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Sample records for tristeza virus isolate

  1. Molecular Characterization of Citrus tristeza virus Isolates from Panama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were collected from the main citrus growing regions in Panama and characterized at the molecular level. The CTV coat protein gene (CPG) was amplified by RT-PCR, and the amplified PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The sequences analyses showed the ...

  2. Molecular Characterization of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates from Mild Strain Cross Protection Experiments in Peru

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) collected from the Topara Nursery, Lima, Peru were established as in planta cultures in Madam Vinous sweet orange in the Exotic Citrus Pathogen Quarantine Greenhouse, Beltsville, MD. Two of the isolates were collected from non-cross protected plants; Pe...

  3. Molecular characterization of Peruvian Citrus tristeza virus isolates based on 3’UTR sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus in Peru was decimated by quick decline and stem pitting strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). Commercial citrus production in Peru is being restored by use of CTV cross-protection. To characterize the predominant CTV strains involved, Peruvian CTV isolates from “protected” and “non-protecti...

  4. The prevalence of the citrus tristeza virus trifoliate resistant breaking genotype among Puerto Rican isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates have been grouped previously into five genotypes: T3, T30, T36, VT, B165 based on symptoms, host range and genomic sequence data. A sixth genotype has recently been identified with the novel property of replicating in trifoliate orange trees, a non host for the o...

  5. Molecular analyses revealed genetic complexity in Citrus tristeza virus Dekopon isolate and its aphid-transmitted progeny

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An assessment was made of the disease potential of a Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolate designated Dekopon found in a hybrid mandarin variety topworked in a citrus planting in Fresno County, CA. After aphid transmissions (AT), parental and AT isolates were analyzed by SSCP, genotyping with multipl...

  6. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of a New Genotype of Citrus Tristeza Virus from an Isolate Having a Mixed Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) that causes severe stem pitting in grapefruits (# 3800) was used for sequencing. Analysis of the isolate revealed the presence of at least three different populations, one belonging to T30 genotype and the other two belonging to new genotypes, designated T2K...

  7. Assessment of the Citrus tristeza virus isolates detected in spring 2007 at the Lindcove Research and Extension Center, Exeter, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus was detected in at least 50 trees at the 71 ha Lindcove Research and Extension Center (LREC) near Exeter, Calif. in spring 2007. The purpose of this research was to assess genetic diversity and aphid transmissibility of these isolates. Nine representative trees were sampled o...

  8. Molecular characterization of Cirus tristeza virus isolates associated with stem pitting CTV cross-protection in Peru

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, the Peruvian citrus industry was destroyed by severe Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains spread by the brown citrus aphid. The Topara Nursery, located 180 km south of Lima Peru, selected and identified CTV isolates that confer cross-protection against virulent stem...

  9. Citrus tristeza virus-host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a phloem-limited virus whose natural host range is restricted to citrus and related species. Although the virus has killed millions of trees, almost destroying whole industries, and continually limits production in many citrus growing areas, most isolates are mild or s...

  10. Differentiation of citrus tristeza virus isolates by serological analysis of p25 coat protein peptide maps.

    PubMed

    Albiach-Marti, M R; Guerri, J; Cambra, M; Garnsey, S M; Moreno, P

    2000-07-01

    A procedure was developed to purify rapidly and easily a sufficient quantity of native p25 coat protein (CP) to allow comparison of five isolates of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) by serological analysis of peptide maps, using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. CTV particles were concentrated by centrifugation and purified by agarose gel electrophoresis. The CP was extracted from gel slices riched in virions and protein yields were about three times greater than those obtained previously and of comparable purity. The purified CP was partially digested with either V8 or papain endo-protease, and the peptides generated were separated and electroblotted to a membrane. Protein blots were tested with four monoclonal antibodies and one source of polyclonal antibodies. The serological maps generated by papain allowed differentiation of all the isolates examined, and those generated by V8 endoprotease allowed discrimination of four of the five isolates tested. Some of these isolates had been indistinguishable based on their reactivity in DASI-ELISA, dsRNA pattern and biological characterization. Serological analysis of peptide maps, as described below, allowed accurate comparison of CTV isolates with minimum amounts of p25 CP and proved superior to other techniques for discriminating CTV isolates. PMID:10921839

  11. Genetic diversity of Citrus tristeza virus isolates spreading in Central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid increase in the number of trees infected with Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was observed in several locations in Tulare, County, CA during 2007. Since trees had been tested annually, these infections represent new infections. Leaf and bark tissue were sampled from infected trees and used for...

  12. Real-time RT-PCR assay for detection and differentiation of Citrus tristeza virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For universal detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains by real time RT-PCR, a protocol was developed based on a set of primers and a Cy5-labeled TaqMan probe. This test included primers and a TET-labeled TaqMan probe selected on the mitochondrial nad5 gene for the simultaneous detection of ...

  13. Genetic Diversity of Citrus tristeza Virus Isolates Collected Recently in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveys conducted over the past several years show a dramatic increase in Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) incidence in several locations in Central California. Our objective was to assess genetic diversity of current CTV field populations and determine their phylogenetic relationships with representati...

  14. Real-time RT-PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiplex one step real time RT-PCR assays using TaqMan probes were developed for detection and strain differentiation of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). For broad spectrum CTV detection, a TaqMan primer and Cy5-labeled probe were designed using CP gene sequences. An internal control was developed us...

  15. HISTOLOGY OF SWEET ORANGE STEM PITTING CAUSED BY AN AUSTRALIAN ISOLATE OF CITRUS TRISTEZA VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some strains of the citrus tristeza virus (CTV) cause stem pitting in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck). This abnormality causes tree decline and reduction in fruit size and yield of affected citrus trees. Stem-pitting symptoms can occur on trunks, on all sizes of limbs, and on the twigs ...

  16. Molecular Marker Analysis of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from the Dominican Republic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Samples of citrus tissue infected with Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were collected from Persian lime, mandarin, Washington navel, Valencia or grapefruit trees from various locations in the Dominican Republic. Desiccated tissue samples were re-hydrated and virions extracted by grinding samples in buff...

  17. Characterization of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates by Single-strand Conformation Polymorphism Analysis of the Coat Protein Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method is needed to rapidly assess Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains and to identify mixed populations in tristeza-infected trees. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) can detect point mutations in DNA fragments and determine the structure of viral populations. Previous reports utili...

  18. Genetic Variation of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates from California and Spain: Evidence for Mixed Infections and Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Luis; Aylln, Mara Angeles; Kong, Ping; Fernndez, Andres; Polek, MaryLou; Guerri, Jos; Moreno, Pedro; Falk, Bryce W.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the population structure and genetic variation of four genomic regions within and between 30 Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from Spain and California. Our analyses showed that most isolates contained a population of sequence variants, with one being predominant. Four isolates showed two major sequence variants in some genomic regions. The two major variants of three of these isolates showed very low nucleotide identity to each other but were very similar to those of other isolates, suggesting the possibility of mixed infections with two divergent isolates. Incongruencies of phylogenetic relationships in the different genomic regions and statistical analyses suggested that the genomes of some CTV sequence variants originated by recombination events between diverged sequence variants. No correlation was observed between geographic origin and nucleotide distance, and thus from a genetic view, the Spanish and Californian isolates analyzed here could be considered members of the same population. PMID:11483750

  19. Nucleotide heterogeneity at the genomic 5’- and 3’-termini of California (CA) isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nucleotide (nt) sequences in the genomic ends of sense (+)-RNA viruses serve essential biological functions and are important considerations in the construction of infectious clones. Two isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) from California (CA) having a T30- and a T36-genotype were inoculated in ...

  20. Complete 3' end genome analysis of the asymptomatic citrus tristeza virus isolate B192 and its eight single aphid transmitted subisolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most important viral disease of citrus is caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). CTV infection often exists in field isolates as a complex of multiple genotypes. Aphid transmission is important for CTV dispersal. The complete 3' terminal half sequences of the asymptomatic CTV isolate B192 and it...

  1. Molecular Analysis Among MCA13-reactive Isolates Reveals a Strategy for Rapid Assessment of Citrus tristeza Virus Severity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypes vary in disease severity ranging from symptomless to virulent (stem pitting) in commercial citrus plantings. Because CTV is spread by propagation and by aphid vectors, rapid identification and virulence typing are critical for control and interdiction activitie...

  2. Molecular analysis among MCA13-reactive isolates reveals a rapid strategy for assessment of Citrus tristeza virus severity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) usually occurs as a complex of strains that vary greatly in severity and aphid transmissibility. A rapid assay, therefore, is needed to distinguish potentially mild vs. severe strains of CTV for disease mitigation. An economical and practical strategy to screen for poten...

  3. Development and application of a hexaplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for screening global Citrus tristeza virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The discovery of the diversity of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypes has complicated detection and diagnostic measures. To simplify the identification and differentiation of CTV genotypes, an efficient multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) technique for the screenin...

  4. Molecular diversity of Citrus tristeza virus in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a serious citrus pathogen worldwide. Recent genetic studies have identified five standard CTV genotypic groups: T30, VT, T36, T3, and B165/T68. Field surveys performed in California in 2008-2010 identified primarily MCA13-negative CTV isolates with T30-like genotype. C...

  5. Survey of citrus tristeza virus populations in Central California that react with MCA13 monoclonal antibody

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Citrus Pest Detection Program (CPDP) of the Central California Tristeza Eradication Agency monitors Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in Central California. MCA13 is a severe strain discriminating monoclonal antibody used to screen for potentially virulent CTV isolates. MCA13-reactive CTV isolates are...

  6. Citrus tristeza virus-aphid interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A review chapter on aphid transmission of Citrus tristeza virus is provided for a book on “Vector-Mediated Transmission of Plant Pathogens”. Earliest uses of citrus goes back over two millennia as items of trade, gifts and medicinal compounds. Citrus propagation during this period was by seed and si...

  7. Cross-protection by Citrus Tristeza Virus: prevention of superinfection occurs only when plants are protected by isolates of the same strain.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most important virus of citrus worldwide. CTV has a 19.3 kb RNA genome, is transmitted by aphids, and accumulates in trees predominantly in phloem-associated cells. Inoculation of trees with mild strains of CTV has been used to allow citrus production in areas wher...

  8. Evidence of Recombinant Citrus tristeza virus Isolate Occurring in Acid Lime cv. Pant Lemon Orchard in Uttarakhand Terai Region of Northern Himalaya in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaywant Kumar; Tarafdar, Avijit; Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Biswas, Kajal Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The present study for the first time describes biological and molecular characterization of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) occurring in the Terai area of Uttarakhand State in Northern Himalaya region of India. Direct antigen coated-ELISA and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected the CTV infection in Acid lime cv. Pant lemon (Citrus aurantifolia) orchards of Pantnagar with an estimated disease incidence of 16.6-20.5%. To know the biological and genetic properties, an isolate, CTV Pant 4 was characterized. Isolate Pant 4 could be graft transmitted to Kinnow, Nagpur and Darjeeling mandarins, Mosambi sweet orange, Kagzi lime, Sweet lime, Sour orange but not to Rough lemon. The sequence analyses of the 5'ORF1a (3038nucleotides) of LPro domain and 3'end (2058nt) covering ORF7-ORF10 regions of the CTV genome revealed that Pant 4 was closely related to the previously reported Indian CTV isolate, Kpg3 from Northeastern Himalaya region with 97 and 98% sequence identity, respectively. Whereas, it differed from the previously reported CTV isolate B165 from Southern India with 79 and 92% identity, respectively for 5'ORF1a and 3' end regions. Recombination and SplitsTree decomposition analyses indicated that CTV isolate Pant 4 was a recombinant isolate originating from Kpg3 as a major and B165 as a minor donor. PMID:24426255

  9. Rapid Assessment of the Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates Detected in Spring 2007 at the Lindcove Research and Extension Center, Exeter, Calif.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was detected in at least 50 trees at the 71 ha Lindcove Research and Extension Center (LREC) near Exeter, Calif. in spring 2007. In the previous 3 years, 3, 1, and 5 trees were infected. The purpose of this research was to assess the aphid transmissibility and molecular ...

  10. Deep sequencing of viral small-RNAs of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) reveals genomic differences between two Italian isolates of CTV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) epidemic of quick decline (QD) killed many sweet orange trees grafted on sour orange rootstock in Sicily but left some asymptomatic trees in the same field. Recent reports indicated cross-protection involves exclusion of a severe CTV strain by a mild strain of th...

  11. Stem pitting Citrus tristeza virus predominantly transmitted by the brown citrus aphid from mixed infections containing non-stem pitting and stem pitting isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a phloem-limited closterovirus that produces a variety of symptoms in various Citrus spp. One of these symptoms is stem pitting (SP). SP does not occur in all Citrus spp. but when it does it may cause low tree vigor, decline and an economically-significant reduction ...

  12. Novel mild strains of Citrus tristeza virus from California and Peru.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) has caused great economic losses to citrus worldwide. CTV isolates from California were identified which reacted to MCA13 but were mild in biological indexing tests. Molecular markers were developed to differentiate these isolates from established CTV genotypes and the is...

  13. Genotype composition of populations of grapefruit-cross-protecting citrus tristeza virus strain GFMS12 in different host plants and aphid-transmitted sub-isolates.

    PubMed

    Scott, Katherine Anne; Hlela, Quinsile; Zablocki, Olivier; Read, David; van Vuuren, Stephanus; Pietersen, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes severe losses in grapefruit production in South Africa and requires mild-strain cross-protection to maintain production. Unfortunately, cross-protection breakdown of the pre-immunizing CTV grapefruit mild source GFMS12 is prevalent in grapefruit in South Africa. The CTV genotype composition of the GFMS12 population inoculated onto different hosts was determined by sequencing part of ORF1a and the p23 gene of multiple clones from each plant. Analysis of the GFMS12 population in Mexican lime and Marsh and Star Ruby grapefruit varieties revealed that at least four genotypes occur in the GFMS12 population and that genotype compositions differed amongst the populations in different host plants. Single-aphid-transmitted sub-isolates derived from the GFMS12 mother population on Mexican lime appeared to contain three populations of a mixture of VT-like and recombinant B165/VT-like genotypes; a mixture of recombinant RB/VT- and B165/VT-like genotypes; and a single recombinant B165/VT-like genotype. This study underlines the importance of determining the genotype composition of a potential CTV pre-immunizing source on a range of inoculated host species before utilization. PMID:22932923

  14. Dramatic Change in Citrus tristeza virus populations in the Dominican Republic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most destructive viral pathogen of citrus and has been an important concern for the citrus industry in the Dominican Republic. Earlier studies documented widespread distribution of mild isolates of the T30 genotype, which caused no disease in the infected trees, an...

  15. Genetic differentiation and biology of Citrus tristeza virus populations spreading in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates were collected from more than 1500 trees in citrus groves in Tulare, Kern, Ventura, Riverside and San Diego Counties for laboratory tests to assess molecular and biological properties of CTV strains currently in California. Tests included serology with MCA13 mon...

  16. Distribution, genetic diversity and recombination analysis of Citrus tristeza virus of India

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates representing all the citrus growing geographical zones of India were analyzed for sequence of the 5'ORF1a fragments of the partial LProI domain and for the coat protein (CP) gene. The sequences were compared with previously reported Indian and CTV genotypes from...

  17. Transgenic Resistance to Citrus tristeza virus in Grapefruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) transgenic plants transformed with a variety of constructs derived from the Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genome were tested for their resistance to the virus. Most transgenic lines were susceptible (27 lines), a few were partially resistant (6 lines) and only one line, tr...

  18. Production of Polyclonal Antibodies to the Recombinant Coat Protein of Citrus tristeza virus and Their Effectiveness for Virus Detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The p25 coat protein gene of three Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates, two from Mexico and one from India, was amplified by RT-PCR and further cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The recombinant coat protein (rCP) of the three CTV isolates was injected into rabbits and goats for antibo...

  19. Thirty years of citrus tristeza virus observations in Peru

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Peruvian citrus industry was devastated by epidemics of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) decline (CTV-D) on sour orange rootstock between 1950 and 1965 and CTV stem pitting (SP) between 1965 and 1985. CTV-SP debilitates citrus and fruit production regardless of rootstock. Control of CTV-SP by mild st...

  20. Current status of Citrus tristeza virus in Central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lindcove Research and Extension Center (LREC), Exeter, CA has 51 ha of citrus and is the field site and screenhouses for the University of California Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP). LREC maintains a zero tolerance of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) infected trees to protect the CCPP and re...

  1. Emergence and Phylodynamics of Citrus tristeza virus in Sicily, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Davino, Salvatore; Willemsen, Anouk; Panno, Stefano; Davino, Mario; Catara, Antonino; Elena, Santiago F.; Rubio, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) outbreaks were detected in Sicily island, Italy for the first time in 2002. To gain insight into the evolutionary forces driving the emergence and phylogeography of these CTV populations, we determined and analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the p20 gene from 108 CTV isolates collected from 2002 to 2009. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed that mild and severe CTV isolates belonging to five different clades (lineages) were introduced in Sicily in 2002. Phylogeographic analysis showed that four lineages co-circulated in the main citrus growing area located in Eastern Sicily. However, only one lineage (composed of mild isolates) spread to distant areas of Sicily and was detected after 2007. No correlation was found between genetic variation and citrus host, indicating that citrus cultivars did not exert differential selective pressures on the virus. The genetic variation of CTV was not structured according to geographical location or sampling time, likely due to the multiple introduction events and a complex migration pattern with intense co- and re-circulation of different lineages in the same area. The phylogenetic structure, statistical tests of neutrality and comparison of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates suggest that weak negative selection and genetic drift following a rapid expansion may be the main causes of the CTV variability observed today in Sicily. Nonetheless, three adjacent amino acids at the p20 N-terminal region were found to be under positive selection, likely resulting from adaptation events. PMID:23818960

  2. Genetic differentiation and biology of Citrus tristeza virus populations spreading in eradicative and non-eradicative areas of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies showed Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from the 1970’s in California were closely related to the mild T30 isolate; only a few severe strains such as SY568 (Riverside) and Dekopon (Orange Cove) were found and subsequently eradicated. CTV is now spreading rapidly in so...

  3. Citrus tristeza virus: Evolution of Complex and Varied Genotypic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Harper, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the Closteroviridae, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is almost unique in possessing a number of distinct and characterized strains, isolates of which produce a wide range of phenotype combinations among its different hosts. There is little understanding to connect genotypes to phenotypes, and to complicate matters more, these genotypes are found throughout the world as members of mixed populations within a single host plant. There is essentially no understanding of how combinations of genotypes affect symptom expression and disease severity. We know little about the evolution of the genotypes that have been characterized to date, little about the biological role of their diversity and particularly, about the effects of recombination. Additionally, genotype grouping has not been standardized. In this study we utilized an extensive array of CTV genomic information to classify the major genotypes, and to determine the major evolutionary processes that led to their formation and subsequent retention. Our analyses suggest that three major processes act on these genotypes: (1) ancestral diversification of the major CTV lineages, followed by (2) conservation and co-evolution of the major functional domains within, though not between CTV genotypes, and (3) extensive recombination between lineages that have given rise to new genotypes that have subsequently been retained within the global population. The effects of genotype diversity and host-interaction are discussed, as is a proposal for standardizing the classification of existing and novel CTV genotypes. PMID:23630519

  4. Use of the Coat Protein (CP) and minor CP Intergene Sequence to Discriminate Severe Strains of Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid assay is a needed to differentiate mild vs severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). Multiple alignment performed on the coat protein (CP) and the minor coat protein (CPm) intergene sequences (~80-100 bp) from different CTV isolates revealed that severe strains generally associated wit...

  5. Citrus tristeza virus: making an ally from an enemy.

    PubMed

    Dawson, William O; Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Garnsey, Stephen M; Moreno, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Virus diseases of perennial trees and vines have characteristics not amenable to study using small model annual plants. Unique disease symptoms such as graft incompatibilities and stem pitting cause considerable crop losses. Also, viruses in these long-living plants tend to accumulate complex populations of viruses and strains. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the biology and genetics of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and in developing it into a tool for crop protection and improvement. The diseases in tree and vine crops have commonalities for which CTV can be used to develop a baseline. The purpose of this review is to provide a necessary background of systems and reagents developed for CTV that can be used for continued progress in this area and to point out the value of the CTV-citrus system in answering important questions on plant-virus interactions and developing new methods for controlling plant diseases. PMID:25973695

  6. Genetic variation and recombination of RdRp and HSP 70h genes of Citrus tristeza virus isolates from orange trees showing symptoms of citrus sudden death disease

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Clarissa PC; Nagata, Tatsuya; de Jesus, Waldir C; Neto, Carlos R Borges; Pappas, Georgios J; Martin, Darren P

    2008-01-01

    Background Citrus sudden death (CSD), a disease that rapidly kills orange trees, is an emerging threat to the Brazilian citrus industry. Although the causal agent of CSD has not been definitively determined, based on the disease's distribution and symptomatology it is suspected that the agent may be a new strain of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). CTV genetic variation was therefore assessed in two Brazilian orange trees displaying CSD symptoms and a third with more conventional CTV symptoms. Results A total of 286 RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) and 284 heat shock protein 70 homolog (HSP70h) gene fragments were determined for CTV variants infecting the three trees. It was discovered that, despite differences in symptomatology, the trees were all apparently coinfected with similar populations of divergent CTV variants. While mixed CTV infections are common, the genetic distance between the most divergent population members observed (24.1% for RdRp and 11.0% for HSP70h) was far greater than that in previously described mixed infections. Recombinants of five distinct RdRp lineages and three distinct HSP70h lineages were easily detectable but respectively accounted for only 5.9 and 11.9% of the RdRp and HSP70h gene fragments analysed and there was no evidence of an association between particular recombinant mosaics and CSD. Also, comparisons of CTV population structures indicated that the two most similar CTV populations were those of one of the trees with CSD and the tree without CSD. Conclusion We suggest that if CTV is the causal agent of CSD, it is most likely a subtle feature of population structures within mixed infections and not merely the presence (or absence) of a single CTV variant within these populations that triggers the disease. PMID:18199320

  7. Citrus tristeza virus: a pathogen that changed the course of the citrus industry.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Pedro; Ambrós, Silvia; Albiach-Martí, Maria R; Guerri, José; Peña, Leandro

    2008-03-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) is the causal agent of devastating epidemics that changed the course of the citrus industry. Adapted to replicate in phloem cells of a few species within the family Rutaceae and to transmission by a few aphid species, CTV and citrus probably coevolved for centuries at the site of origin of citrus plants. CTV dispersal to other regions and its interaction with new scion varieties and rootstock combinations resulted in three distinct syndromes named tristeza, stem pitting and seedling yellows. The first, inciting decline of varieties propagated on sour orange, has forced the rebuilding of many citrus industries using tristeza-tolerant rootstocks. The second, inducing stunting, stem pitting and low bearing of some varieties, causes economic losses in an increasing number of countries. The third is usually observed by biological indexing, but rarely in the field. CTV polar virions are composed of two capsid proteins and a single-stranded, positive-sense genomic RNA (gRNA) of approximately 20 kb, containing 12 open reading frames (ORFs) and two untranslated regions (UTRs). ORFs 1a and 1b, encoding proteins of the replicase complex, are directly translated from the gRNA, and together with the 5' and 3'UTRs are the only regions required for RNA replication. The remaining ORFs, expressed via 3'-coterminal subgenomic RNAs, encode proteins required for virion assembly and movement (p6, p65, p61, p27 and p25), asymmetrical accumulation of positive and negative strands during RNA replication (p23), or suppression of post-transcriptional gene silencing (p25, p20 and p23), with the role of proteins p33, p18 and p13 as yet unknown. Analysis of genetic variation in CTV isolates revealed (1) conservation of genomes in distant geographical regions, with a limited repertoire of genotypes, (2) uneven distribution of variation along the gRNA, (3) frequent recombination events and (4) different selection pressures shaping CTV populations. Measures to control CTV damage include quarantine and budwood certification programmes, elimination of infected trees, use of tristeza-tolerant rootstocks, or cross protection with mild isolates, depending on CTV incidence and on the virus strains and host varieties predominant in each region. Incorporating resistance genes into commercial varieties by conventional breeding is presently unfeasible, whereas incorporation of pathogen-derived resistance by plant transformation has yielded variable results, indicating that the CTV-citrus interaction may be more specific and complex than initially thought. A deep understanding of the interactions between viral proteins and host and vector factors will be necessary to develop reliable and sound control measures. PMID:18705856

  8. Evaluación de Anticuerpos Desarrollados Contra la Proteína Recombinante de la Cápside del Virus Tristeza de los Cítricos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyclonal antibodies specific for the recombinant coat protein (rCP) p25 gene of (Citrus tristeza virus = CTV), were developed for isolates MX08 and MX14 from México and B227 from India. The reactivity of rCP antibodies was evaluated using healthy and CTV infected tissue. The combination of rCP ant...

  9. Developing an understanding of cross-protection by Citrus tristeza virus

    PubMed Central

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y.

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes two citrus diseases that have caused devastating losses in global citrus production. The first disease is quick decline of trees propagated on the sour orange rootstock. The second disease is stem pitting, which severely affects a number of economically important citrus varieties regardless of the rootstock used and results in reduced tree growth and vigor as well as in reduced fruit size and quality. Both diseases continue to invade new areas. While quick decline could be effectively managed by the use of resistant and/or tolerant rootstocks, the only means to protect commercial citrus against endemic stem pitting isolates of CTV has been cross-protection with mild isolates of the virus. In some citrus areas cross-protection has been successful and allowed production of certain citrus cultivars despite the presence of severe stem pitting isolates in those regions. However, many other attempts to find isolates that would provide sustained protection against aggressive isolates of the virus had failed. In general, there has been no understanding why some mild isolates were effective and others failed to protect. We have been working on the mechanism of cross-protection by CTV. Recent considerable progress has significantly advanced our understanding of how cross-protection may work in the citrus/CTV pathosystem. As we demonstrated, only isolates that belong to the same strain of the virus cross protect against each other, while isolates from different strains do not. We believe that the results of our research could now make finding protecting isolates relatively straightforward. This review discusses some of the history of CTV cross-protection along with the recent findings and our “recipe” for selection of protecting isolates. PMID:23577008

  10. A 5'-proximal region of the Citrus tristeza virus genome encoding two leader proteases is involved in virus superinfection exclusion.

    PubMed

    Atallah, Osama O; Kang, Sung-Hwan; El-Mohtar, Choaa A; Shilts, Turksen; Bergua, Mara; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a primary virus infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed with various viruses. Earlier we demonstrated that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) requires viral p33 protein. In this work we show that p33 alone is not sufficient for virus exclusion. To define the additional viral components that are involved in this phenomenon, we engineered a hybrid virus in which a 5'-proximal region in the genome of the T36 isolate containing coding sequences for the two leader proteases L1 and L2 has been substituted with a corresponding region from the genome of a heterologous T68-1 isolate. Sequential inoculation of plants pre-infected with the CTV L1L2T68 hybrid with T36 CTV resulted in superinfection with the challenge virus, which indicated that the substitution of the L1-L2 coding region affected SIE ability of the virus. PMID:26748332

  11. Etiology, background, worldwide situation and control of Citrus Tristeza virus and its vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is readily graft-transmissible and, in nature, is spread by aphid vectors in a semi-persistent manner. CTV-decline has killed >85 million citrus trees grown on sour orange rootstock worldwide. Citrus in these areas must be grown on CTV-tolerant or resistant rootstocks. ...

  12. Past and future of a century old Citrus Tristeza virus collection: A California citrus germplasm tale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) provides a mechanism for introduction and distribution of pathogen-free citrus varieties to California for use in research, variety improvement, or commercial production. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a serious citrus pathogen worldwide. The pr...

  13. Genetic diversity and evidence for recent modular recombination in Hawaiian Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Hawaiian Islands are home to a widespread and diverse population of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), an economically important pathogen of citrus. In this study we quantified the genetic diversity of two CTV genes and determined the complete genomic sequence for two strains of Hawaiian CTV. The nucl...

  14. Past and future of a century old Citrus Tristeza Virus collection: A California citrus germplasm tale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP), Riverside, CA provides a mechanism for introduction and distribution of citrus germplasm from any citrus-growing area of the world to California for use in research, variety improvement, or by industry. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a serious ...

  15. Lateral flow immunoassay for the rapid detection of citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A lateral flow methodology was developed using gold nanoparticles for rapid detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). The test strip was based on a sandwich immunoassay and could be accomplished within 10 minutes. A sample was considered negative for CTV when only the control line appeared; whereas,...

  16. Sequences of Citrus Tristeza Virus Separated in Time and Space Are Essentially Identical

    PubMed Central

    Albiach-Mart, Mara R.; Mawassi, Munir; Gowda, Siddarame; Satyanarayana, Tatineni; Hilf, Mark E.; Shanker, Savita; Almira, Ernesto C.; Vives, Mara C.; Lpez, Carmelo; Guerri, Jose; Flores, Ricardo; Moreno, Pedro; Garnsey, Steve M.; Dawson, William O.

    2000-01-01

    The first Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genomes completely sequenced (19.3-kb positive-sense RNA), from four biologically distinct isolates, are unexpectedly divergent in nucleotide sequence (up to 60% divergence). Understanding of whether these large sequence differences resulted from recent evolution is important for the design of disease management strategies, particularly the use of genetically engineered mild (essentially symptomless)-strain cross protection and RNA-mediated transgenic resistance. The complete sequence of a mild isolate (T30) which has been endemic in Florida for about a century was found to be nearly identical to the genomic sequence of a mild isolate (T385) from Spain. Moreover, samples of sequences of other isolates from distinct geographic locations, maintained in different citrus hosts and also separated in time (B252 from Taiwan, B272 from Colombia, and B354 from California), were nearly identical to the T30 sequence. The sequence differences between these isolates were within or near the range of variability of the T30 population. A possible explanation for these results is that the parents of isolates T30, T385, B252, B272, and B354 have a common origin, probably Asia, and have changed little since they were dispersed throughout the world by the movement of citrus. Considering that the nucleotide divergence among the other known CTV genomes is much greater than those expected for strains of the same virus, the remarkable similarity of these five isolates indicates a high degree of evolutionary stasis in some CTV populations. PMID:10888625

  17. Past and future of a century old Citrus tristeza virus collection: a California citrus germplasm tale

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinbo; Bozan, Orhan; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Dang, Tyler; Rucker, Tavia; Yokomi, Raymond K.; Lee, Richard F.; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Krueger, Robert R.; Bash, John; Greer, Greg; Diaz, James; Serna, Ramon; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from citrus germplasm, dooryard and field trees in California from 1914 have been maintained in planta under quarantine in the Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP), Riverside, California. This collection, therefore, represents populations of CTV isolates obtained over time and space in California. To determine CTV genetic diversity in this context, genotypes of CTV isolates from the CCPP collection were characterized using multiple molecular markers (MMM). Genotypes T30, VT, and T36 were found at high frequencies with T30 and T30+VT genotypes being the most abundant. The MMM analysis did not identify T3 and B165/T68 genotypes; however, biological and phylogenetic analysis suggested some relationships of CCPP CTV isolates with these two genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the CTV coat protein (CP) gene sequences classified the tested isolates into seven distinct clades. Five clades were in association with the standard CTV genotypes T30, T36, T3, VT, and B165/T68. The remaining two identified clades were not related to any standard CTV genotypes. Spatiotemporal analysis indicated a trend of reduced genotype and phylogenetic diversity as well as virulence from southern California (SC) at early (19071957) in comparison to that of central California (CC) isolates collected from later (19572009) time periods. CTV biological characterization also indicated a reduced number and less virulent stem pitting (SP) CTV isolates compared to seedling yellows isolates introduced to California. This data provides a historical insight of the introduction, movement, and genetic diversity of CTV in California and provides genetic and biological information useful for CTV quarantine, eradication, and disease management strategies such as CTV-SP cross protection. PMID:24339822

  18. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) Causing Proteomic and Enzymatic Changes in Sweet Orange Variety “Westin”

    PubMed Central

    Dória, Milena Santos; de Sousa, Aurizângela Oliveira; Barbosa, Cristiane de Jesus; Costa, Márcio Gilberto Cardoso; Gesteira, Abelmon da Silva; Souza, Regina Martins; Freitas, Ana Camila Oliveira; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho

    2015-01-01

    Citrus Tristeza disease, caused by CTV (Citrus tristeza virus), committs citrus plantations around the world and specifically attacks phloem tissues of the plant. The virus exists as a mixture of more or less severe variants, which may or may not cause symptoms of Tristeza. The objective of this study was to analyze the changes caused by CTV in the proteome of stems of sweet orange, as well as in the activity and gene expression of antioxidant enzymes. The CTV-infected sweet orange displayed mild symptoms, which were characterized by the presence of sparse stem pitting throughout their stems. The presence of virus was confirmed by RT-PCR. Proteomic analysis by 2DE-PAGE-MS / MS revealed the identity of 40 proteins differentially expressed between CTV- infected and -non-infected samples. Of these, 33 were up-regulated and 7 were down-regulated in CTV-infected samples. Among the proteins identified stands out a specific from the virus, the coat protein. Other proteins identified are involved with oxidative stress and for this their enzymatic activity was measured. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was higher in CTV-infected samples, as catalase (CAT) showed higher activity in uninfected samples. The activity of guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) did not vary significantly between samples. However, ascorbate peroxidase (APX) was more active in the infected samples. The relative expression of the genes encoding CAT, SOD, APX and GPX was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR). The CTV-infected samples showed greater accumulation of transcripts, except for the CAT gene. This gene showed higher expression in the uninfected samples. Taken together, it can be concluded that the CTV affects the protein profile and activity and gene expression of antioxidant enzymes in plants infected by this virus. PMID:26207751

  19. Differential stylet penetration behaviors of two Aphis gossypii biotypes in relation to host or vector infection with Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most important citrus disease agents worldwide. The impact of CTV on American agriculture has been significant, affecting 50 million trees with economic losses of several hundred million dollars. In California, this virus is predominantly transmitted by tw...

  20. Simultaneous visualization of two Citrus tristeza virus genotypes provides new insights into the structure of multi-component virus populations in a host.

    PubMed

    Bergua, María; Phelan, Dane M; Bak, Aurélie; Bloom, David C; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-04-01

    Complex Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) populations composed of mixtures of different strains of the virus are commonly found in citrus trees in the field. At present, little is known about how these populations are formed, maintained, and how they are structured within a host. Here we used a novel in situ hybridization approach allowing simultaneous visualization of two different RNA targets with high sensitivity and specificity to examine the distribution of two isolates, T36 and T68-1, representing phylogenetically distinct strains of CTV, in a citrus host in single and mixed infections. Remarkably, in doubly inoculated plants the two virus variants appeared to be well mixed within the infected tissue and showed no spatial segregation. In addition, both CTV variants were often found occupying the same cells. Possible mechanisms involved in shaping CTV populations and the biological significance of the observed lack of structural separation of the individual components are discussed. PMID:26874013

  1. Elevated Background in double antibody sandwich-indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of Citrus tristeza virus in mandarin cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Healthy tissue extracts from mandarin cultivars induced non-specific reaction in double antibody sandwich-indirect (DASI-) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) by the Central California Tristeza Eradication Agency (CCTEA), Tulare, CA. This probl...

  2. Molecular diversity of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) strains collected over the past 50 years and maintained in CTV collections in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tristeza, caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), is a serious citrus disease worldwide. Because severe strains of CTV reduce fruit production and quality, CTV has been eliminated from citrus germplasm sources by a certification program. CTV is also a regulated pathogen in quarantine zones and infec...

  3. Elevated Background in DAS-I ELISA for the Detection of Citrus Tristeza Virus in Mandarin Varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Healthy tissue extracts from mandarin orange varieties occasionally resulted in elevated absorbance which can exceed twice that of healthy sweet orange tissue extracts in DAS-I-ELISA detection with an expressed coat protein polyclonal antiserum of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). This problem occurs se...

  4. Studies of Seedling Yellows Amelioration of Citrus tristeza virus Strain Mixtures to Elucidate Mechanisms of Cross Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) cross-protection involves a mild strain of CTV preventing or interfering with infection or symptom expression by a severe strain. It is used to protect citrus when virulent stem pitting strains of CTV and efficient aphid vectors are endemic. However, the mode of action ...

  5. LATENCY OF SYSTEMIC INFECTION IN YOUNG FIELD-GROWN SWEET ORANGE TREES FOLLOWING GRAFT-INOCULATION WITH CITRUS TRISTEZA VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the time required for Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) to begin migration from the site of inoculation, and the subsequent incubation period required for systemic infection to occur. Young CTV-free sweet orange trees propagated on Citrus macrophylla rootstocks wer...

  6. Investigation of seedling yellows cross protection by mild components of the Dekopon strain of Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virulent strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) can be controlled by pre-infection by mild strains of CTV which is called cross protection. However, the mode of action of cross protection is unknown and its durability unpredictable. RNA silencing is a regulatory mechanism to maintain genome integri...

  7. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts. PMID:26210077

  8. Virus-Viroid Interactions: Citrus Tristeza Virus Enhances the Accumulation of Citrus Dwarfing Viroid in Mexican Lime via Virus-Encoded Silencing Suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Pedro; Bani Hashemian, Seyed M.; Fagoaga, Carmen; Romero, Juan; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Gorris, Maria T.; Bertolini, Edson

    2014-01-01

    An assay to identify interactions between Citrus Dwarfing Viroid (CDVd) and Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) showed that viroid titer was enhanced by the coinfecting CTV in Mexican lime but not in etrog citron. Since CTV encodes three RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs), p23, p20 and p25, an assay using transgenic Mexican limes expressing each RSS revealed that p23 and, to a lesser extent, p25 recapitulated the effect observed with coinfections of CTV and CDVd. PMID:24227850

  9. Citrus tristeza virus p23: a unique protein mediating key virus–host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ricardo; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Soler, Nuria; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús; Fagoaga, Carmen; López, Carmelo; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Peña, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    The large RNA genome of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV; ca. 20 kb) contains 12 open reading frames, with the 3′-terminal one corresponding to a protein of 209 amino acids (p23) that is expressed from an abundant subgenomic RNA. p23, an RNA-binding protein with a putative zinc-finger domain and some basic motifs, is unique to CTV because no homologs have been found in other closteroviruses, including the type species of the genus Beet yellows virus (despite both viruses having many homologous genes). Consequently, p23 might have evolved for the specific interaction of CTV with its citrus hosts. From a functional perspective p23 has been involved in many roles: (i) regulation of the asymmetrical accumulation of CTV RNA strands, (ii) induction of the seedling yellows syndrome in sour orange and grapefruit, (iii) intracellular suppression of RNA silencing, (iv) elicitation of CTV-like symptoms when expressed ectopically as a transgene in several Citrus spp., and (v) enhancement of systemic infection (and virus accumulation) in sour orange and CTV release from the phloem in p23-expressing transgenic sweet and sour orange. Moreover, transformation of Mexican lime with intron-hairpin constructs designed for the co-inactivation of p23 and the two other CTV silencing suppressors results in complete resistance against the homologous virus. From a cellular point of view, recent data indicate that p23 accumulates preferentially in the nucleolus, being the first closterovirus protein with such a subcellular localization, as well as in plasmodesmata. These major accumulation sites most likely determine some of the functional roles of p23. PMID:23653624

  10. Calculation of diagnostic parameters of advanced serological and molecular tissue-print methods for detection of Citrus tristeza virus. A model for other plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most important virus diseases which affect citrus. Control of CTV in Spain and central California is achieved by planting virus-free citrus on CTV-tolerant or -resistant rootstocks. Quarantine and certification programs remain essential to avoid importation ...

  11. Tissue-print real-time RT-PCR for accurate detection of Citrus tristeza virus. Validation and comparison with Tissue print-ELISA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes one of the most important virus diseases of Citrus species. The control of CTV in Spain and Central California is based on planting virus-free citrus on CTV-tolerant or -resistant rootstocks. However, quarantine and certification programs are still essential to avo...

  12. Rapid Differentiation and Identification of Potential Severe Strains of Citrus tristeza Virus by Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiplex Taqman®-based real-time reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect all strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and to identify potentially severe strains of the virus. A CTV TaqMan probe (CTV-CY5) based on the coat protein (CP) gene sequences...

  13. Strains of Citrus tristeza virus do not exclude superinfection by other strains of the virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Superinfection exclusion or homologous interference, a phenomenon in which a primary viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely-related virus, has been observed commonly for viruses in various systems, including viruses of bacteria, plants, and animals. With plant viruse...

  14. Accumulation of a 5’ proximal subgenomic RNA of Citrus tristeza virus is correlated with encapsidation by the minor coat protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During replication, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) produces large amounts of two unusual subgenomic (sg) RNAs that are positive-stranded and 5' -coterminal. Although these RNAs are produced in similar amounts and are similar in size, with LMT1 (~750 nt) only slightly larger than LMT2 (~650), we found ...

  15. The Pathogenicity Determinant of Citrus Tristeza Virus Causing the Seedling Yellows Syndrome is Located at the 3’-Terminal Region of the Viral Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) causes some of the more important viral diseases of citrus worldwide. The ability to map disease-inducing determinants of CTV is needed to develop better diagnostic and disease control procedures. A distinctive phenotype of s...

  16. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of grapefruit with the wild-type and mutant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes of Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus paradisi Macf. cv. Duncan was transformed with constructs coding for the wild-type and mutant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) for exploring replicase-mediated pathogen-derived resistance (RM-PDR). The RdRp gene was amplified from CTV genome and used to gener...

  17. Profiling of the small RNA populations derived from sour orange seedlings cross-protected against seedling yellows strains of Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in central California changed in 2009 from removal of all CTV-infected trees to only those which react positive in tests with selective probes for potentially severe CTV strains. Therefore, new strategies for CTV control are needed. Greenhouse tests have show...

  18. Quantitative Detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in Citrus and Aphids by Real-time Reverse Transcription-PCR (TaqMan®)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is by enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) and direct tissue blot immunoassays. Reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has also been developed for CTV detection which is more sensitive than serology. We developed a quantitative an...

  19. Genetic diversity of citrus tristeza virus from cross-protected and unprotected citrus trees after 20 years of natural challenge in Peru

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quick decline, caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), devastated Peruvian citrus on sour orange rootstock between 1950 and 1965. A second epidemic occurred between 1965 to 1985 due to spread of CTV strains causing severe stem pitting (SP) on branches and trunks, regardless of rootstock. SP weakens t...

  20. Heterologous Minor Coat Proteins of Citrus Tristeza Virus Strains Affect Encapsidation, but the Coexpression of HSP70h and p61 Restores Encapsidation to Wild-Type Levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long flexuous bipolar virions of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a Closterovirus, are encapsidated with two capsid proteins at opposite ends: the minor coat protein (CPm) encapsidates the 5’ 630 nts of the genomic RNA and the major coat protein encapsidates the remainder of the genome. In this stud...

  1. Development and validation of a multiplex reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay for the rapid detection of Citrus tristeza virus, Citrus psorosis virus, and Citrus leaf blotch virus.

    PubMed

    Osman, Fatima; Hodzic, Emir; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Wang, Jinbo; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2015-08-01

    A single real-time multiplex reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), and Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV) was developed and validated using three different fluorescently labeled minor groove binding qPCR probes. To increase the detection reliability, coat protein (CP) genes from large number of different isolates of CTV, CPsV and CLBV were sequenced and a multiple sequence alignment was generated with corresponding CP sequences from the GenBank and a robust multiplex RT-qPCR assay was designed. The capacity of the multiplex RT-qPCR assay in detecting the viruses was compared to singleplex RT-qPCR designed specifically for each virus and was assessed using multiple virus isolates from diverse geographical regions and citrus species as well as graft-inoculated citrus plants infected with various combination of the three viruses. No significant difference in detection limits was found and specificity was not affected by the inclusion of the three assays in a multiplex RT-qPCR reaction. Comparison of the viral load for each virus using singleplex and multiplex RT-qPCR assays, revealed no significant differences between the two assays in virus detection. No significant difference in Cq values was detected when using one-step and two-step multiplex RT-qPCR detection formats. Optimizing the RNA extraction technique for citrus tissues and testing the quality of the extracted RNA using RT-qPCR targeting the cytochrome oxidase citrus gene as an RNA specific internal control proved to generate better diagnostic assays. Results showed that the developed multiplex RT-qPCR can streamline viruses testing of citrus nursery stock by replacing three separate singleplex assays, thus reducing time and labor while retaining the same sensitivity and specificity. The three targeted RNA viruses are regulated pathogens for California's mandatory "Section 3701: Citrus Nursery Stock Pest Cleanliness Program". Adopting a compatible multiplex RT-qPCR testing protocol for these viruses as well as other RNA and DNA regulated pathogens will provide a valuable alternative tool for virus detection and efficient program implementation. PMID:25907469

  2. Characterisation of isolates and strains of citrus tristeza closterovirus using restriction analysis of the coat protein gene amplified by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gillings, M; Broadbent, P; Indsto, J; Lee, R

    1993-10-01

    Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) exists as a large number of distinct strains differing in biological properties and with different distributions in citrus producing countries. Strategies such as eradication or cross protection, aimed at controlling severe variants of the pathogen, require procedures to identify virus strains accurately and reliably. To fill the need for a rapid, reproducible assay, we have investigated the use of restriction analysis of the CTV coat protein gene amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The primers 5' ATG GAC GAC GAA ACA AAG 3' and 5' TCA ACG TGT GTT GAA TTT 3' amplified a DNA copy of the CTV coat protein gene (approx. 670 base pairs) when used in a reverse transcriptase PCR assay. Amplifications were carried out using dsRNA prepared from field and indicator plants, or from single-stranded RNA prepared from crude PEG precipitates of intact virions. All 51 CTV isolates tested produced an amplified product of the same size, regardless of country of origin or biological properties. Digestion of the amplified coat protein genes with the restriction enzymes Hinf1 or Rsa1 revealed sequence variation in the PCR products. Hinf1 provided the best discrimination between strains, defining seven Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) groups, some of which circumscribed sets of isolates with similar biological properties. Limited analysis of field isolates using this method showed that individual trees could contain mixtures of CTV strains, as assessed by the recovery of several RFLP types from individual reactions. Single aphid transmissions of isolates usually, but not always, generated apparently pure single strains judged by the recovery of single RFLP groups. PMID:7903310

  3. A genetic system for Citrus Tristeza Virus using the non-natural host Nicotiana benthamiana: an update

    PubMed Central

    Ambrós, Silvia; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Peña, Leandro; Moreno, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    In nature Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), genus Closterovirus, infects only the phloem cells of species of Citrus and related genera. Finding that the CTV T36 strain replicated in Nicotiana benthamiana (NB) protoplasts and produced normal virions allowed development of the first genetic system based on protoplast transfection with RNA transcribed from a full-genome cDNA clone, a laborious and uncertain system requiring several months for each experiment. We developed a more efficient system based on agroinfiltration of NB leaves with CTV-T36-based binary plasmids, which caused systemic infection in this non-natural host within a few weeks yielding in the upper leaves enough CTV virions to readily infect citrus by slash inoculation. Stem agroinoculation of citrus and NB plants with oncogenic strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying a CTV-T36 binary vector with a GUS marker, induced GUS positive galls in both species. However, while most NB tumors were CTV positive and many plants became systemically infected, no coat protein or viral RNA was detected in citrus tumors, even though CTV cDNA was readily detected by PCR in the same galls. This finding suggests (1) strong silencing or CTV RNA processing in transformed cells impairing infection progress, and (2) the need for using NB as an intermediate host in the genetic system. To maintain CTV-T36 in NB or assay other CTV genotypes in this host, we also tried to graft-transmit the virus from infected to healthy NB, or to mechanically inoculate NB leaves with virion extracts. While these trials were mostly unsuccessful on non-treated NB plants, agroinfiltration with silencing suppressors enabled for the first time infecting NB plants by side-grafting and by mechanical inoculation with virions, indicating that previous failure to infect NB was likely due to virus silencing in early infection steps. Using NB as a CTV host provides new possibilities to study virus-host interactions with a simple and reliable system. PMID:23847598

  4. Citrus tristeza virus: survival at the edge of the movement continuum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic invasion of plants by viruses is thought to involve two processes: cell-to-cell movement between adjacent cells and long-distance movement that allows the virus to rapidly move through sieve elements and unload at the growing parts of the plant. There is a continuum of proportions of these ...

  5. Enhancement or attenuation of disease by deletion of genes from Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem pitting is a common virus-induced disease of perennial woody plants induced by a range of different viruses. The phenotype results from sporadic areas in which normal xylem and phloem development is prevented during growth of stems. These alterations interfere with carbohydrate transport resu...

  6. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) profiling of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) infection in sweet orange citrus varietals using thermal desorption gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC/TOF-MS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a plant pathogen which predominately infects economically important citrus crops such as sweet orange, clementine, lime and grapefruit varietals. Within the last 70 years, an estimated 100 million citrus trees on sour orange rootstock have been destroyed due to CTV inf...

  7. Fully "Recombinant Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays" Using Genetically Engineered Single-Chain Antibody Fusion Proteins for Detection of Citrus tristeza virus.

    PubMed

    Terrada, E; Kerschbaumer, R J; Giunta, G; Galeffi, P; Himmler, G; Cambra, M

    2000-12-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant single-chain variable fragment antibodies (scFv) that bind specifically to Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), which cause the most detrimental viral disease in the citrus industry worldwide, were obtained from the hybridoma cell lines 3DF1 and 3CA5. These scFv were genetically fused with dimerization domains as well as with alkaline phosphatase, respectively, and diagnostic reagents were produced by expressing these fusion proteins in bacterial cultures. The engineered antibodies were successfully used for CTV diagnosis in plants by tissue print enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and double antibody sandwich-ELISA. The fully recombinant ELISAs were as specific and sensitive as conventional ELISAs performed with the parental monoclonal antibodies, showing the usefulness of recombinant antibodies for routine detection of a virus in woody plants for the first time. PMID:18943374

  8. Citrus tristeza virus-based RNAi in citrus plants induces gene silencing in Diaphorina citri, a phloem-sap sucking insect vector of citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing).

    PubMed

    Hajeri, Subhas; Killiny, Nabil; El-Mohtar, Choaa; Dawson, William O; Gowda, Siddarame

    2014-04-20

    A transient expression vector based on Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is unusually stable. Because of its stability it is being considered for use in the field to control Huanglongbing (HLB), which is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and vectored by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. In the absence of effective control strategies for CLas, emphasis has been on control of D. citri. Coincident cohabitation in phloem tissue by CLas, D. citri and CTV was exploited to develop a novel method to mitigate HLB through RNA interference (RNAi). Since CTV has three RNA silencing suppressors, it was not known if CTV-based vector could induce RNAi in citrus. Yet, expression of sequences targeting citrus phytoene desaturase gene by CTV-RNAi resulted in photo-bleaching phenotype. CTV-RNAi vector, engineered with truncated abnormal wing disc (Awd) gene of D. citri, induced altered Awd expression when silencing triggers ingested by feeding D. citri nymphs. Decreased Awd in nymphs resulted in malformed-wing phenotype in adults and increased adult mortality. This impaired ability of D. citri to fly would potentially limit the successful vectoring of CLas bacteria between citrus trees in the grove. CTV-RNAi vector would be relevant for fast-track screening of candidate sequences for RNAi-mediated pest control. PMID:24572372

  9. Chlorella viruses isolated in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Burbank, D.E.; Van Etten, J.L. )

    1988-09-01

    Plaque-forming viruses of the unicellular, eukaryotic, exsymbiotic, Chlorella-like green algae strain NC64A, which are common in the United States, were also present in fresh water collected in the People's Republic of China. Seven of the Chinese viruses were examined in detail and compared with the Chlorella viruses previously isolated in the United States. Like the American viruses, the Chinese viruses were large polyhedra and sensitive to chloroform. They contained numerous structural proteins and large double-stranded DNA genomes of at least 300 kilobase pairs. Each of the DNAs from the Chinese viruses contained 5-methyldeoxycytosine, which varied from 12.6 to 46.7% of the deoxycytosine, and N{sup 6}-methyldeoxyadenosine, which varied from 2.2 to 28.3% of the deoxyadenosine. Four of the Chinese virus DNAs hybridized extensively with {sup 32}P-labeled DNA from the American virus PBCV-1, and three hybridized poorly.

  10. Characterization of Recently Introduced HLB and CTV Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe stem-pitting isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were found in Florida citrus 5 years ago, followed by the discovery 2 years later of the citrus greening disease (huanglongbing: HLB) caused by the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. The new CTV isolates are members of the VT grou...

  11. The tail that wags the virus: recombination defines two gene modules and provides for increased genetic diversity in a narrow host range plant virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates T36, T68-1 and NS25 showed phylogenetic incongruities between sequences involved in viral RNA replication and those involved in movement and other viral functions. This incongruity was not found in the sequences of isolates T3, T30, T385, VT and T318A. Distance...

  12. Mild strain cross protection of tristeza: A review of research to protect against decline on sour orange in Florida and a look at the future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tristeza, caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), has long been present in Florida, but outbreaks of decline on sour orange rootstock were occasional events until the late 1970s. Sour orange rootstock was valued for the high quality of fruit produced. Research was directed towards the selection and...

  13. Recombination defines two gene modules and provides for increased genetic diversity in a narrow host range plant virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates T36, T68-1 and NS25 showed phylogenetic incongruities between sequences involved in viral RNA replication and those involved in movement and other viral functions. This incongruity was not found in the sequences of isolates T3, T30, T385, VT and T318A. Distance...

  14. [Avian influenza viruses isolated in Japan].

    PubMed

    Mase, Masaji; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2005-12-01

    Currently, H5N1 influenza viruses remain a serious public health concern in Asia and now in Europe. We showed that the H5N1 viruses associated with outbreaks of HPAI in chickens in Japan were genotypically closely related to an H5N1 virus isolated from a chicken in China in 2003 (genotype V), but were different from those prevalent in southeastern Asia in 2003-2004 (i.e., genotype Z). H5N1 viruses were also isolated from duck meat imported from China during this routine surveillance in May of 2003. We characterized these H5N1 isolates and found that poultry products contaminated with influenza viruses of high pathogenic potential to mammals are a threat to public health even in countries where the virus is not enzootic and represent a possible source of influenza outbreaks in poultry. PMID:16557008

  15. Virus isolation and propagation in embryonating eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The embryonating egg is one of the most versatile, easy to work with, and widely used host systems for the isolation and propagation of avian viruses. The embryonating chicken egg (ECE) is the most commonly available system that is both specific pathogen free and supports the replication of viruses...

  16. Mild strain cross protection of tristeza: a review of research to protect against decline on sour orange in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Richard F.; Keremane, Manjunath L.

    2013-01-01

    Tristeza, caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), has long been present in Florida but outbreaks of decline on sour orange rootstock were occasional events until the late 1970s. Sour orange rootstock was valued for the high quality of fruit produced and was widely used because of its tolerance of citrus blight, a disease of unknown etiology. Research was directed towards the selection and screening of mild strains of CTV which could protect against sour orange decline strains. Following the introduction of Toxoptera citricida (also known as the brown citrus aphid) in 1995 there was a greater concern for maintaining production of existing blocks of citrus on sour orange rootstock. Availability of the CTV genome sequence around the same time as well as molecular characterization of in planta CTV populations led to the selection of mild CTV isolates which when inoculated into existing field trees, extended the productive life of the groves and enabled a more graduate replanting of trees on CTV-tolerant rootstocks. The history of CTV in Florida and the methods developed to select mild isolates for use for mild strain cross protection will be reviewed. PMID:24046764

  17. Comparison of Immunohistochemistry and Virus Isolation for Diagnosis of West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Angela E.; Mead, Daniel G.; Allison, Andrew B.; Gibbs, Samantha E. J.; Gottdenker, Nicole L.; Stallknecht, David E.; Howerth, Elizabeth W.

