II. Our findings reveal that homologous recombination can occur naturally in the field and shape the genetic structure of RABV populations. PMID:23226506

  8. Comparison of biological and molecular characterization of Iranian lettuce mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Ormaz, B; Winter, S; Koohi-Habibi, M; Mosahebi, Gh; Izadpanah, K

    2006-01-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV) is one of the most damaging viruses in lettuce and endive cultivating regions. In order to review the characteristics of different LMV isolates of Iran during 2004-2005 samples were collected from lettuce fields in Esfahan, Ghom, Khorasan, Khuzestan and Tehran provinces. All of the isolates were detected by LMV polyclonal antiserum (AS-0155, DSMZ Germany) in ELISA and TIPA tests. Biological purification was done for the LMV isolates and then they were maintained and propagated on Chenopodium quinoa. A range of plant species such as C. amaranticolor, C. album, Carthamus tinctorius, Gazania sp., Gomphrena globosa, Pisum sativum, Spinacia oleracea were inoculated with these isolates using potassium phosphate buffer (0/05M). Molecular weight of coat protein was determined by Polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Immunocapture reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (IC-RT-PCR) was performed using LMV polyclonal antiserum and specific primer pairs of LMV as described by Zerbini et al. (1995). The amplified fragments were included the whole CP and 3'UTR regions and the nucleotide sequences of them determined. All isolates induced chlorotic local lesions on C. amaranticolor and chlorotic local lesions with symptoms of systemic infection (vein clearing) on C. album. Tehran isolate in addition, caused local lesions on Gomphrena globosa with red border and white centre. This isolate infected Pisum sativum without any symptoms. Back inoculation on C. quinoa and DAS-ELISA confirmed the latent infection. None of these isolates infected Carthamus tinctorius, Gazania sp. and Spinacia oleracea. The molecular weight of coat protein was determined 30.33 kDa. Western-blot proved this band as the coat protein of the virus. IC-RT-PCR amplification of LMV isolates produced the expected size IC-RT-PCR product of 1300 bps. The comparison of nucleotide sequences showed that there were 98% identities. PMID:17390892

  9. [Comparative characteristics of PBV-1 and PBV-3 viruses isolated from Penicillium breve-compactum].

    PubMed

    Chaplygina, N M; Velikodvorskaia, G A; Tikhonenko, T I

    1975-01-01

    PBV-1 and PBV-3 viruses isolated from mycelium of Penicillium brevi-compactum show similar morphology and practically the same size of virus particles. Both viruses have been shown to lyse very effectively E. coli C, K12, W3350, CR63. Reproduction of the viruses in E. coli CK cells is limited due to the phenomenon of modification by the host, and negative colonies formed by each on E. coli CK sheet differ in morphology. PBV-1 virus is highly infectious for E. coli B, while the capacity of PBV-3 to multiply in these cells is very low. The limited reproduction appears to be explained by modification of PBV-3 DNA in the E. coli B system. PBV-1 and PBV-3 viruses have been shown to differ serologically, although serological cross reactions indicate their antigenic relationship. The two viruses under study differ in the constituency and molecular weight of the main structural proteins: 36,000: 28,000: 26,500 and 17,000 daltons for PBV-1 and 39,000; 36,000; 32,500; 31,000 and 18,000 daltons for PBV-2. PMID:766406

  10. Sequence analysis of a Torque teno canis virus isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Lan, Daoliang; Hua, Xiuguo; Cui, Li; Luo, Xuenong; Liu, Zhijie; San, Tongling; Zhu, CaiXia; Zhao, Wei; Yang, Zhibiao

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, a total of 158 fecal samples were collected from diarrheal dogs younger than 1 year old in pet clinic in China. 20 specimens (20/158, 13%) were positive for Torque teno canis virus DNA using detection PCR. One representative positive isolate designated LDL was randomly selected, cloned and sequenced. The complete genome of the LDL Chinese strain was 2799 nucleotides in length and contains three open reading frames (ORFs), which encode 576 (ORF1), 101 (ORF2), and 243 (ORF3) aa. Compared with the human and other animal TTV genomes, the genome of the LDL strain is clearly smaller and shares 95% identity with Japanese cf-TTV10 strain (AB076002). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the present Chinese Torque teno canis virus LDL strain was also closely clustered with the previous Japanese cf-TTV10 strain, and formed a different branch together with Torque teno sus viruses 1 and 2 compared with other Torque teno viruses, Torque teno mini virus, and Torque teno midi virus. Our study demonstrated that Torque teno canis virus is present in China. PMID:21645561

  11. Isolation and Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA Virus Infecting Chaetoceros lorenzianus Grunow▿

    PubMed Central

    Tomaru, Yuji; Takao, Yoshitake; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Koike, Kanae; Nagasaki, Keizo

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are one of the most significant primary producers in the ocean, and the importance of viruses as a potential source of mortality for diatoms has recently been recognized. Thus far, eight different diatom viruses infecting the genera Rhizosolenia and Chaetoceros have been isolated and characterized to different extents. We report the isolation of a novel diatom virus (ClorDNAV), which causes the lysis of the bloom-forming species Chaetoceros lorenzianus, and show its physiological, morphological, and genomic characteristics. The free virion was estimated to be ∼34 nm in diameter. The arrangement of virus particles appearing in cross-section was basically a random aggregation in the nucleus. Occasionally, distinctive formations such as a ring-like array composed of 9 or 10 spherical virions or a centipede-like array composed of rod-shaped particles were also observed. The latent period and the burst size were estimated to be <48 h and 2.2 × 104 infectious units per host cell, respectively. ClorDNAV harbors a covalently closed circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genome (5,813 nucleotides [nt]) that includes a partially double-stranded DNA region (979 nt). At least three major open reading frames were identified; one showed a high similarity to putative replicase-related proteins of the other ssDNA diatom viruses, Chaetoceros salsugineum DNA virus (previously reported as CsNIV) and Chaetoceros tenuissimus DNA virus. ClorDNAV is the third member of the closed circular ssDNA diatom virus group, the genus Bacilladnavirus. PMID:21666026

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Sylvatic Mosquito-Borne Viruses in Trinidad: Enzootic Transmission and a New Potential Vector of Mucambo Virus

    PubMed Central

    Auguste, Albert J.; Adams, A. Paige; Arrigo, Nicole C.; Martinez, Raymond; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Adesiyun, Abiodun A.; Chadee, Dave D.; Tesh, Robert B.; Carrington, Christine V. F.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Mosquito surveillance was carried out in three forested regions of Trinidad during July 2007–March 2009. A total of 185,397 mosquitoes representing at least 46 species was collected, divided into pools of 1–50 mosquitoes according to species and sex, and screened for arboviruses using cytopathic effect assays on Vero cell monolayers. Eighty-five viruses were isolated, including members of the genera Alphavirus (Mucambo virus; MUCV) and Orthobunyavirus (Caraparu, Oriboca, Bimiti, and Wyeomyia viruses). Species of the Culex subgenus Melanoconion accounted for 56% of the total number of mosquitoes collected and 97% of the viruses isolated; Cx. (Mel.) portesi accounted for 92% of virus isolations. Our results also implicate for the first time Aedes (Ochlerotatus) hortator as a potential vector of MUCV. Phylogenetic analyses of 43 MUCV strains suggest population subdivision within Trinidad, consistent with the hypothesis of enzootic maintenance in localized rodent populations. PMID:21118932

  13. Population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus: Evidence of reassortment in geographically distinct isolates.

    PubMed

    Thekke-Veetil, Thanuja; Polashock, James J; Marn, Mojca V; Plesko, Irena M; Schilder, Annemiek C; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E

    2015-04-01

    The population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), a putative member of the family Ophioviridae, was examined using 61 isolates collected from North America and Slovenia. The studied isolates displayed low diversity in the movement and nucleocapsid proteins and low ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions, indicative of strong purifying selection. Phylogenetic analyses revealed grouping primarily based on geography with some isolates deviating from this rule. Phylogenetic incongruence in the two regions, coupled with detection of reassortment events, indicated the possible role of genetic exchange in the evolution of BlMaV. PMID:25733053

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a J Subgroup Avian Leukosis Virus Isolated from Local Commercial Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongxin; Xue, Chunyi; Ji, Jun; Chang, Shuang; Shang, Huiqin; Zhang, Lingjun; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo

    2012-01-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) isolate GDKP1202 was isolated from a 50-day-old local yellow commercial broiler in the Guangdong province of China in 2012. Here we report the complete genomic sequence of the GDKP1202 isolate, which caused high mortality, serious growth suppression, thymic atrophy, and liver enlargement in commercial broilers. A novel potential binding site (5?-GGCACCTCC-3?) for c-myb was identified in the GDKP1202 genome. These findings will provide additional insights into the molecular characteristics in the genomes and pathogenicity of ALV-J. PMID:23043170

  15. Coat protein gene diversity among Chrysanthemum virus B isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Singh, L; Hallan, V; Jabeen, N; Singh, A K; Ram, R; Martin, D P; Zaidi, A A

    2007-02-01

    The complete coat protein (CP) sequences from 29 Indian isolates of Chrysanthemum virus B (CVB) were determined and analysed in relation to other previously characterized carlaviruses. The CP genes of the Indian CVB isolates were highly heterogeneous, sharing nucleotide sequence identities of 74-98%. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the isolates formed three groups potentially representing either two or three major CVB strain groupings. Recombination analysis revealed at least one definite recombination event involving the exchange of sequences between members of different groups. To our knowledge this is the first reported evidence of homologous recombination in carlaviruses. PMID:17006596

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of Chinese sheeppox and goatpox virus isolates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sheeppox virus (SPPV) and goatpox virus (GTPV), members of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family are causative agents of sheep pox and goat pox respectively, which are important contagious diseases and endemic in central and northern Africa, the Middle and Far East, and the Indian sub-continent. Both sheep pox and goat pox can cause wool and hide damage, and reduce the production of mutton and milk, which may result in significant economic losses and threaten the stockbreeding. In this study, three SPPVs and two GTPVs were collected from China in 2009 and 2011. We described the sequence features and phylogenetic analysis of the P32 gene, GPCR gene and RPO30 gene of the SPPVs and GTPVs to reveal their genetic relatedness. Results Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that there was a close relationship among SPPV/GanS/2/2011/China, SPPV/GanS/1/2011/China and SPPV/NingX/2009/China. They were clustered on the same SPPV clade. GTPV/HuB/2009/China and GS-V1 belonged to the GTPV lineage. GS-V1 was closely related to other GTPV vaccine strains. GTPV/HuB/2009/China and GS-V1 were clustered with GTPVs from China and some southern Asian countries. Conclusion This study may expand the datum for spread trend research of Chinese SPPVs and GTPVs, meanwhile provide theoretical references to improve the preventive and control strategy. PMID:22264255

  17. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-06-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. 'Sorok', 'Sodam' and 'Somyeong'. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1-100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  18. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. ‘Sorok’, ‘Sodam’ and ‘Somyeong’. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1–100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  19. Genetic variation in potato virus M isolates infecting pepino (Solanum muricatum) in China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beibei; He, Zhen; Zhang, Zhixiang; Wang, Hongqing; Li, Shifang

    2014-12-01

    Potato virus M (PVM, genus Carlavirus, family Betaflexviridae) is considered to be one of most economically important pathogens of pepino in China. However, the details and the mechanisms underlying PVM evolution are unknown. In this study, we determined and analyzed 40 TGB 1 gene sequences, 67 TGB 2 and TGB 3 gene sequences, and 88 CP and NABP gene sequences from viruses isolated from 19 samples of pepino (Solanum muricatum) and one sample of tomato (S. lycopersicum) collected from different areas of China. Recombination analysis identified only one clear recombinant in the TGB2-TGB3-CP region, but no recombinants were detected for each of the five individual genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all PVM isolates could be divided into at least two lineages in trees derived from the TGB 2, CP, and NABP gene sequences, and the lineages seemed to reflect geographical origin. The five PVM genes in this study were found to be under strong negative selection pressure. The PVM isolates examined showed frequent gene flow between the Chinese and European populations, and also within the Chinese population. Clear star phylogenies and the neutral equilibrium model test showed that pepino isolates of PVM appear to be experiencing a new expansion after a recent introduction into China, and these isolates display low levels of genetic diversity. To our knowledge, this study is the first report describing genetic structure, recombination, and gene flow in PVM populations, and it provides strong evolutionary evidence for the virus populations from different geographic regions of China. PMID:25233939

  20. Molecular characteristics of canine parainfluenza viruses type 5 (CPIV-5) isolated in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lee, Kyoung-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Three canine parainfluenza viruses type 5 (CPIV-5) were isolated from lung tissues of 3 Korean dogs with mild pneumonia between 2008 and 2009. The isolates were fully sequenced and compared with published reference sequences. The size of the genome was 15 246 nucleotides long and no remarkable differences were found when compared with previously published reference sequences. In phylogenetic analysis based on the F and P genes, parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV-5) strains were divided into at least 3 subgroups. Three CPIV-5 strains were clustered with CPIV-5 T1, H22 and 78524 strains. All PIV-5 strains were independent of the host species, geographical distribution, and the isolated period. PMID:25673911

  1. Isolation of novel variants of infectious bursal disease virus from different outbreaks in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Morla, Sudhir; Deka, Pankaj; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a highly infectious disease of young chicken that predominantly affects the immune system. In the present study, we are reporting first comprehensive study of IBDV outbreaks from the Northeastern part of India. Northeast India shares a porous border with four different countries; and as a rule any outbreak in the neighboring countries substantially affects the poultry population in the adjoining states. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP2 gene of the IBDV isolates from the Northeastern part of India suggested the extreme virulent nature of the virus. The virulent marker amino acids (A222, I242, Q253, I256 and S299) in the hypervariable region of the Northeastern isolates were found identical with the reported very virulent strains of IBDV. A unique insertion of I/L294V was recorded in all the isolates of the Northeastern India. The study will be useful in understanding the circulating pathotypes of IBDV in India. PMID:26854869

  2. Virus Isolates during Acute and Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection Show Distinct Patterns of Sensitivity to Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rusert, Peter; Kuster, Herbert; Joos, Beda; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Gujer, Cornelia; Leemann, Christine; Fischer, Marek; Stiegler, Gabriela; Katinger, Hermann; Olson, William C.; Weber, Rainer; Aceto, Leonardo; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Trkola, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effect of entry inhibitors on 58 virus isolates derived during acute and chronic infection to validate these inhibitors in vitro and to probe whether viruses at early and chronic disease stages exhibit general differences in the interaction with entry receptors. We included members of all types of inhibitors currently identified: (i) agents that block gp120 binding to CD4 (CD4-IgG2 and monoclonal antibody [MAb] IgG1b12), (ii) compounds that block the interaction with CCR5 (the chemokine RANTES/CCL5, the small-molecule inhibitor AD101, and the anti-CCR5 antibody PRO 140), (iii) the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide (T-20), and (iv) neutralizing antibodies directed against gp120 (MAb 2G12) and gp41 (MAbs 2F5 and 4E10). No differences between viruses from acute and chronic infections in the susceptibility to inhibitors targeting the CD4 binding site, CCR5, or fusion or to MAb 2G12 were apparent, rendering treatment with entry inhibitors feasible across disease stages. The notable exceptions were antibodies 2F5 and 4E10, which were more potent in inhibiting viruses from acute infection (P = 0.0088 and 0.0005, respectively), although epitopes of these MAbs were equally well preserved in both groups. Activities of these MAbs correlated significantly with each other, suggesting that common features of the viral envelope modulate their potencies. PMID:15956589

  3. A comparative study of rabies virus isolates from hematophagous bats in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Juliana G; Carnieli, Pedro; Oliveira, Rafael N; Fahl, Willian O; Cavalcante, Rosangela; Santana, Antonio A; Rosa, Wellington L G A; Carrieri, Maria L; Kotait, Ivanete

    2010-10-01

    The Brazilian chiropteran fauna consists of 167 species; of which, three are hematophagous: the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), the white-winged vampire bat (Diaemus youngi), and the hairy-legged vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata). The aim of this study was to describe the isolation of Rabies virus from common and hairy-legged vampire bats and to report the first comparative antigenic and genetic studies of isolates from these bats. Antigenic and genetic typing of both isolates identified them as antigenic variant 3 (AgV3), the variant frequently isolated from common vampire bats. Phylogenetic analysis showed 99.3% identity between the isolates. This is the first time since 1934 that Rabies virus has been isolated from hairy-legged vampire bats in Brazil. Our analysis provides evidence that the existence of rabies-positive isolates from hairy-legged vampire bats may be the result of an interspecific rabies transmission event from common vampire bats and suggests that roost cohabitation may occur. PMID:20966291

  4. Molecular Detection, Epidemiology, and Genetic Characterization of Novel European Field Isolates of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus?

    PubMed Central

    Cappelli, Katia; Capomaccio, Stefano; Cook, Frank R.; Felicetti, Michela; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Coppola, Giacomo; Verini-Supplizi, Andrea; Coletti, Mauro; Passamonti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The application of molecular diagnostic techniques along with nucleotide sequence determination to permit contemporary phylogenetic analysis of European field isolates of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has not been widely reported. As a result, of extensive testing instigated following the 2006 outbreak of equine infectious anemia in Italy, 24 farms with a history of exposure to this disease were included in this study. New PCR-based methods were developed, which, especially in the case of DNA preparations from peripheral blood cells, showed excellent correlation with OIE-approved agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) tests for identifying EIAV-infected animals. In contrast, the OIE-recommended oligonucleotide primers for EIAV failed to react with any of the Italian isolates. Similar results were also obtained with samples from four Romanian farms. In addition, for the first time complete characterization of gag genes from five Italian isolates and one Romanian isolate has been achieved, along with acquisition of extensive sequence information (86% of the total gag gene) from four additional EIAV isolates (one Italian and three Romanian). Furthermore, in another 23 cases we accomplished partial characterization of gag gene sequences in the region encoding the viral matrix protein. Analysis of this information suggested that most Italian isolates were geographically restricted, somewhat reminiscent of the “clades” described for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Collectively this represents the most comprehensive genetic study of European EIAV isolates conducted to date. PMID:21084503

  5. Molecular characterization of Dasheen mosaic virus isolates infecting edible aroids in India.

    PubMed

    Babu, B; Hegde, V

    2014-01-01

    Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) infecting three major edible aroids namely Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, Colocasia esculenta, and Xanthosoma sagittifolium cultivated in India was characterized. Infected plants showing typical DsMV symptoms were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and an amplification of a 963 bp fragment which encoded the coat protein (CP) gene was obtained. BLAST analysis of the cloned DNA amplicon revealed the identity of the virus to be that of DsMV. Sequence identity matrix of the nucleotide sequences among the three isolates showed that the DsMV isolate infecting A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta shared an identity as high as 93%, while the DsMV isolate from X. sagittifolium shared an identity of only 73% and 76% with the DsMV isolates from A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta, respectively. Comparative analysis of the coat protein of the three DsMV isolates showed the presence of DVG motif (A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta) and DTG motif in X. sagittifolium and several varying potential threonine and asparagine rich N-glycosylation motifs. Single amino acid substitution of the several conserved motifs occurs in all the three DsMV isolates. This is the first characterization of DsMV isolates infecting A. paeoniifolius, C. esculenta, and X. sagittifolium plants in India. PMID:24717027

  6. Biochemical and antigenic properties of the first isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus from salmonid fish in Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arkush, K.D.; Bovo, G.; deKinkelin, P.; Winton, J.R.; Wingfield, W.H.; Hedrick, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The first isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) recovered from rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (formerly Salmo gairdneri) in France and Italy were compared to six representative strains from North America by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of virion polypeptides and neutralization by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). All three IHNV isolates from Europe had similar polypeptide profiles when compared by SDS-PAGE. An analysis of the antigenic relatedness of the European isolates to representative strains from North America showed that they were clearly different from viruses obtained from salmonids in California. The RB/B5 MAb, which was developed against virus isolated from adult steelhead (anadromous rainbow trout) reared in central Oregon, neutralized all isolates examined. The 193–110/B4 MAb, developed against IHNV isolated from infected yearling rainbow trout in southern Idaho, neutralized all isolates tested except those from California. The SRCV/A4 MAb, developed against Sacramento River chinook virus (SRCV) isolated from adult spring chinook salmon O. tshawytscha in central California, was the least reactive, and strong neutralization was observed only with the SRCV strain of IHNV from California. However, partial reactivity of the virus isolates from France with the SRCV/A4 MAb distinguished them from the virus recovered from salmonids in Italy.

