Sample records for tropical rodent funambulus

  1. The oxidative damages caused by ultraviolet radiation type C (UVC) to a tropical rodent Funambulus pennanti: role of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Soumik; Sharma, Shweta; Haldar, Chandana

    2013-08-01

    Data suggests that UV radiation causes oxidative damage of the cells due to the release of inflammatory cytokines which in turn generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damages lipids, proteins and DNA. On the other hand, melatonin a potent antioxidant from the pineal gland under most of the conditions acts as a free radical scavenger. Our data suggests that melatonin pre-treatment (s.c. injections) significantly protected the diurnal squirrels from oxidative damages caused by UVC irradiation of 1528 mJ cm(-2) that induced suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. It also protected the rodents from UVC radiation induced increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels in spleen accompanied with a significant decrease in Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activity indicating the occurrence of superoxide anion mediated damages following UVC exposure. Melatonin administration reduced the radiation induced oxidative stress in the spleen tissue as analyzed by reduced lipid damages and higher SOD activity. Under in vivo (100 ?g/100g body wt.) and in vitro (250 pg/10(6) cells) conditions, melatonin pre-treatment prevented spleen tissues and splenocytes from radiation induced cell death. In conclusion we may suggest that melatonin could be one of the potent antioxidant and radio protector that may reduce UV radiation induced toxicity to the cells and hence may be clinically important. PMID:23708058

  2. Nycthemeral variation in melatonin receptor expression in the lymphoid organs of a tropical seasonal breeder Funambulus pennanti.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sameer; Haldar, Chandana

    2014-12-01

    Seasonal variations in immune functions point toward the involvement of melatonin in its regulation. These chronobiotic effects are exerted by receptors present on the immunocompetent cells. The present study investigated daily/nycthemeral variation in expression of melatonin receptor subtypes MT1/MT2 in the lymphoid organs (spleen/thymus) of a tropical squirrel, Funambulus pennanti. The receptor expression was noted every 4 h interval over 24 h under natural light-dark cycle, during two seasons and was correlated with peripheral level of melatonin. The MT1/MT2 receptor expression displayed higher levels at the time of dusk (light-dark transition; 1800 hours), while plasma melatonin was still low compared to the preceding time point. The receptors were downregulated during the nighttime with a minimum expression at 0200 hours. Thymus, during the long day length, showed a tissue-specific pattern of receptor expression with a minimum expression at 0600 hours. Results suggest that photoperiod by modulation of melatonin level inversely regulates the receptor expression. The observations imply that there exists a temporal window of sensitivity in the target organs to the melatonin signal that is regulated by modulation of melatonin receptor expression which might be involved in mediating the photoperiodic effects of melatonin in the control of seasonal immune physiology. PMID:25369902

  3. Effect of lead nitrate on thyroid function on the Indian palm squirrel, Funambulus pennanti (Wroughton)

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, V.K.; Katti, S.R.; Sathyanesan, A.G.

    1987-06-01

    Some of the known toxic effects of lead in mammals including man are, impaired heme synthesis, anemia, nepatopathy, nephropathy, behavioral disorders and neuropathy. However, very little is known about the effect of lead on endocrine physiology. Some data are available on lead induced impairment of thyroid function in occupationally exposed men and experimental rats. As lead nitrate is largely consumed through water and food, in this study the wild rodents Funambulus pennanti were administered lead through their drinking water and their thyroid structure, radioiodine 131-I percentage uptake and protein bound iodine (PBI) level were assessed.

  4. Ancient DNA and the tropics: a rodent's tale

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-García, Tania A.; Vázquez-Domínguez, Ella; Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquín; Kuch, Melanie; Enk, Jacob; King, Christine; Poinar, Hendrik N.

    2014-01-01

    Most genetic studies of Holocene fauna have been performed with ancient samples from dry and cold regions, in which preservation of fossils is facilitated and molecular damage is reduced. Ancient DNA work from tropical regions has been precluded owing to factors that limit DNA preservation (e.g. temperature, hydrolytic damage). We analysed ancient DNA from rodent jawbones identified as Ototylomys phyllotis, found in Holocene and Late Pleistocene stratigraphic layers from Loltún, a humid tropical cave located in the Yucatan peninsula. We extracted DNA and amplified six short overlapping fragments of the cytochrome b gene, totalling 666 bp, which represents an unprecedented success considering tropical ancient DNA samples. We performed genetic, phylogenetic and divergence time analyses, combining sequences from ancient and modern O. phyllotis, in order to assess the ancestry of the Loltún samples. Results show that all ancient samples fall into a unique clade that diverged prior to the divergence of the modern O. phyllotis, supporting it as a distinct Pleistocene form of the Ototylomys genus. Hence, this rodent's tale suggests that the sister group to modern O. phyllotis arose during the Miocene–Pliocene, diversified during the Pleistocene and went extinct in the Holocene. PMID:24899682

  5. Trade-off between L-thyroxin and melatonin in immune regulation of the Indian palm squirrel, Funambulus pennanti during the reproductively inactive phase.

    PubMed

    Rai, Seema; Haldar, Chandana; Singh, Shiv Shankar

    2005-01-01

    The thyroid gland and its hormones have been reported to influence reproduction and metabolism in a positive manner. However, research to date provides strong evidence for a reciprocal relationship between the immune system and hormones of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. The present study has been taken to elucidate the effect of L-thyroxin (T(4)) on immune parameters such as total leukocyte count, percent lymphocyte count, blastogenic response and percent stimulation ratio of thymocytes and splenocytes of a seasonally breeding rodent, Funambulus pennanti, during its reproductively inactive phase when peripheral T(4) is low. Treatment with L-thyroxin at a near-physiological dose of 35 microg/100 g body weight during evening hours showed a significant elevation of all immune parameters. However, combined treatment of L-thyroxin and melatonin (25 microg/100 g body weight) had no additive effect. On the other hand, in vitro supplementation of T(4) (10(-6) M) either alone or in combination with melatonin (0.5 microM) did not induce any significant change on thymocyte and splenocyte proliferation. Therefore, a trade-off effect of L-thyroxin and melatonin on the immune system (T- and B-cell differentiation) is suggested for this rodent. PMID:16424677

  6. Indirect interactions among tropical tree species through shared rodent seed predators: a novel mechanism of tree species coexistence.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Lopez, Carol X; Ballesteros-Mejia, Liliana; Ordoñez, Alejandro; Bohlman, Stephanie A; Olff, Han; Jansen, Patrick A

    2015-08-01

    The coexistence of numerous tree species in tropical forests is commonly explained by negative dependence of recruitment on the conspecific seed and tree density due to specialist natural enemies that attack seeds and seedlings ('Janzen-Connell' effects). Less known is whether guilds of shared seed predators can induce a negative dependence of recruitment on the density of different species of the same plant functional group. We studied 54 plots in tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, with contrasting mature tree densities of three coexisting large seeded tree species with shared seed predators. Levels of seed predation were far better explained by incorporating seed densities of all three focal species than by conspecific seed density alone. Both positive and negative density dependencies were observed for different species combinations. Thus, indirect interactions via shared seed predators can either promote or reduce the coexistence of different plant functional groups in tropical forest. PMID:25939379

  7. NIH POLICY MANUAL 3043-1 -Introduction of Rodents, Rodent Products and Rodent Pathogens

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    NIH POLICY MANUAL 3043-1 - Introduction of Rodents, Rodent Products and Rodent Pathogens Issuing from sources other than those approved by the NIH Rodent Import Officer are introduced into NIH, and Isolation Area; to clarify NIH excluded pathogens and other terms; and to include the handling of rodent

  8. The largest fossil rodent

    PubMed Central

    Rinderknecht, Andrés; Blanco, R. Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of an exceptionally well-preserved skull permits the description of the new South American fossil species of the rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi sp. nov. (family: Dinomyidae; Rodentia: Hystricognathi: Caviomorpha). This species with estimated body mass of nearly 1000?kg is the largest yet recorded. The skull sheds new light on the anatomy of the extinct giant rodents of the Dinomyidae, which are known mostly from isolated teeth and incomplete mandible remains. The fossil derives from San José Formation, Uruguay, usually assigned to the Pliocene–Pleistocene (4–2?Myr ago), and the proposed palaeoenvironment where this rodent lived was characterized as an estuarine or deltaic system with forest communities. PMID:18198140

  9. TECHNIQUES IN ASEPTIC RODENT SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstraten-Miller, Shelley L.; Brown, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Performing aseptic survival surgery in rodents can be challenging. This unit describes some basic principles to assist clinicians, researchers, and technicians in becoming proficient in performing aseptic rodent surgery. PMID:18729061

  10. Microdialysis in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2010-01-01

    Microdialysis is an in vivo sampling technique that permits the quantification of various substances (e.g., neurotransmitters, peptides, electrolytes) in blood and tissue. It is also used to infuse substances into the brain and spinal cord. This unit describes methods for the construction and stereotaxic implantation of microdialysis probes into discrete brain regions of the rat and mouse. Procedures for the conduct of conventional and quantitative microdialysis experiments in the awake and anesthetized rodent are also provided. PMID:19340813

  11. Toxoplasmosis seroprevalence in urban rodents: a survey in Niamey, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Aurélien; Garba, Madougou; Bonnabau, Henri; Kane, Mamadou; Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Dobigny, Gauthier

    2013-01-01

    A serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii was conducted on 766 domestic and peridomestic rodents from 46 trapping sites throughout the city of Niamey, Niger. A low seroprevalence was found over the whole town with only 1.96% of the rodents found seropositive. However, differences between species were important, ranging from less than 2% in truly commensal Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus and Mus musculus, while garden-associated Arvicanthis niloticus displayed 9.1% of seropositive individuals. This is in line with previous studies on tropical rodents - that we reviewed here - which altogether show that Toxoplasma seroprevalence in rodent is highly variable, depending on many factors such as locality and/or species. Moreover, although we were not able to decipher statistically between habitat or species effect, such a contrast between Nile grass rats and the other rodent species points towards a potentially important role of environmental toxoplasmic infection. This would deserve to be further scrutinised since intra-city irrigated cultures are extending in Niamey, thus potentially increasing Toxoplasma circulation in this yet semi-arid region. As far as we are aware of, our study is one of the rare surveys of its kind performed in Sub-Saharan Africa and the first one ever conducted in the Sahel. PMID:23828008

  12. Thieving rodents as substitute dispersers of megafaunal seeds

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Hirsch, Ben T.; Emsens, Willem-Jan; Zamora-Gutierrez, Veronica; Wikelski, Martin; Kays, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The Neotropics have many plant species that seem to be adapted for seed dispersal by megafauna that went extinct in the late Pleistocene. Given the crucial importance of seed dispersal for plant persistence, it remains a mystery how these plants have survived more than 10,000 y without their mutualist dispersers. Here we present support for the hypothesis that secondary seed dispersal by scatter-hoarding rodents has facilitated the persistence of these large-seeded species. We used miniature radio transmitters to track the dispersal of reputedly megafaunal seeds by Central American agoutis, which scatter-hoard seeds in shallow caches in the soil throughout the forest. We found that seeds were initially cached at mostly short distances and then quickly dug up again. However, rather than eating the recovered seeds, agoutis continued to move and recache the seeds, up to 36 times. Agoutis dispersed an estimated 35% of seeds for >100 m. An estimated 14% of the cached seeds survived to the next year, when a new fruit crop became available to the rodents. Serial video-monitoring of cached seeds revealed that the stepwise dispersal was caused by agoutis repeatedly stealing and recaching each other’s buried seeds. Although previous studies suggest that rodents are poor dispersers, we demonstrate that communities of rodents can in fact provide highly effective long-distance seed dispersal. Our findings suggest that thieving scatter-hoarding rodents could substitute for extinct megafaunal seed dispersers of tropical large-seeded trees. PMID:22802644

  13. Geomagnetic field detection in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Olcese, J.; Reuss, S.; Semm, P.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to behavioral evidence for the detection of earth-strength magnetic fields (MF) by rodents, recent investigations have revealed that electrophysiological and biochemical responses to MF occur in the pineal organ and retina of rodents. In addition, ferrimagnetic deposits have been identified in the ethmoidal regions of the rodent skull. These findings point to a new sensory phenomenon, which interfaces with many fields of biology, including neuroscience, psychophysics, behavioral ecology, chronobiology and sensory physiology.

  14. Correlates of Recent Declines of Rodents in Northern and Southern Australia: Habitat Structure Is Critical.

    PubMed

    Lawes, Michael J; Fisher, Diana O; Johnson, Chris N; Blomberg, Simon P; Frank, Anke S K; Fritz, Susanne A; McCallum, Hamish; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Abbott, Brett N; Legge, Sarah; Letnic, Mike; Thomas, Colette R; Thurgate, Nikki; Fisher, Alaric; Gordon, Iain J; Kutt, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Australia has experienced dramatic declines and extinctions of its native rodent species over the last 200 years, particularly in southern Australia. In the tropical savanna of northern Australia significant declines have occurred only in recent decades. The later onset of these declines suggests that the causes may differ from earlier declines in the south. We examine potential regional effects (northern versus southern Australia) on biological and ecological correlates of range decline in Australian rodents. We demonstrate that rodent declines have been greater in the south than in the tropical north, are strongly influenced by phylogeny, and are consistently greater for species inhabiting relatively open or sparsely vegetated habitat. Unlike in marsupials, where some species have much larger body size than rodents, body mass was not an important predictor of decline in rodents. All Australian rodent species are within the prey-size range of cats (throughout the continent) and red foxes (in the south). Contrary to the hypothesis that mammal declines are related directly to ecosystem productivity (annual rainfall), our results are consistent with the hypothesis that disturbances such as fire and grazing, which occur in non-rainforest habitats and remove cover used by rodents for shelter, nesting and foraging, increase predation risk. We agree with calls to introduce conservation management that limits the size and intensity of fires, increases fire patchiness and reduces grazing impacts at ecological scales appropriate for rodents. Controlling feral predators, even creating predator-free reserves in relatively sparsely-vegetated habitats, is urgently required to ensure the survival of rodent species, particularly in northern Australia where declines are not yet as severe as those in the south. PMID:26111037

  15. Correlates of Recent Declines of Rodents in Northern and Southern Australia: Habitat Structure Is Critical

    PubMed Central

    Lawes, Michael J.; Fisher, Diana O.; Johnson, Chris N.; Blomberg, Simon P.; Frank, Anke S. K.; Fritz, Susanne A.; McCallum, Hamish; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Abbott, Brett N.; Legge, Sarah; Letnic, Mike; Thomas, Colette R.; Thurgate, Nikki; Fisher, Alaric; Gordon, Iain J.; Kutt, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Australia has experienced dramatic declines and extinctions of its native rodent species over the last 200 years, particularly in southern Australia. In the tropical savanna of northern Australia significant declines have occurred only in recent decades. The later onset of these declines suggests that the causes may differ from earlier declines in the south. We examine potential regional effects (northern versus southern Australia) on biological and ecological correlates of range decline in Australian rodents. We demonstrate that rodent declines have been greater in the south than in the tropical north, are strongly influenced by phylogeny, and are consistently greater for species inhabiting relatively open or sparsely vegetated habitat. Unlike in marsupials, where some species have much larger body size than rodents, body mass was not an important predictor of decline in rodents. All Australian rodent species are within the prey-size range of cats (throughout the continent) and red foxes (in the south). Contrary to the hypothesis that mammal declines are related directly to ecosystem productivity (annual rainfall), our results are consistent with the hypothesis that disturbances such as fire and grazing, which occur in non-rainforest habitats and remove cover used by rodents for shelter, nesting and foraging, increase predation risk. We agree with calls to introduce conservation management that limits the size and intensity of fires, increases fire patchiness and reduces grazing impacts at ecological scales appropriate for rodents. Controlling feral predators, even creating predator-free reserves in relatively sparsely-vegetated habitats, is urgently required to ensure the survival of rodent species, particularly in northern Australia where declines are not yet as severe as those in the south. PMID:26111037

  16. RODENT MODELS OF SLEEP APNEA

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Eric M.; O’Donnell, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Rodent models of sleep apnea have long been used to provide novel insight into the generation and predisposition to apneas as well as to characterize the impact of sleep apnea on cardiovascular, metabolic, and psychological health in humans. Given the significant body of work utilizing rodent models in the field of sleep apnea, the aims of this review are three-fold: first, to review the use of rodents as natural models of sleep apnea; second, to provide an overview of the experimental interventions employed in rodents to simulate sleep apnea; third, to discuss the refinement of rodent models to further our understanding of breathing abnormalities that occur during sleep. Given mounting evidence that sleep apnea impairs cognitive function, reduces quality of life, and exacerbates the course of multiple chronic diseases, rodent models will remain a high priority as a tool to interrogate both the pathophysiology and sequelae of breathing related abnormalities during sleep and to improve approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23722067

  17. Tropical Rainforests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigh, Ronald B.; Nations, James D.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a summary of scientific knowledge about the rainforest environment, a tropical ecosystem in danger of extermination. Topics include the current state of tropical rainforests, the causes of rainforest destruction, and alternatives of rainforest destruction. (BT)

  18. Tropical Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaser, Georg; Osmaston, Henry

    2002-01-01

    Tropical glaciers are both highly sensitive indicators of global climate and fresh water reservoirs in some fast developing regions. This book gives a theoretical and practical analysis of tropical glaciology including a useful definition of tropical glacier-climate regimes and an analysis of the main glaciological variables. The Rwenzori and the Cordillera Blanca are investigated as examples of tropical glacierized mountains. The fluctuations of their glaciers since the end of the Little Ice Age are reconstructed and the probable climatic reasons are discussed. The evidence of great expansions of mountain glaciers throughout the tropics on several occasions during the Quaternary are summarized, examined and then applied and contrasted.

  19. Probing perceptual decisions in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Carandini, Matteo; Churchland, Anne K

    2014-01-01

    The study of perceptual decision-making offers insight into how the brain uses complex, sometimes ambiguous information to guide actions. Understanding the underlying processes and their neural bases requires that one pair recordings and manipulations of neural activity with rigorous psychophysics. Though this research has been traditionally performed in primates, it seems increasingly promising to pursue it at least partly in mice and rats. However, rigorous psychophysical methods are not yet as developed for these rodents as they are for primates. Here we give a brief overview of the sensory capabilities of rodents and of their cortical areas devoted to sensation and decision. We then review methods of psychophysics, focusing on the technical issues that arise in their implementation in rodents. These methods represent a rich set of challenges and opportunities. PMID:23799475

  20. Rodent nutrition: digestive comparisons of 4 common rodent species.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kerrin

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes the literature regarding digestive strategies and captive diets of common rodent pocket pets. A comparison is made between the 2 suborders in which chinchillas, guinea pigs, hamsters, and gerbils occur, highlighting digestive anatomy and dietary adaptations. Recommended captive diets are provided, as well as common nutritionally related health issues that may be presented to veterinary clinics. PMID:25155666

  1. In Vivo Rodent Micronucleus Assay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Makoto Hayashi

    Genotoxicity plays an important role for the safety evaluation of chemicals. Chromosomal aberration is one of two major end\\u000a points of genotoxicity. The rodent haematopoietic cell micronucleus assay is most widely used as an in vivo test to evaluate\\u000a structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations. The historical aspects of the development of the in vivo micronucleus test,\\u000a the mechanism of micronucleus

  2. Mycotoxins in laboratory rodent feed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Halldén Waldemarson; P Hedenqvist; A-C Salomonsson; P Häggblom

    2005-01-01

    Summary Twenty-one batches of fixed-formula rodent diets from three feed manufacturers were tested for the presence of five mycotoxins: deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), HT-2 toxin, T-2 toxin and ochratoxin A (OTA). Five batches were also tested for the presence of zearalenone (ZEN) and six batches for aflatoxins. Detectable levels of DON (up to 298mg\\/kg), NIV (up to 118mg\\/kg), OTA (up

  3. Prospects for biological control of rodent populations*

    PubMed Central

    Wodzicki, Kazimierz

    1973-01-01

    Pathogens and predatory animals are the main agents used for the biological control of rodents. The pathogens that have been used are of the genus Salmonella; none is rodent-specific and all can cause severe infection in man and domestic animals. Furthermore, rodents frequently develop immunity to, and become carriers of, these organisms, and there is little to commend their use, except in lightly populated areas where control is infrequently applied. The relationships of five predator species with their rodent prey have been examined. The monitor lizard, mongoose, and ferret were for different reasons found to be unsatisfactory, and there is not yet sufficient evidence to warrant further releases of the Japanese weasel. Domestic and feral cats control rodents well in some situations but only after some other agent has removed a large part of the rodent population. PMID:4587482

  4. Prediction of rodent carcinogenicity for 30 chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, J

    1996-01-01

    Predictions of carcinogenic activity are made for 30 chemicals currently being assessed for rodent carcinogenicity by the U.S. National Toxicology Program. The predictions are based upon the chemical structure, the anticipated or reported mutagenicity, and the reported sub-chronic toxicity of each chemical. It is predicted that 13 chemicals will be noncarcinogenic to rodents, that 7 will be genotoxic carcinogens, and that 10 may show some evidence of presumed nongenotoxic rodent carcinogenesis. PMID:8933060

  5. Rodent Control: Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!

    MedlinePLUS

    ... successfully trapping rodents in and around the home. Seal Up! Seal up holes inside and outside the home to ... infested areas. Before cleaning, trap the rodents and seal up any entryways to ensure that no rodents ...