    2005-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry and virus isolation were performed on 1,057 birds. Immunohistochemistry, virus isolation, or both found 325 birds to be West Nile virus positive. Of these, 271 were positive by both methods. These results indicate that virus isolation and immunohistochemistry are approximately equal in their ability to detect West Nile virus. PMID:15956415

  18. Sequence diversity of wheat mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lucy R

    2016-02-01

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), transmitted by eriophyid wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella) is the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat and maize. WMoV and other members of the genus Emaravirus evaded thorough molecular characterization for many years due to the experimental challenges of mite transmission and manipulating multisegmented negative sense RNA genomes. Recently, the complete genome sequence of a Nebraska isolate of WMoV revealed eight segments, plus a variant sequence of the nucleocapsid protein-encoding segment. Here, near-complete and partial consensus sequences of five more WMoV isolates are reported and compared to the Nebraska isolate: an Ohio maize isolate (GG1), a Kansas barley isolate (KS7), and three Ohio wheat isolates (H1, K1, W1). Results show two distinct groups of WMoV isolates: Ohio wheat isolate RNA segments had 84% or lower nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate, whereas GG1 and KS7 had 98% or higher nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate. Knowledge of the sequence variability of WMoV isolates is a step toward understanding virus biology, and potentially explaining observed biological variation. PMID:26590326

  19. Comparison of camelpox viruses isolated in Dubai.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, M; Meyer, H; Wernery, U; Kaaden, O R

    1996-03-01

    Between October 1993 and March 1994, outbreaks of pox-like exanthemas were observed in several camel raising farms in Dubai. Scabs from twenty camels with either local or generalized lesions were examined, seven of them had previously been vaccinated with a modified live camelpox virus vaccine. Inspection of scabs by electron microscopy confirmed an infection with orthopox viruses (OPV) in 10 animals and with parapox virus in one camel. Investigation of the scabs by polymerase chain reaction and dot blot assay revealed the presence of OPV in 15 or 13 samples, respectively. OPV could be isolated in cell culture in 14 cases. Restriction enzyme profiles characterized all isolates as camelpox virus. Their DNA patterns were virtually identical displaying only slight variations in the terminal fragments. In contrast, the vaccine strain showed a distinct restriction enzyme profile, indicating that it was not involved in the infections. PMID:8861650

  20. DENGUE-TYPE VIRUSES ISOLATED IN SINGAPORE.

    PubMed

    LIM, K A; CHAN, Y C; PHOON, W O; HANAM, E

    1964-01-01

    A dengue-like illness with marked haemorrhagic manifestations appeared in Singapore in 1960. Its similarity in many respects to the haemorrhagic fevers of Thailand and the Philippines led to its being described as "Singapore haemorrhagic fever".This paper describes the isolation and identification of dengue-type viruses from patients in Singapore between 1960 and 1962. In addition to the conventional complement-fixation and neutralization tests, a new test, called the "sensitized erythrocyte agglutination test", was employed; this test method is described.Altogether 21 dengue-type viruses were isolated, including dengue types 1, 2 and 4. Chikungunya virus, prominent in the Thailand disease, was not detected.The author suggests that study of the epidemiology of haemorrhagic fevers in South-East Asia would cast further light on the transmission of arboviruses. PMID:14153412

  1. Dengue-type viruses isolated in Singapore*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, K. A.; Chan, Y. C.; Phoon, W. O.; Hanam, E.

    1964-01-01

    A dengue-like illness with marked haemorrhagic manifestations appeared in Singapore in 1960. Its similarity in many respects to the haemorrhagic fevers of Thailand and the Philippines led to its being described as Singapore haemorrhagic fever. This paper describes the isolation and identification of dengue-type viruses from patients in Singapore between 1960 and 1962. In addition to the conventional complement-fixation and neutralization tests, a new test, called the sensitized erythrocyte agglutination test, was employed; this test method is described. Altogether 21 dengue-type viruses were isolated, including dengue types 1, 2 and 4. Chikungunya virus, prominent in the Thailand disease, was not detected. The author suggests that study of the epidemiology of haemorrhagic fevers in South-East Asia would cast further light on the transmission of arboviruses. PMID:14153412

  2. Molecular variation of hop mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Poke, Fiona S; Crowle, Damian R; Whittock, Simon P; Wilson, Calum R

    2010-10-01

    Hop mosaic virus (HpMV), a member of the genus Carlavirus, is importance to hop production worldwide. We identified variation in nucleic and amino acid sequences among 23 HpMV isolates from Australia, the USA, the Czech Republic, South Africa and Japan using a 1,455-bp fragment covering the 3' end of the virus genome including ORFs 4, 5 and 6. Three clusters of two or more isolates were identified in phylogenies of the total nucleotide sequence and the coat protein (ORF5) amino acid sequence. Two of these clusters combined in analyses of ORF4 and ORF6 amino acid sequences. Isolates from within and outside of Australia were found in each cluster, indicating that sequence variation was not associated with geographic source. Monitoring of HpMV variants in the field and evaluation of the impact of variants on vector association, rate of spread, and hop yield and quality can now be undertaken. PMID:20680359

  3. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Banna Virus from Mosquitoes, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nabeshima, Takeshi; Nga, Phan Thi; Guillermo, Posadas; del Carmen Parquet, Maria; Yu, Fuxun; Thuy, Nguyen Thanh; Trang, Bui Minh; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Nam, Vu Sinh; Inoue, Shingo; Hasebe, Futoshi

    2008-01-01

    We isolated and characterized a Banna virus from mosquitoes in Vietnam; 5 strains were isolated from field-caught mosquitoes at various locations; Banna virus was previously isolated from encephalitis patients in Yunnan, China, in 1987. Together, these findings suggest widespread distribution of this virus throughout Southeast Asia. PMID:18680655

  4. Isolation of ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Abd-Jamil, Juraina; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2010-11-01

    Ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, which was isolated from a monkey in 1972, was isolated from a patient with dengue fever in Malaysia. The virus is neutralized by serum of patients with endemic DENV-1 infection. Rare isolation of this virus suggests a limited spillover infection from an otherwise restricted sylvatic cycle. PMID:21029545

  5. Molecular characterization of Korean rabies virus isolates

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Nam; Hong, Gyeong-Soo; Kang, Hee-Kyung; Oh, Yoon-I; Cho, Soo-Dong; Song, Jae-Young

    2011-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (N) and glycoprotein (G) of 11 Korean rabies virus (RABV) isolates collected from animals diagnosed with rabies between 2008 and 2009 were subjected to molecular and phylogenetic analyses. Six isolates originated from domestic animals (cattle and dogs) and five were obtained from wild free-ranging raccoon dogs. The similarities in the nucleotide sequences of the N gene among all Korean isolates ranged from 98.1 to 99.8%, while those of the G gene ranged from 97.9 to 99.3%. Based on the nucleotide analysis of the N and G genes, the Korean RABV isolates were confirmed as genotype I of Lyssavirus and classified into four distinct subgroups with high similarity. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Korean isolates were most closely related to the non-Korean NeiMeng1025B and 857r strains, which were isolated from rabid raccoon dogs in Eastern China and Russia, respectively. These findings suggest that the Korean RABV isolates originated from a rabid raccoon dog in Northeastern Asia. Genetic analysis of the Korean RABV isolates revealed no substitutions at several antigenic sites, indicating that the isolates circulating in Korea may be pathogenic in several hosts. PMID:21368564

  6. Characterization of rabies virus isolates in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Favi, Myriam; Nina, Aleida; Yung, Verónica; Fernández, Jorge

    2003-11-01

    In Latin America, rabies is still an important public health problem. Canine rabies, and wild animal rabies, especially transmitted by hematofagous and insectivorous bats, has become an emerging problem in the countries of this region. We received 363 samples with a laboratory-confirmed rabies diagnosis from Bolivia during l997-2001. From these, we could obtain 222 rabies virus isolates by intra-cerebral inoculation in mice. By antigenic characterization we could identify 147 isolates as variant 1, 2 isolates as variant 2, 3 isolates as variant 3, and 1 isolate as variant 5. Phylogenetic analysis of 84 isolates established that they segregated in 3 different branches, corresponding to 3 genetic variants, 78 isolates corresponding to antigenic variant 1 segregated in the same lineage as the antigenic variant 5, 2 isolates corresponding to antigenic variant 2 segregated in another lineage, and 3 isolates from antigenic variant 3 segregated in a different lineage.The genetic variant that mainly circulates in Bolivia is maintained in a cycle whose main reservoir are dogs, but it is not possible to discard the presence of other cycles, in which different species of bats or other wild mammals could be participating. PMID:14602205

  7. African swine fever virus isolate, Georgia, 2007.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Rebecca J; Michaud, Vincent; Heath, Livio; Hutchings, Geoff; Oura, Chris; Vosloo, Wilna; Dwarka, Rahana; Onashvili, Tinatin; Albina, Emmanuel; Dixon, Linda K

    2008-12-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is widespread in Africa but is rarely introduced to other continents. In June 2007, ASF was confirmed in the Caucasus region of Georgia, and it has since spread to neighboring countries. DNA fragments amplified from the genome of the isolates from domestic pigs in Georgia in 2007 were sequenced and compared with other ASF virus (ASFV) isolates to establish the genotype of the virus. Sequences were obtained from 4 genome regions, including part of the gene B646L that encodes the p72 capsid protein, the complete E183L and CP204L genes, which encode the p54 and p30 proteins and the variable region of the B602L gene. Analysis of these sequences indicated that the Georgia 2007 isolate is closely related to isolates belonging to genotype II, which is circulating in Mozambique, Madagascar, and Zambia. One possibility for the spread of disease to Georgia is that pigs were fed ASFV-contaminated pork brought in on ships and, subsequently, the disease was disseminated throughout the region. PMID:19046509

  8. Genetic Transformation of Citrus Paradisi with Antisense and untranslatable RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Genes of Citrus Tristeza Closterovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expression of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was studied in vivo and in vitro using a polyclonal antiserum raised against the recombinant CTV-RdRp protein. Although 56 kDa CTV-RdRp is thought to be expressed by a +1 translational frameshift at the carboxyl te...

  9. Analysis of Iranian Potato virus S isolates.

    PubMed

    Salari, Khadijeh; Massumi, Hossein; Heydarnejad, Jahangir; Hosseini Pour, Akbar; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-10-01

    Two hundred forty potato samples with one or more symptoms of leaf mosaic, distortion, mottling and yellowing were collected between 2005 and 2008 from seven Iranian provinces. Forty-four of these samples tested positive with double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (DAS-ELISA) using a Potato virus S (PVS) polyclonal antibody. Of these 12 isolates of PVS were selected based on the geographical location for biological and molecular characterization. The full coat protein (CP) and 11K genes from 12 PVS isolates were PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced. All 12 PVS isolates showed mosaic symptoms on Nicotiana debneyii and N. tabacum cv. Whiteburly and local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor, C. quinoa and C. album. The Iranian isolates share between 93 and 100% pairwise nucleotide identity with other PVS(O) isolates. Based on maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis coupled with pairwise identity analysis, we propose 15 genotypes for the PVS(O) strain and 3 genotypes for the PVS(A) strain. PMID:21567245

  10. Phylogenetic Relationships of Southern African West Nile Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Grobbelaar, Antoinette A.; Leman, Patricia A.; Anthony, Fiona S.; Gibson, Georgina V.F.; Swanepoel, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were examined for 29 southern African West Nile virus (formal name West Nile virus [WNV]) isolates from various sources in four countries from 1958 to 2001. In addition sequence data were retrieved from GenBank for another 23 WNV isolates and Kunjin and Japanese encephalitis viruses. All isolates belonged to two lineages. Lineage 1 isolates were from central and North Africa, Europe, Israel, and North America; lineage 2 isolates were from central and southern Africa and Madagascar. No strict correlation existed between grouping and source of virus isolate, pathogenicity, geographic distribution, or year of isolation. Some southern African isolates have been associated with encephalitis in a human, a horse, and a dog and with fatal hepatitis in a human and death of an ostrich chick. PMID:12141968

  11. Complete genome sequence of chikungunya virus isolated in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Kent D; Suarez, Lady-Anne C; Labayo, Hannah Karen M; Liles, Veni R; Salvoza, Noel C; Klinzing, David C; Daroy, Maria Luisa G; Matias, Ronald R; Natividad, Filipinas F

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is an alphavirus of the Togaviridae family, which causes a febrile illness with arthralgia in humans. We report here on the complete genome sequence of chikungunya virus strain CHIKV-13-112A isolated from a patient in the Philippines who was suspected to have dengue virus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strain is of the Asian genotype. PMID:24970822

  12. Variants of Triticum mosaic virus isolated from wheat in Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a recently discovered virus infecting wheat. We compared the Colorado isolates C10-492 and C11-775 with the 06-123 isolate of TriMV from Kansas (TriMV-K). Comparisons were made using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), infectivity assay, host range, dry weig...

  13. Isolation of Genetically Diverse Marburg Viruses from Egyptian Fruit Bats

    PubMed Central

    Towner, Jonathan S.; Amman, Brian R.; Sealy, Tara K.; Carroll, Serena A. Reeder; Comer, James A.; Kemp, Alan; Swanepoel, Robert; Paddock, Christopher D.; Balinandi, Stephen; Khristova, Marina L.; Formenty, Pierre B. H.; Albarino, Cesar G.; Miller, David M.; Reed, Zachary D.; Kayiwa, John T.; Mills, James N.; Cannon, Deborah L.; Greer, Patricia W.; Byaruhanga, Emmanuel; Farnon, Eileen C.; Atimnedi, Patrick; Okware, Samuel; Katongole-Mbidde, Edward; Downing, Robert; Tappero, Jordan W.; Zaki, Sherif R.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2009-01-01

    In July and September 2007, miners working in Kitaka Cave, Uganda, were diagnosed with Marburg hemorrhagic fever. The likely source of infection in the cave was Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) based on detection of Marburg virus RNA in 31/611 (5.1%) bats, virus-specific antibody in bat sera, and isolation of genetically diverse virus from bat tissues. The virus isolates were collected nine months apart, demonstrating long-term virus circulation. The bat colony was estimated to be over 100,000 animals using mark and re-capture methods, predicting the presence of over 5,000 virus-infected bats. The genetically diverse virus genome sequences from bats and miners closely matched. These data indicate common Egyptian fruit bats can represent a major natural reservoir and source of Marburg virus with potential for spillover into humans. PMID:19649327

  14. Improved methods for isolation of avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuang; Li, Yongdong; Xia, Han; Huang, Juan; Zhang, Zhong; Zhu, Na; Zhao, Jiuru; Li, Tianxian

    2014-09-27

    Isolation of viruses using chick embryos is a classical virological method. Inoculation of the allantoic cavity and use of allantoic fluid is a common method of passaging isolated avian influenza viruses. In the present study, 2490 fresh fecal samples and 4967 old fecal samples were investigated and subjected to conventional passaging (allantoic fluid method). Two newly developed methods-the allantochorion and allantoic fluid mixed method and the chick embryo and allantoic fluid mixed method-were also examined. The rates of influenza virus isolation for these three methods were compared. There appeared to be little difference among these methods when fresh fecal samples were used. However, for the old fecal samples, isolation rates for influenza virus were significantly higher for the chick embryo and allantoic fluid mixed method compared with the conventional allantoic fluid method. All viruses isolated using the conventional allantoic fluid method were isolated successfully using the two newly developed methods. These results suggest that using chick embryos in conjunction with allantoic fluid is effective for early virus isolation, especially for fecal samples that are not fresh. Additionally, practical chick embryo passage methods are described that improve significantly the rate of isolation of influenza viruses from fecal samples of migratory birds in a complex wild ecological environment. PMID:25261812

  15. West Nile Virus Isolation in Human and Mosquitoes, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Quiroga, Darwin; Davis, C. Todd; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Escobar-Lopez, Roman; Olmos, Dolores Velasco; Gastalum, Lourdes Cecilia Soto; Acosta, Magaly Aviles; Elizondo-Quiroga, Armando; Gonzalez-Rojas, Jose I.; Cordero, Juan F. Contreras; Guzman, Hilda; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Barrett, Alan D.T.; Beaty, Barry J.

    2005-01-01

    West Nile virus has been isolated for the first time in Mexico, from a sick person and from mosquitoes (Culex quinquefasciatus). Partial sequencing and analysis of the 2 isolates indicate that they are genetically similar to other recent isolates from northern Mexico and the western United States. PMID:16229779

  16. Infection and immunity with a virus isolate from turkeys.

    PubMed

    Winterfield, R W; Reed, W M; Thacker, H L

    1985-11-01

    Avian pox virus was isolated from cutaneous pox lesions removed from turkey breeders that had been vaccinated three times with a commercial fowl pox vaccine. In three cross-immunization experiments with turkeys and two with chickens, the turkey pox isolate, designated NC5271, proved immunologically different from fowl, pigeon, and quail pox viruses. Significant protection against NC5271 virus infection and inducement of pox lesions was only attained when the homologous isolate was used as a vaccine. The potential need in the field for such a vaccine was discussed. PMID:2999743

  17. Chikungunya virus was isolated in Thailand, 2010.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, Mikiko; Benjathummarak, Surachet; Kawashita, Norihito; Rukmanee, Prasert; Sangmukdanun, Suntaree; Masrinoul, Promsin; Pitaksajjakul, Pannamthip; Puiprom, Orapim; Wuthisen, Pitak; Kurosu, Takeshi; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Maneekan, Pannamas; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Luplertlop, Natthanej

    2014-12-01

    Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) is an acute febrile illness caused by a mosquito-borne alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV). This disease re-emerged in Kenya in 2004, and spread to the countries in and around the Indian Ocean. The re-emerging epidemics rapidly spread to regions like India and Southeast Asia, and it was subsequently identified in Europe in 2007, probably as a result of importation of chikungunya cases. On the one hand, chikungunya is one of the neglected diseases and has only attracted strong attention during large outbreaks. In 2008-2009, there was a major outbreak of chikungunya fever in Thailand, resulting in the highest number of infections in any country in the region. However, no update of CHIKV circulating in Thailand has been published since 2009. In this study, we examined the viral growth kinetics and sequences of the structural genes derived from CHIKV clinical isolates obtained from the serum specimens of CHIKF-suspected patients in Central Thailand in 2010. We identified the CHIKV harboring two mutations E1-A226V and E2-I211T, indicating that the East, Central, and South African lineage of CHIKV was continuously circulating as an indigenous population in Thailand. PMID:25113745

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Zika Virus Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Jason T; Wiley, Michael R; Prieto, Karla; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Nagle, Elyse; Kasper, Matthew R; Reyes, Daniel; Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Heang, Vireak; Weaver, Scott C; Haddow, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B; Sovann, Ly; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus is an emerging human pathogen of great concern due to putative links to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Here, we report the complete genomes, including the 5' and 3' untranslated regions, of five Zika virus isolates, one from the Asian lineage and four from the African lineage. PMID:27174284

  19. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Zika Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Jason T.; Wiley, Michael R.; Prieto, Karla; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Nagle, Elyse; Kasper, Matthew R.; Reyes, Daniel; Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Heang, Vireak; Weaver, Scott C.; Haddow, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B.; Sovann, Ly

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus is an emerging human pathogen of great concern due to putative links to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Here, we report the complete genomes, including the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions, of five Zika virus isolates, one from the Asian lineage and four from the African lineage. PMID:27174284

  20. Genome Sequences of Two Pseudorabies Virus Strains Isolated in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Konstantinos V.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Filioussis, George; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Nauwynck, Hans J.; Kritas, Spyridon K.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (species Suid herpesvirus 1) belongs to the genus Varicellovirus, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, family Herpesviridae, and is the causative agent of an acute and frequently fatal disease that affects mainly pigs. Here, we report the genome sequences of two strains of this virus isolated in Greece in 2010. PMID:26798112

  1. Yukon isolates of snowshoe hare virus, 1972-1982.

    PubMed

    McLean, D M

    1983-01-01

    Bunyaviruses including 53 strains of snowshoe hare (SSH) and 4 of Northway (NOR) were isolated from 132,428 unengorged adult female mosquitoes of 7 species collected throughout the boreal forest of the Yukon Territory and open woodland terrain in the Mackenzie Valley, Northwest Territories, Canada during 8 of 11 arctic summers from 1972 through 1982. Isolations of SSH virus were also achieved from mosquito larvae during 1974 and 1975. Percentage virus infection rates of important vectors were Aedes communis (0.038) and Culiseta inornata (0.124). Isolations of NOR virus were achieved during 1976 and 1978 only. Infection thresholds of SSH virus for Ae. communis were 0.1 mouse LD50, when virus transmission occurred both after virus feeding and after intrathoracic injection and Cs. inornata transmitted SSH virus after intrathoracic injection. Both Ae. communis and Cs. inornata were infected after injection of 3 plaque-forming units (PFU) NOR virus, and transmitted after injection of 300 PFU, but they also became infected after feeding on 30 PFU virus. PMID:6135219

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Isolates from Florida

    PubMed Central

    White, Gregory S.; Pickett, Brett E.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Johnson, Amelia G.; Ottendorfer, Christy; Stark, Lillian M.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Florida has the highest degree of endemicity for eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) of any state in the United States and is the only state with year-round transmission of EEEV. To further understand the viral population dynamics in Florida, the genome sequence of six EEEV isolates from central Florida were determined. These data were used to identify the most polymorphic regions of the EEEV genome from viruses isolated in Florida. The sequence of these polymorphic regions was then determined for 18 additional Florida isolates collected in four geographically distinct regions over a 20-year period. Phylogenetic analyses of these data suggested a rough temporal association of the Florida isolates, but no clustering by region or by source of the isolate. Some clustering of northeastern isolates with Florida isolates was seen, providing support for the hypothesis that Florida serves as a reservoir for the periodic introduction of EEEV into the northeastern United States. PMID:21540379

  3. Molecular characterization of Chittoor (Batai) virus isolates from India

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, P.D.; Sudeep, A.B.; Mishra, A.C.; Mourya, D.T.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Chittoor virus (CHITV) belongs to genus Orthobunyavirus, family Bunyaviridae. It has been isolated from various species of mosquitoes and pig from different parts of India. Five isolates of CHITV were characterized at the molecular level and compared with other Batai viruses (BATV) to find out any kind of reassortment in their genome. Methods: Complete nucelocapsid (S), glycoprotein (M) and partial RNA polymerase (L) segments of CHITV were amplified and sequenced. These sequences were compared with those of Batai viruses, isolated from different geographical locations in Asia, Africa and Europe. Results: Phylogenetic analysis revealed CHITV as a variant of BATV. High level of conservation was seen among the CHITV isolates studied. The CHITV sequences showed clustering in one lineage with the sequences from Japan and Malaysia, however, BATV sequences from Europe and Africa formed a separate phylogenetic lineage. Interpretation & conclusions: The study indicates the presence of a single genotype of CHITV circulating in India, despite the involvement of different hosts in the natural cycle by this virus. Analysis of the sequences of the S, M and L segments of genome indicated that the virus has not undergone any reassortment. This virus has not caused any epidemic involving humans, however, replication of the virus in different mosquito and vertebrate hosts species suggests that it is a cause of concern. PMID:23287126

  4. Isolation of genotypic variants of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H H; Miller, L K

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear polyhedrosis virus (MNPV) isolated from a lepidopteran (Noctuidae) insect, Autographa californica, was cloned by successive plaque purification using virions containing only one nucleocapsid per envelope as inoculum. The ability to clone the virus by this method was demonstrated by the isolation of nondefective, genotypic variants of the virus with similar but not identical restriction endonuclease fragment patterns. Five distinct variants were identified by genotypic analysis with HindIII, EcoRI, SalI, and Bam HI restriction endonucleases. The characteristic genotype of each variant was maintained upon passage in insect larvae. The isolation of these virus variants demonstrates (i) the heterogeneity of the uncloned virus preparation and (ii) the ability to clone MNPVs by plaque purification of media-derived nonoccluded virions. The A. californica MNPV is being considered for commercial use as a pesticide in the United States, and the cloning of the virus, in view of the heterogeneity detected, may be advisable. The cloning and genotype analyses are also significant with regard to understanding the genetic nature of multiply embedded NPVs (those NPVs containing more than one nucleocapsid per envelope in the occluded form of the virus) and indicate that further genetic analysis of these viruses is possible. Images PMID:359831

  5. Variability in alternanthera mosaic virus isolates from different hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have determined the complete genome sequences of Alternanthera mosaic virus phlox isolate PA (AltMV-PA) and four infectious clone variants derived from AltMV-SP, as well as partial sequences of other isolates from various types of phlox, and from portulaca, nandina, and cineraria. Phylogenetic co...

  6. Comparison of influenza viruses isolated from man and from whales.

    PubMed

    Lvov, D K; Zdanov, V M; Sazonov, A A; Braude, N A; Vladimirtceva, E A; Agafonova, L V; Skljanskaja, E I; Kaverin, N V; Reznik, V I; Pysina, T V; Oserovic, A M; Berzin, A A; Mjasnikova, I A; Podcernjaeva, R Y; Klimenko, S M; Andrejev, V P; Yakhno, M A

    1978-01-01

    Four isolates of influenza virus strains from Moscow and Habarovsk that caused outbreaks of influenza in November and December 1977 in several cities of the USSR were studied and their haemagglutinins and neuraminidases were compared with those of other human and animal influenza viruses including A/whale/Pacific Ocean/76. In H1 tests these isolates, designated A/USSR/77, reacted with immune serum against A/FM/1/47 (H1N1) to the homologous titre, and with antiserum against A/whale/PO/19/76 virus to 1/8 of the homologous titre. In neuraminidase inhibition tests all A/USSR/77 isolates showed the presence of human N1 type neuraminidase, more closely related to A/sw/New Jersey/76 (Hsw1N1) than to A/FM/1/47 (H1N1) virus. The haemagglutinin of A/whale/Pacific Ocean/19/76 virus occupies an intermediate position between H0 and H1, but its neuraminidase is close to Nav2. The virus from whales multiplies better at low (28 degrees C) and at high (40 degrees C) temperatures than do the viruses of human origin that were tested. PMID:310734

  7. Isolation of influenza viruses in MDCK 33016PF cells and clearance of contaminating respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Roth, Bernhard; Mohr, Hannah; Enders, Martin; Garten, Wolfgang; Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2012-01-11

    This paper summarizes results obtained by multiplex PCR screening of human clinical samples for respiratory viruses and corresponding data obtained after passaging of virus-positive samples in MDCK 33016PF cells. Using the ResPlexII v2.0 (Qiagen) multiplex PCR, 393 positive results were obtained in 468 clinical samples collected during an influenza season in Germany. The overall distribution of positive results was influenza A 42.0%, influenza B 38.7%, adenovirus 1.5%, bocavirus 0.5%, coronavirus 3.3%, enterovirus 5.6%, metapneumovirus 1.0%, parainfluenza virus 0.8%, rhinovirus 4.1%, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) 2.5%. Double infections of influenza virus together with another virus were found for adenovirus B and E, bocavirus, coronavirus, enterovirus and for rhinovirus. These other viruses were rapidly lost upon passages in MDCK 33016PF cells and under conditions as applied to influenza virus passaging. Clinical samples, in which no influenza virus but other viruses were found, were also subject to passages in MDCK 33016PF cells. Using lower inoculum dilutions than those normally applied for preparations containing influenza virus (total dilution of the original sample of ∼10(4)), the positive results for the different viruses turned negative already after 2 or 3 passages in MDCK 33016PF cells. These results demonstrate that, under practical conditions as applied to grow influenza viruses, contaminating viruses can be effectively removed by passages in MDCK cells. In combination with their superior isolation efficiency, MDCK cells appear highly suitable to be used as an alternative to embryonated eggs to isolate and propagate influenza vaccine candidate viruses. PMID:22119922

  8. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A New Virus Isolated From Wheat in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006 a mechanically-transmissible and previously uncharacterized virus was isolated in Kansas from wheat with mosaic symptoms. The physio-chemical properties of the virus were examined by purification on cesium chloride density gradients, electron microscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylalmid...

  9. Isolated acute dysphagia due to varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Mantero, Vittorio; Rigamonti, Andrea; Valentini, Sergio; Fiumani, Anna; Piamarta, Francesca; Bonfanti, Paolo; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    We present a case of zoster sine herpete causing isolated acute dysphagia in an immunocompetent patient. The interest of this paper is the atypical presentation of varicella-zoster virus reactivation. A 77-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of fever and worsening dysphagia for both liquid and solid foods. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis and PCR amplified varicella-zoster virus DNA with high antibody titers in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The panel was suggestive of a cranial neuritis due to varicella-zoster virus, involved cranial nerves, even in the absence of a cutaneous and mucosal rash. Varicella-zoster virus reactivation should be included in the differential diagnosis of isolated or multiple cranial nerve palsies, with or without zosteriform skin lesions. A prompt etiologic diagnosis can lead to early administration of antiviral therapy. PMID:24529416

  10. A Circo-Like Virus Isolated from Penaeus monodon Shrimps

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hanh T.; Yu, Qian; Boisvert, Maude; Van, Hanh T.; Bergoin, Max

    2014-01-01

    A virus with a circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) genome (PmCV-1) was isolated from Penaeus monodon shrimps in Vietnam. The gene structure of the 1,777-nucleotide (nt) genome was similar to that of circoviruses and cycloviruses, but the nucleic acid and protein sequence identities to these viruses were very low. PMID:24435870

  11. Vaccine efficacy against challenge with HPAI H5N1 virus isolates from Vietnam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple isolates of H5N1 were isolated from northern Vietnam in December of 2005. All the viruses characterized were clade 2 viruses, but phylogenetically they formed two separate sub-lineages. The isolation of clade 2 viruses was unexpected, since previous isolations from both northern and south...

  12. Isolation and characterization of H9N2 influenza virus isolates from poultry respiratory disease outbreak.

    PubMed

    Jakhesara, Subhash J; Bhatt, Vaibhav D; Patel, Namrata V; Prajapati, Kantilal S; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports isolation and characterization of H9N2 virus responsible for disease characterized by symptoms including difficulty in respiration, head swelling, nasal discharge, reduced feed intake, cyanotic comb, reduced egg production and mortality. Virus isolation from allantoic fluid inoculated with tracheal aspirates and whole genome sequencing of two isolates were performed on an Ion-Torrent sequencer. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two H9N2 isolates are reassortant viruses showing a G1-like lineage for HA, NA and NP, a Hok/49/98-like lineage for PB1 and PA, PK/UDL-01/05-like lineage for PB2, IL/90658/00-like lineage for NS and an unknown lineage for M gene. Analyses of the HA cleavage site showed a sequence of (333PARSSR↓GL340) indicating that these isolates are of low pathogenicity. Isolate 2 has leucine at amino acid position 226, a substitution which is associated with mammalian adaptation of avian influenza virus. Isolate 1 has the S31N substitution in the M2 gene that has been associated with drug resistance as well as R57Q and C241Y mutations in the NP gene which are associated with human adaptation. The result reported here gives deep insight in to H9N2 viruses circulating in domestic poultry of India and supports the policy of active efforts to control and manage H9N2 infections in Indian poultry. PMID:24790833

  13. Full Genomic Characterization of a Saffold Virus Isolated in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Leguia, Mariana; Loyola, Steev; Rios, Jane; Juarez, Diana; Guevara, Carolina; Silva, Maria; Prieto, Karla; Wiley, Michael; Kasper, Matthew R.; Palacios, Gustavo; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    While studying respiratory infections of unknown etiology we detected Saffold virus in an oropharyngeal swab collected from a two-year-old female suffering from diarrhea and respiratory illness. The full viral genome recovered by deep sequencing showed 98% identity to a previously described Saffold strain isolated in Japan. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the Peruvian Saffold strain belongs to genotype 3 and is most closely related to strains that have circulated in Asia. This is the first documented case report of Saffold virus in Peru and the only complete genomic characterization of a Saffold-3 isolate from the Americas. PMID:26610576

  14. Isolation of human immunodeficiency virus-related simian immunodeficiency viruses from African green monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, G; Werner, A; Baier, M; Binniger, D; Ferdinand, F J; Norley, S; Kurth, R

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated lentivirus strains that are related to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops; AGM). Although immunologically related, these SIVagm are clearly distinct from other simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) isolates, including isolates from Macaca mulatta (SIVmac) or even from other AGM. The SIVagm strains described in this communication grow well in a limited number of human T-lymphoma lines. Virus density, morphology, and reverse transcriptase activity are characteristic of the lentivirus group. SIVagm exhibits the following pattern of major virus proteins: p18, p28, gp45, p64, gp140. They appear to bind to the target cell via the CD4 or its primate analogue. Four virus isolates have already been molecularly cloned for detailed genomic analysis and within this SIV agm group they exhibit the genomic variability that is typical of lentiviruses. AGMs infected with this virus apparently remain healthy and therefore SIVagm not only provides a virus model for vaccine studies but also allows investigation of the defense mechanisms (immunological and others) that keep the AGMs healthy. Furthermore, precise genomic analysis of these and other SIV strains will lead to a better understanding of the evolution and pathogenicity of human lentiviruses like HIV. Images PMID:2468160

  15. Isolation of infectious chikungunya virus and dengue virus using anionic polymer-coated magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Patramool, Sirilaksana; Bernard, Eric; Hamel, Rodolphe; Natthanej, Luplertlop; Chazal, Nathalie; Surasombatpattana, Pornapat; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Daoust, Simon; Thongrungkiat, Supatra; Thomas, Frdric; Briant, Laurence; Miss, Dorothe

    2013-10-01

    Mosquitoes-borne viruses are a major threat for human populations. Among them, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and dengue virus (DENV) cause thousands of cases worldwide. The recent propagation of mosquito vectors competent to transmit these viruses to temperate areas increases their potential impact on susceptible human populations. The development of sensitive methods allowing the detection and isolation of infectious viruses is of crucial interest for determination of virus contamination in humans and in competent mosquito vectors. However, simple and rapid method allowing the capture of infectious CHIKV and DENV from samples with low viral titers useful for further genetic and functional characterization of circulating strains is lacking. The present study reports a fast and sensitive isolation technique based on viral particles adsorption on magnetic beads coated with anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate) and suitable for isolation of infectious CHIKV and DENV from the four serotypes. Starting from quite reduced biological material, this method was accurate to combine with conventional detection techniques, including qRT-PCR and immunoblotting and allowed isolation of infectious particles without resorting to a step of cultivation. The use of polymer-coated magnetic beads is therefore of high interest for rapid detection and isolation of CHIKV and DENV from samples with reduced viral loads and represents an accurate approach for the surveillance of mosquito vector in area at risk for arbovirus outbreaks. PMID:23669102

  16. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of infectious bursal disease virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Dormitorio, T V; Giambrone, J J; Guo, K; Jackwood, D J

    2007-06-01

    Two infectious bursal disease viruses (IBDVs 1174 and V1) were isolated from IBDV-vaccinated broiler flocks in California and Georgia. These flocks had a history of subclinical immunosuppression. These isolates are commonly used in IBDV progeny challenge studies at Auburn, AL, as well as vaccine manufacturer's vaccine efficacy studies, because they come from populated poultry-producing states, and are requested by poultry veterinarians from those states. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) generated viral genome products for sequencing. A 491-bp segment from the VP2 gene, covering the hypervariable region, from each isolate was analyzed and compared with previously sequenced isolates. Sequence analysis showed that they were more closely related to the Delaware (Del) E antigenic variant than they are to the Animal Health Plant Inspection Service (APHIS) standard, both at the nucleotide level (96%, 97%) and at the amino acid level (94%, 97%). Both isolates had the glutamine to lysine shift in amino acid 249 which has been reported to be critical in binding the virus neutralizing Mab B69. Phenotypic studies showed that both isolates produced rapid atrophy of the bursae and weight loss, without the edematous bursal phase, in 2-wk-old commercial broilers having antibody against IBDV. A progeny challenge study showed both isolates produced more atrophy of the bursae (less percentage of protection) than the Del E isolate. Molecular and phenotypic data of these important IBDV isolates help in the improved detection and control of this continually changing and important viral pathogen of chickens. PMID:17626491

  17. Aphid Transmission of the Ontario Isolate of Plum Pox Virus.

    PubMed

    Lowery, D Thomas; Vickers, Patricia M; Bittner, Lori A; Stobbs, Lorne W; Foottit, Robert G

    2015-10-01

    Utilization of timed virus acquisition access probes in studies of plum pox virus (PPV) transmission by aphids demonstrated that endemic species transmitted the virus readily from plum, Prunus domestica (L.) Batsch; peach, P. persica (L.); or dwarf flowering almond, P. glandulosa Thunberg., to peach seedlings. The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), was shown to be the most efficient vector. Acquisition of virus by green peach aphids from infected peach leaves resulted in 18-28% infected peach seedlings, while aphids previously fed on infected leaves of plum transferred virus to 36% of peach seedlings. Although the spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecola (Patch), was a less efficient vector than M. persicae it is perhaps more important for the spread of PPV due to its greater abundance and occurrence earlier in the season when peach trees are thought to be more susceptible to infection. Virus transmission rates varied depending on the virus source and healthy test plant species. In contrast to many previous studies, aphid inoculation of the experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana Domin occurred at a low rate, never exceeding 4%. Acquisition of PPV by M. persicae from infected peach fruit was greatly reduced compared with acquisition from leaves. The results of this research indicate that the Ontario isolate of PPV-D is readily transmissible by aphids to peach and natural spread of the virus needs to be considered in future management or eradication programs. PMID:26453705

  18. Isolation of Newcastle disease virus from birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Chu, H P; Trow, E W; Greenwood, A G; Jennings, A R; Keymer, I F

    1976-01-01

    In the 4 year period 1971-74 11 isolations of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) were made from 44 birds of prey that died in captivity. Three species of Falconiformes were involved, including one red-headed falcon (Falco chicquera), 5 European kestrels (F. tinnunculus), and 2 secretary birds (Sagittarius serpentarius), also 2 species of Strigiformes, comprising 2 barn owls (Tyto alba) and one little owl (Athene noctua). All NDV isolates were of the velogenic type. PMID:18777349

  19. Characterization and phylogenic analysis of Mexican Newcastle disease virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was isolated in Mexico for the first time in 1946 and the last report of a field outbreak caused by a highly virulent strain dates from year 2000, when 13.6 million birds were slaughtered and 93 farms quarantined. Mean Death Time test resulted in velogenic classificati...

  20. Avian influenza viruses isolated from mallards in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Goujgoulova, G; Petkova, A Marinova; Georgiev, G

    2010-03-01

    Bulgaria has a unique geographic position in Europe, with two migratory wild bird routes, Via Pontica and Via Aristotelis, passing through the country. Via Pontica is the second-largest migration route in Europe, with hundreds of thousands of birds, representing more than 110 species, wintering in lakes by the Black Sea and the wetlands near the Danube River. Via Aristotelis is situated in West Bulgaria along the Strouma and Mesta river valleys, and it is of regional importance for the Balkan Peninsula. In this study, we examined more than 2000 samples from wild birds from the orders Anseriformes, Ciconiiformes, Gruiformes, and Charadriformes in the period 2006-2008. We isolated three influenza viruses, subtypes H4N6, H7N7, and H10N7, all from mallards, Anas platyrhynchos. The H7N7 was isolated from a hunter-killed mallard at the river bank of Kamchia (Via Pontica). The cleavage site sequence of the hemagglutinin gene in the H7N7 isolate was PEIPKGR*GLF, which is characteristic of a low-pathogenic virus. The H4N6 isolates belonged to a mallard wintering along the Maritza River (Via Aristotelis). We detected the H10N7 virus in samples from mallards that inhabit the Ogosta River, one of the feeders of the Danube (Via Pontica). All these viruses were detected during the active migration of the birds, February-March. PMID:20521677

  1. Recent isolations of Lassa virus from Nigerian rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Herta; Fabiyi, A.; Monath, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    Rodents were trapped in the Benue-Plateau and North-Eastern States of Nigeria where Lassa fever had been reported in previous years. Eight Lassa virus strains were isolated from tissues and blood of rodents identified in the field as being of 3 different species: Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus, and Mus minutoides. All the infected rodents were collected in village habitats. These isolations indicate the presence of Lassa virus in wild rodents in Nigeria during periods when no human infections were evident. Prior studies in Sierra Leone have indicated that a single rodent species, M. natalensis, may be the important reservoir host of Lassa virus. Since the present study indicates that other rodent species may be involved as well, the ecology of Lassa virus may be more complicated than was heretofore supposed. In view of the importance of determining the geographic and species range of rodent hosts of Lassa virus, and because of the problems inherent in rodent identification under austere field conditions, it is urgent that further studies be conducted in the same areas of Nigeria to confirm these findings. PMID:1085216

  2. Isolation and molecular characterization of Newcastle disease viruses from raptors.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Naresh; Chander, Yogesh; Primus, Alexander; Redig, Patrick T; Goyal, Sagar M

    2010-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to detect and characterize Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in raptors. Cloacal and oropharyngeal swab samples were collected from 60 casualty raptors during January to March 2009 in Minnesota. Inoculation of all these samples (n=120) in 9-day-old embryonated hens' eggs resulted in isolation of haemagglutinating viruses in three samples from two bald eagles and one great horned owl. These three haemagglutinating viruses were confirmed as NDV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using fusion gene-specific primers, and were negative for avian influenza virus by RT-PCR. Further characterization revealed that all three possessed (112)GKQGRL(117) at the fusion gene cleavage site, indicating that they were lentogenic strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all three isolates clustered with published class II genotype II NDVs. The nucleotide sequence homology of the three NDV isolates among themselves was 98.4 to 99.6% and the sequence homology with lentogenic strains from wild birds used for comparison varied between 94.5 and 100%. Detection of NDV strains from raptors merits further epidemiological studies to determine the prevalence of different NDV strains in raptors and their impact in relation to transmission to domestic poultry. PMID:21154052

  3. Genetic diversity of Hungarian Maize dwarf mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Balázs, Ervin; Petrik, Kathrin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic diversity of the coat-protein (CP) region and the untranslated C-terminal region (3'UTR) of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) was analyzed to evaluate the variability between isolates (inter-isolate sequence diversity). The results of inter-isolate sequence diversity analysis showed that the diversity of the MDMV CP gene is fairly high (p-distance: up to 0.136). During sequence analysis, a 13 amino-acid residue insertion and an 8 amino-acid residue deletion were found within the N-terminal region of the CP gene. The phylogenetic analysis showed that-unlike other potyvirus species in this subgroup-the MDMV isolates could not be distinguished on the basis of their host plants or geographic origins. PMID:20033839

  4. The E116 isolate of Dutch pea early-browning virus is a recombinant virus.

    PubMed

    Swanson, M M; MacFarlane, S A

    1999-03-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of RNA2 of the E116 isolate of Dutch pea early-browning virus (PEBV-D) was obtained from overlapping cDNA clones. The RNA was found to encode three open reading frames corresponding to, in 5' to 3' order, the coat protein, the 2b nematode transmission protein and the C-terminal part of the cysteine-rich 1b protein derived from RNA1. The 3' non-coding region of PEBV-D RNA2 was also shown to be derived from RNA1. This is the first demonstration that recombination of PEBV occurs in nature. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of the PEBV-D RNA2 proteins with those of British PEBV and several isolates of tobacco rattle virus reveals complex patterns of mixing of the genomes of these two viruses. PMID:10225277

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Rat Hepatitis E Virus Strain Isolated in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Debing, Yannick; Emerson, Suzanne U.; Purcell, Robert H.; Dallmeier, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a common cause of acute hepatitis in humans. Related viruses have been isolated from multiple animal species, including rats, but their impact on human health is unclear. We present the first full-length genome sequence of a rat hepatitis E virus strain isolated in the United States (LA-B350). PMID:25377700

  6. Psittacine pox virus: virus isolation and identification, transmission, and cross-challenge studies in parrots and chickens.

    PubMed

    Boosinger, T R; Winterfield, R W; Feldman, D S; Dhillon, A S

    1982-01-01

    An avian pox virus was isolated from Amazon parrots dying with severe diphtheritic oral, esophageal, and crop lesions. The virus was propagated on chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) of 10-day-old chicken embryos, and a homogenate of the infected CAM was rubbed vigorously onto the conjunctiva, oral mucosa, and defeathered follicles of two healthy Amazon parrots and three conures. All experimental birds developed cutaneous and ocular pox lesions, and one parrot developed oral pox lesions. Specific-pathogen-free chicks inoculated with the virus isolate developed skin lesions identical to those of the parrots. Chickens vaccinated with fowl and pigeon pox vaccines and inoculated with the psittacine isolate developed lesions typical of avian pox. Chickens vaccinated with the psittacine virus were susceptible to fowl and pigeon pox virus infection. This pox virus isolate may thus be regarded as a potential pathogen for chickens. PMID:6285884

  7. Isolation and genetic characterization of a tembusu virus strain isolated from mosquitoes in Shandong, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Diao, Y; Chen, H; Ou, Q; Liu, X; Gao, X; Yu, C; Wang, L

    2015-04-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a flavivirus, presumed to be a mosquito-borne flavivirus of the Ntaya virus subgroup. To date, however, there have been no reports indicating that mosquitoes are involved in the spread of TMUV. In this study, we report the first isolation of TMUV from Culex mosquitoes. We describe the isolation and characterization of a field strain of TMUV from mosquitoes collected in Shandong Province, China. The virus isolate, named TMUV-SDMS, grows well in mosquito cell line C6/36, in Vero and duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cell lines, and causes significant cytopathic effects in these cell cultures. The TMUV-SDMS genome is a single-stranded RNA, 10 989 nt in length, consisting of a single open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3410 amino acids, with 5' and 3' untranslated regions of 142 and 617 nt, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the E and NS5 genes revealed that the TMUV-SDMS is closely related to the TMUV YY5 and BYD strains which cause severe egg-drop in ducks. The 3'NTR of TMUV-SDMS contains two pairs of tandem repeat CS and one non-duplicate CS, which have sequence similarities to the same repeats in the YY5 and BYD strains. Our findings indicate that mosquitoes carrying the TMUV may play an important role in the spread of this virus and in disease outbreak. PMID:23711093

  8. Restriction endonuclease analysis of infectious laryngotracheitis viruses: comparison of modified-live vaccine viruses and North Carolina field isolates.

    PubMed

    Guy, J S; Barnes, H J; Munger, L L; Rose, L

    1989-01-01

    Six modified-live (ML) infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) vaccine viruses, three reference strains, and 18 field isolates were compared by restriction endonuclease analysis of their DNA. Viral DNA digestion patterns were established for vaccine viruses using restriction endonucleases PstI, BamHI, KpnI, and HindIII. Using these enzymes, five of six ML vaccine viruses had identical restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns. Vaccine viruses had distinct patterns compared with ILT virus reference strains Illinois-N71851, Cover, and NVSL. Restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of 18 field isolates of ILT virus, obtained from ILT outbreaks in North Carolina, were indistinguishable from vaccine viruses. These results suggest a possible role of vaccine or vaccine-like viruses in recent ILT outbreaks. PMID:2546530

  9. Cedar Virus: A Novel Henipavirus Isolated from Australian Bats

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jennifer A.; Tachedjian, Mary; Smith, Craig; Middleton, Deborah; Yu, Meng; Todd, Shawn; Foord, Adam J.; Haring, Volker; Payne, Jean; Robinson, Rachel; Broz, Ivano; Crameri, Gary; Field, Hume E.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-01-01

    The genus Henipavirus in the family Paramyxoviridae contains two viruses, Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) for which pteropid bats act as the main natural reservoir. Each virus also causes serious and commonly lethal infection of people as well as various species of domestic animals, however little is known about the associated mechanisms of pathogenesis. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new paramyxovirus from pteropid bats, Cedar virus (CedPV), which shares significant features with the known henipaviruses. The genome size (18,162 nt) and organization of CedPV is very similar to that of HeV and NiV; its nucleocapsid protein displays antigenic cross-reactivity with henipaviruses; and it uses the same receptor molecule (ephrin- B2) for entry during infection. Preliminary challenge studies with CedPV in ferrets and guinea pigs, both susceptible to infection and disease with known henipaviruses, confirmed virus replication and production of neutralizing antibodies although clinical disease was not observed. In this context, it is interesting to note that the major genetic difference between CedPV and HeV or NiV lies within the coding strategy of the P gene, which is known to play an important role in evading the host innate immune system. Unlike HeV, NiV, and almost all known paramyxoviruses, the CedPV P gene lacks both RNA editing and also the coding capacity for the highly conserved V protein. Preliminary study indicated that CedPV infection of human cells induces a more robust IFN-β response than HeV. PMID:22879820

  10. Genomic characterization of pseudorabies virus strains isolated in Italy.

    PubMed

    Sozzi, E; Moreno, A; Lelli, D; Cinotti, S; Alborali, G L; Nigrelli, A; Luppi, A; Bresaola, M; Catella, A; Cordioli, P

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we undertook the genomic characterization of 54 pseudorabies virus (PRV) strains isolated in Italy during 1984-2010. The characterization was based on partial sequencing of the UL44 (gC) and US8 (gE) genes; 44 strains (38 for gene gE and 36 for gC) were isolated on pig farms; 9 originated from dogs and 1 from cattle. These porcine PRV strains, which were closely related to those isolated in Europe and America in the last 20 years, and the bovine strain bovine/It/2441/1992 belong to cluster B in both phylogenetic trees. Six porcine strains that do not belong to cluster B are related in both gE and gC phylogenetic trees to the 'old' porcine PRV strains isolated in the 1970s and 1980s. In the last two decades, the presence of these strains in domestic pig populations has been reduced drastically, whereas they are prevalent in wild boar. The two remaining strains have an interesting genomic profile, characterized by the gC gene being closely related to the old porcine PRV strains, and the gE gene being similar to that of recently isolated strains. Three strains originating from working dogs on pig farms are located in cluster B in both phylogenetic trees. Five strains isolated from hunting dogs have a high degree of correlation with PRV strains circulating in wild boar. The last isolate has a gC gene similar to that in the two porcine strains mentioned previously, and the gE gene is correlated with the strains isolated from hunting dogs. These results provide interesting insight into the genomic characterization of PRV strains and reveal a clear differentiation between the strains isolated from hunting dogs that are related to the wild boar strains and those originating from domestic pigs. PMID:23331342

  11. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Watermelon Mosaic Virus Isolated from Watermelon in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rajbanshi, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Watermelon mosaic virus was first reported in 1965 from the Rio Grande Valley, TX. We report here the first complete genome sequence of a watermelon mosaic virus isolate from watermelon collected from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. PMID:27103724

  12. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Watermelon Mosaic Virus Isolated from Watermelon in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rajbanshi, Naveen; Ali, Akhtar

    2016-01-01

    Watermelon mosaic virus was first reported in 1965 from the Rio Grande Valley, TX. We report here the first complete genome sequence of a watermelon mosaic virus isolate from watermelon collected from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. PMID:27103724

  13. Isolation, Genetic Characterization, and Seroprevalence of Adana Virus, a Novel Phlebovirus Belonging to the Salehabad Virus Complex, in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Cigdem; Alwassouf, Sulaf; Piorkowski, Géraldine; Bichaud, Laurence; Tezcan, Seda; Dincer, Ender; Ergunay, Koray; Ozbel, Yusuf; Alten, Bulent; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A new phlebovirus, Adana virus, was isolated from a pool of Phlebotomus spp. (Diptera; Psychodidae) in the province of Adana, in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. Genetic analysis based on complete coding of genomic sequences indicated that Adana virus belongs to the Salehabad virus species of the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. Adana virus is the third virus of the Salehabad virus species for which the complete sequence has been determined. To understand the epidemiology of Adana virus, a seroprevalence study using microneutralization assay was performed to detect the presence of specific antibodies in human and domestic animal sera collected in Adana as well as Mersin province, located 147 km west of Adana. The results demonstrate that the virus is present in both provinces. High seroprevalence rates in goats, sheep, and dogs support intensive exposure to Adana virus in the region, which has not been previously reported for any virus included in the Salehabad serocomplex; however, low seroprevalence rates in humans suggest that Adana virus is not likely to constitute an important public health problem in exposed human populations, but this deserves further studies. IMPORTANCE Until recently, in the genus Phlebovirus, the Salehabad virus species consisted of two viruses: Salehabad virus, isolated from sand flies in Iran, and Arbia virus, isolated from sand flies in Italy. Here we present the isolation and complete genome characterization of the Adana virus, which we propose to be included in the Salehabad virus species. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation and complete genome characterization, from sand flies in Turkey, of a Salehabad virus-related phlebovirus with supporting seropositivity in the Mediterranean, Aegean, and Central Anatolia regions, where phleboviruses have been circulating and causing outbreaks. Salehabad species viruses have generally been considered to be a group of viruses with little medical or veterinary interest. This view deserves to be revisited according to our results, which indicate a high animal infection rate of Adana virus and recent evidence of human infection with Adria virus in Greece. PMID:25653443

  14. Characterization of a Siberian Virus Isolated from a Patient with Progressive Chronic Tick-Borne Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Gritsun, T. S.; Frolova, T. V.; Zhankov, A. I.; Armesto, M.; Turner, S. L.; Frolova, M. P.; Pogodina, V. V.; Lashkevich, V. A.; Gould, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    A strain of Tick-borne encephalitis virus designated Zausaev (Za) was isolated in Siberia from a patient who died of a progressive (2-year) form of tick-borne encephalitis 10 years after being bitten by a tick. The complete genomic sequence of this virus was determined, and an attempt was made to correlate the sequence with the biological characteristics of the virus. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this virus belongs to the Siberian subtype of Tick-borne encephalitis virus. Comparison of Za virus with two related viruses, a Far Eastern isolate, Sofjin, and a Siberian isolate, Vasilchenko, revealed differences among the three viruses in pathogenicity for Syrian hamsters, cytopathogenicity for PS cells, plaque morphology, and the electrophoretic profiles of virus-specific nonstructural proteins. Comparative amino acid alignments revealed 10 individual amino acid substitutions in the Za virus polyprotein sequence that were different from those of other tick-borne flaviviruses. Notably, the dimeric form of the Za virus NS1 protein migrated in polyacrylamide gels as a heterogeneous group of molecules with a significantly higher electrophoretic mobility than those of the Sofjin and Vasilchenko viruses. Two amino acid substitutions, T277?V and E279?G, within the NS1 dimerization domain are probably responsible for the altered oligomerization of Za virus NS1. These studies suggest that the patient from whom Za virus was isolated died due to increased pathogenicity of the latent virus following spontaneous mutagenesis. PMID:12477807

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Hydrangea Ringspot Virus Isolates from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yusa, Akira; Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Koinuma, Hiroaki; Keima, Takuya; Neriya, Yutaro; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Maejima, Kensaku; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Hydrangea ringspot virus (HdRSV) is a plant RNA virus, naturally infecting Hydrangea macrophylla. Here, we report the first genomic sequences of two HdRSV isolates from hydrangea plants in Japan. The overall nucleotide sequences of these Japanese isolates were 96.0 to 96.3% identical to those of known European isolates. PMID:27034476

  16. Application of the "best fit" pathotyping assay for evaluation of Russian isolates of Marek's disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the validity of the "best fit" pathotyping assay for testing of field isolates of Marek's disease (MD) virus. Twenty serotype 1 MD viruses were isolated from breeder and commercial flocks in 8 regions of the Russian Federation. These isolates were pat...