  7. Isolation of Irkut Virus from a Murina leucogaster Bat in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ye; Zhang, Shoufeng; Zhao, Jinghui; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Bats are recognized as a major reservoir of lyssaviruses; however, no bat lyssavirus has been isolated in Asia except for Aravan and Khujand virus in Central Asia. All Chinese lyssavirus isolates in previous reports have been of species rabies virus, mainly from dogs. Following at least two recent bat-associated human rabies-like cases in northeast China, we have initiated a study of the prevalence of lyssaviruses in bats in Jilin province and their public health implications. A bat lyssavirus has been isolated and its pathogenicity in mice and genomic alignment have been determined. Results We report the first isolation of a bat lyssavirus in China, from the brain of a northeastern bat, Murina leucogaster. Its nucleoprotein gene shared 92.4%/98.9% (nucleotide) and 92.2%/98.8% (amino acid) identity with the two known Irkut virus isolates from Russia, and was designated IRKV-THChina12. Following intracranial and intramuscular injection, IRKV-THChina12 produced rabies-like symptoms in adult mice with a short inoculation period and high mortality. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that IRKV-THChina12 has the same genomic organization as other lyssaviruses and its isolation provides an independent origin for the species IRKV. Conclusions We have identified the existence of a bat lyssavirus in a common Chinese bat species. Its high pathogenicity in adult mice suggests that public warnings and medical education regarding bat bites in China should be increased, and that surveillance be extended to provide a better understanding of Irkut virus ecology and its significance for public health. PMID:23505588

  8. Clustering of classical swine fever virus isolates by codon pair bias

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic code consists of non-random usage of synonymous codons for the same amino acids, termed codon bias or codon usage. Codon juxtaposition is also non-random, referred to as codon context bias or codon pair bias. The codon and codon pair bias vary among different organisms, as well as with viruses. Reasons for these differences are not completely understood. For classical swine fever virus (CSFV), it was suggested that the synonymous codon usage does not significantly influence virulence, but the relationship between variations in codon pair usage and CSFV virulence is unknown. Virulence can be related to the fitness of a virus: Differences in codon pair usage influence genome translation efficiency, which may in turn relate to the fitness of a virus. Accordingly, the potential of the codon pair bias for clustering CSFV isolates into classes of different virulence was investigated. Results The complete genomic sequences encoding the viral polyprotein of 52 different CSFV isolates were analyzed. This included 49 sequences from the GenBank database (NCBI) and three newly sequenced genomes. The codon usage did not differ among isolates of different virulence or genotype. In contrast, a clustering of isolates based on their codon pair bias was observed, clearly discriminating highly virulent isolates and vaccine strains on one side from moderately virulent strains on the other side. However, phylogenetic trees based on the codon pair bias and on the primary nucleotide sequence resulted in a very similar genotype distribution. Conclusion Clustering of CSFV genomes based on their codon pair bias correlate with the genotype rather than with the virulence of the isolates. PMID:22126254

  9. Potato virus Y CFH, a putative recombinant isolate from Capsicum chinense cv. Habanero.

    PubMed

    Comes, S; Fanigliulo, A; Pacella, R; Parrella, G; Crescenzi, A

    2006-01-01

    Ornamental plants of Chili pepper, Capsicum chinense cv. Habanero, with symptoms of leaf mosaic, necrotic rings on fruits and necrotic stems were observed in June 2003 in a private garden in the province of Naples (Italy). Preliminary serological characterisation allowed the association of these symptoms with infections by Potato virus Y (PVY). The virus was isolated on Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi and characterised by mechanical inoculation on herbaceous hosts and molecular characterisation of the P1 and the coat protein (CP) genes. Symptoms produced on indicator plants were generally consistent with those described for PVY. The identity of PVY was further confirmed by reaction with PVYN, PVYC and PVYO specific monoclonal antibodies: the isolate reacted only with the PVYC specific Mab. Immuno capture reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (IC-RT-PCR) was performed on extracts of PVY-CFH infected N. tabacum cv. Xanthi plants, using two couples of primers specifically designed out of the P1 and the CP coding regions of the so far fully sequenced PVY isolates. PCR products were then cloned into pCRII-TOPO vector using TOPO-TA cloning kit (Invitrogen) and sequenced. Sequence analysis suggests that PVY-CFH originated from a recombination event involving a virus of the PVYO type and another parental virus, maybe resembling the PVYNP isolates, given the reasonably high similarity shared by PVY-CFH and, respectively, non potato PVY isolates in the CP coding region, PVYO isolates in the P1 coding region. Evidence for the existence of such a recombination comes, apart from similarity analysis, by the different locations of CFH within phylogenetic trees constructed from P1 and CP genomic regions. PMID:17390887

  10. Hepatitis delta virus: Making the point from virus isolation up to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Raffaella; Perbellini, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis delta virus (HDV) has lately regained clinical importance because of the recent evidence of increasing prevalence in several European countries, due to immigration from highly endemic areas. HDV requires the mandatory presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) for propagation to hepatocytes. It is transmitted by the same routes of HBV and it can be acquired either by co-infection (simultaneous transmission of the two viruses) or super-infection (acquisition of HDV by an already chronic carrier of HBV). As a consequence, every HBV carrier is potentially at risk for HDV superinfection. Since the clinical course of super-infection can be severe, early diagnosis of HDV infection is necessary. PMID:26464754

  11. Properties of a virus isolated from Vernonia amygdalina Del. in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, M A; Dijkstra, J

    2004-01-01

    A previously uncharacterized virus tentatively named Vernonia green vein-banding virus (VGVBV) was isolated from Vernonia amygdalina Del. ("bitterleaf") from Lagos, Nigeria. The virus was mechanically transmissible but had a narrow host range restricted to Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa and C. amaranticolor. It was also transmissible in a non-persistent manner by Myzus persicae. The virus was purified from N. benthamiana and about 750 nm long flexuous rod-shaped particles were observed in purified preparations as well as in leaf-dips of Vernonia sp. Inclusion bodies in the form of pinwheels and scrolls were observed in ultrathin sections of Vernonia leaves by electron microscopy. M(r), of the viral coat protein was estimated to be about 34 K. In indirect ELISA, all 20 samples from naturally infected Vernonia sp. reacted positively with a potyvirus-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) as well as with an antiserum raised against VGVBV. Apart from the homologous antigen, the VGVBV antiserum reacted only with Plum poxvirus (PPV). The VGVBV reacted strongly with the antisera to Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV), Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Amaranthus leaf mottle virus (AmLMV) but weakly with antisera to PPV and Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) (all members of the family Potyviridae, the genus Potyvirus) in at least one of the assays used (indirect ELISA, dot-blot immunoassay and Western blot analysis). The results of our host range, cytopathological and serological studies and the available literature indicate that a hitherto difficult to transmit VGVBV has only been reported from Nigeria. We consider VGVBV a candidate for a new potyvirus. This virus should be further investigated to collect sufficient data for a qualified proposal of VGVBV as a new potyvirus. PMID:15745049

  12. Viral Replication, Persistence in Water and Genetic Characterization of Two Influenza A Viruses Isolated from Surface Lake Water

    PubMed Central

    Lebarbenchon, Camille; Yang, My; Keeler, Shamus P.; Ramakrishnan, Muthannan A.; Brown, Justin D.; Stallknecht, David E.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2011-01-01

    Water-borne transmission has been suggested as an important transmission mechanism for Influenza A (IA) viruses in wild duck populations; however, relatively few studies have attempted to detect IA viruses from aquatic habitats. Water-isolated viruses have rarely been genetically characterized and evaluation for persistence in water and infectivity in natural hosts has never been documented. In this study, we focused on two IA viruses (H3N8 and H4N6 subtypes) isolated from surface lake water in Minnesota, USA. We investigated the relative prevalence of the two virus subtypes in wild duck populations at the sampling site and their genetic relatedness to IA viruses isolated in wild waterbirds in North America. Viral persistence under different laboratory conditions (temperature and pH) and replication in experimentally infected Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were also characterized. Both viruses were the most prevalent subtype one year following their isolation in lake water. The viruses persisted in water for an extended time period at constant temperature (several weeks) but infectivity rapidly reduced under multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Furthermore, the two isolates efficiently replicated in Mallards. The complete genome characterization supported that these isolates originated from genetic reassortments with other IA viruses circulating in wild duck populations during the year of sampling. Based on phylogenetic analyses, we couldn't identify genetically similar viruses in duck populations in the years following their isolation from lake water. Our study supports the role for water-borne transmission for IA viruses but also highlights that additional field and experimental studies are required to support inter-annual persistence in aquatic habitats. PMID:22028909

  13. The mythology of various hepatitis A virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Deinhardt, F; Wolfe, L; Peterson, D; Cross, G F; Holmes, A W

    1975-01-01

    Several types of viral hepatitis may exist. Hepatitis A (MS-1 type) can be transmitted to marmosets and chimpanzees. Virus-like particles, which may be parvo- or enteroviruses and which have been demonstrated in feces of this type of hepatitis, do not share cross-reacting antigens with hepatitis B but do cross-react with fecal hepatitis A antigen. Hepatitis A (GB type), which also does not cross-react with hepatitis B, is not antigenically identical with MS-1; it can be transmitted to marmosets and it may be similar to non-type A/non-type B post-transfusion hepatitis. Hepatitits B does not cross-react either with HA particles, the faecal hepatitis type A antigen or with the MS-1 or GB strains; it can be transmitted to chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys but not to marmosets. PMID:173601

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus Nucleocapsids

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jen; Iwasaki, Yuzo

    1972-01-01

    Nucleocapsids from subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) virus-infected CV-1 cells were concentrated by differential centrifugation employing sucrose cushion techniques and further purified by centrifugation through a linear CsCl density gradient. The bouyant density of 3H-uridine-labeled nucleocapsids in CsCl was found to be 1.31 g/cm3. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of the purified SSPE nucleocapsid showed an absorption maximum at 260 to 265 nm and a 280/260 ratio that corresponded to a nucleic acid content of approximately 4.3%. Negatively stained preparations of SSPE nucleocapsids were found to have a width of 18 ± 1 nm, a periodicity of 5 to 6 nm, and a length between 1-1.4 ?m, with the greatest number at 1.3 ?m. Images PMID:4118868

  15. Isolation and full-genome sequence of two reticuloendotheliosis virus strains from mixed infections with Marek's disease virus in China.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ke-yan; Zhang, Yan-ping; Zheng, Hui-wen; Lv, Hong-chao; Gao, Yu-long; Wang, Jing-fei; Gao, Hong-lei; Qi, Xiao-le; Cui, Hong-yu; Wang, Yong-qiang; Ren, Xian-gang; Wang, Xiao-mei; Liu, Chang-jun

    2015-06-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), classified as a gammaretrovirus, has a variety of hosts, including chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys, and wild birds. REV causes a series of pathological syndromes, especially the immunosuppression of the host, which may lead to an increased susceptibility to other pathogens, thus greatly damaging the poultry industry. Mixed infections of REV and Marek's disease virus (MDV) have been reported in many countries, including China. Previous reports revealed that MDV vaccines were not efficacious, and even less-virulent MDV strains would cause some losses due to mixed infections with REV. Additionally, contaminants in the MDV vaccine might be the main source of REV. In this study, two clinical samples were collected from two flocks of chickens that were diagnosed with MDV. Subsequently, two REV isolates were obtained from the clinical samples. The isolates, named CY1111 and SY1209, were further confirmed through an indirect immunofluorescence assay and electron microscopy. Complete genome sequences of the two REV strains were determined to test the relationship between them and other REV strains. Phylogenetic trees showed that the two REV strains were closely related to most REV strains that were isolated from a variety of hosts. Therefore, REVs might spread freely among these hosts under natural conditions. Additionally, most REV strains in China were in the same clade. The present work offers some information regarding REV in China. PMID:25850423

  16. A new subgenotype 2.1d isolates of classical swine fever virus in China, 2014.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongliang; Leng, Chaoliang; Feng, Liping; Zhai, Hongyue; Chen, Jiazeng; Liu, Chunxiao; Bai, Yun; Ye, Chao; Peng, Jinmei; An, Tongqing; Kan, Yunchao; Cai, Xuehui; Tian, Zhijun; Tong, Guangzhi

    2015-08-01

    The lapinized attenuated vaccine against classical swine fever (CSF) has been used in China for over half a century and has generally prevented large-scale outbreaks in recent years. However, since late 2014, a large number of new cases of CSF were detected in many immunized pig farms in China. Several of these CSV viruses were isolated and characterized. Phylogenetic and genomic sequence analyses indicate that these new isolates, as well as some reference isolates, form a new subgenotype named 2.1d, and share several consistent molecular characteristics. Since these new isolates emerged in disparate geographic regions within 5 months, this suggests that these isolates may be widespread. Given that current vaccines do not appear to provide effective protection against this new subgenotype, further investigation of these strains is urgently needed. PMID:26031602

  17. Isolation and identification of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Valícek, L; Psikal, I; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Kubalíková, R; Kosinová, E

    1997-10-01

    Three strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were isolated in porcine lung macrophage (PLM) cultures from three swine herds. This has been the first successful isolation of PRRSV in the Czech Republic and the strains received the designations CAPM V-501, CAPM V-502 and CAPM V-503, respectively. All the three isolates in PLM were identified by immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase tests and the strain CAPM V-502 also by electron microscopy using the ultrathin section technique. The strain CAPM V-502 has been adapted to the cell line MARC-145. Viral RNA in PLM cultures infected with any of the isolated PRRSV strains was demonstrated by RT-PCR targeted to the more conserved ORF 7 genomic region encoding the nucleocapsid protein. The assessment of PCR products in agarose gel revealed a uniform size of 394 bp in all the three isolates and the European prototype strain Lelystad used as positive control. PMID:9416008

  18. First Isolation of Dengue Virus from the 2010 Epidemic in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Basu D.; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Pandey, Kishor; Rajendra, Saroj P.; Shah, Yogendra; Adhikari, Bal R.; Gupta, Govinda; Gautam, Ishan; Tun, Mya M. N.; Uchida, Reo; Shrestha, Mahendra; Kurane, Ichiro; Morita, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is an emerging disease in Nepal and was first observed as an outbreak in nine lowland districts in 2006. In 2010, however, a large epidemic of dengue occurred with 4,529 suspected and 917 serologically-confirmed cases and five deaths reported in government hospitals in Nepal. The collection of demographic information was performed along with an entomological survey and clinical evaluation of the patients. A total of 280 serum samples were collected from suspected dengue patients. These samples were subjected to routine laboratory investigations and IgM-capture ELISA for dengue serological identification, and 160 acute serum samples were used for virus isolation, RT-PCR, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The results showed that affected patients were predominately adults, and that 10% of the cases were classified as dengue haemorrhagic fever/ dengue shock syndrome. The genetic characterization of dengue viruses isolated from patients in four major outbreak areas of Nepal suggests that the DENV-1 strain was responsible for the 2010 epidemic. Entomological studies identified Aedes aegypti in all epidemic areas. All viruses belonged to a monophyletic single clade which is phylogenetically close to Indian viruses. The dengue epidemic started in the lowlands and expanded to the highland areas. To our knowledge, this is the first dengue isolation and genetic characterization reported from Nepal. PMID:24155651

  19. Development, Characterization and Application of Monoclonal Antibodies against Brazilian Dengue Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bordignon, Juliano; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arboviral disease. The morbidity related to dengue infection supports the need for an early, quick and effective diagnostic test. Brazil is a hotspot for dengue, but no serological diagnostic test has been produced using Brazilian dengue virus isolates. This study aims to improve the development of immunodiagnostic methods for dengue virus (DENV) detection through the production and characterization of 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Brazilian isolates of DENV-1, -2 and -3. The mAbs include IgG2bκ, IgG2aκ and IgG1κ isotypes, and most were raised against the envelope or the pre-membrane proteins of DENV. When the antibodies were tested against the four DENV serotypes, different reactivity patterns were identified: group-specific, subcomplex specific (DENV-1, -3 and -4 and DENV-2 and -3) and dengue serotype-specific (DENV-2 or -3). Additionally, some mAbs cross-reacted with yellow fever virus (YFV), West Nile virus (WNV) and Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). None of the mAbs recognized the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Furthermore, mAbs D3 424/8G, D1 606/A12/B9 and D1 695/12C/2H were used to develop a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-dengue IgM detection in sera from patients with acute dengue. To our knowledge, these are the first monoclonal antibodies raised against Brazilian DENV isolates, and they may be of special interest in the development of diagnostic assays, as well as for basic research. PMID:25412181

  20. Isolation of avian influenza H5N1 virus from vaccinated commercial layer flock in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Uninterrupted transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 of clade 2.2.1 in Egypt since 2006 resulted in establishment of two main genetic clusters. The 2.2.1/C group where all recent human and majority of backyard origin viruses clustered together, meanwhile the majority of viruses derived from vaccinated poultry in commercial farms grouped in 2.2.1.1 clade. Findings In the present investigation, an HPAIV H5N1 was isolated from twenty weeks old layers chickens that were vaccinated with a homologous H5N1 vaccine at 1, 7 and 16 weeks old. At twenty weeks of age, birds showed cyanosis of comb and wattle, decrease in egg production and up to 27% mortality. Examined serum samples showed low antibody titer in HI test (Log2 3.2± 4.2). The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of the isolated virus were closely related to viruses in 2.2.1/C group isolated from poultry in live bird market (LBM) and backyards or from infected people. Conspicuous mutations in the HA and NA genes including a deletion within the receptor binding domain in the HA globular head region were observed. Conclusions Despite repeated vaccination of layer chickens using a homologous H5N1 vaccine, infection with HPAIV H5N1 resulted in significant morbidity and mortality. In endemic countries like Egypt, rigorous control measures including enforcement of biosecurity, culling of infected birds and constant update of vaccine virus strains are highly required to prevent circulation of HPAIV H5N1 between backyard birds, commercial poultry, LBM and humans. PMID:23185975

  1. Genetic diversity of the coat protein of olive latent virus 1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Varanda, C M R; Nolasco, G; Clara, M I; Félix, M R

    2014-06-01

    The CP gene variability among 21 olive latent virus 1 (OLV-1) isolates obtained from different hosts and locations and at different times was assessed. Amplicons obtained by RT-PCR were cloned, and at least 10 sequences from each isolate were analyzed and compared. OLV-1 sequences available in GenBank were included. The encoded CPs consisted of 270 amino acids, except those of isolates G1S and C7 (269 aa) and G6 (271 aa). Comparison of CP genomic sequences of the isolates under study showed very low values of nucleotide diversity, 0.02, and maximum nucleotide distances between (0.087) or within isolates (0.001). Although very few nucleotide sequence differences were observed among the isolates, olive isolates exhibited lower diversity (0.012). In addition, at position 158 (157 in C7 and G1S and 159 in G6) of the deduced aa sequences, an alanine residue was found to be conserved among the olive isolates. In citrus and tulip isolates, a threonine residue was present at position 158, whereas a valine was present at this same position in tomato isolates. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that OLV-1 isolates clustered in five groups according to original host. However, G6, originally recovered from olive but repeatedly inoculated and maintained in N. benthamiana plants for 8 years in our laboratory, was separated from other isolates. This may be attributable to adaptation to the experimental host over time. There was no correlation of phylogenetic grouping of isolates based on geographical location or year of collection. Strong negative selection may have contributed to the low diversity among the OLV-1 CP isolates. PMID:24352437

  2. Phospholipase A2 Isolated from the Venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus Inactivates Dengue virus and Other Enveloped Viruses by Disrupting the Viral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Vanessa Danielle; Soares, Ricardo Oliveira; dos Santos-Junior, Nilton Nascimento; Trabuco, Amanda Cristina; Cintra, Adelia Cristina; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu; Caliri, Antonio; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; Aquino, Victor Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The Flaviviridae family includes several virus pathogens associated with human diseases worldwide. Within this family, Dengue virus is the most serious threat to public health, especially in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Currently, there are no vaccines or specific antiviral drugs against Dengue virus or against most of the viruses of this family. Therefore, the development of vaccines and the discovery of therapeutic compounds against the medically most important flaviviruses remain a global public health priority. We previously showed that phospholipase A2 isolated from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus was able to inhibit Dengue virus and Yellow fever virus infection in Vero cells. Here, we present evidence that phospholipase A2 has a direct effect on Dengue virus particles, inducing a partial exposure of genomic RNA, which strongly suggests inhibition via the cleavage of glycerophospholipids at the virus lipid bilayer envelope. This cleavage might induce a disruption of the lipid bilayer that causes a destabilization of the E proteins on the virus surface, resulting in inactivation. We show by computational analysis that phospholipase A2 might gain access to the Dengue virus lipid bilayer through the pores found on each of the twenty 3-fold vertices of the E protein shell on the virus surface. In addition, phospholipase A2 is able to inactivate other enveloped viruses, highlighting its potential as a natural product lead for developing broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. PMID:25383618

  3. The complete genome sequence of a Brazilian isolate of yam mild mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Filho, Francisco de Assis Câmara Rabelo; Nicolini, Cícero; Resende, Renato de Oliveira; Andrade, Genira Pereira de; Pio-Ribeiro, Gilvan; Nagata, Tatsuya

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the complete genome of an isolate of yam mild mosaic virus (YMMV) from Brazil was sequenced, and the predicted amino acid sequence was analyzed. The YMMV RNA genome consists of 9538 nt without the poly(A) tail, encoding a putative typical potyvirus polyprotein of 3084 amino acids. Furthermore, the small overlapping ORF (PIPO) in the P3 gene was also deduced, and the cleavage sites of the polyprotein were predicted. Multiple alignment with other potyviruses showed a maximum nucleotide sequence identity of 64 % to wild tomato mosaic virus. A phylogenetic tree showed that YMMV clustered with Asian potyviruses that mainly infect solanaceous plants. PMID:23081678

  4. Full Genome Sequence of Egg Drop Syndrome Virus Strain FJ12025 Isolated from Muscovy Duckling.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guanghua; Chen, Hongmei; Huang, Yu; Cheng, Longfei; Fu, Qiuling; Shi, Shaohua; Wan, Chunhe; Chen, Cuiteng; Lin, Jiansheng

    2013-01-01

    Egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) strain FJ12025 was isolated from a 9-day-old Muscovy duckling. The results of the sequence showed that the genome of strain FJ12025 is 33,213 bp in length, with a G+C content of 43.03%. When comparing the genome sequence of strain FJ12025 to that of laying duck original strain AV-127, we found 50 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the two viral genome sequences. A genomic sequence comparison of FJ12025 and AV-127 will help to understand the phenotypic differences between the two viruses. PMID:23969050

  5. Comparison of the Czech Scrophularia isolate with the Italian Anagyris strain of scrophularia mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Honetslegrová, J; Petrzik, K; Spak, J; Pelikánová, J

    1994-02-01

    Scrophularia mottle virus (ScMV) was newly found in the Czech Republic in Scrophularia nodosa L. plants. The Czech isolate (ScMV-C) was serologically identical and similar in symptoms and host range to the Italian Anagyris strain (ScMV-I). Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Samsun, Nicotiana glutinosa L., Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. White Burley, Physalis floridana Rybd. and Cucumis sativus L. are described as new host plants of ScMV. Double-stranded RNA patterns and the isoelectric point of this virus are characterized. PMID:8067309

  6. Full Genome Sequence of Egg Drop Syndrome Virus Strain FJ12025 Isolated from Muscovy Duckling

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guanghua; Chen, Hongmei; Cheng, Longfei; Fu, Qiuling; Shi, Shaohua; Wan, Chunhe; Chen, Cuiteng; Lin, Jiansheng

    2013-01-01

    Egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) strain FJ12025 was isolated from a 9-day-old Muscovy duckling. The results of the sequence showed that the genome of strain FJ12025 is 33,213 bp in length, with a G+C content of 43.03%. When comparing the genome sequence of strain FJ12025 to that of laying duck original strain AV-127, we found 50 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the two viral genome sequences. A genomic sequence comparison of FJ12025 and AV-127 will help to understand the phenotypic differences between the two viruses. PMID:23969050

  7. Genotyping of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) geographical isolates from Brazil and comparison to other isolates from the Americas.

    PubMed

    Muller, Isabel C; Andrade, Thales P D; Tang-Nelson, Kathy F J; Marques, Maria R F; Lightner, Donald V

    2010-01-25

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a viral pathogen that has caused significant economic losses in shrimp farming. Variable-number tandem repeats (VNTRs) (open reading frame [ORF] 94, 125 and 75), a large deletion (ORF 23/24) and a transposase were proposed as molecular markers for genotyping. WSSV-infected shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei were collected in 2 Brazilian regions (Santa Catarina and Bahia) from 2005 to 2008. DNA was extracted and PCR of the variable regions was performed, followed by sequencing. All Santa Catarina samples showed the same number of repeats for the minisatellites analyzed. Bahia samples showed a different pattern for the regions, indicating that there are at least 2 different WSSV genotypes in Brazil. Both Brazilian isolates have an 11453 bp deletion in ORF 23/24 when compared with WSSV-TW (Taiwan), which has the full sequence for this locus. The Brazilian WSSV isolates were compared with WSSV isolates from other countries in the Americas (USA, Panama, Honduras, Mexico and Nicaragua); the repeat number patterns for the 3 VNTR regions analyzed were different between the Brazilian isolates and the other western-hemisphere isolates. This may be due to mutations in WSSV after its introduction into the different countries. Our results also show that WSSV found in Bahia and Santa Catarina very likely originated from different sources of contamination. PMID:20225670

  8. Evolutionary and phenotypic analysis of live virus isolates suggests arthropod origin of a pathogenic RNA virus family

    PubMed Central

    Marklewitz, Marco; Zirkel, Florian; Kurth, Andreas; Drosten, Christian; Junglen, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of arboviruses are unknown because their typical dual host tropism is paraphyletic within viral families. Here we studied one of the most diversified and medically relevant RNA virus families, the Bunyaviridae, in which four of five established genera are transmitted by arthropods. We define two cardinally novel bunyavirus groups based on live isolation of 26 viral strains from mosquitoes (Jonchet virus [JONV], eight strains; Ferak virus [FERV], 18 strains). Both viruses were incapable of replicating at vertebrate-typical temperatures but replicated efficiently in insect cells. Replication involved formation of virion-sense RNA (vRNA) and mRNA, including cap-snatching activity. SDS/PAGE, mass spectrometry, and Edman degradation identified translation products corresponding to virion-associated RNA-dependent RNA polymerase protein (RdRp), glycoprotein precursor protein, glycoproteins Gn and Gc, as well as putative nonstructural proteins NSs and NSm. Distinct virion morphologies suggested ancient evolutionary divergence, with bunyavirus-typical morphology for FERV (spheres of 60–120 nm) as opposed to an unusual bimorphology for JONV (tubular virions of 60 × 600 nm and spheres of 80 nm). Both viruses were genetically equidistant from all other bunyaviruses, showing <15% amino acid identity in the RdRp palm domain. Both had different and unique conserved genome termini, as in separate bunyavirus genera. JONV and FERV define two novel sister taxons to the superclade of orthobunyaviruses, tospoviruses, and hantaviruses. Phylogenetic ancestral state reconstruction with probabilistic hypothesis testing suggested ancestral associations with arthropods at deep nodes throughout the bunyavirus tree. Our findings suggest an arthropod origin of bunyaviruses. PMID:26038576

  9. Evolutionary and phenotypic analysis of live virus isolates suggests arthropod origin of a pathogenic RNA virus family.