  6. Tropical Cyclones John, Steve

    E-print Network

    Greenslade, Diana

    Tropical Cyclones John, Steve and Rosita Tropical Cyclone Season 1999--2000 #12;Tropical Cyclones John, Steve and Rosita Tropical Cyclone Season 1999­2000 © Commonwealth of Australia, August 2000 Hotel: Courtesy of WA Newspapers. #12;Tropical Cyclones John, Steve and Rosita 1 Tropical Cyclones John

  7. Rodent models for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-07-15

    One of the factors limiting the translation of knowledge from preclinical studies to the clinic has been the limitations of in vivo diseases models. Except in the case of highly controlled and regulated clinical trials, geneticists and scientists do not use humans for their experimental investigations because of the obvious risk to life. Instead, they use various animal, fungal, bacterial, and plant species as model organisms for their studies. Amongst these model organisms, rodent models are the most used due to the easiness for the experiments and the possibility to modify genetically these model animals. Nevertheless, due to the fact that animal models typically do not contract the same genetic diseases as people, so scientists must alter their genomes to induce human disease states and to know what kind of mutation causes the disease. In this brief review, we will discuss the interests of rodent models that have been developed to simulate human pathologies, focusing in models that employ xenografts and genetic modification. Within the framework of genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models, we will review some of the current genetic strategies for modeling diseases. PMID:25823811

  8. Mathematical Models for Hantavirus Infection in Rodents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda J. S. Allen; Robert K. McCormack; Colleen B. Jonsson

    2006-01-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome is an emerging disease of humans that is carried by wild rodents. Humans are usually exposed to the virus through geographically isolated outbreaks. The driving forces behind these outbreaks is poorly understood. Certainly, one key driver of the emergence of these viruses is the virus population dynamics within the rodent population. Two new mathematical models for hantavirus

  9. A Guide to Research Rodent Housing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William J. White

    BACKGROUND Laboratory rodents have been used in the United States as research animals since the late 1800s. In the past, housing of rodents used for research was designed primarily to prevent escape, to provide easy access to the animals by researchers, to allow the animals ready access to food and water, and to allow efficient dirty bedding removal and cage

  10. CONTROLLING RODENTS IN COMMERCIAL POULTRY FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    Ginzel, Matthew

    CONTROLLING RODENTS IN COMMERCIAL POULTRY FACILITIES Judy Loven, Animal Damage Management and Ralph in and around livestock and farm facilities. Enclosed and insulated commercial poultry facilities provide ideal problems to a poultry manager. Rodents consume and contaminate feed, gnaw on struc- tural, mechanical

  11. Rodents as agents of ecological change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rodents have the potential to exert a wide array of ecological pressures in any given ecosystem. The negative impacts to plant communities in general, especially cultivated crops, are typically cited as examples of rodent grazing pressure. Considerable research has been conducted on the negative imp...

  12. Rodent Models for Metabolic Syndrome Research

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Sunil K.; Brown, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Rodents are widely used to mimic human diseases to improve understanding of the causes and progression of disease symptoms and to test potential therapeutic interventions. Chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and hypertension, together known as the metabolic syndrome, are causing increasing morbidity and mortality. To control these diseases, research in rodent models that closely mimic the changes in humans is essential. This review will examine the adequacy of the many rodent models of metabolic syndrome to mimic the causes and progression of the disease in humans. The primary criterion will be whether a rodent model initiates all of the signs, especially obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dysfunction of the heart, blood vessels, liver and kidney, primarily by diet since these are the diet-induced signs in humans with metabolic syndrome. We conclude that the model that comes closest to fulfilling this criterion is the high carbohydrate, high fat-fed male rodent. PMID:21253582

  13. Tropical Deforestation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, Peter H.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the deforestation problem and some efforts for solving the problem. Considers the impact of population growth, poverty, and ignorance. Includes a discussion of the current rapid decline in tropical forests, the consequences of destruction, and an outlook for the future. (YP)

  14. Tropical Elliptic Tropical Elliptic Curves and their

    E-print Network

    Roé, Joaquim

    Tropical Elliptic Curves Tropical Elliptic Curves and their j-Invariant (joint work with Eric Katz Elliptic CurvesExamples conv(A) conv(A) XA P9 XA P8 3-tuple Veronese (2, 2)-Segre embedding embedding of P2 of P1 × P1 #12;Tropical Elliptic CurvesClassification of the polygons #12;Tropical Elliptic

  15. Urban resident attitudes toward rodents, rodent control products, and environmental effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anita T. Morzillo; Angela G. Mertig

    2011-01-01

    Rodent control in urban areas can result in the inadvertent mortality of non-target species (e.g., bobcats). However, there\\u000a is little detailed information from urban residents about rodent control practices. We evaluated urban rodent control behaviors\\u000a in two areas of California (southwestern Bakersfield and in proximity to Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (SAMO))\\u000a where biologists have observed non-target mortality among

  16. Rodents as potential couriers for bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Mare; Janse, Ingmar; van de Goot, Frank; van Rotterdam, Bart J

    2013-09-01

    Many pathogens that can cause major public health, economic, and social damage are relatively easily accessible and could be used as biological weapons. Wildlife is a natural reservoir for many potential bioterrorism agents, and, as history has shown, eliminating a pathogen that has dispersed among wild fauna can be extremely challenging. Since a number of wild rodent species live close to humans, rodents constitute a vector for pathogens to circulate among wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. This article reviews the possible consequences of a deliberate spread of rodentborne pathogens. It is relatively easy to infect wild rodents with certain pathogens or to release infected rodents, and the action would be difficult to trace. Rodents can also function as reservoirs for diseases that have been spread during a bioterrorism attack and cause recurring disease outbreaks. As rats and mice are common in both urban and rural settlements, deliberately released rodentborne infections have the capacity to spread very rapidly. The majority of pathogens that are listed as potential agents of bioterrorism by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases exploit rodents as vectors or reservoirs. In addition to zoonotic diseases, deliberately released rodentborne epizootics can have serious economic consequences for society, for example, in the area of international trade restrictions. The ability to rapidly detect introduced diseases and effectively communicate with the public in crisis situations enables a quick response and is essential for successful and cost-effective disease control. PMID:23971813

  17. Can rodents conceive hyperbolic spaces?

    PubMed

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Troiani, Francesca; Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    The grid cells discovered in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex have been proposed to provide a metric for Euclidean space, possibly even hardwired in the embryo. Yet, one class of models describing the formation of grid unit selectivity is entirely based on developmental self-organization, and as such it predicts that the metric it expresses should reflect the environment to which the animal has adapted. We show that, according to self-organizing models, if raised in a non-Euclidean hyperbolic cage rats should be able to form hyperbolic grids. For a given range of grid spacing relative to the radius of negative curvature of the hyperbolic surface, such grids are predicted to appear as multi-peaked firing maps, in which each peak has seven neighbours instead of the Euclidean six, a prediction that can be tested in experiments. We thus demonstrate that a useful universal neuronal metric, in the sense of a multi-scale ruler and compass that remain unaltered when changing environments, can be extended to other than the standard Euclidean plane. PMID:25948611

  18. Tropical rat mites (Ornithonyssus bacoti) - serious ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Beck, Wieland; Fölster-Holst, Regina

    2009-08-01

    In Germany there is limited information available about the distribution of the tropical rat mite (Ornithonyssus bacoti) in rodents. A few case reports show that this hematophagous mite species may also cause dermatitis in man. Having close body contact to small rodents is an important question for patients with pruritic dermatoses. The definitive diagnosis of this ectoparasitosis requires the detection of the parasite, which is more likely to be found in the environment of its host (in the cages, in the litter or in corners or cracks of the living area) than on the hosts' skin itself. A case of infestation with tropical rat mites in a family is reported here. Three mice that had been removed from the home two months before were the reservoir. The mites were detected in a room where the cage with the mice had been placed months ago. Treatment requires the eradication of the parasites on its hosts (by a veterinarian) and in the environment (by an exterminator) with adequate acaricides such as permethrin. PMID:19508683

  19. Endoparasites of Wild Rodents in Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nateghpour, Mehdi; Motevalli-Haghi, Afsaneh; Akbarzadeh, Kamran; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Mobedi, Iraj; Farivar, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to collect wild rodents for endoparasites determination in some parts of Sistan and Baluchistan Province, southeastern Iran nearby Pakistan and Afghanistan countries. Methods: A total of 100 wild rodents were captured alive with cage traps. Various samples were collected from blood and feces, also impression smear prepared from different organs. The samples were prepared by formalin-ether or stained with Giemsa, after that were examined under microscope. Results: All the caught rodents (47 Tatera indica, 44 Meriones hurriana, 5 Gerbilus nanus and 4 Meriones libycus) were studied for endoparasites emphasizing to their zoonotic aspects. Endoparasites including Spirurida, Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana feraterna, Trichuris trichiura, Skerjabino taenia, Trichostrongylus spp, Entamoeba muris, Chilomastix mesnili and Leishmania spp were parasitologically identified. Conclusion: Among 9 genera or species of the identified parasites at least 5 of them have zoonotic and public health importance.

  20. The MAM rodent model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent models of human disease are essential to obtain a better understanding of disease pathology, the mechanism of action underlying conventional treatments, as well as for the generation of novel therapeutic approaches. There are a number of rodent models of schizophrenia based on either genetic manipulations, acute or sub-chronic drug administration, or developmental disturbances. The prenatal methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) rodent model is a developmental disruption model gaining increased attention because it displays a number of histological, neurophysiological and behavioral deficits analogous to those observed in schizophrenia patients. This unit describes the procedures required to safely induce the MAM phenotype in rats. In addition, we describe a simple behavioral procedure, amphetamine-induced hyper-locomotion, which can be utilized to verify the MAM phenotype. PMID:23559309

  1. Chemical carcinogenesis: too many rodent carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, B N; Gold, L S

    1990-01-01

    The administration of chemicals at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in standard animal cancer tests is postulated to increase cell division (mitogenesis), which in turn increases rates of mutagenesis and thus carcinogenesis. The animal data are consistent with this mechanism, because a high proportion--about half--of all chemicals tested (whether natural or synthetic) are indeed rodent carcinogens. We conclude that at the low doses of most human exposures, where cell killing does not occur, the hazards to humans of rodent carcinogens may be much lower than is commonly assumed. Images PMID:2217209

  2. Chemical carcinogenesis: Too many rodent carcinogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. N. Ames; L. S. Gold

    1990-01-01

    The administration of chemicals at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in standard animal cancer tests is postulated to increase cell division (mitogenesis), which in turn increases rates of mutagenesis and thus carcinogenesis. The animal data are consistent with this mechanism, because a high proportionâabout halfâof all chemicals tested (whether natural or synthetic) are indeed rodent carcinogens. The authors conclude that

  3. Too many rodent carcinogens: Mitogenesis increases mutagenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. N. Ames; L. S. Gold

    1990-01-01

    A clarification of the mechanism of carcinogenesis is developing at a rapid rate. This new understanding undermines many assumptions of current regulatory policy toward rodent carcinogens and necessitates rethinking the utility and meaning of routine animal cancer tests. At a recent watershed meeting on carcinogenesis, much evidence was presented suggesting that mitogenesis plays a dominant role in carcinogenesis. Our own

  4. Enrichment Strategies Rodents in the Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    enclosure such as "cage furniture, equipment for environmental enrichment, objects for manipulationEnrichment Strategies for Rodents in the Laboratory Endorsed by ARAC - 9/8/04 #12 of environmental enrichment on laboratory rats and mice. The development of enrichment programs for non

  5. Mycoplasmas and their role as rodent pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Fallon

    1967-01-01

    SUMMARY Mycoplasmas are the smallest known free-living form of life, and differ from bacteria in a number of characteristics. They are widely distributed in the animal kingdom and may give rise to both acute and latent infections as well as being present as normal flora. The three principal rodent pathogens so far described are Mycoplasma pulmonis, Mycoplasma arthritidis and Mycoplasma

  6. Object Recognition Memory and the Rodent Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR…

  7. Effects of rodent poisoning on Powelliphanta traversi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaun J. Bennett; Rachel J. Standish; Ian A. N. Stringer

    Rat predation is a threat to lowland Powelliphanta traversi (giant predatory land snail), and we have shown that 'press' poisoning of rodents (rats and mice) using brodifacoum baits significantly reduces rat abundance relative to non- poisoned areas. The effect on P. t. traversi was evident by the increase in population size, mainly due to adult migration, and a decrease in

  8. Biodiversity Conservation in Tropical Agroecosystems

    E-print Network

    Biodiversity Conservation in Tropical Agroecosystems A New Conservation Paradigm Ivette Perfectoa. This conclusion has major consequences for biodiversity con- servation in fragmented tropical forests the literature on biodiversity in tropical agricul- tural landscapes and present evidence that many tropical

  9. Tropical Convex Hull Computations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Joswig

    2008-01-01

    This is a survey on tropical polytopes from the combinatorial point of view and with a focus on algorithms. Tropical convexity is interesting because it relates a number of combinatorial concepts including ordinary convexity, monomial ideals, subdivisions of products of simplices, matroid theory, finite metric spaces, and the tropical Grassmannians. The relationship between these topics is explained via one running

  10. Fruit characters as a basis of fruit choice and seed dispersal in a tropical forest vertebrate community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Gautier-Hion; J.-M. Duplantier; R. Quris; F. Feer; C. Sourd; J.-P. Decoux; G. Dubost; L. Emmons; C. Erard; P. Hecketsweiler; A. Moungazi; C. Roussilhon; J.-M. Thiollay

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between a large community of vertebrate frugivore-granivores (including 7 species of large canopy birds, 19 species of rodents, 7 species of ruminants, and 6 species of monkeys), and 122 fruit species they consume, were studied for a year in a tropical rainforest in Gabon.

  11. Rodent reservoirs of future zoonotic diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Barbara A; Schmidt, John Paul; Bowden, Sarah E; Drake, John M

    2015-06-01

    The increasing frequency of zoonotic disease events underscores a need to develop forecasting tools toward a more preemptive approach to outbreak investigation. We apply machine learning to data describing the traits and zoonotic pathogen diversity of the most speciose group of mammals, the rodents, which also comprise a disproportionate number of zoonotic disease reservoirs. Our models predict reservoir status in this group with over 90% accuracy, identifying species with high probabilities of harboring undiscovered zoonotic pathogens based on trait profiles that may serve as rules of thumb to distinguish reservoirs from nonreservoir species. Key predictors of zoonotic reservoirs include biogeographical properties, such as range size, as well as intrinsic host traits associated with lifetime reproductive output. Predicted hotspots of novel rodent reservoir diversity occur in the Middle East and Central Asia and the Midwestern United States. PMID:26038558

  12. Transplantation tolerance: lessons from experimental rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Cherry I; Nadig, Satish N; Wood, Kathryn J

    2007-01-01

    Immunological tolerance or functional unresponsiveness to a transplant is arguably the only approach that is likely to provide long-term graft survival without the problems associated with life-long global immunosuppression. Over the past 50 years, rodent models have become an invaluable tool for elucidating the mechanisms of tolerance to alloantigens. Importantly, rodent models can be adapted to ensure that they reflect more accurately the immune status of human transplant recipients. More recently, the development of genetically modified mice has enabled specific insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a key role in both the induction and maintenance of tolerance to be obtained and more complex questions to be addressed. This review highlights strategies designed to induce alloantigen specific immunological unresponsiveness leading to transplantation tolerance that have been developed through the use of experimental models. PMID:17711408

  13. Cage allocation designs for rodent carcinogenicity experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, A M; Lagakos, S W

    1992-01-01

    Cage allocation designs for rodent carcinogenicity experiments are discussed and presented with the goal of avoiding dosage group biases related to cage location. Considerations in selecting a cage design are first discussed in general terms. Specific designs are presented for use in experiments involving three, four, and five dose groups and with one, four, and five rodents per cage. Priorities for balancing treatment groups include horizontal position on shelf and shelf of rack, nearest neighbor balance, and male-female balance. It is proposed that these balance criteria be considered together with practical issues, such as the ability to accurately conform to a design and to determine a sensible and efficient design for each experiment. PMID:1295494

  14. Rodent reservoirs of future zoonotic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Barbara A.; Schmidt, John Paul; Bowden, Sarah E.; Drake, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing frequency of zoonotic disease events underscores a need to develop forecasting tools toward a more preemptive approach to outbreak investigation. We apply machine learning to data describing the traits and zoonotic pathogen diversity of the most speciose group of mammals, the rodents, which also comprise a disproportionate number of zoonotic disease reservoirs. Our models predict reservoir status in this group with over 90% accuracy, identifying species with high probabilities of harboring undiscovered zoonotic pathogens based on trait profiles that may serve as rules of thumb to distinguish reservoirs from nonreservoir species. Key predictors of zoonotic reservoirs include biogeographical properties, such as range size, as well as intrinsic host traits associated with lifetime reproductive output. Predicted hotspots of novel rodent reservoir diversity occur in the Middle East and Central Asia and the Midwestern United States. PMID:26038558

  15. Evolution of the spermatozoon in muroid rodents.

    PubMed

    Breed, William G

    2005-09-01

    In the rodent superfamily Muroidea, a model for the evolution of sperm form has been proposed in which it is suggested that a hook-shaped sperm head and long tail evolved from a more simple, nonhooked head and short tail in several different subfamilies. To test this model the shape of the sperm head, with particular emphasis on its apical region, and length of sperm tail were matched to a recent phylogeny based on the nucleotide sequence of several protein-coding nuclear genes from 3 families and 10 subfamilies of muroid rodents. Data from the two other myomorph superfamilies, the Dipodoidea and kangaroo rats in the Geomyoidea, were used for an outgroup comparison. In most species in all 10 muroid subfamilies, apart from in the Murinae, the sperm head has a long rostral hook largely composed of acrosomal material, although its length and cross-sectional shape vary across the various subfamilies. Nevertheless, in a few species of various lineages a very different sperm morphology occurs in which an apical hook is lacking. In the outgroups the three species of dipodid rodents have a sperm head that lacks a hook, whereas in the heteromyids an acrosome-containing apical hook is present. It is concluded that, as the hook-shaped sperm head and long sperm tail occur across the muroid subfamilies, as well as in the heteromyid rodents, it is likely to be the ancestral condition within each of the subfamilies with the various forms of nonhooked sperm heads, that are sometimes associated with short tails, being highly derived states. These findings thus argue against a repeated evolution in various muroid lineages of a complex, hook-shaped sperm head and long sperm tail from a more simple, nonhooked sperm head and short tail. An alternative proposal for the evolution of sperm form within the Muroidea is presented in the light of these data. PMID:16037955

  16. A primer on rodent identification methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lotus

    2005-04-01

    Identifying laboratory rodents as a group may be sufficient if all the animals are to receive the same treatment and/or manipulation and if individual variations in response are not to be recorded separately. However, it is frequently necessary to be able to differentiate between individual animals used in a study. Identification of individual animals may also be necessary to maintain health records and to properly manage colonies of laboratory animals in compliance with regulatory agencies and research protocol requirements. PMID:15806093

  17. Geometric Morphometrics of Rodent Sperm Head Shape

    PubMed Central

    Varea Sánchez, María; Bastir, Markus; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa, particularly those of rodent species, are extremely complex cells and differ greatly in form and dimensions. Thus, characterization of sperm size and, particularly, sperm shape represents a major challenge. No consensus exists on a method to objectively assess size and shape of spermatozoa. In this study we apply the principles of geometric morphometrics to analyze rodent sperm head morphology and compare them with two traditional morphometry methods, that is, measurements of linear dimensions and dimensions-derived parameters calculated using formulae employed in sperm morphometry assessments. Our results show that geometric morphometrics clearly identifies shape differences among rodent spermatozoa. It is also capable of discriminating between size and shape and to analyze these two variables separately. Thus, it provides an accurate method to assess sperm head shape. Furthermore, it can identify which sperm morphology traits differ between species, such as the protrusion or retraction of the base of the head, the orientation and relative position of the site of flagellum insertion, the degree of curvature of the hook, and other distinct anatomical features and appendices. We envisage that the use of geometric morphometrics may have a major impact on future studies focused on the characterization of sperm head formation, diversity of sperm head shape among species (and underlying evolutionary forces), the effects of reprotoxicants on changes in cell shape, and phenotyping of genetically-modified individuals. PMID:24312234

  18. Rodents and risk in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam: seroprevalence of selected zoonotic viruses in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Van Cuong, Nguyen; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Vo Be, Hien; An, Nguyen Ngoc; Tue, Ngo Tri; Anh, Nguyet Lam; Anh, Pham Hong; Phuc, Nguyen The; Baker, Stephen; Voutilainen, Liina; Jääskeläinen, Anne; Huhtamo, Eili; Utriainen, Mira; Sironen, Tarja; Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Chaval, Yannick; Morand, Serge; Bryant, Juliet E

    2015-01-01

    In the Mekong Delta in southern Vietnam, rats are commonly traded in wet markets and sold live for food consumption. We investigated seroprevalence to selected groups of rodent-borne viruses among human populations with high levels of animal exposure and among co-located rodent populations. The indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) was used to determine seropositivity to representative reference strains of hantaviruses (Dobrava virus [DOBV], Seoul virus [SEOV]), cowpox virus, arenaviruses (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV]), flaviviruses (tick-borne encephalitis virus [TBEV]), and rodent parechoviruses (Ljungan virus), using sera from 245 humans living in Dong Thap Province and 275 rodents representing the five common rodent species sold in wet markets and present in peridomestic and farm settings. Combined seropositivity to DOBV and SEOV among the rodents and humans was 6.9% (19/275) and 3.7% (9/245), respectively; 1.1% (3/275) and 4.5% (11/245) to cowpox virus; 5.4% (15/275) and 47.3% (116/245) for TBEV; and exposure to Ljungan virus was 18.8% (46/245) in humans, but 0% in rodents. Very little seroreactivity was observed to LCMV in either rodents (1/275, 0.4%) or humans (2/245, 0.8%). Molecular screening of rodent liver tissues using consensus primers for flaviviruses did not yield any amplicons, whereas molecular screening of rodent lung tissues for hantavirus yielded one hantavirus sequence (SEOV). In summary, these results indicate low to moderate levels of endemic hantavirus circulation, possible circulation of a flavivirus in rodent reservoirs, and the first available data on human exposures to parechoviruses in Vietnam. Although the current evidence suggests only limited exposure of humans to known rodent-borne diseases, further research is warranted to assess public health implications of the rodent trade. PMID:25629782