  17. Hepatitis B virus infection in isolated Afro-Brazilian communities.

    PubMed

    Motta-Castro, Ana R C; Martins, Regina M B; Yoshida, Clara F T; Teles, Sheila A; Paniago, Anamaria M; Lima, Kátia M B; Gomes, Selma A

    2005-10-01

    The prevalence and genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) have distinct geographical distribution. In Brazil, some African-descendants have been maintained as small isolated communities since the slavery period. In this study, HBV infection among these communities of African origin was examined. Individuals (1,058) living in 12 communities were interviewed and serum samples screened for the presence of HBV markers. HBsAg-positive sera were tested for HBV DNA by PCR and positive samples were genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The overall prevalence of HBV infection was 19.8% (95% CI: 17.5-22.3), ranging from 5.5% to 42.4%, depending on the communities studied. Multivariate analysis of risk factors showed that increasing age, family history of hepatitis, and sexual activity were associated significantly with this infection. HBsAg was detected in 23/1,058 (2.2%) individuals. HBV DNA was present in 2/2 of HBeAg-positive serum samples and in 18/21 (85.7%) anti-HBe-positive samples. All HBV isolates belonged to genotype A, subtype Aa. Three RFLP patterns were identified: AI (17 isolates), AIV (1 isolate), and AVI (2 isolates). These findings suggest a common introduction of HBV during the slave trade from Africa to Brazil. PMID:16121385

  18. First Isolation of a Giant Virus from Wild Hirudo medicinalis Leech: Mimiviridae isolation in Hirudo medicinalis

    PubMed Central

    Boughalmi, Mondher; Pagnier, Isabelle; Aherfi, Sarah; Colson, Philippe; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Giant viruses and amoebae are common in freshwater, where they can coexist with other living multicellular organisms. We screened leeches from the species Hirudo medicinalis for giant viruses. We analyzed five H. medicinalis obtained from Tunisia (3) and France (2). The leeches were decontaminated and then dissected to remove internal parts for co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga. The genomes of isolated viruses were sequenced on a 454 Roche instrument, and a comparative genomics analysis was performed. One Mimivirus was isolated and the strain was named Hirudovirus. The genome assembly generated two scaffolds, which were 1,155,382 and 25,660 base pairs in length. Functional annotations were identified for 47% of the genes, which corresponds to 466 proteins. The presence of Mimividae in the same ecological niche as wild Hirudo may explain the presence of the mimivirus in the digestive tract of the leech, and several studies have already shown that viruses can persist in the digestive tracts of leeches fed contaminated blood. As leeches can be used medically and Mimiviruses have the potential to be an infectious agent in humans, patients treated with leeches should be surveyed to investigate a possible connection. PMID:24287596

  19. Molecular characterization of a hepatitis E virus isolate from Namibia.

    PubMed

    He, J; Binn, L N; Tsarev, S A; Hayes, C G; Frean, J A; Isaacson, M; Innis, B L

    2000-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes sporadic and epidemic acute viral hepatitis in many developing countries. In Africa, hepatitis E has been documented by virus detection (reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR) in Egypt, Chad, Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia. Cases of presumptive hepatitis E also have been documented by detection of antibody to HEV in the Sudan, Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia, Djibouti and South Africa. Recently, we reported the recovery of 9 isolates of HEV from feces collected during an outbreak of jaundice in Namibia. These specimens were stored frozen for many years at the South African Institute for Medical Research awaiting new methods to determine the etiology of jaundice. HEV genomic sequences were detected by antigen-capture RT-PCR with primers that amplified 2 independent regions of the HEV genome (ORF-2 and ORF-3). To further characterize the HEV 83-Namibia isolates, we determined the nucleotide (nt) sequence of the 3' end of the capsid gene (296 of 1, 980 nt in ORF-2) and ORF-3 for 1 isolate. The capsid gene sequence shared 86% identity with the prototype Burma strain and up to 96% identity with other African strains at the (nt) level, and 99% identity with Burma or other Africa strains at the amino acid level. A 188 (nt) fragment amplified from ORF-3 was also highly homologous to other HEV but was too short for meaningful comparison. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that HEV 83-Namibia is closely related to other African isolates, and differs from Burmese, Mexican and Chinese HEV. These data link the HEV causing the 1983 Namibia outbreak to more recent HEV transmission in northern and sub-Saharan Africa, suggesting this subgenotype of HEV is firmly established throughout the continent. PMID:10895057

  20. Isolation of Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus from a Horse with Neurological Disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Roberta; Costa, Erica Azevedo; Marques, Rafael Elias; Oliveira, Taismara Simas; Furtini, Ronaldo; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Quaresma; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2013-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a causative agent of encephalitis in humans in the Western hemisphere. SLEV is a positive-sense RNA virus that belongs to the Flavivirus genus, which includes West Nile encephalitis virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Dengue virus and other medically important viruses. Recently, we isolated a SLEV strain from the brain of a horse with neurological signs in the countryside of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The SLEV isolation was confirmed by reverse-transcription RT-PCR and sequencing of the E protein gene. Virus identity was also confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence using commercial antibodies against SLEV. To characterize this newly isolated strain in vivo, serial passages in newborn mice were performed and led to hemorrhagic manifestations associated with recruitment of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system of newborns. In summary this is the first isolation of SLEV from a horse with neurological signs in Brazil. PMID:24278489

  1. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of Canine distemper virus from India.

    PubMed

    Swati; Deka, Dipak; Uppal, Sanjeev Kumar; Verma, Ramneek

    2015-09-01

    Canine distemper (CD), caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious disease that infects a variety of carnivores. Sequence analysis of CDVs from different geographical areas has shown a lot of variation in the genome of the virus especially in haemagglutinin gene which might be one of the causes of vaccine failure. In this study, we isolated the virus (place: Ludhiana, Punjab; year: 2014) and further cloned, sequenced and analyzed partial haemagglutinin (H) gene and full length genes for fusion protein (F), phosphoprotein (P) and matrix protein (M) from an Indian wild-type CDV. Higher sequence homology was observed with the strains from Switzerland, Hungary, Germany; and lower with the vaccine strains like Ondersteport, CDV3, Convac for all the genes. The multiple sequence alignment showed more variation in partial H (45 nucleotide and 5 amino acid substitutions) and complete F (79 nucleotide and 30 amino acid substitutions) than in complete P (44 nucleotide and 22 amino acid substitutions) and complete M (22 nucleotide and 4 amino acid substitutions) gene/protein. Predicted potential N-linked glycosylation sites in H, F, M and P proteins were similar to the previously known wild-type CDVs but different from the vaccine strains. The Indian CDV formed a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree clearly separated from the previously known wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26396979

  2. Identification of Asian genotype of chikungunya virus isolated in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Ortíz-Alcántara, Joanna; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; de la Luz Torres-Rodríguez, María; Nuñez-León, Alma; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruiz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-02-01

    We identified 25 autochthonous chikungunya virus cases in Mexico, initially detected by RT-PCR targeting the E1 gene and propagated in C6/36 Aedes albopictus cells, in 2014. To determine the type of virus found, in a previous report, the genomes of 2 CHIKV strains were fully sequenced. Genome sequence analysis revealed that these isolates from Mexico belonged to the Asian genotype, and a phylogenetic association with the circulating strain in the British Virgin Islands was also established in the same year. This was further supported by changes in specific amino acids, E2-V368A and 6K-L20M. For these reasons, it can be inferred that the route of virus entry to Mexico was held across the countries in the Caribbean and Central America. The presence of E1-A226V mutation associated with more efficient replication in the salivary gland of the A. albopictus mosquito was not observed. Interestingly, a newly acquired NSP4-S399C mutation was observed; however, the significance of changes in amino acid found in non-structural proteins in autochthonous strains remains to be elucidated. PMID:26781948

  3. Peruvian horse sickness virus and Yunnan orbivirus, isolated from vertebrates and mosquitoes in Peru and Australia.

    PubMed

    Attoui, Houssam; Mendez-Lopez, Maria Rosario; Rao, Shujing; Hurtado-Alendes, Ana; Lizaraso-Caparo, Frank; Jaafar, Fauziah Mohd; Samuel, Alan R; Belhouchet, Mourad; Pritchard, Lindsay I; Melville, Lorna; Weir, Richard P; Hyatt, Alex D; Davis, Steven S; Lunt, Ross; Calisher, Charles H; Tesh, Robert B; Fujita, Ricardo; Mertens, Peter P C

    2009-11-25

    During 1997, two new viruses were isolated from outbreaks of disease that occurred in horses, donkeys, cattle and sheep in Peru. Genome characterization showed that the virus isolated from horses (with neurological disorders, 78% fatality) belongs to a new species the Peruvian horse sickness virus (PHSV), within the genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae. This represents the first isolation of PHSV, which was subsequently also isolated during 1999, from diseased horses in the Northern Territory of Australia (Elsey virus, ELSV). Serological and molecular studies showed that PHSV and ELSV are very similar in the serotype-determining protein (99%, same serotype). The second virus (Rioja virus, RIOV) was associated with neurological signs in donkeys, cattle, sheep and dogs and was shown to be a member of the species Yunnan orbivirus (YUOV). RIOV and YUOV are also almost identical (97% amino acid identity) in the serotype-determining protein. YUOV was originally isolated from mosquitoes in China. PMID:19766284

  4. Isolation and molecular characterization of nephropathic infectious bronchitis virus isolates of Gujarat state, India.

    PubMed

    Patel, B H; Bhimani, M P; Bhanderi, B B; Jhala, M K

    2015-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) is a common, highly contagious, acute, and economically important viral disease of chickens caused by Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV, sp. Avian coronavirus). Five pooled tissue suspensions of 50 layer birds and one reference Massachusetts vaccine strain were inoculated into specific pathogen free (SPF) chicken egg for isolation of IBV. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was carried out using post inoculated allontoic fluid to amplify the spike (S) glycoprotein of S1 subunit of IBV. All the eggs inoculated with five pooled tissue samples and vaccine sample showed dwarfing and curling of SPF embryos indicative of IBV. All the five samples and the vaccine sample produced the expected amplicons of 466bp by RT-PCR. The sequencing of five isolates revealed that all the five sequences were 99.09-100% similar among themselves and showed 99.10-100% nucleotide identity with the vaccine strain. On multiple sequence alignment it was found that our isolates were more similar at S1 subunit nucleotide level with the reference Ma5 and H120 vaccine strains than the reference Mass41 strain. The sequences of Anand isolates revealed further genetic changes in the circulating IBV in comparison to previous isolate of Gujarat as well as higher differences with the strains isolated in other states showing substantial changes at genetic level in Indian IBV isolates, which may partially explain the increasing incidences of IB in the country in spite of the vaccination. PMID:26436120

  5. West Nile virus in Tunisia, 2014: First isolation from mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Wasfi, F; Dachraoui, K; Cherni, S; Bosworth, A; Barhoumi, W; Dowall, S; Chelbi, I; Derbali, M; Zoghlami, Z; Beier, J C; Zhioua, E

    2016-07-01

    Several outbreaks of human West Nile virus (WNV) infections were reported in Tunisia during the last two decades. Serological studies on humans as well as on equine showed intensive circulation of WNV in Tunisia. However, no virus screening of mosquitoes for WNV has been performed in Tunisia. In the present study, we collected mosquito samples from Central Tunisia to be examined for the presence of flaviviruses. A total of 102 Culex pipiens mosquitoes were collected in September 2014 from Central Tunisia. Mosquitoes were pooled according to the collection site, date and sex with a maximum of 5 specimens per pool and tested for the presence of flaviviruses by conventional reverse transcription heminested PCR and by a specific West Nile virus real time reverse transcription PCR. Of a total of 21 pools tested, 7 were positive for WNV and no other flavivirus could be evidenced in mosquito pools. In addition, WNV was isolated on Vero cells. Phylogenetic analysis showed that recent Tunisian WNV strains belong to lineage 1 WNV and are closely related to the Tunisian strain 1997 (PAH 001). This is the first detection and isolation of WNV from mosquitoes in Tunisia. Some areas of Tunisia are at high risk for human WNV infections. WNV is likely to cause future sporadic and foreseeable outbreaks. Therefore, it is of major epidemiological importance to set up an entomological surveillance as an early alert system. Timely detection of WNV should prompt vector control to prevent future outbreaks. In addition, education of people to protect themselves from mosquito bites is of major epidemiological importance as preventive measure against WNV infection. PMID:27038557

  6. Characterization of reticuloendotheliosis virus isolates obtained from chickens, turkeys and prairie chickens in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) isolates obtained from chickens, turkeys and prairie chickens in the United States were characterized using ploymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect immunofluoresence (IFA) assays. This study included five REV isolates from Prairie chickens in Texas, two ...

  7. Genotyping of Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) based on the glycoprotein gene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, W.-S.; Oh, M.-J.; Nishizawa, T.; Park, J.-W.; Kurath, G.; Yoshimizu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein (G) gene nucleotide sequences of four Korean isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) were analyzed to evaluate their genetic relatedness to worldwide isolates. All Korean isolates were closely related to Japanese isolates of genogroup JRt rather than to those of North American and European genogroups. It is believed that Korean IHNV has been most likely introduced from Japan to Korea by the movement of contaminated fish eggs. Among the Korean isolates, phylogenetically distinct virus types were obtained from sites north and south of a large mountain range, suggesting the possibility of more than one introduction of virus from Japan. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Bunyamwera and Ngari viruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus) isolated in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odhiambo, C; Venter, M; Lwande, O; Swanepoel, R; Sang, R

    2016-01-01

    Orthobunyaviruses, tri-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses, have long been associated with mild to severe human disease in Africa, but not haemorrhagic fever. However, during a Rift Valley fever outbreak in East Africa in 1997-1998, Ngari virus was isolated from two patients and antibody detected in several others with haemorrhagic fever. The isolates were used to identify Ngari virus as a natural Orthobunyavirus reassortant. Despite their potential to reassort and cause severe human disease, characterization of orthobunyaviruses is hampered by paucity of genetic sequences. Our objective was to obtain complete gene sequences of two Bunyamwera virus and three Ngari virus isolates from recent surveys in Kenya and to determine their phylogenetic positioning within the Bunyamwera serogroup. Newly sequenced Kenyan Bunyamwera virus isolates clustered closest to a Bunyamwera virus isolate from the same locality and a Central African Republic isolate indicating that similar strains may be circulating regionally. Recent Kenyan Ngari isolates were closest to the Ngari isolates associated with the 1997-1998 haemorrhagic fever outbreak. We observed a temporal/geographical relationship among Ngari isolates in all three gene segments suggesting a geographical/temporal association with genetic diversity. These sequences in addition to earlier sequences can be used for future analyses of this neglected but potentially deadly group of viruses. PMID:26118981

  9. The equine arteritis virus isolate from the 2010 Argentinian outbreak.

    PubMed

    Metz, G E; Serena, M S; Panei, C J; Nosetto, E O; Echeverria, M G

    2014-12-01

    A semen sample from a stallion infected during the 2010 equine arteritis virus (EAV) outbreak was received for viral isolation prior to castration of the animal. The virus was identified using a polyclonal antibody immunofluorescence test. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to amplify a region of the GP5 gene with primers GL105F and GL673R. The PCR products were purified and sequences of both strands were determined in a MegaBACE™1000 with inner primers CR2 and EAV32. A phylogenetic dataset was built with the previously reported sequences of five strains isolated in Argentina, together with a group of selected sequences obtained from GenBank. The unrooted neighbour-joining tree was constructed using molecular evolutionary genetic analysis (MEGA) and bootstrap analyses were conducted using 1,000 replicate datasets. Evolutionary distances were computed using the maximum composite likelihood method. A NetNGlyc server analysis at the Technical University of Denmark (www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetNGlyc/) was used to predict N-glycosylation in GP5 sequences. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the new strain GLD-LP-ARG), together with other strains previously isolated, belongs to the European group EU-1 but in a different branch. The new strain shows 99% nucleotide identity with strain Al1and 98.1% with the Belgian strain 08P178. Persistently infected stallions and their cryopreserved semen constitute a reservoir of EAV, which ensures its persistence in the horse population around the world. These findings reinforce the importance of careful monitoring of persistently infected stallions, as well as semen straws, by RT-PCR or test mating, in accordance with national regulations. PMID:25812217

  10. Isolation of swine influenza virus in cell cultures and embryonated chicken eggs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqiang; Gauger, Phillip C

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus isolation is a procedure to obtain a live and infectious virus that can be used for antigenic characterization, pathogenesis investigation, and vaccine production. Embryonated chicken egg inoculation is traditionally considered the "gold standard" method for influenza virus isolation and propagation. However, many primary cells and continuous cell lines have also been examined or developed for influenza virus isolation and replication. Specifically, swine influenza virus (SIV) isolation and propagation have been attempted and compared in embryonated chicken eggs, some primary porcine cells, and a number of continuous cell lines. Currently Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells remain the most commonly used cell line for isolation, propagation, and titration of SIV. Virus isolation in embryonated chicken eggs or in different cell lines offers alternative approaches when SIV isolation in MDCK cells is unsuccessful. Nasal swabs, lung tissues, and oral fluids are three major specimen types for SIV isolation. In this chapter, we describe the procedures of sample processing, SIV isolation in MDCK cells and in embryonated chicken eggs, as well as methods used for confirming the virus isolation results. PMID:24899436

  11. Complete Coding Sequences of Three Toscana Virus Strains Isolated from Sandflies in France

    PubMed Central

    Leparc Goffard, Isabelle; Piorkowski, Geraldine; Coutard, Bruno; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; De Lamballerie, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV) is an arthropod-borne virus belonging to the sandfly fever Naples virus species within the genus Phlebovirus. We report here the complete coding sequences of three TOSV strains belonging to lineage B and isolated from sandflies trapped in the Southeast of France between 2009 and 2013. PMID:26868387

  12. Genetic relationships between southern African SAT-2 isolates of foot-and-mouth-disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Vosloo, W.; Knowles, N. J.; Thomson, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    Sequencing of part of the 1D gene of foot-and-mouth disease virus was used to determine the relationships between SAT-2 viruses isolated from outbreaks which occurred in cattle in Zimbabwe and Namibia and in impala in South Africa between 1979 and 1989. The results demonstrated that the outbreaks in different countries were unrelated. Surprisingly close relationships were shown between all SAT-2 viruses isolated from cattle in Zimbabwe since 1983 but the two major epizootics which occurred in 1989 were caused by viruses which were clearly different. Conversely, two apparently unrelated outbreaks in impala in South Africa were caused by viruses which could not be distinguished. PMID:1334842

  13. Isolation of transforming murine leukemia viruses from mice with a high incidence of spontaneous lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Staal, S P; Hartley, J W; Rowe, W P

    1977-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses capable of malignant transformation of mink tissue culture cells have been isolated from an AKR thymoma cell line and from a spontaneous reticulum cell sarcoma in an NIH Swiss mouse partially congenic for the AKR ecotropic virus-inducing locus Akv-2. In contrast to the recently described mink cell focus-inducing strains of murine leukemia virus, at least one of the two transforming strains is replication defective. Nonproducer mink cells carrying the genome of the transforming virus of AKR origin have been isolated, and pseudotype transforming viruses generated. Images PMID:197531

  14. Isolation and characterisation of an H3N8 equine influenza virus in Australia, 2007.

    PubMed

    Watson, J; Halpin, K; Selleck, P; Axell, A; Bruce, K; Hansson, E; Hammond, J; Daniels, P; Jeggo, M

    2011-07-01

    Before 2007, equine influenza had never been diagnosed in Australia. On 22 August 2007, infection was confirmed in horses at Eastern Creek Animal Quarantine Station near Sydney. The virus subsequently isolated (A/equine/Sydney/2888-8/2007) was confirmed by sequence analysis of the haemagglutinin (HA) gene as an H3 virus of the variant American Florida lineage that is now referred to as Clade 1. The HA sequence of the virus was identical to that of a virus isolated from a contemporaneous outbreak in Japan and showed high homology to viruses circulating in North America. PMID:21711282

  15. Isolation of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus from goats in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Daltabuit Test, M; de la Concha-Bermejillo, A; Espinosa, L E; Loza Rubio, E; Aguilar Setién, A

    1999-01-01

    A lentivirus was isolated from 2 goats in Mexico that were seropositive to caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) by the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. The lentivirus was identified as CAEV by the observation of giant multinucleated cells (syncytia) in goat synovial membrane (GSM) monolayers co-cultivated with blood mononuclear (BMN) cells from the seropositive goats, and by amplifying a DNA segment of the CAEV gag gene using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Subsequently, cell supernatants from the GSM cells co-cultivated with BMN cells were used to infect 2 CAEV-seronegative goats. These goats seroconverted to CAEV as determined by the AGID test, and CAEV was re-isolated from these goats. One of the goats developed polyarthritis 8 mo after inoculation. Previous serological surveys indicate that infection with CAEV is prevalent among goats in Mexico. To our knowledge this is the first report of CAEV isolation in Mexico. Because of globalization of markets and increased trading among nations, the rapid identification and reporting of diseases such as CAEV are important to prevent the dissemination of these diseases. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10480464

  16. Complete genome sequencing and comparative analysis of three dengue virus type 2 Pakistani isolates.

    PubMed

    Akram, Madiha; Idrees, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Dengue is currently one of the most important arthropod borne human viral diseases caused by a flavivirus named as dengue virus. It is now endemic in Pakistan since many dengue fever outbreaks have been observed in Pakistan during the last three decades. Major serotype of dengue virus circulating in Pakistan is serotype 2. Complete genome sequences of three Pakistani dengue virus serotype 2 isolates were generated. Analysis of complete genome sequences showed that Pakistani isolates of dengue virus serotype 2 belonged to cosmopolitan genotype. This study identifies a number of amino acid substitutions that were introduced in local dengue virus serotype 2 isolate over the years. The study provides a significant insight into the evolution of serotype 2 of dengue virus in Pakistan. This is the first report of complete genome sequence information of dengue virus from the most recent outbreak (2013) in Punjab, Pakistan. PMID:26925441

  17. Acquistion and transmissibility of United States Soybean dwarf virus isolates by the soybean aphid Aphis glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV) exists as several distinct strains based on symptomatology, vectors, and host range. Original Japanese isolates of SbDV were specifically transmitted by Aulacorthum solani. More recently Japanese isolates, other exotic isolates, and endemic U.S. isolates have been shown ...

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Papaya Ringspot Virus Isolated from Genetically Modified Papaya in Hainan Island, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangyuan; Shen, Wentao; Tuo, Decai; Li, Xiaoying

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence (10,326 nucleotides) of a papaya ringspot virus isolate infecting genetically modified papaya in Hainan Island of China was determined through reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The virus shares 92% nucleotide sequence identity with the isolate that is unable to infect PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya. PMID:26358610

  19. Molecular-genetic analysis of field isolates of Avian Leucosis Viruses in the Russian Federation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial poultry farms in 14 regions of Russian Federation were monitored for avian leukosis virus (ALV) infection using virus isolation tests and serology. Results indicated the presence of two subgroups of ALV in farms located in 11 of 14 regions. Analysis of the genomes of 12 field isolates of...

  20. Genetic characterization of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus strains isolated from cattle in Israel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), an Orbivirus not previously reported in Israel, was isolated from Israeli cattle during a “bluetongue like” disease outbreak in 2006. To ascertain the origin of this new virus, three isolates from the outbreak were fully sequenced and compared with availab...

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Papaya Ringspot Virus Isolated from Genetically Modified Papaya in Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyuan; Yan, Pu; Shen, Wentao; Tuo, Decai; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence (10,326 nucleotides) of a papaya ringspot virus isolate infecting genetically modified papaya in Hainan Island of China was determined through reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The virus shares 92% nucleotide sequence identity with the isolate that is unable to infect PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya. PMID:26358610

  2. Severe acute measles pneumonitis: virus isolation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed

    Suter, Cosima; Buergi, Urs; Eigenmann, Katja; Franzen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, several endemic outbreaks of measles have been recognised, not only in children but also in adults, with severe and, occasionally, even fatal complications, possibly due to delayed diagnosis of the disease in adult medicine and decreasing vaccination rates. Furthermore, the treatment consists of supportive measures only. We present a case of severe measles pneumonitis in a 42-year-old man, a travel returnee, proven by direct virus isolation with PCR from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. CT findings and pulmonary function testing revealed features of obstructive bronchiolitis; the patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids. He fully recovered, and lung function measurement returned to normal values. We conclude that acute measles can present as obstructive bronchiolitis and may be successfully treated with corticosteroids. PMID:26508116

  3. Chikungunya virus isolated from a returnee to Japan from Sri Lanka: isolation of two sub-strains with different characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chang-Kweng; Nishibori, Takeaki; Watanabe, Kanako; Ito, Mikako; Kotaki, Akira; Tanaka, Keiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2009-11-01

    A large-scale epidemic of chikungunya (CHIK) fever occurred in several Indian Ocean islands in 2004 and spread to India and Sri Lanka. In December 2006, a returnee to Japan from Sri Lanka developed an acute febrile illness. The patient was confirmed to have CHIK fever after reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and specific IgM and IgG detection. CHIK virus was isolated from the serum specimen collected at the acute stage. The isolated virus developed two different sizes of plaques. Two sub-strains with different genetic and biological characteristics were obtained by plaque purification from one isolate. The entire genome was sequenced and phylogenetic analysis of the E1 genome showed that the sub-strains were of the Central/East African genotype, and were closely related to recent isolates in India. This is the first report of CHIK virus genome sequences isolated from a patient infected in Sri Lanka. PMID:19861623

  4. Genetic characterization of H5N1 influenza A viruses isolated from zoo tigers in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Amonsin, Alongkorn; Payungporn, Sunchai; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Suradhat, Sanipa; Pariyothorn, Nuananong; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Damrongwantanapokin, Sudarat; Buranathai, Chantanee; Chaisingh, Arunee; Songserm, Thaweesak; Poovorawan, Yong

    2006-01-20

    The H5N1 avian influenza virus outbreak among zoo tigers in mid-October 2004, with 45 animals dead, indicated that the avian influenza virus could cause lethal infection in a large mammalian species apart from humans. In this outbreak investigation, six H5N1 isolates were identified and two isolates (A/Tiger/Thailand/CU-T3/04 and A/Tiger/Thailand/CU-T7/04) were selected for whole genome analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the 8 gene segments showed that the viruses clustered within the lineage of H5N1 avian isolates from Thailand and Vietnam. The hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the viruses displayed polybasic amino acids at the cleavage site, identical to those of the 2004 H5N1 isolates, which by definition are highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). In addition, sequence analyses revealed that the viruses isolated from tigers harbored few genetic changes compared with the viruses having infected chicken, humans, tigers and a leopard isolated from the early 2004 H5N1 outbreaks. Sequence analyses also showed that the tiger H5N1 isolated in October 2004 was more closely related to the chicken H5N1 isolated in July than that from January. Interestingly, all the 6 tiger H5N1 isolates contained a lysine substitution at position 627 of the PB2 protein similar to the human, but distinct from the original avian isolates. PMID:16194557

  5. Rapid typing of herpes simplex virus isolates by deoxyribonucleic acid:deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, A R; Richman, D D; Oxman, M N

    1980-01-01

    A method for typing clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus was developed. It utilizes hybridization between unlabeled deoxyribonucleic acid from infected cultures and tritium-labeled virus deoxyribonucleic acid, and it can be completed within a day using a single roller-tube culture of the clinical isolated. The data obtained are inherently quantitative, and the method yields unequivocal identification and typing. Thirty-nine coded clinical isolates were all correctly typed by this method. PMID:6262368

  6. Detection, isolation, and persistence of viruses within bivalve mollusks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norovirus (NV), hepatitis A virus (HAV), and other virus transmission by molluscan shellfish is a significant issue. Research at the ARS-Dover DE laboratory has led to the development of improved methods for detecting these viruses. To identify pathogenic viruses within mollusks, a rapid highly-se...

  7. Isolation of a new herpes virus from human CD4 sup + T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, N.; Schirmer, E.C.; Wyatt, L.S.; Katsafanas, G.; Roffman, E.; Danovich, R.M. ); June, C.H. )

    1990-01-01

    A new human herpes virus has been isolated from CD4{sup +} T cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy individual (RK), following incubation of the cells under conditions promoting T-cell activation. The virus could not be recovered from nonactivated cells. Cultures of lymphocytes infected with the RK virus exhibited a cytopathic effect, and electron microscopic analyses revealed a characteristic herpes virus structure. RK virus DNA did not hybridize with large probes derived from herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus. The genetic relatedness of the RK virus to the recently identified T-lymphotropic human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) was investigated by restriction enzyme analyses using 21 different enzymes and by blot hydridization analyses using 11 probes derived from two strains of HHV-6 (Z29 and U1102). Whereas the two HHV-6 strains exhibited only limited restriction enzyme polymorphism, cleavage of the RK virus DNA yielded distinct patterns. Of the 11 HHV-6 DNA probes tested, only 6 cross-hybridized with DNA fragments derived from the RK virus. Taken together, the maximal homology amounted to 31 kilobases of the 75 kilobases tested. The authors conclude that the RK virus is distinct from previously characterized human herpesviruses. The authors propose to designate it as the prototype of a new herpes virus, the seventh human herpes virus identified to date.

  8. Isolation of new Brazilian giant viruses from environmental samples using a panel of protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Dornas, Fábio P.; Khalil, Jacques Y. B.; Pagnier, Isabelle; Raoult, Didier; Abrahão, Jônatas; La Scola, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The Megavirales are a newly described order capable of infecting different types of eukaryotic hosts. For the most part, the natural host is unknown. Several methods have been used to detect these viruses, with large discrepancies between molecular methods and co-cultures. To isolate giant viruses, we propose the use of different species of amoeba as a cellular support. The aim of this work was to isolate new Brazilian giant viruses by comparing the protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii, A. polyphaga, A. griffini, and Vermamoeba vermiformis (VV) as a platform for cellular isolation using environmental samples. One hundred samples were collected from 3 different areas in September 2014 in the Pampulha lagoon of Belo Horizonte city, Minas Gerais, Brazil. PCR was used to identify the isolated viruses, along with hemacolor staining, labelling fluorescence and electron microscopy. A total of 69 viruses were isolated. The highest ratio of isolation was found in A. polyphaga (46.38%) and the lowest in VV (0%). Mimiviruses were the most frequently isolated. One Marseillevirus and one Pandoravirus were also isolated. With Brazilian environmental samples, we demonstrated the high rate of lineage A mimiviruses. This work demonstrates how these viruses survive and circulate in nature as well the differences between protozoa as a platform for cellular isolation. PMID:26500630

  9. New strains of rabies-related viruses isolated from bats in the Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Selimov, M A; Smekhov, A M; Antonova, L A; Shablovskaya, E A; King, A A; Kulikova, L G

    1991-05-01

    Two strains (UB-1 and UB-2) of rabies-related viruses were isolated from the brain of Nyctalus noctula and Vespertilio murinus captured from the hollows of tall trees on the left bank of Pripyat river in the Volynsky region of Ukrainian S.S.R. The viruses were isolated by means of intracerebral inoculation to white mice. The isolates were identified as rabies-related viruses of Duvenhage type in an indirect test of fluorescent antibodies with the panels of nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies (NC Mab) provided by Wistar Institute (Philadelphia) and by Central Veterinary Laboratory (CVL, Weybridge). During the typing with the Wistar panel of NC Mab complete antigenic similarity was established between the newly isolated strain and Yuli virus. The reaction with CVL NC Mab revealed group-specific antigenic similarity between Yuli virus on one hand, Duvenhage-6 and Duvenhage-66 on the other hand, as well as between UB-1 and UB-2 and Duvenhage-26. The reaction with antibodies to clones DB-3,4,6,9, and 10 detected antigenic similarity between the viruses of chiropteric origin isolated in the U.S.S.R., North-West Europe as well in Africa, although some differences were discovered. Yuli, UB-1, and UB-2 viruses isolated in the U.S.S.R. were proved to belong to Duvenhage group of viruses (serotype 4). PMID:1683127

  10. Genetic characterization of swine influenza viruses isolated in Japan between 2009 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Matsuu, Aya; Uchida, Yuko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Mawatari, Takahiro; Yoneyama, Shuji Kasai; Kasai, Tomoe; Nakamura, Ryoko; Eto, Mariko; Saito, Takehiko

    2012-11-01

    Eleven swine influenza viruses (SIVs) isolated from pigs in Japanese institutions between 2009 and 2012 were genetically characterized. Seven H1N1 were shown to have originated from A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Two H1N2 viruses contained H1 and N2 genes of Japanese H1N2 SIV origin together with internal genes of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Two H3N2 viruses isolated during animal quarantine were identified as triple reassortant H3N2 viruses maintained among pigs in North America. This study shows that A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses and their reassortant strains are already present in domestic pigs in Japan and that novel SIVs are possibly being imported from abroad. PMID:22924526

  11. Isolation and analysis of small RNAs from virus-infected plants.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Shaun J; Zsögön, Agustín; Watson, John M; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we detail some of the methods available to the researcher for isolating and analyzing virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs). These methods have been successfully used for four plant viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), including the CMV Y-Satellite, Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), Potato leaf roll virus (PLRV), and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) from inoculated Arabidopsis thaliana plants (Fusaro et al. EMBO Rep 7:1168-1175, 2006; Curtin et al. FEBS Lett 582:2753-2760, 2008). The protocols presented here can also be employed for the isolation of non-virus related small RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and hairpin RNA (hpRNA). PMID:22678580

  12. Adaptive evolution of simian immunodeficiency viruses isolated from two conventional progressor macaques with neuroaids

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian T; Korber, Bette T

    2008-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques may result in neuroAIDS, a feature more commonly observed in macaques with rapid progressive disease than in those with conventional disease. This is the first report of two conventional progressors (H631 and H636) with encephalitis in rhesus macaques inoculated with a derivative of SIVsmES43-3. Phylogenetic analyses of viruses isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from both animals demonstrated tissue compartmentalization. Additionally, virus from the central nervous system (CNS) was able to infect primary macaque monocyte-derived macrophages more efficiently than virus from plasma. Conversely, virus isolated from plasma was able to replicate better in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than virus from CNS. We speculate that these viruses were under different selective pressures in their separate compartments. Furthermore, these viruses appear to have undergone adaptive evolution to preferentially replicate in their respective cell targets. Analysis of the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in gp160 showed that there was a statistically significant loss of PNGS in viruses isolated from CNS in both macaques compared to SIVsmE543-3. Moreover, virus isolated from the brain in H631, had statistically significant loss of PNGS compared to virus isolated from CSF and plasma of the same animal. It is possible that the brain isolate may have adapted to decrease the number of PNGS given that humoral immune selection pressure is less likely to be encountered in the brain. These viruses provide a relevant model to study the adaptations required for SIV to induce encephalitis.

  13. Recombinant virus assay: a rapid, phenotypic assay for assessment of drug susceptibility of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kellam, P; Larder, B A

    1994-01-01

    Antiviral drug susceptibility assays for clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates are required to monitor the development of drug resistance during clinical trials and antiretroviral drug therapy. First-generation phenotypic assays possess a number of drawbacks, not least the selection of unrepresentative virus populations during cocultivation. Here we describe a rapid phenotypic assay for the assessment of the susceptibility of clinical isolates to reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. This procedure, called the recombinant virus assay, allows the generation of viable virus by homologous recombination of a PCR-derived pool of RT coding sequences into an RT-deleted, noninfectious proviral clone, pHIV delta BstEII. A nested PCR procedure has been optimized to allow the amplification of an RT pool from both uncultured and cocultured infected patient peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) DNA for subsequent use in the creation of recombinant viruses. Analysis of two patients during the course of zidovudine therapy showed that this approach produced viruses which accurately exhibited the same genotype and phenotype as that of the original infected PBL DNA. The recombinant virus assay can be performed in approximately 3 weeks without the use of donor PBLs and therefore represents a rapid, nonselective procedure for the assay of clinical isolates. Images PMID:8141575

  14. Pathogenicity and antigenicity of a new influenza A (H5N1) virus isolated from duck meat.

    PubMed

    Lu, X; Cho, D; Hall, H; Rowe, T; Sung, H; Kim, W; Kang, C; Mo, I; Cox, N; Klimov, A; Katz, J

    2003-04-01

    Avian influenza A viruses are the ancestral origin of all human influenza viruses. The outbreak of highly pathogenic (HP) avian H5N1 in Hong Kong in 1997 highlighted the potential of these viruses to infect and cause severe disease in humans. Since 1999, HP H5N1 viruses were isolated several times from domestic poultry in Asia. In 2001, a HP H5N1 virus, A/Duck/Anyang/AVL-1/2001 (Dk/Anyang), was isolated from imported frozen duck meat in Korea. Because of this novel source of HP H5N1 virus isolation, concerns were raised about the potential for human exposure and infection; we therefore compared the Dk/Anyang virus with HP H5N1 viruses isolated from humans in 1997 in terms of antigenicity and pathogenicity for mammals. At high doses, Dk/Anyang virus caused up to 50% mortality in BALB/c mice, was isolated from the brains and lymphoid organs of mice, and caused lymphopenia. Overall Dk/Anyang virus was substantially less pathogenic for mice than the H5N1 virus isolated from a fatal human case in 1997. Likewise, Dk/Anyang virus was apathogenic for ferrets. Dk/Anyang virus was antigenically distinguishable by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay from human H5N1 viruses isolated in 1997 and avian H5N1 viruses isolated in 2001 in Hong Kong. Nevertheless, prior infection with Dk/Anyang virus protected mice from death after secondary infection with HP human H5N1 viruses. These results indicate that compared with HP human H5N1 viruses, Dk/Anyang virus is substantially less pathogenic for mammalian species. Nevertheless, the novel source of isolation of this avian H5N1 virus must be considered when evaluating the potential risk to public health. PMID:12601764

  15. Avian influenza virus isolation, propagation and titration in embryonated chicken eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) virus is usually isolated, propagated, and titrated in embryonated chickens eggs (ECE). Most any sample type can be accommodated for culture with appropriate processing. Isolation may also be accomplished in cell culture particularly if mammalian lineage isolates are suspected, ...

  16. PATHOGENESIS OF CHICKEN-PASSAGED NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUSES ISOLATED FROM CHICKENS, WILD, AND EXOTIC BIRDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogenesis of six Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates recovered from chickens and wild (anhinga) and exotic (yellow nape parrot, pheasant, and dove isolate) birds was examined after four passages of the isolates in domestic chickens. Groups of four-week-old specific-pathogen-free White Legh...

  17. Emergence of a new arbovirus disease in Brazil. I. Isolation and characterization of the etiologic agent, Rocio virus.

    PubMed

    de Souza Lopes, O; Coimbra, T L; de Abreu Sacchetta, L; Calisher, C H

    1978-05-01

    In April, 1975, an epidemic of human encephalitis was detected in several counties in the State of São Paulo, Brazil; the epidemic continued into 1976. A virus was isolated from central nervous system (CNS) tissues of a 39-year-old male who died on December 8, 1975; the virus was found to be a new flavivirus for which the name Rocio virus is proposed. Nine further isolations of Rocio virus were obtained from CNS tissues of 17 patients who died with clinical symptoms of encephalitis. Isolations of virus and serologic evidence of Rocio virus infection in a significant proportion of the encephalitis patients suggested that Rocio virus was the etiologic agent of the epidemic. Rocio virus was isolated only from patients who died within 5 days of onset of illness. The virus was isolated from two sentinel mice exposed in the epidemic zone and from a rufous collared sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis) collected in the area. PMID:665659

  18. Nucleotide sequence analysis of virus isolates indicates the presence of three potyvirus species in Allium plants.

    PubMed

    Tsuneyoshi, T; Matsumi, T; Natsuaki, K T; Sumi, S

    1998-01-01

    cDNAs of potyviruses from Allium plants cultivated in different parts of the world were cloned by RT-PCR with a common primer for amplifying the 3' terminal genomic RNAs of onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV), leek yellow stripe virus (LYSV) and, probably, of closely related potyviruses. Their nucleotide sequences bearing the viral coat protein (CP) gene and the 3' non-coding sequence were determined and compared. The degree of their sequence similarities clearly differentiated the respective viruses into 3 groups, namely OYDV "garlic-type", "wakegi-type" and LYSV group. The "garlic-type" included all the garlic isolates and two Indonesian shallot isolates. The "wakegi-type" group consisted of the isolates from Indonesian shallot and previously reported ones from Japanese Allium plants excluding garlic. The LYSV group was represented by LYSV isolates from garlic and leek. The CP sequences of LYSV group viruses differed from those of OYDV "garlic-type" and "wakegi-type" viruses (less than 60% similarities). In contrast, the sequence similarities between the OYDV "wakegi-type" and "garlic-type" isolates were 73.5 to 76.7%, suggesting they were closely related but should be discriminated as distinct species. These findings indicate that at least three distinct potyviruses, clearly distinguishable by the viral CP sequence, are present in Allium species. Finally, we concluded that the "garlic-type" viruses correspond to the typical OYDV and the "wakegi-type" viruses represent the viruses previously identified as Welsh onion yellow stripe virus (WoYSV) and shallot yellow stripe virus (SYSV). We propose the name wakegi yellow dwarf virus (WYDV) for the "wakegi-type" viruses. PMID:9505969

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Goose Tembusu Virus, Isolated from Jiangnan White Geese in Jiangsu, China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kaikai; Huang, Xinmei; Zhao, Dongmin; Liu, Yuzhuo; Zhou, Xiaobo; You, Yuan; Xie, Xingxing

    2013-01-01

    Avian tembusu virus (TMUV), which was first identified in eastern China, is an emerging virus causing serious economic losses in the Chinese poultry industry. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of goose tembusu virus strain JS804, isolated from Jiangnan white geese with severe neurological signs. The genome of JS804 is 10,990 nucleotides (nt) in length and contains a single open reading frame encoding a putative polyprotein of 3,425 amino acids. Research of the whole sequence of tembusu virus will help us to understand further the molecular and evolutionary characteristics and pathogenesis of this virus. PMID:23516233

  20. Isolation of Tacaribe Virus, a Caribbean Arenavirus, from Host-Seeking Amblyomma americanum Ticks in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Sayler, Katherine A.; Barbet, Anthony F.; Chamberlain, Casey; Clapp, William L.; Alleman, Rick; Loeb, Julia C.; Lednicky, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Arenaviridae are a family of single stranded RNA viruses of mammals and boid snakes. Twenty-nine distinct mammalian arenaviruses have been identified, many of which cause severe hemorrhagic disease in humans, particularly in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, and in Central and South America. Humans typically become infected with an arenavirus through contact with excreta from infected rodents. Tacaribe virus (TCRV) is an arenavirus that was first isolated from bats and mosquitoes during a rabies surveillance survey conducted in Trinidad from 1956 to 1958. Tacaribe virus is unusual because it has never been associated with a rodent host and since that one time isolation, the virus has not been isolated from any vertebrate or invertebrate hosts. We report the re-isolation of the virus from a pool of 100 host-seeking Amblyomma americanum (lone star ticks) collected in a Florida state park in 2012. TCRV was isolated in two cell lines and its complete genome was sequenced. The tick-derived isolate is nearly identical to the only remaining isolate from Trinidad (TRVL-11573), with 99.6% nucleotide identity across the genome. A quantitative RT-PCR assay was developed to test for viral RNA in host-seeking ticks collected from 3 Florida state parks. Virus RNA was detected in 56/500 (11.2%) of surveyed ticks. As this virus was isolated from ticks that parasitize humans, the ability of the tick to transmit the virus to people should be evaluated. Furthermore, reservoir hosts for the virus need to be identified in order to develop risk assessment models of human infection. PMID:25536075

  1. Isolation, identification, and whole genome sequencing of reticuloendotheliosis virus from a vaccine against Marek's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Junping; Dong, Xuan; Yang, Chenghuai; Li, Qihong; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Yu, Kangzhen; Yang, Hanchun

    2015-04-01

    According to the requirements of the Ministry of Agriculture of China, all vaccines must be screened for exogenous virus contamination before commercialization. A freeze-dried vaccine against Marek's disease was used to inoculate specific pathogen-free chickens, from which serum samples were collected after 42 days. The results were positive for reticuloendotheliosis virus antibody, which was indicative of reticuloendotheliosis virus contamination. After neutralization with serum positive for Marek's disease virus, chicken embryo fibroblasts were inoculated with the vaccine. Afterward, viral isolation and identification were performed. One reticuloendotheliosis virus strain (MD-2) was isolated and verified using an immunofluorescence assay. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the provirus MD-2 genome was performed using seven overlapping fragments as primers. The amplified products were sequenced and spliced to obtain the whole MD-2 genome sequence. The full genome length of MD-2 was 8,284 bp, which had an identity greater than 99% with the prairie chicken isolate APC-566 from the US, the goose-derived isolate 3410/06 from Taiwan, and the chicken-derived reticuloendotheliosis virus isolate HLJR0901 from Heilongjiang Province, China. The MD-2 was phylogenetically close to these isolates. The identity with REV isolate HA9901 from Jiangsu Province of China was 96.7%. The MD-2 had the lowest identity with duck-derived Sin Nombre virus from the United States, with the value of only 93.5%. The main difference lay in the U3 region of the long terminal repeat. The present research indicated that some vaccines produced during specific periods in China might be contaminated by reticuloendotheliosis virus. The reticuloendotheliosis virus strain isolated from the vaccine was phylogenetically close to the prevalent strain, with only minor variations. PMID:25725074

  2. VIRULENCE OF HETEROGENEOUS-ORIGIN NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS ISOLATES BEFORE AND AFTER SEQUENTIAL PASSAGES IN DOMESTIC CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four serial passages of six Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates were performed in 2-week-old White Leghorns. The viruses were recovered from chickens (Ckn-Live Bird Market and Ckn-Australia isolates), exotic (Yellow Nape [YN] Parrot, Pheasant, and Dove isolates) and wild birds (Anhinga isolate). ...

  3. Replication kinetics of Marek's disease vaccine virus in feathers and lymphoid tissues using PCR and virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Baigent, Susan J; Smith, Lorraine P; Currie, Richard J W; Nair, Venugopal K

    2005-11-01

    CVI988 (Rispens), an avirulent strain of Marek's disease virus, is the most widely used vaccine against Marek's disease. The kinetics of replication of CVI988 was examined in tissues of chickens vaccinated at either 1 day or 14 days of age and sampled regularly up to 28 days post-vaccination. Age at vaccination had no significant effect on the kinetics of CVI988 virus replication. During the cytolytic phase of infection (1-7 days), virus levels peaked in the spleen, bursa and thymus with very close correlation among these organs. Virus load in peripheral blood lagged behind and did not reach high levels. Significant numbers of virus genomes were detected in the feather tips only after 7 days, but subsequently rose to levels almost 10(3)-fold greater than in the other tissues. This is the first accurate quantitative data for kinetics of CVI988 replication in a variety of tissues. There was good correlation between data from virus isolation and PCR, with real-time PCR being the preferred method for rapid, accurate and sensitive quantification of virus. Feathers were ideal for non-invasive sampling to detect and measure CVI988 in live chickens and, from 10 days onwards, virus load in feather tips was predictive of virus load in lymphoid tissues where immune responses will occur. The potential for real-time PCR analysis of feather samples for further investigation of the mechanism of vaccinal protection, and to assist optimization of vaccination regimes, is discussed. PMID:16227220

  4. Neurological lesions in chickens experimentally infected with virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropil reaction was evaluated in chickens inoculated with four different Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates, including Texas GB, Turkey North Dakota, Nevada Cormorant (velogenic neurotropic) and Anhinga (mesogenic). Tissues for this study included archived formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded br...

  5. Use of muscovy duck embryo fibroblasts for the isolation of viruses from wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Slota, Paul G.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques are described for the preparation, cryopreservation, and inoculation of Muscovy duck embryo cell cultures. The procedure yields a susceptible reproducible cell culture system for the isolation and cultivation of viruses from wild birds.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Strain MD-2, Isolated from a Contaminated Turkey Herpesvirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junping; Yang, Chenghuai; Li, Qihong; Li, Huijiao; Xia, Yecai; Liu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genomic sequence of a reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) isolated from a contaminated turkey herpesvirus (HVT) vaccine. This report will be helpful for epidemiological studies on REV infection in avian flocks. PMID:24092783

  7. Isolation of two strains of West Nile virus during an outbreak in southern Russia, 1999.

    PubMed Central

    Lvov, D. K.; Butenko, A. M.; Gromashevsky, V. L.; Larichev, V. P.; Gaidamovich, S. Y.; Vyshemirsky, O. I.; Zhukov, A. N.; Lazorenko, V. V.; Salko, V. N.; Kovtunov, A. I.; Galimzyanov, K. M.; Platonov, A. E.; Morozova, T. N.; Khutoretskaya, N. V.; Shishkina, E. O.; Skvortsova, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    From July to September 1999, a widespread outbreak of meningoencephalitis associated with West Nile virus (Flavivirus, Flaviviridae) occurred in southern Russia, with hundreds of cases and dozens of deaths. Two strains of West Nile virus isolated from patient serum and brain-tissue samples reacted in hemagglutination-inhibition and neutralization tests with patients' convalescent-phase sera and immune ascites fluid from other strains of West Nile virus. PMID:10905970

  8. Complete genome sequences of Maize dwarf mosaic and Sugarcane mosaic virus isolates coinfecting maize in Spain.

    PubMed

    Achon, M A; Serrano, L; Alonso-Dueñas, N; Porta, C

    2007-01-01

    The genomes of Spanish isolates of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV-Sp) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV-Sp) were completely sequenced. Nucleotide sequence identities of SCMV-Sp to those of other SCMV isolates ranged from 79 to 90%. MDMV-Sp shared 85% nucleotide identity with the only other fully sequenced isolate of MDMV. MDMV-Sp and SCMV-Sp differed from each other by 31% in their nucleotide sequences. Phylogenetic analyses showed that SCMV isolates group by host rather than by geographical location. Two significant recombination signals were identified in the NIa and NIb regions of the SCMV-Sp genome. PMID:17680319

  9. Full-Genome Sequence of a Novel Varicella-Zoster Virus Clade Isolated in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra Ivette; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Ramirez-González, José Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family, which causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles) in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of varicella-zoster virus, isolated from a vesicular fluid sample, revealing the circulation of VZV clade VIII in Mexico. PMID:26159533

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of an Atypical Dengue Virus Serotype 2 Lineage Isolated in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Felipe Scassi; Amorim, Jaime Henrique; Alves, Rubens Prince Santos; Pereira, Sara A; Ferreira, Luis Carlos Souza; Romano, Camila Malta

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete polyprotein sequence of a dengue virus 2 strain isolated in Brazil. This virus belongs to the American genotype and has the ability to cause neurovirulence in immunocompetent adult mice. The data presented here may help understand the genetic determinants responsible for neurovirulence. PMID:26184939

  11. Complete genome sequence of Tomato mosaic virus isolated from jasmine in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) was first identified in jasmine in the U.S. in Florida in 1999. This report provides the first full genome sequence of a ToMV isolate from jasmine. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional specific diagnostic tests for ...

  12. Characterization of low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds in Mongolia 2005 through 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2005, 2006 and 2007 2,139 specimens representing 4,077 individual birds of 45 species were tested for avian influenza virus (AIV) as part of a wild bird AIV monitoring program conducted in Mongolia. Samples collected in 2005 were tested by virus isolation directly, samples from 2006 and 2007...

  13. Full-Genome Sequence of a Novel Varicella-Zoster Virus Clade Isolated in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra Ivette; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family, which causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles) in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of varicella-zoster virus, isolated from a vesicular fluid sample, revealing the circulation of VZV clade VIII in Mexico. PMID:26159533

  14. Squash vein yellowing virus, a novel ipomovirus, isolated from squash and watermelon in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel whitefly-transmitted member of the family Potyviridae was isolated from a squash plant (Cucurbita pepo) with vein yellowing symptoms in Florida. The virus, for which the name Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is proposed, has flexuous rod-shaped particles of ~840 nm in length. SqVYV was ...

  15. West Nile Virus Isolated from a Virginia Opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in Northwestern Missouri, USA, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Harmon, Jessica R.; Lash, R. Ryan; Weiss, Sonja; Langevin, Stanley; Savage, Harry M.; Godsey, Marvin S.; Burkhalter, Kristen; Root, J. Jeffrey; Gidlewski, Thomas; Nicholson, William L.; Brault, Aaron C.; Komar, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    We describe the isolation of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) from blood of a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) collected in northwestern Missouri, USA in August 2012. Sequencing determined that the virus was related to lineage 1a WNV02 strains. We discuss the role of wildlife in WNV disease epidemiology. PMID:25098303

  16. Evolutionary changes affecting rapid identification of 2008 Newcastle disease viruses isolated from double-crested cormorants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An outbreak of virulent Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in wild double-breasted cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) occurred in North America in the summer of 2008. All ten viruses isolated from cormorants were positively identified by the USDA validated real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chai...

  17. West Nile virus isolated from Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in Northwest Missouri 2012

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Harmon, Jessica; Lash, R. Ryan; Weiss, Sonja; Langevin, Stanley; Savage, Harry; Marvin S. Godsey, Jr.; Burkhalter, Kristen; Root, J. Jeffrey; Gidlewski, Thomas; et al

    2014-12-01

    We describe the isolation of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, flavivirus) from blood of a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) collected in northwestern Missouri, USA in August 2012. Furthermore, sequencing determined that the virus was related to lineage 1a WNV02 strains. We discuss the role of wildlife in WNV disease epidemiology.

  18. Characterization of tomato spotted wilt virus isolates infecting peanut in Southwestern states of USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is among the greatest yield-reducing viruses affecting peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) in all peanut-producing states in U.S. Due to the lack of molecular information on TSWV-isolates associated with peanut in southwestern states, the aim of this study was directed at ...

  19. Characterization of the Taura syndrome virus isolate originating from the 2004 Texas Epizootic in cultured shrimp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Taura syndrome virus (TSV) is a major viral pathogen of penaeid shrimp worldwide. A comprehensive investigation of the Texas isolate of TSV that caused epizootics in shrimp farms in Texas in 2004 (Us04Pv1) revealed that the virus was highly virulent in laboratory bioassays causing severe symptom dev...

  20. Dengue-1 Virus Isolation during First Dengue Fever Outbreak on Easter Island, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Abarca, Katia; Ovalle, Jimena; Ferrer, Pablo; Godoy, Paula; Olea, Andrea; Aguilera, Ximena; Ferrés, Marcela

    2003-01-01

    Dengue virus was detected for the first time in Chile, in an outbreak of dengue fever on Easter Island. The virus was isolated in tissue culture and characterized by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction as being dengue type 1. PMID:14718094

  1. Dengue-1 virus isolation during first dengue fever outbreak on Easter Island, Chile.

    PubMed

    Perret, Cecilia; Abarca, Katia; Ovalle, Jimena; Ferrer, Pablo; Godoy, Paula; Olea, Andrea; Aguilera, Ximena; Ferrés, Marcela

    2003-11-01

    Dengue virus was detected for the first time in Chile, in an outbreak of dengue fever on Easter Island. The virus was isolated in tissue culture and characterized by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as being dengue type 1. PMID:14718094

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Waterfowl-Origin Tembusu Virus Strains Isolated in Shandong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Liu, Xin; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Ti, Jinfeng; Gao, Xuhui

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two tembusu virus strains, ZC-1 and LQ-1, isolated from ducks and geese, respectively, in 2012. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the two strains are closely related to those of the TMUV isolates around Shandong province. The full-length genome sequences of two waterfowl-origin TMUVs provided herein will help to understand the molecular epidemiology of tembusu virus in China, which deserves further investigation. PMID:24356821

  3. Genetic characterization and evolutionary analysis of Newcastle disease virus isolated from domestic duck in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Satish; Kim, Ji-Ye; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Jung, Suk Chan; Choi, Kang-Seuk

    2016-03-15

    Domestic ducks are considered a potential reservoir of Newcastle disease virus. In the study, a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from a domestic duck during surveillance in South Korea was characterized. The complete genome of the NDV isolate was sequenced, and the phylogenetic relationship to reference strains was studied. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strain clustered in genotype I of Class II ND viruses, has highly phylogenetic similarity to NDV strains isolated from waterfowl in China, but was distant from the viruses isolated in chickens and vaccine strains used in South Korea. Pathogenicity experiment in chickens revealed it to be a lentogenic virus. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cleavage site of the fusion (F) protein confirmed that the isolate contained the avirulent motif (112)GKQGRL(117) at the cleavage site and caused no apparent disease in chickens and ducks. With phylogeographic analysis based on fusion gene, we estimate the origin of an ancestral virus of the isolate and its sister strain located in China around 1998. It highlights the need of continuous surveillance to enhance current understanding of the molecular epidemiology and evolution of the pathogenic strains. PMID:26721461

  4. Characterization of a new Marburg virus isolated from a 1987 fatal case in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E D; Johnson, B K; Silverstein, D; Tukei, P; Geisbert, T W; Sanchez, A N; Jahrling, P B

    1996-01-01

    In 1987, an isolated case of fatal Marburg disease was recognized during routine clinical haemorrhagic fever virus surveillance conducted in Kenya. This report describes the isolation and partial characterization of the new Marburg virus (strain Ravn) isolated from this case. The Ravn isolate was indistinguishable from reference Marburg virus strains by cross-neutralization testing. Virus particles and aggregates of Marburg nucleocapsid matrix in Ravn-infected vero cells, were visualized by immunoelectron microscopic techniques, and also in tissues obtained from the patient and from inoculated monkeys. The cell culture isolate produced a haemorrhagic disease typical of Marburg virus infection when inoculated into rhesus monkeys. Disease was characterized by the sudden appearance of fever and anorexia within 4 to 7 days, and death by day 11. Comparison of nucleotide sequences for portions of the glycoprotein genes of Marburg-Ravn were compared with Marburg reference strains Musoki (MUS) and Popp (POP). Nucleotide identity in this alignment between RAV and MUS is 72.3%, RAV and POP is 71%, and MUS and POP is 91.7%. Amino acid identity between RAV and MUS is 72%, RAV and POP is 67%, and MUS and POP is 93%. These data suggest that Ravn is another subtype of Marburg virus, analogous to the emerging picture of a spectrum of Ebola geographic isolates and subtypes. PMID:8800792

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Fish Nervous Necrosis Virus Isolated from Sea Perch (Lateolabrax japonicus) in China

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced and analyzed the complete genome of a fish nervous necrosis virus isolated from diseased sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicus) in Guangdong Province, China. The virus genome contains RNA1 (3,103 bp) and RNA2 (1,433 bp). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the virus belongs to the redspotted grouper nervous necrosis virus genotype of betanodavirus. PMID:26044411

  6. Genetic and antigenic relatedness of H3 subtype influenza A viruses isolated from avian and mammalian species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turkeys are susceptible to some swine influenza viruses based on natural and experimental transmissions of H1 and H3 subtype viruses from swine to turkeys. In 2004, we isolated triple reassortant H3N2 viruses from turkey breeder hens in Ohio and Illinois. These H3N2 viruses are currently the domin...