    PubMed

    Marklewitz, Marco; Zirkel, Florian; Kurth, Andreas; Drosten, Christian; Junglen, Sandra

    2015-06-16

    The evolutionary origins of arboviruses are unknown because their typical dual host tropism is paraphyletic within viral families. Here we studied one of the most diversified and medically relevant RNA virus families, the Bunyaviridae, in which four of five established genera are transmitted by arthropods. We define two cardinally novel bunyavirus groups based on live isolation of 26 viral strains from mosquitoes (Jonchet virus [JONV], eight strains; Ferak virus [FERV], 18 strains). Both viruses were incapable of replicating at vertebrate-typical temperatures but replicated efficiently in insect cells. Replication involved formation of virion-sense RNA (vRNA) and mRNA, including cap-snatching activity. SDS/PAGE, mass spectrometry, and Edman degradation identified translation products corresponding to virion-associated RNA-dependent RNA polymerase protein (RdRp), glycoprotein precursor protein, glycoproteins Gn and Gc, as well as putative nonstructural proteins NSs and NSm. Distinct virion morphologies suggested ancient evolutionary divergence, with bunyavirus-typical morphology for FERV (spheres of 60-120 nm) as opposed to an unusual bimorphology for JONV (tubular virions of 60 × 600 nm and spheres of 80 nm). Both viruses were genetically equidistant from all other bunyaviruses, showing <15% amino acid identity in the RdRp palm domain. Both had different and unique conserved genome termini, as in separate bunyavirus genera. JONV and FERV define two novel sister taxons to the superclade of orthobunyaviruses, tospoviruses, and hantaviruses. Phylogenetic ancestral state reconstruction with probabilistic hypothesis testing suggested ancestral associations with arthropods at deep nodes throughout the bunyavirus tree. Our findings suggest an arthropod origin of bunyaviruses. PMID:26038576

  10. VIRUSES THAT INTERACT SYNGERISTICALLY WITH SWEET POTATO CHLOROTIC STUNT VIRUS-NIGERIAN ISOLATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early studies of sweet potato virus disease (SPVD)in Nigeria showed that it was caused by co-infection of Ipomoea batatas with an aphid-transmitted and a whitefly-transmitted agent. The agents were later found to be Sweet potato feathery mottle (SPFMV, genus Potyvirus)and Sweet potato chlorotic stu...

  11. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ADVENTITIOUS AVIAN LEUKOSIS VIRUS ISOLATED FROM COMMERCIAL MAREK'S DISEASE VACCINES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial Marek's disease (MD) vaccines produced by two manufacturers were tested for possible contamination with avian leukosis virus (ALV). Samples of MD vaccines manufactured by two companies (A & B) were received from a breeder company; samples were also received directly from vaccine company B...

  12. Genetic variation in swine influenza virus A isolate associated with proliferative and necrotizing pneumonia in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Rekik, M R; Arora, D J; Dea, S

    1994-01-01

    A new antigenic variant of H1N1 swine influenza virus A (Sw/QC/5393/91 [QC/91]) has been found to be associated with porcine proliferative and necrotizing pneumonia. Analysis of its genomic RNA by T1 oligonucleotide mapping revealed that considerable genomic divergence exists between QC/91 and the swine influenza viruses currently circulating in North American swine herds. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the HA1 region of the hemagglutinin RNA of QC/91, in comparison with those of most common H1N1 human and swine influenza A viruses, showed the presence of multiple point mutations. Two amino acid substitutions appeared to be located in antigenic sites Sb and Ca. This correlates with antigenic variations demonstrated between A/NJ/8/76, A/Sw/WI/49/76, and Québec isolate A/Sw/QC/5393/91 of swine influenza virus A. Another mutation was responsible for the loss of a glycosylation site, which may have also affected the antigenicity. The other mutations seem to have been accumulated progressively over time. This significant constancy in the fixation of mutations with time suggests that genetic diversity of these viruses may best be interpreted as the result of drifts in the population of circulating swine influenza viruses in Québec. Images PMID:7545918

  13. Ceratothripoides claratris, a New Vector of a Capsicum chlorosis virus Isolate Infecting Tomato in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Premachandra, W T S D; Borgemeister, C; Maiss, E; Knierim, D; Poehling, H-M

    2005-06-01

    ABSTRACT Ceratothripoides claratris, the predominant thrips species on tomato in Thailand, was tested for vector competence and efficiency to transmit Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) (isolate AIT) to tomato. The efficiency of adult-stage transmission was influenced by the larval stage at which virus was acquired. Adult C. claratris showed 69% transmission efficiency after acquiring the virus as freshly emerged (<1 h) first-instar larvae. However, when just molted (<1 h) second-instar larvae acquired the virus, the percentage of adult transmitters significantly decreased (48%). Transmission efficiency of up to 47% was detected with second-instar larvae of C. claratris which had acquired the virus as freshly emerged first-instar larvae. Transmission efficiency did not significantly differ between adult males and females, irrespective of the larval stage at which the virus was acquired. Highest transmission efficiency for CaCV was recorded in adult C. claratris derived from second-instar larvae collected from infected tomato plants in a greenhouse. Lowest transmission efficiency was observed in adults directly collected from infected tomato plants in the greenhouse. The spread of CaCV on tomato plants in greenhouses showed a close association with thrips infestations. PMID:18943782

  14. Structure of a Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus assembly intermediate isolated from infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Kristen; Lokesh, G.L.; Sherman, Michael; Watowich, Stanley

    2010-10-25

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a prototypical enveloped ssRNA virus of the family Togaviridae. To better understand alphavirus assembly, we analyzed newly formed nucleocapsid particles (termed pre-viral nucleocapsids) isolated from infected cells. These particles were intermediates along the virus assembly pathway, and ultimately bind membrane-associated viral glycoproteins to bud as mature infectious virus. Purified pre-viral nucleocapsids were spherical with a unimodal diameter distribution. The structure of one class of pre-viral nucleocapsids was determined with single particle reconstruction of cryo-electron microscopy images. These studies showed that pre-viral nucleocapsids assembled into an icosahedral structure with a capsid stoichiometry similar to the mature nucleocapsid. However, the individual capsomers were organized significantly differently within the pre-viral and mature nucleocapsids. The pre-viral nucleocapsid structure implies that nucleocapsids are highly plastic and undergo glycoprotein and/or lipid-driven rearrangements during virus self-assembly. This mechanism of self-assembly may be general for other enveloped viruses.

  15. Whole Genomes of Chandipura Virus Isolates and Comparative Analysis with Other Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Sarah S.; Kumar, Satyendra; Arankalle, Vidya A.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandipura virus (CHPV) belonging to the Vesiculovirus genus and Rhabdoviridae family, has recently been associated with a number of encephalitis epidemics, with high mortality in children, in different parts of India. No full length genome sequences of CHPV isolates were available in GenBank and little is known about the molecular markers for pathogenesis. In the present study, we provide the complete genomic sequences of four isolates from epidemics during 2003–2007. These sequences along with the deduced sequence of the prototype isolate of 1965 were analysed using phylogeny, motif search, homology modeling and epitope prediction methods. Comparison with other rhaboviruses was also done for functional extrapolations. All CHPV isolates clustered with the Isfahan virus and maintained several functional motifs of other rhabdoviruses. A notable difference with the prototype vesiculovirus, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus was in the L-domain flanking sequences of the M protein that are known to be crucial for interaction with host proteins. With respect to the prototype isolate, significant additional mutations were acquired in the 2003–2007 isolates. Several mutations in G mapped onto probable antigenic sites. A mutation in N mapped onto regions crucial for N-N interaction and a putative T-cell epitope. A mutation in the Casein kinase II phosphorylation site in P may attribute to increased rates of phosphorylation. Gene junction comparison revealed changes in the M-G junction of all the epidemic isolates that may have implications on read-through and gene transcription levels. The study can form the basis for further experimental verification and provide additional insights into the virulence determinants of the CHPV. PMID:22272333

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Drumond, Betania Paiva; da Silva Fagundes, Luiz Gustavo; Rocha, Raissa Prado; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Araki, Carlos Shigueru; Colombo, Tatiana Elisa; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Castilho, Thiago Elias; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1-4) are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER) when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population. PMID:26887252

  17. A highly divergent isolate of tomato blistering mosaic virus from Solanum violaefolium.

    PubMed

    Blawid, Rosana; Hayashi, Evelyn Anly Ishikawa; Rezende, Jorge Alberto Marques; Kitajima, Elliot W; Nagata, Tatsuya

    2016-04-01

    The complete genome of a tymovirus infecting Solanum violaefolium was sequenced. The genome comprised 6284 nt, with a 5'-UTR of 137 nt and a comparatively longer 3'-UTR of 121 nt. Sequence analysis confirmed three ORFs encoding a movement protein, a polyprotein, and a coat protein (CP). The isolate was considered to be the Tomato blistering mosaic virus (ToBMV) based on a CP amino acid sequence identity of 95.3 %. The nucleotide sequence of the complete genome of the S. violaefolium isolate, however, differed markedly from the other two reported ToBMV isolates, with identities of 76.6 and 76.3 %, below one of the demarcation criteria of the genus Tymovirus (overall genome identity of 80 %). No recombination signals were detected in the genome of this isolate. The high identity of the CP amino acid sequence and similar host responses suggest that the S. violaefolium isolate belongs to the same species as the Tomato blistering mosaic virus. The sequence analysis of this ToBMV isolate thus suggests that the demarcation criterion of 80 % overall genome sequence identity in the genus Tymovirus may require revision. PMID:26810401

  18. Isolation and genetic characterization of Japanese encephalitis virus from equines in India

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Harisankar; Singh, Birendra K.; Virmani, Nitin; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an important vector-borne viral disease of humans and horses in Asia. JE outbreaks occur regularly amongst humans in certain parts of India and sporadic cases occur among horses. In this study, JE seroprevalence and evidence of JE virus (JEV) infection among horses in Haryana (India) is described. Antibodies against JEV were detected in 67 out of 637 (10.5%) horses screened between 2006 and 2010. Two foals exhibiting neurological signs were positive for JEV RNA by RT-PCR; JEV was isolated from the serum of one of the foals collected on the second day of illness. This is the first report of JEV isolation from a horse in India. Furthermore, a pool of mosquitoes collected from the premises housing these foals was positive for JEV RNA by RT-PCR. Three structural genes, capsid (C), premembrane (prM), and envelope (E) of the isolated virus (JE/eq/India/H225/2009) spanning 2,500 nucleotides (from 134 to 2,633) were cloned and sequenced. BLAST results showed that these genes had a greater than 97% nucleotide sequence identity with different human JEV isolates from India. Phylogenetic analysis based on E- and C/prM genes indicated that the equine JEV isolate belonged to genotype III and was closely related to the Vellore group of JEV isolates from India. PMID:22705732

  19. Genome sequence analysis of dengue virus 1 isolated in Key West, Florida.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongyoung; Richards, Stephanie L; Alto, Barry W; Bettinardi, David J; Smartt, Chelsea T

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes. In November 2010, a dengue outbreak was reported in Monroe County in southern Florida (FL), including greater than 20 confirmed human cases. The virus collected from the human cases was verified as DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) and one isolate was provided for sequence analysis. RNA was extracted from the DENV-1 isolate and was used in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify PCR fragments to sequence. Nucleic acid primers were designed to generate overlapping PCR fragments that covered the entire genome. The DENV-1 isolate found in Key West (KW), FL was sequenced for whole genome characterization. Sequence assembly, Genbank searches, and recombination analyses were performed to verify the identity of the genome sequences and to determine percent similarity to known DENV-1 sequences. We show that the KW DENV-1 strain is 99% identical to Nicaraguan and Mexican DENV-1 strains. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the DENV-1 isolated in KW originated from Nicaragua (NI) and the KW strain may circulate in KW. Also, recombination analysis results detected recombination events in the KW strain compared to DENV-1 strains from Puerto Rico. We evaluate the relative growth of KW strain of DENV-1 compared to other dengue viruses to determine whether the underlying genetics of the strain is associated with a replicative advantage, an important consideration since local transmission of DENV may result because domestic tourism can spread DENVs. PMID:24098658

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of Indian rabies virus isolates targeting the complete glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Susan; Singh, Rajendra; Singh, K P; Manjunatha Reddy, G B; Anjaneya; Ravi Kumar, G V P P S; Sumithra, T G; Singh, R P

    2015-12-01

    Rabies a fatal viral zoonosis is endemic in India. There is no report on phylogenetic study of Indian rabies virus isolates based on the complete G gene. In the present study, a total of 25 rabies positive brain samples collected during 2001-2014 from North India (UP, MP, Delhi, Rajasthan), South India (Kerala and Karnataka) and Gujarat states belonging to six different host species were subjected to G gene amplification by RT-PCR as three overlapping fragments of 881 bp, 991 bp and 618 bp. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all Indian rabies virus isolates are genetically closely related with Arctic-like 1a lineage viruses. However, two distinct clusters were identified namely, India South and India North. All the Indian rabies isolates had 95.5-100% homology related to geography, but not to host species. Deduced amino acids on comparison revealed two amino acid changes, aa 356 in ECTO; N?K and aa 458; M?I, which were found to distinguish between the India South and India North isolates. PMID:26427850

  1. VARYING GENETIC DIVERSITY OF PAPAYA RINGSPOT VIRUS ISOLATES FROM TWO TIME-SEPARATED OUTBREAKS IN JAMAICA AND VENEZUELA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The coat protein (CP) genes of eleven Jamaican Papaya ringspot virus type-p (PRSV) isolates that were collected in 1999 were cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of these isolates were compared to each other, with a sequence of another Jamaican isolate collected after the f...

  2. Characterization of H7N9 influenza A viruses isolated from humans

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Kiso, Maki; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Nakajima, Noriko; Imai, Masaki; Yamada, Shinya; Murakami, Shin; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Takashita, Emi; McBride, Ryan; Noda, Takeshi; Hatta, Masato; Imai, Hirotaka; Zhao, Dongming; Kishida, Noriko; Shirakura, Masayuki; de Vries, Robert P.; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Tamura, Tomokazu; Tomita, Yuriko; Fujimoto, Naomi; Goto, Kazue; Katsura, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Eiryo; Ishikawa, Izumi; Watanabe, Shinji; Ito, Mutsumi; Sakai-Tagawa, Yuko; Sugita, Yukihiko; Uraki, Ryuta; Yamaji, Reina; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Zhong, Gongxun; Fan, Shufang; Ping, Jihui; Maher, Eileen A.; Hanson, Anthony; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko; Ozawa, Makoto; Neumann, Gabriele; Kida, Hiroshi; Odagiri, Takato; Paulson, James C.; Hasegawa, Hideki; Tashiro, Masato; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Summary Avian influenza A viruses rarely infect humans, but if they do and transmit among them, worldwide outbreaks (pandemics) can result. The recent sporadic infections of humans in China with a previously unrecognized avian influenza A virus of the H7N9 subtype (A(H7N9)) have caused concern due to the appreciable case fatality rate associated with these infections (>25%), potential instances of human-to-human transmission1, and the lack of pre-existing immunity among humans to viruses of this subtype. Here, we therefore characterized two early human A(H7N9) isolates, A/Anhui/1/2013 and A/Shanghai/1/2013 (H7N9; hereafter referred to as Anhui/1 and Shanghai/1, respectively). In mice, Anhui/1 and Shanghai/1 were more pathogenic than a control avian H7N9 virus (A/duck/Gunma/466/2011; H7N9; Dk/GM466) and a representative pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus (A/California/04/2009; H1N1; CA04). Anhui/1, Shanghai/1, and Dk/GM466 replicated well in the nasal turbinates of ferrets. In nonhuman primates (NHPs), Anhui/1 and Dk/GM466 replicated efficiently in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, whereas the replicative ability of conventional human influenza viruses is typically restricted to the upper respiratory tract of infected primates. By contrast, Anhui/1 did not replicate well in miniature pigs upon intranasal inoculation. Most critically, Anhui/1 transmitted via respiratory droplets in one of three pairs of ferrets. Glycan arrays demonstrated that Anhui/1, Shanghai/1, and A/Hangzhou/1/2013 (a third human A(H7N9) virus tested in this assay) bind to human virus-type receptors, a property that may be critical for virus transmissibility in ferrets. Anhui/1 was less sensitive than a pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus to neuraminidase inhibitors, although both viruses were equally susceptible to an experimental antiviral polymerase inhibitor. The robust replicative ability in mice, ferrets, and NHPs and the limited transmissibility in ferrets of Anhui/1 suggest that A(H7N9) viruses have pandemic potential. PMID:23842494

  3. Genetic variation and phylogenetic analysis of 22 French isolates of equine arteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Miszczak, F; Pronost, S; Fortier, C; Balasuriya, U B R; Zientara, S; Fortier, G; Timoney, P J

    2007-01-01

    Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships among 22 French isolates of equine arteritis virus (EAV) obtained over four breeding seasons (2001-2004) were determined by sequencing open reading frames (ORFs) 2a-7. The ORFs 2a-7 of 22 isolates differed from the prototype virulent Bucyrus strain of EAV by between 14 (99.5% identity) and 328 (88.7% identity) nucleotides, and differed from each other by between 0 (100% identity) and 346 (88.1% identity) nucleotides, confirming genetic diversity among EAV strains circulating in France. Phylogenetic analysis based on the partial ORF5 sequences (nucleotides 11296-11813) of 22 French isolates and 216 additional EAV strains available in GenBank clustered the global isolates of EAV into two distinct groups: North American and European. The latter could be further divided into two large subgroups: European subgroup 1 (EU-1) and European subgroup 2 (EU-2). Phylogenetic analysis based on 100 EAV ORF3 sequences yielded similar results. Of the 22 French EAV isolates, the 11 isolates obtained before January 28, 2003 clustered with either the EU-1 (9 isolates) or EU-2 (2 isolates) subgroup. In contrast, by the criteria used in this study, the 11 isolates obtained after January 30, 2003 belong to the North American group, strongly suggesting that these strains were recently introduced into France. PMID:17680321

  4. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johansson, T.; Einer-Jensen, K.; Batts, W.; Ahrens, P.; Bjorkblom, C.; Kurath, G.; Bjorklund, H.; Lorenzen, N.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes the lethal disease infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in juvenile salmon and trout. The nucleocapsid (N) protein gene and partial glycoprotein (G) gene (nucleotides 457 to 1061) of the European isolates IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 13/98 11621, DE-DF 4/99-8/99, AU-9695338 and RU-FR1 were sequenced and compared with IHNV isolates from the North American genogroups U, M and L. In phylogenetic studies the N gene of the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, though in a different subgroup than the isolates from the USA. Analyses of the partial G gene of these European isolates clustered them in the M genogroup close to the root while the Russian isolate clustered in the U genogroup. The European isolates together with US-WRAC and US-Col-80 were also tested in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the N protein. MAbs 136-1 and 136-3 reacted equally at all concentrations with the isolates tested, indicating that these antibodies identify a common epitope. MAb 34D3 separated the M and L genogroup isolates from the U genogroup isolate. MAb 1DW14D divided the European isolates into 2 groups. MAb 1DW14D reacted more strongly with DE-DF 13/98 11621 and RU-FR1 than with IT-217A, FR- 32/87, DE-DF 4/99-8/99 and AU-9695338. In the phylogenetic studies, the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, whereas in the serological studies using MAbs, the European M genogroup isolates could not be placed in the same specific group. These results indicate that genotypic and serotypic classification do not correlate. ?? 2009 Inter-Research.

  5. High-Throughput Isolation of Giant Viruses in Liquid Medium Using Automated Flow Cytometry and Fluorescence Staining.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Jacques Y B; Robert, Stephane; Reteno, Dorine G; Andreani, Julien; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of giant viruses using amoeba co-culture is tedious and fastidious. Recently, the procedure was successfully associated with a method that detects amoebal lysis on agar plates. However, the procedure remains time-consuming and is limited to protozoa growing on agar. We present here advances for the isolation of giant viruses. A high-throughput automated method based on flow cytometry and fluorescent staining was used to detect the presence of giant viruses in liquid medium. Development was carried out with the Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain widely used in past and current co-culture experiments. The proof of concept was validated with virus suspensions: artificially contaminated samples but also environmental samples from which viruses were previously isolated. After validating the technique, and fortuitously isolating a new Mimivirus, we automated the technique on 96-well plates and tested it on clinical and environmental samples using other protozoa. This allowed us to detect more than 10 strains of previously known species of giant viruses and seven new strains of a new virus lineage. This automated high-throughput method demonstrated significant time saving, and higher sensitivity than older techniques. It thus creates the means to isolate giant viruses at high speed. PMID:26858703

  6. Isolation and identification of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mahmoud Moussa; Khan, Owais Ahmed; Cattoli, Giovanni; Lu, Huaguang

    2010-03-01

    An outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus subtype H5N1 was first diagnosed in a "backyard" flock of peafowl (Pavo cristatus) raised on palace premises in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in December 3, 2007. The flock consisted of 40 peafowl, and their ages ranged from 3 to 5 years old. Affected birds suffered from depression, anorexia, and white diarrhea. Four dead birds were submitted for HPAI diagnosis at the Central Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Riyadh. Brain and liver tissues and tracheal and cloacal swabs were taken from the dead birds and processed for a real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR test and virus isolation in specific-pathogen-free embryonating chicken eggs. The H5N1 subtype of avian influenza virus was isolated from the four dead birds and identified by a real-time RT-PCR before and after egg inoculation. The virus isolates were characterized as HPAI H5N1 virus by sequencing analysis. Phylogenetic comparisons revealed that the H5N1 viruses isolated from peafowl belong to the genetic clade 2.2 according to the World Health Organization nomenclature. The peafowl H5N1 virus falls into 2.2.2 sublineage II and clusters with the H5N1 viruses isolated from poultry in Saudi Arabia in 2007-08. PMID:20521659

  7. High-Throughput Isolation of Giant Viruses in Liquid Medium Using Automated Flow Cytometry and Fluorescence Staining

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Jacques Y. B.; Robert, Stephane; Reteno, Dorine G.; Andreani, Julien; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of giant viruses using amoeba co-culture is tedious and fastidious. Recently, the procedure was successfully associated with a method that detects amoebal lysis on agar plates. However, the procedure remains time-consuming and is limited to protozoa growing on agar. We present here advances for the isolation of giant viruses. A high-throughput automated method based on flow cytometry and fluorescent staining was used to detect the presence of giant viruses in liquid medium. Development was carried out with the Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain widely used in past and current co-culture experiments. The proof of concept was validated with virus suspensions: artificially contaminated samples but also environmental samples from which viruses were previously isolated. After validating the technique, and fortuitously isolating a new Mimivirus, we automated the technique on 96-well plates and tested it on clinical and environmental samples using other protozoa. This allowed us to detect more than 10 strains of previously known species of giant viruses and seven new strains of a new virus lineage. This automated high-throughput method demonstrated significant time saving, and higher sensitivity than older techniques. It thus creates the means to isolate giant viruses at high speed. PMID:26858703

  8. Molecular characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus isolated from ruminants in Taiwan in 1999-2000.