  19. Leptospira and Rodents in Cambodia: Environmental Determinants of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Svilena; Herbreteau, Vincent; Blasdell, Kim; Chaval, Yannick; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; Morand, Serge

    2012-01-01

    We investigated infection of rodents and shrews by Leptospira spp. in two localities of Cambodia (Veal Renh, Kaev Seima) and in four types of habitat (forests, non-flooded lands, lowland rain-fed paddy fields, houses) during the wet and the dry seasons. Habitat preference was common, and rodent and shrew species were found only in houses or in rain-fed paddy fields or in forests. Among 649 small mammals trapped belonging to 12 rodent species and 1 shrew species, 71 of 642 animals tested were carriers of Leptospira according to the 16S ribosomal RNA marker used. Rodent infection was higher in low-slope locations, corresponding to rain-fed paddy fields, especially in the rainy season and in Kaev Seima. Rodents (Rattus exulans) and shrews (Suncus murinus) inhabiting households showed significantly low levels of infections, whereas rodents living in and near to forests (shrubby wasteland, orchards) showed high levels of infection. PMID:22665613

  20. Control of Domestic Rats & Mice, Training Guide--Rodent Control Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjornson, Bayard F.; And Others

    As one booklet in a series on rodent control, this training guide has been developed to assist administrators, rodent-control operators, and others responsible for rodent-control operations in the training of employees in this field. Topics covered include rodents and human welfare, description and habits of domestic rats and mice, rodent-borne…

  1. Design of dietary treatment: humans versus rodents.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Douglas A

    2008-11-01

    Ketogenic diets (KDs) are designed to create the metabolic conditions of fasting, which was among the earliest therapies discovered for epilepsy. The major measures used to evaluate dietary effectiveness have been the levels of urinary ketone bodies and the successful reduction of seizure activity. Modifications of the "classical" animal fat KD have been used in an attempt to boost ketonuria or ketonemia, increase palatability and compliance, and reduce side effects. Studies of KDs in experimental animals have been largely confined to rodents (mice and rats) for reasons of cost and convenience, and both have been found to be protected against experimentally induced seizures following consumption of KDs. Most of these studies have been designed to test hypotheses about the mechanism(s) by which reductions in carbohydrate or increases in fat result in elevated seizure threshold, decreased seizure duration, and decreased seizure severity. So far, underlying mechanisms have proven elusive. Rodent studies have led to a degree of general agreement that ketone levels per se do not correlate well with seizure protection, that reduction of glucose levels is fundamentally important, and that calorie restriction is additive to high fat diets in providing seizure protection. PMID:19049590

  2. Genome sequence and comparative analysis of the model rodent malaria

    E-print Network

    Salzberg, Steven

    Genome sequence and comparative analysis of the model rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii Medical Centre, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands § Naval Medical Research Center, Malaria ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Species of malaria parasite that infect rodents have long been used as models for malaria disease research

  3. Visual Landmarks Facilitate Rodent Spatial Navigation in Virtual Reality Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngstrom, Isaac A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    Because many different sensory modalities contribute to spatial learning in rodents, it has been difficult to determine whether spatial navigation can be guided solely by visual cues. Rodents moving within physical environments with visual cues engage a variety of nonvisual sensory systems that cannot be easily inhibited without lesioning brain…

  4. Vitamin K Contents of Rodent Diets: A Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate nutrient intake is critical in the maintenance of normal physiological activity of rodents in biomedical studies. Vitamin K is an essential nutrient in rodent diets and functions as a cofactor for the y-carboxylation of certain proteins involved in blood coagulation and bone metabolism. Dif...

  5. RODENT DAMAGE ON SURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION TUBING IN PEANUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface drip (SD) irrigation of field crops has been gaining interest in the farming community. However, rodent damage is one of the major drawbacks for SD acceptance. This research documents the cost of repairing drip tubing and effectiveness of several rodent control methods. Four sites were used ...

  6. Rodent management for surface drip irrigation tubing in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface drip (SD) irrigation of field crops has been gaining interest in the farming community. However, rodent damage is one of the major drawbacks for SD acceptance. This research documents the cost of repairing drip tubing and effectiveness of several rodent control methods. Four sites were used ...

  7. Response to Rodent Saliva by Two Species of Rodentiophagous Snakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Chiszar; William Lukas; Hobart M. Smith

    1997-01-01

    Brown tree snakes (Boiga irregularis) and prairie rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis) responded with higher rates of tongue flicking to rodent saliva than to water. Both materials were presented on cotton-tipped applicators touched gently to the snakes' lips. Rattlesnakes also struck more frequently at applicators bearing saliva than at control applicators. Since rodents frequently lick themselves during bouts of grooming behavior, saliva

  8. TROPICAL SPIDERWORT - AN INTRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical spiderwort (also known as Benghal dayflower) has gone from relative obscurity as a roadside curiosity to troublesome weed with widespread economic impact in Georgia in less than 10 years. South Georgia and Florida are currently plagued by tropical spiderwort, but isolated populations have ...

  9. Tropical Prediction Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Tropical Prediction Center Web site is maintained by the National Weather Service of NOAA. Visitors will find current information on tropical storms and hurricanes, including public advisories. Also available are hurricane facts, historical data, tracking charts, satellite imagery, season summaries, and a wealth of other interesting and important information.

  10. Tropical Pacific moisture variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.

    1991-01-01

    The research objectives were to describe synoptic scale variability of moisture over the tropical Pacific Ocean and the systems leading to this variability, to implement satellite analysis procedures to accomplish that objective, to incorporate additional satellite information into operational analysis/forecast systems at the National Meteorological Center (NMC), and to synthesize knowledge gained from satellite observations through diagnosis and numerical models. In the past year, three significant satellite data analysis tasks were accomplished: comparisons for upwelling radiance fields for 1983 and 1984 were completed for the purpose of testing the sensitivity of water vapor/greenhouse feedback to local sea surface temperature variations; the interaction between tropical plumes, wave features over Central America, traveling waves in the upper tropospheric tropics, and the tropical interseasonal oscillation was examined; and planning and early efforts on the construction of a model and the infrared based climatology of daily precipitable water was completed. Research on tropical plume mechanisms included is briefly discussed.

  11. Domestic Rodent Control Training Manual: A Training Aid for the Rodent Control Category for Certification of Pesticide Applicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, William R., Jr.; And Others

    This training manual, designed for training applicants who wish to obtain certification in pesticide application relative to rodent control, covers the following topics: economic factors, public health factors, biological characteristics of domestic rodents, rat and mouse signs, trapping, repellents, poisons, baits, poisoned water, dumps, sewers,…

  12. Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden 74 FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN

    E-print Network

    Koptur, Suzanne

    and geographically similar set of communi- ties, such as rainforests or deserts). Our mainly tropical climate permits TROPICAL RAINFOREST This biome occurs in the ever-wet and ever-warm regions of the tropics. Tropical rainforests occur in Central and South America (as the Amazon River Basin), in Africa (particularly the Congo

  13. In vivo OCT microangiography of rodent iris

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woo June; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of iris tissue morphology and microcirculation in living small animals. Anterior segments of healthy mouse and rat eyes are imaged with high-speed spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) utilizing ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) imaging protocol. 3D iris microvasculature is produced by the use of an algorithm that calculates absolute differences between the amplitudes of the OCT inter-frames. We demonstrate that the UHS-OMAG is capable of delineating iris microvascular beds in the mouse and rat with capillary-level resolution. Furthermore, the fast imaging speed enables dynamic imaging of iris micro-vascular response during drug-induced pupil dilation. We believe that this OCT angiographic approach has a great potential for in situ and in vivo monitoring of the microcirculation within iris tissue beds in rodent disease models that have microvascular involvement. PMID:24979017

  14. Intraoperative cerebral blood flow imaging of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangdao; Li, Yao; Yuan, Lu; Wu, Caihong; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-09-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of interest to neuroscience researchers, which offers the assessment of hemodynamic responses throughout the process of neurosurgery and provides an early biomarker for surgical guidance. However, intraoperative CBF imaging has been challenging due to animal's motion and position change during the surgery. In this paper, we presented a design of an operation bench integrated with laser speckle contrast imager which enables monitoring of the CBF intraoperatively. With a specially designed stereotaxic frame and imager, we were able to monitor the CBF changes in both hemispheres during the rodent surgery. The rotatable design of the operation plate and implementation of online image registration allow the technician to move the animal without disturbing the CBF imaging during surgery. The performance of the system was tested by middle cerebral artery occlusion model of rats.

  15. Automatic cortical thickness analysis on rodent brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ehlers, Cindy; Crews, Fulton; Niethammer, Marc; Budin, Francois; Paniagua, Beatriz; Sulik, Kathy; Johns, Josephine; Styner, Martin; Oguz, Ipek

    2011-03-01

    Localized difference in the cortex is one of the most useful morphometric traits in human and animal brain studies. There are many tools and methods already developed to automatically measure and analyze cortical thickness for the human brain. However, these tools cannot be directly applied to rodent brains due to the different scales; even adult rodent brains are 50 to 100 times smaller than humans. This paper describes an algorithm for automatically measuring the cortical thickness of mouse and rat brains. The algorithm consists of three steps: segmentation, thickness measurement, and statistical analysis among experimental groups. The segmentation step provides the neocortex separation from other brain structures and thus is a preprocessing step for the thickness measurement. In the thickness measurement step, the thickness is computed by solving a Laplacian PDE and a transport equation. The Laplacian PDE first creates streamlines as an analogy of cortical columns; the transport equation computes the length of the streamlines. The result is stored as a thickness map over the neocortex surface. For the statistical analysis, it is important to sample thickness at corresponding points. This is achieved by the particle correspondence algorithm which minimizes entropy between dynamically moving sample points called particles. Since the computational cost of the correspondence algorithm may limit the number of corresponding points, we use thin-plate spline based interpolation to increase the number of corresponding sample points. As a driving application, we measured the thickness difference to assess the effects of adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure that persist into adulthood and performed t-test between the control and exposed rat groups. We found significantly differing regions in both hemispheres.

  16. Conceptual Models of Tropical Waves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    Tropical waves are prolific rainfall producers that sometimes form tropical cyclones. Conceptual models of tropical waves are used to help learners understand the dynamical characteristics and evolution of tropical waves. Users will learn about the vertical and horizontal structure of tropical waves and the typical weather changes that accompany the passage of a tropical wave. Four different methods of tracking tropical waves are also provided. The Webcast is presented by Mr. Horace Burton and Mr. Selvin Burton of the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology under the auspices of the MeteoForum Project.

  17. Tropical Storms, Worldwide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The University of Hawaii's Mees Solar Observatory, stationed at Haleakala, Maui, provides a wealth of data and images in its Webpages. This page, Tropical Storms Worldwide, gives regional maps and written updates of hurricane, typhoon, and tropical cyclone activity around the globe. The page also features a strike probability calculator where users click on a list of geographic locations or enter map coordinates or a US zip code in order to view the probability of a tropical storm reaching that area. A storm data archive (1994-2000) and printer-friendly .pdf-formatted storm track maps are also available.

  18. Interactions among unrelated species: Granivorous rodents, a parasitic fungus, and a shared prey species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard S. Inouye

    1981-01-01

    Granivorous rodents and a parasitic fungus in the Sonoran Desert utilize a common prey species, Erodium cicutarium, a desert annual plant. Experimental removal of rodents from field exclosures resulted in significantly higher densities of E. cicutarium. Fungal infection was significantly higher in the absence of rodents, suggesting that, while they do not interact directly, rodents and the fungus affect each

  19. Deforestation in the Tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Repetto, R. (World Resources Institute, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Government policies that encourage exploitation--in particular excessive logging and clearing for ranches and farms--are largely to blame for the accelerating destruction of tropical forests. This paper surveys the problem in detail and briefly recommends potential solutions.

  20. Deforestation in the Tropics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Repetto

    1990-01-01

    Government policies that encourage exploitation--in particular excessive logging and clearing for ranches and farms--are largely to blame for the accelerating destruction of tropical forests. This paper surveys the problem in detail and briefly recommends potential solutions.

  1. CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING

    E-print Network

    CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING Marine Biological I · ·' iw« L I B R >*· ** Y JUL 3 -1350 WOODS POISONING By William Arcisz, Bacteriologist, Formerly with the Fishery Research Laboratory Branch in which Fish Poisoning is Prevalento........... 3 Symptoms of Ciguatera ...... 00

  2. Tropical Severe Local Storms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    The module provides a brief overview of severe local storms in the tropics. Basic ingredients for thunderstorms and assessment of thunderstorm potential from soundings are described. Then properties and hazards of ordinary thunderstorms, multicellular thunderstorms, supercells are reviewed. Conditions conducive to supercell formation in the tropics are examined along with methods of identifying them in radar and satellite images. Supercell and non-supercell tornado properties and formation are described. Finally, tornadoes, waterspouts, and dust devils properties are compared.

  3. Tropical Transpacific Shore Fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack S. Grove; John E. McCosker

    2004-01-01

    Tropical transpacific fishes occur on both sides of the world's largest deep-water barrier to the migration of marine shore organisms, the 4,000- to 7,000-km-wide Eastern Pacific Barrier (EPB). They include 64 epipelagic oce- anic species and 126 species of shore fishes known from both the tropical eastern Pacific (TEP) and the central and West Pacific. The broad distributions of 19

  4. MEASUREMENT OF VENTILATORY FREQUENCY IN UNRESTRAINED RODENTS USING MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel technique for remote determination of breathing frequency in unrestrained rodents using microwave radiation is described. Single mice were placed inside a rectangular waveguide operating at 2450 MHz. Because mice efficiently absorb radio frequency energy at 2450 MHz, any ...

  5. ASSESSMENT OF HOST RESISTANCE TO INFECTION WITH RODENT MALARIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resistance to malaria infection is known to require an intact immune system. his chapter presents an overview of rodent malaria, the host response to infection and methods for assessing infection in rats and mice....

  6. Bone morphology of the hind limbs in two caviomorph rodents.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, F A P; Sesoko, N F; Rahal, S C; Teixeira, C R; Müller, T R; Machado, M R F

    2013-04-01

    In order to evaluate the hind limbs of caviomorph rodents a descriptive analysis of the Cuniculus paca (Linnaeus, 1766) and Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (Linnaeus, 1766) was performed using anatomical specimens, radiography, computed tomography (CT) and full-coloured prototype models to generate bone anatomy data. The appendicular skeleton of the two largest rodents of Neotropical America was compared with the previously reported anatomical features of Rattus norvegicus (Berkenhout, 1769) and domestic Cavia porcellus (Linnaeus, 1758). The structures were analyzed macroscopically and particular findings of each species reported. Features including the presence of articular fibular projection and lunulae were observed in the stifle joint of all rodents. Imaging aided in anatomical description and, specifically in the identification of bone structures in Cuniculus paca and Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris. The imaging findings were correlated with the anatomical structures observed. The data may be used in future studies comparing these animals to other rodents and mammalian species. PMID:22731111

  7. Sex ratios in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi 

    E-print Network

    Reece, S E; Duncan, Alison B; West, Stuart A; Read, Andrew F

    2003-01-01

    The sex ratios of malaria and related Apicomplexan parasites play a major role in transmission success. Here, we address 2 fundamental issues in the sex ratios of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. First we ...

  8. A NEW METHOD TO QUANTIFY CORE TEMPERATURE INSTABILITY IN RODENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to quantify instability of autonomic systems such as temperature regulation should be important in toxicant and drug safety studies. Stability of core temperature (Tc) in laboratory rodents is susceptible to a variety of stimuli. Calculating the temperature differential o...

  9. Rodent models of Helicobacter infection, inflammation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Songhua; Moss, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Establishing a reproducible rodent model of persistent Helicobacter pylori infection that resembles the H. pylori-associated gastritis observed in humans was a considerable challenge until Lee et al (1) successfully adapted a clinical Cag A and Vac A-expressing strain for the mouse stomach. This so-called SS1 (Sydney) strain has since been extensively used for H. pylori research; other rodent-adapted Helicobacter strains have subsequently been developed and utilized in wild type and genetically engineered rodent models. These bacteria include both H. pylori and the larger but related species H. felis (originally isolated from cats). In this chapter we focus mainly on these two Helicobacter strains and review the rodent models that have been employed to investigate how Helicobacter species induce gastric inflammation and disease. PMID:23015495

  10. Space and Context in the Rodent Hippocampal Region

    E-print Network

    - bination of linear and angular path integration eventually overrides sensory cues, even when linear path and are sometimes modu- lated by the rodent's speed and direction of travel, leading to the hypothesis that d

  11. Ejaculate investment in a promiscuous rodent, Peromyscus maniculatus: effects of

    E-print Network

    Montgomerie, Bob

    Ejaculate investment in a promiscuous rodent, Peromyscus maniculatus: effects of population density, somatic mass and annual population density for wild-caught male deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus rank. Keywords: ejaculate investment, mating system, Peromyscus maniculatus, population density, sexual

  12. Swimming ability in three Costa Rican dry forest rodents

    E-print Network

    Cook, William M.; Timm, Robert M.; Hymen, Dena E.

    2001-12-01

    We investigated the swimming abilities of three Costa Rican dry forest rodents (Coues' rice rat. Oryzomys couesi, hispid cotton rat, Sigmodon hispidus, and spiny pocket mouse, Liomys salvini) associated with a large marsh, ...

  13. Edinburgh Research Explorer Functional conservation between rodents and chicken of

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Functional conservation between rodents and chicken of regulatory sequences driving skeletal muscle gene expression in transgenic chickens Citation for published version: Mc and chicken of regulatory sequences driving skeletal muscle gene expression in transgenic chickens' BMC

  14. Dual captures of Colorado rodents: implications for transmission of hantaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Calisher, C. H.; Childs, J. E.; Sweeney, W. P.; Canestrop, K. M.; Beaty, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed dual-capture data collected during longitudinal studies monitoring transmission and persistence of Sin Nombre virus in rodents in Colorado. Our data indicate that multiple captures (two or more rodents captured in a single trap) may not be random, as indicated by previous studies, but rather the result of underlying, species-specific social behavior or cohesiveness. In the pairs we captured, most often, rodents were of the same species, were male, and could be recaptured as pairs. Therefore, dual captures of rodents, which are unusual but not rare, tend to occur among certain species, and appear to be nonrandom, group-foraging encounters. These demographic and ecologic characteristics may have implications for the study of the transmission of hantaviruses. PMID:10970147

  15. Effect of cage-change frequency on rodent breeding performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather M. Multari; Jeffrey J. Lohmiller; Samuel R. Boutin; Amy E. Sanderson

    2010-01-01

    Many people who work in laboratory rodent breeding facilities believe that disrupting certain sensitive rodent lines will result in increased breeding failures and loss of newborn pups. To evaluate this hypothesis, the authors assessed the effect of cage-change frequency on the breeding performances of a mouse strain (C57BL\\/6NTac) and a rat stock (NTac:NIH-Whn) that were thought to be sensitive to

  16. Serologic survey of orthopoxvirus infection among rodents in hungary.

    PubMed

    Oldal, Miklós; Sironen, Tarja; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Madai, Mónika; Horváth, Gy?z?; Dallos, Bianka; Kutas, Anna; Földes, Fanni; Kemenesi, Gábor; Németh, Viktória; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2015-05-01

    As a result of discontinuing vaccination against smallpox after the late 1970s, different orthopoxviruses (OPVs), such as cowpox virus (CPXV), have become a re-emerging healthcare threat among zoonotic pathogens. In Hungary, data on OPV prevalence among its rodent host species have been absent. Here, rodents belonging to four species, i.e., striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius), yellow-necked mouse (A. flavicollis), wood mouse (A. sylvaticus) and bank vole (Myodes glareolus), were live trapped at 13 sampling plots on a 149-ha area in the Mecsek Mountains, Hungary, from March to September in 2011 and 2012. Rodent sera were collected and screened for OPV-reactive antibodies with an immunfluorescence assay (IFA). Among the 1587 tested rodents, 286 (18.0%) harbored OPV-specific antibodies. Seroprevalence was the highest for the bank vole (71.4%) and the striped field mouse (66.7%). Due to a masting event in the autumn of 2011 across Central Europe, the abundance of bank voles increased drastically in the 2012 season, raising the overall OPV seroprevalence. We provide the first data on OPV occurrence and seroprevalence in rodents in Hungary. The circulation of OPV in rodents in densely populated areas warrants further studies to elucidate the zoonotic potential of OPV in humans. PMID:25988441

  17. Immunological Mechanisms Mediating Hantavirus Persistence in Rodent Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Easterbrook, Judith D.; Klein, Sabra L.