  7. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan

    PubMed Central

    ABE, Yuri; TAMURA, Tomokazu; TORII, Shiho; WAKAMORI, Shiho; NAGAI, Makoto; MITSUHASHI, Kazuya; MINE, Junki; FUJIMOTO, Yuri; NAGASHIMA, Naofumi; YOSHINO, Fumi; SUGITA, Yukihiko; NOMURA, Takushi; OKAMATSU, Masatoshi; KIDA, Hiroshi; SAKODA, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we genetically analyzed bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) isolated from 2000 to 2006 in Japan and reported that subgenotype 1b viruses were predominant. In the present study, 766 BVDVs isolated from 2006 to 2014 in Hokkaido, Japan, were genetically analyzed to understand recent epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the 5′-untranslated region of viral genome revealed that 766 isolates were classified as genotype 1 (BVDV-1; 544 isolates) and genotype 2 (BVDV-2; 222). BVDV-1 isolates were further divided into BVDV-1a (93), 1b (371) and 1c (80) subgenotypes, and all BVDV-2 isolates were grouped into BVDV-2a subgenotype (222). Further comparative analysis was performed with BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a viruses isolated from 2001 to 2014. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the viral glycoprotein E2 gene, a major target of neutralizing antibodies, revealed that BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were further classified into several clusters. Cross-neutralization tests showed that BVDV-1b isolates were antigenically different from BVDV-1a isolates, and almost BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were antigenically similar among each subgenotype and each E2 cluster. Taken together, BVDV-1b viruses are still predominant, and BVDV-2a viruses have increased recently in Hokkaido, Japan. Field isolates of BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a show genetic diversity on the E2 gene with antigenic conservation among each subgenotype during the last 14 years. PMID:26400674

  8. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuri; Tamura, Tomokazu; Torii, Shiho; Wakamori, Shiho; Nagai, Makoto; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Mine, Junki; Fujimoto, Yuri; Nagashima, Naofumi; Yoshino, Fumi; Sugita, Yukihiko; Nomura, Takushi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    In our previous study, we genetically analyzed bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) isolated from 2000 to 2006 in Japan and reported that subgenotype 1b viruses were predominant. In the present study, 766 BVDVs isolated from 2006 to 2014 in Hokkaido, Japan, were genetically analyzed to understand recent epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the 5'-untranslated region of viral genome revealed that 766 isolates were classified as genotype 1 (BVDV-1; 544 isolates) and genotype 2 (BVDV-2; 222). BVDV-1 isolates were further divided into BVDV-1a (93), 1b (371) and 1c (80) subgenotypes, and all BVDV-2 isolates were grouped into BVDV-2a subgenotype (222). Further comparative analysis was performed with BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a viruses isolated from 2001 to 2014. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the viral glycoprotein E2 gene, a major target of neutralizing antibodies, revealed that BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were further classified into several clusters. Cross-neutralization tests showed that BVDV-1b isolates were antigenically different from BVDV-1a isolates, and almost BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were antigenically similar among each subgenotype and each E2 cluster. Taken together, BVDV-1b viruses are still predominant, and BVDV-2a viruses have increased recently in Hokkaido, Japan. Field isolates of BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a show genetic diversity on the E2 gene with antigenic conservation among each subgenotype during the last 14 years. PMID:26400674

  9. Characterisation of an isolate of Narcissus degeneration virus from Chinese narcissus (Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis).

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Shi, Y-H; Adams, M J; Zheng, H-Y; Qin, B-X; Chen, J-P

    2007-02-01

    A potyvirus from Chinese narcissus was transmitted mechanically to three species of Narcissus and to Lycoris radiata but not to 22 other test species. In western blot, the coat protein reacted strongly with Narcissus degeneration virus (UK isolate) antiserum. Antiserum raised to the Chinese virus did not react with eighteen other potyviruses. The complete nucleotide sequence (9816 nt) had the typical genome organisation for a member of the genus Potyvirus. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis showed that the Chinese virus was different from all previously sequenced potyviruses but distantly related to onion yellow dwarf and shallot yellow stripe viruses. PMID:16932980

  10. Characterization of a Tembusu virus isolated from naturally infected house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Diao, Y; Yu, C; Gao, X; Ju, X; Xue, C; Liu, X; Ge, P; Qu, J; Zhang, D

    2013-04-01

    The house sparrow (Passer domesticus) is one of the most widely distributed wild birds in China. Tembusu virus (TMUV) strain, TMUV-SDHS, was isolated from house sparrows living around the poultry farms in Shandong Province, Northern China. Genetic analysis of E and NS5 genes showed that it had a close relationship with that of the YY5 strain, which can cause severe egg drop in ducks. Pathogenicity studies showed that the virus is highly virulent when experimentally inoculated into the ducks. These findings show that house sparrows carrying the Tembusu virus may play an important role in transmitting the virus among other species. PMID:22515847

  11. A case of tick-borne encephalitis in Japan and isolation of the the virus.

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, I; Morita, K; Chiba, M; Hayasaka, D; Sato, T; Takezawa, C; Igarashi, A; Kariwa, H; Yoshimatsu, K; Arikawa, J; Hashimoto, N

    1997-01-01

    A case of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) has not been reported for many years in Japan, although a serological survey of sera from domestic animals suggested the presence of TBE foci in Hokkaido, the northern island of Japan. Studies were conducted to prove the presence of an endemic focus of TBE virus in Japan by means of serology and virus isolation. In October 1993 in Hokkaido, a severe case of encephalitis in a dairy farmer's wife was diagnosed as TBE. Serological examination of paired serum specimens showed a rise in the neutralization antibody titer to Russian spring summer encephalitis virus. A seroepizootiological survey of dogs showed that the TBE-related virus was prevalent in the area. Three virus isolates were obtained from the blood of sentinel dogs, and antigenic analysis grouped the isolates into TBE-related viruses. Sequence analysis of the envelope protein gene identified one of the isolates as being of the same subtype as the Russian spring summer encephalitis (Far Eastern TBE) virus. The results provide evidence that TBE is endemic in a certain area of Japan. PMID:9230360

  12. Archaeal Viruses of the Sulfolobales: Isolation, Infection, and CRISPR Spacer Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Susanne; Garrett, Roger A

    2015-01-01

    Infection of archaea with phylogenetically diverse single viruses, performed in different laboratories, has failed to activate spacer acquisition into host CRISPR loci. The first successful uptake of archaeal de novo spacers was observed on infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 with an environmental virus mixture isolated from Yellowstone National Park (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012). Experimental studies of isolated genetic elements from this mixture revealed that SMV1 (S ulfolobus Monocauda Virus 1), a tailed spindle-shaped virus, can induce spacer acquisition in CRISPR loci of Sulfolobus species from a second coinfecting conjugative plasmid or virus (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012; Erdmann et al. Mol Microbiol 91:900-917, 2014). Here we describe, firstly, the isolation of archaeal virus mixtures from terrestrial hot springs and the techniques used both to infect laboratory strains with these virus mixtures and to obtain purified virus particles. Secondly, we present the experimental conditions required for activating SMV1-induced spacer acquisition in two different Sulfolobus species. PMID:25981476

  13. The complete sequence of the genomic RNA of an isolate of Lily virus X (genus Potexvirus).

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Shi, Y-H; Adams, M J; Chen, J-P

    2005-04-01

    The complete sequence of the genomic RNA of an isolate of Lily virus X (LVX) has been determined for the first time. The isolate from the Netherlands was 5823 nucleotide (nt) long excluding the 3'-poly(A) tail, making it the shortest reported potexvirus sequence. The 5'-non-coding region begins with GGAAAA like that of Scallion virus X (ScaVX) and some isolates of Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV), whereas those of other sequenced potexviruses probably all begin with GAAAA. The genome organisation was similar to that of other members of the genus except that a TGBp3-like region lacked a normal AUG start codon. A phylogenetic analysis based on the entire coding sequence showed that LVX was most closely related to Strawberry mild yellow edge virus and belonged in a subgroup of the genus that also contains CymMV, Narcissus mosaic virus, ScaVX, Pepino mosaic virus, Potato aucuba mosaic virus and White clover mosaic virus. PMID:15578239

  14. Genetic characterization of a noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 2b isolated from cattle in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Xinchuan; Chen, Chaoyang; Wu, Hua

    2014-10-01

    In January 2013, several clinical signs of cattle with diarrhea, cough, nasal discharge, and fever were reported in Jilin province, China. One virus named SD1301 was isolated and identified. Complete genome of the virus is 12258nt in length and contains a 5'UTR, one open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3,897 amino acids and a 3'UTR. Phylogenetic analysis of 5'UTR, N(pro), E1 and E2 gene demonstrated the virus belonged to BVDV 2b, and genetically related to the BVDV strain Hokudai-Lab/09 from Japan in 2010. This bovine viral diarrhea virus displays a unique genetic signature with 27-nucleotide deletion in the 5'UTR, which is similar to the bovine viral diarrhea virus C413 (AF002227). This was the first confirmed isolation of ncp BVDV2b circulating in bovine herd of China. PMID:24811746

  15. Nhumirim virus, a novel flavivirus isolated from mosquitoes from the Pantanal, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Owen; Couto-Lima, Dinair; Kenney, Joan; Serra-Freire, Nicolau; Brault, Aaron; Nogueira, Rita; Langevin, Stanley; Komar, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    We describe the isolation of a novel flavivirus, isolated from a pool of mosquitoes identified as Culex (Culex) chidesteri collected in 2010 in the Pantanal region of west-central Brazil. The virus is herein designated Nhumirim virus (NHUV) after the name of the ranch from which the mosquito pool was collected. Flavivirus RNA was detected by real-time RT-PCR of homogenized mosquitoes and from the corresponding C6/36 culture supernatant. Based on full-genome sequencing, the virus isolate was genetically distinct from but most closely related to Barkedji virus (BJV), a newly described flavivirus from Senegal. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that NHUV grouped with mosquito-borne flaviviruses forming a clade with BJV. This clade may be genetically intermediate between the Culex-borne flaviviruses amplified by birds and the insect-only flaviviruses. PMID:25252815

  16. Swine influenza viruses isolated in 1983, 2002 and 2009 in Sweden exemplify different lineages.

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Bálint, Adám; Metreveli, Giorgi; Emmoth, Eva; Widén, Frederik; Belák, Sándor; Wallgren, Per

    2010-01-01

    Swine influenza virus isolates originating from outbreaks in Sweden from 1983, 2002 and 2009 were subjected to nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The aim of the studies was to obtain an overview on their potential relatedness as well as to provide data for broader scale studies on swine influenza epidemiology. Nonetheless, analyzing archive isolates is justified by the efforts directed to the comprehension of the appearance of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Interestingly, this study illustrates the evolution of swine influenza viruses in Europe, because the earliest isolate belonged to 'classical' swine H1N1, the subsequent ones to Eurasian 'avian-like' swine H1N1 and reassortant 'avian-like' swine H1N2 lineages, respectively. The latter two showed close genetic relatedness regarding their PB2, HA, NP, and NS genes, suggesting common ancestry. The study substantiates the importance of molecular surveillance for swine influenza viruses. PMID:21156041

  17. A new cell culture tube in diagnostic virology for virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Chua, K B; Chua, K H; Chua, I-Ly; Chen, K F

    2004-06-01

    Virus isolation and accurate characterization plays a crucial role in the rapid identification of the causative agents of infectious disease outbreaks especially if the causative viruses are novel where no pre-existing diagnostic reagents would be available. A new cell culture tube, named Jui Meng (JM) Cell Culture Tube, was developed to reduce the cost and improve the efficiency and biosafety of work pertaining to virus isolation. The design of the tube is based heavily on the principle of practicability, functionality, biosafety and long-term cost saving for diagnostic laboratory work in virus isolation. It is designed to culture an initial inoculum of one milliliter of culture medium containing 1 x 10(4) to 1 x 10(5) cells/ml. PMID:16190110

  18. MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF VIRUS ISOLATES CAUSING MOSAIC IN LOUISIANA SUGARCANE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten strains of sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and three strains sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) have been reported to cause mosaic in Louisiana; however, only strains H, I, and M of SrMV were recovered from commercial fields during surveys conducted between 1973 and 1995. Annual surveys were discontinue...

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF VIRUS ISOLATES CAUSING MOSAIC OF SUGARCANE IN LOUSIANA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten strains of sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and three strains of sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) have been shown to cause sugarcane mosaic in Louisiana, USA; however, surveys conducted between the 1970s and 1995 identified strains of SrMV only. In 2001 and 2002, approximately 350 leaf samples from pla...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF VIRUS RESISTANT TRANSGENIC PAPAYAS EXPRESSING THE COAT PROTEIN FROM A BRAZILIAN ISOLATE OF PAPAYA RINGSPOT VIRUS (PRSV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Translatable and untranslatable versions of the coat protein (cp) gene of a Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) isolate collected in the State of Bahia, Brazil, were engineered for expression in Sunrise and Sunset Solo varieties of Carica papaya L. The biolistic system was used to transform secondary soma...

  1. Complete genome sequence analysis of an American isolate of Grapevine virus E

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence of an isolate of Grapevine virus E (GVE) collected from a red-berried wine grape cultivar (Cabernet Sauvignon) in Washington State was determined. The 7,568 nt long genome of GVE is similar in size and sequence identity with a GVE isolate from a wine grape cv. Shiraz fro...

  2. Population Structure of Blueberry Mosaic Associated Virus: Evidence of Genetic Exchange in Geographically Distinct Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), a putative member of the family Ophioviridae, was examined using 59 isolates collected from North America and Slovenia. The studied isolates displayed low genetic diversity in the movement and nucleoprotein regions and low ratios...

  3. Genome Sequences of Nine Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Isolates from South America.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Veronica L; King, David J; Howson, Emma L A; Madi, Mikidache; Pauszek, Steven J; Rodriguez, Luis L; Knowles, Nick J; Mioulet, Valérie; King, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    We report nine full-genome sequences of vesicular stomatitis virus obtained by Illumina next-generation sequencing of RNA, isolated from either cattle epithelial suspensions or cell culture supernatants. Seven of these viral genomes belonged to the New Jersey serotype/species (clade III), while two isolates belonged to the Indiana serotype/species. PMID:27081129

  4. Phylogenetic Characterization of Genotype 4 Hepatitis C Virus Isolates from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Victoria; Flichman, Diego; Sookoian, Silvia; Mbayed, Viviana Andrea; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2001-01-01

    Among 114 patients infected with hepatitis C virus, three genotype 4 isolates, unusual in Argentina, were detected by phylogenetic analysis over different genomic regions. The patients were not related. One sample was associated with Egyptian sequences, and the others were associated with a Zairean isolate, a fact which reinforces the idea that they are from independent sources. PMID:11326031

  5. Biological and molecular characterization of a reticuloendotheliosis virus isolated from turkeys with lymphomas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) isolates termed AF-140-11 and AF-140-12 were obtained from turkeys with increased mortality, disseminated lymphoblastoid neoplasia, and decreased egg production. The REV isolates were propagated and titrated in chicken-embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) obtained from a s...

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tomato Isolate of Parietaria Mottle Virus from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Martnez, Carolina; Aramburu, Jos; Rubio, Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of isolate T32 of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) infecting tomato plants in Turin, Italy, obtained by Sanger sequencing. T32 shares 90.48 to 96.69% nucleotide identity with other two PoMV isolates, CR8 and Pe1, respectively, whose complete genome sequences are available. PMID:26679580

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Alternanthera mosaic virus, Isolated from Achyranthes bidentata in Asia.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yusa, Akira; Nishida, Shuko; Tanno, Kazuyuki; Keima, Takuya; Nijo, Takamichi; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) infecting Achyranthes bidentata was first detected in Asia, and the complete genome sequence (6,604 nucleotides) was determined. Sequence identity analysis and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that this isolate is the most phylogenetically distant AltMV isolate worldwide. PMID:26988034

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Alternanthera mosaic virus, Isolated from Achyranthes bidentata in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yusa, Akira; Nishida, Shuko; Tanno, Kazuyuki; Keima, Takuya; Nijo, Takamichi; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) infecting Achyranthes bidentata was first detected in Asia, and the complete genome sequence (6,604 nucleotides) was determined. Sequence identity analysis and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that this isolate is the most phylogenetically distant AltMV isolate worldwide. PMID:26988034

  9. Biological characterization and complete nucleotide sequence of a Tunisian isolate of Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Yakoubi, S; Desbiez, C; Fakhfakh, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Marrakchi, M; Lecoq, H

    2008-01-01

    During a survey conducted in October 2005, cucurbit leaf samples showing virus-like symptoms were collected from the major cucurbit-growing areas in Tunisia. DAS-ELISA showed the presence of Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus (MWMV, Potyvirus), detected for the first time in Tunisia, in samples from the region of Cap Bon (Northern Tunisia). MWMV isolate TN05-76 (MWMV-Tn) was characterized biologically and its full-length genome sequence was established. MWMV-Tn was found to have biological properties similar to those reported for the MWMV type strain from Morocco. Phylogenetic analysis including the comparison of complete amino-acid sequences of 42 potyviruses confirmed that MWMV-Tn is related (65% amino-acid sequence identity) to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) isolates but is a member of a distinct virus species. Sequence analysis on parts of the CP gene of MWMV isolates from different geographical origins revealed some geographic structure of MWMV variability, with three different clusters: one cluster including isolates from the Mediterranean region, a second including isolates from western and central Africa, and a third one including isolates from the southern part of Africa. A significant correlation was observed between geographic and genetic distances between isolates. Isolates from countries in the Mediterranean region where MWMV has recently emerged (France, Spain, Portugal) have highly conserved sequences, suggesting that they may have a common and recent origin. MWMV from Sudan, a highly divergent variant, may be considered an evolutionary intermediate between MWMV and PRSV. PMID:17978887

  10. Genome Sequences of Nine Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Isolates from South America

    PubMed Central

    King, David J.; Howson, Emma L. A.; Madi, Mikidache; Pauszek, Steven J.; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Knowles, Nick J.; Mioulet, Valérie; King, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    We report nine full-genome sequences of vesicular stomatitis virus obtained by Illumina next-generation sequencing of RNA, isolated from either cattle epithelial suspensions or cell culture supernatants. Seven of these viral genomes belonged to the New Jersey serotype/species (clade III), while two isolates belonged to the Indiana serotype/species. PMID:27081129

  11. Complete nucleotide sequence of a maize chlorotic mottle virus isolate from Nebraska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome of a maize chlorotic mottle virus isolate from Nebraska (MCMV-NE) was cloned and sequenced. The MCMV-NE genome consists of 4,436 nucleotides and shares 99.5% nucleotide sequence identity with an MCMV isolate from Kansas (MCMV-KS). Of 22 polymorphic sites, most resulted from t...

  12. Vector competence of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) for West Nile virus isolates from Florida

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Stephanie L.; Anderson, Sheri L.; Lord, Cynthia C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess vector competence (infection, dissemination and transmission) of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus for Florida (FL) West Nile virus (WNV) isolates. METHODS West Nile virus isolates (WN-FL-03: NY99 genotype; WN-FL-05-558, WN-FL-05-2186, WN-FL-05-510: WN02 genotype) collected from different regions of FL were used for vector competence experiments in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus from Alachua County and Indian River County in FL. Mosquitoes from both colonies were fed blood containing 7.9 ± 0.2 log10 plaque-forming units WNV/ml ± SE and incubated at 28 °C for 14 days. Vector competence, including rates of infection, dissemination, and transmission, was compared between colonies for WN-FL-03 using chi-squared. Virus titres in bodies, legs and saliva were compared using ANOVA. Daily measurements of in vitro replication of WNV isolates were evaluated in Vero cells so that a standardised virus dose for each isolate could be delivered to mosquitoes. RESULTS Infection and dissemination rates were high (≥95%) and not affected by isolate or colony (infection, P = 0.679; dissemination, P = 0.799). Transmission rates were low (≤20%), detected in one colony and affected by isolate (P = 0.008). Body and leg titres differed between isolates (body titre, P = 0.031; leg titre, P = 0.044) and colonies (body titre, P = 0.001; leg titre, P = 0.013) while saliva titre did not differ between isolates (P = 0.462). CONCLUSIONS Variation in vector competence of mosquito populations may be attributed, in part, to exposures to WNV with genetic differences leading to different rates of replication in mosquitoes. Evaluation of vector competence for different WNV isolates may help us understand vector–virus interactions and, hence, the role of vectors in complex virus transmission cycles in nature. PMID:24898274

  13. Respiratory transmission of an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from a harbour seal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Ip, Hon S.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Yoon, Sun W.; Johnson, Jordan; Beck, Melinda A.; Webby, Richard J.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing human H7N9 influenza infections highlight the threat of emerging avian influenza viruses. In 2011, an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from moribund New England harbour seals was shown to have naturally acquired mutations known to increase the transmissibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses. To elucidate the potential human health threat, here we evaluate a panel of avian H3N8 viruses and find that the harbour seal virus displays increased affinity for mammalian receptors, transmits via respiratory droplets in ferrets and replicates in human lung cells. Analysis of a panel of human sera for H3N8 neutralizing antibodies suggests that there is no population-wide immunity to these viruses. The prevalence of H3N8 viruses in birds and multiple mammalian species including recent isolations from pigs and evidence that it was a past human pandemic virus make the need for surveillance and risk analysis of these viruses of public health importance.

  14. Antigenic characterization of type C RNA virus isolates of gibbon apes.

    PubMed Central

    Tronick, S R; Stephenson, J R; Aaronson, S A; Kawakami, T G

    1975-01-01

    Type C RNA viruses initially isolated from a lymphosarcoma of a gibbon ape and from a fibrosarcoma of a woolly monkey are very closely related immunologically. However, recent studies have shown that these viruses are distinguishable in a radioimmunoassay for the 12,000-molecular-weight polypeptide (p12) of the woolly monkey virus. In the present report, an immunoassay has been developed for the p12 polypeptide of the gibbon ape type C virus. This assay is shown to further distinguish the woolly monkey and gibbon ape viruses. In type-specific assays for the p12 polypeptides of these viruses, two new type C viruses isolated from gibbons in a second colony, characterized by high incidence of hemopoietic neoplasia, are immunologically distinguishable from the original gibbon ape virus. The p12 type-specific immunoassays described in the present report may be of importance in studying the natural history of these viruses and their relationship to tumors of primates. PMID:46280

  15. Respiratory transmission of an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from a harbour seal

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Ip, Hon S.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Yoon, Sun Woo; Johnson, Jordan; Beck, Melinda A.; Webby, Richard J.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing human H7N9 influenza infections highlight the threat of emerging avian influenza viruses. In 2011, an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from moribund New England harbour seals was shown to have naturally acquired mutations known to increase the transmissibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses. To elucidate the potential human health threat, here we evaluate a panel of avian H3N8 viruses and find that the harbour seal virus displays increased affinity for mammalian receptors, transmits via respiratory droplets in ferrets and replicates in human lung cells. Analysis of a panel of human sera for H3N8 neutralizing antibodies suggests that there is no population-wide immunity to these viruses. The prevalence of H3N8 viruses in birds and multiple mammalian species including recent isolations from pigs and evidence that it was a past human pandemic virus make the need for surveillance and risk analysis of these viruses of public health importance. PMID:25183346

  16. Massilia Virus, A Novel Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae) Isolated from Sandflies in the Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, Grégory; Temmam, Sarah; Izri, Arezki; Marty, Pierre; Parola, Philippe; da Rosa, Amelia Travassos; Tesh, Robert B.; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A new virus was isolated from three independent pools of Phlebotomus perniciosus sandflies (Diptera; Psychodidae) trapped in two regions of southeastern France, located 90 miles apart. Microscopic, antigenic and genetic analyses indicate that this novel virus belongs to the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. The new virus is designated Massilia virus since the first isolate was obtained from sandflies collected in the suburban area of Marseille. The complete genome sequence was determined and used to compare the genetic and phylogenetic relationships of Massilia virus with other phleboviruses. Genetic and antigenic properties were employed to address whether or not Massilia virus should be considered a new species within the genus, or a member of a previously recognized species. Cerebrospinal fluid specimens, collected from local patients with central nervous system infections during the previous four-year period were tested for the presence of Massilia virus RNA, but gave negative results. In conclusion, Massilia virus is proposed as a member of the Sand-fly fever Naples virus complex; its public health importance has yet to be determined. PMID:19055373

  17. How Does Sampling Methodology Influence Molecular Detection and Isolation Success in Influenza A Virus Field Studies?

    PubMed

    Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Avril, Alexis; Tolf, Conny; Olsen, Björn; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Wild waterfowl are important reservoir hosts for influenza A virus (IAV) and a potential source of spillover infections in other hosts, including poultry and swine. The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, such as H5N1 and H5N8, and subsequent spread along migratory flyways prompted the initiation of several programs in Europe, North America, and Africa to monitor circulation of HPAI and low-pathogenicity precursor viruses (low-pathogenicity avian influenza [LPAI] viruses). Given the costs of maintaining such programs, it is essential to establish best practice for field methodologies to provide robust data for epidemiological interpretation. Here, we use long-term surveillance data from a single site to evaluate the influence of a number of parameters on virus detection and isolation of LPAI viruses. A total of 26,586 samples (oropharyngeal, fecal, and cloacal) collected from wild mallards were screened by real-time PCR, and positive samples were subjected to isolation in embryonated chicken eggs. The LPAI virus detection rate was influenced by the sample type: cloacal/fecal samples showed a consistently higher detection rate and lower cycle threshold (Ct) value than oropharyngeal samples. Molecular detection was more sensitive than isolation, and virus isolation success was proportional to the number of RNA copies in the sample. Interestingly, for a given Ct value, the isolation success was lower in samples from adult birds than in those from juveniles. Comparing the results of specific real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCRs and of isolation, it was clear that coinfections were common in the investigated birds. The effects of sample type and detection methods warrant some caution in interpretation of the surveillance data. PMID:26655759

  18. Differentiation of BHV-1 isolates from vaccine virus by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Ostertag-Hill, Claire; Fang, Liang; Izume, Satoko; Lee, Megan; Reed, Aimee; Jin, Ling

    2015-02-16

    An efficacious bovine herpesvirus type-1 (BHV-1) vaccine has been used for many years. However, in the past few years, abortion and respiratory diseases have occurred after administration of the modified live vaccine. To investigate whether BHV-1 isolates from disease outbreaks are identical to those of the vaccines used, selected regions of the BHV-1 genome were investigated by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis and PCR-DNA sequencing. When a target region within the thymidine kinase (TK) gene was examined by HRM analysis, 6 out of the 11 isolates from abortion cases and 22 out of the 25 isolates from bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases had different melting curves compared to the vaccine virus. Surprisingly, when a conserved region within the US6 gene that encodes glycoprotein D (gD) was examined by HRM analysis, 5 out of the 11 abortion isolates and 18 out of the 23 BRD isolates had different melting curves from the vaccine virus. To determine whether SNPs within the coding regions of glycoprotein E (gE) and TK genes can be used to differentiate the isolates from the vaccine virus, PCR-DNA sequencing was used to examine these SNPs in all the isolates. This revealed that only 1 out of 11 of the abortion isolates and 4 out of 24 of the BRD isolates are different in the target region of gE from the vaccine virus, while 5 out of 11 abortion isolates and 4 out of 22 BRD isolates are different in the target region of TK from the vaccine virus. No DNA sequence differences were observed in glycoprotein G (gG) region between disease and vaccine isolates. Our study demonstrated that many disease isolates had genetic differences from the vaccine virus in regions examined by HRM and PCR-DNA sequencing analysis. In addition, many isolates contained more than one type of mutation and were composed of mixed variants. Our study suggests that a mixture of variants were present in isolates collected post-vaccination. HRM is a rapid diagnostic method that can be used for rapid differentiation of clinical isolates from vaccine strains. PMID:25556125

  19. [Molecular-genetic analysis of the field isolates of avian leucosis viruses in the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, V A; Grebennikova, T V; Iuzhakov, A G; Dudnikova, E K; Norkina, S N; Zaberezhnyĭ, A D; Aliper, T I; Fadly, A M

    2012-01-01

    Results of monitoring of different subtypes of avian leukosis virus (ALV) from commercial poultry farms in 14 regions of Russian Federation were discussed. Only three regions were found to be negative. ALV was detected in other 11 regions in 46-64% cases (for different regions). The phylogenetic analysis of the genomes for the 12 field isolates of ALV was carried out in different regions of Russian Federation. The isolates belong to different subtypes of the virus and form two large groups. The genomic differences between Russian and foreign isolates within each group range from 5% to 10%. PMID:23248858

  20. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies recognize antigenic variants among isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.; Arakawa, C.N.; Lannan, C.N.; Fryer, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    eutralizing monoclonal antibodies were developed against strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from steelhead trout Salmo gairdneri in the Deschutes River of Oregon, chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Sacramento River of California, and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri reared in the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, USA. These antibodies were tested for neutralization of 12 IHNV isolates obtained from salmonids in Japan, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho. The antibodies recognized antigenic variants among the isolates and could be used to separate the viruses into 4 groups. The members of each group tended to be related by geographic area rather than by source host species, virulence, or date of isolation.

  1. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of a Dengue-1 virus isolated on Easter Island, Chile.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, C; Yung, V; Araya, P; Tognarelli, J; Villagra, E; Vera, L; Fernández, J

    2008-01-01

    Dengue-1 viruses responsible for the dengue fever outbreak in Easter Island in 2002 were isolated from acute-phase sera of dengue fever patients. In order to analyze the complete genome sequence, we designed primers to amplify contiguous segments across the entire sequence of the viral genome. RT-PCR products obtained were cloned, and complete nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were determined. This report constitutes the first complete genetic characterization of a DENV-1 isolate from Chile. Phylogenetic analysis shows that an Easter Island isolate is most closely related to Pacific DENV-1 genotype IV viruses. PMID:18815724

  2. Punique virus, a novel phlebovirus, related to sandfly fever Naples virus, isolated from sandflies collected in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Zhioua, Elyes; Moureau, Grégory; Chelbi, Ifhem; Ninove, Laetitia; Bichaud, Laurence; Derbali, Mohamed; Champs, Mylène; Cherni, Saifeddine; Salez, Nicolas; Cook, Shelley; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Charrel, Remi N.

    2012-01-01

    Sandflies are widely distributed around the Mediterranean Basin. Therefore, human populations in this area are potentially exposed to sandfly-transmitted diseases, including those caused by phleboviruses. Whilst there are substantial data in countries located in the northern part of the Mediterranean basin, few data are available for North Africa. In this study, a total of 1489 sandflies were collected in 2008 in Tunisia from two sites, bioclimatically distinct, located 235 km apart, and identified morphologically. Sandfly species comprised Phlebotomus perniciosus (52.2 %), Phlebotomus longicuspis (30.1 %), Phlebotomus papatasi (12 .0%), Phlebotomus perfiliewi (4.6 %), Phlebotomus langeroni (0.4 %) and Sergentomyia minuta (0.5 %). PCR screening, using generic primers for the genus Phlebovirus, resulted in the detection of ten positive pools. Sequence analysis revealed that two pools contained viral RNA corresponding to a novel virus closely related to sandfly fever Naples virus. Virus isolation in Vero cells was achieved from one pool. Genetic and phylogenetic characterization based on sequences in the three genomic segments showed that it was a novel virus distinct from other recognized members of the species. This novel virus was provisionally named Punique virus. Viral sequences in the polymerase gene corresponding to another phlebovirus closely related to but distinct from sandfly fever Sicilian virus were obtained from the eight remaining positive pools. PMID:20089800

  3. Variability in the coat protein gene of Papaya ringspot virus isolates from multiple locations in India.

    PubMed

    Jain, R K; Sharma, J; Sivakumar, A S; Sharma, P K; Byadgi, A S; Verma, A K; Varma, A

    2004-12-01

    The coat protein (CP) sequences of eleven Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) isolates originating from different locations in India were determined, analysed and compared with the sequences of other isolates of PRSV. The virus isolates from India exhibited considerable heterogeneity in the CP sequences. The CP-coding region varied in size from 840-858 nucleotides, encoding protein of 280-286 amino acids. Comparative sequence analysis revealed that the PRSV isolates originating from India were divergent up to 11%. Though the PRSV isolates were differentiated in to two clusters, yet the sequence variation could not be correlated with the geographical origin of the isolates. Implication of the sequence variation in the coat protein derived transgenic resistance in papaya is discussed. PMID:15338325

  4. Isolation of the Thogoto virus from a Haemaphysalis longicornis in Kyoto City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Kentaro; Okamoto, Natsumi; Nakao, Ryo; Klaus Hofstetter, Robert; Yabu, Tomoko; Masumoto, Hiroki; Someya, Azusa; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Maeda, Akihiko

    2015-08-01

    Ticks transmit viruses responsible for severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, some of which have a significant impact on public health. In Japan, little is known about the distribution of tick-borne viruses. In this study, we collected and tested ticks to investigate the distribution of tick-borne arboviruses in Kyoto, Japan, and isolated the first Thogoto virus (THOV) to our knowledge from Haemaphysalis longicornis in far-eastern Asia. The Japanese isolate was genetically distinct from a cluster of other isolates from Africa, Europe and the Middle East. Various cell lines derived from mammals and ticks were susceptible to the isolate, but it was not pathogenic in mice. These results advance understanding of the distribution and ecology of THOV. PMID:25957096

  5. Characterization of West Nile Viruses Isolated from Captive American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) in Medellin, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Ciuoderis, Karl A.; Lopera, Juan G.; Piedrahita, Leidy D.; Murphy, Darby; LeVasseur, James; Carrillo, Lina; Ocampo, Martha C.; Hofmeister, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Serum samples from a total of 71 healthy captive birds belonging to 18 species were collected in July of 2008 in Medellin (Colombia) and tested for flaviviruses. Eighteen of 29 samples from American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) were positive for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Selected positive samples were serially passaged and WNV was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Two isolates (524/08, 9835/08) were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analysis revealed WNV with 16 nucleotide substitutions resulting in six amino acid changes when compared with the NY99 strain. Colombian (COL) viruses were more closely related to Louisiana isolates from 2001. When compared with attenuated strains isolated from Texas, COL isolates differed in their plaque size and temperature sensitivity phenotype. The COL viruses were pathogenic in embryonated chicken eggs and Balb/c mice. PMID:22802436

  6. Characterization of West Nile viruses isolated form captive American flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) in Medellin, Colombia.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Ciuoderis, Karl A.; Lopera, Juan G.; Piedrahita, Leidy D.; Murphy, Darby; LeVasseur, James; Carrillo, Lina; Ocampo, Martha C.; Hofmeister, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Serum samples from a total of 71 healthy captive birds belonging to 18 species were collected in July of 2008 in Medellin (Colombia) and tested for flaviviruses. Eighteen of 29 samples from American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) were positive for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Selected positive samples were serially passaged and WNV was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Two isolates (524/08, 9835/08) were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analysis revealed WNV with 16 nucleotide substitutions resulting in six amino acid changes when compared with the NY99 strain. Colombian (COL) viruses were more closely related to Louisiana isolates from 2001. When compared with attenuated strains isolated from Texas, COL isolates differed in their plaque size and temperature sensitivity phenotype. The COL viruses were pathogenic in embryonated chicken eggs and Balb/c mice.

  7. Characterization of West Nile viruses isolated from captive American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) in Medellin, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Jorge E; Ciuoderis, Karl A; Lopera, Juan G; Piedrahita, Leidy D; Murphy, Darby; Levasseur, James; Carrillo, Lina; Ocampo, Martha C; Hofmeister, Erik

    2012-09-01

    Serum samples from a total of 71 healthy captive birds belonging to 18 species were collected in July of 2008 in Medellin (Colombia) and tested for flaviviruses. Eighteen of 29 samples from American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) were positive for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Selected positive samples were serially passaged and WNV was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Two isolates (524/08, 9835/08) were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analysis revealed WNV with 16 nucleotide substitutions resulting in six amino acid changes when compared with the NY99 strain. Colombian (COL) viruses were more closely related to Louisiana isolates from 2001. When compared with attenuated strains isolated from Texas, COL isolates differed in their plaque size and temperature sensitivity phenotype. The COL viruses were pathogenic in embryonated chicken eggs and Balb/c mice. PMID:22802436

  8. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Clinical Isolates of Dengue Virus Serotype 1 from South Korean Travelers.

    PubMed

    Go, Yun Young; Jung, Eunhye; Jeong, Young Eui; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report the complete genome sequences of three clinical isolates of dengue virus serotype 1 isolated from South Korean travelers returning from different countries in Southeast Asia. The nucleotide sequence identities ranged from 91.5 to 92.2%, while the amino acid sequence identities ranged from 97.5 to 97.9% among the three clinical isolates. PMID:26607895

  9. Genetic characterization of dengue virus type 1 isolated in Brunei in 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Osman, Osmali; Fong, Mun Yik; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2009-03-01

    The full-length genomes of two DENV-1 viruses isolated during the 2005-2006 dengue incidents in Brunei were sequenced. Twenty five primer sets were designed to amplify contiguous overlapping fragments of approximately 500-600 base pairs spanning the entire sequence of the genome. The amplified PCR products were sent to a commercial laboratory for sequencing and the nucleotides and the deduced amino acids were determined. Sequence analysis of the envelope gene at the nucleotide and amino acid levels between the two isolates showed 92 and 96 % identity, respectively. Comparison of the envelope gene sequences with 68 other DENV-1 viruses of known genotypes placed the two isolates into two different genotypic groups. Isolate DS06/210505 belongs to genotype V together with some of the recent isolates from India (2003) and older isolates from Singapore (1990) and Burma (1976), while isolate DS212/110306 was clustered in genotype IV with the prototype Nauru strain (1974) and with some of the recent isolates from Indonesia (2004) and the Philippines (2002, 2001). In the full-length genome analysis at the nucleotide level, isolate DS06/210505 showed 94 % identity to the French Guyana strain (1989) in genotype V while isolate DS212/110306 had 96 % identity to the Nauru Island strain (1974) in genotype IV. This work constitutes the first complete genetic characterization of not only Brunei DENV-1 virus isolates, but also the first strain from Borneo Island. This study was the first to report the isolation of dengue virus in the country. PMID:19218214

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Clinical Isolates of Dengue Virus Serotype 1 from South Korean Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eunhye; Jeong, Young Eui; Balasuriya, Udeni B. R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report the complete genome sequences of three clinical isolates of dengue virus serotype 1 isolated from South Korean travelers returning from different countries in Southeast Asia. The nucleotide sequence identities ranged from 91.5 to 92.2%, while the amino acid sequence identities ranged from 97.5 to 97.9% among the three clinical isolates. PMID:26607895

  11. Genetic polymorphism of natural Epstein-Barr virus isolates from infectious mononucleosis patients and healthy carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Lung, M L; Chang, R S; Jones, J H

    1988-01-01

    We analyzed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomes from lymphoblastoid cell lines isolated from patients with infectious mononucleosis and from healthy subjects from California, Hawaii, and Hong Kong between 1970 and 1987. Using genetic polymorphism as epidemiological markers, we found that several genotypes of EBV cocirculate in a community and that although most EBV strains isolated from California and Southern China may be differentiated genotypically, there was no specific association between genotype and disease or time of isolation. Images PMID:2901499

  12. Amantadine resistance among highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) isolated from India.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Aron; Sood, Richa; Chanu, Kh Victoria; Bhatia, Sandeep; Khandia, Rekha; Pateriya, A K; Nagarajan, S; Dimri, U; Kulkarni, D D

    2016-02-01

    Emergence of antiviral resistance among H5N1 avian influenza viruses is the major challenge in the control of pandemic influenza. Matrix 2 (M2) inhibitors (amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir) are the two classes of antiviral agents that are specifically active against influenza viruses and are used for both treatment and prophylaxis of influenza infections. Amantadine targets the M2 ion channel of influenza A virus and interrupts virus life cycle through blockade of hydrogen ion influx. This prevents uncoating of the virus in infected host cells which impedes the release of ribonucleoprotein required for transcription and replication of virion in the nucleus. The present study was carried out to review the status of amantadine resistance in H5N1 viruses isolated from India and to study their replicative capability. Results of the study revealed resistance to amantadine in antiviral assay among four H5N1 viruses out of which two viruses had Serine 31 Asparagine (AGT-AAT i.e., S31N) mutation and two had Valine 27 Alanine (GTT-GCT i.e., V27A) mutation. The four resistant viruses not only exhibited significant difference in effective concentration 50% (EC50) values of amantadine hydrochloride from that of susceptible viruses (P < 0.0001) but also showed significant difference between two different types (S31N and V27A) of mutant viruses (P < 0.05). Resistance to amantadine could also be demonstrated in a simple HA test after replication of the viruses in MDCK cells in presence of amantadine. The study identifies the correlation between in vitro antiviral assay and presence of established molecular markers of resistance, the retention of replicative capacity in the presence of amantadine hydrochloride by the resistant viruses and the emergence of resistant mutations against amantadine among avian influenza viruses (H5N1) without selective drug pressure. PMID:26639679

  13. Genetic heterogeneity among isolates of Ross River virus from different geographical regions.

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, M D; Coelen, R J; Mackenzie, J S

    1993-01-01

    The RNase T1 maps of 80 isolates of Ross River virus from different regions of mainland Australia and the Pacific Islands were compared. Four different clusters of isolates with greater than an estimated 5 to 6% diversity at the nucleotide level were found. There was a pattern of differences between eastern and western Australian strains; however, the pattern was disturbed by overlaps and incursants. Pacific Islands isolates belonged to the eastern Australian topotype. Our findings suggest that certain genetic types of Ross River virus predominate in different geographical regions. In contrast, populations of other important Australian arboviruses (Murray Valley encephalitis, Kunjin, and Sindbis viruses) are distributed across the Australian continent as minor variants of one strain. Our data also show that in one region, strains of Ross River virus with identical RNase T1 maps circulate during both years when epidemics occur and years when they do not. This finding suggests that Ross River virus epidemics are not dependent on the introduction or evolution of new strains of the virus. Two strains, belonging to the eastern Australian topotype, were isolated in Western Australia. It is likely that viremic humans or possibly domestic livestock travelling by aircraft were responsible for this movement. Images PMID:8497065

  14. Characterization of Influenza A (H7N9) Viruses Isolated from Human Cases Imported into Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Huang, Yi-Lung; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Su, Yu-Ting; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    A novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus causes severe human infections and was first identified in March 2013 in China. The H7N9 virus has exhibited two epidemiological peaks of infection, occurring in week 15 of 2013 and week 5 of 2014. Taiwan, which is geographically adjacent to China, faces a large risk of being affected by this virus. Through extensive surveillance, launched in April 2013, four laboratory-confirmed H7N9 cases imported from China have been identified in Taiwan. The H7N9 virus isolated from imported case 1 in May 2013 (during the first wave) was found to be closest genetically to a virus from wild birds and differed from the prototype virus, A/Anhui/1/2013, in the MP gene. The other three imported cases were detected in December 2013 and April 2014 (during the second wave). The viruses isolated from cases 2 and 4 were similar in the compositions of their 6 internal genes and distinct from A/Anhui/1/2013 in the PB2 and MP genes, whereas the virus isolated from case 3 exhibited a novel reassortment that has not been identified previously and was different from A/Anhui/1/2013 in the PB2, PA and MP genes. The four imported H7N9 viruses share similar antigenicity with A/Anhui/1/2013, and their HA and NA genes grouped together in their respective phylogenies. In contrast with the HA and NA genes, which exhibited a smaller degree of diversity, the internal genes were heterogeneous and provided potential distinctions between transmission sources in terms of both geography and hosts. It is important to strengthen surveillance of influenza and to share viral genetic data in real-time for reducing the threat of rapid and continuing evolution of H7N9 viruses. PMID:25748033

  15. Characterization of influenza A (H7N9) viruses isolated from human cases imported into Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Huang, Yi-Lung; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Su, Yu-Ting; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    A novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus causes severe human infections and was first identified in March 2013 in China. The H7N9 virus has exhibited two epidemiological peaks of infection, occurring in week 15 of 2013 and week 5 of 2014. Taiwan, which is geographically adjacent to China, faces a large risk of being affected by this virus. Through extensive surveillance, launched in April 2013, four laboratory-confirmed H7N9 cases imported from China have been identified in Taiwan. The H7N9 virus isolated from imported case 1 in May 2013 (during the first wave) was found to be closest genetically to a virus from wild birds and differed from the prototype virus, A/Anhui/1/2013, in the MP gene. The other three imported cases were detected in December 2013 and April 2014 (during the second wave). The viruses isolated from cases 2 and 4 were similar in the compositions of their 6 internal genes and distinct from A/Anhui/1/2013 in the PB2 and MP genes, whereas the virus isolated from case 3 exhibited a novel reassortment that has not been identified previously and was different from A/Anhui/1/2013 in the PB2, PA and MP genes. The four imported H7N9 viruses share similar antigenicity with A/Anhui/1/2013, and their HA and NA genes grouped together in their respective phylogenies. In contrast with the HA and NA genes, which exhibited a smaller degree of diversity, the internal genes were heterogeneous and provided potential distinctions between transmission sources in terms of both geography and hosts. It is important to strengthen surveillance of influenza and to share viral genetic data in real-time for reducing the threat of rapid and continuing evolution of H7N9 viruses. PMID:25748033

  16. Comparison of monoclonal antibody-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus isolation for detection of peste des petits ruminants virus in goat tissues and secretions.

    PubMed Central

    Saliki, J T; House, J A; Mebus, C A; Dubovi, E J

    1994-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (S-ELISA) was developed for specific detection of peste des petits ruminants virus. Compared with virus isolation in Vero cell cultures using 89 paired tissue and secretion samples from six experimentally infected goats, S-ELISA was significantly more sensitive (71.9% versus 65.2%; P < 0.05). The S-ELISA is a suitable alternative to virus isolation. PMID:8051266

  17. Existence of variant strains Fowlpox virus integrated with Reticuloendotheliosis virus in its genome in field isolates in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mzula, Alexanda; Masola, Selemani N; Kasanga, Christopher J; Wambura, Philemon N

    2014-06-01

    Fowlpox virus (FPV) is one example of poultry viruses which undergoes recombination with Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV). Trepidation had been raised, and it was well established on augmented pathogenicity of the FPV upon integration of the full intact REV. In this study, we therefore intended at assessing the integration of REV into FPV genome of the field isolates obtained in samples collected from different regions of Tanzania. DNA extraction of 85 samples (scabs) was performed, and FPV-specific PCR was done by the amplification of the highly conserved P4b gene. Evaluation of FPV-REV recombination was done to FPV-specific PCR positively identified samples by amplifying the env gene and REV long terminal repeats (5' LTR). A 578-bp PCR product was amplified from 43 samples. We are reporting for the first time in Tanzania the existence of variant stains of FPV integrated with REV in its genome as 65 % of FPV identified isolates were having full intact REV integration, 21 % had partial FPV-REV env gene integration and 5 % had partial 5' LTR integration. Despite of the fact that FPV-REV integrated stains prevailed, FPV-REV-free isolates (9 %) also existed. In view of the fact that full intact REV integration is connected with increased pathogenicity of FPV, its existence in the FPV genome of most field isolates could have played a role in increased endemic, sporadic and recurring outbreaks in selected areas in Tanzania. PMID:24557589

  18. Isolation of a genotypically unique H5N1 influenza virus from duck meat imported into Japan from China.

    PubMed

    Mase, Masaji; Eto, Mariko; Tanimura, Nobuhiko; Imai, Kunitoshi; Tsukamoto, Kenji; Horimoto, Taisuke; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Shigeo

    2005-08-15

    An H5N1 influenza A virus was isolated from duck meat processed for human consumption, imported to Japan from Shandong Province, China in 2003. This virus was antigenically different from other H5 viruses, including the Hong Kong H5N1 viruses isolated from humans in 1997 and 2003. Sequence analysis revealed that six genes (PB1, PA, HA, NA, M, and NS) of this virus showed >97% nucleotide identity with their counterparts from recent H5N1 viruses, but that the remaining two genes (PB2 and NP) were derived from other unknown viruses. This duck meat isolate was highly pathogenic to chickens upon intravenous or intranasal inoculation, replicated well in the lungs of mice and spread to the brain, but was not as pathogenic in mice as H5N1 human isolates (with a dose lethal to 50% of mice (MLD50)=5x10(6) 50% egg infectious doses [EID50]). However, viruses isolated from the brain of mice previously infected with the virus were substantially more pathogenic (MLD50=approximately 10(2) EID50) and possessed some amino acid substitutions relative to the original virus. These results show that poultry products contaminated with influenza viruses of high pathogenic potential to mammals are a threat to public health even in countries where the virus is not enzootic and represent a possible source of influenza outbreaks in poultry. PMID:15964604

  19. Inhangapi Virus: Genome Sequencing of a Brazilian Ungrouped Rhabdovirus Isolated in the Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Wanzeller, Ana Lucia M; Nunes, Márcio R T; Tavares, Fernando N; Pinto, Walber V M; Júnior, Edivaldo C; de Lima, Clayton P S; de Oliveira, Layanna F; Júnior, João Lídio S G V; Cardoso, Jedson F; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2016-01-01

    We report here nearly complete genome sequence of Inhangapi virus (INHV) strain BEAR177325, which was isolated from a pool of sandflies (Lutzomyia flaviscutellata) in the Utinga neighborhood, Belém (01º28´S 48°27'W), State of Pará, Brazil, in 1969. The genome of this virus showed similarity with members belonging to the family Rhabdoviridae. PMID:26798091

  20. Inhangapi Virus: Genome Sequencing of a Brazilian Ungrouped Rhabdovirus Isolated in the Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Fernando N.; Pinto, Walber V. M.; Júnior, Edivaldo C.; de Lima, Clayton P. S.; de Oliveira, Layanna F.; Júnior, João Lídio S. G. V.; Cardoso, Jedson F.; Vasconcelos, Pedro F. C.

    2016-01-01

    We report here nearly complete genome sequence of Inhangapi virus (INHV) strain BEAR177325, which was isolated from a pool of sandflies (Lutzomyia flaviscutellata) in the Utinga neighborhood, Belém (01º28´S 48°27′W), State of Pará, Brazil, in 1969. The genome of this virus showed similarity with members belonging to the family Rhabdoviridae. PMID:26798091

  1. Isolation and characterization of a Korean porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strain KNU-141112.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunhee; Kim, Youngnam; Lee, Changhee

    2015-10-01

    Severe outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) have re-emerged in Korea and rapidly swept across the country, causing tremendous economic losses to producers and customers. Despite the availability of PEDV vaccines in the domestic market, the disease continues to plague the Korean pork industry, raising issues regarding their protective efficacy and new vaccine development. Therefore, PEDV isolation in cell culture is urgently needed to develop efficacious vaccines and diagnostic assays and to conduct further studies on the virus biology. In the present study, one Korean PEDV strain, KOR/KNU-141112/2014, was successfully isolated and serially propagated in Vero cells for over 30 passages. The in vitro and in vivo characteristics of the Korean PEDV isolate were investigated. Virus production in cell culture was confirmed by cytopathology, immunofluorescence, and real-time RT-PCR. The infectious virus titers of the viruses during the first 30 passages ranged from 10(5.1) to 10(8.2) TCID50 per ml. The inactivated KNU-141112 virus was found to mediate potent neutralizing antibody responses in immunized guinea pigs. Animal studies showed that KNU-141112 virus causes severe diarrhea and vomiting, fecal shedding, and acute atrophic enteritis, indicating that strain KNU-141112 is highly enteropathogenic in the natural host. In addition, the entire genomes or complete S genes of KNU-141112 viruses at selected cell culture passages were sequenced to assess the genetic stability and relatedness. Our genomic analyses indicated that the Korean isolate KNU-141112 is genetically stable during the first 30 passages in cell culture and is grouped within subgroup G2b together with the recent re-emergent Korean strains. PMID:26196056

  2. Genome Sequence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype O Isolated from Morocco in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, J.; Gray, A.; Abouchoaib, N.; King, D. P.; Knowles, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    The genome of a virus isolated from an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Morocco in 2015 is described here. This virus is classified as lineage Ind-2001d within serotype O, topotype ME-SA (Middle East-South Asia). This lineage is endemic on the Indian subcontinent but has caused outbreaks in the Middle East and North Africa since 2013. PMID:27103736

  3. Genome Sequence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype O Isolated from Morocco in 2015.

    PubMed

    Bachanek-Bankowska, K; Wadsworth, J; Gray, A; Abouchoaib, N; King, D P; Knowles, N J

    2016-01-01

    The genome of a virus isolated from an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Morocco in 2015 is described here. This virus is classified as lineage Ind-2001d within serotype O, topotype ME-SA (Middle East-South Asia). This lineage is endemic on the Indian subcontinent but has caused outbreaks in the Middle East and North Africa since 2013. PMID:27103736

  4. Analysis of new aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV) isolates suggests evolution of two ALPV species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sijun; Vijayendran, Diveena; Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Miller, W Allen; Bonning, Bryony C

    2014-12-01

    Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV; family Dicistroviridae) was first isolated from the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi. ALPV-like virus sequences have been reported from many insects and insect predators. We identified a new isolate of ALPV (ALPV-AP) from the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and a new isolate (ALPV-DvV) from western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. ALPV-AP has an ssRNA genome of 9940 nt. Based on phylogenetic analysis, ALPV-AP was closely related to ALPV-AM, an ALPV isolate from honeybees, Apis mellifera, in Spain and Brookings, SD, USA. The distinct evolutionary branches suggested the existence of two lineages of the ALPV virus. One consisted of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM, whilst all other isolates of ALPV grouped into the other lineage. The similarity of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was up to 88 % at the RNA level, compared with 78-79 % between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. The sequence identity of proteins between ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was 98-99 % for both ORF1 and ORF2, whilst only 85-87 % for ORF1 and 91-92 % for ORF2 between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. Sequencing of RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) products and cDNA clones of the virus genome revealed sequence variation in the 5' UTRs and in ORF1, indicating that ALPV may be under strong selection pressure, which could have important biological implications for ALPV host range and infectivity. Our results indicated that ALPV-like viruses infect insects in the order Coleoptera, in addition to the orders Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, and we propose that ALPV isolates be classified as two separate viral species. PMID:25170050

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of dengue virus types 1 and 3 isolated in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988.