    PubMed

    Huang, C C; Lin, Y L; Huang, T S; Tu, W J; Lee, S H; Jong, M H; Lin, S Y

    2001-08-01

    In 1999, 10 sporadic outbreaks of cattle foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) occurred in Taiwan. By the time, infection was limited to the Chinese yellow cattle (a native species of beef cattle in Mainland China), which did not develop vesicular lesions under field conditions. Five viruses isolates obtained from individual farms were confirmed to be the serotype O FMD virus (O/Taiwan/1999). During January-February 2000, however, this virus has spread to dairy cattle and goat herds, causing severe mortality in goat kids and vesicular lesions in dairy cattle. Partial nucleotide sequence of the capsid coding gene 1D (VP1) was determined for the virus isolates obtained in this study. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 sequences indicated that the O/Taiwan/1999 viruses shared 95-97% similarities to the virus strains isolated from the Middle East and India. The species susceptibility of the O/Taiwan/1999 virus was experimentally studied in several species of susceptible animals, showing that the virus did cause generalized lesions in dairy cattle and pigs, however, it would not cause vesicular lesions on the Chinese yellow cattle and the adult goats. These studies suggested that the O/Taiwan/1999 virus was a novel FMD virus of Taiwan and it presented various levels of susceptibility in cattle species. PMID:11390103

  9. Genetics, Receptor Binding, and Virulence in Mice of H10N8 Influenza Viruses Isolated from Ducks and Chickens in Live Poultry Markets in China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Jing; Kong, Huihui; Cui, Pengfei; Zhang, Fang; Tan, Dan; Suzuki, Yasuo; Liu, Liling; Jiang, Yongping; Guan, Yuntao; Chen, Hualan

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed eight H10N8 viruses isolated from ducks and chickens in live poultry markets from 2009 to 2013 in China. These viruses showed distinct genetic diversity and formed five genotypes: the four duck isolates formed four different genotypes, whereas the four chicken viruses belong to a single genotype. The viruses bound to both human- and avian-type receptors, and four of the viruses caused 12.7% to 22.5% body weight loss in mice. PMID:25855738

  10. Genetics, Receptor Binding, and Virulence in Mice of H10N8 Influenza Viruses Isolated from Ducks and Chickens in Live Poultry Markets in China

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Jing; Kong, Huihui; Cui, Pengfei; Zhang, Fang; Tan, Dan; Suzuki, Yasuo; Liu, Liling; Jiang, Yongping; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed eight H10N8 viruses isolated from ducks and chickens in live poultry markets from 2009 to 2013 in China. These viruses showed distinct genetic diversity and formed five genotypes: the four duck isolates formed four different genotypes, whereas the four chicken viruses belong to a single genotype. The viruses bound to both human- and avian-type receptors, and four of the viruses caused 12.7% to 22.5% body weight loss in mice. PMID:25855738

  11. Complete genome sequences of two biologically distinct isolates of Asparagus virus 1.

    PubMed

    Blockus, S; Lesker, T; Maiss, E

    2015-02-01

    The complete genome sequences of two asparagus virus 1 (AV-1) isolates differing in their ability to cause systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana were determined. Their genomes had 9,741 nucleotides excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail, encoded a polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids, and shared 99.6 % nucleotide sequence identity. They differed at 37 nucleotide and 15 amino acid sequence positions (99.5 % identity) scattered over the polyprotein. The closest relatives of AV-1 in amino acid sequence identity were plum pox virus (54 %) and turnip mosaic virus (53 %), corroborating the classification of AV-1 as a member of a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus. PMID:25216774

  12. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Algicidal Virus Infecting the Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, JinJoo; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Youn, Seok-Hyun; Choi, Tae-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are a major component of the biological community, serving as the principal primary producers in the food web and sustaining oxygen levels in aquatic environments. Among marine planktonic diatoms, the cosmopolitan Skeletonema costatum is one of the most abundant and widespread species in the world’s oceans. Here, we report the basic characteristics of a new diatom-infecting S. costatum virus (ScosV) isolated from Jaran Bay, Korea, in June 2008. ScosV is a polyhedral virus (45–50 nm in diameter) that propagates in the cytoplasm of host cells and causes lysis of S. costatum cultures. The infectivity of ScosV was determined to be strain- rather than species-specific, similar to other algal viruses. The burst size and latent period were roughly estimated at 90–250 infectious units/cell and <48 h, respectively. PMID:26060438

  13. Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus, a new sobemovirus isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Takemoto, Shogo; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Chiba, Sotaro; Andika, Ida Bagus; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus (CyCMV), isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii), was characterized molecularly. CyCMV isometric virions comprise a single, positive-strand RNA genome of 4,083 nucleotides and 30-kDa coat protein. The virus genome contains five overlapping open reading frames with a genomic organization similar to that of sobemoviruses. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis revealed that CyCMV is most closely related to papaya lethal yellowing virus, a proposed dicot-infecting sobemovirus (58.8 % nucleotide sequence identity), but has a relatively distant relationship to monocot-infecting sobemoviruses, with only modest sequence identities. This suggests that CyCMV is a new monocot-infecting member of the floating genus Sobemovirus. PMID:26025156

  14. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Algicidal Virus Infecting the Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Kim, JinJoo; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Youn, Seok-Hyun; Choi, Tae-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Diatoms are a major component of the biological community, serving as the principal primary producers in the food web and sustaining oxygen levels in aquatic environments. Among marine planktonic diatoms, the cosmopolitan Skeletonema costatum is one of the most abundant and widespread species in the world's oceans. Here, we report the basic characteristics of a new diatom-infecting S. costatum virus (ScosV) isolated from Jaran Bay, Korea, in June 2008. ScosV is a polyhedral virus (45-50 nm in diameter) that propagates in the cytoplasm of host cells and causes lysis of S. costatum cultures. The infectivity of ScosV was determined to be strain- rather than species-specific, similar to other algal viruses. The burst size and latent period were roughly estimated at 90-250 infectious units/cell and <48 h, respectively. PMID:26060438

  15. Genetic diversity of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from domestic poultry species in Eastern China during 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Wang, Weiwei; Yao, Chunfeng; Wang, Xiaoquan; Hu, Shunlin; Cao, Junping; Wu, Yantao; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiufan

    2011-02-01

    Seventy-nine Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) isolated from clinical specimens of different poultry species including chickens, pigeons (Columba livia), geese and ostriches in Eastern China during 2005-2008 were characterized biologically and phylogenetically. The results showed genetic diversity of these viruses: three class I viruses and one genotype I and 12 genotype II viruses of class II circulating in chickens were avirulent; four genotype VIb viruses isolated from pigeons were moderately virulent; and two genotype III viruses and 57 genotype VIId viruses were highly virulent. The three class I viruses were further classified as genotypes 2 and 3. The very high F protein sequence identity of one genotype I virus with strain Queensland V4 and 12 genotype II viruses with strain La Sota indicated that these viruses originated from the two vaccine strains. Two genotype III viruses shared greater than 99% sequence identity with the moderately virulent vaccine strain Mukteswar but exhibited significantly higher virulence, suggesting that they evolved from the vaccine virus and that the Mukteswar vaccine should be banned in China. Fifty-seven of the 63 virulent NDVs in this study belonged to genotype VIId, indicating its predominance in Eastern China. Genotype VIId viruses could be further classified into two subgroups. Four of the five NDVs isolated from pigeons belonged to genotype VIb, indicating its host-specific preference. Both the genotype VIb and VIId NDVs showed low amino acid similarity to the vaccine strains currently used in China, implying the urgent need to develop better vaccines against the most prevalent NDVs in China. PMID:21061026

  16. First genome analysis and molecular characterization of Chickpea chlorotic dwarf virus Egyptian isolate infecting squash.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Inas Farouk; Taha, Omnia; El-Ashry, Abdel Nasser

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to identifying and characterizing some molecular properties of geminiviruses co-infection in squash field crop cultivated in Egypt. Squash crops observed to be heavily infected with several insect vectors, also severe chlorosis and stunting was observed. Electron microscopic analysis has revealed geminate capsid particles which indicate the infection of Geminiviruses, especially SqLCV which represent an economic problem to squash filed crop in Egypt. We have investigated possible mixed infections with different plant viruses associated with chlorotic stunt diseases and or other genus groups of geminiviruses. The main objective of this study is to investigate the recombination events, possible recombinants and variants among these genera in the same family differing in vector transmission. This is the first report of the molecular characterization, phylogenetic analysis and putative recombination events of the full length genome of the Chickpea Chlorotic Dwarf Mastrevirus in Egypt. And the first report of co-infection with another begomovirus infecting squash plants. A full length clone of both viruses were isolated and characterized at the molecular level. The complete nucleotide sequence of DNA-A was determined (2,572 bp) and submitted to the genbank under accession no. KF692356. The isolate from Egypt has about 97.8 % homology with the Chickpea chlorotic dwarf virus (CpCDV) isolate from Syria DNA-A isolate FR687959, a 83.2 % homology with the Sudan isolate AM933134 and a 82.7 % homology with Pakistan isolate FR687960. To best of our knowledge this is the first report of complete genome of CpCDV that infect squash plants in Egypt and worldwide. PMID:26436119

  17. Synthesis of herpes simplex virus, vaccinia virus, and adenovirus DNA in isolated HeLa cell nuclei. I. Effect of viral-specific antisera and phosphonoacetic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Bolden, A; Aucker, J; Weissbach, A

    1975-01-01

    Purified nuclei, isolated from appropriately infected HeLa cells, are shown to synthesize large amounts of either herpes simplex virus (HSV) or vaccinia virus DNA in vitro. The rate of synthesis of DNA by nuclei from infected cells is up to 30 times higher than the synthesis of host DNA in vitro by nuclei isolated from uninfected HeLa cells. Thus HSV nuclei obtained from HSV-infected cells make DNA in vitro at a rate comparable to that seen in the intact, infected cell. Molecular hybridization studies showed that 80% of the DNA sequences synthesized in vitro by nuclei from herpesvirus-infected cells are herpesvirus specific. Vaccinia virus nuclei from vaccinia virus-infected cells, also produce comparable percentages of vaccinia virus-specific DNA sequences. Adenovirus nuclei from adenovirus 2-infected HeLa cells, which also synthesize viral DNA in vitro, have been included in this study. Synthesis of DNA by HSV or vaccinia virus nuclei is markedly inhibited by the corresponding viral-specific antisera. These antisera inhibit in a similar fashion the purified herpesvirus-induced or vaccinia virus-induced DNA polymerase isolated from infected cells. Phosphonoacetic acid, reported to be a specific inhibitor of herpesvirus formation and the herpesvirus-induced DNA polymerase, is equally effective as an inhibitor of HSV DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei in vitro. However, we also find phosphonoacetic acid to be an effective inhibitor of vaccinia virus nuclear DNA synthesis and the purified vaccinia virus-induced DNA polymerase. In addition, this compound shows significant inhibition of DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei obtained from adenovirus-infected or uninfected cells and is a potent inhibitor of HeLa cell DNA polymerase alpha. PMID:172658

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of West Nile virus isolated in Italy in 2008.

    PubMed

    Savini, G; Monaco, F; Calistri, P; Lelli, R

    2008-11-27

    In Italy the first occurrence of West Nile virus (WNV) infection was reported in Tuscany region during the late summer of 1998. In August 2008, the WNV infection re-emerged in Italy, in areas surrounding the Po river delta, and involving three regions Lombardy, Emilia Romagna and Veneto. WNV was isolated from blood and organs samples of one horse, one donkey, one pigeon (Columba livia) and three magpies (Pica pica). The phylogenetic analysis of the isolates, conducted on 255 bp in the region coding for the E protein, indicates that these isolates belong to the lineage I among the European strains. According to the analysis, both the 1998 and 2008 Italian strains as well as isolates from Romania, Russia, Senegal and Kenya fell in the same sub-cluster. PMID:19040827

  19. Detection and partial molecular characterization of atypical plum pox virus isolates from naturally infected sour cherry.

    PubMed

    Chirkov, Sergei; Ivanov, Peter; Sheveleva, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Atypical isolates of plum pox virus (PPV) were discovered in naturally infected sour cherry in urban ornamental plantings in Moscow, Russia. The isolates were detected by polyclonal double antibody sandwich ELISA and RT-PCR using universal primers specific for the 3'-non-coding and coat protein (CP) regions of the genome but failed to be recognized by triple antibody sandwich ELISA with the universal monoclonal antibody 5B and by RT-PCR using primers specific to for PPV strains D, M, C and W. Sequence analysis of the CP genes of nine isolates revealed 99.2-100 % within-group identity and 62-85 % identity to conventional PPV strains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the atypical isolates represent a group that is distinct from the known PPV strains. Alignment of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of CP demonstrated their close similarity to those of a new tentative PPV strain, CR. PMID:23404462

  20. Genetic variability of blueberry scorch virus isolates from highbush blueberry in New York State.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska, Elżbieta; Marsella-Herrick, Patricia; Fuchs, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The genetic variability of blueberry scorch virus (BlScV) isolates from New York was determined within a portion of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene and the triple gene block and coat protein (CP) genes. Phylogenetic analysis of 19 New York isolates and other isolates for which sequence information is available in GenBank revealed two distinct clades, regardless of the coding region analyzed, and limited variability within (0.029 ± 0.007) and between (0.183 ± 0.032) phylogroups. Recombination events were identified in the CP gene of three New York isolates, and codons of the five BlScV genes characterized were found to be under neutral or negative selective pressure. PMID:25809019

  1. Complete genome sequences of blueberry red ringspot virus (Caulimoviridae) isolates from the Czech Republic and Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Petrzik, Karel; Přibylová, Jaroslava; Pleško, Irena Mavrič; Špak, Josef

    2011-10-01

    Genomic DNA of blueberry red ringspot virus (genus Soymovirus, family Caulimoviridae) from highbush blueberry plants growing for years in the Czech Republic and Slovenia was sequenced. The circular dsDNA genomes consist of 8,303 and 8,299 nt, respectively, and contain eight open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 100 amino acids. The European isolates are 90% to 99% identical in aa sequences of distinct proteins. In contrast to the American New Jersey isolate, in-frame initiation codons have been found upstream from AUG codons of ORFs I, IV and V in the European isolates. These and other differences resulted in a longer capsid protein, reverse transcriptase, movement protein and protein the encoded by ORF VII and reduced (75.4% to 93.7%) amino acid identity with corresponding proteins of the New Jersey isolate. PMID:21796400

  2. Identification of syncytial mutations in a clinical isolate of herpes simplex virus 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muggeridge, Martin I. . E-mail: mmugge@lsuhsc.edu; Grantham, Michael L.; Johnson, F. Brent

    2004-10-25

    Small polykaryocytes resulting from cell fusion are found in herpes simplex virus (HSV) lesions in patients, but their significance for viral spread and pathogenesis is unclear. Although syncytial variants causing extensive fusion in tissue culture can be readily isolated from laboratory strains, they are rarely found in clinical isolates, suggesting that extensive cell fusion may be deleterious in vivo. Syncytial mutations have previously been identified for several laboratory strains, but not for clinical isolates of HSV type 2. To address this deficiency, we studied a recent syncytial clinical isolate, finding it to be a mixture of two syncytial and one nonsyncytial strain. The two syncytial strains have novel mutations in glycoprotein B, and in vitro cell fusion assays confirmed that they are responsible for syncytium formation. This panel of clinical strains may be ideal for examining the effect of increased cell fusion on pathogenesis.

  3. Experimental infection of young adult European breed sheep with Rift Valley fever virus field isolates.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Nuria; Xavier, F; Martín-Folgar, Raquel; Lorenzo, Gema; Galindo-Cardiel, Iván; del Val, Bernat Pérez; Rivas, Raquel; Iglesias, Javier; Rodríguez, Fernando; Solanes, David; Domingo, Mariano; Brun, Alejandro

    2010-10-01

    The increasing interest in Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and its potential impact on naive animal populations deserve revisiting experimental reproduction of RVFV infection, particularly in those animal breeds for which no data about their susceptibility to RVFV infection have ever been recorded. In this study we show the susceptibility of 9-10 weeks old European sheep (Ripollesa breed) to RVFV infection, showing a mild, subacute form of disease. Four different viral isolates efficiently replicated in vivo after subcutaneous experimental inoculation, and consistent viral loads in blood and virus shedding (variable in length depending on the RVFV isolate used) were detected, showing horizontal transmission to a noninfected, sentinel lamb. RVFV infection caused transient pyrexia in adult lambs and no other clinical symptoms were observed, with the exception of corneal opacity ("blue eye") found in 3 out of 16 subcutaneously inoculated sheep. In conclusion, adult sheep from this European breed are readily infected with RVFV without apparent clinical manifestations. PMID:20854022

  4. Genome sequence of a pathogenic isolate of monkey B virus (species Macacine herpesvirus 1)

    PubMed Central

    Ohsawa, Kazutaka; Black, Darla; Ohsawa, Makiko; Eberle, R.

    2014-01-01

    The only genome sequence for monkey B virus (BV; species Macacine herpesvirus 1) is that of an attenuated vaccine strain originally isolated from a rhesus monkey (BVrh). Here we report the genome sequence of a virulent BV strain isolated from a cynomolgus macaque (BVcy). The overall genome organization is the same, although sequence differences exist. The greatest sequence divergence is located in non-coding areas of the long and short repeat regions. Like BVrh, BVcy has duplicated Ori elements and lacks an ORF corresponding to the ?34.5 gene of herpes simplex virus. Nine of ten miRNAs and the majority of ORFs are conserved between BVrh and BVcy. The most divergent genes are several membrane-associated proteins and those encoding immediate early proteins. PMID:24903602

  5. Genomic sequence analysis of four new chrysanthemum virus B isolates: evidence of RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lakhmir; Hallan, Vipin; Martin, D P; Ram, Raja; Zaidi, A A

    2012-03-01

    Chrysanthemums worldwide suffer from a high incidence of infection with chrysanthemum virus B (CVB), a member of the genus Carlavirus, family Betaflexiviridae. Three major lineages or strains of this virus have been found in India, but none have been characterized beyond the genetic variation they display in their coat protein genes. Here, we describe the analysis of four near-complete genome sequences (from the three lineages) representing the genetic diversity of these strains. Ranging in size from 8815 to 8855 nucleotides (excluding the polyA tail), these four isolates have a genome organization very similar to that of the recently reported Japanese isolate of CVB, with which they share between 70 and 73% genome-wide sequence identity. We present further evidence that recombination may feature quite prominently in the evolution of CVB. PMID:22179900

  6. Phylogenetic and Pathotypical Analysis of Two Virulent Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated from Domestic Ducks in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shouping; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhao, Changguang; Liu, Dehua; Hu, Yanxin; Zhao, Jixun; Zhang, Guozhong

    2011-01-01

    Two velogenic Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) obtained from outbreaks in domestic ducks in China were characterized in this study. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both strains clustered with the class II viruses, with one phylogenetically close to the genotype VII NDVs and the other closer to genotype IX. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cleavage site of the fusion (F) protein confirmed that both isolates contained the virulent motif 112RRQK/RRF117 at the cleavage site. The two NDVs had severe pathogenicity in fully susceptible chickens, resulting in 100% mortality. One of the isolates also demonstrated some pathogenicity in domestic ducks. The present study suggests that more than one genotype of NDV circulates in domestic ducks in China and viral transmission may occur among chickens and domestic ducks. PMID:21949828

  7. Genetic and antigenic analysis of epidemic influenza viruses isolated during 2006-2007 season in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jih-Hui; Chiu, Shu-Chun; Lee, Cheng-Hao; Su, Yung-Jui; Tsai, Han-Chuan; Peng, Yen-Tzu; Wu, Ho-Seng

    2008-02-01

    Influenza viruses are some of the most active pathogens in Taiwan. The monitoring influenza activity has been coordinated by the Centers for Diseases Control, Taiwan, and the surveillance is based on integrated clinical and virological surveillance components. Data from sentinel physician networks and other sources, mainly hospitals were collected. During 2006-07 season, a total of 1724 cases of laboratory-confirmed influenza were reported by collaborating laboratories and sentinels, which was five fold higher than during the corresponding part of the 2005-06 season. Of the Taiwan isolates analyzed using post-infection ferret antisera, 1.5% were H1N1 (A/Hi), 21.5% H3N2 (A/H3), and 77.0% influenza B viruses. This reflects the predominance of influenza B viruses during 2006-07 season. In addition, continued antigenic drift was seen with the A/I-B viruses compared with the previous season's reference strains. However, an increasing number of recent A/H3 isolates characterized in our report were amantadine sensitive. Preparation for an influenza pandemic is presently a high priority in Taiwan. Laboratory-based surveillance systems must be timely in order to be effective. The data presented here highlights the need to characterize the circulating strains both antigenically and genetically during regular surveillance. Any contribution of individual genes or gene combinations to usual or unusual epidemic characteristics might thus be identified ensuring that virus strains can be selected for vaccine formulation that will most closely match the circulating viruses. PMID:18098164

  8. Two variants of Pepino mosaic virus isolated from imported tomato seed from Chile share high levels of sequence identity with the U.S. isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), a member of the genus Potexvirus, was first described on pepino (Solanum muricatum A.) grown in South America. In recent years PepMV was reported to infect greenhouse-grown tomatoes. European isolates showed high sequence identity (>99%). On the other hand, two US isol...