    2008-01-01

    Hantaviruses, similar to several emerging zoonotic viruses, persistently infect their natural reservoir hosts, without causing overt signs of disease. Spillover to incidental human hosts results in morbidity and mortality mediated by excessive proinflammatory and cellular immune responses. The mechanisms mediating the persistence of hantaviruses and the absence of clinical symptoms in rodent reservoirs are only starting to be uncovered. Recent studies indicate that during hantavirus infection, proinflammatory and antiviral responses are reduced and regulatory responses are elevated at sites of increased virus replication in rodents. The recent discovery of structural and non-structural proteins that suppress type I interferon responses in humans suggests that immune responses in rodent hosts could be mediated directly by the virus. Alternatively, several host factors, including sex steroids, glucocorticoids, and genetic factors, are reported to alter host susceptibility and may contribute to persistence of hantaviruses in rodents. Humans and reservoir hosts differ in infection outcomes and in immune responses to hantavirus infection; thus, understanding the mechanisms mediating viral persistence and the absence of disease in rodents may provide insight into the prevention and treatment of disease in humans. Consideration of the coevolutionary mechanisms mediating hantaviral persistence and rodent host survival is providing insight into the mechanisms by which zoonotic viruses have remained in the environment for millions of years and continue to be transmitted to humans. PMID:19043585

  18. Divergent patterns of breakpoint reuse in Muroid rodents.

    PubMed

    Mlynarski, E E; Obergfell, C J; O'Neill, M J; O'Neill, R J

    2010-02-01

    Multiple Genome Rearrangement (MGR) analysis was used to define the trajectory and pattern of chromosome rearrangement within muroid rodents. MGR was applied using 107 chromosome homologies between Mus, Rattus, Peromyscus, the muroid sister taxon Cricetulus griseus, and Sciurus carolinensis as a non-Muroidea outgroup, with specific attention paid to breakpoint reuse and centromere evolution. This analysis revealed a high level of chromosome breakpoint conservation between Rattus and Peromyscus and indicated that the chromosomes of Mus are highly derived. This analysis identified several conserved evolutionary breakpoints that have been reused multiple times during karyotypic evolution in rodents. Our data demonstrate a high level of reuse of breakpoints among muroid rodents, further supporting the "Fragile Breakage Model" of chromosome evolution. We provide the first analysis of rodent centromeres with respect to evolutionary breakpoints. By analyzing closely related rodent species we were able to clarify muroid rodent karyotypic evolution. We were also able to derive several high-resolution ancestral karyotypes and identify rearrangements specific to various stages of Muroidea evolution. These data were useful in further characterizing lineage-specific modes of chromosome evolution. PMID:20033182

  19. Hindlimb unloading rodent model: technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Morey-Holton, Emily R; Globus, Ruth K

    2002-04-01

    Since its inception at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in the mid-1970s, many laboratories around the world have used the rat hindlimb unloading model to simulate weightlessness and to study various aspects of musculoskeletal loading. In this model, the hindlimbs of rodents are elevated to produce a 30 degrees head-down tilt, which results in a cephalad fluid shift and avoids weightbearing by the hindquarters. Although several reviews have described scientific results obtained with this model, this is the first review to focus on the technical aspects of hindlimb unloading. This review includes a history of the technique, a brief comparison with spaceflight data, technical details, extension of the model to mice, and other important technical considerations (e.g., housing, room temperature, unloading angle, the potential need for multiple control groups, age, body weight, the use of the forelimb tissues as internal controls, and when to remove animals from experiments). This paper is intended as a reference for researchers, reviewers of manuscripts, and institutional animal care and use committees. Over 800 references, related to the hindlimb unloading model, can be accessed via the electronic version of this article. PMID:11895999

  20. Widespread Vestibular Activation of the Rodent Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Javier; Drawitsch, Florian; Brichta, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms of spatial navigation is derived from chronic recordings in rodents in which head-direction, place, and grid cells have all been described. However, despite the proposed importance of self-reference information to these internal representations of space, their congruence with vestibular signaling remains unclear. Here we have undertaken brain-wide functional mapping using both fMRI and electrophysiological methods to directly determine the spatial extent, strength, and time course of vestibular signaling across the rat forebrain. We find distributed activity throughout thalamic, limbic, and particularly primary sensory cortical areas in addition to known head-direction pathways. We also observe activation of frontal regions, including infralimbic and cingulate cortices, indicating integration of vestibular information throughout functionally diverse cortical regions. These whole-brain activity maps therefore suggest a widespread contribution of vestibular signaling to a self-centered framework for multimodal sensorimotor integration in support of movement planning, execution, spatial navigation, and autonomic responses to gravito-inertial changes. PMID:25878265

  1. Utility of Recycled Bedding for Laboratory Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Toru; Li, Zhixia; Kibushi, Tomomi; Okano, Shinya; Yamasaki, Nakamichi; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    Animal facilities generate a large amount of used bedding containing excrement as medical waste. We developed a recycling system for used bedding that involves soft hydrothermal processing. In this study, we examined the effects of bedding type on growth, hematologic and serum biochemical values, and organ weights of female and male mice reared on either recycled or fresh bedding from 3 to 33 wk of age. Neither growth nor physiology differed between mice housed on recycled bedding compared with fresh bedding. When 14-wk-old mice were bred, litter size and total number of weaned pups showed no significant differences between animals raised on recycled or fresh bedding. Because bedding type influences the environment within cages and animal rooms, we evaluated particulate and ammonia data from cages and animal rooms. Values were significantly lower from cages and rooms that used recycled bedding than from those using fresh bedding, thus indicating that recycled bedding has the potential to improve the environment within both cages and animal rooms. Overall, this study revealed that recycled bedding is an excellent material for use in housing laboratory rodents. Specifically, recycled bedding may reduce medical waste and maintain healthy environments within cages and animal rooms. PMID:19653951

  2. Widespread vestibular activation of the rodent cortex.

    PubMed

    Rancz, Ede A; Moya, Javier; Drawitsch, Florian; Brichta, Alan M; Canals, Santiago; Margrie, Troy W

    2015-04-15

    Much of our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms of spatial navigation is derived from chronic recordings in rodents in which head-direction, place, and grid cells have all been described. However, despite the proposed importance of self-reference information to these internal representations of space, their congruence with vestibular signaling remains unclear. Here we have undertaken brain-wide functional mapping using both fMRI and electrophysiological methods to directly determine the spatial extent, strength, and time course of vestibular signaling across the rat forebrain. We find distributed activity throughout thalamic, limbic, and particularly primary sensory cortical areas in addition to known head-direction pathways. We also observe activation of frontal regions, including infralimbic and cingulate cortices, indicating integration of vestibular information throughout functionally diverse cortical regions. These whole-brain activity maps therefore suggest a widespread contribution of vestibular signaling to a self-centered framework for multimodal sensorimotor integration in support of movement planning, execution, spatial navigation, and autonomic responses to gravito-inertial changes. PMID:25878265

  3. Rodent models of neuroinflammation for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nazem, Amir; Sankowski, Roman; Bacher, Michael; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease remains incurable, and the failures of current disease-modifying strategies for Alzheimer's disease could be attributed to a lack of in vivo models that recapitulate the underlying etiology of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The etiology of late-onset Alzheimer's disease is not based on mutations related to amyloid-? (A?) or tau production which are currently the basis of in vivo models of Alzheimer's disease. It has recently been suggested that mechanisms like chronic neuroinflammation may occur prior to amyloid-? and tau pathologies in late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study is to analyze the characteristics of rodent models of neuroinflammation in late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Our search criteria were based on characteristics of an idealistic disease model that should recapitulate causes, symptoms, and lesions in a chronological order similar to the actual disease. Therefore, a model based on the inflammation hypothesis of late-onset Alzheimer's disease should include the following features: (i) primary chronic neuroinflammation, (ii) manifestations of memory and cognitive impairment, and (iii) late development of tau and A? pathologies. The following models fit the pre-defined criteria: lipopolysaccharide- and PolyI:C-induced models of immune challenge; streptozotocin-, okadaic acid-, and colchicine neurotoxin-induced neuroinflammation models, as well as interleukin-1?, anti-nerve growth factor and p25 transgenic models. Among these models, streptozotocin, PolyI:C-induced, and p25 neuroinflammation models are compatible with the inflammation hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25890375

  4. Experimental transmission of Hepatozoon americanum to rodents.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eileen M; Allen, Kelly E; Breshears, Melanie A; Panciera, Roger J; Little, Susan E; Ewing, Sidney A

    2008-02-14

    Laboratory-raised cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), outbred white mice (Mus musculus), and C57BL/6J-Lystbg-J/J mice (M. musculus) that were administered approximately 50 sporulated oocysts of Hepatozoon americanum (AF176836) by gavage developed inflammatory lesions containing parasitic cystozoites in cardiac and skeletal muscle, kidney, and lung. Sprague-Dawley rats (Rattus norvegicus) similarly exposed showed no evidence of infection. Cystozoites were first detected by histopathologic examination four weeks after exposure to oocysts. Globular, PAS-positive material accumulated around the cystozoites as the duration of infection lengthened. Nested PCR analysis of tissues collected 16 weeks post-exposure was positive for the 18S rRNA Hepatozoon sp. gene and the DNA sequence of the fragment amplified was 99.6% and 99.8% identical to H. americanum sequences previously reported from naturally-infected dogs (AF176836 and AY864676, respectively). Merogonous and gamontogonous stages of the parasite were not detected in any of the cystozoite-infected rodents. PMID:18055118

  5. Assessing spatial learning and memory in rodents.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Maneuvering safely through the environment is central to survival of almost all species. The ability to do this depends on learning and remembering locations. This capacity is encoded in the brain by two systems: one using cues outside the organism (distal cues), allocentric navigation, and one using self-movement, internal cues and nearby proximal cues, egocentric navigation. Allocentric navigation involves the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and surrounding structures; in humans this system encodes allocentric, semantic, and episodic memory. This form of memory is assessed in laboratory animals in many ways, but the dominant form of assessment is the Morris water maze (MWM). Egocentric navigation involves the dorsal striatum and connected structures; in humans this system encodes routes and integrated paths and, when overlearned, becomes procedural memory. In this article, several allocentric assessment methods for rodents are reviewed and compared with the MWM. MWM advantages (little training required, no food deprivation, ease of testing, rapid and reliable learning, insensitivity to differences in body weight and appetite, absence of nonperformers, control methods for proximal cue learning, and performance effects) and disadvantages (concern about stress, perhaps not as sensitive for working memory) are discussed. Evidence-based design improvements and testing methods are reviewed for both rats and mice. Experimental factors that apply generally to spatial navigation and to MWM specifically are considered. It is concluded that, on balance, the MWM has more advantages than disadvantages and compares favorably with other allocentric navigation tasks. PMID:25225309

  6. Active vibrissal sensing in rodents and marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Mitchinson, Ben; Grant, Robyn A.; Arkley, Kendra; Rankov, Vladan; Perkon, Igor; Prescott, Tony J.

    2011-01-01

    In rats, the long facial whiskers (mystacial macrovibrissae) are repetitively and rapidly swept back and forth during exploration in a behaviour known as ‘whisking’. In this paper, we summarize previous evidence from rats, and present new data for rat, mouse and the marsupial grey short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) showing that whisking in all three species is actively controlled both with respect to movement of the animal's body and relative to environmental structure. Using automatic whisker tracking, and Fourier analysis, we first show that the whisking motion of the mystacial vibrissae, in the horizontal plane, can be approximated as a blend of two sinusoids at the fundamental frequency (mean 8.5, 11.3 and 7.3 Hz in rat, mouse and opossum, respectively) and its second harmonic. The oscillation at the second harmonic is particularly strong in mouse (around 22 Hz) consistent with previous reports of fast whisking in that species. In all three species, we found evidence of asymmetric whisking during head turning and following unilateral object contacts consistent with active control of whisker movement. We propose that the presence of active vibrissal touch in both rodents and marsupials suggests that this behavioural capacity emerged at an early stage in the evolution of therian mammals. PMID:21969685

  7. Tropical rainforest biodiversity: field and

    E-print Network

    Tropical rainforest biodiversity: field and GIS tools for assessing, monitoring and mapping II. Francesco Rovero, Curator, (tropical biodiversity and forest mammal expert) and Dr. Clara Tattoni, Research international biodiversity experts will teach specific modules. In collaboration with: Further information

  8. Fibrosis worsens chronic lymphedema in rodent tissues.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Laura L; Mendez, Uziel; Waller, Anna B; Gillette, Amani A; Guillory, Roger J; Goldman, Jeremy

    2015-05-15

    Secondary lymphedema in humans is a common consequence of lymph node dissection (LND) to treat breast cancer. A peculiar characteristic of the disease is that lifelong swelling often precipitously appears several years after the surgical treatment, often due to an inflammatory stimulus. Although the incidence of secondary lymphedema dramatically increases after radiation therapy, the relationship between fibrotic scarring and the eventual appearance of lymphedema remains unclear. To clarify the role of fibrosis in secondary lymphedema initiation, we chemically increased fibrosis in rodent tissues with bleomycin and assessed the ability of the local lymphatic system to prevent lymphedema, either acutely or in a chronic state induced by inflammation. We found that bleomycin injections exacerbated fibrotic matrix deposition in an acute mouse tail lymphedema model (P < 0.005), reduced wound closure (P < 0.005), and impaired the ability of tail lymphatics to regenerate (P < 0.005) and reduce the swelling (P < 0.05). When fibrosis was worsened with bleomycin after axillary LND in the rat foreleg, the ability of the foreleg lymphatic system to reduce the chronic state swelling induced by stimulated inflammation was severely impaired (P < 0.005). Indocyanine green lymphography in axillary LND-recovered rat forelegs revealed a worsened lymphatic drainage due to inflammation and bleomycin pretreatment. Although inflammation reduced the drainage of dextran fluid tracer from control forelegs (P < 0.05), the reduction in fluid drainage was more severe after axillary LND when fibrosis was first increased (P < 0.005). These findings demonstrate that fibrosis reduces the lymphatic capacity to functionally regenerate and prevent the chronic appearance of lymphedema. PMID:25770241

  9. Partial Rodent Genetic Models for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang; Henter, Ioline D.; Manji, Husseini K.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is a complex clinical phenomenon. This episodic illness comprises at least four features/components: depression, mania, vulnerability to mood swings in euthymic BPD patients, and spontaneous cyclicity in at least some BPD patients. Currently, there is no rodent genetic model capable of encompassing the whole phenotype of BPD exists; however, recent genetic-behavioral studies have delineated partial models for some components of BPD, namely, depression, mania, and vulnerability or resilience to mood swings. p11 knockout (KO), vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) heterozygous KO, and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) KO mice display anhedonia-like symptoms, and treatment with antidepressants rescues this anhedonia-related phenotype. Mutant CLOCK, glutamate receptor 6 (GluR6) KO, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) KO mice exhibit mania-like behavioral clusters referred to as excessive behavioral excitement; at least some of the exhibited behaviors can be rescued through treatment with mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics. Neuronal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) overexpressing, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) heterozygous KO, and Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG1) heterozygous KO mice show vulnerability to mood swings. In contrast, neuronal BAG1 overexpressing mice display resilience to mood swings. These mutant mouse strains and the behavioral approaches used to characterize these strains offer an emerging set of research tools for the comprehensive understanding of various components of BPD, and the interrelation of these components at the molecular, cellular, and neuronal circuitry levels. These partial genetic models can also be used as complementary tools to augment other existing behavioral tests and paradigms in drug development for BPD. PMID:25236551

  10. Ectoparasites of Rodents Captured in Bandar Abbas, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kia, EB; Moghddas-Sani, H; Hassanpoor, H; Vatandoost, H; Zahabiun, F; Akhavan, AA; Hanafi-Bojd, AA; Telmadarraiy, Z

    2009-01-01

    Background: Rodents play important role as host of ectoparasites and reservoir of different zoonotic diseases. The aim of this study was to asses the infestation of commensal rodents with ectoparasites in Bandar Abbas, a port city located in the northern part of the Persian Gulf in Iran. Methods: Rodents were captured using live traps during the study period in year 2007. After transferring the rodents to the laboratory, they were identified and then their ectoparasites were collected and mounted for species identification using appropriate systematic keys. Results: A total of 77 rodents were identified including Rattus norvegicus (74%), R. rattus (16.9%), Mus musculus (7.8%) and one hamster. Among all rodents, 40.3% were found infested with ectoparasites. A total of 69 ectoparasites were collected comprising flea, lice, mite and tick. Two species of fleas; Xenopsylla cheopis and X. astia were identified with higher index of X. astia. Two genera of ticks including Hyalomma sp. and Rhipicephalus sp. were identified. Laelaps nuttalli was the only mite found. The Polyplax spinulosa was considered as lice ectoparasite. Conclusion: Among all arthropods collected, flea and lice had the most and the least frequency, respectively. Nearly all rodent species were infested with Xenopsylla. These fleas are important due to their role in plague and murine typhus transmission. Ticks are important due to their role in CCHF (Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever), theileriosis, babesiosis, anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis transmission .Monitoring of ectoparaiste infestation is important for preparedness and early warning preparation for possible control of arthropod-borne diseases. PMID:22808381

  11. Lassa fever or lassa hemorrhagic fever risk to humans from rodent-borne zoonoses.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Abdalla Saleh, Hala Ahmed; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound hemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. Lassa fever, an acute hemorrhagic fever characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and chest and abdominal pain. Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne zoonosis worldwide. Transmission rodents to humans occur by aerosol spread, either from the genus Mastomys rodents' excreta (multimammate rat) or through the close contact with infected patients (nosocomial infection). Other rodents of the genera Rattus, Mus, Lemniscomys, and Praomys are incriminated rodents hosts. Now one may ask do the rodents' ectoparasites play a role in Lassa virus zoonotic transmission. This paper summarized the update knowledge on LHV; hopping it might be useful to the clinicians, nursing staff, laboratories' personals as well as those concerned zoonoses from rodents and rodent control. PMID:26012219

  12. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Tropical rainfall affects the lives and economics of a majority of the Earth's population. Tropical rain systems, such as hurricanes, typhoons, and monsoons, are crucial to sustaining the livelihoods of those living in the tropics. Excess rainfall can cause floods and great property and crop damage, whereas too little rainfall can cause drought and crop failure. The latent heat release during the process of precipitation is a major source of energy that drives the atmospheric circulation. This latent heat can intensify weather systems, affecting weather thousands of kilometers away, thus making tropical rainfall an important indicator of atmospheric circulation and short-term climate change. Tropical forests and the underlying soils are major sources of many of the atmosphere's trace constituents. Together, the forests and the atmosphere act as a water-energy regulating system. Most of the rainfall is returned to the atmosphere through evaporation and transpiration, and the atmospheric trace constituents take part in the recycling process. Hence, the hydrological cycle provides a direct link between tropical rainfall and the global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur, all important trace materials for the Earth's system. Because rainfall is such an important component in the interactions between the ocean, atmosphere, land, and the biosphere, accurate measurements of rainfall are crucial to understanding the workings of the Earth-atmosphere system. The large spatial and temporal variability of rainfall systems, however, poses a major challenge to estimating global rainfall. So far, there has been a lack of rain gauge networks, especially over the oceans, which points to satellite measurement as the only means by which global observation of rainfall can be made. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, provides visible, infrared, and microwave observations of tropical and subtropical rain systems.The satellite observations are complemented by ground radar and rain gauge measurements to validate satellite rain estimation techniques. Goddard Space Flight Center's involvement includes the observatory, four instruments, integration and testing of the observatory, data processing and distribution, and satellite operations. TRMM has a design lifetime of three years. Data generated from TRMM and archived at the GDAAC are useful not only for hydrologists, atmospheric scientists, and climatologists, but also for the health community studying infectious diseases, the ocean research community, and the agricultural community.

  13. Tropical Pacific moisture variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The research objectives are the following: (1) to describe synoptic scale variability of moisture over the tropical Pacific Ocean and the systems leading to this variability; (2) to implement satellite analysis procedures to accomplish (1); (3) to incorporate additional satellite information into operational analysis/forecast systems at NMC; and (4) to synthesize knowledge gained from satellite observations through diagnosis and numerical models. Significant accomplishments in FY 91/92 are presented and include the following: (1) satellite forecast applications; (2) satellite data analysis; and (3) tropical plume mechanisms.

  14. Old World Hantaviruses in Rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Robert W.; Waffa, Bradley; Freeman, Ashley; Riegel, Claudia; Moses, Lina M.; Bennett, Andrew; Safronetz, David; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Feldmann, Heinz; Voss, Thomas G.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Seoul virus, an Old World hantavirus, is maintained in brown rats and causes a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. We captured rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana and tested them for the presence of Old World hantaviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with sequencing, cell culture, and electron microscopy; 6 (3.4%) of 178 rodents captured—all brown rats—were positive for a Seoul virus variant previously coined Tchoupitoulas virus, which was noted in rodents in New Orleans in the 1980s. The finding of Tchoupitoulas virus in New Orleans over 25 years since its first discovery suggests stable endemicity in the city. Although the degree to which this virus causes human infection and disease remains unknown, repeated demonstration of Seoul virus in rodent populations, recent cases of laboratory-confirmed HFRS in some US cities, and a possible link with hypertensive renal disease warrant additional investigation in both rodents and humans. PMID:24639295

  15. Hypergravity Effects on Rodent Pregnancy and Parturition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Mills, N. A.; Wade, C. E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    No mammal has yet undergone birth, or parturition, in the microgravity of space. Previous studies (Ronco & Alberts, 2000) have shown that mid-pregnant rat dams exposed to spaceflight (0-g) and landed 48-72 hrs before term successfully delivered robust, healthy offspring Microgravity-exposed dams exhibited twice the expected numbers of labor contractions whereas length of pregnancy, duration of labor, fetal wastage, number of neonates born and litter gender ratios were identical to controls. In the present study, we report the results of rodent pregnancy and parturition at the opposite end of the gravity spectrum, in hypergravity. Dams exposed to either: 1.0-g, 1.5-g, 1.75-g or 2.0-g from Gestational day (G) 11 and throughout the births of their litters had comparable pregnancy and labor durations, fetal wastage, numbers of neonates born and litter Tender ratios. During parturition, hypergravity-exposed dams exhibited significantly fewer labor contractions as compared to 1.0-g controls. Dams that underwent birth in hypergravity had significantly fewer offspring surviving the immediate postpartum period (P1: 1.0-g, 11.92 +/- 2.84; 1.5-g, 10.88 +/- 2.17; 1.75-g, 9.22 +/-1.99; 2.0-g, 8.83 +/- 3.31). Within 24 hrs postpartum, neonatal survival was further diminished in hypergravity [P2: 100% (1.0-g); 96% (1.5-g); 96% (1.75-g); 73% (2.0-g)] and continued to decline (P10: 100%(1.0-g.); 90%(1.5-g); 87%(1.75-g), 40%(2.0-g)]. Neonatal losses stabilized by P5 for the 1.5-g andl.75-g conditions but continued until P9 for the 2.0-g condition. Together, these findings show that postnatal, but not prenatal, survival is compromised following birth in hypergravity, Maternal and neonatal factors that contribute to peri-parturitional vulnerability to altered gravity environments will be discussed.