    PubMed

    Sjatha, Fithriyah; Takizawa, Yamato; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Konishi, Eiji

    2012-12-01

    Dengue viruses are mosquito-borne viruses that cause dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, both of which are globally important diseases. These viruses have evolved in a transmission cycle between human hosts and mosquito vectors in various tropical and subtropical environments. We previously isolated three strains of dengue type 1 virus (DENV1) and 14 strains of dengue type 3 virus (DENV3) during an outbreak of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988. Here, we compared the nucleotide sequences of the entire envelope protein-coding region among these strains. The isolates were 97.6-100% identical for DENV1 and 98.8-100% identical for DENV3. All DENV1 isolates were included in two different clades of genotype IV and all DENV3 isolates were included in a single clade of genotype I. For DENV1, three Yap Island strains isolated in 2004 were the only strains closely related to the present isolates; the recently circulated Indonesian strains were in different clades. Molecular clock analyses estimated that ancestors of the genotype IV strains of DENV1 have been indigenous in Indonesia since 1948. We predict that they diverged frequently around 1967 and that their offspring distributed to Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific, and Africa. For DENV3, the clade containing all the present isolates also contained strains isolated from other Indonesian regions and other countries including Malaysia, Singapore, China, and East Timor from 1985-2010. Molecular clock analyses estimated that the common ancestor of the genotype I strains of DENV3 emerged in Indonesia around 1967 and diverged frequently until 1980, and that their offspring distributed mainly in Southeast Asia. The first dengue outbreak in 1968 and subsequent outbreaks in Indonesia might have influenced the divergence and distribution of the DENV1 genotype IV strains and the DENV3 genotype I strains in many countries. PMID:22959957

  6. New Genotype of Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses Isolated from Tree Sparrows in China

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Z.; Lei, F. M.; Yu, J.; Fan, Z. J.; Yin, Z. H.; Jia, C. X.; Xiong, K. J.; Sun, Y. H.; Zhang, X. W.; Wu, X. M.; Gao, X. B.; Li, T. X.

    2005-01-01

    The 2004 outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 disease in China led to a great poultry loss and society attention. A survey of avian influenza viruses was conducted on tree sparrows (Passer montanus) collected in China in 2004. Four viruses were isolated from free-living tree sparrows. The results of the whole-genome analysis indicated that an H5N1 virus with a new genotype is circulating among tree sparrows. The hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of the new genotype were derived from Gs/Gd/96-like viruses and the nuclear protein gene descended from the 2001 genotype A H5N1 viruses, while the other inner genes originated from an unknown influenza virus. In experimental infection, all four viruses were highly pathogenic to chickens but not pathogenic to ducks or mice. The four tree sparrow viruses were different from the 2003 tree sparrow strain (genotype Z) in Hong Kong. The results suggested that H5N1 viruses might be distributed widely in tree sparrows. PMID:16306617

  7. Opium poppy mosaic virus, a new umbravirus isolated from Papaver somniferum in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joe; Lebas, Bénédicte; Liefting, Lia; Veerakone, Stella; Wei, Ting; Ward, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A novel virus, tentatively named "opium poppy mosaic virus" (OPMV), was isolated from Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) with leaf mosaic and mottling symptoms in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2006. The virus was mechanically transmitted to herbaceous plants of several species, in which it induced local and/or systemic symptoms. No virus particles were observed by electron microscopy in the diseased P. somniferum or any of the symptomatic herbaceous plants. The complete genomic sequence of 4230 nucleotides contains four open reading frames (ORF) and is most closely related (59.3 %) to tobacco bushy top virus, a member of the genus Umbravirus. These data suggest that OPMV is a new umbravirus. PMID:26514844

  8. Isolation and Complete Genome Sequencing of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 12 from India.

    PubMed

    Rao, P P; Reddy, Y V; Hegde, N R

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes disease mainly in sheep, but can be transmitted via other domestic and wild ruminants, resulting in pecuniary burden and trade restrictions. Segmented genome with the possibility of reassortment, existence of 26 serotypes, geographical restriction in the distribution of many of the serotypes, use of live attenuated vaccines and the lack of complete sequences of viruses isolated from several parts of the globe have complicated our understanding of the origin, movement and distribution of BTV. Recent efforts in genome sequencing of several strains have helped in better comprehending BTV epidemiology. In an effort to contribute to the genetic epidemiology of BTV in India, we report the isolation and complete genome sequencing of a BTV serotype 12 virus (designated NMO1). This is the first BTV-12 isolated from India and the second BTV-12 to be sequenced worldwide. The analysis of sequences of this virus suggests that NMO1 derived its segments from viruses belonging to western topotype viruses, as well as those from South-East Asia and India. The results have implications for understanding the origin, emergence/re-emergence and movement of BTV as well as for the development of vaccines and diagnostics based on robust epidemiological data. PMID:24330644

  9. Resistance breaking tomato spotted wilt virus isolates on resistant pepper varieties in Italy.

    PubMed

    Crescenzi, A; Viggiano, A; Fanigliulo, A

    2013-01-01

    In spring 2012, resistance breaking (RB) isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) that overcome the resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in different pepper hybrids have been recovered in different locations in southern Italy (Campania and Apulia regions) in protected cultivation, about one month after transplant. The percentage of symptomatic plants was 5-10% and, only in particular cases of advanced stage of cultivation, it reached 30-50% at the end of cycle. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in all resistant infected pepper hybrids: yellowing or browning of apical leaves, which later become necrotic, long necrotic streakson stems, extending to the terminal shoots, complete necrosis of younger fruits and large necrotic streaks and spots on fruits formed after infection. On ripe fruits, yellow spots with concentric rings or necrotic streaks could be observed. Leaf extracts of these samples were tested in ELISA for the detection of TSWV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), Potato virus Y (PVY), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and Pepper Mottle Virus (PepMoV). Only TSWV was detected in all the field samples tested. The correspondent virus isolates were inoculated mechanically and by Frankliniella occidentalis on to a set of different pepper and tomato hybrids, as well as on some herbaceous test plants, in order to investigate for their ability to overcome the resistance genes Tsw and Sw5, respectively. Tomato hybrids carrying the Sw5 gene were uninfected by all RB isolates, whereas all resistant pepper hybrids became systemically infected. RB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when they were tested with the thrips F. occidentalis. Obtained results demonstrate that evolved strains of TSWV have emerged, that they are able to overcome the Tsw resistance gene in pepper plants experimentally inoculated both by mechanical infection and by the vector F. accidentalis. Moreover, evolved strains, here indicated as TSWV-RB-PI (Pepper, Italy), are not able to infect tomato plants carrying the Sw5 gene, confirming that distinct viral gene products control the outcome of infection in plants carrying Sw5 and Tsw. The simultaneous presence of evolved TSWV strains, showing the same biological characteristics (such as host range and symptomatology on different hosts) in two geographic areas of southern Italy, very far each other, let us hypothesize a unique focus of infection. Only subsequently, infected plants, through trade of plant material, have been diffused in locations so far apart. Further molecular studies are underway to assess the possible correlation between the different isolates in different geographical areas. PMID:25151838

  10. Complete nucleotide sequence of a Japanese isolate of Chrysanthemum virus B (genus Carlavirus).

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, A; Yamada, M; Sayama, H; Sugiyama, N; Okuda, S; Natsuaki, T

    2007-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a Chrysanthemum virus B isolate from Japan (CVB-S) has been determined. The genomic RNA of CVB-S is 8,990 nucleotides long, excluding the poly(A) tail and, like that of other carlaviruses, contains six open reading frames (ORFs). Multiple alignment and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the phylogenetic relationship among members of the genus Carlavirus is very diverse, with phlox virus S being the closest relative of CVB. In aphid transmission tests, CVB-S was transmitted at a very low rate by Aphis gossypii, a new vector of the virus. PMID:17726637

  11. Isolation of a protein kinase induced by herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, W.T.; Stobbs, D.G.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have isolated a new cyclic AMP-independent protein kinase activity induced in HeLa cells by infection with herpes simplex virus type 1. Induction of the enzyme does not occur in cells treated with cycloheximide at the time of infection, or in cells infected with UV-inactivated herpes simplex virus type 1. The amount of enzyme induced in infected cells is dependent upon the multiplicity of infection. An enzyme with identical properties to the appearing in infected HeLa cells is also induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 in BHK cells.

  12. Sequence analysis and genetic diversity of five new Indian isolates of cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Gautam, K K; Raj, S K

    2015-12-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is an important virus since it causes severe losses to many economically important crops worldwide. Five new isolates of CMV were isolated from naturally infected Hippeastrum hybridum, Dahlia pinnata, Hemerocallis fulva, Acorus calamus and Typhonium trilobatum plants, all exhibiting severe leaf mosaic symptoms. For molecular identification and sequence analyses, the complete coat protein (CP) gene of these isolates was amplified by RT-PCR. The resulting amplicons were cloned and sequenced and isolates were designated as HH (KP698590), DP (JF682239), HF (KP698589), AC (KP698588) and TT (JX570732). For study of genetic diversity among these isolates, the sequence data were analysed by BLASTn, multiple alignment and generating phylogenetic trees along with the respective sequences of other CMV isolates available in GenBank Database were done. The isolates under study showed 82-99% sequence diversity among them at nucleotide and amino acid levels; however they showed close relationships with CMV isolates of subgroup IB. In alignment analysis of amino acid sequences of HH and AC isolates, we have found fifteen and twelve unique substitutions, compared to HF, DP and TT isolates, suggesting the cause of high genetic diversity. PMID:26666188

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Influenza C Viruses in the Philippines and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Odagiri, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Okamoto, Michiko; Suzuki, Akira; Saito, Mariko; Tamaki, Raita; Lupisan, Socorro P.; Sombrero, Lydia T.; Hongo, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    From November 2009 to December 2013 in the Philippines, 15 influenza C viruses were isolated, using MDCK cells, from specimens obtained from children with severe pneumonia and influenza-like illness (ILI). This is the first report of influenza C virus isolation in the Philippines. In addition, from January 2008 to December 2013, 7 influenza C viruses were isolated from specimens that were obtained from children with acute respiratory illness (ARI) in Sendai city, Japan. Antigenic analysis with monoclonal antibodies to the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) glycoprotein showed that 19 strains (12 from the Philippines and 7 from Japan) were similar to the influenza C virus reference strain C/Sao Paulo/378/82 (SP82). Phylogenetic analysis of the HE gene showed that the strains from the Philippines and Japan formed distinct clusters within an SP82-related lineage. The clusters that included the Philippine and Japanese strains were shown to have diverged from a common ancestor around 1993. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of the internal genes showed that all strains isolated in the Philippines and Japan had emerged through reassortment events. The composition of the internal genes of the Philippine strains was different from that of the Japanese strains, although all strains were classified into an SP82-related lineage by HE gene sequence analysis. These observations suggest that the influenza C viruses analyzed here had emerged through different reassortment events; however, the time and place at which the reassortment events occurred were not determined. PMID:25552361

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of surface proteins of novel H1N1 virus isolated from 2009 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Danishuddin, Mohd; Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2009-01-01

    Swine Influenza Virus (H1N1) is a known causative agent of swine flu. Transmission of Swine Influenza Virus form pig to human is not a common event and may not always cause human influenza. The 2009 outbreak by subtype H1N1 in humans is due to transfer of Swine Influenza Virus from pig to human. Thus to analyze the origin of this novel virus we compared two surface proteins (HA and NA) with influenza viruses of swine, avian and humans isolates recovered from 1918 to 2008 outbreaks. Phylogenetic analyses of hemagglutinin gene from 2009 pandemic found to be clustered with swine influenza virus (H1N2) circulated in U.S.A during the 1999-2004 outbreaks. Whereas, neuraminidase gene was clustered with H1N1 strains isolated from Europe and Asia during 1992-2007 outbreaks. This study concludes that the new H1N1 strain appeared in 2009 outbreak with high pathogenicity to human was originated as result of re-assortment (exchange of gene). Moreover, our data also suggest that the virus will remain sensitive to the pre-existing therapeutic strategies. PMID:20198180

  15. Virus isolations from sewage and from a stream receiving effluents of sewage treatment plants*

    PubMed Central

    Grinstein, Saul; Melnick, Joseph L.; Wallis, Craig

    1970-01-01

    In order to detect viruses in sewage or streams, it is first necessary to concentrate the virus present in the fluid sample. Available methods are not readily manageable for concentrating virus from large volumes of fluid, and have not always yielded high recovery rates. In the study described in this paper, a method for concentration of viruses by adsorption on insoluble cross-linked maleic anhydride polyelectrolytes has been utilized to survey the viral flora of sewage and of a stream receiving sewage effluents, in a residential area of Houston, Texas. On a single day the virus flow at different points along the stream varied from 304 000 to 6 014 000 PFU/min. From 84 samples each of 1 US gal, 14 520 isolates were obtained, chiefly echovirus type 7 and polioviruses of all 3 types, some of them with characteristics of virulent wild strains. With virus isolation rates as high as those achieved, it is now possible to monitor virus in natural waters more effectively. PMID:4315865

  16. Characterisation of the welsh onion isolate of Shallot yellow stripe virus from China.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Wei, C-B; Zheng, H-Y; Shi, Y-H; Adams, M J; Lin, L; Zhang, Q-Y; Wang, S-J; Chen, J-P

    2005-10-01

    The host range and nucleotide sequence of shallot yellow stripe virus (SYSV) from welsh onion in Shandong province, China is described. Of the plants tested, only shallot and welsh onion became infected but most shallot plants were symptomless. The complete sequence of one isolate (10429 nt) and the 3'-terminal 3540 nts of a second isolate were determined. They had c. 90% nt identity to one another and to published (partial) sequences of SYSV. SYSV was most closely related to onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV) and resembled it in having a much larger P3 protein than other species in the genus. PMID:15968472

  17. Genome organization and host range of a Brazilian isolate of johnsongrass mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Camelo-García, Viviana Marcela; da Silva Andrade, Sónia Cristina; Geering, Andrew D W; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Rezende, Jorge A M

    2016-05-01

    This work reports the complete genome sequence, production of a polyclonal antiserum, and host range of a Brazilian strain of johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) found infecting Panicum maximum in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The complete genome sequence of this potyvirus, comprising 9874 nucleotides, showed 82 % amino acid sequence identity in the polyprotein to that of an isolate of JGMV from Australia. The experimental host range of this virus included mainly fodder species. Cultivated species such as rice, oats, sugarcane, rye, corn and wheat were not infected, suggesting that current isolates of this potyvirus do not represent a threat to these crops in Brazil. PMID:26869279

  18. Molecular epidemiology of bluetongue virus serotype 1 isolated in 2006 from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Cêtre-Sossah, C; Madani, H; Sailleau, C; Nomikou, K; Sadaoui, H; Zientara, S; Maan, S; Maan, N; Mertens, P; Albina, E

    2011-12-01

    This study reports on an outbreak of disease that occurred in central Algeria during July 2006. Sheep in the affected area presented clinical signs typical of bluetongue (BT) disease. A total of 5245 sheep in the affected region were considered to be susceptible, with 263 cases and thirty-six deaths. Bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 1 was isolated and identified as the causative agent. Segments 2, 7 and 10 of this virus were sequenced and compared with other isolates from Morocco, Italy, Portugal and France showing that they all belong to a 'western' BTV group/topotype and collectively represent a western Mediterranean lineage of BTV-1. PMID:21074232

  19. Molecular Characteristics of H6N6 Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigeons in Guangxi, Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Xie, Zhiqin; Luo, Sisi; Xie, Liji; Huang, Li; Deng, Xianwen; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an H6N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) isolated from a pigeon in Guangxi, southern China, in 2014. The eight RNA segment genes shared a high nucleotide identity (97 to 99%) with H6N6 subtypes of AIV isolated from ducks in the regions around Guangxi Province. The finding of this study will help us understand the ecology and molecular characteristics of H6 avian influenza virus in wild birds in southern China. PMID:26634763

  20. Molecular Characteristics of H6N6 Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigeons in Guangxi, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Xie, Zhixun; Xie, Zhiqin; Luo, Sisi; Xie, Liji; Huang, Li; Deng, Xianwen; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an H6N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) isolated from a pigeon in Guangxi, southern China, in 2014. The eight RNA segment genes shared a high nucleotide identity (97 to 99%) with H6N6 subtypes of AIV isolated from ducks in the regions around Guangxi Province. The finding of this study will help us understand the ecology and molecular characteristics of H6 avian influenza virus in wild birds in southern China. PMID:26634763

  1. Diversity of Papaya ringspot virus isolates in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) devastates papaya production worldwide. In Puerto Rico, papaya fields can be completely infected with PRSV within a year of planting. Information about the diversity of the Puerto Rican PRSV population is relevant in order to establish a control strategy in the island. T...

  2. Pathogenesis and Transmission of Feral Swine Pseudorabies Virus Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Aujesky’s Disease or pseudorabies, is one of the oldest recognized swine diseases. It is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV), an alpha-herpesvirus that can induce respiratory disease, reproductive failure, and affect the central nervous system. PRV vaccines, in conjunction with serologi...

  3. Genetic Characterization of the Influenza A Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus Isolates from India

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Varsha A.; Chadha, Mandeep S.; Jadhav, Santosh M.; Mullick, Jayati; Cherian, Sarah S.; Mishra, Akhilesh C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Influenza A pandemic H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm) virus appeared in India in May 2009 and thereafter outbreaks with considerable morbidity and mortality have been reported from many parts of the country. Continuous monitoring of the genetic makeup of the virus is essential to understand its evolution within the country in relation to global diversification and to track the mutations that may affect the behavior of the virus. Methods H1N1pdm viruses were isolated from both recovered and fatal cases representing major cities and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of six concatenated whole genomes and the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of seven more isolates from May-September 2009 was performed with reference to 685 whole genomes of global isolates available as of November 24, 2009. Molecular characterization of all the 8 segments was carried out for known pathogenic markers. Results The first isolate of May 2009 belonged to clade 5. Although clade 7 was the dominant H1N1pdm lineage in India, both clades 6 and 7 were found to be co-circulating. The neuraminidase of all the Indian isolates possessed H275, the marker for sensitivity to the neuraminidase inhibitor Oseltamivir. Some of the mutations in HA are at or in the vicinity of antigenic sites and may therefore be of possible antigenic significance. Among these a D222G mutation in the HA receptor binding domain was found in two of the eight Indian isolates obtained from fatal cases. Conclusions The majority of the 13 Indian isolates grouped in the globally most widely circulating H1N1pdm clade 7. Further, correlations of the mutations specific to clade 7 Indian isolates to viral fitness and adaptability in the country remains to be understood. The D222G mutation in HA from isolates of fatal cases needs to be studied for pathogenicity. PMID:20300625

  4. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: Monophyletic origin of European isolates from North American Genogroup M

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enzmann, P.-J.; Kurath, G.; Fichtner, D.; Bergmann, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was first detected in Europe in 1987 in France and Italy, and later, in 1992, in Germany. The source of the virus and the route of introduction are unknown. The present study investigates the molecular epidemiology of IHNV outbreaks in Germany since its first introduction. The complete nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein (G) and non-virion (NV) genes from 9 IHNV isolates from Germany have been determined, and this has allowed the identification of characteristic differences between these isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of partial G gene sequences (mid-G, 303 nucleotides) from North American IHNV isolates (Kurath et al. 2003) has revealed 3 major genogroups, designated U, M and L. Using this gene region with 2 different North American IHNV data sets, it was possible to group the European IHNV strains within the M genogroup, but not in any previously defined subgroup. Analysis of the full length G gene sequences indicated that an independent evolution of IHN viruses had occurred in Europe. IHN viruses in Europe seem to be of a monophyletic origin, again most closely related to North American isolates in the M genogroup. Analysis of the NV gene sequences also showed the European isolates to be monophyletic, but resolution of the 3 genogroups was poor with this gene region. As a result of comparative sequence analyses, several different genotypes have been identified circulating in Europe. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  5. An avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolate with a Rous sarcoma virus-like 5'-LTR shows enhanced replication capability.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanni; Guan, Xiaolu; Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Xiaofei; Yun, Bingling; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-producing chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis. However, ALV-J infections associated with hemangiomas have occurred in egg-producing (layer) flocks in China. In this study, we identified an ALV-J layer isolate (HLJ13SH01) as a recombinant of ALV-J and a Rous sarcoma virus Schmidt-Ruppin B strain (RSV-SRB), which contained the RSV-SRB 5'-LTR and the other genes of ALV-J. Replication kinetic testing indicated that the HLJ13SH01 strain replicated faster than other ALV-J layer isolates in vitro. Sequence analysis indicated that the main difference between the two isolates was the 5'-LTR sequences, particularly the U3 sequences. A 19 nt insertion was uniquely found in the U3 region of the HLJ13SH01 strain. The results of a Dual-Glo luciferase assay revealed that the 19 nt insertion in the HLJ13SH01 strain increased the enhancer activity of the U3 region. Moreover, an additional CCAAT/enhancer element was found in the 19 nt insertion and the luciferase assay indicated that this element played a key role in increasing the enhancer activity of the 5'-U3 region. To confirm the potentiation effect of the 19 nt insertion and the CCAAT/enhancer element on virus replication, three infectious clones with 5'-U3 region variations were constructed and rescued. Replication kinetic testing of the rescued viruses demonstrated that the CCAAT/enhancer element in the 19 nt insertion enhanced the replication capacity of the ALV-J recombinant in vitro. PMID:25274857

  6. Receptor specificity of subtype H1 influenza A viruses isolated from swine and humans in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evolution of receptor specificity of classical swine influenza viruses leading to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was analyzed in glycan microarrays. Classical influenza viruses from the alpha, beta, and gamma antigenic clusters isolated between 1945 and 2009 revealed a binding profile very simila...

  7. Use of ultrafiltration to isolate viruses from seawater which are pathogens of marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Suttle, C A; Chan, A M; Cottrell, M T

    1991-03-01

    Viruses may be major structuring elements of phytoplankton communities and hence important regulators of nutrient and energy fluxes in aquatic environments. In order to ascertain whether viruses are potentially important in dictating phytoplankton community structure, it is essential to determine the extent to which representative phytoplankton taxa are susceptible to viral infection. We used a spiral ultrafiltration cartridge (30,000-molecular-weight cutoff) to concentrate viruses from seawater at efficiencies approaching 100%. Natural virus communities were concentrated from stations in the Gulf of Mexico, a barrier island pass, and a hypersaline lagoon (Laguna Madre) and added to cultures of potential phytoplankton hosts. By following changes in in vivo fluorescence over time, it was possible to isolate several viruses that were pathogens to a variety of marine phytoplankton, including a prasinophyte (Micromonas pusilla), a pennate diatom (likely a Navicula sp.), a centric diatom (of unknown taxa), and a chroococcoid cyanobacterium (a Synechococcus sp.). As well, we observed changes in fluorescence in cultures of a cryptophyte (a Rhodomonas sp.) and a chlorophyte (Nannochloropsis oculata) which were consistent with the presence of viral pathogens. Although pathogens were isolated from all stations, all the pathogens were not isolated from every station. Filterability studies on the viruses infecting M. pusilla and the Navicula sp. showed that the viruses were consistently infective after filtration through polycarbonate and glass-fiber filters but were affected by most other filter types. Establishment of phytoplankton-pathogen systems will be important in elucidating the effect that viruses have on primary producers in aquatic systems. PMID:16348439

  8. Isolation and characterization of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) was isolated from dairy buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) naturally affected with respiratory and reproductive clinical conditions. Results Examination of nasal and vaginal swabs collected from 12 diseased buffaloes led to the isolation of three paramyxovirus isolates from two animals. Antigenic, morphological and biological characteristics of these three isolates were essentially similar to those of members of the Paramyxoviridae family. Antigenic analysis by direct immunofluorescence and cross neutralization test placed these isolates together with bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3). Nucleotide and amino acid phylogenetic analysis of partial matrix gene sequences of the buffalo isolates and six field BPIV3 isolates from bovines in Argentina were studied. Buffalo isolates were similar to genotype B (BPIV3b) while the six BPIV3 isolates were similar to genotypes A (BPIV3a) and C (BPIV3c). Conclusions This is the first characterization of BPIV3 in water buffalo. According to the samples analyzed, in Argentina, the genotype B was found in buffalo and the genotypes A and C were found in cattle. PMID:22716217

  9. Isolation of virus from brain after immunosuppression of mice with latent herpes simplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastrukoff, Lorne; Long, Carol; Doherty, Peter C.; Wroblewska, Zofia; Koprowski, Hilary

    1981-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is usually present in a latent form in the trigeminal ganglion of man1-3. Various stress factors may induce virus reactivation, which is manifest by a lip lesion (innervated from the trigeminal ganglion) and the production of infectious virus. The considerable experimental efforts to define the conditions that lead to the reactivation of latent HSV have concentrated on isolating virus either from the original extraneural site of virus inoculation, or from cell-free homogenates of sensory ganglia from latently infected animals4-15. Recent DNA hybridization experiments resulted in the demonstration of the presence of HSV genomes in the brain tissue of both latently infected mice, and of humans who showed no clinical symptoms of HSV (ref. 16 and N. Fraser, personal communication). This led us to consider the possibility that HSV may be present in brain tissue as the result of either reactivation of the virus in brain cells or the passage of reactivated virus from trigeminal ganglia through the brain stem to the brain. The presence of infectious HSV in brain tissue has not previously been demonstrated; yet this could be a factor in chronic, relapsing neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis. We have now shown experimentally that mice carrying latent HSV in their trigeminal ganglia may, following massive immunosuppression, express infectious virus in the central nervous system (CNS).

  10. Isolation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Novel Viruses Infecting the Phytoplankton Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Brussaard, C. P. D.; Short, S. M.; Frederickson, C. M.; Suttle, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    Viruses infecting the harmful bloom-causing alga Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae) were readily isolated from Dutch coastal waters (southern North Sea) in 2000 and 2001. Our data show a large increase in the abundance of putative P. globosa viruses during blooms of P. globosa, suggesting that viruses are an important source of mortality for this alga. In order to examine genetic relatedness among viruses infecting P. globosa and other phytoplankton, DNA polymerase gene (pol) fragments were amplified and the inferred amino acid sequences were phylogenetically analyzed. The results demonstrated that viruses infecting P. globosa formed a closely related monophyletic group within the family Phycodnaviridae, with at least 96.9% similarity to each other. The sequences grouped most closely with others from viruses that infect the prymnesiophyte algae Chrysochromulina brevifilum and Chrysochromulina strobilus. Whether the P. globosa viruses belong to the genus Prymnesiovirus or form a separate group needs further study. Our data suggest that, like their phytoplankton hosts, the Chrysochromulina and Phaeocystis viruses share a common ancestor and that these prymnesioviruses and their algal host have coevolved. PMID:15184176

  11. Differentiation of U.S. and European isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, E A; Christopher-Hennings, J; Drew, T; Wensvoort, G; Collins, J E; Benfield, D A

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to two U.S. isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus were prepared. Two MAbs specifically recognized a conserved epitope on the putative 15-kDa nucleocapsid protein of U.S. and European isolates of PRRS virus. Four other MAbs recognized epitopes on the 15-kDa protein of U.S. but not European isolates of PRRS virus. Collectively, this indicates that PRRS viruses contain both conserved and divergent epitopes on the 15-kDa viral protein. Images PMID:7508455

  12. Genetic variations of nucleoprotein gene of influenza A viruses isolated from swine in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus causes severe disease in both humans and animals and thus, has a considerably impact on economy and public health. In this study, the genetic variations of the nucleoprotein (NP) gene of influenza viruses recovered from swine in Thailand were determined. Results Twelve influenza A virus specimens were isolated from Thai swine. All samples were subjected to nucleotide sequencing of the complete NP gene. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted by comparing the NP gene of swine influenza viruses with that of seasonal and pandemic human viruses and highly pathogenic avian viruses from Thailand (n = 77). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the NP gene from different host species clustered in distinct host specific lineages. The NP gene of swine influenza viruses clustered in either Eurasian swine or Classical swine lineages. Genetic analysis of the NP gene suggested that swine influenza viruses circulating in Thailand display 4 amino acids unique to Eurasian and Classical swine lineages. In addition, the result showed 1 and 5 amino acids unique to avian and human lineages, respectively. Furthermore, nucleotide substitution rates showed that the NP gene is highly conserved especially in avian influenza viruses. Conclusion The NP gene sequence of influenza A in Thailand is highly conserved within host-specific lineages and shows amino acids potentially unique to distinct NP lineages. This information can be used to investigate potential interspecies transmission of influenza A viruses. In addition, the genetic variations of the NP gene will be useful for monitoring the viruses and preparing effective prevention and control strategies for potentially pandemic influenza outbreaks. PMID:20696044

  13. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Human Isolate from the 2000 Israel West Nile virus Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Rambaut, Andrew; Pathmajeyan, Melissa; Bishara, Jihad; Weinberger, Miriam; Pitlik, Silvio; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2002-01-01

    Specimens from a patient of the 2000 Israel West Nile virus epidemic were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Products corresponding to E, NS3, and NS5 sequences were amplified from cerebellar but not from cortical samples. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a closer relationship of this isolate to 1996 Romanian and 1999 Russian than to 1998-99 Israeli or 1999 New York isolates. PMID:11996693

  14. Ilheus Virus Isolation in the Pantanal, West-Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Kenney, Joan L.; Couto-Lima, Dinair; Campos, Zilca M. S.; Nogueira, Rita M. R.; Brault, Aaron C.; Komar, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The wetlands of the Brazilian Pantanal host large concentrations of diverse wildlife species and hematophagous arthropods, conditions that favor the circulation of zoonotic arboviruses. A recent study from the Nhecolândia sub-region of Pantanal reported serological evidence of various flaviviruses, including West Nile virus and Ilheus virus (ILHV). According to the age of seropositive horses, at least three flaviviruses, including ILHV, circulated in the Brazilian Pantanal between 2005 and 2009. To extend this study, we collected 3,234 adult mosquitoes of 16 species during 2009 and 2010 in the same sub-region. Mosquito pool homogenates were assayed for infectious virus on C6/36 and Vero cell monolayers and also tested for flaviviral RNA by a group-specific real-time RT-PCR. One pool containing 50 non-engorged female specimens of Aedes scapularis tested positive for ILHV by culture and for ILHV RNA by real-time RT-PCR, indicating a minimum infection rate of 2.5 per 1000. Full-length genomic sequence exhibited 95% identity to the only full genome sequence available for ILHV. The present data confirm the circulation of ILHV in the Brazilian Pantanal. PMID:23875051

  15. Isolation and Genetic Characterization of Mangshi Virus: A Newly Discovered Seadornavirus of the Reoviridae Family Found in Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinglin; Li, Huachun; He, Yuwen; Zhou, Yang; Meng, Jingxing; Zhu, Wuyang; Chen, Hongyu; Liao, Defang; Man, Yunping

    2015-01-01

    Background Seadornavirus is a genus of viruses in the family Reoviridae, which consists of Banna virus, Kadipiro virus, and Liao ning virus. Banna virus is considered a potential pathogen for zoonotic diseases. Here, we describe a newly discovered Seadornavirus isolated from mosquitos (Culex tritaeniorhynchus) in Yunnan Province, China, which is related to Banna virus, and referred to as Mangshi virus. Methods and Results The Mangshi virus was isolated by cell culture in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells, in which it replicated and caused cytopathic effects, but not in mammalian BHK-21 or Vero cells. Polyacrylamide gel analysis revealed a genome consisting of 12 segments of double-stranded RNA, with a “6–4–2” pattern in which the migrating bands were different from those of the Banna virus. Complete genome sequencing was performed by full-length amplification of cDNAs. Sequence analysis showed that seven highly conserved nucleotides and three highly conserved nucleotides were present at the ends of the 5′- and 3′-UTRs in each of 12 genome segments. The amino acid identities of Mangshi virus shared with Balaton virus varied from 27.3% (VP11) to 72.3% (VP1) with Banna virus varying from 18.0% (VP11) to 63.9% (VP1). Phylogenetic analysis based on amino acid sequences demonstrated that Mangshi virus is a member of the genus Seadornavirus and is most closely related to, but distinct from, Balaton virus and Banna virus in the genus Seadornavirus of the family Reoviridae. Conclusion Mangshi virus isolated from mosquitoes (C. tritaeniorhynchus) was identified as a newly discovered virus in the genus Seadornavirus and is phylogenetically close to Banna virus, suggesting that there is genetic diversity of seadornaviruses in tropical and subtropical areas of Southeast Asia. PMID:26630378

  16. Differential pathogenicity among Tomato leaf curl Gujarat virus isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Punam; Kumar, R Vinoth; Chakraborty, S

    2013-12-01

    Tomato leaf curl Gujarat virus (ToLCGV) has been identified as one of the most destructive pathogens causing tomato leaf curl disease (ToLCD) in India. In the tomato growing regions of Dhanbad and Ramgarh, plants bearing severe symptoms of ToLCD such as leaf curling, leaf crinkling, yellowing and leaf rolling was observed in the farmer fields. The association of begomovirus in these samples was confirmed by PCR and the causal viruses were identified as the isolates of ToLCGV. However, association of cognate DNA B component could not be ascertained from these samples. Indeed, like other Old World begomoviruses, the present ToLCGV isolates were found to be associated with a particular betasatellite, Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand betasatellite (TYLCTHB). Although DNA A of both ToLCGV isolates could alone infect tomato inducing systemic symptoms, the difference in virulence was observed. Co-inoculation of TYLCTHB reduced the incubation period without influencing the accumulation of helper virus DNA and hence, differential pathogenesis among ToLCGV isolates was governed by the helper component rather than betasatellite. ToLCGV infection with DNA B increases the accumulation of DNA A component of Dhanbad isolate but not of Ramgarh isolate. Results indicated that the begomovirus identified from Ramgarh sample was a mild strain of ToLCGV. PMID:24026875

  17. Specific Insect-Virus Interactions Are Responsible for Variation in Competency of Different Thrips tabaci Isolines to Transmit Different Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Alana L.; Kennedy, George G.

    2013-01-01

    Local adaptation between sympatric host and parasite populations driven by vector genetics appears to be a factor that influences dynamics of disease epidemics and evolution of insect-vectored viruses. Although T. tabaci is the primary vector of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in some areas of the world, it is not an important vector of this economically important plant virus in many areas where it occurs. Previous studies suggest that genetic variation of thrips populations, virus isolates, or both are important factors underlying the localized importance of this species as a vector of TSWV. This study was undertaken to quantify variation in transmissibility of TSWV isolates by T. tabaci, in the ability of T. tabaci to transmit isolates of TSWV, and to examine the possibility that genetic interactions and local adaptation contribute to the localized nature of this species as a vector of TSWV. Isofemale lines of Thrips tabaci from multiple locations were tested for their ability to transmit multiple TSWV isolates collected at the same and different locations as the thrips. Results revealed that the probability of an isofemale line transmitting TSWV varied among virus isolates, and the probability of an isolate being transmitted varied among isofemale lines. These results indicate that the interaction of T. tabaci and TSWV isolate genetic determinants underlie successful transmission of TSWV by T. tabaci. Further analysis revealed sympatric vector-virus pairing resulted in higher transmission than allopatric pairing, which suggests that local adaptation is occurring between T. tabaci and TSWV isolates. PMID:23358707

  18. Characterization of a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A virus isolated from duck meat.

    PubMed

    Tumpey, Terrence M; Suarez, David L; Perkins, Laura E L; Senne, Dennis A; Lee, Jae-Gil; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Mo, In-Pil; Sung, Haan-Woo; Swayne, David E

    2002-06-01

    Since the 1997 H5N1 influenza virus outbreak in humans and poultry in Hong Kong, the emergence of closely related viruses in poultry has raised concerns that additional zoonotic transmissions of influenza viruses from poultry to humans may occur. In May 2001, an avian H5N1 influenza A virus was isolated from duck meat that had been imported to South Korea from China. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of A/Duck/Anyang/AVL-1/01 showed that the virus clustered with the H5 Goose/Guandong/1/96 lineage and 1997 Hong Kong human isolates and possessed an HA cleavage site sequence identical to these isolates. Following intravenous or intranasal inoculation, this virus was highly pathogenic and replicated to high titers in chickens. The pathogenesis of DK/Anyang/AVL-1/01 virus in Pekin ducks was further characterized and compared with a recent H5N1 isolate, A/Chicken/Hong Kong/317.5/01, and an H5N1 1997 chicken isolate, A/Chicken/Hong Kong/220/97. Although no clinical signs of disease were observed in H5N1 virus-inoculated ducks, infectious virus could be detected in lung tissue, cloacal, and oropharyngeal swabs. The DK/Anyang/AVL-1/01 virus was unique among the H5N1 isolates in that infectious virus and viral antigen could also be detected in muscle and brain tissue of ducks. The pathogenesis of DK/Anyang/AVL-1/01 virus was characterized in BALB/c mice and compared with the other H5N1 isolates. All viruses replicated in mice, but in contrast to the highly lethal CK/HK/220/97 virus, DK/Anyang/AVL-1/01 and CK/HK/317.5/01 viruses remained localized to the respiratory tract. DK/Anyang/AVL-1/01 virus caused weight loss and resulted in 22 to 33% mortality, whereas CK/HK/317.5/01-infected mice exhibited no morbidity or mortality. The isolation of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus from poultry indicates that such viruses are still circulating in China and may present a risk for transmission of the virus to humans. PMID:12021367

  19. Isolation of mixed subtypes of influenza A virus from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    From April 2007 to March 2008, cloacal swabs were obtained from 246 casualty raptors recovered by various wildlife rehabilitation centers in the United States. The swabs were placed in a virus transport medium and transported to the laboratory on ice packs. At the laboratory, the samples were pooled with each pool consisting of five samples. All pools (n = 50) were screened for the presence of avian influenza virus (AIV) using a real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR); one of the pools was found positive. All five samples in this pool were tested individually by rRT-PCR; one sample from a bald eagle was found positive. This sample was inoculated in embryonated chicken eggs for virus isolation and a hemagglutinating virus was isolated. Complete genome sequencing of the isolate revealed a mixed infection with H1N1 and H2N1 subtypes. Further analysis revealed that the PB1-F2 gene sequence of H1N1 virus had the N66S virulence-associated substitution. Further studies on ecology and epidemiology of AIV in raptors are needed to help understand their role in the maintenance and evolution of AIV. PMID:20667110

  20. Isolation of mixed subtypes of influenza A virus from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sagar M; Jindal, Naresh; Chander, Yogesh; Ramakrishnan, Muthanan A; Redig, Patrick T; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2010-01-01

    From April 2007 to March 2008, cloacal swabs were obtained from 246 casualty raptors recovered by various wildlife rehabilitation centers in the United States. The swabs were placed in a virus transport medium and transported to the laboratory on ice packs. At the laboratory, the samples were pooled with each pool consisting of five samples. All pools (n = 50) were screened for the presence of avian influenza virus (AIV) using a real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR); one of the pools was found positive. All five samples in this pool were tested individually by rRT-PCR; one sample from a bald eagle was found positive. This sample was inoculated in embryonated chicken eggs for virus isolation and a hemagglutinating virus was isolated. Complete genome sequencing of the isolate revealed a mixed infection with H1N1 and H2N1 subtypes. Further analysis revealed that the PB1-F2 gene sequence of H1N1 virus had the N66S virulence-associated substitution. Further studies on ecology and epidemiology of AIV in raptors are needed to help understand their role in the maintenance and evolution of AIV. PMID:20667110

  1. Complete genome sequence of nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus reveals its relationship to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ravendra P; Rajakaruna, Punsasi; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2015-03-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained from nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus (CaYSV). CaYSV belongs to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses with johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) as its closest relative. Multiple sequence alignments showed a pattern of amino acid substitutions in the CP sequences, which enabled us to relate these isolates to South East Asian or European isolates. Biological characterization of CaYSV identified Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa and Phaseolus vulgaris as experimental hosts. Given the popularity and global trade of cannas, a clear picture of the genetic diversity of CaYSV is critical to disease management. PMID:25567205

  2. Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) oronasally inoculated with a Nipah virus isolate from Bangladesh or Malaysia develop similar respiratory tract lesions.

    PubMed

    Baseler, L; de Wit, E; Scott, D P; Munster, V J; Feldmann, H

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus is a paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus, which has caused outbreaks in humans in Malaysia, India, Singapore, and Bangladesh. Whereas the human cases in Malaysia were characterized mainly by neurological symptoms and a case fatality rate of ∼40%, cases in Bangladesh also exhibited respiratory disease and had a case fatality rate of ∼70%. Here, we compared the histopathologic changes in the respiratory tract of Syrian hamsters, a well-established small animal disease model for Nipah virus, inoculated oronasally with Nipah virus isolates from human cases in Malaysia and Bangladesh. The Nipah virus isolate from Bangladesh caused slightly more severe rhinitis and bronchointerstitial pneumonia 2 days after inoculation in Syrian hamsters. By day 4, differences in lesion severity could no longer be detected. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated Nipah virus antigen in the nasal cavity and pulmonary lesions; the amount of Nipah virus antigen present correlated with lesion severity. Immunohistochemistry indicated that both Nipah virus isolates exhibited endotheliotropism in small- and medium-caliber arteries and arterioles, but not in veins, in the lung. This correlated with the location of ephrin B2, the main receptor for Nipah virus, in the vasculature. In conclusion, Nipah virus isolates from outbreaks in Malaysia and Bangladesh caused a similar type and severity of respiratory tract lesions in Syrian hamsters, suggesting that the differences in human disease reported in the outbreaks in Malaysia and Bangladesh are unlikely to have been caused by intrinsic differences in these 2 virus isolates. PMID:25352203

  3. Genetic relationship between the HA genes of type A influenza viruses isolated in off-seasons and later epidemic seasons.

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nishikawa, F.; Nakajima, K.

    1991-01-01

    From January 1985 to March 1989, off-season viruses of H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes of influenza A viruses were isolated on five occasions in Japan. The HA gene sequences of the influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) viruses isolated in Japan from 1985-9 were analysed and the phylogenetic tree for each subtype virus was constructed to determine any genetic relationship between viruses isolated in off-seasons and the epidemic viruses of the following influenza seasons. In one instance with H1N1 viruses in 1986 and in two instances with H3N2 viruses in 1985 and 1987, the spring isolates were genetically close to some of the winter isolates and were considered to be the parental viruses of the following influenza seasons. However, even in these cases, influenza viruses of the same subtype with different lineages co-circulated in Japan. PMID:2019304

  4. Molecular characterisation of Raspberry bushy dwarf virus isolates from Sweden and Belarus.

    PubMed

    Valasevich, N; Kukharchyk, N; Kvarnheden, A

    2011-03-01

    The complete coding sequences were determined for RNA-1 and RNA-2 of five raspberry isolates of Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) from Belarus (BY1, BY3, BY8, BY22) and Sweden (SE3). The analysed sequences for both RNA-1 and RNA-2 were highly conserved among these isolates. Phylogenetic analyses including available sequences for the CP gene and the MP gene showed that all analysed RBDV isolates from raspberry were closely related. However, there was no strong correlation between the grouping of raspberry isolates in the phylogenetic analyses and their geographical location. In contrast, RBDV isolates showed a host-dependent relationship with isolates from raspberry and grapevine, forming two distinct clades. PMID:21253783

  5. Genetic characterization of border disease virus (BDV) isolates from small ruminants in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giammarioli, Monica; Rossi, Elisabetta; Casciari, Cristina; Bazzucchi, Moira; Torresi, Claudia; Claudia, Torresi; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2015-04-01

    Border disease virus (BDV) belongs to the Pestivirus genus in the family Flaviviridae. Genetic analyses of pestiviruses that have been isolated from sheep and goat have led to the proposal that BDV isolates can be phylogenetically segregated into at least seven clusters, subtypes BDV-1 to BDV-7. In order to investigate the genetic heterogeneity of small ruminant pestivirus isolates in Italy, a selection of 5'-UTR sequences from isolates that were collected from clinical specimens between 2002 and 2014 was analysed. Phylogenetic reconstructions indicated that the BDV-positive samples clustered within the BDV-1, BDV-3, BDV-5, and BDV-7 groups. These results suggested high genetic diversity within the Italian BDV field isolates. The phylogenetic analysis indicated the first evidence of BDV-1 and BDV-5 circulation in Italy. The marked diversity of the pestivirus isolates might reflect the sheep trade with foreign countries. PMID:25636968

  6. Genetic characterization of Arrabida virus, a novel phlebovirus isolated in South Portugal.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Fátima; Hanke, Dennis; Zé-Zé, Líbia; Alves, Maria João; Becker, Stefanie C; Höper, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    In order to detect phleboviruses' natural infection in sandflies, an entomological survey was carried out, from May to October in 2007 and 2008, in Arrábida region in the south of Portugal. The isolation of a new phlebovirus was achieved after inoculation of a sandfly pool homogenate in Vero E6 cells. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome sequences from the Small, Medium and Large, segments obtained with Next Generation sequencing, we can assume that the new phlebovirus, provisionally named Arrabida virus, is closely related to Massilia, Granada and Punique viruses. This is the first isolation of a sandfly-borne phlebovirus from the Sandfly Naples Fever Virus group in Portugal. Further investigation is needed in order to assess the importance of this phlebovirus for Public Health. PMID:26795868

  7. Molecular Characterization of Hepatitis A Virus Isolates from a Transcontinental Shellfish-Borne Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Glòria; Pintó, Rosa M.; Vanaclocha, Hermelinda; Bosch, Albert

    2002-01-01

    One hundred eighty-four serologically confirmed cases of hepatitis A were reported in eastern Spain in 1999. A matched case-control study implicated imported coquina clams complying with European Union shellfish standards as the source of infection; this implication was confirmed by the detection by reverse transcription-PCR of hepatitis A virus (HAV) RNA in shellfish samples. In spite of the recognized low variability of HAV, genetic characterization of the complete capsid region of virus isolates from patient serum samples revealed the existence of both synonymous and nonsynonymous variants. Two antigenic variants were detected, one in a discontinuous epitope defined by monoclonal antibody K3-4C8 and a second in a linear VP1 epitope of the virus. In spite of these antigenic variants, all isolates were assigned to genotype IB, providing further evidence that the outbreak originated from a common source, although multiple strains were likely to be involved. PMID:12409389

  8. Complete genome sequences of two middelburg viruses isolated from arthropods in the central african republic.

    PubMed

    Tricou, Vianney; Berthet, Nicolas; Descorps-Declere, Stéphane; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2014-01-01

    Arboviral diseases are a major threat to human and animal health today. Analysis of whole-genome sequences of decades-old arboviral strains may bring new insights into the viral evolution that might have facilitated outbreaks. Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of two Middelburg viruses isolated several decades ago in the Central African Republic. PMID:25342688

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Two Middelburg Viruses Isolated from Arthropods in the Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Berthet, Nicolas; Descorps-Declere, Stéphane; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2014-01-01

    Arboviral diseases are a major threat to human and animal health today. Analysis of whole-genome sequences of decades-old arboviral strains may bring new insights into the viral evolution that might have facilitated outbreaks. Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of two Middelburg viruses isolated several decades ago in the Central African Republic. PMID:25342688

  10. Genome Sequence and Attenuating Mutations in West Nile Virus Isolate from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. Todd; Estrada-Franco, Jose; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Campomanes-Cortes, Arturo; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Barrett, Alan D.T.

    2004-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a Mexican West Nile virus isolate, TM171-03, included 46 nucleotide (0.42%) and 4 amino acid (0.11%) differences from the NY99 prototype. Mouse virulence differences between plaque-purified variants of TM171-03 with mutations at the E protein glycosylation motif suggest the emergence of an attenuating mutation. PMID:15663867

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from Wild Peacock (Pavo cristatus) in India

    PubMed Central

    Khulape, Sagar A.; Gaikwad, Satish S.; Chellappa, Madhan Mohan; Mishra, Bishnu Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from a wild peacock. Phylogenetic analysis showed that it belongs to genotype II, class II of NDV strains. This study helps to understand the ecology of NDV strains circulating in a wild avian host of this geographical region during the outbreak of 2012 in northwest India. PMID:24903868

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a Variant Pseudorabies Virus Strain Isolated in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shuangshuang; Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Xule; Li, Yingying; Zhang, Chaolin; Wang, Juan; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) variants have been prevalent in China since 2011 and have caused huge economic losses to the Chinese pig industry. Here, we report the genome sequence of a PRV variant HN1201 that was isolated from diseased animals in central China in 2011. PMID:26988055

  13. Molecular Diversity of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus-2 Isolates in Pacific Northwest Vineyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One hundred and five isolates of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus-2 (GLRaV-2) collected from vineyard blocks located in different geographical regions of Washington and Oregon states were characterized based on coat protein (CP) and heat-shock protein 70 homologue (HSP-70h) gene sequences. The re...

  14. Antigenic and genetic characterisation of border disease viruses isolated from UK cattle.

    PubMed

    Strong, R; La Rocca, S A; Ibata, G; Sandvik, T

    2010-03-24

    Available empirical data on the natural occurrence of ruminant pestiviruses has shown that in cattle, bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is nearly exclusively found, whereas both border disease virus (BDV) and BVDV can be isolated from sheep. During routine genetic typing of pestivirus RNA from UK cattle diagnosed as BVDV positive between 2006 and 2008, five samples that were classified as BDV positive yielded positive virus isolates in cell cultures. The samples originated from animals that had shown signs typical for BVD. Phylogenetic analysis of the bovine BDVs showed that two belonged to the BDV-1a group and three to the BDV-1b group, thereby matching the genetic diversity seen for previously described UK ovine BDVs. Antigenic typing with a set of monoclonal antibodies (MABs) showed that all bovine BDVs lacked one or more epitopes conserved among ovine BDV-1 isolates, and that they had gained reactivity with at least one BVDV-1 specific MAB. Serial passaging of two of the virus isolates in ovine cell cultures did not change the epitope expression pattern. These findings suggest that the presumed natural resistance of cattle against infection with BDV no longer holds. A consequence of this is that BVD diagnostic assays should be checked for their ability to also detect BDV, and also highlights the need for monitoring of the BDV status in sheep that may be in contact with cattle in areas with organised BVD control programmes. PMID:19781869

  15. Complete genome sequence of an Argentinean isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of an Argentinean isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3ArgSF) obtained from the Santa Fe region of Argentina was sequenced in entirety. Assembly of 9 overlapping fragments yielded a consensus genome sequence 10,386 nucleotides long, excluding the poly(A) tail present on the 3' en...

  16. First complete genome sequence of an emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus isolate in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence (6,423 nt) of an emerging Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate on cucumber in North America was determined through deep sequencing of sRNA and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. It shares 99% nucleotide sequence identity to the Asian genotype, but only 90% t...

  17. Avian influenza virus with Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase combination H8N8, isolated in Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the genome sequence of an avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H8N8 isolated in Russia. The genome analysis shows that all genes belong to AIV Eurasian lineages. The PB2 gene was similar to a Mongolian low pathogenic (LP) AIV H7N1 and a Chinese high pathogenic (HP) AIV H5N2....

  18. First Complete Coding Sequence of a Spanish Isolate of Swine Vesicular Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a porcine pathogen and a member of the Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family. The SVDV genome is composed of a single-stranded RNA molecule of positive polarity. Here, we report the first complete sequence of the coding region of a Spanish SVDV isolate (SPA/1/'93). PMID:26941157

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Duck Tembusu Virus Isolated from Pekin Ducks in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Zhang, Chuanpeng; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) SH001 strain, isolated from Pekin ducks in Shanghai, China, in 2013. The genome of SH001 is 10,990 nucleotides (nt) in length and contains a single open reading frame encoding a putative polyprotein of 3,425 amino acids. PMID:25908131

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Isolated in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Medina, J. E.; Monroy-Muñoz, I. E.; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, A.; Meza-Chávez, A.; Ángeles-Martínez, J.; Anguiano-Hernández, Y. M.; Santacruz-Tinoco, C. E.; González-Ibarra, J.; Martínez-Miguel, B.; Alvarado-Yaah, J. E.; Palomec-Nava, I. D.; Ortiz-Alcántara, J. M.; Garcés-Ayala, F.; Díaz-Quiñonez, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, which causes lower respiratory tract infections in neonates and children younger than 5 years. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of HRSV, isolated from a nasopharyngeal swab of a pregnant woman with cardiac complications. PMID:26769933

  1. H7 avian influenza virus vaccines protect chickens against challenge with antigenically diverse isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination has been a critical tool in the control of some avian influenza viruses (AIV) and has been used routinely in Pakistan to help control sporadic outbreaks of highly pathogenic (HP) H7 AIV since 1995. During that time, several AIV isolates were utilized as inactivated vaccines with varying...

  2. Sequence and virulence comparison of four North American isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considerable genetic, antigenic and virulence differences exist among porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates and depending on strain, dose and immune status, some farms may be subclinically infected with PRRSV while others experience severe reproductive and/or respirato...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from Wild Peacock (Pavo cristatus) in India.

    PubMed

    Khulape, Sagar A; Gaikwad, Satish S; Chellappa, Madhan Mohan; Mishra, Bishnu Prasad; Dey, Sohini

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from a wild peacock. Phylogenetic analysis showed that it belongs to genotype II, class II of NDV strains. This study helps to understand the ecology of NDV strains circulating in a wild avian host of this geographical region during the outbreak of 2012 in northwest India. PMID:24903868

  4. Complete nucleotide sequence of encephalomyocarditis virus isolated from South china tigers in china.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Yan, Qi; He, Hongxuan

    2013-01-01

    A strain of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), strain FJ13, has been isolated from South China tigers in China, and its complete genome has been sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that FJ13 belongs to the EMCV-1 serotype, and it is highly prevalent in China. PMID:23990575

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Variant Pseudorabies Virus Strain Isolated in Central China.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shuangshuang; Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Xule; Li, Yingying; Zhang, Chaolin; Wang, Juan; Li, Xiangdong; Tan, Feifei; Tian, Kegong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) variants have been prevalent in China since 2011 and have caused huge economic losses to the Chinese pig industry. Here, we report the genome sequence of a PRV variant HN1201 that was isolated from diseased animals in central China in 2011. PMID:26988055

  6. Neurological lesions in chickens experimentally infected with virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distribution, character, and severity of lesions were evaluated in tissues from the central nervous system of chickens inoculated with 10 different Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates: CA 1083, Korea 97-147, Australia (all velogenic viscerotropic); Texas GB and Turkey North Dakota (both velogenic...

  7. First Complete Coding Sequence of a Spanish Isolate of Swine Vesicular Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Sobrino, Francisco; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a porcine pathogen and a member of the Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family. The SVDV genome is composed of a single-stranded RNA molecule of positive polarity. Here, we report the first complete sequence of the coding region of a Spanish SVDV isolate (SPA/1/'93). PMID:26941157

  8. Biological and molecular characterization of a US isolate of Hosta virus X

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hosta virus X (HVX) is rapidly becoming a serious pathogen of commercially important hosta plants worldwide. We report here a biological and molecular characterization of a US isolate of HVX, HVX-37. HVX-37 infectivity was tested in 21 hosta cultivars over three growth seasons, and three types of re...