  9. Characterization of a Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) isolate in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Liang; Pennerman, Kayla K; Wang, Hongxing; Yin, Guohua

    2016-03-01

    Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), a causal agent of the destructive sugarcane mosaic disease, has a global presence. An isolate of SrMV infecting a commercially-grown sugarcane plant was recovered from the Hainan province of China. The virions were visualized by an electron microscope, and the coat proteins (CPs) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. Discrepancies between the CP predicted and actual amino acid sequences were noted, which confounded the phylogenetic assignment of the isolate. The apparent variations may have physiological effects on the pathogenicity and virulence of SrMV. PMID:26981005

  10. Comparative Sequence Analyses of La Crosse Virus Strain Isolated from Patient with Fatal Encephalitis, Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Fryxell, Rebecca Trout; Freyman, Kimberly; Ulloa, Armando; Velez, Jason O.; Paulsen, Dave; Lanciotti, Robert S.; Moncayo, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    We characterized a La Crosse virus (LACV) isolate from the brain of a child who died of encephalitis-associated complications in eastern Tennessee, USA, during summer 2012. We compared the isolate with LACV sequences from mosquitoes collected near the child’s home just after his postmortem diagnosis. In addition, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of these and other sequences derived from LACV strains representing varied temporal, geographic, and ecologic origins. Consistent with historical findings, results of these analyses indicate that a limited range of LACV lineage I genotypes is associated with severe clinical outcomes. PMID:25898269

  11. Enhanced virus isolation by use of the transporter for a regional laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Warford, A L; Eveland, W G; Strong, C A; Levy, R A; Rekrut, K A

    1984-01-01

    Transporter tubes with fibroblast monolayers were compared with sucrose-phosphate-glutamate buffer for transport of 385 specimens to a regional laboratory for virus culture. Ninety-two (91%) of 101 viral isolates were recovered in cell culture from the Transporter, as compared with 82 (81%) from sucrose-phosphate-glutamate buffer. Twenty-five (24.7%) of the viral isolates were detected by cytopathic effect from 1 to 11 days earlier from the Transporter than from the sucrose-phosphate-glutamate buffer. The Transporter also permitted the use of ambient temperature for transport. PMID:6325498

  12. Comparative sequence analyses of La Crosse virus strain isolated from patient with fatal encephalitis, Tennessee, USA.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Amy J; Fryxell, Rebecca Trout; Freyman, Kimberly; Ulloa, Armando; Velez, Jason O; Paulsen, Dave; Lanciotti, Robert S; Moncayo, Abelardo

    2015-05-01

    We characterized a La Crosse virus (LACV) isolate from the brain of a child who died of encephalitis-associated complications in eastern Tennessee, USA, during summer 2012. We compared the isolate with LACV sequences from mosquitoes collected near the child's home just after his postmortem diagnosis. In addition, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of these and other sequences derived from LACV strains representing varied temporal, geographic, and ecologic origins. Consistent with historical findings, results of these analyses indicate that a limited range of LACV lineage I genotypes is associated with severe clinical outcomes. PMID:25898269

  13. Characterization of a Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) isolate in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu Liang; Pennerman, Kayla K.; Wang, Hongxing; Yin, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), a causal agent of the destructive sugarcane mosaic disease, has a global presence. An isolate of SrMV infecting a commercially-grown sugarcane plant was recovered from the Hainan province of China. The virions were visualized by an electron microscope, and the coat proteins (CPs) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. Discrepancies between the CP predicted and actual amino acid sequences were noted, which confounded the phylogenetic assignment of the isolate. The apparent variations may have physiological effects on the pathogenicity and virulence of SrMV. PMID:26981005

  14. Label-fracture of plasma membranes isolated from measles virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Rutter, G; Hohenberg, H

    1993-07-01

    We present a method that permits correlation of the intramembrane architecture of plasma membrane fracture faces with the distribution of specific molecules at the corresponding cytoplasmic or exoplasmic membrane surfaces. HeLa cells infected with measles virus were used as a model system. Large fragments of the dorsal membrane were isolated after the virus glycoproteins were tagged at the outer cell surface with immune serum and protein A-gold markers. In a second step, different virus polypeptides at the inner cell surface were also identified by a smaller gold label. Thereafter, the isolated plasma membranes were frozen and freeze-fractured. The complementary fracture faces were shadowed with heavy metals and carbon and examined in the transmission electron microscope without cleaning of remaining biological material. Thus, the micromorphology of the replicated fracture faces and the topochemistry of virus components localized at the corresponding leaflets of the plasmalemma could be seen on the same image at high resolution. Of note is that the freeze-fracture morphology of the protoplasmic face is related to the molecular composition of the cytoplasmic surface, as revealed by antibody tagging. PMID:8515050

  15. Sequence determination of a quadripartite dsRNA virus isolated from Aspergillus foetidus.

    PubMed

    Kozlakidis, Zisis; Herrero, Noemi; Ozkan, Selin; Kanhayuwa, Lakkhana; Jamal, Atif; Bhatti, Muhammad F; Coutts, Robert H A

    2013-01-01

    Virus infection of Aspergillus foetidus was documented over 40 years ago and was one of the first mycovirus infections described in a filamentous fungus. The virus, named Aspergillus foetidus virus (AfV), contains at least two types of icosahedral particles, called AfV-fast (-F) and AfV-slow (-S) virions, based on their relative electrophoretic mobilities. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the AfV-F genome isolated from virions purified from the prototype isolate of the fungus. The AfV-F double-stranded (ds) RNA genome is tetra-segmented, and the plus strands of each of the four segments, but not the minus strands, are polyadenylated. The organisation and sequences of the four AfV-F dsRNAs are similar to those described for Alternaria alternata virus 1, which we propose is a member of an emerging mycovirus genus ("Alternavirus") and family ("Alternaviridae"), which also includes AfV-F. PMID:22760661

  16. Isolation and characterization of tick-borne encephalitis virus from Ixodes persulcatus in Mongolia in 2012.

    PubMed

    Muto, Memi; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Tsevel, Bazartseren; Dashzevge, Erdenechimeg; Yoshii, Kentaro; Kariwa, Hiroaki

    2015-07-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a zoonotic virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, in the family Flaviviridae. The virus, which is endemic in Europe and northern parts of Asia, causes severe encephalitis. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) has been reported in Mongolia since the 1980s, but details about the biological characteristics of the endemic virus are lacking. In this study, 680 ticks (Ixodes persulcatus) were collected in Selenge aimag, northern Mongolia, in 2012. Nine Mongolian TBEV strains were isolated from tick homogenates. A sequence analysis of the envelope protein gene revealed that all isolates belonged to the Siberian subtype of TBEV. Two strains showed similar growth properties in cultured cells, but their virulence in mice differed. Whole genome sequencing revealed only thirteen amino acid differences between these Mongolian TBEV strains. Our results suggest that these naturally occurring amino acid mutations affected the pathogenicity of Mongolian TBEV. Our results may be an important platform for monitoring TBEV to evaluate the epidemiological risk in TBE endemic areas of Mongolia. PMID:26025267

  17. Genetic Diversity of the Coat Protein of Olive Mild Mosaic Virus (OMMV) and Tobacco Necrosis Virus D (TNV-D) Isolates and Its Structural Implications

    PubMed Central

    Varanda, Carla M. R.; Machado, Marco; Martel, Paulo; Nolasco, Gustavo; Clara, Maria I. E.; Félix, Maria R.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic variability among 13 isolates of Olive mild mosaic virus (OMMV) and of 11 isolates of Tobacco necrosis virus D (TNV-D) recovered from Olea europaea L. samples from various sites in Portugal, was assessed through the analysis of the coat protein (CP) gene sequences. This gene was amplified through reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloned, and 5 clone sequences of each virus isolate, were analysed and compared, including sequences from OMMV and TNV-D isolates originally recovered from different hosts and countries and available in the GenBank, totalling 131 sequences. The encoded CP sequences consisted of 269 amino acids (aa) in OMMV and 268 in TNV-D. Comparison of the CP genomic and amino acid sequences of the isolates showed a very low variability among OMMV isolates, 0.005 and 0.007, respectively, as well as among TNV-D isolates, 0.006 and 0.008. The maximum nucleotide distances of OMMV and TNV-D sequences within isolates were also low, 0.013 and 0.031, respectively, and close to that found between isolates, 0.018 and 0.034, respectively. In some cases, less variability was found in clone sequences between isolates than in clone sequences within isolates, as also shown through phylogenetic analysis. CP aa sequence identities among OMMV and TNV-D isolates ranged from 84.3% to 85.8%. Comparison between the CP genomic sequences of the two viruses, showed a relatively low variability, 0.199, and a maximum nucleotide distance between isolates of 0.411. Analysis of comparative models of OMMV and TNV-D CPs, showed that naturally occurring substitutions in their respective sequences do not seem to cause significant alterations in the virion structure. This is consistent with a high selective pressure to preserve the structure of viral capsid proteins. PMID:25350108

  18. Screening, isolation and optimization of anti–white spot syndrome virus drug derived from terrestrial plants

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Upasana; Chakraborty, Somnath; Balasubramanian, Thangavel; Das, Punyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Objective To screen, isolate and optimize anti-white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) drug derived from various terrestrial plants and to evaluate the efficacy of the same in host–pathogen interaction model. Methods Thirty plants were subjected to Soxhlet extraction using water, ethanol, methanol and hexane as solvents. The 120 plant isolates thus obtained were screened for their in vivo anti–WSSV property in Litopenaeus vannamei. The best anti–WSSV plant isolate, TP22C was isolated and further analyzed. The drug was optimized at various concentrations. Viral and immune genes were analysed using reverse transcriptase PCR to confirm the potency of the drug. Results Seven plant isolates exhibited significant survivability in host. The drug TP22C thus formulated showed 86% survivability in host. The surviving shrimps were nested PCR negative at the end of the 15 d experimentation. The lowest concentration of TP22C required intramuscularly for virucidal property was 10 mg/mL. The oral dosage of 750 mg/kg body weight/day survived at the rate of 86%. Neither VP28 nor ie 1 was expressed in the test samples at 42nd hour and 84th hour post viral infection. Conclusions The drug TP22C derived from Momordica charantia is a potent anti-white spot syndrome virus drug. PMID:25183066

  19. Genetic Diversity of a Natural Population of Apple stem pitting virus Isolated from Apple in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ju Yeon; Joa, Jae Ho; Choi, Kyung San; Do, Ki Seck; Lim, Han Cheol; Chung, Bong Nam

    2014-01-01

    Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), of the Foveavirus genus in the family Betaflexiviridae, is one of the most common viruses of apple and pear trees. To examine variability of the coat protein (CP) gene from ASPV, eight isolates originating from 251 apple trees, which were collected from 22 apple orchards located in intensive apple growing areas of the North Gyeongsang and North Jeolla Provinces in Korea, were sequenced and compared. The nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene of eight ASPV isolates ranged from 77.0 to 97.0%, while the amino acid sequence identity ranged from 87.7 to 98.5%. The N-terminal region of the viral CP gene was highly variable, whereas the C-terminal region was conserved. Genetic algorithm recombination detection (GARD) and single breakpoint recombination (SBP) analyses identified base substitutions between eight ASPV isolates at positions 54 and 57 and position 771, respectively. GABranch analysis was used to determine whether the eight isolates evolved due to positive selection. All values in the GABranch analysis showed a ratio of substitution rates at non-synonymous and synonymous sites (dNS/dS) below 1, suggestive of strong negative selection forces during ASPV CP history. Although negative selection dominated CP evolution in the eight ASPV isolates, SLAC and FEL tests identified four possible positive selection sites at codons 10, 22, 102, and 158. This is the first study of the ASPV genome in Korea. PMID:25289003

  20. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of Mucambo virus (Venezuelan equine encephalitis complex subtype IIIA) in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Auguste, Albert J; Volk, Sara M; Arrigo, Nicole C; Martinez, Raymond; Ramkissoon, Vernie; Adams, A Paige; Thompson, Nadin N; Adesiyun, Abiodun A; Chadee, Dave D; Foster, Jerome E; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P A; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C; Carrington, Christine V F

    2009-09-15

    In the 1950s and 1960s, alphaviruses in the Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) antigenic complex were the most frequently isolated arboviruses in Trinidad. Since then, there has been very little research performed with these viruses. Herein, we report on the isolation, sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses of Mucambo virus (MUCV; VEE complex subtype IIIA), including 6 recently isolated from Culex (Melanoconion) portesi mosquitoes and 11 previously isolated in Trinidad and Brazil. Results show that nucleotide and amino acid identities across the complete structural polyprotein for the MUCV isolates were 96.6-100% and 98.7-100%, respectively, and the phylogenetic tree inferred for MUCV was highly geographically- and temporally-structured. Bayesian analyses suggest that the sampled MUCV lineages have a recent common ancestry of approximately 198 years (with a 95% highest posterior density (HPD) interval of 63-448 years) prior to 2007, and an overall rate of evolution of 1.28 x 10(-4) substitutions/site/yr. PMID:19631956

  1. Genetic Structure and Molecular Variability of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolates in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Shahideh; Arevalo, Rafael; Falk, Bryce W.; Groves, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has a worldwide distribution and the widest host range of any known plant virus. From 2000 to 2012, epidemics of CMV severely affected the production of snap bean (Phaseulos vulgaris L.) in the Midwest and Northeastern United States. Virus diversity leading to emergence of new strains is often considered a significant factor in virus epidemics. In addition to epidemics, new disease phenotypes arising from genetic exchanges or mutation can compromise effectiveness of plant disease management strategies. Here, we captured a snapshot of genetic variation of 32 CMV isolates collected from different regions of the U.S including new field as well as historic isolates. Nucleotide diversity (?) was low for U.S. CMV isolates. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that CMV subgroup I is predominant in the US and further showed that the CMV population is a mixture of subgroups IA and IB. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis suggests likely reassortment between subgroups IA and IB within five CMV isolates. Based on phylogenetic and computational analysis, recombination between subgroups I and II as well as IA and IB in RNA 3 was detected. This is the first report of recombination between CMV subgroups I and II. Neutrality tests illustrated that negative selection was the major force operating upon the CMV genome, although some positively selected sites were detected for all encoded proteins. Together, these data suggest that different regions of the CMV genome are under different evolutionary constraints. These results also delineate composition of the CMV population in the US, and further suggest that recombination and reassortment among strain subgroups does occur but at a low frequency, and point towards CMV genomic regions that differ in types of selection pressure. PMID:24801880

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the First Aichi Virus Isolated in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jenn-Tzong; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Bao-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The first Aichi virus (AiV), kvgh99012632/2010, was identified in Taiwan. The entire genome of the AiV isolate was sequenced and compared to known AiV sequences. Genome alignment revealed that the Taiwan AiV strain shares 96.3% nucleotide and 99% amino acid identities with the German strain D/VI2287/2004. PMID:23405311

  3. Influenza A(H5N8) virus isolation in Russia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, Vasiliy Y; Susloparov, Ivan M; Kolosova, Nataliya P; Goncharova, Nataliya I; Shipovalov, Andrey V; Durymanov, Alexander G; Ilyicheva, Tatyana N; Budatsirenova, Lubov V; Ivanova, Valentina K; Ignatyev, Georgy A; Ershova, Svetlana N; Tulyahova, Valeriya S; Mikheev, Valeriy N; Ryzhikov, Alexander B

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report the isolation of influenza A(H5N8) virus from a Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope) in Sakha Republic of the Russian Far East. The strain A/wigeon/Sakha/1/2014 (H5N8) has been shown to be pathogenic for mammals. It is similar to the strains that caused outbreaks in wild birds and poultry in Southeast Asia and Europe in 2014. PMID:26306756

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Nervous Necrosis Virus Isolated from Sevenband Grouper (Epinephelus septemfasciatus) in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Wi-Sik; Cho, Jae-Kwon; Kim, Kyong-Min; Son, Maeng-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the nervous necrosis virus (NNV) SGYeosu08, isolated from sevenband grouper (Epinephelus septemfasciatus) in Yeosu, South Korea, was cloned and analyzed. The full-length RNA1 was a 3,103-nucleotide-encoding region of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and the RNA2 encoding a coat protein was 1,433 nucleotides in length. This genome sequence might be useful in the development of an accurate diagnostic tool. PMID:25502666

  5. Identify, isolate, inform: Background and considerations for Ebola virus disease preparedness in U.S. ambulatory care settings.

    PubMed

    Chea, Nora; Perz, Joseph F; Srinivasan, Arjun; Laufer, Alison S; Pollack, Lori A

    2015-11-01

    Public health activities to identify and monitor persons at risk for Ebola virus disease in the United States include directing persons at risk to assessment facilities that are prepared to safely evaluate for Ebola virus disease. Although it is unlikely that a person with Ebola virus disease will unexpectedly present to a nonemergency ambulatory care facility, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have provided guidance for this setting that can be summarized as identify, isolate, and inform. PMID:26277570

  6. Isolation and Characterization of H4N6 Avian Influenza Viruses from Pigs with Pneumonia in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Karasin, Alexander I.; Brown, Ian H.; Carman, Suzanne; Olsen, Christopher W.

    2000-01-01

    In October 1999, H4N6 influenza A viruses were isolated from pigs with pneumonia on a commercial swine farm in Canada. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequences of all eight viral RNA segments demonstrated that these are wholly avian influenza viruses of the North American lineage. To our knowledge, this is the first report of interspecies transmission of an avian H4 influenza virus to domestic pigs under natural conditions. PMID:10982381

  7. Broad-spectrum detection and quantitation methods of Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Vaïanopoulos, Céline; Legrève, Anne; Moreau, Virginie; Bragard, Claude

    2009-08-01

    A broad-spectrum reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was developed for detecting Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus (SBCMV) isolates, responsible for mosaic diseases in Europe, using primers targeting the highly conserved 3'-untranslated region of RNA-1 and RNA-2 of SBCMV. The 3'-end region is a privileged target for the detection of a wide range of isolates, because of sequence conservation, of the tRNA-like structure, the major role in viral replication and the signal amplification due to the presence of numerous genomic and subgenomic RNAs. The primers were also designed for virus quantitation using real-time RT-PCR with SYBR-Green chemistry. No cross-reaction with Wheat spindle streak mosaic virus, frequently associated with SBCMV, was observed. The use of RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR allowed a more sensitive detection and quantitation of SBCMV to be made than was the case with ELISA. The methods enabled European isolates of SBCMV from Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and the UK to be detected and quantified. Real-time RT-PCR represents a new tool for comparing soil inoculum potential as well as cultivar resistance to SBCMV. PMID:19490978

  8. Molecular characterization of Rabies Virus isolates from dogs and crab-eating foxes in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carnieli, Pedro; Castilho, Juliana Galera; Fahl, Willian de Oliveira; Véras, Nazle Mendonça Collaço; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete

    2009-04-01

    Thirty-eight samples of Rabies Virus isolated from dogs and crab-eating foxes (Cerdocyon thous) in Northeastern Brazil were characterized genetically by analyzing the G gene and the psi region. The results show that there are two groups of Rabies Virus lineages circulating among domestic and wild animals in the region. The topologies of the phylogenetic trees of the G gene and psi region are similar and reveal the existence of geographic groups. The genetic diversity of the lineages isolated from wild animals (wild group) was approximately twice that of the lineages isolated from domestic animals (domestic group), and the genetic distance between the two groups was 9.93%. Polymorphism analysis revealed specific intra- and inter-group molecular signatures for both the G gene and psi region. Together with the analysis of the N gene undertaken previously, the results of this study confirm the existence of a Rabies Virus phylogroup in Northeastern Brazil (NB) circulating in the C. thous population, making this species a rabies biotype in the region. PMID:19185599

  9. Efficient isolation of Swine influenza viruses by age-targeted specimen collection.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Makoto; Matsuu, Aya; Yonezawa, Kouki; Igarashi, Manabu; Okuya, Kosuke; Kawabata, Toshiko; Ito, Kimihito; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Taneno, Akira; Deguchi, Eisaburo

    2015-04-01

    The control of swine influenza virus (SIV) infection is paramount for increasing the productivity of pig farming and minimizing the threat of pandemic outbreaks. Thus, SIV surveillance should be conducted by region and on a regular basis. Here, we established a microneutralization assay specific for SIV seroprevalence surveillance by using reporter gene-expressing recombinant influenza viruses. Growth-based SIV seroprevalence revealed that most sows and piglets were positive for neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses. In contrast, the 90-day-old growing pigs exhibited limited neutralizing activity in their sera, suggesting that this particular age of population is most susceptible to SIV infection and thus is an ideal age group for SIV isolation. From nasal swab specimens of healthy pigs in this age population, we were able to isolate SIVs at a higher incidence (5.3%) than those of previous reports. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) genes revealed that the isolated SIVs have circulated and evolved in pigs but not have been recently introduced from humans, implying that a large number of SIV lineages may remain "undiscovered" in the global porcine populations. We propose that the 90-day-old growing pig-targeted nasal swab collection presented in this study facilitates global SIV surveillance and contributes to the detection and control of SIV infection. PMID:25694523

  10. Characterization of a North American orf virus isolated from a goat with persistent, proliferative dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Guo, J; Zhang, Z; Edwards, J F; Ermel, R W; Taylor, C; de la Concha-Bermejillo, A

    2003-06-01

    The characterization of an orf virus (OV) isolated from skin lesions of a goat kid with severe, persistent, proliferative dermatitis, and designated orf virus-San Angelo 2000 (OV-SA00) strain, is described. The identity of OV-SA00 was confirmed by a combination of methods, including electron microscopy, amplification of specific fragments of viral DNA by polymerase chain reaction, restriction enzyme analysis of viral DNA and gene sequencing. Restriction endonuclease analyses of viral DNA and the protein profile studied by Western blot revealed differences between OV-SA00 strain and the profiles of other OV strains that have been published. The restriction enzyme profile of OV-SA00 was also different from the orf virus vaccine (OV-V) strain used to vaccinate this kid. Comparison of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences indicated that OV-SA00 is closely related to OV-V strain, the Scottish OV strains orf11 and MRI Scab, and the human OV-CE/Shoe strain and more distant to bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) reference strain and the pseudocowpox virus (PCPV)-MNV/Till strain. These results indicate that OV-SA00 is a strain of OV rather than a different parapoxvirus. Further studies are necessary to determine if the severity of orf-induced lesions in this goat kid was the result of individual host susceptibility factors. PMID:12782365

  11. A cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus isolated from the pine processionary caterpillar, Thaumetopoea pityocampa.

    PubMed

    Ince, Ikbal Agah; Demir, Ismail; Demirbag, Zihni; Nalcacioglu, Remziye

    2007-04-01

    A cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV) was isolated from the larvae of Thaumetopoea pityocampa and shown to cause an infection of midgut cells. This viral infection revealed several important diagnostic symptoms, including discoloration of the posterior midgut, reduced feeding, and extended development time of the larvae. The virus infection is lethal to Thaumetopoea pityocampa, and with the increasing doses kills the larvae within 4-5 days post infection. Electron microscopy studies showed typical cytoplasmic polyhedral inclusion bodies that are icosahedral, and ranged from 2.4 to 5.3 microm in diameter. Electrophoretic analysis of the RNA genome showed that the virus has a genome composed of 10 equimolar RNA segments with the sizes of 3,907, 3,716, 3,628, 3,249, 2,726, 1,914, 1,815, 1,256, 1,058, and 899 bp, respectively. Based on morphology and nucleic acid analysis, this virus was named Thaumetopoea pityocampa cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (TpCPV), and belongs to the genus Cypovirus, family Reoviridae. PMID:18051275

  12. Nasal Wipes for Influenza A Virus Detection and Isolation from Swine.

    PubMed

    Nolting, Jacqueline M; Szablewski, Christine M; Edwards, Jody L; Nelson, Sarah W; Bowman, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance for influenza A viruses in swine is critical to human and animal health because influenza A virus rapidly evolves in swine populations and new strains are continually emerging. Swine are able to be infected by diverse lineages of influenza A virus making them important hosts for the emergence and maintenance of novel influenza A virus strains. Sampling pigs in diverse settings such as commercial swine farms, agricultural fairs, and live animal markets is important to provide a comprehensive view of currently circulating IAV strains. The current gold-standard ante-mortem sampling technique (i.e. collection of nasal swabs) is labor intensive because it requires physical restraint of the pigs. Nasal wipes involve rubbing a piece of fabric across the snout of the pig with minimal to no restraint of the animal. The nasal wipe procedure is simple to perform and does not require personnel with professional veterinary or animal handling training. While slightly less sensitive than nasal swabs, virus detection and isolation rates are adequate to make nasal wipes a viable alternative for sampling individual pigs when low stress sampling methods are required. The proceeding protocol outlines the steps needed to collect a viable nasal wipe from an individual pig. PMID:26709840

  13. Isolation of exotic Newcastle disease virus (ENDV) from field collected flies and experimental ENDV infections of three arthropod species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the 2002 Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) outbreak in California arthropods were collected from two quarantined backyard poultry premises after removal of END virus infected birds. The END virus (ENDV) isolated from field collected pools of three fly species was found to have >98% homology by ...

  14. Phylogenetic and biological characterization of virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated in wild birds during 2002-2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a West Nile virus surveillance program in the Houston Metropolitan Area and in Rhode Island, extracts from brain from 5608 dead birds representing 21 avian orders, were cultured in Vero cells. Sixteen Newcastle disease virus isolates were recovered from birds of the order Columbiformes. ...

  15. Evaluation and optimization of avian embryos and cell culture methods for efficient isolation and propagation of avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveillance of wild bird populations for avian influenza viruses (AIV) contributes to our understanding of AIV evolution and ecology. Both real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) and virus isolation in embryonating chicken eggs (ECE) are standard methods for detecting A...

  16. Full-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Baioni, Laura; Luppi, Andrea; Moreno, Ana; Castellan, Alberto; Foni, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the full-genome sequence of a novel reassortant H1N1 swine influenza virus (SIV) is reported. The isolate has a hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, but it carries the seven genome segments of the avian-origin H1N1 SIV currently circulating in European pig farms. PMID:24092781

  17. West Nile virus isolated from Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in Northwest Missouri 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Harmon, Jessica; Lash, R. Ryan; Weiss, Sonja; Langevin, Stanley; Savage, Harry; Marvin S. Godsey, Jr.; Burkhalter, Kristen; Root, J. Jeffrey; Gidlewski, Thomas; Nicholson, William; Brault, Aaron C.; Komar, Nicholas

    2014-12-01

    We describe the isolation of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, flavivirus) from blood of a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) collected in northwestern Missouri, USA in August 2012. Furthermore, sequencing determined that the virus was related to lineage 1a WNV02 strains. We discuss the role of wildlife in WNV disease epidemiology.