  16. Tropical Limit in Statistical Physics

    E-print Network

    M. Angelelli; B. Konopelchenko

    2015-02-04

    Tropical limit for macroscopic systems in equilibrium defined as the formal limit of Boltzmann constant k going to 0 is discussed. It is shown that such tropical limit is well-adapted to analyse properties of systems with highly degenerated energy levels, particularly of frustrated systems like spin ice and spin glasses. Tropical free energy is a piecewise linear function of temperature, tropical entropy is a piecewise constant function and the system has energy for which tropical Gibbs' probability has maximum. Properties of systems in the points of jump of entropy are studied. Systems with finite and infinitely many energy levels and phenomena of limiting temperatures are discussed.

  17. Tropical limit in statistical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelelli, M.; Konopelchenko, B.

    2015-07-01

    Tropical limit for macroscopic systems in equilibrium defined as the formal limit of Boltzmann constant k ? 0 is discussed. It is shown that such tropical limit is well-adapted to analyze properties of systems with highly degenerated energy levels, particularly of frustrated systems like spin ice and spin glasses. Tropical free energy Ftr (T) is a piecewise linear function of temperature T, tropical entropy is a piecewise constant function and the system has energy for which tropical Gibbs' probability has maximum. Properties of systems in the points of jump of entropy are studied. Systems with finite and infinitely many energy levels and phenomenon of limiting temperatures are discussed.

  18. Tropical Atlantic Aerosols

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rex Roettger

    Students will use real satellite data to determine 1) where the greatest concentrations of aerosols are located during the course of a year in the tropical Atlantic region and 2) their source of origin. This is an inquiry-style lesson where students pull real aerosol data and attempt to identify trends among data sets.

  19. Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures." Contents are organized into the following…

  20. Tropical orographic rainfall regimes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Reed; S. W. Nesbitt

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to (1) examine the variables that influence precipitation mode and structure near complex terrain and (2) analyze the vertical and horizontal structure of precipitation systems in regions of complex terrain under current climate conditions, and how it may evolve in the future. For this study, we will examine 11 years (1998-2008) of data over the tropical Andes,

  1. Postdoctoral Researcher Tropical Ecology

    E-print Network

    . S/he will also contribute to the design of further studies of food webs, apply for grant support tropical plant-insect food webs. RESPONSIBILITIES The successful applicant will develop ecological, statistical, molecular and phylogenetic analyses of large data sets on plant-insect food webs. In addition, s

  2. Rodents for comparative aging studies: from mice to beavers

    PubMed Central

    Bozzella, Michael J.; Seluanov, Andrei

    2008-01-01

    After humans, mice are the best-studied mammalian species in terms of their biology and genetics. Gerontological research has used mice and rats extensively to generate short- and long-lived mutants, study caloric restriction and more. Mice and rats are valuable model organisms thanks to their small size, short lifespans and fast reproduction. However, when the goal is to further extend the already long human lifespan, studying fast aging species may not provide all the answers. Remarkably, in addition to the fast-aging species, the order Rodentia contains multiple long-lived species with lifespans exceeding 20 years (naked mole-rat, beavers, porcupines, and some squirrels). This diversity opens great opportunities for comparative aging studies. Here we discuss the evolution of lifespan in rodents, review the biology of slow-aging rodents, and show an example of how the use of a comparative approach revealed that telomerase activity coevolved with body mass in rodents. PMID:19424861

  3. Rodents for comparative aging studies: from mice to beavers.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Vera; Bozzella, Michael J; Seluanov, Andrei

    2008-09-01

    After humans, mice are the best-studied mammalian species in terms of their biology and genetics. Gerontological research has used mice and rats extensively to generate short- and long-lived mutants, study caloric restriction and more. Mice and rats are valuable model organisms thanks to their small size, short lifespans and fast reproduction. However, when the goal is to further extend the already long human lifespan, studying fast aging species may not provide all the answers. Remarkably, in addition to the fast-aging species, the order Rodentia contains multiple long-lived species with lifespans exceeding 20 years (naked mole-rat, beavers, porcupines, and some squirrels). This diversity opens great opportunities for comparative aging studies. Here we discuss the evolution of lifespan in rodents, review the biology of slow-aging rodents, and show an example of how the use of a comparative approach revealed that telomerase activity coevolved with body mass in rodents. PMID:19424861

  4. Antenatal maternal hypoxia: criterion for fetal growth restriction in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eeun Amy; Longo, Lawrence D.; Goyal, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Rodents are a useful model for life science research. Accumulating evidence suggests that the offspring of mice and rats suffer from similar disorders as humans when exposed to hypoxia during pregnancy. Importantly, with antenatal hypoxic exposure, human neonates demonstrate low birth weight or growth restriction. Similarly, with antenatal hypoxic exposure rodents also demonstrate the fetal growth restriction (FGR). Surprisingly, there is no consensus on the minimum duration or degree of hypoxic exposure required to cause FGR in rodents. Thus, we have reviewed the available literature in an attempt to answer these questions. Based on studies in rats, birth weight reduction of 31% corresponded to 10th percentile reduction in birth weight curve. With the similar criterion (10th percentile), in mice 3 days or more and in rats 7 days or more of 14% or lower hypoxia administration was required to produce statistically significant FGR.

  5. Anatomy and Histology of Rodent and Human Major Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Osamu; Mizobe, Kenichi; Bando, Yasuhiko; Sakiyama, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Major salivary glands of both humans and rodents consist of three pairs of macroscopic glands: parotid, submandibular, and sublingual. These glands secrete serous, mucous or mixed saliva via the proper main excretory ducts connecting the glandular bodies with the oral cavity. A series of discoveries about the salivary ducts in the 17th century by Niels Stensen (1638–1686), Thomas Wharton (1614–1673), and Caspar Bartholin (1655–1738) established the concept of exocrine secretion as well as salivary glands. Recent investigations have revealed the endocrine functions of parotin and a variety of cell growth factors produced by salivary glands. The present review aims to describe macroscopic findings on the major salivary glands of rodents and the microscopic differences between those of humans and rodents, which review should be of interest to those researchers studying salivary glands. PMID:23209333

  6. Can shrub cover increase predation risk for a desert rodent?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schooley, R.L.; Sharpe, Peter B.

    1996-01-01

    Previous research indicates that predation risk may influence activity patterns, habitat partitioning, and community structure of nocturnal desert rodents. Shrub microhabitat is typically considered safer than open microhabitat for these small mammals. We investigated predation risk for Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii), which are diurnal desert rodents that detect predators visually and use burrows for refuge. Our results suggested that shrub cover may increase risk for these squirrels by decreasing their ability to escape from predators. Our field experiment indicated that running speeds of juvenile squirrels were lower in shrub (Ceratoides lanata) habitat than in open areas. Shrub cover was also associated with shorter predator-detection distances (mammalian and avian) and fewer refuges (burrow entrances per hectare) than in open areas in one year but not in another. Our study demonstrated that the visual and locomotive obstruction of vegetative cover may increase predation risk for diurnal desert rodents and that elements of habitat-dependent risk may be temporally dynamic.

  7. Multiple infections of rodents with zoonotic pathogens in Austria.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sabrina; Essbauer, Sandra S; Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Poppert, Sven; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Klempa, Boris; Henning, Klaus; Schares, Gereon; Groschup, Martin H; Spitzenberger, Friederike; Richter, Dania; Heckel, Gerald; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2014-07-01

    Rodents are important reservoirs for a large number of zoonotic pathogens. We examined the occurrence of 11 viral, bacterial, and parasitic agents in rodent populations in Austria, including three different hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox virus, Leptospira spp., Borrelia spp., Rickettsia spp., Bartonella spp., Coxiella burnetii, and Toxoplasma gondii. In 2008, 110 rodents of four species (40 Clethrionomys glareolus, 29 Apodemus flavicollis, 26 Apodemus sylvaticus, and 15 Microtus arvalis) were trapped at two rural sites in Lower Austria. Chest cavity fluid and samples of lung, spleen, kidney, liver, brain, and ear pinna skin were collected. We screened selected tissue samples for hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox viruses, Leptospira, Borrelia, Rickettsia, Bartonella spp., C. burnetii, and T. gondii by RT-PCR/PCR and detected nucleic acids of Tula hantavirus, Leptospira spp., Borrelia afzelii, Rickettsia spp., and different Bartonella species. Serological investigations were performed for hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox viruses, and Rickettsia spp. Here, Dobrava-Belgrade hantavirus-, Tula hantavirus-, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-, orthopox virus-, and rickettsia-specific antibodies were demonstrated. Puumala hantavirus, C. burnetii, and T. gondii were neither detected by RT-PCR/PCR nor by serological methods. In addition, multiple infections with up to three pathogens were shown in nine animals of three rodent species from different trapping sites. In conclusion, these results show that rodents in Austria may host multiple zoonotic pathogens. Our observation raises important questions regarding the interactions of different pathogens in the host, the countermeasures of the host's immune system, the impact of the host-pathogen interaction on the fitness of the host, and the spread of infectious agents among wild rodents and from those to other animals or humans. PMID:24915446

  8. Synanthropic rodents as possible reservoirs of shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Blanco Crivelli, Ximena; Rumi, María V.; Carfagnini, Julio C.; Degregorio, Osvaldo; Bentancor, Adriana B.

    2012-01-01

    Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are worldwide zoonotic pathogen responsible for different cases of human disease including hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Transmission of STEC to humans occurs through the consumption of food and water contaminated by faeces of carriers and by person-to-person contact. The objective of this study was two-fold: (1) to investigate whether synanthropic rodents are possible reservoirs of STEC in the urban area and (2) whether a particular genus out of synanthropic rodent is the principal carrier of STEC. One hundred and forty-five rodents were captured in Buenos Aires City. Screening for stx1/stx2 and rfbO157 was done by PCR from the confluence zone. STEC isolates were further characterized with biochemical tests by standard methods. Additional virulence factors (eae, ehxA, and saa) were also determined by PCR. Forty-one of the rodents were necropsied and sample of kidney and small and large intestine were taken for histopathological diagnosis. The samples sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and observed by light microscopy to evaluate the systemic involvement of these species in natural infections. STEC was isolated from seven out of 27 suspect animals at screening. The following genotypes were found in the STEC strains: stx1/stx2/ehxA (1), stx2 (4), stx2/ehxA (1), stx2/ehxA/eae (1). Neither gross nor microscopic lesions compatible with those produced by Shiga toxin were observed in the studied organs of necropsied rodents. The bivariate analysis including the 145 rodent's data showed that the isolation of STEC is associated positively to Rattus genus. This synanthropic species may play a role in the transmissibility of the agent thus being a risk to the susceptible population. Their control should be included specifically in actions to dismiss the contamination of food and water by STEC in the urban area, as additional strategies for epidemiological control. PMID:23125967

  9. Multiple Infections of Rodents with Zoonotic Pathogens in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Sabrina; Essbauer, Sandra S.; Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Poppert, Sven; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Klempa, Boris; Henning, Klaus; Schares, Gereon; Groschup, Martin H.; Spitzenberger, Friederike; Richter, Dania; Heckel, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rodents are important reservoirs for a large number of zoonotic pathogens. We examined the occurrence of 11 viral, bacterial, and parasitic agents in rodent populations in Austria, including three different hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox virus, Leptospira spp., Borrelia spp., Rickettsia spp., Bartonella spp., Coxiella burnetii, and Toxoplasma gondii. In 2008, 110 rodents of four species (40 Clethrionomys glareolus, 29 Apodemus flavicollis, 26 Apodemus sylvaticus, and 15 Microtus arvalis) were trapped at two rural sites in Lower Austria. Chest cavity fluid and samples of lung, spleen, kidney, liver, brain, and ear pinna skin were collected. We screened selected tissue samples for hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox viruses, Leptospira, Borrelia, Rickettsia, Bartonella spp., C. burnetii, and T. gondii by RT-PCR/PCR and detected nucleic acids of Tula hantavirus, Leptospira spp., Borrelia afzelii, Rickettsia spp., and different Bartonella species. Serological investigations were performed for hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox viruses, and Rickettsia spp. Here, Dobrava-Belgrade hantavirus-, Tula hantavirus-, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-, orthopox virus-, and rickettsia-specific antibodies were demonstrated. Puumala hantavirus, C. burnetii, and T. gondii were neither detected by RT-PCR/PCR nor by serological methods. In addition, multiple infections with up to three pathogens were shown in nine animals of three rodent species from different trapping sites. In conclusion, these results show that rodents in Austria may host multiple zoonotic pathogens. Our observation raises important questions regarding the interactions of different pathogens in the host, the countermeasures of the host's immune system, the impact of the host–pathogen interaction on the fitness of the host, and the spread of infectious agents among wild rodents and from those to other animals or humans. PMID:24915446

  10. Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra

    E-print Network

    Mitchener, Paul

    Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in fuzzy algebra Tolerance interval eigenvectors in tropical and fuzzy algebra Martin Workshop Birmingham, May 16, 2013 #12;Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance

  11. Seasonal variation of ozone in the tropical lower stratosphere: Southern tropics are different from northern tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wang, Lei; Oman, Luke D.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2014-05-01

    We examine the seasonal behavior of ozone by using measurements from various instruments including ozonesondes, Aura Microwave Limb Sounder, and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II. We find that the magnitude of the annual variation in ozone, as a percentage of the mean ozone, exhibits a maximum at or slightly above the tropical tropopause. The maximum is larger in the northern tropics than in the southern tropics, and the annual maximum of ozone in the southern tropics occurs 2 months later than that in the northern tropics, in contrast to usual assumption that the tropics can be treated as a horizontally homogeneous region. The seasonal cycles of ozone and other species in this part of the lower stratosphere result from a combination of the seasonal variation of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and the seasonal variation of tropical and midlatitude mixing. In the Northern Hemisphere, the impacts of upwelling and mixing between the tropics and midlatitudes on ozone are in phase and additive. In the Southern Hemisphere, they are not in phase. We apply a tropical leaky pipe model independently to each hemisphere to examine the relative roles of upwelling and mixing in the northern and southern tropical regions. Reasonable assumptions of the seasonal variation of upwelling and mixing yield a good description of the seasonal magnitude and phase in both the southern and northern tropics. The differences in the tracers and transport between the northern and southern tropical stratospheres suggest that the paradigm of well-mixed tropics needs to be revised to consider latitudinal variations within the tropics.

  12. Seasonal Variation of Ozone in the Tropical Lower Stratosphere: Southern Tropics are Different from Northern Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wang, Lei,; Oman, Luke D.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the seasonal behavior of ozone by using measurements from various instruments including ozonesondes, Aura Microwave Limb Sounder, and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II. We find that the magnitude of the annual variation in ozone, as a percentage of the mean ozone, exhibits a maximum at or slightly above the tropical tropopause. The maximum is larger in the northern tropics than in the southern tropics, and the annual maximum of ozone in the southern tropics occurs 2 months later than that in the northern tropics, in contrast to usual assumption that the tropics can be treated as a horizontally homogeneous region. The seasonal cycles of ozone and other species in this part of the lower stratosphere result from a combination of the seasonal variation of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and the seasonal variation of tropical and midlatitude mixing. In the Northern Hemisphere, the impacts of upwelling and mixing between the tropics and midlatitudes on ozone are in phase and additive. In the Southern Hemisphere, they are not in phase. We apply a tropical leaky pipe model independently to each hemisphere to examine the relative roles of upwelling and mixing in the northern and southern tropical regions. Reasonable assumptions of the seasonal variation of upwelling and mixing yield a good description of the seasonal magnitude and phase in both the southern and northern tropics. The differences in the tracers and transport between the northern and southern tropical stratospheres suggest that the paradigm of well-mixed tropics needs to be revised to consider latitudinal variations within the tropics.

  13. Microbial safety of tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    Strawn, Laura K; Schneider, Keith R; Danyluk, Michelle D

    2011-02-01

    There are approximately 140 million tons of over 3,000 types of tropical fruits produced annually worldwide. Tropical fruits, once unfamiliar and rare to the temperate market, are now gaining widespread acceptance. Tropical fruits are found in a variety of forms, including whole, fresh cut, dried, juice blends, frozen, pulp, and nectars in markets around the world. Documented outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with tropical fruits have occurred. Norovirus and Salmonella are the leading viral and bacterial pathogens, respectively, documented to have caused outbreaks of infections associated with consumption of tropical fruits. Sources of contamination of tropical fruit have been identified in the production environment and postharvest handling, primarily related to sanitation issues. Limited data exist on the specific route of transmission from these sources. Research on the microbial safety of tropical fruits is minimal; with the growing market for tropical fruit expected to increase by 33% in 2010 this research area needs to be addressed. The aim of this review is to discuss the foodborne pathogen outbreaks associated tropical fruit consumption, research previously completed on pathogen behavior on tropical fruits, preventive strategies for pathogen contamination, and research needs. PMID:21328109

  14. The Touchscreen Cognitive Testing Method for Rodents: How to Get the Best out of Your Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussey, Timothy J.; Padain, Tina L.; Skillings, Elizabeth A.; Winters, Boyer D.; Morton, A. Jennifer; Saksida, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    The touchscreen testing method for rodents is a computer-automated behavioral testing method that allows computer graphic stimuli to be presented to rodents and the rodents to respond to the computer screen via a nose-poke directly to the stimulus. The advantages of this method are numerous; however, a systematic study of the parameters that…

  15. Profiles of chemically-induced tumors in rodents: quantitative relationships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Romualdo Benigni; Anna Pino

    1998-01-01

    The rodent carcinogenicity bioassay has been used for several decades for evaluating hundreds of chemicals, with the two aims of better understanding the etiologies of cancer, and of assessing the hazard posed by environmental and industrial chemicals. This has generated an enormous wealth of data and information on the phenomenon of chemical carcinogenicity. However, this information cannot be appreciated easily,

  16. RODENT AND RUMINANT INGESTIVE RESPONSES TO FLAVONOIDS IN EUPHORBIA ESULA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Euphorbia esula, common name leafy spurge, was chemically evaluated for aversive phytochemicals that appear to minimize herbivory by rodents and cattle. A portion of the initial aqueous methanol extract called the middle layer elicited food aversions in rats as did the petroleum ether extract of th...

  17. DESERT RODENTS REDUCE SEEDLING RECRUITMENT OF SALSOLA PAULSENII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heteromyid rodents in the deserts of North America have been shown to harvest large quantities of seeds of both native and introduced plants from soil seedbanks, but rarely has the impact of this seed removal been demonstrated experimentally. I used a series of fenced plots (some of which excluded ...

  18. Lassa serology in natural populations of rodents and horizontal transmission.

    PubMed

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Koivogui, Lamine; Günther, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic fever in West Africa. Previously, we demonstrated by PCR screening that only the multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis, hosts Lassa virus in Guinea. In the present study, we used the same specimen collection from 17 villages in Coastal, Upper, and Forest Guinea to investigate the Lassa virus serology in the rodent population. The aim was to determine the dynamics of antibody development in M. natalensis and to detect potential spillover infections in other rodent species. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody screening was performed using the indirect immunofluorescence assay with the Guinean Lassa virus strain Bantou 289 as antigen. The overall seroprevalence was 8% (129/1551) with the following rodents testing positive: 109 M. natalensis, seven Mastomys erythroleucus, four Lemniscomys striatus, four Praomys daltoni, three Mus minutoides, and two Praomys rostratus. Nearly all of them (122/129) originated from Bantou, Tanganya, and Gbetaya, where Lassa virus is highly endemic in M. natalensis. The antibody seroprevalence in M. natalensis from this high-endemic area (27%; 108/396) depended on the village, habitat, host age, and host abundance. A main positive factor was age; the maximum seroprevalence reached 50% in older animals. Our data fit with a model implicating that most M. natalensis rodents become horizontally infected, clear the virus within a period significantly shorter than their life span, and develop antibodies. In addition, the detection of antibodies in other species trapped in the habitats of M. natalensis suggests spillover infections. PMID:25229705

  19. Leptospira spp. in Rodents and Shrews in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Hammerl, Jens Andre; Schmidt, Sabrina; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Pfeffer, Martin; Woll, Dietlinde; Scholz, Holger C.; Thomas, Astrid; Nöckler, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an acute, febrile disease occurring in humans and animals worldwide. Leptospira spp. are usually transmitted through direct or indirect contact with the urine of infected reservoir animals. Among wildlife species, rodents act as the most important reservoir for both human and animal infection. To gain a better understanding of the occurrence and distribution of pathogenic leptospires in rodent and shrew populations in Germany, kidney specimens of 2973 animals from 11 of the 16 federal states were examined by PCR. Rodent species captured included five murine species (family Muridae), six vole species (family Cricetidae) and six shrew species (family Soricidae). The most abundantly trapped animals were representatives of the rodent species Apodemus flavicollis, Clethrionomys glareolus and Microtus agrestis. Leptospiral DNA was amplified in 10% of all animals originating from eight of the 11 federal states. The highest carrier rate was found in Microtus spp. (13%), followed by Apodemus spp. (11%) and Clethrionomys spp. (6%). The most common Leptospira genomospecies determined by duplex PCR was L. kirschneri, followed by L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii; all identified by single locus sequence typing (SLST). Representatives of the shrew species were also carriers of Leptospira spp. In 20% of Crocidura spp. and 6% of the Sorex spp. leptospiral DNA was detected. Here, only the pathogenic genomospecies L. kirschneri was identified. PMID:25062275

  20. A simple mathematical model of rodent population cycles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Dekker

    1975-01-01

    A simple mathematical rate equation model is presented, which describes the observed cycles in rodent populations. The population is assumed to consist of two different genotypes. One type is called “emigrants”, having a high reproductive rate and reacting on the stress due to dense populations by dispersal. The other type may be referred to as “tolerants”, being insensitive to overpopulation

  1. COMPLEMENTARITY OF GENOTOXIC AND NONGENOTOXIC PREDICTORS OF RODENT CARCINOGENICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty-one chemicals known to be carcinogenic in rodent bioassays were selected for study. he chemicals were administered by gavage in two dose levels to female Sprague-Dawley rats. he effects of these 21 chemicals on four biochemical assays (hepatic DNA damage by alkaline elutio...