  9. Complete genome sequence of duck tembusu virus isolated from pekin ducks in shanghai, china.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Zhang, Chuanpeng; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan; Sun, Jianhe

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) SH001 strain, isolated from Pekin ducks in Shanghai, China, in 2013. The genome of SH001 is 10,990 nucleotides (nt) in length and contains a single open reading frame encoding a putative polyprotein of 3,425 amino acids. PMID:25908131

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolate from an Outbreak in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Polakshee; Morla, Sudhir; Kaore, Megha; Kurkure, Nitin Vasantrao

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain NDV/Chicken/Nagpur/01/12 was isolated from vaccinated chicken farms in India during outbreaks in 2012. The genome is 15,192 nucleotides in length and is classified as genotype VII in class II. PMID:25593257

  11. Induction of type I interferons by a novel porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) inhibits synthesis of type I interferons (IFNs) in infected pigs and in cultured cells. Here we report that one PRRSV mutant A2MC2 induces type I IFNs in cultured cells and has no effect on IFN downstream signaling. The mutant isolate was p...

  12. Complete genome sequences of new emerging Newcastle disease virus strains isolated from China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains were isolated from geese in China during 2010 to 2011. The complete sequences of two NDV strains and the sequences of the envelop glyprotein genes (F and HN) of three other strains were determined. Phylogenetic analysis classified then into a new g...

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Isolated in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Medina, J E; Monroy-Muñoz, I E; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, A; Meza-Chávez, A; Ángeles-Martínez, J; Anguiano-Hernández, Y M; Santacruz-Tinoco, C E; González-Ibarra, J; Martínez-Miguel, B; Alvarado-Yaah, J E; Palomec-Nava, I D; Ortiz-Alcántara, J M; Garcés-Ayala, F; Ramírez-González, J E; Díaz-Quiñonez, J A; González-Bonilla, C R

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, which causes lower respiratory tract infections in neonates and children younger than 5 years. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of HRSV, isolated from a nasopharyngeal swab of a pregnant woman with cardiac complications. PMID:26769933

  14. Molecular analysis of complete genomic sequences of four isolates of Gooseberry vein banding associated virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presence of Gooseberry vein banding associated virus (GVBaV), a badnavirus in the family Caulimoviridae, is strongly correlated with gooseberry vein banding disease in Ribes spp. In this study, full-length genomic sequences of four GVBaV isolates from different hosts and geographic regions were det...

  15. SIMILARITIES IN SEED AND APHID TRANSMISSION OF SOYBEAN MOSAIC VIRUS ISOLATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strain specificity of transmission of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) through seed and SMV-induced seed-coat mottling were investigated in field experiments. Six soybean plant introductions (PIs) were inoculated with eight SMV isolates. Transmission of SMV through seed ranged from 0% to 42.6% in see...

  16. Molecular detection and characterization of Chinese Yam mild mosaic virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An improved RT-PCR was developed and validated to be sensitive and reliable for the detection of Yam mild mosaic virus (YMMV). Sequences of coat protein core region of 19 Chinese isolates were obtained, and analysis indicated the presence of different genetic variants. Phylogenetic analyses showed t...

  17. Pathogenesis in lambs and sequence analysis of putative virulence genes of Brazilian orf virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mathias; Cargnelutti, Juliana F; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F

    2014-11-01

    The parapoxvirus orf virus (ORFV) is the agent of contagious ecthyma, an ubiquitous mucocutaneous disease of sheep and goats that may present variable clinical presentations. We herein studied the pathogenesis of ORFV infection in lambs and analyzed three putative virulence genes of four Brazilian ORFV isolates. Lambs inoculated in the labial commissures with each ORFV isolate (n=4, viral titer 10(5.6) TCID50/ml) developed classical orf lesions, characterized by a progressive course of erythema/macules, vesicles, pustules and proliferative scabs. Lesions lasted an average of 22.9 days (18-26) and virus shedding was detected for approximately 24.6 days (18-30). Two isolates (SV269/11 and SV820/10) produced more severe, long-lasting lesions resulting in highest clinical scores. Lambs inoculated with isolate SV581/11 developed lesions markedly milder (lower clinical scores [p<0.05]) and more limited than the other groups. Virus shedding by SV581/11 group, however, lasted similarly or even longer than the other groups. Sequence analysis of three virulence genes (VEGF, VIR and IL-10v) revealed amino acid deletions and mutations in VEGF and IL-10v genes of SV581/11 and SV252/11, the isolate(s) producing milder lesions. Additionally, the VEGF gene of isolate SV581/11 presented the lowest amino acid identity with the other isolates and with ORFV standard strain OV-IA82. Thus, these results demonstrate that ORFV isolates may display differential virulence in lambs and these differences might be associated with genetic changes in putative virulence genes. PMID:25293399

  18. Isolation and Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA Virus Infecting Chaetoceros lorenzianus Grunow▿

    PubMed Central

    Tomaru, Yuji; Takao, Yoshitake; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Koike, Kanae; Nagasaki, Keizo

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are one of the most significant primary producers in the ocean, and the importance of viruses as a potential source of mortality for diatoms has recently been recognized. Thus far, eight different diatom viruses infecting the genera Rhizosolenia and Chaetoceros have been isolated and characterized to different extents. We report the isolation of a novel diatom virus (ClorDNAV), which causes the lysis of the bloom-forming species Chaetoceros lorenzianus, and show its physiological, morphological, and genomic characteristics. The free virion was estimated to be ∼34 nm in diameter. The arrangement of virus particles appearing in cross-section was basically a random aggregation in the nucleus. Occasionally, distinctive formations such as a ring-like array composed of 9 or 10 spherical virions or a centipede-like array composed of rod-shaped particles were also observed. The latent period and the burst size were estimated to be <48 h and 2.2 × 104 infectious units per host cell, respectively. ClorDNAV harbors a covalently closed circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genome (5,813 nucleotides [nt]) that includes a partially double-stranded DNA region (979 nt). At least three major open reading frames were identified; one showed a high similarity to putative replicase-related proteins of the other ssDNA diatom viruses, Chaetoceros salsugineum DNA virus (previously reported as CsNIV) and Chaetoceros tenuissimus DNA virus. ClorDNAV is the third member of the closed circular ssDNA diatom virus group, the genus Bacilladnavirus. PMID:21666026

  19. Population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus: Evidence of reassortment in geographically distinct isolates.

    PubMed

    Thekke-Veetil, Thanuja; Polashock, James J; Marn, Mojca V; Plesko, Irena M; Schilder, Annemiek C; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E

    2015-04-01

    The population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), a putative member of the family Ophioviridae, was examined using 61 isolates collected from North America and Slovenia. The studied isolates displayed low diversity in the movement and nucleocapsid proteins and low ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions, indicative of strong purifying selection. Phylogenetic analyses revealed grouping primarily based on geography with some isolates deviating from this rule. Phylogenetic incongruence in the two regions, coupled with detection of reassortment events, indicated the possible role of genetic exchange in the evolution of BlMaV. PMID:25733053

  20. Coat protein gene diversity among Chrysanthemum virus B isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Singh, L; Hallan, V; Jabeen, N; Singh, A K; Ram, R; Martin, D P; Zaidi, A A

    2007-02-01

    The complete coat protein (CP) sequences from 29 Indian isolates of Chrysanthemum virus B (CVB) were determined and analysed in relation to other previously characterized carlaviruses. The CP genes of the Indian CVB isolates were highly heterogeneous, sharing nucleotide sequence identities of 74-98%. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the isolates formed three groups potentially representing either two or three major CVB strain groupings. Recombination analysis revealed at least one definite recombination event involving the exchange of sequences between members of different groups. To our knowledge this is the first reported evidence of homologous recombination in carlaviruses. PMID:17006596

  1. Molecular characterization and detection of a recombinant isolate of bamboo mosaic virus from China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenwu; Gao, Fangluan; Yang, Wenting; Yu, Chaowei; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lingli; Wu, Zujian; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Xie, Lianhui

    2016-04-01

    The complete genome sequences of three isolates of bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) from mainland China were determined and compared to those of BaMV isolates from Taiwan. Sequence analysis showed that isolate BaMV-JXYBZ1 from Fuzhou shares 98 % nucleotide sequence identity with BaMV-YTHSL14 from nucleotides 2586 to 6306, and more than 94 % nucleotide sequence identity with BaMV-MUZHUBZ2 in other regions. Recombination and phylogenetic analyses indicate that BaMV-JXYBZ1 is a recombinant with one recombination breakpoint. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a BaMV recombinant worldwide. PMID:26923929

  2. Molecular characterization of a severe isolate of papaya ringspot virus in Mexico and its relationship with other isolates.

    PubMed

    Noa-Carrazana, Juan Carlos; González-de-León, Diego; Silva-Rosales, Laura

    2007-08-01

    The virus most often reported in papaya (Carica papaya L.) is papaya ringspot (PRSV). The aim of this work was the molecular genomic characterization of a Mexican severe isolate of PRSV-P "Mex-VrPO" (isolate from the State of Veracruz in Paso de Ovejas) as well as its comparison with other isolates from other world regions. The linear, assembled, single-strand positive sense RNA genome of PRSV-P Mex-VrPO was 10320 nt in length (excluding the poly(A) tail) and contained a single large predicted ORF with 3344 aa. The comparative analysis of our PRSV isolates and five others reported before, showed the most variable proteins were P1, P3, 6 K and CP with 13-33%, 5-7%, 6-9% and 5-9% divergence respectively. The most conserved ones were CI, NIb and HC-Pro (2-3%, 3-5% and 4-5%). The phylogenetic analysis showed a close relation between the Mexican (Mex-VrPO) and Hawaiian (PRSV-P HA) isolates. This work provided the first opportunity to establish the foundation for (1) understanding whole genome and polyprotein variability between Asian and American PRSV isolates, and (2) elucidating major trends in the relative evolution of viral cistrons as deduced from in silico recombination analyses. PMID:17082995

  3. Genetic variation in potato virus M isolates infecting pepino (Solanum muricatum) in China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beibei; He, Zhen; Zhang, Zhixiang; Wang, Hongqing; Li, Shifang

    2014-12-01

    Potato virus M (PVM, genus Carlavirus, family Betaflexviridae) is considered to be one of most economically important pathogens of pepino in China. However, the details and the mechanisms underlying PVM evolution are unknown. In this study, we determined and analyzed 40 TGB 1 gene sequences, 67 TGB 2 and TGB 3 gene sequences, and 88 CP and NABP gene sequences from viruses isolated from 19 samples of pepino (Solanum muricatum) and one sample of tomato (S. lycopersicum) collected from different areas of China. Recombination analysis identified only one clear recombinant in the TGB2-TGB3-CP region, but no recombinants were detected for each of the five individual genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all PVM isolates could be divided into at least two lineages in trees derived from the TGB 2, CP, and NABP gene sequences, and the lineages seemed to reflect geographical origin. The five PVM genes in this study were found to be under strong negative selection pressure. The PVM isolates examined showed frequent gene flow between the Chinese and European populations, and also within the Chinese population. Clear star phylogenies and the neutral equilibrium model test showed that pepino isolates of PVM appear to be experiencing a new expansion after a recent introduction into China, and these isolates display low levels of genetic diversity. To our knowledge, this study is the first report describing genetic structure, recombination, and gene flow in PVM populations, and it provides strong evolutionary evidence for the virus populations from different geographic regions of China. PMID:25233939

  4. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. ‘Sorok’, ‘Sodam’ and ‘Somyeong’. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1–100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  5. Isolation of novel variants of infectious bursal disease virus from different outbreaks in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Morla, Sudhir; Deka, Pankaj; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a highly infectious disease of young chicken that predominantly affects the immune system. In the present study, we are reporting first comprehensive study of IBDV outbreaks from the Northeastern part of India. Northeast India shares a porous border with four different countries; and as a rule any outbreak in the neighboring countries substantially affects the poultry population in the adjoining states. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP2 gene of the IBDV isolates from the Northeastern part of India suggested the extreme virulent nature of the virus. The virulent marker amino acids (A222, I242, Q253, I256 and S299) in the hypervariable region of the Northeastern isolates were found identical with the reported very virulent strains of IBDV. A unique insertion of I/L294V was recorded in all the isolates of the Northeastern India. The study will be useful in understanding the circulating pathotypes of IBDV in India. PMID:26854869

  6. A comparative study of rabies virus isolates from hematophagous bats in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Juliana G; Carnieli, Pedro; Oliveira, Rafael N; Fahl, Willian O; Cavalcante, Rosangela; Santana, Antonio A; Rosa, Wellington L G A; Carrieri, Maria L; Kotait, Ivanete

    2010-10-01

    The Brazilian chiropteran fauna consists of 167 species; of which, three are hematophagous: the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), the white-winged vampire bat (Diaemus youngi), and the hairy-legged vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata). The aim of this study was to describe the isolation of Rabies virus from common and hairy-legged vampire bats and to report the first comparative antigenic and genetic studies of isolates from these bats. Antigenic and genetic typing of both isolates identified them as antigenic variant 3 (AgV3), the variant frequently isolated from common vampire bats. Phylogenetic analysis showed 99.3% identity between the isolates. This is the first time since 1934 that Rabies virus has been isolated from hairy-legged vampire bats in Brazil. Our analysis provides evidence that the existence of rabies-positive isolates from hairy-legged vampire bats may be the result of an interspecific rabies transmission event from common vampire bats and suggests that roost cohabitation may occur. PMID:20966291

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of bluetongue virus serotype 4 field isolates from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Legisa, D; Gonzalez, F; De Stefano, G; Pereda, A; Dus Santos, M J

    2013-03-01

    Bluetongue is an insect-transmitted viral disease of ruminant species, which represents a major barrier to the international trade of animals and their products. Bluetongue virus (BTV) has a genome composed of ten linear segments of dsRNA, which code for at least ten different viral proteins. In South America, serological evidence for the presence of BTV has been found in Peru, Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador and Chile. Brazil and Argentina are the only South American countries where BTV has been isolated. In Brazil, only one BTV isolate, serotype 12, has been reported, whereas in Argentina five BTV serotype 4 isolates have been obtained from cattle without clinical signs. Three of these five isolates were isolated during 1999-2001, whereas two of them were obtained as part of the present work. This study describes sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses of segment (Seg)-2, Seg-3, Seg-6, Seg-7 and Seg-10 of the first Argentinian field isolates of BTV. The analysis of Seg-2 and Seg-6 resulted in a single cluster of Argentinian sequences into the serotype 4 clade. In addition, the Argentinian sequences grouped within the nucleotype A clade, along with reference strains. The analysis of Seg-3, Seg-7 and Seg-10 showed that the Argentinian isolates grouped into the western topotype, indicating that the circulating virus had an African/European origin. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Argentinian sequences present a South American genetic identity, suggesting an independent lineage evolution. PMID:23152367

  8. Molecular characterization of Dasheen mosaic virus isolates infecting edible aroids in India.

    PubMed

    Babu, B; Hegde, V

    2014-01-01

    Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) infecting three major edible aroids namely Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, Colocasia esculenta, and Xanthosoma sagittifolium cultivated in India was characterized. Infected plants showing typical DsMV symptoms were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and an amplification of a 963 bp fragment which encoded the coat protein (CP) gene was obtained. BLAST analysis of the cloned DNA amplicon revealed the identity of the virus to be that of DsMV. Sequence identity matrix of the nucleotide sequences among the three isolates showed that the DsMV isolate infecting A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta shared an identity as high as 93%, while the DsMV isolate from X. sagittifolium shared an identity of only 73% and 76% with the DsMV isolates from A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta, respectively. Comparative analysis of the coat protein of the three DsMV isolates showed the presence of DVG motif (A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta) and DTG motif in X. sagittifolium and several varying potential threonine and asparagine rich N-glycosylation motifs. Single amino acid substitution of the several conserved motifs occurs in all the three DsMV isolates. This is the first characterization of DsMV isolates infecting A. paeoniifolius, C. esculenta, and X. sagittifolium plants in India. PMID:24717027

  9. Clustering of classical swine fever virus isolates by codon pair bias

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic code consists of non-random usage of synonymous codons for the same amino acids, termed codon bias or codon usage. Codon juxtaposition is also non-random, referred to as codon context bias or codon pair bias. The codon and codon pair bias vary among different organisms, as well as with viruses. Reasons for these differences are not completely understood. For classical swine fever virus (CSFV), it was suggested that the synonymous codon usage does not significantly influence virulence, but the relationship between variations in codon pair usage and CSFV virulence is unknown. Virulence can be related to the fitness of a virus: Differences in codon pair usage influence genome translation efficiency, which may in turn relate to the fitness of a virus. Accordingly, the potential of the codon pair bias for clustering CSFV isolates into classes of different virulence was investigated. Results The complete genomic sequences encoding the viral polyprotein of 52 different CSFV isolates were analyzed. This included 49 sequences from the GenBank database (NCBI) and three newly sequenced genomes. The codon usage did not differ among isolates of different virulence or genotype. In contrast, a clustering of isolates based on their codon pair bias was observed, clearly discriminating highly virulent isolates and vaccine strains on one side from moderately virulent strains on the other side. However, phylogenetic trees based on the codon pair bias and on the primary nucleotide sequence resulted in a very similar genotype distribution. Conclusion Clustering of CSFV genomes based on their codon pair bias correlate with the genotype rather than with the virulence of the isolates. PMID:22126254

  10. Biochemical and antigenic properties of the first isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus from salmonid fish in Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arkush, K.D.; Bovo, G.; deKinkelin, P.; Winton, J.R.; Wingfield, W.H.; Hedrick, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The first isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) recovered from rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (formerly Salmo gairdneri) in France and Italy were compared to six representative strains from North America by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of virion polypeptides and neutralization by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). All three IHNV isolates from Europe had similar polypeptide profiles when compared by SDS-PAGE. An analysis of the antigenic relatedness of the European isolates to representative strains from North America showed that they were clearly different from viruses obtained from salmonids in California. The RB/B5 MAb, which was developed against virus isolated from adult steelhead (anadromous rainbow trout) reared in central Oregon, neutralized all isolates examined. The 193–110/B4 MAb, developed against IHNV isolated from infected yearling rainbow trout in southern Idaho, neutralized all isolates tested except those from California. The SRCV/A4 MAb, developed against Sacramento River chinook virus (SRCV) isolated from adult spring chinook salmon O. tshawytscha in central California, was the least reactive, and strong neutralization was observed only with the SRCV strain of IHNV from California. However, partial reactivity of the virus isolates from France with the SRCV/A4 MAb distinguished them from the virus recovered from salmonids in Italy.

  11. Hepatitis delta virus: Making the point from virus isolation up to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Raffaella; Perbellini, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis delta virus (HDV) has lately regained clinical importance because of the recent evidence of increasing prevalence in several European countries, due to immigration from highly endemic areas. HDV requires the mandatory presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) for propagation to hepatocytes. It is transmitted by the same routes of HBV and it can be acquired either by co-infection (simultaneous transmission of the two viruses) or super-infection (acquisition of HDV by an already chronic carrier of HBV). As a consequence, every HBV carrier is potentially at risk for HDV superinfection. Since the clinical course of super-infection can be severe, early diagnosis of HDV infection is necessary. PMID:26464754

  12. A bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1a strain in China: isolation, identification, and experimental infection in calves

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the most important pathogens in cattle. Previously, BVDV sub-genotypes of 1b, 1c, 1d, and 1 m were detected in China. However, isolation of BVDV type 1a from cattle has not been reported in China. In 2010, twenty nasal swabs and blood samples were collected from the cattle suspected BVDV infection in Henan province, China. A BVDV isolate was isolated using cell culture, and the pathogenesis of the virus isolate was studied. Methods Virus isolation was performed on MDBK cells. The virus identification was conducted by RT-PCR, neutralization test and immunofluorescence assay. In order to determine the genotype of the newly isolated virus, the 5′ un-translated region (5′UTR) of the virus isolate was cloned, sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. To evaluate the virulence of the virus isolate, four BVDV sero-negative calves were intranasally inoculated with the virus suspension. Rectal temperatures and clinical signs were recorded daily. Blood samples were analyzed for changes in white blood cell counts, and tissue samples were taken for histopathology analysis. Results A new isolate of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), named HN01, was isolated from the nasal swabs using MDBK cell culture. The HN01 strain caused cytopathic effect (CPE) in MDBK cell cultures after two passages. The virus specifically reacted to BVDV1-specific monoclonal antibody in an immunofluorescence assay. A fragment of 288 bp of genome from this isolate was amplified by the RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of 5′UTR indicated that the virus was BVDV 1a. In the pathogenesis study, four calves experimentally infected with the BVDV strain developed depression, cough and other clinical signs. Calves showed high temperature over 40°C, and white blood cell counts dropped more than 40%. Conclusions A new subgenotype 1a strain of BVDV was firstly isolated from dairy cattle in China. The experimental infection showed that the virus was moderate pathogenic to cattle and can be used as a BVDV challenge virus to evaluate the efficacy of BVDV vaccines in the target animals. PMID:24444389

  13. TT Virus Infection in Nonhuman Primates and Characterization of the Viral Genome: Identification of Simian TT Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kenji; Inami, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Koichi; Nakamura, Shin; Goto, Shunji

    2000-01-01

    Newly discovered TT virus (TTV) is widely distributed in human populations. To understand more about the relationship between TTV and its hosts, we tested 400 sera from various nonhuman primates for the presence of TTV DNA by PCR assay. We collected serum samples from 24 different species of nonhuman primates. TTV DNA was determined by PCR with primers designed from the 5′-end region of the TTV genome. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of viral genomes were also performed. TTV DNA was detected in 87 of 98 (89%) chimpanzees and 3 of 21 (14%) crab-eating macaques. Nucleotide sequences of the PCR products obtained from both animals were 80 to 100% identical between two species. In contrast, the sequences differed from TTV isolates in humans by 24 to 33% at the nucleotide level and 36 to 50% at the amino acid level. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that all TTV isolates obtained from simians were distinct from the human TTV isolates. Furthermore, TTV in simians, but not in humans, was classified into three different genotypes. Our results indicate that TTV in simians represents a group different from, but closely related to, TTV in humans. From these results, we tentatively named this TTV simian TTV (s-TTV). The existence of the s-TTV will be important in determining the origin, nature, and transmission of human TTV and may provide useful animal models for studies of the infection and pathogenesis of this new DNA virus. PMID:10627568

  14. Surveillance and characterization of low pathogenic H5 avian influenza viruses isolated from wild migratory birds in Korea.

    PubMed

    Baek, Yun Hee; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Song, Min-Suk; Park, Kuk Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-il; Lee, Jun Han; Kim, Seok-Yong; Moon, Ho-Jin; Kim, Chul-Joong; Choi, Young Ki

    2010-06-01

    Migratory waterfowls are the natural reservoir of influenza A viruses. However, interspecies transmission had occasionally caused outbreaks in various hosts including humans. To characterize the genetic origins of H5 avian influenza viruses isolated from migratory birds in South Korea, phylogenetic analysis were conducted. A total of 53 H5 viruses were isolated between October 2005 and November 2008. Full genetic characterization indicated that most of these viruses belong to the Eurasian-like avian lineage. However, some segments of the AB/Korea/W235/07 and the AB/Korea/W236/07 isolates were clustered with North American lineage viruses rather than those of the Eurasian lineage, suggesting the occurrence of reassortment between these two avian virus lineages. Phylogenetic analysis further demonstrated that the H5N2 and H5N3 virus isolates were of the low pathogenicity H5 phenotype. The H5 viruses appear to be antigenically similar to each other, but could be distinguished from a recent HPAI H5N1 (EM/Korea/W149/06) virus by hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) assays. Experimental inoculation of representative viruses indicated that certain isolates, particularly AB/Korea/W163/07 (H5N2), could be detected in trachea and lungs of chickens but none could be transmitted by direct contact. Furthermore, all of the viruses could be detected in mice lung without prior adaptation which is indicative of their pathogenic potential in a mammalian host. Overall, our results emphasize the important role that migratory birds play in the perpetuation, transport, and reassortment of avian influenza viruses stressing the need for continued surveillance of influenza virus activity in these avian populations. PMID:20227447

  15. Identification of a bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 isolated from cattle in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L Q; Ren, M; Lin, Y Q; Ding, X Y; Zhang, G P; Zhao, X; Zhu, G Q

    2009-01-01

    The identification and characterization of bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2) strain SD-06 isolated from cattle in China is reported. We performed sequence analysis of 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) and E2 sequences and the identity at the nucleotide and amino acid level indicated that the isolate was closely related to BVDV-2. The BVDV-2 strain New York'93 showed the highest sequence homology with the isolate SD-06. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolate SD-06 belonged to BVDV-2a subtype. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay with the monoclonal antibody specific for BVDV-2 glycoprotein E2 confirmed this identification. Thus, the strain SD-06 was the first isolate of BVDV-2 identified in China. PMID:19537915

  16. Isolation and identification of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Valícek, L; Psikal, I; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Kubalíková, R; Kosinová, E

    1997-10-01

    Three strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were isolated in porcine lung macrophage (PLM) cultures from three swine herds. This has been the first successful isolation of PRRSV in the Czech Republic and the strains received the designations CAPM V-501, CAPM V-502 and CAPM V-503, respectively. All the three isolates in PLM were identified by immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase tests and the strain CAPM V-502 also by electron microscopy using the ultrathin section technique. The strain CAPM V-502 has been adapted to the cell line MARC-145. Viral RNA in PLM cultures infected with any of the isolated PRRSV strains was demonstrated by RT-PCR targeted to the more conserved ORF 7 genomic region encoding the nucleocapsid protein. The assessment of PCR products in agarose gel revealed a uniform size of 394 bp in all the three isolates and the European prototype strain Lelystad used as positive control. PMID:9416008

  17. Isolation of human T-cell leukemia virus in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Gallo, R C; Sarin, P S; Gelmann, E P; Robert-Guroff, M; Richardson, E; Kalyanaraman, V S; Mann, D; Sidhu, G D; Stahl, R E; Zolla-Pazner, S; Leibowitch, J; Popovic, M

    1983-05-20

    Several isolates of a human type-C retrovirus belonging to one group, known as human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV), have previously been obtained from patients with adult T-cell leukemia or lymphoma. The T-cell tropism of HTLV and its prevalence in the Caribbean basin prompted a search for it in patients with the epidemic T-cell immune deficiency disorder known as AIDS. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from one patient in the United States and two in France were cultured with T-cell growth factor (TCGF) an shown to express HTLV antigens. Virus from the U.S. patient was isolated and characterized and shown to be related to HTLV subgroup I. The virus was also transmitted into normal human T cells from umbilical cord blood of a newborn. Whether or not HTLV-I or other retroviruses of this family with T-cell tropism cause AIDS, it is possible that patients from whom the virus can be isolated can also transmit it to others. If the target cell of AIDS is the mature T cell as suspected, the methods used in these studies may prove useful for the long-term growth of these cells and for the identification of antigens specific for the etiological agent of AIDS. PMID:6601823

  18. Development, Characterization and Application of Monoclonal Antibodies against Brazilian Dengue Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bordignon, Juliano; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arboviral disease. The morbidity related to dengue infection supports the need for an early, quick and effective diagnostic test. Brazil is a hotspot for dengue, but no serological diagnostic test has been produced using Brazilian dengue virus isolates. This study aims to improve the development of immunodiagnostic methods for dengue virus (DENV) detection through the production and characterization of 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Brazilian isolates of DENV-1, -2 and -3. The mAbs include IgG2bκ, IgG2aκ and IgG1κ isotypes, and most were raised against the envelope or the pre-membrane proteins of DENV. When the antibodies were tested against the four DENV serotypes, different reactivity patterns were identified: group-specific, subcomplex specific (DENV-1, -3 and -4 and DENV-2 and -3) and dengue serotype-specific (DENV-2 or -3). Additionally, some mAbs cross-reacted with yellow fever virus (YFV), West Nile virus (WNV) and Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). None of the mAbs recognized the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Furthermore, mAbs D3 424/8G, D1 606/A12/B9 and D1 695/12C/2H were used to develop a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-dengue IgM detection in sera from patients with acute dengue. To our knowledge, these are the first monoclonal antibodies raised against Brazilian DENV isolates, and they may be of special interest in the development of diagnostic assays, as well as for basic research. PMID:25412181

  19. Development, characterization and application of monoclonal antibodies against Brazilian Dengue virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Zanluca, Camila; Mazzarotto, Giovanny Augusto Camacho Antevere; Bordignon, Juliano; Duarte Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arboviral disease. The morbidity related to dengue infection supports the need for an early, quick and effective diagnostic test. Brazil is a hotspot for dengue, but no serological diagnostic test has been produced using Brazilian dengue virus isolates. This study aims to improve the development of immunodiagnostic methods for dengue virus (DENV) detection through the production and characterization of 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Brazilian isolates of DENV-1, -2 and -3. The mAbs include IgG2bκ, IgG2aκ and IgG1κ isotypes, and most were raised against the envelope or the pre-membrane proteins of DENV. When the antibodies were tested against the four DENV serotypes, different reactivity patterns were identified: group-specific, subcomplex specific (DENV-1, -3 and -4 and DENV-2 and -3) and dengue serotype-specific (DENV-2 or -3). Additionally, some mAbs cross-reacted with yellow fever virus (YFV), West Nile virus (WNV) and Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). None of the mAbs recognized the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Furthermore, mAbs D3 424/8G, D1 606/A12/B9 and D1 695/12C/2H were used to develop a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-dengue IgM detection in sera from patients with acute dengue. To our knowledge, these are the first monoclonal antibodies raised against Brazilian DENV isolates, and they may be of special interest in the development of diagnostic assays, as well as for basic research. PMID:25412181

  20. Newcastle Disease Viruses Causing Recent Outbreaks Worldwide Show Unexpectedly High Genetic Similarity to Historical Virulent Isolates from the 1940s.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Kiril M; Lee, Dong-Hun; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Olivier, Timothy L; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-05-01

    Virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), a devastating disease of poultry and wild birds. Phylogenetic analyses clearly distinguish historical isolates (obtained prior to 1960) from currently circulating viruses of class II genotypes V, VI, VII, and XII through XVIII. Here, partial and complete genomic sequences of recent virulent isolates of genotypes II and IX from China, Egypt, and India were found to be nearly identical to those of historical viruses isolated in the 1940s. Phylogenetic analysis, nucleotide distances, and rates of change demonstrate that these recent isolates have not evolved significantly from the most closely related ancestors from the 1940s. The low rates of change for these virulent viruses (7.05 × 10(-5) and 2.05 × 10(-5) per year, respectively) and the minimal genetic distances existing between these and historical viruses (0.3 to 1.2%) of the same genotypes indicate an unnatural origin. As with any other RNA virus, Newcastle disease virus is expected to evolve naturally; thus, these findings suggest that some recent field isolates should be excluded from evolutionary studies. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses show that these recent virulent isolates are more closely related to virulent strains isolated during the 1940s, which have been and continue to be used in laboratory and experimental challenge studies. Since the preservation of viable viruses in the environment for over 6 decades is highly unlikely, it is possible that the source of some of the recent virulent viruses isolated from poultry and wild birds might be laboratory viruses. PMID:26888902

  1. Co-culture: A quick approach for isolation of street rabies virus in murine neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sasikalaveni, A.; Tirumurugaan, K. G.; Manoharan, S.; Raj, G. Dhinakar; Kumanan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laboratory detection of rabies in most cases is based on detection of the antigen by fluorescent antibody test, however, in weak positive cases confirmative laboratory diagnosis depends on widely accepted mouse inoculation test. Cell lines like neuroblastoma have been used to isolate the virus with greater success not only to target for diagnosis, but also for molecular studies that determine the epidemiology of the circulating street rabies strains and in studies that look at the efficiency of the developed monoclonal antibodies to neutralize the different rabies strains. Due to the recent issues in obtaining ethical permission for mouse experimentation, and also the passages required in the cell lines to isolate the virus, we report herewith a co-culture protocol using the murine neuroblastoma (MNA) cells, which enable quicker isolation of street rabies virus with minimum passages. Objective: This study is not to have an alternative diagnostic assay, but an approach to produce sufficient amount of rabies virus in minimum passages by a co-culture approach in MNA cells. Materials and Methods: The MNA cells are co-cultured by topping the normal cells with infected cells every 48 h and the infectivity was followed up by performing direct fluorescent-antibody test. Results: The co-culture approach results in 100% infectivity and hence the use of live mouse for experimentation could be avoided. Conclusion: Co-culture method provides an alternative for the situations with limited sample volume and for the quicker isolation of virus which warrants the wild type strains without much modification. PMID:27047148

  2. NS-gene based phylogenetic analysis of equine influenza viruses isolated in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kwasnik, Malgorzata; Gora, Ilona M; Rola, Jerzy; Zmudzinski, Jan F; Rozek, Wojciech

    2016-01-15

    The phylogenetic analysis of influenza virus is based mainly on the variable hemagglutinin or neuraminidase genes. However, some discrete evolutionary trends might be revealed when more conservative genes are considered. We compared all available in GenBank database full length NS sequences of equine influenza virus including Polish isolates. Four nucleotides at positions A202, A237, T672 and A714 and three amino acids at positions H59, K71 and S216 which are also present in A/eq/Pulawy/2006 and A/eq/Pulawy/2008 may be discriminating for the Florida sublineage. Threonine at position 83 seems to be characteristic for EIV strains of Florida 2 isolated after 2007. There are nine common substitutions in the NS sequences of A/eq/Pulawy/2005, A/eq/Aboyne/1/2005 and A/eq/Lincolnshire/1/2006 in relation to the reference strain A/eq/Miami/63, resulting in four amino acid changes in NS1 protein (I56, E76, K140, E179) and one in NEP (R22). We grouped these strains as "Aboyne-like". Some of the listed changes were also observed in H7N7 strains isolated between 1956 and 1966, in A/eq/Jilin/89 or in pre-divergent H3N8 strains. Two hypotheses regarding the origin of this group were postulated: three independent transfers of avian influenza viruses into the equine population or reassortation between H7N7 and H3N8 EIV. Similarities of the NS sequences of "Aboyne like" viruses to viruses isolated in the fifties or seventies can reflect a phenomenon of "frozen evolution". PMID:26711034

  3. Genetic diversity of the coat protein of olive latent virus 1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Varanda, C M R; Nolasco, G; Clara, M I; Félix, M R

    2014-06-01

    The CP gene variability among 21 olive latent virus 1 (OLV-1) isolates obtained from different hosts and locations and at different times was assessed. Amplicons obtained by RT-PCR were cloned, and at least 10 sequences from each isolate were analyzed and compared. OLV-1 sequences available in GenBank were included. The encoded CPs consisted of 270 amino acids, except those of isolates G1S and C7 (269 aa) and G6 (271 aa). Comparison of CP genomic sequences of the isolates under study showed very low values of nucleotide diversity, 0.02, and maximum nucleotide distances between (0.087) or within isolates (0.001). Although very few nucleotide sequence differences were observed among the isolates, olive isolates exhibited lower diversity (0.012). In addition, at position 158 (157 in C7 and G1S and 159 in G6) of the deduced aa sequences, an alanine residue was found to be conserved among the olive isolates. In citrus and tulip isolates, a threonine residue was present at position 158, whereas a valine was present at this same position in tomato isolates. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that OLV-1 isolates clustered in five groups according to original host. However, G6, originally recovered from olive but repeatedly inoculated and maintained in N. benthamiana plants for 8 years in our laboratory, was separated from other isolates. This may be attributable to adaptation to the experimental host over time. There was no correlation of phylogenetic grouping of isolates based on geographical location or year of collection. Strong negative selection may have contributed to the low diversity among the OLV-1 CP isolates. PMID:24352437

  4. Phospholipase A2 Isolated from the Venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus Inactivates Dengue virus and Other Enveloped Viruses by Disrupting the Viral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Vanessa Danielle; Soares, Ricardo Oliveira; dos Santos-Junior, Nilton Nascimento; Trabuco, Amanda Cristina; Cintra, Adelia Cristina; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu; Caliri, Antonio; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; Aquino, Victor Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The Flaviviridae family includes several virus pathogens associated with human diseases worldwide. Within this family, Dengue virus is the most serious threat to public health, especially in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Currently, there are no vaccines or specific antiviral drugs against Dengue virus or against most of the viruses of this family. Therefore, the development of vaccines and the discovery of therapeutic compounds against the medically most important flaviviruses remain a global public health priority. We previously showed that phospholipase A2 isolated from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus was able to inhibit Dengue virus and Yellow fever virus infection in Vero cells. Here, we present evidence that phospholipase A2 has a direct effect on Dengue virus particles, inducing a partial exposure of genomic RNA, which strongly suggests inhibition via the cleavage of glycerophospholipids at the virus lipid bilayer envelope. This cleavage might induce a disruption of the lipid bilayer that causes a destabilization of the E proteins on the virus surface, resulting in inactivation. We show by computational analysis that phospholipase A2 might gain access to the Dengue virus lipid bilayer through the pores found on each of the twenty 3-fold vertices of the E protein shell on the virus surface. In addition, phospholipase A2 is able to inactivate other enveloped viruses, highlighting its potential as a natural product lead for developing broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. PMID:25383618

  5. Isolation of vesicular stomatitis virus defective interfering genomes with different amounts of 5'-terminal complementarity.

    PubMed Central

    Kolakofsky, D

    1982-01-01

    I isolated at least 30 different vesicular stomatitis virus defective interfering (DI) genomes, distinguished by chain length, by five independent undiluted passages of a repeatedly cloned virus plaque. Labeling of the 3' hydroxyl ends of these DI genomes and RNase digestion studies demonstrated that the ends of these DI genomes were terminally complementary to different extents (approximately 46 to 200 nucleotides). Mapping studies showed that the complementary ends of all of the DI genomes were derived from the 5' ends of the nondefective minus-strand genome. Regardless of the extent of terminal complementarity, all of the DI genomes synthesized the same 46-nucleotide minus-strand leader RNA. Images PMID:6281468

  6. Comparison of the Czech Scrophularia isolate with the Italian Anagyris strain of scrophularia mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Honetslegrov, J; Petrzik, K; Spak, J; Peliknov, J

    1994-02-01

    Scrophularia mottle virus (ScMV) was newly found in the Czech Republic in Scrophularia nodosa L. plants. The Czech isolate (ScMV-C) was serologically identical and similar in symptoms and host range to the Italian Anagyris strain (ScMV-I). Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Samsun, Nicotiana glutinosa L., Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. White Burley, Physalis floridana Rybd. and Cucumis sativus L. are described as new host plants of ScMV. Double-stranded RNA patterns and the isoelectric point of this virus are characterized. PMID:8067309

  7. Full Genome Sequence of Egg Drop Syndrome Virus Strain FJ12025 Isolated from Muscovy Duckling

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guanghua; Chen, Hongmei; Cheng, Longfei; Fu, Qiuling; Shi, Shaohua; Wan, Chunhe; Chen, Cuiteng; Lin, Jiansheng

    2013-01-01

    Egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) strain FJ12025 was isolated from a 9-day-old Muscovy duckling. The results of the sequence showed that the genome of strain FJ12025 is 33,213 bp in length, with a G+C content of 43.03%. When comparing the genome sequence of strain FJ12025 to that of laying duck original strain AV-127, we found 50 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the two viral genome sequences. A genomic sequence comparison of FJ12025 and AV-127 will help to understand the phenotypic differences between the two viruses. PMID:23969050

  8. Full Genome Sequence of Egg Drop Syndrome Virus Strain FJ12025 Isolated from Muscovy Duckling.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guanghua; Chen, Hongmei; Huang, Yu; Cheng, Longfei; Fu, Qiuling; Shi, Shaohua; Wan, Chunhe; Chen, Cuiteng; Lin, Jiansheng

    2013-01-01

    Egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) strain FJ12025 was isolated from a 9-day-old Muscovy duckling. The results of the sequence showed that the genome of strain FJ12025 is 33,213 bp in length, with a G+C content of 43.03%. When comparing the genome sequence of strain FJ12025 to that of laying duck original strain AV-127, we found 50 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the two viral genome sequences. A genomic sequence comparison of FJ12025 and AV-127 will help to understand the phenotypic differences between the two viruses. PMID:23969050

  9. VIRUSES THAT INTERACT SYNGERISTICALLY WITH SWEET POTATO CHLOROTIC STUNT VIRUS-NIGERIAN ISOLATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early studies of sweet potato virus disease (SPVD)in Nigeria showed that it was caused by co-infection of Ipomoea batatas with an aphid-transmitted and a whitefly-transmitted agent. The agents were later found to be Sweet potato feathery mottle (SPFMV, genus Potyvirus)and Sweet potato chlorotic stu...

  10. Evolutionary and phenotypic analysis of live virus isolates suggests arthropod origin of a pathogenic RNA virus family

    PubMed Central

    Marklewitz, Marco; Zirkel, Florian; Kurth, Andreas; Drosten, Christian; Junglen, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of arboviruses are unknown because their typical dual host tropism is paraphyletic within viral families. Here we studied one of the most diversified and medically relevant RNA virus families, the Bunyaviridae, in which four of five established genera are transmitted by arthropods. We define two cardinally novel bunyavirus groups based on live isolation of 26 viral strains from mosquitoes (Jonchet virus [JONV], eight strains; Ferak virus [FERV], 18 strains). Both viruses were incapable of replicating at vertebrate-typical temperatures but replicated efficiently in insect cells. Replication involved formation of virion-sense RNA (vRNA) and mRNA, including cap-snatching activity. SDS/PAGE, mass spectrometry, and Edman degradation identified translation products corresponding to virion-associated RNA-dependent RNA polymerase protein (RdRp), glycoprotein precursor protein, glycoproteins Gn and Gc, as well as putative nonstructural proteins NSs and NSm. Distinct virion morphologies suggested ancient evolutionary divergence, with bunyavirus-typical morphology for FERV (spheres of 60–120 nm) as opposed to an unusual bimorphology for JONV (tubular virions of 60 × 600 nm and spheres of 80 nm). Both viruses were genetically equidistant from all other bunyaviruses, showing <15% amino acid identity in the RdRp palm domain. Both had different and unique conserved genome termini, as in separate bunyavirus genera. JONV and FERV define two novel sister taxons to the superclade of orthobunyaviruses, tospoviruses, and hantaviruses. Phylogenetic ancestral state reconstruction with probabilistic hypothesis testing suggested ancestral associations with arthropods at deep nodes throughout the bunyavirus tree. Our findings suggest an arthropod origin of bunyaviruses. PMID:26038576

  11. Genotyping of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) geographical isolates from Brazil and comparison to other isolates from the Americas.

    PubMed

    Muller, Isabel C; Andrade, Thales P D; Tang-Nelson, Kathy F J; Marques, Maria R F; Lightner, Donald V

    2010-01-25

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a viral pathogen that has caused significant economic losses in shrimp farming. Variable-number tandem repeats (VNTRs) (open reading frame [ORF] 94, 125 and 75), a large deletion (ORF 23/24) and a transposase were proposed as molecular markers for genotyping. WSSV-infected shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei were collected in 2 Brazilian regions (Santa Catarina and Bahia) from 2005 to 2008. DNA was extracted and PCR of the variable regions was performed, followed by sequencing. All Santa Catarina samples showed the same number of repeats for the minisatellites analyzed. Bahia samples showed a different pattern for the regions, indicating that there are at least 2 different WSSV genotypes in Brazil. Both Brazilian isolates have an 11453 bp deletion in ORF 23/24 when compared with WSSV-TW (Taiwan), which has the full sequence for this locus. The Brazilian WSSV isolates were compared with WSSV isolates from other countries in the Americas (USA, Panama, Honduras, Mexico and Nicaragua); the repeat number patterns for the 3 VNTR regions analyzed were different between the Brazilian isolates and the other western-hemisphere isolates. This may be due to mutations in WSSV after its introduction into the different countries. Our results also show that WSSV found in Bahia and Santa Catarina very likely originated from different sources of contamination. PMID:20225670

  12. Novel influenza A viruses isolated from Canadian feral ducks: including strains antigenically related to swine influenza (Hsw1N1) viruses.

    PubMed

    Hinshaw, V S; Webster, R G; Turner, B

    1978-10-01

    Twelve influenza A viruses, antigenically related to the Ho, H1 and Hsw1 subtypes, were isolated from cloacal samples of feral ducks in Canada. Antigenic comparisons showed that these viruses were most closely related to the recent HSW1N1 isolates from man and pigs, whereas in vivo pathogenicity tests revealed differences between the Hsw1N1 viruses from the ducks and those from humans and pigs. Antigenic characterization of 94 additional influenza A viruses from the ducks showed four haemagglutinin subtypes (Hav1, Hav4, Hav5 and Hav7), an unclassified haemagglutinin, and six neuraminidase subtypes (N1, N2, Neq2, Nav1, Nav2 and Nav5) in various combinations, some of which are novel and have not previously been reported. Three of these duck influenza viruses possessed a haemagglutinin antigenically related to that of classical fowl plaque virus. A much higher percentage of virus isolations were from juvenile ducks (18.5%) than from adults (5%). All of the ducks, from which viruses were isolated, appeared healthy at the time of sampling. Serological studies on a limited number of humans and domestic birds living in close proximity to the Canadian ducks revealed no evidence of interspecies transmission. Our findings suggest that these birds serve as a substantial reservoir of antigenically diverse influenza viruses, including isolates antigenically related to the current human and animal influenza viruses. This reservoir in nature may be perpetuated by a cycle involving annual infection of juvenile birds followed by transmission to the remaining susceptible birds until the next congregation during the breeding season. PMID:81267

  13. Isolation and genetic characterization of avian influenza viruses and a Newcastle disease virus from wild birds in Barbados: 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Kirk O; Lavoie, Marc C; Kim, L Mia; Afonso, Claudio L; Suarez, David L

    2007-09-01

    Zoonotic transmission of an H5N1 avian influenza A virus to humans in 2003-present has generated increased public health and scientific interest in the prevalence and variability of influenza A viruses in wild birds and their potential threat to human health. Migratory waterfowl and shorebirds are regarded as the primordial reservoir of all influenza A viral subtypes and have been repeatedly implicated in avian influenza outbreaks in domestic poultry and swine. All of the 16 hemagglutinin and nine neuraminidase influenza subtypes have been isolated from wild birds, but waterfowl of the order Anseriformes are the most commonly infected. Using 9-to-11-day-old embryonating chicken egg culture, virus isolation attempts were conducted on 168 cloacal swabs from various resident, imported, and migratory bird species in Barbados during the months of July to October of 2003 and 2004. Hemagglutination assay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to screen all allantoic fluids for the presence of hemagglutinating agents and influenza A virus. Hemagglutination positive-influenza negative samples were also tested for Newcastle disease virus (NDV), which is also found in waterfowl. Two influenza A viruses and one NDV were isolated from Anseriformes (40/168), with isolation rates of 5.0% (2/40) and 2.5% (1/40), respectively, for influenza A and NDV. Sequence analysis of the influenza A virus isolates showed them to be H4N3 viruses that clustered with other North American avian influenza viruses. This is the first report of the presence of influenza A virus and NDV in wild birds in the English-speaking Caribbean. PMID:17992942

  14. Isolation and characterization of a hepatitis B virus endemic in herons.

    PubMed Central

    Sprengel, R; Kaleta, E F; Will, H

    1988-01-01

    A new hepadnavirus (designated heron hepatitis B virus [HHBV]) has been isolated; this virus is endemic in grey herons (Ardea cinerea) in Germany and closely related to duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) by morphology of viral particles and size of the genome and of the major viral envelope and core proteins. Despite its striking similarities to DHBV, HHBV cannot be transmitted to ducks by infection or by transfection with cloned viral DNA. After the viral genome was cloned and sequenced, a comparative sequence analysis revealed an identical genome organization of HHBV and DHBV (pre-C/C-, pre-S/S-, and pol-ORFs). An open reading frame, designated X in mammalian hepadnaviruses, is not present in DHBV. DHBV and HHBV differ by 21.6% base exchanges, and thus they are less closely related than the two known rodent hepatitis B viruses (16.4%). The nucleocapsid protein and the 17-kilodalton envelope protein sequences of DHBV and HHBV are well conserved. In contrast, the pre-S part of the 34-kilodalton envelope protein which is believed to mediate virus attachment to the cell is highly divergent (less than 50% homology). The availability of two closely related avian hepadnaviruses will now allow us to test recombinant viruses in vivo and in vitro for host specificity-determining sequences. Images PMID:3418788

  15. Structure of a Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus assembly intermediate isolated from infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Kristen; Lokesh, G.L.; Sherman, Michael; Watowich, Stanley

    2010-10-25

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a prototypical enveloped ssRNA virus of the family Togaviridae. To better understand alphavirus assembly, we analyzed newly formed nucleocapsid particles (termed pre-viral nucleocapsids) isolated from infected cells. These particles were intermediates along the virus assembly pathway, and ultimately bind membrane-associated viral glycoproteins to bud as mature infectious virus. Purified pre-viral nucleocapsids were spherical with a unimodal diameter distribution. The structure of one class of pre-viral nucleocapsids was determined with single particle reconstruction of cryo-electron microscopy images. These studies showed that pre-viral nucleocapsids assembled into an icosahedral structure with a capsid stoichiometry similar to the mature nucleocapsid. However, the individual capsomers were organized significantly differently within the pre-viral and mature nucleocapsids. The pre-viral nucleocapsid structure implies that nucleocapsids are highly plastic and undergo glycoprotein and/or lipid-driven rearrangements during virus self-assembly. This mechanism of self-assembly may be general for other enveloped viruses.

  16. Pathotyping of recent Indian field isolates of Marek's disease virus serotype 1.

    PubMed

    Suresh, P; Johnson Rajeswar, J; Sukumar, K; Harikrishnan, T J; Srinivasan, P

    2015-06-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the virulence of Marek's disease virus (MDV) serotype 1 field isolates obtained from poultry flocks of southern part of India. Five representative MDV serotype 1 strains were isolated from eighty-six blood samples collected from fifteen farms. Three out of five isolates which were free from avian leukosis virus (ALV) and reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) were adapted in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) culture and designated as Ind/TN/11/01, Ind/KA/12/02 and Ind/TN/12/03. Pathotyping assay was conducted in two trials. In the first trial, non-vaccinated chickens were challenged (trial I), while in second trial, two types of vaccinated chickens along with non-vaccinated controls were challenged (trial II). Birds inoculated with field isolate Ind/TN/12/03 had very low body (75.34 ± 3.04 g 15 days post infection (dpi)) and bursa Fabricii weight (1.64 ± 0.06 at 15 dpi) when compared to those inoculated with the other two isolates (Ind/TN/11/01 and Ind/KA/12/02) and uninoculated controls (body weight 111.33 ± 1.30 g and bursa Fabricii weight 4.33 ± 0.11 15 dpi). Incidence of early mortality syndrome (53%) and lymphoma (86%) induced by Ind/TN/12/03 was comparable with very virulent strains published elsewhere. In protection test, the percentage of Marek's disease (MD) incidence induced by Ind/TN/12/03 was 57.5% and 25% in monovalent and bivalent vaccine inoculated birds respectively compared to uninoculated control (100%). Based on the above findings in pathotyping experimental trials with a supportive evidence of histopathological observations, isolate Ind/TN/12/03 was considered as very virulent MDV and other two isolates were considered as virulent MDVs. PMID:26104332

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Drumond, Betania Paiva; da Silva Fagundes, Luiz Gustavo; Rocha, Raissa Prado; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Araki, Carlos Shigueru; Colombo, Tatiana Elisa; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Castilho, Thiago Elias; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1-4) are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER) when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population. PMID:26887252

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Drumond, Betania Paiva; da Silva Fagundes, Luiz Gustavo; Rocha, Raissa Prado; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Araki, Carlos Shigueru; Colombo, Tatiana Elisa; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Castilho, Thiago Elias; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1–4) are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER) when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population. PMID:26887252

  19. Whole Genomes of Chandipura Virus Isolates and Comparative Analysis with Other Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Sarah S.; Kumar, Satyendra; Arankalle, Vidya A.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandipura virus (CHPV) belonging to the Vesiculovirus genus and Rhabdoviridae family, has recently been associated with a number of encephalitis epidemics, with high mortality in children, in different parts of India. No full length genome sequences of CHPV isolates were available in GenBank and little is known about the molecular markers for pathogenesis. In the present study, we provide the complete genomic sequences of four isolates from epidemics during 2003–2007. These sequences along with the deduced sequence of the prototype isolate of 1965 were analysed using phylogeny, motif search, homology modeling and epitope prediction methods. Comparison with other rhaboviruses was also done for functional extrapolations. All CHPV isolates clustered with the Isfahan virus and maintained several functional motifs of other rhabdoviruses. A notable difference with the prototype vesiculovirus, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus was in the L-domain flanking sequences of the M protein that are known to be crucial for interaction with host proteins. With respect to the prototype isolate, significant additional mutations were acquired in the 2003–2007 isolates. Several mutations in G mapped onto probable antigenic sites. A mutation in N mapped onto regions crucial for N-N interaction and a putative T-cell epitope. A mutation in the Casein kinase II phosphorylation site in P may attribute to increased rates of phosphorylation. Gene junction comparison revealed changes in the M-G junction of all the epidemic isolates that may have implications on read-through and gene transcription levels. The study can form the basis for further experimental verification and provide additional insights into the virulence determinants of the CHPV. PMID:22272333

  20. Isolation and genetic characterization of Japanese encephalitis virus from equines in India

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Harisankar; Singh, Birendra K.; Virmani, Nitin; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an important vector-borne viral disease of humans and horses in Asia. JE outbreaks occur regularly amongst humans in certain parts of India and sporadic cases occur among horses. In this study, JE seroprevalence and evidence of JE virus (JEV) infection among horses in Haryana (India) is described. Antibodies against JEV were detected in 67 out of 637 (10.5%) horses screened between 2006 and 2010. Two foals exhibiting neurological signs were positive for JEV RNA by RT-PCR; JEV was isolated from the serum of one of the foals collected on the second day of illness. This is the first report of JEV isolation from a horse in India. Furthermore, a pool of mosquitoes collected from the premises housing these foals was positive for JEV RNA by RT-PCR. Three structural genes, capsid (C), premembrane (prM), and envelope (E) of the isolated virus (JE/eq/India/H225/2009) spanning 2,500 nucleotides (from 134 to 2,633) were cloned and sequenced. BLAST results showed that these genes had a greater than 97% nucleotide sequence identity with different human JEV isolates from India. Phylogenetic analysis based on E- and C/prM genes indicated that the equine JEV isolate belonged to genotype III and was closely related to the Vellore group of JEV isolates from India. PMID:22705732

  1. A highly divergent isolate of tomato blistering mosaic virus from Solanum violaefolium.

    PubMed

    Blawid, Rosana; Hayashi, Evelyn Anly Ishikawa; Rezende, Jorge Alberto Marques; Kitajima, Elliot W; Nagata, Tatsuya

    2016-04-01

    The complete genome of a tymovirus infecting Solanum violaefolium was sequenced. The genome comprised 6284 nt, with a 5'-UTR of 137 nt and a comparatively longer 3'-UTR of 121 nt. Sequence analysis confirmed three ORFs encoding a movement protein, a polyprotein, and a coat protein (CP). The isolate was considered to be the Tomato blistering mosaic virus (ToBMV) based on a CP amino acid sequence identity of 95.3 %. The nucleotide sequence of the complete genome of the S. violaefolium isolate, however, differed markedly from the other two reported ToBMV isolates, with identities of 76.6 and 76.3 %, below one of the demarcation criteria of the genus Tymovirus (overall genome identity of 80 %). No recombination signals were detected in the genome of this isolate. The high identity of the CP amino acid sequence and similar host responses suggest that the S. violaefolium isolate belongs to the same species as the Tomato blistering mosaic virus. The sequence analysis of this ToBMV isolate thus suggests that the demarcation criterion of 80 % overall genome sequence identity in the genus Tymovirus may require revision. PMID:26810401

  2. Genome sequence analysis of dengue virus 1 isolated in Key West, Florida.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongyoung; Richards, Stephanie L; Alto, Barry W; Bettinardi, David J; Smartt, Chelsea T

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes. In November 2010, a dengue outbreak was reported in Monroe County in southern Florida (FL), including greater than 20 confirmed human cases. The virus collected from the human cases was verified as DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) and one isolate was provided for sequence analysis. RNA was extracted from the DENV-1 isolate and was used in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify PCR fragments to sequence. Nucleic acid primers were designed to generate overlapping PCR fragments that covered the entire genome. The DENV-1 isolate found in Key West (KW), FL was sequenced for whole genome characterization. Sequence assembly, Genbank searches, and recombination analyses were performed to verify the identity of the genome sequences and to determine percent similarity to known DENV-1 sequences. We show that the KW DENV-1 strain is 99% identical to Nicaraguan and Mexican DENV-1 strains. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the DENV-1 isolated in KW originated from Nicaragua (NI) and the KW strain may circulate in KW. Also, recombination analysis results detected recombination events in the KW strain compared to DENV-1 strains from Puerto Rico. We evaluate the relative growth of KW strain of DENV-1 compared to other dengue viruses to determine whether the underlying genetics of the strain is associated with a replicative advantage, an important consideration since local transmission of DENV may result because domestic tourism can spread DENVs. PMID:24098658

  3. Nonsuppurative Encephalomyelitis in a Calf in Japan and Isolation of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Genotype 1 from the Affected Calf

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Takashi; Saito, Sachie; Horiuchi, Sanae; Maruta, Tetsuya; Kato, Tomoko; Yanase, Tohru; Yamakawa, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was isolated from the cerebrum of a calf which showed severe neurological symptoms in late September 2009, and the JEV isolate was revealed to be of genotype 1. This is the first report describing the isolation of genotype 1 JEV from cattle. PMID:23885004

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF VARIOUS ISOLATES OF A NATURALLY OCCURRING RECOMBINANT AVIAN LEUKOSIS VIRUS USING BIOLOGICAL ASSAYS AND POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, we have isolated a naturally occurring recombinant avian leukosis virus (ALV) containing the envelope of ALV-B and LTR of ALV-J from commercial layer flocks affected with myeloid leukosis. Seven new isolates of the recombinant ALV, isolated from the same flock, were characterized using bio...