  18. A highly divergent Encephalomyocarditis virus isolated from nonhuman primates in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2001 and 2002, fatal myocarditis resulted in the sudden deaths of four, two adult and two juvenile, orang utans out of a cohort of 26 in the Singapore Zoological Gardens. Methods Of the four orang utans that underwent post-mortem examination, virus isolation was performed from the tissue homogenates of the heart and lung obtained from the two juvenile orang utans in Vero cell cultures. The tissue culture fluid was examined using electron microscopy. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction with Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV)-specific primers targeting the gene regions of VP3/VP1 and 3D polymerase (3Dpol) confirmed the virus genus and species. The two EMCV isolates were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses of the virus genes performed. Serological testing on other animal species in the Singapore Zoological Gardens was also conducted. Results Electron microscopy of the two EMCV isolates, designated Sing-M100-02 and Sing-M105-02, revealed spherical viral particles of about 20 to 30 nm, consistent with the size and morphology of members belonging to the family Picornaviridae. In addition, infected-Vero cells showed positive immunoflorescence staining with antiserum to EMCV. Sequencing of the viral genome showed that the two EMCV isolates were 99.9% identical at the nucleotide level, indicating a similar source of origin. When compared with existing EMCV sequences in the VP1 and 3Dpol gene regions, the nucleotide divergence were at a maximum of 38.8% and 23.6% respectively, while the amino acid divergence were at a maximum of 33.9% and 11.3% respectively. Phylogenetic analyses of VP1 and 3Dpol genes further grouped the Sing-M100-02 and Sing-M105-02 isolates to themselves, away from existing EMCV lineages. This strongly suggested that Sing-M100-02 and Sing-M105-02 isolates are highly divergent variants of EMCV. Apart from the two deceased orang utans, a serological survey conducted among other zoo animals showed that a number of other animal species had neutralizing antibodies to Sing-M105-02 isolate, indicating that the EMCV variant has a relatively wide host range. Conclusions The etiological agent responsible for the fatal myocarditis cases among two of the four orang utans in the Singapore Zoological Gardens was a highly divergent variant of EMCV. This is the first report of an EMCV infection in Singapore and South East Asia. PMID:23914943

  19. Genomic Characterization of a Novel Virus of the Family Tymoviridae Isolated from Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shihong; Wang, David; Rayner, Simon; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong

    2012-01-01

    Background The family Tymoviridae comprises three plant virus genera, including Tymovirus, Marafivirus, and Maculavirus, which are found in most parts of the world and cause severe agricultural losses. We describe a putatively novel member of the family Tymoviridae, which is isolated from mosquitoes (Culex spp.), referred to as CuTLV. Methods and Results The CuTLV was isolated by cell culture, which replicates and causes cytopathic effects in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells, but not in mammalian BHK-21 or Vero cells. The complete 6471 nucleotide sequence of CuTLV was determined. The genome of CuTLV is predicted to contain three open reading frames (ORFs). The largest ORF1 is 5307 nucleotides (nt) in length and encodes a putative polypeptide of 1769 amino acids (aa), which contains the conserved motifs for the methyltransferase (MTR), Tymovirus endopeptidase (PRO), helicase (HEL), and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of the replication-associated proteins (RPs) of positive-stranded RNA viruses. In contrast, the ORF1 sequence does not contain the so-called “tymobox” or “marafibox”, the conserved subgenomic RNA promoter present in all tymoviruses or marafiviruses, respectively. ORF2 and ORF3 putatively encode a 248-aa coat protein (CP) and a proline-rich 149-aa polypeptide. The whole genomic nucleotide identity of CuTLV with other members of family Tymoviridae ranged from 46.2% (ChiYMV) to 52.4% (GFkV). Phylogenetic analysis based on the putative RP and CP genes of CuTLV demonstrated that the virus is most closely related to viruses in the genus Maculavirus. Conclusions The CuTLV is a novel virus related to members of the family Tymoviridae, with molecular characters that are distinct from those of tymoviruses, marafiviruses, and other maculaviruses or macula-like viruses. This is the first report of the isolation of a Tymoviridae-like virus from mosquitoes. Further investigations are required to clarify the origin, replication strategy, and the public health or agricultural importance of the CuTLV. PMID:22848363

  20. Efficacy of rabies vaccines against Duvenhage virus isolated from European house bats (Eptesicus serotinus), classic rabies and rabies-related viruses.

    PubMed

    Fekadu, M; Shaddock, J H; Sanderlin, D W; Smith, J S

    1988-12-01

    Isolates of rabies from separate enzootics can be distinguished by their reactions with panels of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to different sites on the nucleocapsid and glycoproteins of the virus. Estimates of antigenic relatedness can be made by comparing similarities among groups. In this manner it can be shown that while classic strains of rabies react with most of the mAbs, the rabies related Lyssaviruses (Mokola, Lagos and Duvenhage) react with only a few of the mAbs and isolates of rabies from Eptesicus serotinus bats in Europe are intermediate between the two groups. Mice immunized intraperitoneally with human diploid vaccine (HDCV) or animal vaccines (Rabisin and Rabiffa) were protected against a challenge with DBV, DUV-1 and most classic rabies strains. HDCV gave only partial protection against human virus isolates from Finland and Saudi Arabia. The HDCV did not protect mice against challenges with Lagos bat or Mokola virus (rabies-like viruses). The animal vaccines, however, did protect mice against Lagos bat virus, but not against Mokola. Dogs immunized with Rabisin were protected against an intracerebral challenge with DBV. Dogs developed rabies-neutralizing antibody titres after intramuscular or intravenous inoculation with live DBV or DUV-1 virus; these dogs were protected against an intramuscular canine street rabies virus challenge. We conclude that the rabies vaccines tested protect against DBV/DUV-1 and classic street rabies strains, but not Mokola. PMID:3245296

  1. [Isolation, identification and full-length genome sequence analysis of encephalomyocarditis virus from local aardvarks].

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong-Tao; Liu, Hui-Min; He, Xiu-Yuan; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xin-Wei; Yang, Xia; Yao, Hui-Xia; Wang, Chuan-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a natural epidemic zoonotic pathogen. However, no reports have been published regarding the isolation, identification and full-length genome of EMCV from a local aardvark population. In present study, an EMCV isolate HNXX13 was isolated from aardvarks named Huainan-pig in Henan Province. The systematic identification, full-length genome sequencing and molecular characteristic analysis of the isolate HNXX13 were conducted. The result showed that the isolate was spherical with a diameter of 24-30 nm, neither heat- nor acid-resistant, sensitive to trypsin, insensitive to chloroform, not protected by bivalent cationic, and the specific fluorescence was observed in the cytoplasm of BHK-21 cells infected with the isolate by using indirect fluorescence assay. The full-length genome of EMCV HNXX13 generated a 7 725bp sequence (GenBank: F771002), with 81.0%-99.9% nucleotide identity to reference strains from different animals, and 99.5% with a Chinese reference strain isolated earlier from a commercial pig herd. The phylogenetic tree based on the full-length genome and ORF sequences identified that all EMCV strains were divided into three groups G1, G2 and G3, and strain HNXX13 belonging to the G1 group with other Chinese reference strains. The result also identified that this EMCV infection could cause severe clinical signs in a local aardvark population, and enriches the molecular epidemiological data of EMCV in China. Regional differences exist in EMCV genome and transmission is limited within a certain area. However, the cross-infection and transmission of EMCV between aardvark and mice appears most likely. Mutations have occurred in some amino acids of EMCV strain HNXX13 during the transmission in local aardvark herd and these mutations might make the virus easier to infect the aardvark. PMID:25272589

  2. The complete genome sequences of two naturally occurring recombinant isolates of Sugarcane mosaic virus from Iran.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Zohreh; Mehrvar, Mohsen; Nazifi, Ehsan; Zakiaghl, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) is the most prevalent virus causing sugarcane mosaic and maize dwarf mosaic diseases. Here, we presented the first two complete genomic sequences of Iranian SCMV isolates, NRA and ZRA from sugarcane and maize. The complete genome sequences of NRA and ZRA were, respectively, 9571 and 9572 nucleotides (nt) in length, excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail. Both isolates contained a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 149 nt, an open reading frame of 9192 nt encoding a polyprotein of 3063 amino acids (aa), and 3'-UTR of 230 nt for NRA and 231 nt for ZRA. SCMV-NRA and -ZRA genome nucleotide sequences were 97.3 % identical and shared nt identities of 79.1-92 % with those of other 21 SCMV isolates available in the GenBank, highest with the isolate Bris-A (AJ278405) (92 and 91.7 %) from Australia. When compared for separate genes, most of their genes shared the highest identities with Australian and Argentinean isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genomic sequences reveals that SCMV can be clustered to three groups. Both NRA and ZRA were clustered with sugarcane isolates from Australia and Argentina in group III but formed a separate sublineage. Recombination analysis showed that both isolates were intraspecific recombinants, and represented two novel recombination patterns of SCMV (in the P1 coding region). NRA had six recombination sites within the P1, HC-Pro, CI, NIa-Vpg, and NIa-pro coding regions, while ZRA had four within the P1, HC-Pro, NIa-Pro, and NIb coding regions. PMID:26905544

  3. Genetic Variation among Temporally and Geographically Distinct West Nile Virus Isolates, United States, 2001, 2002

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. Todd; Beasley, David W.C.; Guzman, Hilda; Raj, Pushker; D’Anton, Mary; Novak, Robert J.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Tesh, Robert B.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of partial nucleotide sequences of 22 West Nile virus (WNV) isolates collected during the summer and fall of 2001 and 2002 indicated genetic variation among strains circulating in geographically distinct regions of the United States and continued divergence from isolates collected in the northeastern United States during 1999 and 2000. Sequence analysis of a 2,004-nucleotide region showed that 14 isolates shared two nucleotide mutations and one amino acid substitution when they were compared with the prototype WN-NY99 strain, with 10 of these isolates sharing an additional nucleotide mutation. In comparison, isolates collected from coastal regions of southeast Texas shared the following differences from WN-NY99: five nucleotide mutations and one amino acid substitution. The maximum nucleotide divergence of the 22 isolates from WN-NY99 was 0.35% (mean = 0.18%). These results show the geographic clustering of genetically similar WNV isolates and the possible emergence of a dominant variant circulating across much of the United States during 2002. PMID:14718086

  4. Lassa virus isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast represent an emerging fifth lineage

    PubMed Central

    Manning, John T.; Forrester, Naomi; Paessler, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Previous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus (LASV) among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for LF is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each LASV isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200–300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa. PMID:26483768

  5. Lassa virus isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast represent an emerging fifth lineage.

    PubMed

    Manning, John T; Forrester, Naomi; Paessler, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Previous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus (LASV) among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for LF is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each LASV isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200-300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa. PMID:26483768

  6. Genotype analysis of varicella-zoster virus isolates from suburban Shanghai Municipal Province, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Guo, Y; Li, M; Yao, Z

    2016-02-01

    To determine the predominant genotype of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in suburban Shanghai Municipal Province, specimens were collected from the lesions of 95 outpatients clinically diagnosed with varicella or herpes zoster. Of these, 69 patients (72.6?%) were positive for VZV DNA. The 69 isolates were all genotyped as the genotype J1/clade 2. Based on sequencing of the 447?bp sequence in ORF22, 66 isolates were identified as genotype J/clade 2 strains and three were identified as type M2/clade 4 strains. To confirm the classification of these three strains, we determined the presence of 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and found that isolates 1270/1450 shared seven SNPs that differed from those of clade 2, in which three SNPs were unique to clade 3 and another three were unique to clade 4. Isolate 1456 had two markers of clade 4 that differed from clade 2. The phylogenetic tree showed that our isolates clustered primarily with clade 2 and that the three M2/J1 strains clustered between clades 2 and 4. It is likely that isolates 1270/1450/1446 may represent a new subclade of either clade 2 or 4, or some recombinant events. In addition, our isolates were WT strains. We also observed significant inter-strain variations. PMID:26654224

  7. Complete genome sequence of an avian leukosis virus isolate associated with hemangioma and myeloid leukosis in egg-type and meat-type chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new virus isolate was separated from a commercial egg-type flock of chickens in China and was determined as subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J). ALV-J is known to cause myeloid leukosis. But this new isolate of viruses causes both hemangioma and myeloid leukosis in chickens. Hemangioma is an a...

  8. Genetic and biological characterization of Muko virus, a new distinct member of the species Great Island virus (genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae), isolated from ixodid ticks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ejiri, Hiroko; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Isawa, Haruhiko; Kuwata, Ryusei; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Kinoshita, Hitomi; Kakiuchi, Satsuki; Horiya, Madoka; Kotaki, Akira; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Maeda, Ken; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Toshinori; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Saijo, Masayuki; Sawabe, Kyoko

    2015-12-01

    Among the tick-borne orbiviruses (genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae), 36 serotypes are currently classified within a single virus species, Great Island virus. In this study, we report the first characterization of a tick-borne orbivirus isolated from the tick Ixodes turdus in Japan, which we identified as a new member of the species Great Island virus. The virus isolate, designated Muko virus (MUV), replicated and induced cytopathic effects in BHK-21, Vero E6, and CCL-141 cells and caused high mortality in suckling mice after intracerebral inoculation. Full genome sequence analysis showed that MUV shared the greatest phylogenetic similarity with Tribe? virus in terms of the amino acid sequences of all viral proteins except for outer capsid protein 1 (OC1; VP4 of MUV). Analysis of genome segment 9 in MUV detected an uninterrupted open reading frame that overlaps with VP6 (Hel), which putatively encodes a molecular and functional equivalent of NS4 from Great Island virus. Our study provides new insights into the geographic distribution, genetic diversity, and evolutionary history of the members of the species Great Island virus. PMID:26350980

  9. The isolation of salmonellae, Newcastle disease virus and other infectious agents from quarantined imported birds in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, C E; Pettit, J R; Papp-Vid, G; Spencer, J L; Willis, N G

    1981-01-01

    Necropsy and culture results are presented for 269 consignments of imported birds (mainly psittacine and passerine species) examined between January 1977 and August 1980. Consignments were submitted for diagnosis of clinical illness or deaths occurring among these birds while they were in quarantine before entry into Canada. Enteritis and injury were the most frequent diagnoses. Pathogens or potential pathogens were isolated from 77% of consignments. Newcastle disease virus was isolated nine times, and Chlamydia psittaci was isolated once. Escherichia coli (from 113 consignments) and salmonellae (from 49) were the most common bacteria isolated, and reoviruses (from 22) and paramyxoviruses other than Newcastle disease virus (from 22) were the most common viruses. Salmonella typhimurium was the most common Salmonella serovar. Salmonella hadar was isolated from turkey poults imported from Great Britain. The possible public health significance of the role of imported birds in the introduction of exotic Salmonella serovars, or of serovars resistant to several antimicrobials is discussed. PMID:7039785

  10. Properties and Dissemination of H5N1 Viruses Isolated during an Influenza Outbreak in Migratory Waterfowl in Western China †

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hualan; Li, Yanbing; Li, Zejun; Shi, Jianzhong; Shinya, Kyoko; Deng, Guohua; Qi, Qiaoling; Tian, Guobin; Fan, Shufang; Zhao, Haidan; Sun, Yingxiang; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    H5N1 influenza A viruses are widely distributed among poultry in Asia, but until recently, only a limited number of wild birds were affected. During late April through June 2005, an outbreak of H5N1 virus infection occurred among wild birds at Qinghai Lake in China. Here, we describe the features of this outbreak. First identified in bar-headed geese, the disease soon spread to other avian species populating the lake. Sequence analysis of 15 viruses representing six avian species and collected at different times during the outbreak revealed four different H5N1 genotypes. Most of the isolates possessed lysine at position 627 in the PB2 protein, a residue known to be associated with virulence in mice and adaptation to humans. However, neither of the two index viruses possessed this residue. All of the viruses tested were pathogenic in mice, with the exception of one index virus. We also tested the replication of two viruses isolated during the Qinghai Lake outbreak and one unrelated duck H5N1 virus in rhesus macaques. The Qinghai Lake viruses did not replicate efficiently in these animals, producing no evidence of disease other than transient fever, while the duck virus replicated in multiple organs and caused symptoms of respiratory illness. Importantly, H5N1 viruses isolated in Mongolia, Russia, Inner Mongolia, and the Liaoning Province of China after August 2005 were genetically closely related to one of the genotypes isolated during the Qinghai outbreak, suggesting the dominant nature of this genotype and underscoring the need for worldwide intensive surveillance to minimize its devastating consequences. PMID:16731936

  11. Isolation and characterization of a variant porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    An outbreak of diarrhea in pigs started in Guangdong, South China in January 2011. Cases were characterized by watery diarrhea, dehydration and vomiting, with 80–100% morbidity and 50–90% mortality in suckling piglets. The causative agent of the diarrhea was ultimately identified as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). In this study, we isolated a PEDV strain designated CHGD-01 from piglet intestines using Vero cell cultures, and its specific cytopathic effects were confirmed in susceptible cells by direct immunofluorescence testing and electron microscopy. The complete genome of CHGD-01 was shown to be 28,035 nucleotides in length, with a similar structure to that of PEDV reference strains. Phylogenetic analyses based on the whole genome revealed that CHGD-01 shared nucleotide sequence identities of 98.2–98.4% with two other Chinese isolates reported in the same year, thus constituting a new cluster. Amino acid sequence analysis based on individual virus genes indicated a close relationship between the spike protein gene of CHGD-01 and the field strain KNU0802 in Korea. Its ORF3 and nucleoprotein genes, however, were divergent from all other sequenced PEDV isolate clusters and therefore formed a new group, suggesting a new variant PEDV isolate in China. Further studies will be required to determine the immunogenicity and pathogenicity of this new variant. PMID:22967434

  12. Comparative effectiveness of isolation techniques for contemporary Influenza A virus strains circulating in exhibition swine.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Andrew S; Nelson, Sarah W; Edwards, Jody L; Hofer, Christian C; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Davis, Ian C; Slemons, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    The current study sought to compare the effectiveness of 2 virus isolation methods for the recovery of contemporary Influenza A virus (FLUAV) strains circulating in swine at agricultural exhibitions. Following the emergence of the influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus, increased surveillance of FLUAV strains among swine was recommended for early detection of emerging strains that threaten animal and human health. The increase in genetic drift and genomic reassortment among FLUAV strains infecting swine since 1998 necessitates that detection protocols be periodically validated for contemporary FLUAV strains. During 2009, nasal swabs were collected from 221 clinically healthy pigs at 12 agricultural exhibitions in Ohio. Nasal swabs were tested in parallel for the presence of FLUAV strains using 3 methodologies: 2 passages through Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells adapted to serum-free medium (SFM), 2 passages through embryonated chicken eggs (ECEs), and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR). Of the 221 samples, 40 (18.1%) were positive for FLUAV recovery in MDCK cell culture and 13 (5.9%) were positive in ECEs (P = 0.015). All samples positive in ECEs were also positive in MDCK cell culture. MDCK cell culture virus isolation results were in perfect agreement with results of the real-time RT-PCR. Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase combinations of the recovered isolates were H1N2 and H3N2, which were consistent with FLUAV strains circulating in U.S. pigs. Effectiveness and cost savings justify the use of SFM-adapted MDCK cell culture over ECEs for the recovery of contemporary FLUAV strains from exhibition swine. PMID:23242667

  13. Variation in the NS3 gene and protein in South African isolates of bluetongue and equine encephalosis viruses.

    PubMed

    van Niekerk, M; Freeman, M; Paweska, J T; Howell, P G; Guthrie, A J; Potgieter, A C; van Staden, V; Huismans, H

    2003-03-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) and equine encephalosis virus (EEV) are agriculturally important orbiviruses transmitted by biting midges of the genus Culicoides. The smallest viral genome segment, S10, encodes two small nonstructural proteins, NS3 and NS3A, which mediate the release of virus particles from infected cells and may subsequently influence the natural dispersion of these viruses. The NS3 gene and protein sequences of South African isolates of these viruses were determined, analysed and compared with cognate orbivirus genes from around the world. The South African BTV NS3 genes were found to have the highest level of sequence variation for BTV (20 %), while the highest level of protein variation of BTV NS3 (10 %) was found between South African and Asian BTV isolates. The inferred NS3 gene phylogeny of the South African BTV isolates grouped them with BTV isolates from the United States, while the Asian BTV isolates grouped into a separate lineage. The level of variation found in the NS3 gene and protein of EEV was higher than that found for BTV and reached 25 and 17 % on the nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. The EEV isolates formed a lineage independent from that of the other orbiviruses. This lineage segregated further into two clusters that corresponded to the northern and southern regions of South Africa. The geographical distribution of these isolates may be related to the distribution of the Culicoides subspecies that transmit them. PMID:12604809

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Mayaro Virus from a Human in Acre, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Terzian, Ana Carolina B.; Auguste, Albert J.; Vedovello, Danila; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica; Sperança, Márcia A.; Suzuki, Rodrigo B.; Juncansen, Camila; Araújo, João P.; Weaver, Scott C.; Nogueira, Maurício L.