  2. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS. WP Watkinson1, LB Wichers2, JP Nolan1, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, LC Walsh1, ER Lappi1, D Terrell1, R Slade1, AD Ledbetter1, and DL Costa1. 1USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, US...

  3. Robust reproducible resting state networks in the awake rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Lino; Pendse, Gautam; Chang, Pei-Ching; Bishop, James; Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Resting state networks (RSNs) have been studied extensively with functional MRI in humans in health and disease to reflect brain function in the un-stimulated state as well as reveal how the brain is altered with disease. Rodent models of disease have been used comprehensively to understand the biology of the disease as well as in the development of new therapies. RSN reported studies in rodents, however, are few, and most studies are performed with anesthetized rodents that might alter networks and differ from their non-anesthetized state. Acquiring RSN data in the awake rodent avoids the issues of anesthesia effects on brain function. Using high field fMRI we determined RSNs in awake rats using an independent component analysis (ICA) approach, however, ICA analysis can produce a large number of components, some with biological relevance (networks). We further have applied a novel method to determine networks that are robust and reproducible among all the components found with ICA. This analysis indicates that 7 networks are robust and reproducible in the rat and their putative role is discussed. PMID:22028788

  4. A rodent and lightning protective sheath for fiber optic cables

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. C. L. Weinraub; D. D. Davis; M. D. Kinard

    1983-01-01

    A new protective sheath design for fiber optic cables has been developed. It features corrugated and longitudinally applied metal members with a plastic jacket in an adhesively bonded construction. The use of conventional corrugation tools and longitudinal application in a single pass results in low cost and high line speeds. Tests have shown this sheath to be rodent proof, to

  5. Assessment of the use of selected rodents in ecological monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Richard J.

    1989-05-01

    Rodents can be useful in detecting environmental impacts because they are easy to study (easy to capture and handle), they can occur in densities adequate for statistical analysis, and they are ecologically important. In this study the usefulness of rodent populations for ecological monitoring was investigated by examining the effect of variation on the possibility of detecting differences among populations of rodents on 10 trapping grids. The effects of sampling frequencies and dispersal on detecting differences in population parameters among grids was also investigated, as was the possibility of inferring population parameters from correlations with habitat data. Statistically significant differences as small as 4.3 Peromyscus maniculatus/ha were detected between grids. Of 10 populations, this comprised 12% of the highest-density population and 44% of the lowest-density population. Smaller and more differences among grids were found by examining only animals surviving from previous months. Dispersal confounds detection of direct impacts to populations, especially during the breeding season. Infrequent sampling fails to detect impacts that occur between sampling periods and will indicate impacts when observed changes result from natural variation. Correlations between population parameters and habitat variables exist but should only be used in predicting, not measuring, impacts. It is concluded that some rodent populations can be used in ecological monitoring. However, intensive sampling is required to account for variation and dispersal.

  6. Toxoplasmosis in Rodents: Ecological Survey and First Evidences in Thailand

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a serological survey with latex agglu- tination test to detect anti-T. gondii antibodies. Overall, 21 of 461 (4Toxoplasmosis in Rodents: Ecological Survey and First Evidences in Thailand Sathaporn Jittapalapong prevalences were reported in either forested or anthropized areas. This survey constitutes the first confirmed

  7. PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) DISRUPTS THE THYROID STATUS IN LABORATORY RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) DISRUPTS THE THYROID STATUS IN LABORATORY RODENTS. C. Lau, J.R. Thibodeaux, R.G. Hanson, B.E. Gray and J.M. Rogers. Reprod. Tox. Div. NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC. PFOS is an environmental contaminant ubiquitously found in h...

  8. Response of brown treesnakes to reduction of their rodent prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gragg, J.E.; Rodda, G.H.; Savidge, J.A.; White, G.C.; Dean-Bradley, K.; Ellingson, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Trapping brown treesnakes (Boiga irregularis; BTS) with live-mouse (Mus domesticus) lures is the principal control technique for this invasive species on Guam. Lure-based trapping is also used on other islands as a precaution against undetected arrivals and in response to verified BTS sightings. However, the effectiveness of lure-based trapping on other islands is questionable, as it has yielded no BTS despite other evidence of their presence. Some evidence suggests that high rodent numbers may interfere with BTS control. To test the relationship between rodent abundance and snake trappability, we conducted a controlled, replicated field experiment incorporating a rodenticide treatment during a BTS mark-recapture study. Using open population modeling in Program MARK, we estimated BTS apparent survival and recapture probabilities. Rodent reduction increased BTS recapture probabilities by 52-65% in 2002 and 22-36% in 2003, and it decreased apparent survival by <1% both years. This appears to be the first published instance of manipulating wild prey to influence snake behavior. Rodent reduction may enhance detection and control of BTS with traps on Guam and other islands. It may also amplify the effectiveness of oral toxicants against BTS.

  9. SHORT REPORT Open Access Optimizing the phenotyping of rodent ASD

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SHORT REPORT Open Access Optimizing the phenotyping of rodent ASD models: enrichment analysis spectrum disorders (ASD) in both forward and reverse genetic approaches. A recurrent focus has been on high-order phenotypes, raising a question as to what constitutes useful phenotypes in ASD models. Methods: To address

  10. Student Research, Tropical Style!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Monte Morris (Clark County R-1 High School REV)

    1995-06-30

    A field trip to a tropical location is used to help students examine the process of scientific research. Each student designs a research project, compiles background material, develops the procedure, and builds, buys, or acquires the necessary equipment. A field study trip to a tropical location allows them to collect their data, while demonstrating that science can be interesting and fun! Conclusions are drawn and the final paper is drafted and submitted several weeks after their return. The main area of concentration is marine ecology, but usually each year an additional research topic is offered depending on the location of the field study. One semester of elective high school science credit is awarded for each year. College credit is also offered.

  11. Tropical Pacific moisture variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives are to describe synoptic scale variability of moisture over the tropical Pacific Ocean and the systems leading to this variability; implement satellite analysis procedures in support of this effort, and to incorporate additional satellite information into operational analysis forecast systems at the National Meteorological Center (NMC). Composite satellite radiance patterns describe features detectable well before the development of synoptic scale tropical plumes. These typical features were extracted from historical files of Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) radiance observations for a pair of tropical plumes which developed during January 1989. Signals were inserted into the NMC operational medium range forecast model and a suite of model integrations were conducted. Many of the 48 h model errors of the historical forecasts were eliminated by the inclusion of more complete satellite observations. Three studies in satellite radiance analysis progressed. An analysis which blended TOVS moisture channels, OLR observations and European Center for Medium Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model analysis to generate fields of total precipitable water comparable to those estimated from Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) mu-wave observations. This study demonstrated that a 10 y climatology of precipitable water over the oceans is feasible, using available infrared observations (OLR and TOVS) and model analysis (ECMWF, NMC or similar quality). The estimates are sensitive to model quality and the estimating model must be updated with operational model changes. Coe developed a set of tropical plume and ITCZ composites from TOVS observations, and from NMC and ECMWF analyses which had been passed through a radiative transfer model to simulate TOVS radiances. The composites have been completed as well as many statistical diagnostics of individual TOVS channels. Analysis of the computations is commencing. Chung has initiated a study of the differences between TOVS observed vapor structure during El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (1983) and non-ENSO (1984) years. Preliminary diagnosis demonstrates gross moisture changes between warm and cold sea surface temperature episodes.

  12. Tropical fevers: Management guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Sunit; Chaudhary, Dhruva; Varghese, George M.; Bhalla, Ashish; Karthi, N.; Kalantri, S.; Peter, J. V.; Mishra, Rajesh; Bhagchandani, Rajesh; Munjal, M.; Chugh, T. D.; Rungta, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Tropical fevers were defined as infections that are prevalent in, or are unique to tropical and subtropical regions. Some of these occur throughout the year and some especially in rainy and post-rainy season. Concerned about high prevalence and morbidity and mortality caused by these infections, and overlapping clinical presentations, difficulties in arriving at specific diagnoses and need for early empiric treatment, Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) constituted an expert committee to develop a consensus statement and guidelines for management of these diseases in the emergency and critical care. The committee decided to focus on most common infections on the basis of available epidemiologic data from India and overall experience of the group. These included dengue hemorrhagic fever, rickettsial infections/scrub typhus, malaria (usually falciparum), typhoid, and leptospira bacterial sepsis and common viral infections like influenza. The committee recommends a ‘syndromic approach’ to diagnosis and treatment of critical tropical infections and has identified five major clinical syndromes: undifferentiated fever, fever with rash / thrombocytopenia, fever with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), fever with encephalopathy and fever with multi organ dysfunction syndrome. Evidence based algorithms are presented to guide critical care specialists to choose reliable rapid diagnostic modalities and early empiric therapy based on clinical syndromes. PMID:24678147

  13. Tropical Anvil Cirrus Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.; Schmitt, C.; Baumgardner, D.; Poellot, M.; Twohy, C.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. T.; Sayres, D.; Avallone, L.; Hallar, G.

    2003-12-01

    This study synthesizes data collected during a number of field campaigns by in-situ aircraft to characterize the microphysical properties of tropical, convectively-generated cirrus. The field campaigns include the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission KWAJEX campaign near Kwajalein, M. I., KAMP (the Keys Area Microphysics Project) and the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers (CRYSTAL) Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (FACE), both over southern Florida, and CAMEX-4 (the fourth convection and moisture experiment), studying hurricanes off the east coast of Florida. The measurements include particle size distribution and particle shape information, direct measurements of the condensed water content (CRYSTAL-FACE), and radar imagery. We examine the temperature dependence and vertical variability of the ice water content (IWC), extinction, and effective radii, and deduce the ensemble-mean ice particle densities. Data obtained in quiescent regions outside of convection are compared to observations within convective cells. The relationship between the properties of the particle size distributions and proximity to convection are examined. The IWCs show a strong temperature dependence and dependence on distance below cloud top. The IWCs are larger in the convective regions than in the quiescent regions, and the particle size distributions are markedly broader. Ensemble-mean ice particle densities are a strong function of the breadth of the particle size distributions.

  14. Nutritional Evaluation of NASA's Rodent Food Bar Diet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joyce E.; Yu, Diane S.; Dalton, Bonnie P.

    2000-01-01

    Tests are being conducted on NASA's rodent Food Bar in preparation for long-term use as the rat and mouse diet aboard the International Space Station. Nutritional analyses are performed after the bars are manufactured and then repeated periodically to determine nutritional stability. The primary factors analyzed are protein, ash, fat, fiber, moisture, amino acids, fatty acids, and minerals. Nutrient levels are compared to values published in the National Research Council's dietary requirements for rodents, and also to those contained in several commonly used commercial rodent lab diets. The Food Bar is manufactured from a powdered diet to which moisture is added as it is processed through an extruder. The bars are dipped into potassium sorbate, vacuum-sealed, and irradiated. In order to determine nutrient changes during extrusion and irradiation, the powdered diet, the non-irradiated bars, and the irradiated bars are all analyzed. We have observed lower values for some nutrients (iodine, vitamin K, and iron) in the Food Bars compared with NRC requirements. Many nutrients in the Food Bars are contained at a higher level than levels in the NRC requirements. An additional factor we are investigating is the 26% moisture level in the Food Bars, which drops to about 15% within a week, compared to a stable 10% moisture in many standard lab chow diets. In addition to the nutritional analyses, the food bar is being fed to several strains of rats and mice, and feeding study and necropsy results are being observed (Barrett et al, unpublished data). Information from the nutritional analyses and from the rodent studies will enable us to recommend the formulation that will most adequately meet the rodent Food Bar requirements for long-term use aboard the Space Station.

  15. CHEMICAL AND RADIATION LEUKEMOGENESIS IN HUMANS AND RODENTS AND THE VALUE OF RODENT MODELS FOR ASSESSING RISKS OF LYMPHOHEMATOPOIETIC CANCERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is intended to provide an up-to-date overview of the lymphoid and hematopoietic diseases induced in humans and rodents following exposure to chemical agents. It includes a brief introduction to hematopoiesis and leukemia-inducing agents and their effects in mice and r...

  16. Tropical Marine Biology Syllabus Summer 2014

    E-print Network

    Acevedo, Alejandro

    Flores Ramírez2 1 Western Washington University, Washington, USA 2 Universidad Autónoma de Baja will learn about Tropical Organismal Biology and Tropical Marine Ecology from Western Washington University

  17. Seven Guideposts for Tropical Rain Forest Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Identifies seven guideposts for tropical rain forest education. Aids teachers in finding structure and creating educational experiences that promote more complete understanding of tropical rain forests. (CCM)

  18. Conservation of tropical plant species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book is designed to provide a review of the methods and current status of conservation of many tropical plant species. Future perspectives of conservation of tropical species will also be discussed. The section on methods covers the range of conservation techniques, in situ, seed banking, in vi...

  19. Simple models of tropical plumes

    E-print Network

    Carrie, Gordon David, d 1960-

    1994-01-01

    Tropical plumes are upper and mid-level cloud bands at least 2000 km long that cross 15' latitude. The simplest conditions that lead to tropical plume development are sought in a barotropic model simulating winter 200 mb flow. The features sought...

  20. Climatic Variability In Tropical Countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. W. Seneviratne

    2003-01-01

    Introduction Droughts in tropical countries are proved as periodic and its occurrence is shown remarkable in 9.25 year cycles as explained by the author. These cycles exist as soon or late around the central point. In the tropical regions monsoons or trade winds has a definite origin and pattern of advancing towards land mass. Ocean evaporation is the main source

  1. Tropical Rainforest Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    This digest provides four guideposts for tropical rainforest education: (1) structure; (2) location and climate; (3) importance; and (4) conservation of resources. Research is cited and background information provided about the layers of life and the adaptations of life within the tropical rain forest. Aspects of life within and near rain forests…

  2. 6, 1146511520, 2006 Tropical tropospheric

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 11465­11520, 2006 Tropical tropospheric ozone B. Sauvage et al. Title Page Abstract. Sauvage1 , R. V. Martin1,2 , A. van Donkelaar1 , X. Liu2 , K. Chance2 , L. Jaegl´e3 , P. I. Palmer4 , S Correspondence to: B. Sauvage (bsauvage@fizz.phys.dal.ca) 11465 #12;ACPD 6, 11465­11520, 2006 Tropical

  3. Botany, Chemistry, and Tropical Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headrick, Daniel R.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the role played by botany and chemistry in the development, exploitation, and later deterioration of tropical economies. Although near equals in 19th-century international trade, the development of synthetics by European scientists in the early 20th century crippled the tropical economies. Research, innovation, and investment protected…

  4. Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Background

    E-print Network

    - 1 - Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Background: Over the last 20 years, hurricane research at AOML has focused on improved scientific understanding of hurricanes and of tropical meteorology scientific goals for AOMLs hurricane research derive from the U.S. Weather Research Programs (USWRP

  5. Cloudsat tropical cyclone database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourville, Natalie D.

    CloudSat (CS), the first 94 GHz spaceborne cloud profiling radar (CPR), launched in 2006 to study the vertical distribution of clouds. Not only are CS observations revealing inner vertical cloud details of water and ice globally but CS overpasses of tropical cyclones (TC's) are providing a new and exciting opportunity to study the vertical structure of these storm systems. CS TC observations are providing first time vertical views of TC's and demonstrate a unique way to observe TC structure remotely from space. Since December 2009, CS has intersected every globally named TC (within 1000 km of storm center) for a total of 5,278 unique overpasses of tropical systems (disturbance, tropical depression, tropical storm and hurricane/typhoon/cyclone (HTC)). In conjunction with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), each CS TC overpass is processed into a data file containing observational data from the afternoon constellation of satellites (A-TRAIN), Navy's Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System Model (NOGAPS), European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) model and best track storm data. This study will describe the components and statistics of the CS TC database, present case studies of CS TC overpasses with complementary A-TRAIN observations and compare average reflectivity stratifications of TC's across different atmospheric regimes (wind shear, SST, latitude, maximum wind speed and basin). Average reflectivity stratifications reveal that characteristics in each basin vary from year to year and are dependent upon eye overpasses of HTC strength storms and ENSO phase. West Pacific (WPAC) basin storms are generally larger in size (horizontally and vertically) and have greater values of reflectivity at a predefined height than all other basins. Storm structure at higher latitudes expands horizontally. Higher vertical wind shear (? 9.5 m/s) reduces cloud top height (CTH) and the intensity of precipitation cores, especially in HTC strength storms. Average zero and ten dBZ height thresholds confirm WPAC storms loft precipitation sized particles higher into the atmosphere than in other basins. Two CS eye overpasses (32 hours apart) of a weakening Typhoon Nida in 2009 reveal the collapse of precipitation cores, warm core anomaly and upper tropospheric ice water content (IWC) under steady moderate shear conditions.

  6. Limitations to adaptive optics image quality in rodent eyes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Metha, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal image quality of rodent eyes is inferior to that of human eyes, despite the promise of greater numerical aperture. This paradox challenges several assumptions commonly made in AO imaging, assumptions which may be invalidated by the very high power and dioptric thickness of the rodent retina. We used optical modeling to compare the performance of rat and human eyes under conditions that tested the validity of these assumptions. Results showed that AO image quality in the human eye is robust to positioning errors of the AO corrector and to differences in imaging depth and wavelength compared to the wavefront beacon. In contrast, image quality in the rat eye declines sharply with each of these manipulations, especially when imaging off-axis. However, some latitude does exist to offset these manipulations against each other to produce good image quality. PMID:22876346

  7. Pet Rodents and Fatal Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis in Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pavlin, Boris I.; Albariño, Cesar G.; Comer, James A.; Erickson, Bobbie R.; Oliver, Jennifer B.; Sealy, Tara K.; Vincent, Martin J.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Tumpey, Abbigail J.; Wagoner, Kent D.; Glauer, R. David; Smith, Kathleen A.; Winpisinger, Kim A.; Parsely, Melody S.; Wyrick, Phil; Hannafin, Christopher H.; Bandy, Utpala; Zaki, Sherif; Rollin, Pierre E.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    In April 2005, 4 transplant recipients became ill after receiving organs infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV); 3 subsequently died. All organs came from a donor who had been exposed to a hamster infected with LCMV. The hamster was traced back through a Rhode Island pet store to a distribution center in Ohio, and more LCMV-infected hamsters were discovered in both. Rodents from the Ohio facility and its parent facility in Arkansas were tested for the same LCMV strain as the 1 involved in the transplant-associated deaths. Phylogenetic analysis of virus sequences linked the rodents from the Ohio facility to the Rhode Island pet store, the index hamster, and the transplant recipients. This report details the animal traceback and the supporting laboratory investigations. PMID:17553250

  8. The organizational variability of the rodent somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Santiago, L F; Rocha, E G; Freire, M A M; Dias, I A; Lent, R; Houzel, J C; Picanço-Diniz, C W; Pereira, A; Franca, J G

    2007-01-01

    Rodentia is the largest mammalian order, with more than 2,000 species displaying a great diversity of morphological characteristics and living in different ecological niches (terrestrial, semi-aquatic, arboreal and fossorial). Analysis of the organization of the somatosensory areas in six species of rodents allowed us to demonstrate that although these species share a similar neocortical blueprint with other eutherian mammals, important differences exist between homologous areas across different species, probably as a function of both lifestyle and peripheral sensory specializations typical of each species. We based this generalization on a phylogenetic comparison of the intrinsic organization of the primary somatosensory area (SI) across representatives of different rodent suborders. This analysis revealed considerable structural variability, including the differential expansion of cortical representation of specific body parts (cortical amplification) as well as the parcellation of areas into processing modules. PMID:18019610

  9. Hantavirus Immunology of Rodent Reservoirs: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Schountz, Tony; Prescott, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Hantaviruses are hosted by rodents, insectivores and bats. Several rodent-borne hantaviruses cause two diseases that share many features in humans, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Eurasia or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in the Americas. It is thought that the immune response plays a significant contributory role in these diseases. However, in reservoir hosts that have been closely examined, little or no pathology occurs and infection is persistent despite evidence of adaptive immune responses. Because most hantavirus reservoirs are not model organisms, it is difficult to conduct meaningful experiments that might shed light on how the viruses evade sterilizing immune responses and why immunopathology does not occur. Despite these limitations, recent advances in instrumentation and bioinformatics will have a dramatic impact on understanding reservoir host responses to hantaviruses by employing a systems biology approach to identify important pathways that mediate virus/reservoir relationships. PMID:24638205

  10. First diatomyid rodent from the Early Miocene of Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel

    2011-02-01

    The Asian family Diatomyidae is known from the Early Oligocene to the present. Among living rodents, this group comprises only the recently discovered Laonastes aenigmamus from Laos. Fossil diatomyids are known from only a few sites, in which they are often rare. The discovery of Pierremus explorator gen. nov. sp. nov. in the Lower Miocene of As-Sarrar (Saudi Arabia) raises to ten the number of extinct diatomyid species recognized. Pierremus explorator is the first record of a diatomyid from the Afro-Arabian plate. This discovery provides evidence that, together with other rodents (ctenodactylids, zapodids…), the diatomyids took advantage of the corridor that was established between Afro-Arabia and Eurasia in Early Miocene times.