  5. Genetic characterization of influenza A viruses (H5N1) isolated from 3rd wave of Thailand AI outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Amonsin, Alongkorn; Chutinimitkul, Salin; Pariyothorn, Nuananong; Songserm, Thaweesak; Damrongwantanapokin, Sudarat; Puranaveja, Suphasawatt; Jam-On, Rungroj; Sae-Heng, Namdee; Payungporn, Sunchai; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Chaisingh, Arunee; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Suradhat, Sanipa; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Poovorawan, Yong

    2006-12-01

    Three major outbreaks of avian influenza (AI) occurred in Thailand. During the third episode in October 2005, we have isolated H5N1 viruses from one human case and three poultry cases. The whole genomes of AI viruses from human, chickens and quail from the outbreaks were characterized. Sequence analysis of eight gene segments revealed that the 2005 H5N1 viruses isolated in October 2005 were closely related to those recovered from chicken, tiger(s) and human(s) in January and July 2004. In addition, the genetic changes of the AI isolates at the HA cleavage site have been observed. PMID:16935377

  6. Characterization of H7N9 influenza A viruses isolated from humans.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Kiso, Maki; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Nakajima, Noriko; Imai, Masaki; Yamada, Shinya; Murakami, Shin; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Takashita, Emi; McBride, Ryan; Noda, Takeshi; Hatta, Masato; Imai, Hirotaka; Zhao, Dongming; Kishida, Noriko; Shirakura, Masayuki; de Vries, Robert P; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Tamura, Tomokazu; Tomita, Yuriko; Fujimoto, Naomi; Goto, Kazue; Katsura, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Eiryo; Ishikawa, Izumi; Watanabe, Shinji; Ito, Mutsumi; Sakai-Tagawa, Yuko; Sugita, Yukihiko; Uraki, Ryuta; Yamaji, Reina; Eisfeld, Amie J; Zhong, Gongxun; Fan, Shufang; Ping, Jihui; Maher, Eileen A; Hanson, Anthony; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko; Ozawa, Makoto; Neumann, Gabriele; Kida, Hiroshi; Odagiri, Takato; Paulson, James C; Hasegawa, Hideki; Tashiro, Masato; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-09-26

    Avian influenza A viruses rarely infect humans; however, when human infection and subsequent human-to-human transmission occurs, worldwide outbreaks (pandemics) can result. The recent sporadic infections of humans in China with a previously unrecognized avian influenza A virus of the H7N9 subtype (A(H7N9)) have caused concern owing to the appreciable case fatality rate associated with these infections (more than 25%), potential instances of human-to-human transmission, and the lack of pre-existing immunity among humans to viruses of this subtype. Here we characterize two early human A(H7N9) isolates, A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) and A/Shanghai/1/2013 (H7N9); hereafter referred to as Anhui/1 and Shanghai/1, respectively. In mice, Anhui/1 and Shanghai/1 were more pathogenic than a control avian H7N9 virus (A/duck/Gunma/466/2011 (H7N9); Dk/GM466) and a representative pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus (A/California/4/2009 (H1N1pdm09); CA04). Anhui/1, Shanghai/1 and Dk/GM466 replicated well in the nasal turbinates of ferrets. In nonhuman primates, Anhui/1 and Dk/GM466 replicated efficiently in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, whereas the replicative ability of conventional human influenza viruses is typically restricted to the upper respiratory tract of infected primates. By contrast, Anhui/1 did not replicate well in miniature pigs after intranasal inoculation. Critically, Anhui/1 transmitted through respiratory droplets in one of three pairs of ferrets. Glycan arrays showed that Anhui/1, Shanghai/1 and A/Hangzhou/1/2013 (H7N9) (a third human A(H7N9) virus tested in this assay) bind to human virus-type receptors, a property that may be critical for virus transmissibility in ferrets. Anhui/1 was found to be less sensitive in mice to neuraminidase inhibitors than a pandemic H1N1 2009 virus, although both viruses were equally susceptible to an experimental antiviral polymerase inhibitor. The robust replicative ability in mice, ferrets and nonhuman primates and the limited transmissibility in ferrets of Anhui/1 suggest that A(H7N9) viruses have pandemic potential. PMID:23842494

  7. Characterization of H7N9 influenza A viruses isolated from humans

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Kiso, Maki; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Nakajima, Noriko; Imai, Masaki; Yamada, Shinya; Murakami, Shin; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Takashita, Emi; McBride, Ryan; Noda, Takeshi; Hatta, Masato; Imai, Hirotaka; Zhao, Dongming; Kishida, Noriko; Shirakura, Masayuki; de Vries, Robert P.; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Tamura, Tomokazu; Tomita, Yuriko; Fujimoto, Naomi; Goto, Kazue; Katsura, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Eiryo; Ishikawa, Izumi; Watanabe, Shinji; Ito, Mutsumi; Sakai-Tagawa, Yuko; Sugita, Yukihiko; Uraki, Ryuta; Yamaji, Reina; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Zhong, Gongxun; Fan, Shufang; Ping, Jihui; Maher, Eileen A.; Hanson, Anthony; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko; Ozawa, Makoto; Neumann, Gabriele; Kida, Hiroshi; Odagiri, Takato; Paulson, James C.; Hasegawa, Hideki; Tashiro, Masato; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Summary Avian influenza A viruses rarely infect humans, but if they do and transmit among them, worldwide outbreaks (pandemics) can result. The recent sporadic infections of humans in China with a previously unrecognized avian influenza A virus of the H7N9 subtype (A(H7N9)) have caused concern due to the appreciable case fatality rate associated with these infections (>25%), potential instances of human-to-human transmission1, and the lack of pre-existing immunity among humans to viruses of this subtype. Here, we therefore characterized two early human A(H7N9) isolates, A/Anhui/1/2013 and A/Shanghai/1/2013 (H7N9; hereafter referred to as Anhui/1 and Shanghai/1, respectively). In mice, Anhui/1 and Shanghai/1 were more pathogenic than a control avian H7N9 virus (A/duck/Gunma/466/2011; H7N9; Dk/GM466) and a representative pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus (A/California/04/2009; H1N1; CA04). Anhui/1, Shanghai/1, and Dk/GM466 replicated well in the nasal turbinates of ferrets. In nonhuman primates (NHPs), Anhui/1 and Dk/GM466 replicated efficiently in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, whereas the replicative ability of conventional human influenza viruses is typically restricted to the upper respiratory tract of infected primates. By contrast, Anhui/1 did not replicate well in miniature pigs upon intranasal inoculation. Most critically, Anhui/1 transmitted via respiratory droplets in one of three pairs of ferrets. Glycan arrays demonstrated that Anhui/1, Shanghai/1, and A/Hangzhou/1/2013 (a third human A(H7N9) virus tested in this assay) bind to human virus-type receptors, a property that may be critical for virus transmissibility in ferrets. Anhui/1 was less sensitive than a pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus to neuraminidase inhibitors, although both viruses were equally susceptible to an experimental antiviral polymerase inhibitor. The robust replicative ability in mice, ferrets, and NHPs and the limited transmissibility in ferrets of Anhui/1 suggest that A(H7N9) viruses have pandemic potential. PMID:23842494

  8. Identification of new isolates of Turnip mosaic virus that cluster with less common viral strains.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Rodríguez-Mateos, M; Touriño, A; Fresno, J; Gómez-Campo, C; Jenner, C E; Walsh, J A; Ponz, F

    2007-01-01

    Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) was found infecting cultivated brassicas and wild and cultivated ornamental Brassicaceae plants in different regions of Spain. Five new TuMV isolates, originating from different host plant species (Brassica cretica, Brassica juncea, Brassica napus, Eruca vesicaria subsp. sativa and Sisymbrium orientale), have been identified. The nucleotide sequences of the coat protein (CP) genes of the five isolates were determined. Phylogenetic analysis of the CP sequences showed that the five isolates grouped into two different clusters. The three isolates from the central region of Spain clustered with a previously reported Pisum sativum isolate from southeastern Spain, whereas the other two isolates from the eastern region clustered with two Italian and two Greek isolates. Both clusters were genetically distinct and belonged to the multi-lineage group OBR. The OBR group contains mainly TuMV isolates from hosts other than Brassica spp. and Raphanus sativus and mostly originating from Mediterranean countries. These new sequences provide further phylogenetic resolution of the OBR group. Although new TuMV isolates have been found in Spain, they were not associated with any serious disease outbreaks. PMID:17347771

  9. Pathogenesis of and immunity to a new influenza A (H5N1) virus isolated from duck meat.

    PubMed

    Lu, X H; Cho, D; Hall, H; Rowe, T; Mo, I P; Sung, H W; Kim, W J; Kang, C; Cox, N; Klimov, A; Katz, J M

    2003-01-01

    The outbreak of avian influenza H5N1 in Hong Kong in 1997 raised concerns about the potential for the H5 subtype to cause a human pandemic. In 2001 a new H5N1 virus, A/Duck Meat/Anyang/AVL-1/2001 (A/Dkmt), was isolated from imported duck meat in Korea. The pathogenesis of this virus was investigated in mice. A/Dkmt virus had low infectivity but was lethal for mice at high doses, and at lethal doses, the virus replicated in the brains of infected mice. A/Dkmt virus cross-reacted poorly with ferret antisera raised against human H5N1 viruses, but prior infection with A/Dkmt virus protected mice from death after secondary infection with human H5N1 virus. PMID:14575129

  10. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johansson, T.; Einer-Jensen, K.; Batts, W.; Ahrens, P.; Bjorkblom, C.; Kurath, G.; Bjorklund, H.; Lorenzen, N.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes the lethal disease infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in juvenile salmon and trout. The nucleocapsid (N) protein gene and partial glycoprotein (G) gene (nucleotides 457 to 1061) of the European isolates IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 13/98 11621, DE-DF 4/99-8/99, AU-9695338 and RU-FR1 were sequenced and compared with IHNV isolates from the North American genogroups U, M and L. In phylogenetic studies the N gene of the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, though in a different subgroup than the isolates from the USA. Analyses of the partial G gene of these European isolates clustered them in the M genogroup close to the root while the Russian isolate clustered in the U genogroup. The European isolates together with US-WRAC and US-Col-80 were also tested in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the N protein. MAbs 136-1 and 136-3 reacted equally at all concentrations with the isolates tested, indicating that these antibodies identify a common epitope. MAb 34D3 separated the M and L genogroup isolates from the U genogroup isolate. MAb 1DW14D divided the European isolates into 2 groups. MAb 1DW14D reacted more strongly with DE-DF 13/98 11621 and RU-FR1 than with IT-217A, FR- 32/87, DE-DF 4/99-8/99 and AU-9695338. In the phylogenetic studies, the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, whereas in the serological studies using MAbs, the European M genogroup isolates could not be placed in the same specific group. These results indicate that genotypic and serotypic classification do not correlate. ?? 2009 Inter-Research.

  11. High-Throughput Isolation of Giant Viruses in Liquid Medium Using Automated Flow Cytometry and Fluorescence Staining

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Jacques Y. B.; Robert, Stephane; Reteno, Dorine G.; Andreani, Julien; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of giant viruses using amoeba co-culture is tedious and fastidious. Recently, the procedure was successfully associated with a method that detects amoebal lysis on agar plates. However, the procedure remains time-consuming and is limited to protozoa growing on agar. We present here advances for the isolation of giant viruses. A high-throughput automated method based on flow cytometry and fluorescent staining was used to detect the presence of giant viruses in liquid medium. Development was carried out with the Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain widely used in past and current co-culture experiments. The proof of concept was validated with virus suspensions: artificially contaminated samples but also environmental samples from which viruses were previously isolated. After validating the technique, and fortuitously isolating a new Mimivirus, we automated the technique on 96-well plates and tested it on clinical and environmental samples using other protozoa. This allowed us to detect more than 10 strains of previously known species of giant viruses and seven new strains of a new virus lineage. This automated high-throughput method demonstrated significant time saving, and higher sensitivity than older techniques. It thus creates the means to isolate giant viruses at high speed. PMID:26858703

  12. Isolation and identification of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 in peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mahmoud Moussa; Khan, Owais Ahmed; Cattoli, Giovanni; Lu, Huaguang

    2010-03-01

    An outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus subtype H5N1 was first diagnosed in a "backyard" flock of peafowl (Pavo cristatus) raised on palace premises in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in December 3, 2007. The flock consisted of 40 peafowl, and their ages ranged from 3 to 5 years old. Affected birds suffered from depression, anorexia, and white diarrhea. Four dead birds were submitted for HPAI diagnosis at the Central Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Riyadh. Brain and liver tissues and tracheal and cloacal swabs were taken from the dead birds and processed for a real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR test and virus isolation in specific-pathogen-free embryonating chicken eggs. The H5N1 subtype of avian influenza virus was isolated from the four dead birds and identified by a real-time RT-PCR before and after egg inoculation. The virus isolates were characterized as HPAI H5N1 virus by sequencing analysis. Phylogenetic comparisons revealed that the H5N1 viruses isolated from peafowl belong to the genetic clade 2.2 according to the World Health Organization nomenclature. The peafowl H5N1 virus falls into 2.2.2 sublineage II and clusters with the H5N1 viruses isolated from poultry in Saudi Arabia in 2007-08. PMID:20521659

  13. High-Throughput Isolation of Giant Viruses in Liquid Medium Using Automated Flow Cytometry and Fluorescence Staining.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Jacques Y B; Robert, Stephane; Reteno, Dorine G; Andreani, Julien; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of giant viruses using amoeba co-culture is tedious and fastidious. Recently, the procedure was successfully associated with a method that detects amoebal lysis on agar plates. However, the procedure remains time-consuming and is limited to protozoa growing on agar. We present here advances for the isolation of giant viruses. A high-throughput automated method based on flow cytometry and fluorescent staining was used to detect the presence of giant viruses in liquid medium. Development was carried out with the Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain widely used in past and current co-culture experiments. The proof of concept was validated with virus suspensions: artificially contaminated samples but also environmental samples from which viruses were previously isolated. After validating the technique, and fortuitously isolating a new Mimivirus, we automated the technique on 96-well plates and tested it on clinical and environmental samples using other protozoa. This allowed us to detect more than 10 strains of previously known species of giant viruses and seven new strains of a new virus lineage. This automated high-throughput method demonstrated significant time saving, and higher sensitivity than older techniques. It thus creates the means to isolate giant viruses at high speed. PMID:26858703

  14. Molecular characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus isolated from ruminants in Taiwan in 1999-2000.

    PubMed

    Huang, C C; Lin, Y L; Huang, T S; Tu, W J; Lee, S H; Jong, M H; Lin, S Y

    2001-08-01

    In 1999, 10 sporadic outbreaks of cattle foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) occurred in Taiwan. By the time, infection was limited to the Chinese yellow cattle (a native species of beef cattle in Mainland China), which did not develop vesicular lesions under field conditions. Five viruses isolates obtained from individual farms were confirmed to be the serotype O FMD virus (O/Taiwan/1999). During January-February 2000, however, this virus has spread to dairy cattle and goat herds, causing severe mortality in goat kids and vesicular lesions in dairy cattle. Partial nucleotide sequence of the capsid coding gene 1D (VP1) was determined for the virus isolates obtained in this study. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 sequences indicated that the O/Taiwan/1999 viruses shared 95-97% similarities to the virus strains isolated from the Middle East and India. The species susceptibility of the O/Taiwan/1999 virus was experimentally studied in several species of susceptible animals, showing that the virus did cause generalized lesions in dairy cattle and pigs, however, it would not cause vesicular lesions on the Chinese yellow cattle and the adult goats. These studies suggested that the O/Taiwan/1999 virus was a novel FMD virus of Taiwan and it presented various levels of susceptibility in cattle species. PMID:11390103

  15. Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus, a new sobemovirus isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Takemoto, Shogo; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Chiba, Sotaro; Andika, Ida Bagus; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus (CyCMV), isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii), was characterized molecularly. CyCMV isometric virions comprise a single, positive-strand RNA genome of 4,083 nucleotides and 30-kDa coat protein. The virus genome contains five overlapping open reading frames with a genomic organization similar to that of sobemoviruses. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis revealed that CyCMV is most closely related to papaya lethal yellowing virus, a proposed dicot-infecting sobemovirus (58.8 % nucleotide sequence identity), but has a relatively distant relationship to monocot-infecting sobemoviruses, with only modest sequence identities. This suggests that CyCMV is a new monocot-infecting member of the floating genus Sobemovirus. PMID:26025156

  16. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Algicidal Virus Infecting the Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, JinJoo; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Youn, Seok-Hyun; Choi, Tae-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are a major component of the biological community, serving as the principal primary producers in the food web and sustaining oxygen levels in aquatic environments. Among marine planktonic diatoms, the cosmopolitan Skeletonema costatum is one of the most abundant and widespread species in the world’s oceans. Here, we report the basic characteristics of a new diatom-infecting S. costatum virus (ScosV) isolated from Jaran Bay, Korea, in June 2008. ScosV is a polyhedral virus (45–50 nm in diameter) that propagates in the cytoplasm of host cells and causes lysis of S. costatum cultures. The infectivity of ScosV was determined to be strain- rather than species-specific, similar to other algal viruses. The burst size and latent period were roughly estimated at 90–250 infectious units/cell and <48 h, respectively. PMID:26060438

  17. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Algicidal Virus Infecting the Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Kim, JinJoo; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Youn, Seok-Hyun; Choi, Tae-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Diatoms are a major component of the biological community, serving as the principal primary producers in the food web and sustaining oxygen levels in aquatic environments. Among marine planktonic diatoms, the cosmopolitan Skeletonema costatum is one of the most abundant and widespread species in the world's oceans. Here, we report the basic characteristics of a new diatom-infecting S. costatum virus (ScosV) isolated from Jaran Bay, Korea, in June 2008. ScosV is a polyhedral virus (45-50 nm in diameter) that propagates in the cytoplasm of host cells and causes lysis of S. costatum cultures. The infectivity of ScosV was determined to be strain- rather than species-specific, similar to other algal viruses. The burst size and latent period were roughly estimated at 90-250 infectious units/cell and <48 h, respectively. PMID:26060438

  18. Complete genome sequences of two biologically distinct isolates of Asparagus virus 1.

    PubMed

    Blockus, S; Lesker, T; Maiss, E

    2015-02-01

    The complete genome sequences of two asparagus virus 1 (AV-1) isolates differing in their ability to cause systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana were determined. Their genomes had 9,741 nucleotides excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail, encoded a polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids, and shared 99.6 % nucleotide sequence identity. They differed at 37 nucleotide and 15 amino acid sequence positions (99.5 % identity) scattered over the polyprotein. The closest relatives of AV-1 in amino acid sequence identity were plum pox virus (54 %) and turnip mosaic virus (53 %), corroborating the classification of AV-1 as a member of a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus. PMID:25216774

  19. Genetics, Receptor Binding, and Virulence in Mice of H10N8 Influenza Viruses Isolated from Ducks and Chickens in Live Poultry Markets in China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Jing; Kong, Huihui; Cui, Pengfei; Zhang, Fang; Tan, Dan; Suzuki, Yasuo; Liu, Liling; Jiang, Yongping; Guan, Yuntao; Chen, Hualan

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed eight H10N8 viruses isolated from ducks and chickens in live poultry markets from 2009 to 2013 in China. These viruses showed distinct genetic diversity and formed five genotypes: the four duck isolates formed four different genotypes, whereas the four chicken viruses belong to a single genotype. The viruses bound to both human- and avian-type receptors, and four of the viruses caused 12.7% to 22.5% body weight loss in mice. PMID:25855738

  20. Genetics, Receptor Binding, and Virulence in Mice of H10N8 Influenza Viruses Isolated from Ducks and Chickens in Live Poultry Markets in China

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Jing; Kong, Huihui; Cui, Pengfei; Zhang, Fang; Tan, Dan; Suzuki, Yasuo; Liu, Liling; Jiang, Yongping; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed eight H10N8 viruses isolated from ducks and chickens in live poultry markets from 2009 to 2013 in China. These viruses showed distinct genetic diversity and formed five genotypes: the four duck isolates formed four different genotypes, whereas the four chicken viruses belong to a single genotype. The viruses bound to both human- and avian-type receptors, and four of the viruses caused 12.7% to 22.5% body weight loss in mice. PMID:25855738

  1. Genetic diversity of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from domestic poultry species in Eastern China during 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Wang, Weiwei; Yao, Chunfeng; Wang, Xiaoquan; Hu, Shunlin; Cao, Junping; Wu, Yantao; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiufan

    2011-02-01

    Seventy-nine Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) isolated from clinical specimens of different poultry species including chickens, pigeons (Columba livia), geese and ostriches in Eastern China during 2005-2008 were characterized biologically and phylogenetically. The results showed genetic diversity of these viruses: three class I viruses and one genotype I and 12 genotype II viruses of class II circulating in chickens were avirulent; four genotype VIb viruses isolated from pigeons were moderately virulent; and two genotype III viruses and 57 genotype VIId viruses were highly virulent. The three class I viruses were further classified as genotypes 2 and 3. The very high F protein sequence identity of one genotype I virus with strain Queensland V4 and 12 genotype II viruses with strain La Sota indicated that these viruses originated from the two vaccine strains. Two genotype III viruses shared greater than 99% sequence identity with the moderately virulent vaccine strain Mukteswar but exhibited significantly higher virulence, suggesting that they evolved from the vaccine virus and that the Mukteswar vaccine should be banned in China. Fifty-seven of the 63 virulent NDVs in this study belonged to genotype VIId, indicating its predominance in Eastern China. Genotype VIId viruses could be further classified into two subgroups. Four of the five NDVs isolated from pigeons belonged to genotype VIb, indicating its host-specific preference. Both the genotype VIb and VIId NDVs showed low amino acid similarity to the vaccine strains currently used in China, implying the urgent need to develop better vaccines against the most prevalent NDVs in China. PMID:21061026

  2. First genome analysis and molecular characterization of Chickpea chlorotic dwarf virus Egyptian isolate infecting squash.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Inas Farouk; Taha, Omnia; El-Ashry, Abdel Nasser

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to identifying and characterizing some molecular properties of geminiviruses co-infection in squash field crop cultivated in Egypt. Squash crops observed to be heavily infected with several insect vectors, also severe chlorosis and stunting was observed. Electron microscopic analysis has revealed geminate capsid particles which indicate the infection of Geminiviruses, especially SqLCV which represent an economic problem to squash filed crop in Egypt. We have investigated possible mixed infections with different plant viruses associated with chlorotic stunt diseases and or other genus groups of geminiviruses. The main objective of this study is to investigate the recombination events, possible recombinants and variants among these genera in the same family differing in vector transmission. This is the first report of the molecular characterization, phylogenetic analysis and putative recombination events of the full length genome of the Chickpea Chlorotic Dwarf Mastrevirus in Egypt. And the first report of co-infection with another begomovirus infecting squash plants. A full length clone of both viruses were isolated and characterized at the molecular level. The complete nucleotide sequence of DNA-A was determined (2,572 bp) and submitted to the genbank under accession no. KF692356. The isolate from Egypt has about 97.8 % homology with the Chickpea chlorotic dwarf virus (CpCDV) isolate from Syria DNA-A isolate FR687959, a 83.2 % homology with the Sudan isolate AM933134 and a 82.7 % homology with Pakistan isolate FR687960. To best of our knowledge this is the first report of complete genome of CpCDV that infect squash plants in Egypt and worldwide. PMID:26436119

  3. Genetic variability of blueberry scorch virus isolates from highbush blueberry in New York State.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska, Elżbieta; Marsella-Herrick, Patricia; Fuchs, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The genetic variability of blueberry scorch virus (BlScV) isolates from New York was determined within a portion of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene and the triple gene block and coat protein (CP) genes. Phylogenetic analysis of 19 New York isolates and other isolates for which sequence information is available in GenBank revealed two distinct clades, regardless of the coding region analyzed, and limited variability within (0.029 ± 0.007) and between (0.183 ± 0.032) phylogroups. Recombination events were identified in the CP gene of three New York isolates, and codons of the five BlScV genes characterized were found to be under neutral or negative selective pressure. PMID:25809019

  4. Identification of syncytial mutations in a clinical isolate of herpes simplex virus 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muggeridge, Martin I. . E-mail: mmugge@lsuhsc.edu; Grantham, Michael L.; Johnson, F. Brent

    2004-10-25

    Small polykaryocytes resulting from cell fusion are found in herpes simplex virus (HSV) lesions in patients, but their significance for viral spread and pathogenesis is unclear. Although syncytial variants causing extensive fusion in tissue culture can be readily isolated from laboratory strains, they are rarely found in clinical isolates, suggesting that extensive cell fusion may be deleterious in vivo. Syncytial mutations have previously been identified for several laboratory strains, but not for clinical isolates of HSV type 2. To address this deficiency, we studied a recent syncytial clinical isolate, finding it to be a mixture of two syncytial and one nonsyncytial strain. The two syncytial strains have novel mutations in glycoprotein B, and in vitro cell fusion assays confirmed that they are responsible for syncytium formation. This panel of clinical strains may be ideal for examining the effect of increased cell fusion on pathogenesis.

  5. Complete genome sequences of blueberry red ringspot virus (Caulimoviridae) isolates from the Czech Republic and Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Petrzik, Karel; Přibylová, Jaroslava; Pleško, Irena Mavrič; Špak, Josef

    2011-10-01

    Genomic DNA of blueberry red ringspot virus (genus Soymovirus, family Caulimoviridae) from highbush blueberry plants growing for years in the Czech Republic and Slovenia was sequenced. The circular dsDNA genomes consist of 8,303 and 8,299 nt, respectively, and contain eight open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 100 amino acids. The European isolates are 90% to 99% identical in aa sequences of distinct proteins. In contrast to the American New Jersey isolate, in-frame initiation codons have been found upstream from AUG codons of ORFs I, IV and V in the European isolates. These and other differences resulted in a longer capsid protein, reverse transcriptase, movement protein and protein the encoded by ORF VII and reduced (75.4% to 93.7%) amino acid identity with corresponding proteins of the New Jersey isolate. PMID:21796400

  6. Phylogenetic and Pathotypical Analysis of Two Virulent Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated from Domestic Ducks in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shouping; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhao, Changguang; Liu, Dehua; Hu, Yanxin; Zhao, Jixun; Zhang, Guozhong

    2011-01-01

    Two velogenic Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) obtained from outbreaks in domestic ducks in China were characterized in this study. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both strains clustered with the class II viruses, with one phylogenetically close to the genotype VII NDVs and the other closer to genotype IX. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cleavage site of the fusion (F) protein confirmed that both isolates contained the virulent motif 112RRQK/RRF117 at the cleavage site. The two NDVs had severe pathogenicity in fully susceptible chickens, resulting in 100% mortality. One of the isolates also demonstrated some pathogenicity in domestic ducks. The present study suggests that more than one genotype of NDV circulates in domestic ducks in China and viral transmission may occur among chickens and domestic ducks. PMID:21949828

  7. Experimental infection of young adult European breed sheep with Rift Valley fever virus field isolates.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Nuria; Xavier, F; Martín-Folgar, Raquel; Lorenzo, Gema; Galindo-Cardiel, Iván; del Val, Bernat Pérez; Rivas, Raquel; Iglesias, Javier; Rodríguez, Fernando; Solanes, David; Domingo, Mariano; Brun, Alejandro

    2010-10-01

    The increasing interest in Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and its potential impact on naive animal populations deserve revisiting experimental reproduction of RVFV infection, particularly in those animal breeds for which no data about their susceptibility to RVFV infection have ever been recorded. In this study we show the susceptibility of 9-10 weeks old European sheep (Ripollesa breed) to RVFV infection, showing a mild, subacute form of disease. Four different viral isolates efficiently replicated in vivo after subcutaneous experimental inoculation, and consistent viral loads in blood and virus shedding (variable in length depending on the RVFV isolate used) were detected, showing horizontal transmission to a noninfected, sentinel lamb. RVFV infection caused transient pyrexia in adult lambs and no other clinical symptoms were observed, with the exception of corneal opacity ("blue eye") found in 3 out of 16 subcutaneously inoculated sheep. In conclusion, adult sheep from this European breed are readily infected with RVFV without apparent clinical manifestations. PMID:20854022

  8. Genomic sequence analysis of four new chrysanthemum virus B isolates: evidence of RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lakhmir; Hallan, Vipin; Martin, D P; Ram, Raja; Zaidi, A A

    2012-03-01

    Chrysanthemums worldwide suffer from a high incidence of infection with chrysanthemum virus B (CVB), a member of the genus Carlavirus, family Betaflexiviridae. Three major lineages or strains of this virus have been found in India, but none have been characterized beyond the genetic variation they display in their coat protein genes. Here, we describe the analysis of four near-complete genome sequences (from the three lineages) representing the genetic diversity of these strains. Ranging in size from 8815 to 8855 nucleotides (excluding the polyA tail), these four isolates have a genome organization very similar to that of the recently reported Japanese isolate of CVB, with which they share between 70 and 73% genome-wide sequence identity. We present further evidence that recombination may feature quite prominently in the evolution of CVB. PMID:22179900

  9. Direct sequencing of hepatitis A virus strains isolated during an epidemic in France.

    PubMed Central

    Apaire-Marchais, V; Robertson, B H; Aubineau-Ferre, V; Le Roux, M G; Leveque, F; Schwartzbrod, L; Billaudel, S

    1995-01-01

    Direct sequencing of PCR products was used to study the VP1 region of the hepatitis A virus (HAV) genome (position 2199 to 2356) of nine strains isolated from human stools collected during a hepatitis A epidemic (western France, 1992), three strains from environmental samples (1990, 1991, and 1992), and two HAV cell culture isolates (the French strain CF53/Lyon and strain CLF). These viruses differed from CF53/Lyon (genotype I) by between 1 and 10.3%, and results indicated the existence of two groups of strains belonging to two different subgenotypes (IA and IB). With this sequencing technique it was possible to monitor the epidemiology of HAV and study its relations. PMID:8526512

  10. Genomic, pathogenic, and antigenic comparisons of Getah virus strains isolated in 1978 and 2014 in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Manabu; Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    A Getah virus strain isolated during an outbreak in racehorses in Japan in 2014 (14-I-605) was compared with the vaccine strain isolated in 1978 (MI-110). A comparison of the genome sequences of these strains revealed seven amino acid substitutions in non-structural protein 3, and one or two substitutions in each of other non-structural proteins. In contrast, the structural proteins were highly conserved (99.8-99.9 % amino acid sequence identity). Horse antisera raised against the MI-110 strain showed similar virus-neutralization titers against both MI-110 and 14-I-605 strains (512 and 256, respectively). Therefore, antigenic mutation was probably not a direct cause of the outbreak that occurred in 2014. PMID:27016932

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Broad and Ultrapotent Human Monoclonal Antibodies with Therapeutic Activity against Chikungunya Virus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott A; Silva, Laurie A; Fox, Julie M; Flyak, Andrew I; Kose, Nurgun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Khomandiak, Solomiia; Khomadiak, Solomiia; Ashbrook, Alison W; Kahle, Kristen M; Fong, Rachel H; Swayne, Sherri; Doranz, Benjamin J; McGee, Charles E; Heise, Mark T; Pal, Pankaj; Brien, James D; Austin, S Kyle; Diamond, Michael S; Dermody, Terence S; Crowe, James E

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted RNA virus that causes acute febrile infection associated with polyarthralgia in humans. Mechanisms of protective immunity against CHIKV are poorly understood, and no effective therapeutics or vaccines are available. We isolated and characterized human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize CHIKV infectivity. Among the 30 mAbs isolated, 13 had broad and ultrapotent neutralizing activity (IC50 < 10 ng/ml), and all of these mapped to domain A of the E2 envelope protein. Potent inhibitory mAbs blocked post-attachment steps required for CHIKV membrane fusion, and several were protective in a lethal challenge model in immunocompromised mice, even when administered at late time points after infection. These highly protective mAbs could be considered for prevention or treatment of CHIKV infection, and their epitope location in domain A of E2 could be targeted for rational structure-based vaccine development. PMID:26159721

  12. Genetic and antigenic analysis of epidemic influenza viruses isolated during 2006-2007 season in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jih-Hui; Chiu, Shu-Chun; Lee, Cheng-Hao; Su, Yung-Jui; Tsai, Han-Chuan; Peng, Yen-Tzu; Wu, Ho-Seng

    2008-02-01

    Influenza viruses are some of the most active pathogens in Taiwan. The monitoring influenza activity has been coordinated by the Centers for Diseases Control, Taiwan, and the surveillance is based on integrated clinical and virological surveillance components. Data from sentinel physician networks and other sources, mainly hospitals were collected. During 2006-07 season, a total of 1724 cases of laboratory-confirmed influenza were reported by collaborating laboratories and sentinels, which was five fold higher than during the corresponding part of the 2005-06 season. Of the Taiwan isolates analyzed using post-infection ferret antisera, 1.5% were H1N1 (A/Hi), 21.5% H3N2 (A/H3), and 77.0% influenza B viruses. This reflects the predominance of influenza B viruses during 2006-07 season. In addition, continued antigenic drift was seen with the A/I-B viruses compared with the previous season's reference strains. However, an increasing number of recent A/H3 isolates characterized in our report were amantadine sensitive. Preparation for an influenza pandemic is presently a high priority in Taiwan. Laboratory-based surveillance systems must be timely in order to be effective. The data presented here highlights the need to characterize the circulating strains both antigenically and genetically during regular surveillance. Any contribution of individual genes or gene combinations to usual or unusual epidemic characteristics might thus be identified ensuring that virus strains can be selected for vaccine formulation that will most closely match the circulating viruses. PMID:18098164

  13. Two variants of Pepino mosaic virus isolated from imported tomato seed from Chile share high levels of sequence identity with the U.S. isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), a member of the genus Potexvirus, was first described on pepino (Solanum muricatum A.) grown in South America. In recent years PepMV was reported to infect greenhouse-grown tomatoes. European isolates showed high sequence identity (>99%). On the other hand, two US isol...

  14. Antigenic and genetic diversity of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses isolated in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Balish, Amanda L; Davis, C Todd; Saad, Magdi D; El-Sayed, Nasr; Esmat, Hala; Tjaden, Jeffrey A; Earhart, Kenneth C; Ahmed, Lu'ay E; Abd El-Halem, Mohamed; Ali, Abdel Hakem M; Nassif, Samir A; El-Ebiary, Elham A; Taha, M; Aly, Mona M; Arafa, Abdelstattar; O'Neill, Eduardo; Xiyan, Xu; Cox, Nancy J; Donis, Ruben O; Klimov, Alexander I

    2010-03-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H5N1) has diverged antigenically and genetically since its initial detection in Asia in 1997. Viruses belonging to clade 2.2 in particular have been reported in numerous countries with the majority occurring in Egypt. Previous reports identified antigenic similarities between viruses belonging to clade 2.2. However, poultry and human viruses isolated in northern Egypt during 2007 and 2008 were found to be antigenically distinct from other clade 2.2 viruses from this country. Genetic analysis of the hemagglutinin revealed a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid divergence. The antigenic changes in Egyptian viruses isolated during 2007-08 necessitated that two of these strains be considered as potential H5N1 pre-pandemic vaccine candidates. PMID:20521654

  15. Characterization of a Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) isolate in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Liang; Pennerman, Kayla K; Wang, Hongxing; Yin, Guohua

    2016-03-01

    Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), a causal agent of the destructive sugarcane mosaic disease, has a global presence. An isolate of SrMV infecting a commercially-grown sugarcane plant was recovered from the Hainan province of China. The virions were visualized by an electron microscope, and the coat proteins (CPs) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. Discrepancies between the CP predicted and actual amino acid sequences were noted, which confounded the phylogenetic assignment of the isolate. The apparent variations may have physiological effects on the pathogenicity and virulence of SrMV. PMID:26981005

  16. Comparative Sequence Analyses of La Crosse Virus Strain Isolated from Patient with Fatal Encephalitis, Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Fryxell, Rebecca Trout; Freyman, Kimberly; Ulloa, Armando; Velez, Jason O.; Paulsen, Dave; Lanciotti, Robert S.; Moncayo, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    We characterized a La Crosse virus (LACV) isolate from the brain of a child who died of encephalitis-associated complications in eastern Tennessee, USA, during summer 2012. We compared the isolate with LACV sequences from mosquitoes collected near the child’s home just after his postmortem diagnosis. In addition, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of these and other sequences derived from LACV strains representing varied temporal, geographic, and ecologic origins. Consistent with historical findings, results of these analyses indicate that a limited range of LACV lineage I genotypes is associated with severe clinical outcomes. PMID:25898269

  17. Enhanced virus isolation by use of the transporter for a regional laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Warford, A L; Eveland, W G; Strong, C A; Levy, R A; Rekrut, K A

    1984-01-01

    Transporter tubes with fibroblast monolayers were compared with sucrose-phosphate-glutamate buffer for transport of 385 specimens to a regional laboratory for virus culture. Ninety-two (91%) of 101 viral isolates were recovered in cell culture from the Transporter, as compared with 82 (81%) from sucrose-phosphate-glutamate buffer. Twenty-five (24.7%) of the viral isolates were detected by cytopathic effect from 1 to 11 days earlier from the Transporter than from the sucrose-phosphate-glutamate buffer. The Transporter also permitted the use of ambient temperature for transport. PMID:6325498

  18. Characterization of a Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) isolate in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu Liang; Pennerman, Kayla K.; Wang, Hongxing; Yin, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), a causal agent of the destructive sugarcane mosaic disease, has a global presence. An isolate of SrMV infecting a commercially-grown sugarcane plant was recovered from the Hainan province of China. The virions were visualized by an electron microscope, and the coat proteins (CPs) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. Discrepancies between the CP predicted and actual amino acid sequences were noted, which confounded the phylogenetic assignment of the isolate. The apparent variations may have physiological effects on the pathogenicity and virulence of SrMV. PMID:26981005

  19. Label-fracture of plasma membranes isolated from measles virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Rutter, G; Hohenberg, H

    1993-07-01

    We present a method that permits correlation of the intramembrane architecture of plasma membrane fracture faces with the distribution of specific molecules at the corresponding cytoplasmic or exoplasmic membrane surfaces. HeLa cells infected with measles virus were used as a model system. Large fragments of the dorsal membrane were isolated after the virus glycoproteins were tagged at the outer cell surface with immune serum and protein A-gold markers. In a second step, different virus polypeptides at the inner cell surface were also identified by a smaller gold label. Thereafter, the isolated plasma membranes were frozen and freeze-fractured. The complementary fracture faces were shadowed with heavy metals and carbon and examined in the transmission electron microscope without cleaning of remaining biological material. Thus, the micromorphology of the replicated fracture faces and the topochemistry of virus components localized at the corresponding leaflets of the plasmalemma could be seen on the same image at high resolution. Of note is that the freeze-fracture morphology of the protoplasmic face is related to the molecular composition of the cytoplasmic surface, as revealed by antibody tagging. PMID:8515050

  20. The distribution of African swine fever virus isolated from Ornithodoros moubata in Zambia.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P. J.; Pegram, R. G.; Perry, B. D.; Lemche, J.; Schels, H. F.

    1988-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) has been reported in the Eastern Province of Zambia since 1912 and is now considered to be enzootic there. A survey of the distribution of ASF virus in Zambia was carried out by virus isolation from Ornithodoros moubata ticks collected from animal burrows in National Parks and Game Management Areas in northern, eastern, central and southern Zambia. ASF virus was isolated from ticks in all areas examined. The prevalence of infection in O. moubata was between 0.4% in South Luangwa National Park and 5.1% in Livingstone Game Park and mean infectious virus titres ranged from 10(3.4) HAD50/tick in Kakumbe Game Management Area to 10(5.9) HAD50/tick in Chunga and Nalusanga Game Management Areas. The prevalence of infection in adult ticks was between 4.7% and 5.3% in all areas examined except Sumbu National Park and Livingstone Game Park, where the prevalence was 15.1% and 13.2% respectively in adult ticks. The ratio of infected females to males for all the infected adult ticks in all areas of Zambia was 3.2:1. PMID:3215286

  1. Isolation and characterization of tick-borne encephalitis virus from Ixodes persulcatus in Mongolia in 2012.

    PubMed

    Muto, Memi; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Tsevel, Bazartseren; Dashzevge, Erdenechimeg; Yoshii, Kentaro; Kariwa, Hiroaki

    2015-07-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a zoonotic virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, in the family Flaviviridae. The virus, which is endemic in Europe and northern parts of Asia, causes severe encephalitis. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) has been reported in Mongolia since the 1980s, but details about the biological characteristics of the endemic virus are lacking. In this study, 680 ticks (Ixodes persulcatus) were collected in Selenge aimag, northern Mongolia, in 2012. Nine Mongolian TBEV strains were isolated from tick homogenates. A sequence analysis of the envelope protein gene revealed that all isolates belonged to the Siberian subtype of TBEV. Two strains showed similar growth properties in cultured cells, but their virulence in mice differed. Whole genome sequencing revealed only thirteen amino acid differences between these Mongolian TBEV strains. Our results suggest that these naturally occurring amino acid mutations affected the pathogenicity of Mongolian TBEV. Our results may be an important platform for monitoring TBEV to evaluate the epidemiological risk in TBE endemic areas of Mongolia. PMID:26025267

  2. Sequence determination of a quadripartite dsRNA virus isolated from Aspergillus foetidus.

    PubMed

    Kozlakidis, Zisis; Herrero, Noemi; Ozkan, Selin; Kanhayuwa, Lakkhana; Jamal, Atif; Bhatti, Muhammad F; Coutts, Robert H A

    2013-01-01

    Virus infection of Aspergillus foetidus was documented over 40 years ago and was one of the first mycovirus infections described in a filamentous fungus. The virus, named Aspergillus foetidus virus (AfV), contains at least two types of icosahedral particles, called AfV-fast (-F) and AfV-slow (-S) virions, based on their relative electrophoretic mobilities. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the AfV-F genome isolated from virions purified from the prototype isolate of the fungus. The AfV-F double-stranded (ds) RNA genome is tetra-segmented, and the plus strands of each of the four segments, but not the minus strands, are polyadenylated. The organisation and sequences of the four AfV-F dsRNAs are similar to those described for Alternaria alternata virus 1, which we propose is a member of an emerging mycovirus genus ("Alternavirus") and family ("Alternaviridae"), which also includes AfV-F. PMID:22760661

  3. Genetic Diversity of a Natural Population of Apple stem pitting virus Isolated from Apple in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ju Yeon; Joa, Jae Ho; Choi, Kyung San; Do, Ki Seck; Lim, Han Cheol; Chung, Bong Nam

    2014-01-01

    Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), of the Foveavirus genus in the family Betaflexiviridae, is one of the most common viruses of apple and pear trees. To examine variability of the coat protein (CP) gene from ASPV, eight isolates originating from 251 apple trees, which were collected from 22 apple orchards located in intensive apple growing areas of the North Gyeongsang and North Jeolla Provinces in Korea, were sequenced and compared. The nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene of eight ASPV isolates ranged from 77.0 to 97.0%, while the amino acid sequence identity ranged from 87.7 to 98.5%. The N-terminal region of the viral CP gene was highly variable, whereas the C-terminal region was conserved. Genetic algorithm recombination detection (GARD) and single breakpoint recombination (SBP) analyses identified base substitutions between eight ASPV isolates at positions 54 and 57 and position 771, respectively. GABranch analysis was used to determine whether the eight isolates evolved due to positive selection. All values in the GABranch analysis showed a ratio of substitution rates at non-synonymous and synonymous sites (dNS/dS) below 1, suggestive of strong negative selection forces during ASPV CP history. Although negative selection dominated CP evolution in the eight ASPV isolates, SLAC and FEL tests identified four possible positive selection sites at codons 10, 22, 102, and 158. This is the first study of the ASPV genome in Korea. PMID:25289003

  4. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of Mucambo virus (Venezuelan equine encephalitis complex subtype IIIA) in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Auguste, Albert J; Volk, Sara M; Arrigo, Nicole C; Martinez, Raymond; Ramkissoon, Vernie; Adams, A Paige; Thompson, Nadin N; Adesiyun, Abiodun A; Chadee, Dave D; Foster, Jerome E; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P A; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C; Carrington, Christine V F

    2009-09-15

    In the 1950s and 1960s, alphaviruses in the Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) antigenic complex were the most frequently isolated arboviruses in Trinidad. Since then, there has been very little research performed with these viruses. Herein, we report on the isolation, sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses of Mucambo virus (MUCV; VEE complex subtype IIIA), including 6 recently isolated from Culex (Melanoconion) portesi mosquitoes and 11 previously isolated in Trinidad and Brazil. Results show that nucleotide and amino acid identities across the complete structural polyprotein for the MUCV isolates were 96.6-100% and 98.7-100%, respectively, and the phylogenetic tree inferred for MUCV was highly geographically- and temporally-structured. Bayesian analyses suggest that the sampled MUCV lineages have a recent common ancestry of approximately 198 years (with a 95% highest posterior density (HPD) interval of 63-448 years) prior to 2007, and an overall rate of evolution of 1.28 x 10(-4) substitutions/site/yr. PMID:19631956

  5. Screening, isolation and optimization of anti–white spot syndrome virus drug derived from terrestrial plants

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Upasana; Chakraborty, Somnath; Balasubramanian, Thangavel; Das, Punyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Objective To screen, isolate and optimize anti-white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) drug derived from various terrestrial plants and to evaluate the efficacy of the same in host–pathogen interaction model. Methods Thirty plants were subjected to Soxhlet extraction using water, ethanol, methanol and hexane as solvents. The 120 plant isolates thus obtained were screened for their in vivo anti–WSSV property in Litopenaeus vannamei. The best anti–WSSV plant isolate, TP22C was isolated and further analyzed. The drug was optimized at various concentrations. Viral and immune genes were analysed using reverse transcriptase PCR to confirm the potency of the drug. Results Seven plant isolates exhibited significant survivability in host. The drug TP22C thus formulated showed 86% survivability in host. The surviving shrimps were nested PCR negative at the end of the 15 d experimentation. The lowest concentration of TP22C required intramuscularly for virucidal property was 10 mg/mL. The oral dosage of 750 mg/kg body weight/day survived at the rate of 86%. Neither VP28 nor ie 1 was expressed in the test samples at 42nd hour and 84th hour post viral infection. Conclusions The drug TP22C derived from Momordica charantia is a potent anti-white spot syndrome virus drug. PMID:25183066

  6. Genetic Diversity of the Coat Protein of Olive Mild Mosaic Virus (OMMV) and Tobacco Necrosis Virus D (TNV-D) Isolates and Its Structural Implications

    PubMed Central

    Varanda, Carla M. R.; Machado, Marco; Martel, Paulo; Nolasco, Gustavo; Clara, Maria I. E.; Flix, Maria R.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic variability among 13 isolates of Olive mild mosaic virus (OMMV) and of 11 isolates of Tobacco necrosis virus D (TNV-D) recovered from Olea europaea L. samples from various sites in Portugal, was assessed through the analysis of the coat protein (CP) gene sequences. This gene was amplified through reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloned, and 5 clone sequences of each virus isolate, were analysed and compared, including sequences from OMMV and TNV-D isolates originally recovered from different hosts and countries and available in the GenBank, totalling 131 sequences. The encoded CP sequences consisted of 269 amino acids (aa) in OMMV and 268 in TNV-D. Comparison of the CP genomic and amino acid sequences of the isolates showed a very low variability among OMMV isolates, 0.005 and 0.007, respectively, as well as among TNV-D isolates, 0.006 and 0.008. The maximum nucleotide distances of OMMV and TNV-D sequences within isolates were also low, 0.013 and 0.031, respectively, and close to that found between isolates, 0.018 and 0.034, respectively. In some cases, less variability was found in clone sequences between isolates than in clone sequences within isolates, as also shown through phylogenetic analysis. CP aa sequence identities among OMMV and TNV-D isolates ranged from 84.3% to 85.8%. Comparison between the CP genomic sequences of the two viruses, showed a relatively low variability, 0.199, and a maximum nucleotide distance between isolates of 0.411. Analysis of comparative models of OMMV and TNV-D CPs, showed that naturally occurring substitutions in their respective sequences do not seem to cause significant alterations in the virion structure. This is consistent with a high selective pressure to preserve the structure of viral capsid proteins. PMID:25350108

  7. Influenza A(H5N8) virus isolation in Russia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, Vasiliy Y; Susloparov, Ivan M; Kolosova, Nataliya P; Goncharova, Nataliya I; Shipovalov, Andrey V; Durymanov, Alexander G; Ilyicheva, Tatyana N; Budatsirenova, Lubov V; Ivanova, Valentina K; Ignatyev, Georgy A; Ershova, Svetlana N; Tulyahova, Valeriya S; Mikheev, Valeriy N; Ryzhikov, Alexander B

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report the isolation of influenza A(H5N8) virus from a Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope) in Sakha Republic of the Russian Far East. The strain A/wigeon/Sakha/1/2014 (H5N8) has been shown to be pathogenic for mammals. It is similar to the strains that caused outbreaks in wild birds and poultry in Southeast Asia and Europe in 2014. PMID:26306756

  8. Genetic Structure and Molecular Variability of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolates in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Shahideh; Arevalo, Rafael; Falk, Bryce W.; Groves, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has a worldwide distribution and the widest host range of any known plant virus. From 2000 to 2012, epidemics of CMV severely affected the production of snap bean (Phaseulos vulgaris L.) in the Midwest and Northeastern United States. Virus diversity leading to emergence of new strains is often considered a significant factor in virus epidemics. In addition to epidemics, new disease phenotypes arising from genetic exchanges or mutation can compromise effectiveness of plant disease management strategies. Here, we captured a snapshot of genetic variation of 32 CMV isolates collected from different regions of the U.S including new field as well as historic isolates. Nucleotide diversity (π) was low for U.S. CMV isolates. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that CMV subgroup I is predominant in the US and further showed that the CMV population is a mixture of subgroups IA and IB. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis suggests likely reassortment between subgroups IA and IB within five CMV isolates. Based on phylogenetic and computational analysis, recombination between subgroups I and II as well as IA and IB in RNA 3 was detected. This is the first report of recombination between CMV subgroups I and II. Neutrality tests illustrated that negative selection was the major force operating upon the CMV genome, although some positively selected sites were detected for all encoded proteins. Together, these data suggest that different regions of the CMV genome are under different evolutionary constraints. These results also delineate composition of the CMV population in the US, and further suggest that recombination and reassortment among strain subgroups does occur but at a low frequency, and point towards CMV genomic regions that differ in types of selection pressure. PMID:24801880

  9. Genetic Diversity of Pneumocystis carinii Isolated from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients in Turin, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Gisella; Sbaiz, Luca; Avanzini, Claudio; Caramello, Pietro; Savoia, Dianella

    2001-01-01

    By DNA sequence analysis we identified two new strain types and five novel sporadic variations among 25 isolates of Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis obtained from 19 human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. Of these, 13 were infected with a single strain and 6 were coinfected. Fifteen different combination types were identified among the 18 strains for which complete molecular typing was accomplished. PMID:11474032

  10. Complete genome analysis of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza A virus isolated from a tiger in China.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muhammad Hassan; Juan, Huang; Jiang, Ping; Li, Yufeng; Li, TianXian; Du, Yijun; Mukhtar, Muhammad Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    An influenza A virus (A/Tig/SH/01/2005 (H5N1) was isolated from lung tissue samples of a dead zoo tiger with respiratory disease in China in July 2005. Complete genome analysis indicated that the isolate was highly identical to an H5N1 virus isolated from a migratory duck at Poyang lake in China in that year. The genotype of the isolate was K,G,D,5J,F,1J,F,1E, and phylogenetically it was a clade 2.2 virus. Molecular characterization of all of the gene segments revealed characteristics of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses. These results may help to identify molecular determinants of virulence and highlight the necessity for continuous surveillance. PMID:18592132

  11. Broad-spectrum detection and quantitation methods of Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Vaïanopoulos, Céline; Legrève, Anne; Moreau, Virginie; Bragard, Claude

    2009-08-01

    A broad-spectrum reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was developed for detecting Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus (SBCMV) isolates, responsible for mosaic diseases in Europe, using primers targeting the highly conserved 3'-untranslated region of RNA-1 and RNA-2 of SBCMV. The 3'-end region is a privileged target for the detection of a wide range of isolates, because of sequence conservation, of the tRNA-like structure, the major role in viral replication and the signal amplification due to the presence of numerous genomic and subgenomic RNAs. The primers were also designed for virus quantitation using real-time RT-PCR with SYBR-Green chemistry. No cross-reaction with Wheat spindle streak mosaic virus, frequently associated with SBCMV, was observed. The use of RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR allowed a more sensitive detection and quantitation of SBCMV to be made than was the case with ELISA. The methods enabled European isolates of SBCMV from Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and the UK to be detected and quantified. Real-time RT-PCR represents a new tool for comparing soil inoculum potential as well as cultivar resistance to SBCMV. PMID:19490978

  12. Efficient isolation of Swine influenza viruses by age-targeted specimen collection.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Makoto; Matsuu, Aya; Yonezawa, Kouki; Igarashi, Manabu; Okuya, Kosuke; Kawabata, Toshiko; Ito, Kimihito; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Taneno, Akira; Deguchi, Eisaburo

    2015-04-01

    The control of swine influenza virus (SIV) infection is paramount for increasing the productivity of pig farming and minimizing the threat of pandemic outbreaks. Thus, SIV surveillance should be conducted by region and on a regular basis. Here, we established a microneutralization assay specific for SIV seroprevalence surveillance by using reporter gene-expressing recombinant influenza viruses. Growth-based SIV seroprevalence revealed that most sows and piglets were positive for neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses. In contrast, the 90-day-old growing pigs exhibited limited neutralizing activity in their sera, suggesting that this particular age of population is most susceptible to SIV infection and thus is an ideal age group for SIV isolation. From nasal swab specimens of healthy pigs in this age population, we were able to isolate SIVs at a higher incidence (5.3%) than those of previous reports. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) genes revealed that the isolated SIVs have circulated and evolved in pigs but not have been recently introduced from humans, implying that a large number of SIV lineages may remain "undiscovered" in the global porcine populations. We propose that the 90-day-old growing pig-targeted nasal swab collection presented in this study facilitates global SIV surveillance and contributes to the detection and control of SIV infection. PMID:25694523

  13. Nasal Wipes for Influenza A Virus Detection and Isolation from Swine.

    PubMed

    Nolting, Jacqueline M; Szablewski, Christine M; Edwards, Jody L; Nelson, Sarah W; Bowman, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance for influenza A viruses in swine is critical to human and animal health because influenza A virus rapidly evolves in swine populations and new strains are continually emerging. Swine are able to be infected by diverse lineages of influenza A virus making them important hosts for the emergence and maintenance of novel influenza A virus strains. Sampling pigs in diverse settings such as commercial swine farms, agricultural fairs, and live animal markets is important to provide a comprehensive view of currently circulating IAV strains. The current gold-standard ante-mortem sampling technique (i.e. collection of nasal swabs) is labor intensive because it requires physical restraint of the pigs. Nasal wipes involve rubbing a piece of fabric across the snout of the pig with minimal to no restraint of the animal. The nasal wipe procedure is simple to perform and does not require personnel with professional veterinary or animal handling training. While slightly less sensitive than nasal swabs, virus detection and isolation rates are adequate to make nasal wipes a viable alternative for sampling individual pigs when low stress sampling methods are required. The proceeding protocol outlines the steps needed to collect a viable nasal wipe from an individual pig. PMID:26709840

  14. Full-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Baioni, Laura; Luppi, Andrea; Moreno, Ana; Castellan, Alberto; Foni, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the full-genome sequence of a novel reassortant H1N1 swine influenza virus (SIV) is reported. The isolate has a hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, but it carries the seven genome segments of the avian-origin H1N1 SIV currently circulating in European pig farms. PMID:24092781

  15. Isolation of exotic Newcastle disease virus (ENDV) from field collected flies and experimental ENDV infections of three arthropod species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the 2002 Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) outbreak in California arthropods were collected from two quarantined backyard poultry premises after removal of END virus infected birds. The END virus (ENDV) isolated from field collected pools of three fly species was found to have >98% homology by ...