    2015-01-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is widely distributed throughout South America and is the etiologic agent of Mayaro fever, an acute febrile illness often presenting with arthralgic manifestations. The true incidence of MAYV infection is likely grossly underestimated because the symptomatic presentation is very similar to that of dengue fever and other acute febrile tropical diseases. We report the complete genome sequence of a MAYV isolate detected from an Acrelândia patient presenting with fever, chills, and sweating, but with no arthralgia. Results show that this isolate belongs to genotype D and is closely related to Bolivian strains. Our results suggest that the Acre/Mayaro strain is closely related to the progenitor of these Bolivian strains that were isolated between 2002 and 2006. PMID:25510721

  15. Isolation and characterization of Mayaro virus from a human in Acre, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Terzian, Ana Carolina B; Auguste, Albert J; Vedovello, Danila; Ferreira, Marcelo U; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica; Sperança, Márcia A; Suzuki, Rodrigo B; Juncansen, Camila; Araújo, João P; Weaver, Scott C; Nogueira, Maurício L

    2015-02-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is widely distributed throughout South America and is the etiologic agent of Mayaro fever, an acute febrile illness often presenting with arthralgic manifestations. The true incidence of MAYV infection is likely grossly underestimated because the symptomatic presentation is very similar to that of dengue fever and other acute febrile tropical diseases. We report the complete genome sequence of a MAYV isolate detected from an Acrelândia patient presenting with fever, chills, and sweating, but with no arthralgia. Results show that this isolate belongs to genotype D and is closely related to Bolivian strains. Our results suggest that the Acre/Mayaro strain is closely related to the progenitor of these Bolivian strains that were isolated between 2002 and 2006. PMID:25510721

  16. Intersubtype Reassortments of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Quail

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Hung, Vu-Khac; Nguyen, Duc Tan; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses are considered a threat to national animal industries, causing production losses and high mortality in domestic poultry. In recent years, quail has become a popular terrestrial poultry species raised for production of meat and eggs in Asia. In this study, to better understand the roles of quail in H5N1 viral evolution, two H5N1-positive samples, designated A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-49/2010 (CVVI-49/2010) and A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-50/2014 (CVVI-50/2014), were isolated from quail during H5N1 outbreaks in Vietnam, and their whole genome were analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis reveals new evolutionary variation in the worldwide H5N1 viruses. The quail HA genes were clustered into clades 1.1.1 (CVVI-49/2010) and clade 2.3.2.1c (CVVI-50/2014), which may have evolved from viruses circulating from chickens and/or ducks in Cambodia, mainland of China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and South Korea in recent years. Interestingly, the M2 gene of the CVVI-49/2010 strain contained amino acid substitutions at position 26L-I and 31S-N that are related to amantadine-resistance. In particular, the CVVI-50/2014 strain revealed evidence of multiple intersubtype reassortment events between virus clades 2.3.2.1c, 2.3.2.1b, and 2.3.2.1a. Data from this study supports the possible role of quail as an important intermediate host in avian influenza virus evolution. Therefore, additional surveillance is needed to monitor these HPAI viruses both serologically and virologically in quail. PMID:26900963

  17. Intersubtype Reassortments of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Quail.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Hung, Vu-Khac; Nguyen, Duc Tan; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses are considered a threat to national animal industries, causing production losses and high mortality in domestic poultry. In recent years, quail has become a popular terrestrial poultry species raised for production of meat and eggs in Asia. In this study, to better understand the roles of quail in H5N1 viral evolution, two H5N1-positive samples, designated A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-49/2010 (CVVI-49/2010) and A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-50/2014 (CVVI-50/2014), were isolated from quail during H5N1 outbreaks in Vietnam, and their whole genome were analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis reveals new evolutionary variation in the worldwide H5N1 viruses. The quail HA genes were clustered into clades 1.1.1 (CVVI-49/2010) and clade 2.3.2.1c (CVVI-50/2014), which may have evolved from viruses circulating from chickens and/or ducks in Cambodia, mainland of China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and South Korea in recent years. Interestingly, the M2 gene of the CVVI-49/2010 strain contained amino acid substitutions at position 26L-I and 31S-N that are related to amantadine-resistance. In particular, the CVVI-50/2014 strain revealed evidence of multiple intersubtype reassortment events between virus clades 2.3.2.1c, 2.3.2.1b, and 2.3.2.1a. Data from this study supports the possible role of quail as an important intermediate host in avian influenza virus evolution. Therefore, additional surveillance is needed to monitor these HPAI viruses both serologically and virologically in quail. PMID:26900963

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Avian Tembusu-Related Virus Strain WR Isolated from White Kaiya Ducks in Fujian, China

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chunhe; Fu, Guanghua; Shi, Shaohua; Cheng, Longfei; Chen, Hongmei

    2012-01-01

    Avian tembusu-related virus, which was first identified in China, is an emerging virus causing serious economic loss to the Chinese poultry industry. We report here the complete genome sequences of avian tembusu-related virus strain WR, isolated from a White Kaiya duck with disease characterized by an abrupt decrease in egg laying with ovarian hemorrhage, which will help in further understanding the molecular and evolutionary characteristics and pathogenesis of avian tembusu-related virus, the new flavivirus affecting ducks in Southern China. PMID:22966199

  19. Molecular characterisation of the full-length genome of olive latent virus 1 isolated from tomato.

    PubMed

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Borodynko, Natasza; Pospieszny, Henryk

    2011-05-01

    Olive latent virus 1 (OLV-1) is a species of the Necrovirus genus. So far, it has been reported to infect olive, citrus tree and tulip. Here, we determined and analysed the complete genomic sequence of an isolate designated as CM1, which was collected from tomato plant in the Wielkopolska region of Poland and represents the prevalent isolate of OLV-1. The CM1 genome consists of monopartite single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome sized 3,699 nt with five open reading frames (ORFs) and small inter-cistronic regions. ORF1 encodes a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 23 kDa and the read-through (RT) of its amber stop codon results in ORF1 RT that encodes the virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. ORF2 and ORF3 encode two peptides, with 8 kDa and 6 kDa, respectively, which appear to be involved in cell-to-cell movement. ORF4 is located in the 3' terminal and encodes a protein with 30 kDa identified as the viral coat protein (CP). The differences in CP region of four OLV-1 isolates whose sequences have been deposited in GenBank were observed. Nucleotide sequence identities of the CP of tomato CM1 isolate with those of olive, citrus and tulip isolates were 91.8%, 89.5% and 92.5%, respectively. In contrast to other OLV-1 isolates, CM1 induced necrotic spots on tomato plants and elicited necrotic local lesions on Nicotiana benthamiana, followed by systemic infection. This is the third complete genomic sequence of OLV-1 reported and the first one from tomato. PMID:21181333

  20. Complete genome sequence of mumps viruses isolated from patients with parotitis, pancreatitis and encephalitis in India.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Chowdhury, Deepika T; Jadhav, Santoshkumar M; Hamde, Venkat S

    2016-04-01

    Limited information is available regarding epidemiology of mumps in India. Mumps vaccine is not included in the Universal Immunization Program of India. The complete genome sequences of Indian mumps virus (MuV) isolates are not available, hence this study was performed. Five isolates from bilateral parotitis and pancreatitis patients from Maharashtra, a MuV isolate from unilateral parotitis patient from Tamil Nadu, and a MuV isolate from encephalitis patient from Uttar Pradesh were genotyped by the standard protocol of the World Health Organization and subsequently complete genomes were sequenced. Indian MuV genomes were compared with published MuV genomes, including reference genotypes and eight vaccine strains for the genetic differences. The SH gene analysis revealed that five MuV isolates belonged to genotype C and two belonged to genotype G strains. The percent nucleotide divergence (PND) was 1.1% amongst five MuV genotype C strains and 2.2% amongst two MuV genotype G strains. A comparison with widely used mumps Jeryl Lynn vaccine strain revealed that Indian mumps isolates had 54, 54, 53, 49, 49, 38, and 49 amino acid substitutions in Chennai-2012, Kushinagar-2013, Pune-2008, Osmanabad-2012a, Osmanabad-2012b, Pune-1986 and Pune-2012, respectively. This study reports the complete genome sequences of Indian MuV strains obtained in years 1986, 2008, 2012 and 2013 that may be useful for further studies in India and globally. PMID:26876221

  1. Genome analysis and detection of a Chilean isolate of Grapevine leafroll associated virus-3.

    PubMed

    Engel, Esteban A; Girardi, Cristobal; Escobar, Paula F; Arredondo, Vania; Domínguez, Calixto; Pérez-Acle, Tomás; Valenzuela, Pablo D T

    2008-08-01

    The complete genome of the Chilean isolate Cl-766 of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus-3 (GLRaV-3) has been sequenced. This is the first genome sequence obtained from a GLRaV-3 isolate of the Southern hemisphere. The genomic RNA of 17,919 nucleotides contains 13 open reading frames (ORFs) with 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of 158 and 277 nucleotides, respectively. Comparison with NY1, the only isolate with complete genomic sequence available today, shows 97.6% nucleotide identity between the two isolates. Examination of the genome variability shows that most of the genetic diversity is concentrated in ORF1a. Three additional isolates from different geographic regions of Chile were partially sequenced as well, one which showed sequence divergence with respect to the other local and foreign isolates, indicative of different evolutionary constrains. Immunodetection systems were developed using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies produced against the recombinant major coat protein of GLRaV-3, providing sensitive and specific detection using a triple antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA) and an immunocapture-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (IC-RT-PCR) assay. PMID:18498048

  2. Genotyping of clinical varicella-zoster virus isolates collected from Yunnan in Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    LI, YUNLONG; ZHU, BAOSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the α-herpesvirus family. Genetically, it is stable and is divided into several genotypes based upon the genetic variations. The genotypes of VZV are rarely studied in the Southwestern region of China. In the present study, the common genetic variations in the VZV genes were examined in 42 VZV isolates collected from the patients with herpes zoster in the Yunnan province (Southwestern China). The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) 38, 54 and 62 in the VZV genes showed that all the collected VZV isolates were PstI, BglI and SmaI positive. The R5 variable-repeat region in these isolates was variable (R5A: 46.4%; R5B: 53.6%). The sequencing data of ORFs 1, 21, 22 and 54 indicated that 41 of the 42 collected VZV isolates could be grouped into genotype J or J1. Only one VZV isolate was identified as genotype A1 or M2. No new substitutions in the sequenced fragments were found in the collected VZV isolates. The results of the present study provided a preliminary genetic characterization of the VZV strains in the Yunnan province of Southwestern China. PMID:26893840

  3. Characterization of infectious laryngotracheitis virus isolates: demonstration of viral subpopulations within vaccine preparations.

    PubMed

    García, M; Riblet, S M

    2001-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a severe acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by ILT virus. To better understand the epidemiology of the disease, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay of the glycoprotein E gene has been developed and utilized to characterize vaccine strains and outbreak-related isolates. Enzymes EaeI and DdeI were used to differentiate the tissue culture origin (TCO) vaccine from chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines. Two RFLP patterns were observed with enzyme EaeI, one characteristic of the TCO vaccine and a second characteristic of all CEO vaccines. Three RFLP patterns were observed with enzyme DdeI. Patterns A and B were characterized as single patterns, whereas the type C pattern was a combination of patterns A and B. Analysis of vaccine strains showed the presence of patterns A and C. Pattern A was observed for the TCO vaccine and one CEO vaccine, whereas pattern C was observed for five of the six CEO vaccines analyzed. PCR-RFLP analysis of plaque-purified virus from pattern C CEO vaccine preparations demonstrated the presence of two populations (patterns A and B). Identification of molecularly different populations of viruses within currently used ILT vaccine is the first step to develop better molecular epidemiologic tools to track vaccine isolates in the field. PMID:11569727

  4. Isolation of maedi/visna virus from a sheep in Japan.

    PubMed

    Oguma, Keisuke; Tanaka, Chiaki; Harasawa, Ryo; Kimura, Atsushi; Sasaki, Jun; Goryo, Masanobu; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Maedi/visna (MV) is a lentiviral disease of sheep caused by the maedi/visna virus (MVV). Although MV is prevalent in many countries, it had not been reported in Japan. In 2011, however, three sheep in northern Japan were reported to be seropositive against the MVV antigen, indicating a persistent MVV infection. In the present study, we isolated MVV from one sheep to confirm MVV infection and conducted genomic classification of the virus. The co-culture of leukocytes from a seropositive sheep with fetal goat lung cells resulted in the formation of syncytial cells and the amplification of a long terminal repeat sequence of MVV by polymerase chain reaction. The isolate was confirmed as being MVV, rather than the caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus based on phylogenetic analysis of the gag gene sequence. Although the sheep was asymptomatic, nonpurulent meningitis and demyelination were found in the spinal cord. These were considered to be early lesions associated with pathogenic MVV infection. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that MVV is distributed in Japan. PMID:24141278

  5. PAV1, the First Virus-Like Particle Isolated from a Hyperthermophilic Euryarchaeote, “Pyrococcus abyssi”

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, C.; Le Romancer, M.; Erauso, G.; Gaillard, M.; Perrot, G.; Prieur, D.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the first virus-like particle of a hyperthermophilic euryarchaeote which was discovered in a strain of “Pyrococcus abyssi” previously characterized in our laboratory. This particle, named PAV1, is lemon-shaped (120 nm × 80 nm), with a short tail terminated by fibers, and resembles the virus SSV1, the type member of the Fuselloviridae, isolated from Sulfolobus shibatae. Sensitivity of the virus-like particle to organic solvents and detergents suggested that the envelope of PAV1 may contain lipids in addition to proteins. It contains a double-stranded circular DNA of 18 kb which is also present in high copy number in a free form in the host cytoplasm. No integrated form of the PAV1 genome could be detected in the host chromosome. Under standard growth conditions, the host cells continuously release PAV1 particles into the culture supernatant without spontaneous lysis, with a maximum reached in the late stationary phase. UV, gamma irradiation, treatment with mitomycin C, and various physiological stresses had no effect on PAV1 production. Screening of a large number of Thermococcales isolates did not permit to find a sensitive host. These results suggest that PAV1 persists in the host strain in a stable carrier state rather than a prophage. PMID:12813083

  6. A sequence database allowing automated genotyping of Classical swine fever virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Sabrina; Zimmermann, Bernd; Moennig, Volker; Greiser-Wilke, Irene

    2007-03-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious viral disease of pigs. According to the OIE classification of diseases it is classified as a notifiable (previously List A) disease, thus having the potential for causing severe socio-economic problems and affecting severely the international trade of pigs and pig products. Effective control measures are compulsory, and to expose weaknesses a reliable tracing of the spread of the virus is necessary. Genetic typing has proved to be the method of choice. However, genotyping involves the use of multiple software applications, which is laborious and complex. The implementation of a sequence database, which is accessible by the World Wide Web with the option to type automatically new CSF virus isolates once the sequence is available is described. The sequence to be typed is tested for correct orientation and, if necessary, adjusted to the right length. The alignment and the neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis with a standard set of sequences can then be calculated. The results are displayed as a graph. As an example, the determination is shown of the genetic subgroup of the isolate obtained from the outbreaks registered in Russia, in 2005. After registration (Irene.greiser-wilke@tiho-hannover.de) the database including the module for genotyping are accessible under http://viro08.tiho-hannover.de/eg/eurl_virus_db.htm. PMID:17187869

  7. Comparison of a modified shell vial culture procedure with conventional mouse inoculation for rabies virus isolation

    PubMed Central

    Antúnez, María de los Angeles Ribas; Girón, Blanca; Monsalvez, Iraima; Morier, Luis; Acosta, Gretel; Tejero, Yahisel; Cordero, Yanislet; Piedra, Dainelyd

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is a neurotropic disease that is often lethal. The early diagnosis of rabies infection is important and requires methods that allow for the isolation of the virus from animals and humans. The present study compared a modified shell vial (MSV) procedure using 24-well tissue culture plates with the mouse inoculation test (MIT), which is considered the gold standard for rabies virus isolation. Thirty brain samples (25 positive and 5 negative by the fluorescent antibody test) obtained from different animal species at the National Institute of Hygiene Rafael Rangel in Caracas, Venezuela, were studied by the MIT and MSV assays. Nine samples (36%) were positive at 24 h, 10 (40%) were positive at 48 h and six (24%) were positive at 72 h by the MSV assay. With the MIT assay, 76% were positive at six days post inoculation and 12% were positive at 12 and 18 days post inoculation. One sample that was negative according to the MSV assay was positive with MIT on the 12th day. The MSV procedure exhibited a sensitivity of 96.2%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value 80%. This procedure allowed for rapid rabies virus detection. MIT can be employed as an alternative method in laboratories without tissue culture facilities. PMID:23579811

  8. Transcriptional analysis of the DNA polymerase gene of Bombyx mori parvo-like virus (China isolate).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Jie; Chen, Ke-Ping; Yao, Qin; Han, Xu

    2007-04-01

    The Bombyx mori parvo-like virus (China isolate) DNA polymerase (BmDNV-3 dnapol) gene has been tentatively identified based on the presence of conserved motifs. In the present study, we perform a transcriptional analysis of the BmDNV-3 dnapol gene using the total RNA isolated from BmDNV-3 infected silkworm at different times. Northern blot analysis with a BmDNV-3 dnapol-specific riboprobe showed a major transcript of 3.3 kb. 5'-RACE revealed that the major transcription start point was located 20 nucleotides downstream of the TATA box. In a temporal expression analysis using differential RT-PCR, BmDNV-3 dnapol transcript was detected at low levels at 6 h.p.i., increased from 6 to 36 h.p.i., and remained fairly constant thereafter. Analysis of the predicted DNA polymerase sequence using neighborjoining and protein parsimony algorithms indicated that the predicted 1115-residue polypeptide contained five motifs associated with DNA polymerases synthetic activities and three additional motifs associated with polymerases possessing 3' to 5' exonuclease activity. The molecular phylogenetic analysis of this gene supported the placement of Bombyx mori parvo-like virus in a separate virus family. PMID:17483799

  9. Molecular analysis and characterization of swine and human influenza viruses isolated in Hungary in 2006–2007.

    PubMed

    Gyarmati, Péter; Metreveli, Giorgi; Kecskeméti, Sándor; Rózsa, Mónika; Belák, Sándor; Kiss, István

    2009-10-01

    In order to provide additional information to the epidemiological situation in Middle Europe and open further possibilities to investigate the transmission of influenza viruses between species, the viral genomes of three influenza A virus isolates (one human and two swine) collected from North-East Hungary in 2006–2007 have been fully sequenced and characterized. The sequence analysis reveals strong geographical relationships between the internal genes of the two swine viruses; the human isolate shows strict conservation to recent H1N1 strains, while the swine strains demonstrate and reflect a mixed avian–human origin, a characteristic of European swine influenza viruses. No evidence of interspecies interaction has been found among the studied isolates. PMID:19609664

  10. Single Strain Isolation Method for Cell Culture-Adapted Hepatitis C Virus by End-Point Dilution and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Nao; Murayama, Asako; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Shiina, Masaaki; Liang, T. Jake; Wakita, Takaji; Kato, Takanobu

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) culture system has enabled us to clarify the HCV life cycle and essential host factors for propagation. However, the virus production level of wild-type JFH-1 (JFH-1/wt) is limited, and this leads to difficulties in performing experiments that require higher viral concentrations. As the cell culture-adapted JFH-1 has been reported to have robust virus production, some mutations in the viral genome may play a role in the efficiency of virus production. In this study, we obtained cell culture-adapted virus by passage of full-length JFH-1 RNA-transfected Huh-7.5.1 cells. The obtained virus produced 3 log-fold more progeny viruses as compared with JFH-1/wt. Several mutations were identified as being responsible for robust virus production, but, on reverse-genetics analysis, the production levels of JFH-1 with these mutations did not reach the level of cell culture-adapted virus. By using the single strain isolation method by end-point dilution and infection, we isolated two strains with additional mutations, and found that these strains have the ability to produce more progeny viruses. On reverse-genetics analysis, the strains with these additional mutations were able to produce robust progeny viruses at comparable levels as cell culture-adapted JFH-1 virus. The strategy used in this study will be useful for identifying strains with unique characteristics, such as robust virus production, from a diverse population, and for determining the responsible mutations for these characteristics. PMID:24848954

  11. Bovine viral diarrhea virus isolated from fetal calf serum enhances pathogenicity of attenuated transmissible gastroenteritis virus in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Woods, R D; Kunkle, R A; Ridpath, J E; Bolin, S R

    1999-09-01

    A bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV-C) was isolated from swine tissue culture cells used to attenuate the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) after 68 passes. Piglets given a pure culture of BVDV-C developed clinical signs similar to those of a mild TGEV infection and recovered by 10 days postexposure. Villous blunting and fusion was observed in the small intestine, and a lymphocyte depletion was observed in Peyer's patches in the ileum. Piglets given a combination of BVDV-C and attenuated TGEV developed clinical signs similar to those of a virulent TGEV infection and were euthanized. The combined infection induced a generalized lymphocyte depletion throughout the lymphatic system and villous atrophy in the intestinal tract. Piglets exposed to a another type I strain of BVDV (NY-1) either alone or in combination with the attenuated TGEV had mild clinical signs similar to those of a TGEV infection. Moderate villous atrophy in the ileum and a lymphocyte depletion in the mesenteric lymph node were observed in these piglets postmortem. The data indicate a potential problem for diagnostic laboratories in relation to a diagnosis of virulent TGEV infections and in the field for young piglets exposed to a BVDV-contaminated TGEV vaccine. PMID:12968752

  12. Prevalence of newly isolated, cytopathic small round virus (Aichi strain) in Japan.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, T; Sakae, K; Ishihara, Y; Isomura, S; Utagawa, E

    1993-01-01

    Cytopathic small round virus (Aichi strain), isolated from a patient with oyster-associated gastroenteritis, showed no reaction in the polymerase chain reaction method for enteroviruses or in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the five serotypes of astroviruses. Our ELISA was sensitive in detecting the Aichi strain antigen in stool samples, but there was no reaction in this ELISA with any non-Aichi strains of enteric viruses, with such origins as enterovirus, rotavirus, Norwalk virus, calicivirus, or astrovirus. In the ELISA, 13 of 47 stool samples from adult patients in five of nine oyster-associated gastroenteritis outbreaks were positive, but only 1 of 397 pediatric stool samples in Aichi Prefecture was positive. The prevalence rate for Aichi strain antibody was found to be 7.2% for persons aged 7 months to 4 years. The prevalence rate for antibody to Aichi strain increased with age, to about 80% in persons 35 years old. On the basis of the results of the present study, it was hypothesized that Aichi strain could be a new type of small round virus that mainly produces diarrhea in patients in the 15- to 34-year-old age group, 50 to 76% of whom possess neutralizing antibody. Images PMID:8263178

  13. Detection and some properties of cowpea mild mottle virus isolated from soybean in Iran.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, M; Shahraeen, N; Ghorbani, S

    2008-12-01

    During 2006-2007 growing seasons, survey were carried to identify a virus disease causing mosaic of soybean in the field in Southern region (Khozestan Province) of Iran. To detect the viral infection, diseased leaf samples showing mild mosaic and leaf malformation were collected from soybean fields in Dezful, located in Khozestan Province. Infected samples were carried to the lab in a proper condition on ice packages. TPIA and DAS-ELISA serological tests were applied to identify the viral agent. To investigate the host-range, several indicator plants were mechanically inoculated under green-house condition. Seed transmission of CPMMV was examined using the seeds obtained from infected plants. The virus isolate was not found to be seed-borne in Clark variety of soybean. Different steps of ultracentrifugation including sucrose density gradient (10-40%) were carried out in order to obtain partial purified virus. On the basis of biological, serological and EM results, CPMMV-Carla virus was identified in the infected soybean samples. This is the first report of CPMMV infection of soybean in Iran. PMID:19630214

  14. Leek yellow stripe virus isolates from Brazil form a distant clade based on the P1 gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genomic sequence of a garlic isolate of Leek yellow stripe virus from Brazil (LYSV-MG) has been determined, and phylogenetic comparisons made to LYSV isolates from other parts of the world. In addition, the nucleotide sequence of the 5'UTR and part of the P1 gene of multiple LYSV isolat...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype Ib Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from a Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Sobolev, Ivan A.; Glushchenko, Alexandra V.; Shestopalov, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus isolate, NDV/Yakutiya/mallard/852/2011, isolated from a mallard in Russia. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, this strain was clustered into class II genotype Ib. PMID:26634762

  16. THE COMPLETE NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE OF BEAN YELLOW MOSAIC VIRUS ISOLATE BYMV-GDD, AND COMPARISON TO OTHER POTYVIRUSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) gladiolus isolate GDD was determined and compared to broad bean isolates BYMV-MB4 and BYMV-S. The BYMV-GDD genome (9528nt) was more similar to BYMV-MB4 (9532nt) than to BYMV-S (9547nt), which has atypical symptom expression and host...

  17. Wheat streak mosaic virus genotypes introduced to Argentina are closely related to isolates from the American Pacific Northwest and Australia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) was first detected in Argentina in 2002. Comparison of 78 WSMV coat protein sequences revealed that three Argentine isolates were closely related to isolates from the American Pacific Northwest (APNW) and Australia. Complete sequences were determined for one Argen...

  18. Identification of ribonucleotide reductase mutation causing temperature-sensitivity of herpes simplex virus isolates from whitlow by deep sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Daikoku, Tohru; Oyama, Yukari; Yajima, Misako; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Shimada, Yuka; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Miwa, Naoko; Okuda, Tomoko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Herpes simplex virus 2 caused a genital ulcer, and a secondary herpetic whitlow appeared during acyclovir therapy. The secondary and recurrent whitlow isolates were acyclovir-resistant and temperature-sensitive in contrast to a genital isolate. We identified the ribonucleotide reductase mutation responsible for temperature-sensitivity by deep-sequencing analysis. PMID:26185649

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus of Serotype A Isolated from Vietnam in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji-Hyeon; Nguyen, Tho Dang; Mai, Duoung Thuy; Kim, Su-Mi; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan; To, Thanh Long

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) found in an isolate collected in northern Vietnam in 2013 appears to be closely related to a genetic cluster formed with isolates from China, Mongolia, and Russia in 2013. All of these are classified to fall within the Sea-97 lineage, for which little complete genome data are available. PMID:26294636

  20. Comparisons of Highly Virulent H5N1 Influenza A Viruses Isolated from Humans and Chickens from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, David L.; Perdue, Michael L.; Cox, Nancy; Rowe, Thomas; Bender, Catherine; Huang, Jing; Swayne, David E.