  11. Hantavirus Infection in Humans and Rodents, Northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Levis, Silvana; Calderón, Gladys; Ramirez, Josefina; Bravo, Daniel; Lozano, Elena; Ripoll, Carlos; St. Jeor, Stephen; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Barquez, Ruben M.; Enria, Delia

    2003-01-01

    We initiated a study to elucidate the ecology and epidemiology of hantavirus infections in northern Argentina. The northwestern hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS)–endemic area of Argentina comprises Salta and Jujuy Provinces. Between 1997 and 2000, 30 HPS cases were diagnosed in Jujuy Province (population 512,329). Most patients had a mild clinical course, and the death rate (13.3%) was low. We performed a serologic and epidemiologic survey in residents of the area, in conjunction with a serologic study in rodents. The prevalence of hantavirus antibodies in the general human population was 6.5%, one of the highest reported in the literature. No evidence of interhuman transmission was found, and the high prevalence of hantavirus antibody seemed to be associated with the high infestation of rodents detected in domestic and peridomestic habitats. PMID:14519242

  12. Rapid field test for detection of hantavirus antibodies in rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Sirola, H.; Kallio, E. R.; Koistinen, V.; Kuronen, I.; Lundkvist, A.; Vaheri, A.; Vapalahti, O.; Henttonen, H.; Närvänen, A.

    2004-01-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is the causative agent of nephropathia epidemica, a mild form of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. PUUV is transmitted to humans via aerosolized excreta of the infected bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus). Current methods for screening of the PUUV prevalence among bank vole populations are laborious, combining sampling in the field and subsequent analyses in the laboratory. In order to facilitate animal testing, a new serological immunochromatographic rapid test was developed. The test uses PUUV nucleocapsid protein as antigen, and it detects anti-PUUV IgG antibodies in rodents. With fresh and undiluted bank-vole blood samples (n = 105) the efficacy of the test was 100%, and with frozen and diluted samples (n = 78) the efficacy was 91%. The test was also shown to detect related hantavirus infections in Norway lemmings and sibling voles (n = 31) with 99% efficacy. The test provides an applicable tool for studying PUUV and related hantavirus infections in arvicoline rodents. PMID:15188724

  13. Experimental infections by Brucella suis type 4 in Alaskan rodents.

    PubMed

    Miller, L G; Neiland, K A

    1980-10-01

    The susceptibility of nine species of rodents and one species of lagomorph to Brucella suis type 4 was studied experimentally. The rodent species included: guinea pig (Cavia porcellus), Scandinavian lemming (Lemmus lemmus), brown lemming (L. sibiricus), northern red-backed vole (Clethrionomys rutilis), varying lemmings (Dicrostonyx stevensoni and D. rubricatus), yellow-cheeked vole (Microtus xanthognathus), flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) and ground squirrel (Citellus parryii). The lagomorph, Lepus americanus (varying hare), was also studied. All of these species were readily infected by intraperitoneal inoculations of brucellae. Pathologic responses were not marked in most of these species. However, both species of varying lemmings responded dramatically to infections initiated by about as few as two cfu. All individuals of both species that were not killed eventually died from the infection. PMID:7463596

  14. Susceptibility of selected rodent species from Colorado to Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Ubico, S R; McLean, R G; Cooksey, L M

    1996-04-01

    To determine the susceptibility of some common Colorado (USA) rodent species to Borrelia burgdorferi, pregnant Peromyscus maniculatus, Tamias minimus, and Spermophilus lateralis were trapped in May 1990 and kept in quarantine until their young were old enough to be used in the experiment. Six to eight 8-wk-old individuals of each of the Colorado species and, for comparison, eight laboratory raised P. leucopus were subcutaneously inoculated with > or = 10(5) spirochetes in 0.1 ml in July 1990. Tissue specimens were collected for isolation from these animals through April 1991. Spirochetes were isolated from blood, ear, bladder, kidney, spleen, liver, and eye in Barbour-Stoener-Kelly (BSK) medium from P. maniculatus, P. leucopus and T. minimus. Spirochetes were isolated from at least one tissue from all of these animals and no isolations were obtained from any of the S. lateralis. Thus, three of the four rodent species tested are susceptible to, and could harbor, B. burgdorferi. PMID:8722268

  15. Molecular examinations of Babesia microti in rodents and rodent-attached ticks from urban and sylvatic habitats in Germany.

    PubMed

    Obiegala, Anna; Pfeffer, Martin; Pfister, Kurt; Karnath, Carolin; Silaghi, Cornelia

    2015-06-01

    Small mammals serve as reservoir hosts for tick-borne pathogens, especially for those which are not transmitted transovarially in ticks - such as Babesia microti. Molecular investigations on the prevalence of B. microti in wild small mammals and on attached ticks from differently structured areas may provide information on the circulation of B. microti in different ecological niches. In 2012 and 2013, 622 rodents (396 Myodes glareolus, 178 Apodemus flavicollis, 36 Apodemus sylvaticus, 4 Apodemus agrarius, 7 Microtus arvalis, 1 Microtus agrestis) were captured from three differently structured habitats (urban, sylvatic, recultivated) in Germany. Attached ticks were collected from 449 small mammals (3250 Ixodes ricinus, 7 Ixodes trianguliceps, 133 Dermacentor reticulatus). A representative selection of a maximum of 5 ticks per developmental stage and species per 30 rodents of each species, location and year resulting in 965 ticks was further investigated. DNA was extracted from tick, blood and spleen samples, and tested by PCR for the partial 18S rRNA gene of B. microti with subsequent sequencing. The prevalence was significantly higher in rodents from the sylvatic site (4.6%) than in rodents captured at both other sites (-0.6%) (?(2)=11.95; p=0.00125). Body and spleen weight of infected M. glareolus from the sylvatic site were significantly higher compared to those from non-infected individuals from that site (p=0.00288 and p=0.00017, respectively). Babesia microti DNA was detected in 3 out of 965 attached ticks (0.3%; 95%CI: 0-1) from all sites, but they derived exclusively from rodents captured at the sylvatic site. At the same site, I. ricinus nymphs (7.7%; 95%CI: 1-25.3) were significantly more often infected than I. ricinus larvae (0%; 95%CI: 0-1.3)(?(2)=26.72; p<0.0001). The majority of positive rodents was also found at that site. I. trianguliceps occurred exclusively and the majority of M. glareolus at that site. Thus, it may be assumed that the circulation of B. microti is more efficient where this tick species and voles exist sympatrically than in areas with a predominant occurrence of Apodemus species. PMID:25922232

  16. Rodent and Ruminant Ingestive Response to Flavonoids in Euphorbia esula

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Halaweish; S. Kronberg; J. A. Rice

    2003-01-01

    Euphorbia esula, common name leafy spurge, was chemically evaluated for aversive phytochemicals that appear to minimize herbivory by rodents and cattle. A middle-layer extract elicited food aversions in rats as did the petroleum ether extract of the initial methanol extract. Kaempferol-3-0-ß- glucuronic acid and quercetin-3-0-ß-glucuronic acid were separated and identified from the middle-layer residue. This study is the first report

  17. Species diversity patterns in some present and prehistoric rodent communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sally J. Holbrook

    1979-01-01

    Comparisons of prehistoric (A.D. 1100–1400) and extant cricetine-dominated rodent faunas from two locations in New Mexico and one in Arizona reveal temporal changes in both species diversity and taxonomic composition. The archaeological context of the prehistoric faunas permitted them to be dated rather accurately; paleoenvironmental inferences generated from other materials recovered in the excavations such as pollen samples, agricultural remains,

  18. Evidence for secondary seed dispersal by rodents in Panama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre-Michel Forget; Tarek Milleron

    1991-01-01

    Summary  The data presented show thatVirola nobilis (Myristicaceae), a bird\\/mammal-dispersed tree species in Panama, may also be dispersed by a terrestrial rodent, the agouti\\u000a (Dasyprocta punctata). Using a thread-marking method, we observed that agoutis scatterhoardedV. nobilis seeds that they found both singly or in clumps. Seed removal and seed burial rates were strongly affected by features of\\u000a forest habitats, such asV.

  19. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Youngho Seo; Tomoki Hashimoto; Yoshitsugu Nuki; Bruce H Hasegawa

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography (‘microCT’) system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma

  20. Evaluation of two rodent delayed-response memory tasks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvin V Terry; William J Jackson; Jerry J Buccafusco

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare two similar rodent memory tasks developed in our laboratory that employ stimulus discrimination and delayed response (light and tone stimuli and variable length delays) and to determine their sensitivity to the muscarinic-acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist, scopolamine hydrobromide (SCOP HBr), and its quaternary (methylbromide) analog (SCOP MBr). Male Wistar rats were

  1. Neural Representation of Spatial Topology in the Rodent Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Gomperts, Stephen N.; Yamamoto, Jun; Wilson, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal cells in the rodent hippocampus often exhibit clear spatial tuning in navigation. Although it has been long suggested that pyramidal cell activity may underlie a topological code rather than a topographic code, it remains unclear whether an abstract spatial topology can be encoded in the ensemble spiking activity of hippocampal place cells. Using a statistical approach developed previously, we investigate this question and related issues in greater details. We recorded ensembles of hippocampal neurons as rodents freely foraged in one and two-dimensional spatial environments, and we used a “decode-to-uncover” strategy to examine the temporally structured patterns embedded in the ensemble spiking activity in the absence of observed spatial correlates during periods of rodent navigation or awake immobility. Specifically, the spatial environment was represented by a finite discrete state space. Trajectories across spatial locations (“states”) were associated with consistent hippocampal ensemble spiking patterns, which were characterized by a state transition matrix. From this state transition matrix, we inferred a topology graph that defined the connectivity in the state space. In both one and two-dimensional environments, the extracted behavior patterns from the rodent hippocampal population codes were compared against randomly shuffled spike data. In contrast to a topographic code, our results support the efficiency of topological coding in the presence of sparse sample size and fuzzy space mapping. This computational approach allows us to quantify the variability of ensemble spiking activity, to examine hippocampal population codes during off-line states, and to quantify the topological complexity of the environment. PMID:24102128

  2. Rodent seed predation and seedling recruitment in mesic grassland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Edwards; M. J. Crawley

    1999-01-01

    Seedling recruitment of two grasses (Arrhenatherum elatius and Festuca rubra) and two herbs (Centaurea nigra and Rumex acetosa) was measured in areas with and without rodents to which seeds of each species were sown at three seed densities (1000, 10,000\\u000a and 50,000 seeds m?2) in two seasons (spring and autumn 1995). Seed removal was measured for 10-day periods and the

  3. Ventilatory accommodation of changing oxygen demand in sciurid rodents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark A. Chappell

    1992-01-01

    Ventilation was measured across a range of O2 consumption rates in four sciurid rodents: Tamias minimus (47 g), Spermophilus lateralis (189 g), S. beecheyi (531 g), and Marmota flaviventris juveniles (1054 g) and adults (2989 g). Maximum thermogenic oxygen consumption was measured for all but adult M. flaviventris. Aerobic scopes (maximum\\/minimum O2 consumption rates) were 4.6, 3.8, 5.4, and 4.8

  4. Evidence for rodent-common and species-typical limb and digit use in eating, derived from a comparative analysis of ten rodent species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Q. Whishaw; J. R. Sarna; S. M. Pellis

    1998-01-01

    Order Rodentia comprises a vast portion of mammalian species (1814 species), which occupy extremely diverse habitats requiring very distinct motor specializations (e.g. burrowing, hopping, climbing, flying and swimming). Although early classification of paw use ability suggests rodents are impoverished relative to primates and make little use of their paws, there have been no systematic investigations of paw use in rodents.

  5. Results from a Survey of Current Practices for Sampling of Nervous System in Rodents and Non-rodents in General Toxicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey of current practices for sampling and examination of the nervous system in rodents and non-rodents for general and neurotoxicity (NT) studies was conducted by the Nervous System Sampling Subcommittee of the STP. For general toxicity studies most of those surveyed (>63%) ...

  6. Tropical Cyclone Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, P. Peggy; Knosp, Brian W.; Vu, Quoc A.; Yi, Chao; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.

    2009-01-01

    The JPL Tropical Cyclone Infor ma tion System (TCIS) is a Web portal (http://tropicalcyclone.jpl.nasa.gov) that provides researchers with an extensive set of observed hurricane parameters together with large-scale and convection resolving model outputs. It provides a comprehensive set of high-resolution satellite (see figure), airborne, and in-situ observations in both image and data formats. Large-scale datasets depict the surrounding environmental parameters such as SST (Sea Surface Temperature) and aerosol loading. Model outputs and analysis tools are provided to evaluate model performance and compare observations from different platforms. The system pertains to the thermodynamic and microphysical structure of the storm, the air-sea interaction processes, and the larger-scale environment as depicted by ocean heat content and the aerosol loading of the environment. Currently, the TCIS is populated with satellite observations of all tropical cyclones observed globally during 2005. There is a plan to extend the database both forward in time till present as well as backward to 1998. The portal is powered by a MySQL database and an Apache/Tomcat Web server on a Linux system. The interactive graphic user interface is provided by Google Map.

  7. Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Most visitors to the Smithsonian Institution's museums in Washington, DC may not be aware of the activities of their Tropical Research Institute, which may have something to do with the fact that is located in Panama. The Institute's history stretches back to the early years of the 20th century, when one of its prime directives was to survey the flora and fauna of the area for the purpose of controlling diseases such as yellow fever and malaria. In 1946, the Institute came into the fold of the Smithsonian Institution, and since then it has conducted research in the areas of archaeology, behavioral ecology, environmental monitoring, and other topics. On the site, visitors can learn about the intitute's diverse research projects, international activities (such as the Center for Tropical Forest Science), and fellowship opportunities. Finally, visitors can also look at the two webcams operated by the Institute, including one that looks over the island (Barro Colorado) where they are located off the coast of Panama.

  8. Herbivorous rodents (Neotoma spp.) harbour abundant and active foregut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kevin D; Miller, Aaron W; Marvin, James E; Mackie, Roderick; Dearing, M Denise

    2014-09-01

    Symbiotic gut microbes have facilitated the success of herbivorous mammals, which are generally grouped into foregut- and hindgut-fermenters. However, rodents are primarily herbivorous and exhibit a variety of gastrointestinal anatomies. Most rodents house microbes in hindgut chambers, such as the caecum and colon. Some rodents also exhibit stomach segmentation with a foregut chamber proximal to the stomach. For over a century, scientists have hypothesized that this foregut chamber houses a microbial community, yet this has never been explicitly examined. We investigated the capacity of each of the gut regions to house microbes by measuring size, pH, bacterial cell density, concentrations of microbial metabolites and digesta transit time in woodrats (Neotoma spp.). We also compared microbial communities across gut chambers, as well as faeces, using 16S rRNA sequencing. This allowed us to test the appropriateness of using faeces as a proxy for microbial communities of other gut chambers. We found that woodrats house foregut microbial communities with similar density and volatile fatty acid concentrations to rumen ecosystems. Resident microbial communities varied between gut chambers, and faecal bacterial communities were significantly different from caecal and colonic communities. The foregut microbiota may provide a number of physiological services to the host. PMID:24373154

  9. Rodent models and imaging techniques to study liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Weiwei; Dirsch, Olaf; Mclean, Anna Lawson; Zafarnia, Sara; Schwier, Michael; Dahmen, Uta

    2015-01-01

    The liver has the unique capability of regeneration from various injuries. Different animal models and in vitro methods are used for studying the processes and mechanisms of liver regeneration. Animal models were established either by administration of hepatotoxic chemicals or by surgical approach. The administration of hepatotoxic chemicals results in the death of liver cells and in subsequent hepatic regeneration and tissue repair. Surgery includes partial hepatectomy and portal vein occlusion or diversion: hepatectomy leads to compensatory regeneration of the remnant liver lobe, whereas portal vein occlusion leads to atrophy of the ipsilateral lobe and to compensatory regeneration of the contralateral lobe. Adaptation of modern radiological imaging technologies to the small size of rodents made the visualization of rodent intrahepatic vascular anatomy possible. Advanced knowledge of the detailed intrahepatic 3D anatomy enabled the establishment of refined surgical techniques. The same technology allows the visualization of hepatic vascular regeneration. The development of modern histological image analysis tools improved the quantitative assessment of hepatic regeneration. Novel image analysis tools enable us to quantify reliably and reproducibly the proliferative rate of hepatocytes using whole-slide scans, thus reducing the sampling error. In this review, the refined rodent models and the newly developed imaging technology to study liver regeneration are summarized. This summary helps to integrate the current knowledge of liver regeneration and promises an enormous increase in hepatological knowledge in the near future. PMID:25402256

  10. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Tilman's predicted productivity-diversity relationship shown by desert rodents.

    PubMed

    Abramsky, Z; Rosenzweig, M L

    Tilman has developed a model to predict the number of plant species that can coexist competitively on a limited resource base. Species diversity first increases over low resource supplies, then declines as the environment becomes richer. Although Tilman 's model was developed to describe interspecific interactions between plant species, it may also apply to animal species. Tilman questions whether animals specialize on particular proportions of nutrients. However, we believe animals probably specialize on relatively subtle microhabitat differences, especially in a multispecies competitive regime. Thus, microhabitats may act like nutrients. We hypothesize that animal species, too, show a peaked curve of diversity over productivity. The present data provide a confirmation of the hypothesis using rodent species. We have investigated the number of rodent species along a geographical gradient of increasing rainfall. The gradient extends from extremely poor desert habitats to those with annual rainfall over 300 mm. Because of the aridity , precipitation reflects productivity. The diversity pattern in desert rodents agrees with that predicted by Tilman for plants. It even possesses similar asymmetry, rising steeply then falling slowly. The pattern is duplicated in rocky and sandy habitats, each of which has a distinct and almost nonoverlapping assemblage of species. As mean precipitation is closely correlated with the variability of precipitation, the diversity pattern might also be caused by a decline in the frequency of disturbances, models for which have been proposed by several investigators. PMID:6717592

  12. Towards an integrative model of sociality in caviomorph rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Loren D.; Burger, Joseph Robert; Soto-Gamboa, Mauricio; Sobrero, Raúl; Ebensperger, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    In the late 1990s and early 2000s it was recognized that behavioral ecologists needed to study the sociality of caviomorph rodents (New World hystricognaths) before generalizations about rodent sociality could be made. Researchers identified specific problems facing individuals interested in caviomorph sociality, including a lack of information on the proximate mechanisms of sociality, role of social environment in development, and geographical or intraspecific variation in social systems. Since then researchers have described the social systems of many previously understudied species, including some with broad geographical ranges. Researchers have done a good job of determining the role of social environments in development and identifying the costs and benefits of social living. However, relatively little is known about the proximate mechanisms of social behavior and fitness consequences, limiting progress toward the development of integrative (evolutionary-mechanistic) models for sociality. To develop integrative models behavioral ecologists studying caviomorph rodents must generate information on the fitness consequences of different types of social organization, brain mechanisms, and endocrine substrates of sociality. We review our current understanding and future directions for research in these conceptual areas. A greater understanding of disease ecology, particularly in species carrying Old World parasites, is needed before we can identify potential links between social phenotypes, mechanism, and fitness. PMID:22328791

  13. TROPICAL FRUIT URBAN FORESTRY AT THE WHITMAN TROPICAL FRUIT PLAZA OF FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noris Ledesma; Richard J. Campbell; Juan Valls

    South Florida horticulture continues to evolve. Changes are due to urbanization, governmental regulation, foreign competition and the needs of the growing community. An urban forestry project was initiated in 2004 at FTBG in conjunction with the Whitman Tropical Fruit Pavilion. This project provides the home owner and estate gardener with examples of tropical fruit in the urban landscape. The formal

  14. HERBIVORY AND PLANT DEFENSES IN TROPICAL FORESTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. D. Coley; J. A. Barone

    1996-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the ecological and evolutionary consequences of plant- herbivore interactions in tropical forests. We note first that herbivory rates are higher in tropical forests than in temperate ones and that, in contrast to leaves in temperate forests, most of the damage to tropical leaves occurs when they are young and expanding. Leaves in dry tropical forests

  15. Forest rodents provide directed dispersal of Jeffrey pine seeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, J.S.; Wall, S.B.V.; Jenkins, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    Some species of animals provide directed dispersal of plant seeds by transporting them nonrandomly to microsites where their chances of producing healthy seedlings are enhanced. We investigated whether this mutualistic interaction occurs between granivorous rodents and Jeffrey pine (Pinus Jeffreyi) in the eastern Sierra Nevada by comparing the effectiveness of random abiotic seed dispersal with the dispersal performed by four species of rodents: deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), yellow-pine and long-eared chipmunks (Tamias amoenus and T. quadrimaculatus), and golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis). We conducted two caching studies using radio-labeled seeds, the first with individual animals in field enclosures and the second with a community of rodents in open forest. We used artificial caches to compare the fates of seeds placed at the range of microsites and depths used by animals with the fates of seeds dispersed abiotically. Finally, we examined the distribution and survival of naturally establishing seedlings over an eight-year period. Several lines of evidence suggested that this community of rodents provided directed dispersal. Animals preferred to cache seeds in microsites that were favorable for emergence or survival of seedlings and avoided caching in microsites in which seedlings fared worst. Seeds buried at depths typical of animal caches (5-25 mm) produced at least five times more seedlings than did seeds on the forest floor. The four species of rodents differed in the quality of dispersal they provided. Small, shallow caches made by deer mice most resembled seeds dispersed by abiotic processes, whereas many of the large caches made by ground squirrels were buried too deeply for successful emergence of seedlings. Chipmunks made the greatest number of caches within the range of depths and microsites favorable for establishment of pine seedlings. Directed dispersal is an important element of the population dynamics of Jeffrey pine, a dominant tree species in the eastern Sierra Nevada. Quantifying the occurrence and dynamics of directed dispersal in this and other cases will contribute to better understanding of mutualistic coevolution of plants and animals and to more effective management of ecosystems in which directed dispersal is a keystone process. ?? 2009 by the Ecological society of America.