  16. West Nile virus isolated from Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in Northwest Missouri 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Harmon, Jessica; Lash, R. Ryan; Weiss, Sonja; Langevin, Stanley; Savage, Harry; Marvin S. Godsey, Jr.; Burkhalter, Kristen; Root, J. Jeffrey; Gidlewski, Thomas; Nicholson, William; Brault, Aaron C.; Komar, Nicholas

    2014-12-01

    We describe the isolation of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, flavivirus) from blood of a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) collected in northwestern Missouri, USA in August 2012. Furthermore, sequencing determined that the virus was related to lineage 1a WNV02 strains. We discuss the role of wildlife in WNV disease epidemiology.

  17. Phylogenetic and biological characterization of virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated in wild birds during 2002-2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a West Nile virus surveillance program in the Houston Metropolitan Area and in Rhode Island, extracts from brain from 5608 dead birds representing 21 avian orders, were cultured in Vero cells. Sixteen Newcastle disease virus isolates were recovered from birds of the order Columbiformes. ...

  18. Evaluation and optimization of avian embryos and cell culture methods for efficient isolation and propagation of avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveillance of wild bird populations for avian influenza viruses (AIV) contributes to our understanding of AIV evolution and ecology. Both real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) and virus isolation in embryonating chicken eggs (ECE) are standard methods for detecting A...

  19. Characaterization of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses isolated from poultry in Pakistan 2006-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine avian influenza viruses (AIV), H5N1 subtype, were isolated from dead poultry in the Karachi region of Pakistan from 2006-2008. The intravenous pathogenicity indices and HA protein cleavage sites of all nine viruses were consistent with highly pathogenic AIV. Based on phylogenetic analysis of ...

  20. Variable Genome Sequences of the Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Regulatory Region Isolated from an Infected Mouse Tissue Viral Suspension.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Fujinami, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome, isolated from an infected murine tissue homogenate, was sequenced to completion. The lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys were the source of the tissue homogenate in order to mirror the heterogeneity of the virus population in vivo The regulatory region sequence was found to be highly variable. PMID:27231357

  1. Molecular characterization of Korean Pepper mottle virus isolates and its relationship to symptom variations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Jeong; Jonson, Miranda Gilda; Choi, Hong Soo; Ko, Sug-Ju; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2009-09-01

    The symptom variations among Korean Pepper mottle virus (PepMoV) isolates infecting pepper, tomato and potato were described and the cause of variations in relation to molecular variability were investigated. In addition, the entire genome of the 13 PepMoV isolates, collected from five provinces (Kyonggi, Chungnam, Gyeongnam, Jeonbuk and Jeonnam) in Korea, were determined and compared including the previously reported Korean-Vb isolate and 2 other PepMoV isolates isolated from America (CA and FL). Our results showed that the nucleotide sequence of all Korean isolates tested were nearly identical (98-99%) and only 94% similar to American isolates. In general, the complete nucleotide sequences and deduced polyprotein sequences indicated low genetic variation among isolates showing 0.1-3% nucleotide changes per site. However, based on ratio between nucleotide diversity values in nonsynonymous and synonymous position (dN/dS ratio) surprisingly, P1 and 6K2 genes showed relatively high nucleotide substitution ratio (0.8 and 1.0 nucleotide, respectively). When the 6K2 amino acid were aligned, there were 15 amino acid substitutions found in PepMoV-infected potato and only 1 amino acid change from two isolates of PepMoV-infected bell pepper. Interestingly, three isolates including isolate numbers 731, 205135 and 205136 that possessed different aa changes at 6K2 region also showed distinct symptom differentiation in indicator hosts and cosegregated in the phylogenetic analysis. These results further proved previous studies that P1 and 6K2 genes with other proteins might have some involvement on host specificity and pathogenicity. PMID:19374928

  2. A highly divergent Encephalomyocarditis virus isolated from nonhuman primates in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2001 and 2002, fatal myocarditis resulted in the sudden deaths of four, two adult and two juvenile, orang utans out of a cohort of 26 in the Singapore Zoological Gardens. Methods Of the four orang utans that underwent post-mortem examination, virus isolation was performed from the tissue homogenates of the heart and lung obtained from the two juvenile orang utans in Vero cell cultures. The tissue culture fluid was examined using electron microscopy. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction with Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV)-specific primers targeting the gene regions of VP3/VP1 and 3D polymerase (3Dpol) confirmed the virus genus and species. The two EMCV isolates were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses of the virus genes performed. Serological testing on other animal species in the Singapore Zoological Gardens was also conducted. Results Electron microscopy of the two EMCV isolates, designated Sing-M100-02 and Sing-M105-02, revealed spherical viral particles of about 20 to 30nm, consistent with the size and morphology of members belonging to the family Picornaviridae. In addition, infected-Vero cells showed positive immunoflorescence staining with antiserum to EMCV. Sequencing of the viral genome showed that the two EMCV isolates were 99.9% identical at the nucleotide level, indicating a similar source of origin. When compared with existing EMCV sequences in the VP1 and 3Dpol gene regions, the nucleotide divergence were at a maximum of 38.8% and 23.6% respectively, while the amino acid divergence were at a maximum of 33.9% and 11.3% respectively. Phylogenetic analyses of VP1 and 3Dpol genes further grouped the Sing-M100-02 and Sing-M105-02 isolates to themselves, away from existing EMCV lineages. This strongly suggested that Sing-M100-02 and Sing-M105-02 isolates are highly divergent variants of EMCV. Apart from the two deceased orang utans, a serological survey conducted among other zoo animals showed that a number of other animal species had neutralizing antibodies to Sing-M105-02 isolate, indicating that the EMCV variant has a relatively wide host range. Conclusions The etiological agent responsible for the fatal myocarditis cases among two of the four orang utans in the Singapore Zoological Gardens was a highly divergent variant of EMCV. This is the first report of an EMCV infection in Singapore and South East Asia. PMID:23914943

  3. Genomic Characterization of a Novel Virus of the Family Tymoviridae Isolated from Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shihong; Wang, David; Rayner, Simon; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong

    2012-01-01

    Background The family Tymoviridae comprises three plant virus genera, including Tymovirus, Marafivirus, and Maculavirus, which are found in most parts of the world and cause severe agricultural losses. We describe a putatively novel member of the family Tymoviridae, which is isolated from mosquitoes (Culex spp.), referred to as CuTLV. Methods and Results The CuTLV was isolated by cell culture, which replicates and causes cytopathic effects in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells, but not in mammalian BHK-21 or Vero cells. The complete 6471 nucleotide sequence of CuTLV was determined. The genome of CuTLV is predicted to contain three open reading frames (ORFs). The largest ORF1 is 5307 nucleotides (nt) in length and encodes a putative polypeptide of 1769 amino acids (aa), which contains the conserved motifs for the methyltransferase (MTR), Tymovirus endopeptidase (PRO), helicase (HEL), and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of the replication-associated proteins (RPs) of positive-stranded RNA viruses. In contrast, the ORF1 sequence does not contain the so-called “tymobox” or “marafibox”, the conserved subgenomic RNA promoter present in all tymoviruses or marafiviruses, respectively. ORF2 and ORF3 putatively encode a 248-aa coat protein (CP) and a proline-rich 149-aa polypeptide. The whole genomic nucleotide identity of CuTLV with other members of family Tymoviridae ranged from 46.2% (ChiYMV) to 52.4% (GFkV). Phylogenetic analysis based on the putative RP and CP genes of CuTLV demonstrated that the virus is most closely related to viruses in the genus Maculavirus. Conclusions The CuTLV is a novel virus related to members of the family Tymoviridae, with molecular characters that are distinct from those of tymoviruses, marafiviruses, and other maculaviruses or macula-like viruses. This is the first report of the isolation of a Tymoviridae-like virus from mosquitoes. Further investigations are required to clarify the origin, replication strategy, and the public health or agricultural importance of the CuTLV. PMID:22848363

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of clinical herpes simplex virus type 1 isolates identified three genetic groups and recombinant viruses.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Peter; Bergström, Tomas; Rekabdar, Elham; Lindh, Magnus; Liljeqvist, Jan-Ake

    2004-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen which establishes lifelong infections. In the present study, we determined the sequence diversity of the complete genes coding for glycoproteins G (gG), I (gI), and E (gE), comprising 2.3% of the HSV-1 genome and located within the unique short (US) region, for 28 clinical HSV-1 isolates inducing oral lesions, genital lesions, or encephalitis. Laboratory strains F and KOS321 were sequenced in parallel. Phylogenetic analysis, including analysis of laboratory strain 17 (GenBank), revealed that the sequences were separated into three genetic groups. The identification of different genogroups facilitated the detection of recombinant viruses by using specific nucleotide substitutions as recombination markers. Seven of the isolates and strain 17 displayed sequences consistent with intergenic recombination, and at least four isolates were intragenic recombinants. The observed frequency of recombination based on an analysis of a short stretch of the US region suggests that most full-length HSV-1 genomes consist of a mosaic of segments from different genetic groups. Polymorphic tandem repeat regions, consisting of two to eight blocks of 21 nucleotides in the gI gene and seven to eight repeats of 3 nucleotides in the gG gene, were also detected. Laboratory strain KOS321 displayed a frameshift mutation in the gI gene with a subsequent alteration of the deduced intracellular portion of the protein. The presence of polymorphic tandem repeat regions and the different genogroup identities can be used for molecular epidemiology studies and for further detection of recombination in the HSV-1 genome. PMID:15367642

  5. Cloning and sequencing of the coat protein gene of tobacco ringspot virus isolates from UK and Iran.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, A H; Foster, G D

    2001-01-01

    The coat protein (CP) gene and the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of genomic RNA 2 of Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV, the genus Nepovirus, subgroup a) isolates from the UK and Iran were cloned from total viral RNA and sequenced. Comparison of these isolates with an isolate from the USA revealed a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid identity which extends the knowledge of molecular relationships between these three TRSV isolates. The UK isolate shared the highest nucleotide identity (95%) with the US isolate as compared to a lower identity with the Iranian isolate (92%). The highest identity (98%) was found between the UK and US isolates at amino acid level. Comparative analysis of the Iranian, UK and US isolates revealed some differences concerning some members of other subgroups of nepoviruses. For example, the N-terminal FDAYXR and the C-terminal FYGRXS motifs conserved among some nepoviruses, which occur adjacent to each other in folded CP molecules, were not detected in the Iranian, UK or US TSRV isolates. These isolates shared similarity only with Tomato ringspot virus (TomRSV) belonging to the subgroup c of nepoviruses. Another similarity of these isolates with TomRSV and Raspberry ringspot virus (RRSV) was the presence of a 34 nucleotide (nt) long sequence within the 3'-UTR. PMID:12083332

  6. The complete genome sequences of two naturally occurring recombinant isolates of Sugarcane mosaic virus from Iran.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Zohreh; Mehrvar, Mohsen; Nazifi, Ehsan; Zakiaghl, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) is the most prevalent virus causing sugarcane mosaic and maize dwarf mosaic diseases. Here, we presented the first two complete genomic sequences of Iranian SCMV isolates, NRA and ZRA from sugarcane and maize. The complete genome sequences of NRA and ZRA were, respectively, 9571 and 9572 nucleotides (nt) in length, excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail. Both isolates contained a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 149 nt, an open reading frame of 9192 nt encoding a polyprotein of 3063 amino acids (aa), and 3'-UTR of 230 nt for NRA and 231 nt for ZRA. SCMV-NRA and -ZRA genome nucleotide sequences were 97.3 % identical and shared nt identities of 79.1-92 % with those of other 21 SCMV isolates available in the GenBank, highest with the isolate Bris-A (AJ278405) (92 and 91.7 %) from Australia. When compared for separate genes, most of their genes shared the highest identities with Australian and Argentinean isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genomic sequences reveals that SCMV can be clustered to three groups. Both NRA and ZRA were clustered with sugarcane isolates from Australia and Argentina in group III but formed a separate sublineage. Recombination analysis showed that both isolates were intraspecific recombinants, and represented two novel recombination patterns of SCMV (in the P1 coding region). NRA had six recombination sites within the P1, HC-Pro, CI, NIa-Vpg, and NIa-pro coding regions, while ZRA had four within the P1, HC-Pro, NIa-Pro, and NIb coding regions. PMID:26905544

  7. Complete nucleotide sequence of Alfalfa mosaic virus isolated from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Bejerman, Nicolás; Lenardon, Sergio; Giolitti, Fabián

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) isolate infecting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina, AMV-Arg, was determined. The virus genome has the typical organization described for AMV, and comprises 3,643, 2,593, and 2,038 nucleotides for RNA1, 2 and 3, respectively. The whole genome sequence and each encoding region were compared with those of other four isolates that have been completely sequenced from China, Italy, Spain and USA. The nucleotide identity percentages ranged from 95.9 to 99.1 % for the three RNAs and from 93.7 to 99 % for the protein 1 (P1), protein 2 (P2), movement protein and coat protein (CP) encoding regions, whereas the amino acid identity percentages of these proteins ranged from 93.4 to 99.5 %, the lowest value corresponding to P2. CP sequences of AMV-Arg were compared with those of other 25 available isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis based on the CP gene was carried out. The highest percentage of nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene was 98.3 % with a Chinese isolate and 98.6 % at the amino acid level with four isolates, two from Italy, one from Brazil and the remaining one from China. The phylogenetic analysis showed that AMV-Arg is closely related to subgroup I of AMV isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a complete nucleotide sequence of AMV from South America and the first worldwide report of complete nucleotide sequence of AMV isolated from alfalfa as natural host. PMID:24510307

  8. [Isolation, identification and full-length genome sequence analysis of encephalomyocarditis virus from local aardvarks].

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong-Tao; Liu, Hui-Min; He, Xiu-Yuan; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xin-Wei; Yang, Xia; Yao, Hui-Xia; Wang, Chuan-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a natural epidemic zoonotic pathogen. However, no reports have been published regarding the isolation, identification and full-length genome of EMCV from a local aardvark population. In present study, an EMCV isolate HNXX13 was isolated from aardvarks named Huainan-pig in Henan Province. The systematic identification, full-length genome sequencing and molecular characteristic analysis of the isolate HNXX13 were conducted. The result showed that the isolate was spherical with a diameter of 24-30 nm, neither heat- nor acid-resistant, sensitive to trypsin, insensitive to chloroform, not protected by bivalent cationic, and the specific fluorescence was observed in the cytoplasm of BHK-21 cells infected with the isolate by using indirect fluorescence assay. The full-length genome of EMCV HNXX13 generated a 7 725bp sequence (GenBank: F771002), with 81.0%-99.9% nucleotide identity to reference strains from different animals, and 99.5% with a Chinese reference strain isolated earlier from a commercial pig herd. The phylogenetic tree based on the full-length genome and ORF sequences identified that all EMCV strains were divided into three groups G1, G2 and G3, and strain HNXX13 belonging to the G1 group with other Chinese reference strains. The result also identified that this EMCV infection could cause severe clinical signs in a local aardvark population, and enriches the molecular epidemiological data of EMCV in China. Regional differences exist in EMCV genome and transmission is limited within a certain area. However, the cross-infection and transmission of EMCV between aardvark and mice appears most likely. Mutations have occurred in some amino acids of EMCV strain HNXX13 during the transmission in local aardvark herd and these mutations might make the virus easier to infect the aardvark. PMID:25272589

  9. Genetic diversity of subgenotype 2.1 isolates of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenjie; Wu, Jianmin; Lu, Zongji; Zhang, Li; Qin, Shaomin; Chen, Fenglian; Peng, Zhicheng; Wang, Qin; Ma, Ling; Bai, Anbin; Guo, Huancheng; Shi, Jishu; Tu, Changchun

    2016-07-01

    As the causative agent of classical swine fever, the economically devastating swine disease worldwide, classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is currently classified into the 11 subgenotypes, of which subgenotype 2.1 is distributed worldwide and showing more genetic diversity than other subgenotypes. Prior to this report, subgenotype 2.1 was divided into three sub-subgenotypes (2.1a-2.1c). To further analyze the genetic diversity of CSFV isolates in China, 39 CSFV isolates collected between 2004 and 2012 in two Chinese provinces Guangxi and Guangdong were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis together with reference sequences retrieved from GenBank. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 190-nt and/or 1119-nt full length E2 gene fragments showed that current CSFV subgenotype 2.1 virus isolates in the world could be divided into 10 sub-subgenotypes (2.1a-2.1j) and the 39 isolates collected in this study were grouped into 7 of them (2.1a-2.1c and 2.1g-2.1j). Among the 10 sub-subgenotypes, 2.1d-2.1j were newly identified. Sub-subgenotype 2.1d isolates were circulated only in India, however the rest 9 sub-subgenotypes were from China with some of them closely related to isolates from European and neighboring Asian countries. According to the temporal and spatial distribution of CSFV subgenotype 2.1 isolates, the newly classified 10 sub-subgenotypes were further categorized into three groups: dominant sub-subgenotype, minor sub-subgenotype and silent sub-subgenotype, and each sub-subgenotype can be found only in certain geographical areas. Taken together, this study reveals the complex genetic diversity of CSFV subgenotype 2.1 and improves our understanding about the epidemiological trends of CSFV subgenotype 2.1 in the world, particularly in China. PMID:27085291

  10. Lassa virus isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast represent an emerging fifth lineage

    PubMed Central

    Manning, John T.; Forrester, Naomi; Paessler, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Previous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus (LASV) among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for LF is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each LASV isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200–300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa. PMID:26483768

  11. Lassa virus isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast represent an emerging fifth lineage.

    PubMed

    Manning, John T; Forrester, Naomi; Paessler, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Previous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus (LASV) among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for LF is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each LASV isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200-300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa. PMID:26483768

  12. Double-stranded RNA virus in Korean Isolate IH-2 of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Pyung-Rim; Hwang, Myung-Ki; Choi, Eun Young

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we describe Korean isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis infected with double-stranded (ds) RNA virus (TVV). One T. vaginalis isolate infected with TVV IH-2 evidenced weak pathogenicity in the mouse assay coupled with the persistent presence of a dsRNA, thereby indicating a hypovirulence effect of dsRNA in T. vaginalis. Cloning and sequence analysis results revealed that the genomic dsRNA of TVV IH-2 was 4,647 bp in length and evidenced a sequence identity of 80% with the previously-described TVV 1-1 and 1-5, but only a 42% identity with TVV 2-1 and 3 isolates. It harbored 2 overlapping open reading frames of the putative capsid protein and dsRNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). As previously observed in the TVV isolates 1-1 and 1-5, a conserved ribosomal slippage heptamer (CCUUUUU) and its surrounding sequence context within the consensus 14-nt overlap implied the gene expression of a capsid protein-RdRp fusion protein, occurring as the result of a potential ribosomal frameshift event. The phylogenetic analysis of RdRp showed that the Korean TVV IH-2 isolate formed a compact group with TVV 1-1 and 1-5 isolates, which was divergent from TVV 2-1, 3 and other viral isolates classified as members of the Giardiavirus genus. PMID:17570970

  13. Genotype analysis of varicella-zoster virus isolates from suburban Shanghai Municipal Province, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Guo, Y; Li, M; Yao, Z

    2016-02-01

    To determine the predominant genotype of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in suburban Shanghai Municipal Province, specimens were collected from the lesions of 95 outpatients clinically diagnosed with varicella or herpes zoster. Of these, 69 patients (72.6 %) were positive for VZV DNA. The 69 isolates were all genotyped as the genotype J1/clade 2. Based on sequencing of the 447 bp sequence in ORF22, 66 isolates were identified as genotype J/clade 2 strains and three were identified as type M2/clade 4 strains. To confirm the classification of these three strains, we determined the presence of 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and found that isolates 1270/1450 shared seven SNPs that differed from those of clade 2, in which three SNPs were unique to clade 3 and another three were unique to clade 4. Isolate 1456 had two markers of clade 4 that differed from clade 2. The phylogenetic tree showed that our isolates clustered primarily with clade 2 and that the three M2/J1 strains clustered between clades 2 and 4. It is likely that isolates 1270/1450/1446 may represent a new subclade of either clade 2 or 4, or some recombinant events. In addition, our isolates were WT strains. We also observed significant inter-strain variations. PMID:26654224

  14. Genetic Diversity Based on Coat Protein of Papaya ringspot virus (Pathotype P) Isolates from Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Akhter, M S; Basavaraj, Y B; Akanda, A M; Mandal, B; Jain, R K

    2013-06-01

    The coat protein (CP) sequences of twelve Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) (pathotype-P) isolates from six major papaya growing areas were determined and compared with those of published PRSV. The CP coding region varied in size from 846-852 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 282-284 amino acids. Comparative CP sequence analysis revealed that the PRSV-P isolates originating from Bangladesh were divergent up to 14 % at amino acids level. Further, the isolates from Bangladesh shared 86-95 % amino acid sequence identity with those reported from rest 21 of the Asia and 83-93 % amino acid sequence identity with isolates from the other parts of the world. A number of KE repeats were observed in the N terminus of the CP coding region of all Bangladesh isolates. Phylogenetic branching pattern revealed that the PRSV-P isolates originating from Bangladesh formed a distinct clade from those from the rest of the world. This forms the first report on the genetic diversity of PRSV-P isolates from Bangladesh. PMID:24426261

  15. Characterization of low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds in Mongolia 2005 through 2007

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Since the emergence of H5N1 high pathogenicity (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV) in Asia, numerous efforts worldwide have focused on elucidating the relative roles of wild birds and domestic poultry movement in virus dissemination. In accordance with this a surveillance program for AIV in wild birds was conducted in Mongolia from 2005-2007. An important feature of Mongolia is that there is little domestic poultry production in the country, therefore AIV detection in wild birds would not likely be from spill-over from domestic poultry. Results During 2005-2007 2,139 specimens representing 4,077 individual birds of 45 species were tested for AIV by real time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) and/or virus isolation. Bird age and health status were recorded. Ninety rRT-PCR AIV positive samples representing 89 individual birds of 19 species including 9 low pathogenicity (LP) AIVs were isolated from 6 species. A Bar-headed goose (Anser indicus), a Whooper swan (Cygnus cygnus) and 2 Ruddy shelducks (Tadorna ferruginea) were positive for H12N3 LP AIV. H16N3 and H13N6 viruses were isolated from Black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus). A Red-crested pochard (Rhodonessa rufina) and 2 Mongolian gulls (Larus vagae mongolicus) were positive for H3N6 and H16N6 LP AIV, respectively. Full genomes of each virus isolate were sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically and were most closely related to recent European and Asian wild bird lineage AIVs and individual genes loosely grouped by year. Reassortment occurred within and among different years and subtypes. Conclusion Detection and/or isolation of AIV infection in numerous wild bird species, including 2 which have not been previously described as hosts, reinforces the wide host range of AIV within avian species. Reassortment complexity within the genomes indicate the introduction of new AIV strains into wild bird populations annually, however there is enough over-lap of infection for reassortment to occur. Further work is needed to clarify how AIV is maintained in these wild bird reservoirs. PMID:19891786

  16. Complete genome sequence of an avian leukosis virus isolate associated with hemangioma and myeloid leukosis in egg-type and meat-type chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new virus isolate was separated from a commercial egg-type flock of chickens in China and was determined as subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J). ALV-J is known to cause myeloid leukosis. But this new isolate of viruses causes both hemangioma and myeloid leukosis in chickens. Hemangioma is an a...

  17. The consequence of passive administration of an anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralizing monoclonal antibody before challenge of chimpanzees with a primary virus isolate.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, A J; Kessler JA, I I; Boots, L J; McKenna, P M; Schleif, W A; Emini, E A; Mark, G E; Katinger, H; Cobb, E K; Lunceford, S M; Rouse, S R; Murthy, K K

    1996-01-01

    The anti-gp41 virus neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2F5 was infused into chimpanzees, which were then given an intravenous challenge with a primary human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) isolate. In two control animals, the infection was established immediately, as evidenced by positive cell-associated DNA PCR and serum RNA PCR tests within 1 week, seroconversion by 4 weeks, and development of lymphadenopathy in this acute phase. Serum RNA PCR tests were negative in one of the two antibody-infused animals until week 8 and in the other antibody-infused animal until week 12; both animals seroconverted at week 14. The peak of measurable virus-specific serum RNA was delayed until week 16 in one antibody-infused animal. Virus-specific RNA in the other animal did not reach levels comparable to those in the other animals through 1 year of follow-up studies. Virus was isolated from the week 16 blood sample from one infused animal. Virus was not isolated from peripheral blood of the second animal but was isolated from lymph node cells taken at week 36. The infection of untreated chimpanzees with this primary isolate appears robust. Use of this isolate should widen the scope of possible experiments in the chimpanzee model. This antibody infusion study indicates that neutralizing antibody, when present at the time of challenge, affects the timing and level of infection and remains influential after it can no longer be detected in the peripheral circulation. It is possible that preexisting, neutralizing antibodies (passively administered or actively elicited) affect the course of acute-phase virus replication in humans. It remains to be established whether these immunologically mediated early effects will influence the course of HIV-1 disease. PMID:8794312

  18. Genetic and biological characterization of Muko virus, a new distinct member of the species Great Island virus (genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae), isolated from ixodid ticks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ejiri, Hiroko; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Isawa, Haruhiko; Kuwata, Ryusei; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Kinoshita, Hitomi; Kakiuchi, Satsuki; Horiya, Madoka; Kotaki, Akira; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Maeda, Ken; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Toshinori; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Saijo, Masayuki; Sawabe, Kyoko

    2015-12-01

    Among the tick-borne orbiviruses (genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae), 36 serotypes are currently classified within a single virus species, Great Island virus. In this study, we report the first characterization of a tick-borne orbivirus isolated from the tick Ixodes turdus in Japan, which we identified as a new member of the species Great Island virus. The virus isolate, designated Muko virus (MUV), replicated and induced cytopathic effects in BHK-21, Vero E6, and CCL-141 cells and caused high mortality in suckling mice after intracerebral inoculation. Full genome sequence analysis showed that MUV shared the greatest phylogenetic similarity with Tribeč virus in terms of the amino acid sequences of all viral proteins except for outer capsid protein 1 (OC1; VP4 of MUV). Analysis of genome segment 9 in MUV detected an uninterrupted open reading frame that overlaps with VP6 (Hel), which putatively encodes a molecular and functional equivalent of NS4 from Great Island virus. Our study provides new insights into the geographic distribution, genetic diversity, and evolutionary history of the members of the species Great Island virus. PMID:26350980

  19. Evaluation of a high-pathogenicity H5N1 avian influenza A virus isolated from duck meat.

    PubMed

    Tumpey, T M; Suarez, D L; Perkins, L E L; Senne, D A; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Mo, I P; Sung, H W; Swayne, D E

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of an influenza A virus possessing a novel hemagglutinin (HA) into an immunologically naive human population has the potential to cause severe disease and death. Such was the case in 1997 in Hong Kong, where H5N1 influenza was transmitted to humans from infected poultry. Because H5N1 viruses are still isolated from domestic poultry in southern China, there needs to be continued surveillance of poultry and characterization of virus subtypes and variants. This study provides molecular characterization and evaluation of pathogenesis of a recent H5N1 virus isolated from duck meat that had been imported to South Korea from China. The HA gene of A/Duck/Anyang/AVL-1/01 (H5N1) isolate was found to be closely related to the Hong Kong/97 H5N1 viruses. This virus also contained multiple basic amino acids adjacent to the cleavage site between HA1 and HA2, characteristic of high-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (HPAI). The pathogenesis of this virus was characterized in chickens, ducks, and mice. The DK/Anyang/AVL-1/01 isolate replicated well in all species and resulted in 100% and 22% lethality for chickens and mice, respectively. No clinical signs of disease were observed in DK/Anyang/AVL-1/01-inoculated ducks, but high titers of infectious virus could be detected in multiple tissues and oropharyngeal swabs. The presence of an H5N1 influenza virus in ducks bearing a HA gene that is highly similar to those of the pathogenic 1997 human/poultry H5N1 viruses raises the possibility of reintroduction of HPAI to chickens and humans. PMID:14575093

  20. Adaptation and growth kinetics study of an Indian isolate of virulent duck enteritis virus in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Aravind, S; Kamble, Nitin M; Gaikwad, Satish S; Shukla, Sanjeev Kumar; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2015-01-01

    Duck virus enteritis, also known as duck plague, is a viral infection of ducks caused by duck enteritis virus (DEV). The control of the disease is mainly done by vaccination with chicken embryo adapted live virus that is known to be poorly immunogenic and elicits only partial protection. Further, the embryo propagated vaccine virus pose a threat of harboring other infectious agents. Seeing these limitations, the present study reports for the first time regarding propagation and adaptation of a virulent Indian isolate of duck enteritis virus in Vero cell line. In this study isolation of an outbreak virus from Kerala state was done in chicken embryo fibroblast cell culture (CEF). Then adapted the DEV isolate in the Vero cell line. The characteristic cytopathic effects (CPE) of clumping and fusion of Vero cells were observed starting from the 7th passage onwards. The presence of the virus and its multiplication in Vero cells was confirmed by detection of viral specific DNA and antigen by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect immuno fluorescent assay (IIFA), respectively. PCR detection of DEV using self designed primers for US4 (gD) and UL30 (DNA Polymerase) gene has been reported for the in the present study. The kinetics of DEV in Vero cells revealed a maximum infectivity titer of 10(5.6) TCID 50/ml after 48hr of viral infection. Compared to chicken embryo adapted DVE vaccine virus, the Vero cell culture system is free from other infectious agents. So it will be a good candidate for cultivation and propagation of duck enteritis virus vaccine strain. Further research studies are suggested to explore the feasibility of utilizing this Vero cell culture adapted DEV isolate for developing an attenuated vaccine virus against duck virus enteritis. PMID:25450886

  1. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 2 isolated from cattle in India.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sthita Pragnya; Mishra, Niranjan; Vilcek, Stefan; Rajukumar, Katherukamem; Nema, Ram Kumar; Prakash, Anil; Kalaiyarasu, S; Dubey, Shiv Chandra

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 (BVDV-1) subtype b is predominantly circulating in Indian cattle. During testing for exotic pestiviruses between 2007 and 2010, BVDV-2 was identified by real time RT-PCR in two of 1446 cattle blood samples originating from thirteen states of India. The genetic analysis of the isolated virus in 5' UTR, N(pro), entire structural genes (C, E(rns), E1 and E2), nonstructural genes NS2-3 besides 3' UTR demonstrated that the nucleotide and amino acid sequences showed highest similarity with BVDV-2. The entire 5' and 3' UTR consisted of 387 and 204 nucleotides, respectively, and an eight nucleotide repeat motif was found twice within the variable part of 3' UTR that may be considered as a characteristic of BVDV-2. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the cattle isolate and earlier reported goat BVDV-2 isolate fall into separate clades within BVDV-2a subtype. Antigenic typing with monoclonal antibodies verified the cattle isolate also as BVDV-2. In addition, cross-neutralization tests using antisera raised against Indian BVDV strains circulating in ruminants (cattle, sheep, goat and yak) displayed significant antigenic differences only between BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 strains. This is the first identification of BVDV-2 in Indian cattle that may have important implications for immunization strategies and molecular epidemiology of BVD. PMID:21112633

  2. Complete genome sequence of a Chuzan virus strain isolated for the first time in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heng; Xiao, Lei; Meng, Jinxing; Xiong, Heli; Gao, Lin; Liao, Defang; Li, Huachun

    2016-04-01

    Chuzan virus (CHUV) belongs to the Palyam serogroup, causes bovine congenital disease, and is prevalent in Asia. To date, only one full Palyam virus (PALV) genome sequence, that of Japanese CHUV strain K47, has been reported. Sequence analysis indicates that PALV strains isolated from different geographical regions show significant diversity, which is mainly shaped by geographically independent evolution and genetic reassortment. Our understanding of the genetic characteristics of PALV is hampered by a very limited genomic sequence database. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of CHUV strain SZ187, which was isolated for the first time in 2012 in mainland China. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrate that SZ187 is closely related to other CHUV strains isolated in Taiwan and Japan, indicating that they may share a common ancestor. This new full-length CHUV genome sequence could help in the design of broader assays for epidemiological studies and facilitate the identification of new CHUV isolates in the future. PMID:26733292

  3. Complete coding sequence and molecular epidemiological analysis of Sindbis virus isolates from mosquitoes and humans, Finland.

    PubMed

    Sane, Jussi; Kurkela, Satu; Putkuri, Niina; Huhtamo, Eili; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2012-09-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an arthropod-borne alphavirus, which causes rash-arthritis, particularly in Finland. SINV is transmitted by mosquitoes in Finland but thus far no virus has been isolated from mosquitoes. In this study, we report the isolation of the first SINV strain from mosquitoes in Finland and its full-length protein-coding sequence. We furthermore describe the full-length coding sequence of six SINV strains previously isolated from humans in Finland and from a mosquito in Russia. The strain isolated from mosquitoes (Ilomantsi-2005M) was very closely related to all the other Northern European SINV strains. We found 9 aa positions, of which five in the nsP3 protein C terminus, to be distinctive signatures for the Northern European strains that may be associated with vector or host species adaptation. Phylogenetic analyses further indicate that SINV has a local circulation in endemic regions in Northern Europe and no novel strains are frequently being introduced. PMID:22647374

  4. Propagation of Asian isolates of canine distemper virus (CDV) in hamster cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Serageldeen; Lan, Nguyen Thi; Ueda, Toshiki; Yamaguchi, Ryoji; Maeda, Ken; Kai, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    Backgrounds The aim of this study was to confirm the propagation of various canine distemper viruses (CDV) in hamster cell lines of HmLu and BHK, since only a little is known about the possibility of propagation of CDV in rodent cells irrespective of their epidemiological importance. Methods The growth of CDV in hamster cell lines was monitored by titration using Vero.dogSLAMtag (Vero-DST) cells that had been proven to be susceptible to almost all field isolates of CDV, with the preparations of cell-free and cell-associated virus from the cultures infected with recent Asian isolates of CDV (13 strains) and by observing the development of cytopathic effect (CPE) in infected cultures of hamster cell lines. Results Eleven of 13 strains grew in HmLu cells, and 12 of 13 strains grew in BHK cells with apparent CPE of cell fusion in the late stage of infection. Two strains and a strain of Asia 1 group could not grow in HmLu cells and BHK cells, respectively. Conclusion The present study demonstrates at the first time that hamster cell lines can propagate the majority of Asian field isolates of CDV. The usage of two hamster cell lines suggested to be useful to characterize the field isolates biologically. PMID:19835588

  5. Isolation and molecular and phylogenetic analyses of encephalomyocarditis virus from wild boar in central China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; He, Xiuyuan; Song, Xiaofeng; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Yun; Zhou, Guoli; Zhu, Wenjiao; Chang, Chen; Yin, Zhian; Shi, Yuhang; Wang, Chuanqing; Chang, Hongtao

    2016-06-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) can infect many host species and cause acute myocarditis and respiratory failure in piglets, reproductive failure in pregnant sows. In this study, an EMCV strain, designated JZ1202, was isolated from semi-captive wild boars that presented with acute myocarditis and sudden death in central China. It was identified by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and genome sequencing. The subsequent results showed that the virus could produce a specific cytopathic effect on BHK cells and could cause clinical symptoms and pathological changes in mice. Complete genome sequencing and multiple sequence alignment indicated that JZ1202 strain was 81.3%-99.9% identical with other isolates worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome, ORF, VP3/VP1 and 3D genes using neighbor-joining method revealed that JZ1202 isolate was grouped into lineage 1. The results of this study confirmed that an EMCV strain JZ 1202 isolated from wild boar in central China was fatal to mice and provided new epidemiologic data on EMCV in China. PMID:26917364

  6. Citrus Viruses in Guatemala: Application of Laboratory-Based Assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In preparation for a citrus certification in Guatemala, there was an urgent need to determine which graft transmissible citrus pathogens were present. Because of the lack of biological indicator plants, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and Xylella fastidiosa, causal agent for citrus variegated chlorosis...

  7. Comparative effectiveness of isolation techniques for contemporary Influenza A virus strains circulating in exhibition swine.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Andrew S; Nelson, Sarah W; Edwards, Jody L; Hofer, Christian C; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Davis, Ian C; Slemons, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    The current study sought to compare the effectiveness of 2 virus isolation methods for the recovery of contemporary Influenza A virus (FLUAV) strains circulating in swine at agricultural exhibitions. Following the emergence of the influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus, increased surveillance of FLUAV strains among swine was recommended for early detection of emerging strains that threaten animal and human health. The increase in genetic drift and genomic reassortment among FLUAV strains infecting swine since 1998 necessitates that detection protocols be periodically validated for contemporary FLUAV strains. During 2009, nasal swabs were collected from 221 clinically healthy pigs at 12 agricultural exhibitions in Ohio. Nasal swabs were tested in parallel for the presence of FLUAV strains using 3 methodologies: 2 passages through Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells adapted to serum-free medium (SFM), 2 passages through embryonated chicken eggs (ECEs), and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR). Of the 221 samples, 40 (18.1%) were positive for FLUAV recovery in MDCK cell culture and 13 (5.9%) were positive in ECEs (P = 0.015). All samples positive in ECEs were also positive in MDCK cell culture. MDCK cell culture virus isolation results were in perfect agreement with results of the real-time RT-PCR. Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase combinations of the recovered isolates were H1N2 and H3N2, which were consistent with FLUAV strains circulating in U.S. pigs. Effectiveness and cost savings justify the use of SFM-adapted MDCK cell culture over ECEs for the recovery of contemporary FLUAV strains from exhibition swine. PMID:23242667

  8. Variation in the NS3 gene and protein in South African isolates of bluetongue and equine encephalosis viruses.

    PubMed

    van Niekerk, M; Freeman, M; Paweska, J T; Howell, P G; Guthrie, A J; Potgieter, A C; van Staden, V; Huismans, H

    2003-03-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) and equine encephalosis virus (EEV) are agriculturally important orbiviruses transmitted by biting midges of the genus Culicoides. The smallest viral genome segment, S10, encodes two small nonstructural proteins, NS3 and NS3A, which mediate the release of virus particles from infected cells and may subsequently influence the natural dispersion of these viruses. The NS3 gene and protein sequences of South African isolates of these viruses were determined, analysed and compared with cognate orbivirus genes from around the world. The South African BTV NS3 genes were found to have the highest level of sequence variation for BTV (20 %), while the highest level of protein variation of BTV NS3 (10 %) was found between South African and Asian BTV isolates. The inferred NS3 gene phylogeny of the South African BTV isolates grouped them with BTV isolates from the United States, while the Asian BTV isolates grouped into a separate lineage. The level of variation found in the NS3 gene and protein of EEV was higher than that found for BTV and reached 25 and 17 % on the nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. The EEV isolates formed a lineage independent from that of the other orbiviruses. This lineage segregated further into two clusters that corresponded to the northern and southern regions of South Africa. The geographical distribution of these isolates may be related to the distribution of the Culicoides subspecies that transmit them. PMID:12604809

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Mayaro Virus from a Human in Acre, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Terzian, Ana Carolina B.; Auguste, Albert J.; Vedovello, Danila; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica; Sperança, Márcia A.; Suzuki, Rodrigo B.; Juncansen, Camila; Araújo, João P.; Weaver, Scott C.; Nogueira, Maurício L.

    2015-01-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is widely distributed throughout South America and is the etiologic agent of Mayaro fever, an acute febrile illness often presenting with arthralgic manifestations. The true incidence of MAYV infection is likely grossly underestimated because the symptomatic presentation is very similar to that of dengue fever and other acute febrile tropical diseases. We report the complete genome sequence of a MAYV isolate detected from an Acrelândia patient presenting with fever, chills, and sweating, but with no arthralgia. Results show that this isolate belongs to genotype D and is closely related to Bolivian strains. Our results suggest that the Acre/Mayaro strain is closely related to the progenitor of these Bolivian strains that were isolated between 2002 and 2006. PMID:25510721

  10. LNA probe-based assay for the detection of Tomato black ring virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Rymelska, Natalia; Borodynko, Natasza

    2015-02-01

    Tomato black ring virus (TBRV) infects a wide range of economically important plant species worldwide. In the present study we developed a locked nucleic acid (LNA) real-time RT-PCR assay for accurate detection of genetically diverse TBRV isolates collected from different hosts. The assay based on the LNA probe has a wide detection range, high sensitivity, stability and amplification efficiency. The assay amplified all tested TBRV isolates, but no signal was observed for the RNA from other nepoviruses and healthy plant species. Under optimum reaction conditions, the detection limit was estimated around 17 copies of the TBRV target region in total RNA. Real-time RT-PCR with the LNA probe described in this paper will serve as a valuable tool for robust, sensitive and reliable detection of TBRV isolates. PMID:25542840

  11. Isolation and characterization of Mayaro virus from a human in Acre, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Terzian, Ana Carolina B; Auguste, Albert J; Vedovello, Danila; Ferreira, Marcelo U; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica; Sperança, Márcia A; Suzuki, Rodrigo B; Juncansen, Camila; Araújo, João P; Weaver, Scott C; Nogueira, Maurício L

    2015-02-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is widely distributed throughout South America and is the etiologic agent of Mayaro fever, an acute febrile illness often presenting with arthralgic manifestations. The true incidence of MAYV infection is likely grossly underestimated because the symptomatic presentation is very similar to that of dengue fever and other acute febrile tropical diseases. We report the complete genome sequence of a MAYV isolate detected from an Acrelândia patient presenting with fever, chills, and sweating, but with no arthralgia. Results show that this isolate belongs to genotype D and is closely related to Bolivian strains. Our results suggest that the Acre/Mayaro strain is closely related to the progenitor of these Bolivian strains that were isolated between 2002 and 2006. PMID:25510721

  12. Intersubtype Reassortments of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Quail

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Hung, Vu-Khac; Nguyen, Duc Tan; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses are considered a threat to national animal industries, causing production losses and high mortality in domestic poultry. In recent years, quail has become a popular terrestrial poultry species raised for production of meat and eggs in Asia. In this study, to better understand the roles of quail in H5N1 viral evolution, two H5N1-positive samples, designated A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-49/2010 (CVVI-49/2010) and A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-50/2014 (CVVI-50/2014), were isolated from quail during H5N1 outbreaks in Vietnam, and their whole genome were analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis reveals new evolutionary variation in the worldwide H5N1 viruses. The quail HA genes were clustered into clades 1.1.1 (CVVI-49/2010) and clade 2.3.2.1c (CVVI-50/2014), which may have evolved from viruses circulating from chickens and/or ducks in Cambodia, mainland of China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and South Korea in recent years. Interestingly, the M2 gene of the CVVI-49/2010 strain contained amino acid substitutions at position 26L-I and 31S-N that are related to amantadine-resistance. In particular, the CVVI-50/2014 strain revealed evidence of multiple intersubtype reassortment events between virus clades 2.3.2.1c, 2.3.2.1b, and 2.3.2.1a. Data from this study supports the possible role of quail as an important intermediate host in avian influenza virus evolution. Therefore, additional surveillance is needed to monitor these HPAI viruses both serologically and virologically in quail. PMID:26900963

  13. Molecular characterisation of the full-length genome of olive latent virus 1 isolated from tomato.

    PubMed

    Hasiw-Jaroszewska, Beata; Borodynko, Natasza; Pospieszny, Henryk

    2011-05-01

    Olive latent virus 1 (OLV-1) is a species of the Necrovirus genus. So far, it has been reported to infect olive, citrus tree and tulip. Here, we determined and analysed the complete genomic sequence of an isolate designated as CM1, which was collected from tomato plant in the Wielkopolska region of Poland and represents the prevalent isolate of OLV-1. The CM1 genome consists of monopartite single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome sized 3,699 nt with five open reading frames (ORFs) and small inter-cistronic regions. ORF1 encodes a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 23kDa and the read-through (RT) of its amber stop codon results in ORF1 RT that encodes the virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. ORF2 and ORF3 encode two peptides, with 8kDa and 6kDa, respectively, which appear to be involved in cell-to-cell movement. ORF4 is located in the 3' terminal and encodes a protein with 30kDa identified as the viral coat protein (CP). The differences in CP region of four OLV-1 isolates whose sequences have been deposited in GenBank were observed. Nucleotide sequence identities of the CP of tomato CM1 isolate with those of olive, citrus and tulip isolates were 91.8%, 89.5% and 92.5%, respectively. In contrast to other OLV-1 isolates, CM1 induced necrotic spots on tomato plants and elicited necrotic local lesions on Nicotiana benthamiana, followed by systemic infection. This is the third complete genomic sequence of OLV-1 reported and the first one from tomato. PMID:21181333

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Avian Tembusu-Related Virus Strain WR Isolated from White Kaiya Ducks in Fujian, China

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chunhe; Fu, Guanghua; Shi, Shaohua; Cheng, Longfei; Chen, Hongmei

    2012-01-01

    Avian tembusu-related virus, which was first identified in China, is an emerging virus causing serious economic loss to the Chinese poultry industry. We report here the complete genome sequences of avian tembusu-related virus strain WR, isolated from a White Kaiya duck with disease characterized by an abrupt decrease in egg laying with ovarian hemorrhage, which will help in further understanding the molecular and evolutionary characteristics and pathogenesis of avian tembusu-related virus, the new flavivirus affecting ducks in Southern China. PMID:22966199

  15. Multiple mitochondrial viruses in an isolate of the Dutch Elm disease fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y; Dover, S L; Cole, T E; Brasier, C M; Buck, K W

    1999-05-25

    The nucleotide sequences of three mitochondrial virus double-stranded (ds) RNAs, RNA-4 (2599 nucleotides), RNA-5 (2474 nucleotides), and RNA-6 (2343 nucleotides), in a diseased isolate Log1/3-8d2 (Ld) of the Dutch elm disease fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi have been determined. All these RNAs are A-U-rich (71-73% A + U residues). Using the fungal mitochondrial genetic code in which UGA codes for tryptophan, the positive-strand of each of RNAs 4, 5, and 6 contains a single open reading frame (ORF) with the potential to encode a protein of 783, 729, and 695 amino acids, respectively, all of which contain conserved motifs characteristic of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps). Sequence comparisons showed that these RNAs are related to each other and to a previously characterized RNA, RNA-3a, from the same O. novo-ulmi isolate, especially within the RdRp-like motifs. However, the overall RNA nucleotide and RdRp amino acid sequence identities were relatively low (43-55% and 20-32%, respectively). The 5'- and 3'-terminal sequences of these RNAs are different, but they can all be folded into potentially stable stem-loop structures. Those of RNA-4 and RNA-6 have inverted complementarity, potentially forming panhandle structures. Their molecular and biological properties indicate that RNAs 3a, 4, 5, and 6 are the genomes of four different viruses, which replicate independently in the same cell. These four viruses are also related to a mitochondrial RNA virus from another fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, recently designated the type species of the Mitovirus genus of the Narnaviridae family, and to a virus from the fungus Rhizoctonia solani. It is proposed that the four O. novo-ulmi mitochondrial viruses are assigned to the Mitovirus genus and designated O. novo-ulmi mitovirus (OnuMV) 3a-Ld, 4-Ld, 5-Ld, and 6-Ld, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicated that O. novo-ulmi Ld nucleic acid extracts contain more single-stranded (ss, positive-stranded) RNA than dsRNA for all three newly described mitoviruses. O. novo-ulmi RNA-7, previously believed to be a satellite-like RNA, is shown to be a defective RNA, derived from OnuMV4-Ld RNA by multiple internal deletions. OnuMV4-Ld is therefore the helper virus for the replication of both RNA-7 and another defective RNA, RNA-10. Sequence comparisons indicate that RNA-10 could be derived from RNA-7, as previously suggested, or derived directly from RNA-4. PMID:10329574

  16. Genomic sequencing and characterization of a Chinese isolate of Bovine viral diarrhea virus 2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L Q; Lin, Y Q; Ding, X Y; Ren, M; Tao, J; Wang, J Y; Zhang, G P; Zhu, G Q

    2009-01-01

    The complete genomic sequencing and characterization of Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolate XJ-04 originated from cattle in China was described. The genomic RNA of the isolate was 12,284 nt long and contained short 5'- untranslated region (UTR), 3'-non-coding regions (NCR), and one open reading frame (ORF) encoding a large polyprotein of 3,895 amino acids with 20 potential N-glycosylation sites. The identity of the isolate XJ-04 with reference strains NADL (BVDV-1) and 890 (BVDV-2) in autoprotease (N(pro)) gene and structural genes (C, E(rns), E1, E2) was analyzed. The percentage of nt and aa identity in analyzed genes indicated that the isolate XJ-04 was closer to the reference strain 890 (BVDV-2) than to NADL (BVDV-1). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolate belonged to BVDV-2a subtype. Furthermore, comparison analysis indicated that the isolate XJ-04 did not contain any genomic insertions that can be directly related to the cytopathic phenotype. PMID:19941402

  17. Genome analysis and detection of a Chilean isolate of Grapevine leafroll associated virus-3.

    PubMed

    Engel, Esteban A; Girardi, Cristobal; Escobar, Paula F; Arredondo, Vania; Domínguez, Calixto; Pérez-Acle, Tomás; Valenzuela, Pablo D T

    2008-08-01

    The complete genome of the Chilean isolate Cl-766 of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus-3 (GLRaV-3) has been sequenced. This is the first genome sequence obtained from a GLRaV-3 isolate of the Southern hemisphere. The genomic RNA of 17,919 nucleotides contains 13 open reading frames (ORFs) with 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of 158 and 277 nucleotides, respectively. Comparison with NY1, the only isolate with complete genomic sequence available today, shows 97.6% nucleotide identity between the two isolates. Examination of the genome variability shows that most of the genetic diversity is concentrated in ORF1a. Three additional isolates from different geographic regions of Chile were partially sequenced as well, one which showed sequence divergence with respect to the other local and foreign isolates, indicative of different evolutionary constrains. Immunodetection systems were developed using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies produced against the recombinant major coat protein of GLRaV-3, providing sensitive and specific detection using a triple antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA) and an immunocapture-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (IC-RT-PCR) assay. PMID:18498048

  18. Genotyping of clinical varicella-zoster virus isolates collected from Yunnan in Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    LI, YUNLONG; ZHU, BAOSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the α-herpesvirus family. Genetically, it is stable and is divided into several genotypes based upon the genetic variations. The genotypes of VZV are rarely studied in the Southwestern region of China. In the present study, the common genetic variations in the VZV genes were examined in 42 VZV isolates collected from the patients with herpes zoster in the Yunnan province (Southwestern China). The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) 38, 54 and 62 in the VZV genes showed that all the collected VZV isolates were PstI, BglI and SmaI positive. The R5 variable-repeat region in these isolates was variable (R5A: 46.4%; R5B: 53.6%). The sequencing data of ORFs 1, 21, 22 and 54 indicated that 41 of the 42 collected VZV isolates could be grouped into genotype J or J1. Only one VZV isolate was identified as genotype A1 or M2. No new substitutions in the sequenced fragments were found in the collected VZV isolates. The results of the present study provided a preliminary genetic characterization of the VZV strains in the Yunnan province of Southwestern China. PMID:26893840

  19. Complete genome sequence of mumps viruses isolated from patients with parotitis, pancreatitis and encephalitis in India.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Chowdhury, Deepika T; Jadhav, Santoshkumar M; Hamde, Venkat S

    2016-04-01

    Limited information is available regarding epidemiology of mumps in India. Mumps vaccine is not included in the Universal Immunization Program of India. The complete genome sequences of Indian mumps virus (MuV) isolates are not available, hence this study was performed. Five isolates from bilateral parotitis and pancreatitis patients from Maharashtra, a MuV isolate from unilateral parotitis patient from Tamil Nadu, and a MuV isolate from encephalitis patient from Uttar Pradesh were genotyped by the standard protocol of the World Health Organization and subsequently complete genomes were sequenced. Indian MuV genomes were compared with published MuV genomes, including reference genotypes and eight vaccine strains for the genetic differences. The SH gene analysis revealed that five MuV isolates belonged to genotype C and two belonged to genotype G strains. The percent nucleotide divergence (PND) was 1.1% amongst five MuV genotype C strains and 2.2% amongst two MuV genotype G strains. A comparison with widely used mumps Jeryl Lynn vaccine strain revealed that Indian mumps isolates had 54, 54, 53, 49, 49, 38, and 49 amino acid substitutions in Chennai-2012, Kushinagar-2013, Pune-2008, Osmanabad-2012a, Osmanabad-2012b, Pune-1986 and Pune-2012, respectively. This study reports the complete genome sequences of Indian MuV strains obtained in years 1986, 2008, 2012 and 2013 that may be useful for further studies in India and globally. PMID:26876221

  20. Characterization of infectious laryngotracheitis virus isolates: demonstration of viral subpopulations within vaccine preparations.

    PubMed

    Garca, M; Riblet, S M

    2001-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a severe acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by ILT virus. To better understand the epidemiology of the disease, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay of the glycoprotein E gene has been developed and utilized to characterize vaccine strains and outbreak-related isolates. Enzymes EaeI and DdeI were used to differentiate the tissue culture origin (TCO) vaccine from chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines. Two RFLP patterns were observed with enzyme EaeI, one characteristic of the TCO vaccine and a second characteristic of all CEO vaccines. Three RFLP patterns were observed with enzyme DdeI. Patterns A and B were characterized as single patterns, whereas the type C pattern was a combination of patterns A and B. Analysis of vaccine strains showed the presence of patterns A and C. Pattern A was observed for the TCO vaccine and one CEO vaccine, whereas pattern C was observed for five of the six CEO vaccines analyzed. PCR-RFLP analysis of plaque-purified virus from pattern C CEO vaccine preparations demonstrated the presence of two populations (patterns A and B). Identification of molecularly different populations of viruses within currently used ILT vaccine is the first step to develop better molecular epidemiologic tools to track vaccine isolates in the field. PMID:11569727