    1998-01-01

    Genes of an influenza A (H5N1) virus from a human in Hong Kong isolated in May 1997 were sequenced and found to be all avian-like (K. Subbarao et al., Science 279:393–395, 1998). Gene sequences of this human isolate were compared to those of a highly pathogenic chicken H5N1 influenza virus isolated from Hong Kong in April 1997. Sequence comparisons of all eight RNA segments from the two viruses show greater than 99% sequence identity between them. However, neither isolate’s gene sequence was closely (>95% sequence identity) related to any other gene sequences found in the GenBank database. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the nucleotide sequences of at least four of the eight RNA segments clustered with Eurasian origin avian influenza viruses. The hemagglutinin gene phylogenetic analysis also included the sequences from an additional three human and two chicken H5N1 virus isolates from Hong Kong, and the isolates separated into two closely related groups. However, no single amino acid change separated the chicken origin and human origin isolates, but they all contained multiple basic amino acids at the hemagglutinin cleavage site, which is associated with a highly pathogenic phenotype in poultry. In experimental intravenous inoculation studies with chickens, all seven viruses were highly pathogenic, killing most birds within 24 h. All infected chickens had virtually identical pathologic lesions, including moderate to severe diffuse edema and interstitial pneumonitis. Viral nucleoprotein was most frequently demonstrated in vascular endothelium, macrophages, heterophils, and cardiac myocytes. Asphyxiation from pulmonary edema and generalized cardiovascular collapse were the most likely pathogenic mechanisms responsible for illness and death. In summary, a small number of changes in hemagglutinin gene sequences defined two closely related subgroups, with both subgroups having human and chicken members, among the seven viruses examined from Hong Kong, and all seven viruses were highly pathogenic in chickens and caused similar lesions in experimental inoculations. PMID:9658115

  1. Median infectious dose (ID??) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolate MN-184 via aerosol exposure.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Timothy D; Wang, Chong; Hoff, Steven J; Kittawornrat, Apisit; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J

    2011-08-01

    The median infectious dose (ID(50)) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus isolate MN-184 was determined for aerosol exposure. In 7 replicates, 3-week-old pigs (n=58) respired 10l of airborne PRRS virus from a dynamic aerosol toroid (DAT) maintained at -4°C. Thereafter, pigs were housed in isolation and monitored for evidence of infection. Infection occurred at virus concentrations too low to quantify by microinfectivity assays. Therefore, exposure dose was determined using two indirect methods ("calculated" and "theoretical"). "Calculated" virus dose was derived from the concentration of rhodamine B monitored over the exposure sequence. "Theoretical" virus dose was based on the continuous stirred-tank reactor model. The ID(50) estimate was modeled on the proportion of pigs that became infected using the probit and logit link functions for both "calculated" and "theoretical" exposure doses. Based on "calculated" doses, the probit and logit ID(50) estimates were 1 × 10(-0.13)TCID(50) and 1 × 10(-0.14)TCID(50), respectively. Based on "theoretical" doses, the probit and logit ID(50) were 1 × 10(0.26)TCID(50) and 1 × 10(0.24)TCID(50), respectively. For each point estimate, the 95% confidence interval included the other three point estimates. The results indicated that MN-184 was far more infectious than PRRS virus isolate VR-2332, the only other PRRS virus isolate for which ID(50) has been estimated for airborne exposure. Since aerosol ID(50) estimates are available for only these two isolates, it is uncertain whether one or both of these isolates represent the normal range of PRRS virus infectivity by this route. PMID:21474258

  2. [Taxonomy of the Sokuluk virus (SOKV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus, Entebbe bat virus group) isolated from bats (Vespertilio pipistrellus Schreber, 1774), ticks (Argasidae Koch, 1844), and birds in Kyrgyzstan].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovski?, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Shchetinin, A M; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Samokhvalov, E I; Botikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of the Sokuluk virus (SOKV) isolated in Kyrgyzstan from bats Vespertilio pipistrellus and their obligatory parasites--Argasidae Koch, 1844, ticks was carried out. SOKV was classified as attributed to the Flaviviridae family, Flavivirus genus. The maximum homology (71% for nucleotide and 79% for amino acid sequences) was detected with respect to the Entebbe bat virus (ENTV). ENTV and SOKV form a group joining to the yellow fever virus (YFV) within the limits of the mosquito flavivirus branch. Close relation of SOKV with bat covers and human housings permits to assume SOKV potentially patogenic to human health. PMID:25065143

  3. Reassortant swine influenza viruses isolated in Japan contain genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Katsushi; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Uchida, Yuko; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-06-01

    In 2013, three reassortant swine influenza viruses (SIVs)-two H1N2 and one H3N2-were isolated from symptomatic pigs in Japan; each contained genes from the pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus and endemic SIVs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two H1N2 viruses, A/swine/Gunma/1/2013 and A/swine/Ibaraki/1/2013, were reassortants that contain genes from the following three distinct lineages: (i) H1 and nucleoprotein (NP) genes derived from a classical swine H1 HA lineage uniquely circulating among Japanese SIVs; (ii) neuraminidase (NA) genes from human-like H1N2 swine viruses; and (iii) other genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 viruses. The H3N2 virus, A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013, comprised genes from two sources: (i) hemagglutinin (HA) and NA genes derived from human and human-like H3N2 swine viruses and (ii) other genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 viruses. Phylogenetic analysis also indicated that each of the reassortants may have arisen independently in Japanese pigs. A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013 were found to have strong antigenic reactivities with antisera generated for some seasonal human-lineage viruses isolated during or before 2003, whereas A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013 reactivities with antisera against viruses isolated after 2004 were clearly weaker. In addition, antisera against some strains of seasonal human-lineage H1 viruses did not react with either A/swine/Gunma/1/2013 or A/swine/Ibaraki/1/2013. These findings indicate that emergence and spread of these reassortant SIVs is a potential public health risk. PMID:24750464

  4. Molecular characterization of an influenza A virus (H4N2) isolated from waterfowl habitats in the State of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Eusebio, Erika; Obregón-Ascencio, Alejandro; Chávez-Maya, Fernando; García-Espinosa, Gary

    2015-03-01

    Wild waterfowl and their habitats are the main reservoirs of influenza A virus (IAV) mainly during the breeding season and prior to migration. This study describes the molecular characterization of an IAV isolated from 240 water samples of a small wetland during non-breeding season of migratory wild ducks in the State of Mexico, Mexico. The results showed that the virus belongs to the H4N2 subtype and each of its eight segments of the viral genome has similarity to IAV isolated from ducks in North America. This study suggests that IAV can be isolated from small wetland during non-breeding season of migrating waterfowl. PMID:25482497

  5. Molecular characterization of an influenza A virus (H4N2) isolated from waterfowl habitats in the State of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    ORNELAS-EUSEBIO, Erika; OBREGÓN-ASCENCIO, Alejandro; CHÁVEZ-MAYA, Fernando; GARCÍA-ESPINOSA, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Wild waterfowl and their habitats are the main reservoirs of influenza A virus (IAV) mainly during the breeding season and prior to migration. This study describes the molecular characterization of an IAV isolated from 240 water samples of a small wetland during non-breeding season of migratory wild ducks in the State of Mexico, Mexico. The results showed that the virus belongs to the H4N2 subtype and each of its eight segments of the viral genome has similarity to IAV isolated from ducks in North America. This study suggests that IAV can be isolated from small wetland during non-breeding season of migrating waterfowl. PMID:25482497

  6. First isolation of a rabies-related virus from a Daubenton's bat in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Whitby, J E; Heaton, P R; Black, E M; Wooldridge, M; McElhinney, L M; Johnstone, P

    2000-09-30

    On May 30, 1996, a sick Daubenton's bat (Myotis daubentonii) was recovered from the cellar of a public house in Newhaven, East Sussex. Its condition deteriorated rapidly, and it was euthanased and examined. Positive results, establishing the presence of a rabies or rabies-related virus in its brain, were obtained from the fluorescent antibody test, the rabies tissue culture isolation test, and a hemi-nested reverse-transcription PCR. The complete sequence of the nucleoprotein gene was determined and a phylogenetic analysis, based on the 470 nucleotide bases of the amino terminus of the nucleoprotein, established the genotype of the virus as European bat lyssavirus 2. Bat rabies had not previously been recorded in the UK but does occur in mainland Europe. A study of the back-trajectories of the wind on May 29 and 30, established that the infected bat possibly came from near the Franco-Swiss border. PMID:11073000

  7. Evolutionary and Ecological Characterization of Mayaro Virus Strains Isolated during an Outbreak, Venezuela, 2010.

    PubMed

    Auguste, Albert J; Liria, Jonathan; Forrester, Naomi L; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Long, Kanya C; Morón, Dulce; de Manzione, Nuris; Tesh, Robert B; Halsey, Eric S; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-10-01

    In 2010, an outbreak of febrile illness with arthralgic manifestations was detected at La Estación village, Portuguesa State, Venezuela. The etiologic agent was determined to be Mayaro virus (MAYV), a reemerging South American alphavirus. A total of 77 cases was reported and 19 were confirmed as seropositive. MAYV was isolated from acute-phase serum samples from 6 symptomatic patients. We sequenced 27 complete genomes representing the full spectrum of MAYV genetic diversity, which facilitated detection of a new genotype, designated N. Phylogenetic analysis of genomic sequences indicated that etiologic strains from Venezuela belong to genotype D. Results indicate that MAYV is highly conserved genetically, showing ?17% nucleotide divergence across all 3 genotypes and 4% among genotype D strains in the most variable genes. Coalescent analyses suggested genotypes D and L diverged ?150 years ago and genotype diverged N ?250 years ago. This virus commonly infects persons residing near enzootic transmission foci because of anthropogenic incursions. PMID:26401714

  8. Research note: the isolation of a herpes virus from captive cranes with an inclusion body disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Henning, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A viral agent, identified as a herpesvirus and tentatively called 'inclusion body disease of cranes' (IBDC), was isolated from captive cranes involved in a die-off at the International Crane Foundation near Baraboo, Wisconsin. Preliminary animal susceptibility tests, based on experimental infections, suggested that White Pekin ducklings up to 17 days old and adult coots were susceptible to the IBDC virus whereas 16-day-old White Leghorn chicks and 64-day-old Muscovy ducks were not. No serum antibody to IBDC virus was detected in 95 wild sandhill cranes collected in Wisconsin or Indiana in 1976 and 1977. However, 9 of 11 captive cranes in the affected area at the ICF had antibody to this agent.

  9. Whole-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H5N6 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from a Live Poultry Market in China, 2013.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xian; Cui, Lunbiao; Yu, Huiyan; Ge, Yiyue; Tang, Fengyang

    2014-01-01

    An avian influenza virus, A/environment/Zhenjiang/C13/2013(H5N6), was isolated from a live poultry market in eastern China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate was a novel reassortant virus with a neuraminidase (NA) gene from H6N6 viruses and the other seven genes from H5N1 viruses, which may pose a potential threat to human and animal health. PMID:25212611

  10. Monoclonal antibody characterization of rabies virus strains isolated in the River Plate Basin.

    PubMed

    Delpietro, H A; Gury-Dhomen, F; Larghi, O P; Mena-Segura, C; Abramo, L

    1997-10-01

    In this study, 91 strains isolated in the River Plate Basin, South America, were examined from the epidemiological standpoint and with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the nucleocapsid of rabies virus. Such strains reacted to MAbs in accordance with nine different patterns (antigenic variants). Rabies virus was isolated from 49 cattle, 21 dogs, 11 non-haematophagous bats, four vampire bats, two foxes, two horses, one buffalo, and one human. Five of the variants had not been described previously. It was also found that two cases of rabies in wild foxes (Cerdocyon thous) which had attacked persons in the Province of Chaco, Argentina, had been caused by variants from dog and vampire bat, while two cases in frugivorous bats (Artibeus lituratus) from Argentina and Brazil, had been infected by vampire bat variants. In addition, symptoms shown by cattle infected with strains which reacted as originating in canine vectors, differed from those observed in bovines from which the variants isolated corresponded to vampire bats. PMID:9394612

  11. Genetic characterization of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus strains isolated from cattle in Israel.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William C; Ruder, Mark G; Klement, Eyal; Jasperson, Dane C; Yadin, Hagai; Stallknecht, David E; Mead, Daniel G; Howerth, Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), a member of the genus Orbivirus not reported previously in Israel, was isolated from Israeli cattle during a 'bluetongue-like' disease outbreak in 2006. To ascertain the origin of this new virus, three isolates from the outbreak were fully sequenced and compared with available sequences. Whilst the L2 gene segment clustered with the Australian EHDV serotype 7 (EHDV-7) reference strain, most of the other segments were clustered with EHDV isolates of African/Middle East origin, specifically Bahrain, Nigeria and South Africa. The M6 gene had genetic relatedness to the Australian/Asian strains, but with the limited data available the significance of this relationship is unclear. Only one EHDV-7 L2 sequence was available, and as this gene encodes the serotype-specific epitope, the relationship of these EHDV-7 L2 genes to an Australian EHDV-7 reflects the serotype association, not necessarily the origin. The genetic data indicated that the strains affecting Israel in 2006 may have been related to similar outbreaks that occurred in North Africa in the same year. This finding also supports the hypothesis that EHDV entered Israel during 2006 and was not present there before this outbreak. PMID:25701817

  12. Isolation, molecular characterization, and phylogenetic analysis of encephalomyocarditis virus from South China tigers in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Yan, Qi; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Jing; Wang, Chengmin; Du, Yingchun; Yan, Jing; He, Hongxuan

    2013-10-01

    Although encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) can infect many host species and cause myocarditis and sudden death in many species, little is known about EMCV infection in tigers. A virus was isolated from organs of dead South China tigers with sudden death in southern China. The production of cytopathic effect on BHK cells, and the results of PCR, electron microscopy (EM), and whole genome sequencing indicated that the pathogen was EMCV, the strain was named FJ13. Other pathogenic agents were excluded as possible pathogenic agents. Phylogenetic analyses of the whole genome, ORF (open reading frame) and CCR (capsid coding region) using the neighbour-joining method revealed that EMCV isolates cluster into two groups (group 1 and 2) with two sub-clusters within group 1 (group 1a and 1b), and FJ13 belongs to group 1a. Animal experiment showed that the isolated strain FJ13 could cause clinical symptoms and pathological changes. The results of this study indicated that FJ13 caused myocarditis of tigers and provided new epidemiologic data on EMCV in China. PMID:23917023

  13. Characteristics of a Lettuce mosaic virus Isolate Infecting Lettuce in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Lee, Su-Heon; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun

    2014-06-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV) causes disease of plants in the family Asteraceae, especially lettuce crops. LMV isolates have previously been clustered in three main groups, LMV-Yar, LMV-Greek and LMVRoW. The first two groups, LMV-Yar and LMV-Greek, have similar characteristics such as no seed-borne transmission and non-resistance-breaking. The latter one, LMV-RoW, comprising a large percentage of the LMV isolates contains two large subgroups, LMV-Common and LMV-Most. To date, however, no Korean LMV isolate has been classified and characterized. In this study, LMV-Muju, the Korean LMV isolate, was isolated from lettuce showing pale green and mottle symptoms, and its complete genome sequence was determined. Classification method of LMV isolates based on nucleotide sequence divergence of the NIb-CP junction showed that LMV-Muju was categorized as LMV-Common. LMV-Muju was more similar to LMV-O (LMV-Common subgroup) than to LMV-E (LMV-RoW group but not LMV-Common subgroup) even in the amino acid domains of HC-Pro associated with pathogenicity, and in the CI and VPg regions related to ability to overcome resistance. Taken together, LMV-Muju belongs to the LMV-Common subgroup, and is expected to be a seed-borne, non-resistance-breaking isolate. According to our analysis, all other LMV isolates not previously assigned to a subgroup were also included in the LMV-RoW group. PMID:25289001

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of three orf virus strains isolated from different districts in Shandong Province, East China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaizhao; Xiao, Yihong; Yu, Meng; Liu, Jianxin; Wang, Qingnan; Tao, Pan; Liu, Sidang; Ning, Zhangyong

    2016-01-01

    Orf virus (ORFV) is the causative agent of contagious ecthyma, which is a zoonotic disease that affects sheep, goats, wild small ruminants and humans. Shandong Province in East China is one of the main producing areas in China for sheep and goats. Here, we conducted epidemiological surveys in different areas in this Province, isolated three orf virus strains, SDLC, SDTA and SDJN, from goat flocks and then analyzed the genetic evolution of these strains. The ORFV011, ORFV059, ORFV109, ORFV110 and ORFV127 genes of these three strains were amplified, sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ORFV011 of the SDLC and SDTA strains cluster together with the Gansu, Liaoning, Shanxi, Nantou, Hoping and FJ-YX strains, while SDJN clusters with the FJ-GS and FJ-GO strains. ORFV059 of the SDLC and SDTA strains cluster together with the FJ-YX strain, while SDJN clusters with the FJ-GS and FJ-GO strains. ORFV059 and ORFV127 of these three strains were similar to those of the OV-SA00 strain. The results suggested that SDLC, SDTA and SDJN originated from Fujian Province and formed a complex group of viruses in Shandong Province. As the role of ORFV127 gene responsible for the immune evasion of ORFV, the pathogenesis of these three virus strains may similar to that of OV-SA00. These three strains first isolated in Shandong Province are novel ORFV strains, and the data reported here will be helpful for further research about ORFV and its comprehensive prevention and control. PMID:26311786

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of three orf virus strains isolated from different districts in Shandong Province, East China

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Kaizhao; XIAO, Yihong; YU, Meng; LIU, Jianxin; WANG, Qingnan; TAO, Pan; LIU, Sidang; NING, Zhangyong

    2015-01-01

    Orf virus (ORFV) is the causative agent of contagious ecthyma, which is a zoonotic disease that affects sheep, goats, wild small ruminants and humans. Shandong Province in East China is one of the main producing areas in China for sheep and goats. Here, we conducted epidemiological surveys in different areas in this Province, isolated three orf virus strains, SDLC, SDTA and SDJN, from goat flocks and then analyzed the genetic evolution of these strains. The ORFV011, ORFV059, ORFV109, ORFV110 and ORFV127 genes of these three strains were amplified, sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ORFV011 of the SDLC and SDTA strains cluster together with the Gansu, Liaoning, Shanxi, Nantou, Hoping and FJ-YX strains, while SDJN clusters with the FJ-GS and FJ-GO strains. ORFV059 of the SDLC and SDTA strains cluster together with the FJ-YX strain, while SDJN clusters with the FJ-GS and FJ-GO strains. ORFV059 and ORFV127 of these three strains were similar to those of the OV-SA00 strain. The results suggested that SDLC, SDTA and SDJN originated from Fujian Province and formed a complex group of viruses in Shandong Province. As the role of ORFV127 gene responsible for the immune evasion of ORFV, the pathogenesis of these three virus strains may similar to that of OV-SA00. These three strains first isolated in Shandong Province are novel ORFV strains, and the data reported here will be helpful for further research about ORFV and its comprehensive prevention and control. PMID:26311786

  16. [Isolation of an avirulent strain of the chicken herpes virus type B].

    PubMed

    Kasabov, R; Nam, L V

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to isolate type 'B' of the chicken Herpes virus on a farm for stock layers with a low level of losses due to Marek's disease. Seven virus isolates were obtained from 3-4-month-old White Leghorn poults via direct kidney cell cultures. One of them, named strain C-80, was studied in chick embryo fibroblast cultures, and egg cultures (Büllow's test) as well as biochemically, serologically, and through the electron microscope. Results made it reasonable to identify it as a chicken Herpes virus type 'B'. In vivo experiments with strain C-80 inoculated in day-old chicks at the rate of 15 x 10(3) PFU showed that it did not cause gross and microlesions in the nervous system and the parenchymal organs in the course of 18 weeks of observation. The immunogenic properties of strain C-80 were studied in 2250 day-old White Plymouth Rock chicks inoculated at the rate of 1360 PFU, kept in an infected environment together with as many as 4500 control birds immunized three times with a vaccine (obtained from a turkey Herpes virus) at 1500 PFU. Twenty-four weeks later the losses due to Marek's disease were 3.4 per cent in the test group, and 7.2 per cent in the control one. It is believed that strain C-80 is appropriate for the production of a vaccine against Marek's diseases--Rispens type. Further studies are being performed on the antigenic composition and the immunogenic properties as well as series of in vivo passages with regard to reversibility. PMID:7157664

  17. Vaccine Potential of Two Previously Uncharacterized African Swine Fever Virus Isolates from Southern Africa and Heterologous Cross Protection of an Avirulent European Isolate.

    PubMed

    Souto, R; Mutowembwa, P; van Heerden, J; Fosgate, G T; Heath, L; Vosloo, W

    2016-04-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a mostly fatal viral infection of domestic pigs for which there is no vaccine available. The disease is endemic to most of sub-Saharan Africa, causes severe losses and threatens food security in large parts of the continent. Naturally occurring attenuated ASF viruses have been tested as vaccine candidates, but protection was variable depending on the challenge virus. In this study, the virulence of two African isolates, one from a tick vector and the other from an indigenous pig, was determined in domestic pigs to identify a potential vaccine strain for southern Africa. Neither isolate was suitable as the tick isolate was moderately virulent and the indigenous pig virus was highly virulent. The latter was subsequently used as heterologous challenge in pigs first vaccinated with a naturally attenuated isolate previously isolated in Portugal. Although a statistically significant reduction in death rate and virus load was observed compared with unvaccinated pigs post-challenge, all pigs succumbed to infection and died. PMID:25073549

  18. Complete genomic sequences of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus G1 strains isolated in the European rabbit original range.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Joana; Lopes, Ana M; Esteves, Pedro J

    2012-12-01

    The complete genomic sequences of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) strains isolated in 1995 (CB137) and 2006 (CB194) from wild European rabbits from Portugal are described. The strains were isolated in the original range of the European rabbit and assigned to genogroup 1 (G1), which is known to have persisted only in the Iberian Peninsula. ORF2 of isolate CB137 might encode a shorter minor structural protein, VP10. PMID:23166278

  19. First isolation and molecular characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus in Benin.

    PubMed

    Gorna, Kamila; Houndjè, Evelyne; Romey, Aurore; Relmy, Anthony; Blaise-Boisseau, Sandra; Kpodékon, Marc; Saegerman, Claude; Moutou, François; Zientara, Stephan; Bakkali Kassimi, Labib

    2014-06-25

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals. It is one of the most economically devastating diseases affecting livestock animals. In West Africa, where constant circulation of FMD virus (FMDV) is assumed, very few studies on the characterization of circulating strains have been published. This study describes the first isolation and characterization of FMDV in Benin. FMDV was isolated from 42 samples. Antigen Capture Elisa (Ag-ELISA) and VP1 coding sequence analysis revealed 33 strains of serotype O and 9 strains of serotype A. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 sequence revealed two different groups of type O isolates and one group of A isolates. VP1 sequence comparison with the sequences available in the GenBank database revealed a close relationship of the Benin isolates with topotype O of West Africa and with African topotype A of genotype VI. Knowledge of the recent strains circulating in Benin should contribute to better selection of vaccine strains and enable the updating of molecular epidemiology data available for West Africa in general. PMID:24720890

  20. Phylogenetic and Evolutionary Relationships among Yellow Fever Virus Isolates in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mutebi, John-Paul; Wang, Heiman; Li, Li; Bryant, Juliet E.; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies with a limited number of strains have indicated that there are two genotypes of yellow fever (YF) virus in Africa, one in west Africa and the other in east and central Africa. We have examined the prM/M and a portion of the E protein for a panel of 38 wild strains of YF virus from Africa representing different countries and times of isolation. Examination of the strains revealed a more complex genetic relationship than previously reported. Overall, nucleotide substitutions varied from 0 to 25.8% and amino acid substitutions varied from 0 to 9.1%. Phylogenetic analysis using parsimony and neighbor-joining algorithms identified five distinct genotypes: central/east Africa, east Africa, Angola, west Africa I, and west Africa II. Extensive variation within genotypes was observed. Members of west African genotype II and central/east African genotype differed by 2.8% or less, while west Africa genotype I varied up to 6.8% at the nucleotide level. We speculate that the former two genotypes exist in enzootic transmission cycles, while the latter is genetically more heterogeneous due to regular human epidemics. The nucleotide sequence of the Angola genotype diverged from the others by 15.7 to 23.0% but only 0.4 to 5.6% at the amino acid level, suggesting that this genotype most likely diverged from a progenitor YF virus in east/central Africa many years ago, prior to the separation of the other east/central African strains analyzed in this study, and has evolved independently. These data demonstrate that there are multiple genotypes of YF virus in Africa and suggest independent evolution of YF virus in different areas of Africa. PMID:11435580