  16. Forest rodents provide directed dispersal of Jeffrey pine seeds.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Jennifer S; Vander Wall, Stephen B; Jenkins, Stephen H

    2009-03-01

    Some species of animals provide directed dispersal of plant seeds by transporting them nonrandomly to microsites where their chances of producing healthy seedlings are enhanced. We investigated whether this mutualistic interaction occurs between granivorous rodents and Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) in the eastern Sierra Nevada by comparing the effectiveness of random abiotic seed dispersal with the dispersal performed by four species of rodents: deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), yellow-pine and long-eared chipmunks (Tamias amoenus and T. quadrimaculatus), and golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis). We conducted two caching studies using radio-labeled seeds, the first with individual animals in field enclosures and the second with a community of rodents in open forest. We used artificial caches to compare the fates of seeds placed at the range of microsites and depths used by animals with the fates of seeds dispersed abiotically. Finally, we examined the distribution and survival of naturally establishing seedlings over an eight-year period. Several lines of evidence suggested that this community of rodents provided directed dispersal. Animals preferred to cache seeds in microsites that were favorable for emergence or survival of seedlings and avoided caching in microsites in which seedlings fared worst. Seeds buried at depths typical of animal caches (5-25 mm) produced at least five times more seedlings than did seeds on the forest floor. The four species of rodents differed in the quality of dispersal they provided. Small, shallow caches made by deer mice most resembled seeds dispersed by abiotic processes, whereas many of the large caches made by ground squirrels were buried too deeply for successful emergence of seedlings. Chipmunks made the greatest number of caches within the range of depths and microsites favorable for establishment of pine seedlings. Directed dispersal is an important element of the population dynamics of Jeffrey pine, a dominant tree species in the eastern Sierra Nevada. Quantifying the occurrence and dynamics of directed dispersal in this and other cases will contribute to better understanding of mutualistic coevolution of plants and animals and to more effective management of ecosystems in which directed dispersal is a keystone process. PMID:19341138

  17. World Health Organization: Tropical Diseases

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This World Health Organization website feature focuses on tropical diseases. For visitors unfamiliar with which diseases out there are considered tropical, this website provides informative fact sheets on fourteen different tropical diseases. To view the factsheets, visitors should click on "Fact Sheets on Tropical Diseases", under the General Information heading near the top of the homepage. The fact sheets cover topics such as "Symptoms", "Transmission", "Treatment", "Prevention", "Economic Cost", and "Diagnosis". Under the "Multimedia" heading near the top of the homepage, visitors can click on the link "10 Facts on Neglected Tropical Diseases", to be taken to a slide show, via the link near the bottom of the page entitled "Read More About Neglected Tropical Diseases". The slide show explains that a neglected tropical disease is a disease that costs little to prevent, does not spread to wealthy areas and is of little priority to pharmaceutical companies when it comes to research and development of medicines for them. Under the Statistics heading near the bottom of the homepage, visitors can click on a link to get to the "Global Health Database", which contains "standardized data and statistics for infectious diseases at country, regional, and global levels."

  18. Transitions between Andean and Amazonian centers of endemism in the radiation of some arboreal rodents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The tropical Andes and Amazon are among the richest regions of endemism for mammals, and each has given rise to extensive in situ radiations. Various animal lineages have radiated ex situ after colonizing one of these regions from the other: Amazonian clades of dendrobatid frogs and passerine birds may have Andean ancestry, and transitions from the Amazon to Andes may be even more common. To examine biogeographic transitions between these regions, we investigated the evolutionary history of three clades of rodents in the family Echimyidae: bamboo rats (Dactylomys-Olallamys-Kannabateomys), spiny tree-rats (Mesomys-Lonchothrix), and brush-tailed rats (Isothrix). Each clade is distributed in both the Andes and Amazonia, and is more diverse in the lowlands. We used two mitochondrial (cyt-b and 12S) and three nuclear (GHR, vWF, and RAG1) markers to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships. Tree topologies and ancestral geographic ranges were then used to determine whether Andean forms were basal to or derived from lowland radiations. Results Four biogeographic transitions are identified among the generic radiations. The bamboo rat clade unambiguously originated in the Amazon ca. 9 Ma, followed by either one early transition to the Andes (Olallamys) and a later move to the Amazon (Dactylomys), or two later shifts to the Andes (one in each genus). The Andean species of both Dactylomys and Isothrix are sister to their lowland species, raising the possibility that highland forms colonized the Amazon Basin. However, uncertainty in their reconstructed ancestral ranges obscures the origin of these transitions. The lone Andean species of Mesomys is confidently nested within the lowland radiation, thereby indicating an Amazon-to-Andes transition ca. 2 Ma. Conclusions Differences in the timing of these biogeographic transitions do not appear to explain the different polarities of these trees. Instead, even within the radiation of a single family, both Andean and Amazonian centers of endemism appear enriched by lineages that originated in the other region. Our survey of other South American lineages suggests a pattern of reciprocal exchange between these regions—among mammals, birds, amphibians, and insects we found no fewer than 87 transitions between the Andes and Amazon from Miocene-Pleistocene. Because no clear trend emerges between the timing and polarity of transitions, or in their relative frequency, we suggest that reciprocal exchange between tropical highland and lowland faunas in South America has been a continual process since ca. 12 Ma. PMID:24015814

  19. Tropical Ice Cores Measure Climate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NOVA scienceNOW

    This video profiles glaciologist Lonnie Thompson and his research into tropical mountain glaciers as a way to understand climate history. Beginning in the 1970s, Thompson recognized that tropical ice cores contain information relating to tropical climate phenomena, including El NiÃo events and monsoons. These phenomena are not archived in ice from polar regions. Thompson explains that his archive of ice cores is full of clues that, taken together with records collected from around the world, can help scientists create a timeline that tells Earth's climate story.

  20. Cross-reactivity of secondary antibodies against African rodents and application for sero-surveillance.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ichiro; Hang'ombe, Bernard Mudenda; Sawa, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Orba, Yasuko; Ishii, Akihiro; Thomas, Yuka; Isozumi, Rie; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Mweene, Aaron S; Takada, Ayato; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Arikawa, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    A total of 466 rodents were captured in the Republic of Zambia from 2006 to 2010. Based on morphological observations and phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial gene sequences, rodents were divided into 10 groups consisting of 39 Rattus rodents, 263 multimammate rats, 18 other Murinae rodents, 95 gerbils, 11 pouched mice, 1 giant-pouched rat, 38 fat mice and 1 dormouse. Rodent antibodies except that from Rattus were examined for their cross-reactivity to commercially available antibody detection reagents. Anti-mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) was most cross-reactive to heterologous antibodies including multimammate rat, gerbil, pouched mouse and fat mouse. Thus, anti-mouse IgG would be a useful detection tool in serological examination of the Zambian rodent population. Preliminary sero-surveillance for plague, leptospirosis and hantavirus infection was performed by ELISA. PMID:23386359

  1. The African lily Massonia depressa (Hyacinthaceae) the First Monocotyledon Discovered to be Pollinated by Rodents

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Anton Pauw (University of Cape Town, Department of Botany ADR; POSTAL)

    2004-03-09

    A nocturnal rodent, Gerbilluris paeba, feeds on the copious amounts of jelly-like nectar produced by flowers of the African lily Massonia depressa (Hyacinthaceae). This lily, which has flowers situated at ground level, is the first monocotyledon discovered to be pollinated by rodents. The striking similarities between the flowers of M. depressa and those of unrelated rodent-pollinated Protea spp. (Proteaceae) provide strong support for the concept of convergent floral syndromes.

  2. Characteristics associated with contact with rodents in, around, and outside homes in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S

    2015-04-01

    Rodents are an important reservoir for zoonotic diseases. To enhance the evidence on the human-rodent interface, this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011 to investigate characteristics associated with rodent contact in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand. A standardized, interviewer-administered questionnaire elicited information from 201 adults (101 males and 100 females). Overall, 86.6% of participants reported encountering or seeing evidence of rodents in or near the home, whereas 57.2% encountered rodents while working with crops. Encountering rodents in or near the home was positively associated with the number of agricultural activities, whereas encountering rodents during crop work was positively associated with perceiving that disease can be acquired from rodents, the number of food crops grown, the number of agricultural activities, and living in a house with wooden walls. Surprisingly, neither outcome was associated appreciably with gender, age, or setting (urban, forest, or agricultural). These results provide information on the potential risk of rodent-borne zoonoses; this evidence has implications for risk communication strategies in this province and likely elsewhere. PMID:25646260

  3. Deforestation: Tropical Forests in Decline

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Canadian International Development Agency has placed online a draft report entitled "Deforestation: Tropical Forests in Decline." The report examines "the extent of deforestation in developing countries, its causes and consequences, and prospect of more sustainable land use alternatives."

  4. Tropical Ecosystems and Ecological Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Patrick L.

    2000-09-01

    Over one third of the earth's terrestrial surface is situated in the tropics, with environments ranging from hot deserts to tropical rain forests. This introductory textbook, aimed at students studying tropical ecology, provides a comprehensive guide to the major tropical biomes and is unique in its balanced coverage of both aquatic and terrestrial systems. The volume considers the human ecological dimension, covering issues such as population growth, urbanization, agriculture and fisheries, natural resource use, and pollution. It is international in scope and addresses global issues such as conservation of biodiversity, climate change, and the concept of ecological sustainability. The text is supported throughout by boxes containing supplementary material on a range of topics and organisms, mathematical concepts and calculations, and is enlivened with clear line diagrams, maps, and photographs. A cross-referenced glossary, extensive bibliography, and comprehensive index are included as further aids to study.

  5. Mammary gland neoplasia in long-term rodent studies.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I H; Russo, J

    1996-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most frequent spontaneous malignancy diagnosed in women in the western world, is continuously increasing in incidence in industrialized nations. Although breast cancer develops in women as the result of a combination of external and endogenous factors such as exposure to ionizing radiation, diet, socioeconomic status, and endocrinologic, familial, or genetic factors, no specific etiologic agent(s) or the mechanisms responsible of the disease has been identified as yet. Thus, experimental models that exhibit the same complex interactions are needed for testing various mechanisms and for assessing the carcinogenic potential of given chemicals. Rodent mammary carcinomas represent such a model to a great extent because, in these species, mammary cancer is a multistep complex process that can be induced by either chemicals, radiation, viruses, or genetic factors. Long-term studies in rodent models have been particularly useful for dissecting the initiation, promotion, and progression steps of carcinogenesis. The susceptibility of the rodent mammary gland to develop neoplasms has made this organ a unique target for testing the carcinogenic potential of specific genotoxic chemicals and environmental agents. Mammary tumors induced by indirect- or direct-acting carcinogens such as 7, 12-dimethlbenz(a)anthracene or N-methyl-N-nitrosourea are, in general, hormone dependent adenocarcinomas whose incidence, number of tumors per animal, tumor latency, and tumor type are influenced by the age, reproductive history, and endocarinologic milieu of the host at the time of carcinogen exposure. Rodent models are informative in the absence of human data. They have provided valuable information on the dose and route of administration to be used and optimal host conditions for eliciting maximal tumorigenic response. Studies of the influence of normal gland development on the pathogenesis of chemically induced mammary carcinomas have clarified the role of differentiation in cancer initiation. Comparative studies with the development of the human breast and the pathogenesis of breast cancer have contributed to validate rodent-to-human extrapolations. However, it has not been definitively established what type of information is necessary for human risk assessment, whether currently toxicity testing methodologies are sufficient for fulfilling those needs, or whether treatment-induced tumorigenic responses in rodents are predictive of potential human risk. An alternative to the traditional bioassays are mechanism-based toxicology and molecular and cellular approaches, combined with comparative in vitro systems. These approaches might allow the rapid screen of chemicals for setting priorities for further studies to determine the dose-response relationship for chemical effects at low doses, to assess effects other than mutagenesis and/or tumorigenesis, or to establish qualitative and quantitative relationships of biomarkers to toxic effects. Until there is enough information on the predictive value of mechanism-based toxicology for risk assessment, this approach should be used in conjunction with and validated by the traditional in vivo long-term bioassays. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 8. A Figure 8. B Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 12. Figure 13. Figure 14. Figure 15. Figure 16. Figure 17. Figure 18. Figure 19. Figure 20. Figure 21. Figure 22. Figure 23. Figure 24. Figure 25. Figure 26. PMID:8899375

  6. Rodent Models and Behavioral Outcomes of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Sydney A.; Schmidt, Christine E.; Schallert, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Rodent spinal cord injury (SCI) models have been developed to examine functional and physiological deficits after spinal cord injury with the hope that these models will elucidate information about human SCI. Models are needed to examine possible treatments and to understand histopathology after SCI; however, they should be considered carefully and chosen based on the goals of the study being performed. Contusion, compression, transection, and other models exist and have the potential to reveal important information about SCI that may be related to human SCI and the outcomes of treatment and timing of intervention. PMID:25309824

  7. Polycystic echinococcosis in Colombia: the larval cestodes in infected rodents.

    PubMed

    Morales, G A; Guzman, V H; Wells, E A; Angel, D

    1979-07-01

    Described are the characteristics of the polycystic larval cestodes found in an endemic area of echinococcosis in the Easter Plains of Colombia and the tissue reaction evoked in infected rodents. Of 848 free-ranging animals examined, polycystic hydatids were found in 44/93 Cuniculus paca and 1/369 Proechimys sp. None of 20 Dasyprocta fuliginosa examined was infected, but hunters provided a heart with hydatid cysts and information about two additional animals with infected livers. Recognition of an endemic area of polycystic echinococcosis provides a means to investigate the life cycle of the parasites and to study the histogenesis of the larval cestodes in susceptible laboratory animals. PMID:501848

  8. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Taylor, Larry

    2008-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. NASA established the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, LADTAG has recommended investigating its toxicity in the lungs of laboratory animals. After receiving this recommendation, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust in exposed rodents. The rodent pulmonary toxicity studies proposed here are the same as those proposed by the LADTAG. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal instillation (ITI). This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. We succeeded in completing an ITI study on JSC-1 lunar dust simulant in mice (Lam et al., Inhalation Toxicology 14:901-916, 2002, and Inhalation Toxicology 14: 917-928, 2002), and have conducted a pilot ITI study to examine the acute toxicity of an Apollo lunar (highland) dust sample. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies have been planned to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The ITI results will also be useful for choosing an exposure concentration for the animal inhalation study on a selected lunar dust sample, which is included as a part of this proposal. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The simulant exposure will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of ITI and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  9. Integrated Pest Management: Conducting Urban Rodent Surveys i Suggested citation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Integrated pest management: conducting urban

    E-print Network

    #12;Integrated Pest Management: Conducting Urban Rodent Surveys i Suggested citation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Integrated pest management: conducting urban rodent surveys. Atlanta: US...........................................................................................................................2 Characteristics of Urban Rodent Surveys

  10. Molecular detection of bacterial contamination in gnotobiotic rodent units

    PubMed Central

    Packey, Christopher D; Shanahan, Michael T; Manick, Sayeed; Bower, Maureen A; Ellermann, Melissa; Tonkonogy, Susan L; Carroll, Ian M; Sartor, R Balfour

    2013-01-01

    Gnotobiotic rodents provide an important technique to study the functional roles of commensal bacteria in host physiology and pathophysiology. To ensure sterility, these animals must be screened frequently for contamination. The traditional screening approaches of culturing and Gram staining feces have inherent limitations, as many bacteria are uncultivable and fecal Gram stains are difficult to interpret. Thus, we developed and validated molecular methods to definitively detect and identify contamination in germ-free (GF) and selectively colonized animals. Fresh fecal pellets were collected from rodents housed in GF isolators, spontaneously contaminated ex-GF isolators, selectively colonized isolators and specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions. DNA isolated from mouse and rat fecal samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to quantitative PCR (qPCR) using universal primers that amplify the 16S rRNA gene from all bacterial groups. PCR products were sequenced to identify contaminating bacterial species. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR profiles verified bacterial inoculation of selectively colonized animals. These PCR techniques more accurately detected and identified GF isolator contamination than current standard approaches. These molecular techniques can be utilized to more definitively screen GF and selectively colonized animals for bacterial contamination when Gram stain and/or culture results are un-interpretable or inconsistent. PMID:23887190

  11. Preparing undercut model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis in rodents.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenhui; Ping, Xingjie; Gao, Jianhua; Jin, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Partially isolated cortex ("undercut") is an animal model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. The surgical procedure involves cutting through the sensorimotor cortex and the underneath white matter (undercut) so that a specific region of the cerebral cortex is largely isolated from the neighboring cortex and subcortical regions(1-3). After a latency of two or more weeks following the surgery, epileptiform discharges can be recorded in brain slices from rodents(1); and electrical or behavior seizures can be observed in vivo from other species such as cat and monkey(4-6). This well established animal model is efficient to generate and mimics several important characteristics of traumatic brain injury. However, it is technically challenging attempting to make precise cortical lesions in the small rodent brain with a free hand. Based on the procedure initially established in Dr. David Prince's lab at the Stanford University(1), here we present an improved technique to perform a surgery for the preparation of this model in mice and rats. We demonstrate how to make a simple surgical device and use it to gain a better control of cutting depth and angle to generate more precise and consistent results. The device is easy to make, and the procedure is quick to learn. The generation of this animal model provides an efficient system for study on the mechanisms of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. PMID:21946525

  12. Visual landmarks facilitate rodent spatial navigation in virtual reality environments

    PubMed Central

    Youngstrom, Isaac A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    Because many different sensory modalities contribute to spatial learning in rodents, it has been difficult to determine whether spatial navigation can be guided solely by visual cues. Rodents moving within physical environments with visual cues engage a variety of nonvisual sensory systems that cannot be easily inhibited without lesioning brain areas. Virtual reality offers a unique approach to ask whether visual landmark cues alone are sufficient to improve performance in a spatial task. We found that mice could learn to navigate between two water reward locations along a virtual bidirectional linear track using a spherical treadmill. Mice exposed to a virtual environment with vivid visual cues rendered on a single monitor increased their performance over a 3-d training regimen. Training significantly increased the percentage of time avatars controlled by the mice spent near reward locations in probe trials without water rewards. Neither improvement during training or spatial learning for reward locations occurred with mice operating a virtual environment without vivid landmarks or with mice deprived of all visual feedback. Mice operating the vivid environment developed stereotyped avatar turning behaviors when alternating between reward zones that were positively correlated with their performance on the probe trial. These results suggest that mice are able to learn to navigate to specific locations using only visual cues presented within a virtual environment rendered on a single computer monitor. PMID:22345484

  13. Holocene vegetation history from fossil rodent middens near Arequipa, Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmgren, C.A.; Betancourt, J.L.; Rylander, K.A.; Roque, J.; Tovar, O.; Zeballos, H.; Linares, E.; Quade, Jay

    2001-01-01

    Rodent (Abrocoma, Lagidium, Phyllotis) middens collected from 2350 to 2750 m elevation near Arequipa, Peru (16??S), provide an ???9600-yr vegetation history of the northern Atacama Desert, based on identification of >50 species of plant macrofossils. These midden floras show considerable stability throughout the Holocene, with slightly more mesophytic plant assemblages in the middle Holocene. Unlike the southwestern United States, rodent middens of mid-Holocene age are common. In the Arequipa area, the midden record does not reflect any effects of a mid-Holocene mega drought proposed from the extreme lowstand (100 m below modern levels, >6000 to 3500 yr B.P.) of Lake Titicaca, only 200 km east of Arequipa. This is perhaps not surprising, given other evidence for wetter summers on the Pacific slope of the Andes during the middle Holocene as well as the poor correlation of summer rainfall among modern weather stations in the central AndesAtacama Desert. The apparent difference in paleoclimatic reconstructions suggests that it is premature to relate changes observed during the Holocene to changes in El Nin??o Southern Oscillation modes. ?? 2001 University of Washington.

  14. New Insights from Rodent Models of Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Rodent models of fatty liver disease are essential research tools that provide a window into disease pathogenesis and a testing ground for prevention and treatment. Models come in many varieties involving dietary and genetic manipulations, and sometimes both. High-energy diets that induce obesity do not uniformly cause fatty liver disease; this has prompted close scrutiny of specific macronutrients and nutrient combinations to determine which have the greatest potential for hepatotoxicity. At the same time, diets that do not cause obesity or the metabolic syndrome but do cause severe steatohepatitis have been exploited to study factors important to progressive liver injury, including cell death, oxidative stress, and immune activation. Rodents with a genetic predisposition to overeating offer yet another model in which to explore the evolution of fatty liver disease. In some animals that overeat, steatohepatitis can develop even without resorting to a high-energy diet. Importantly, these models and others have been used to document that aerobic exercise can prevent or reduce fatty liver disease. This review focuses primarily on lessons learned about steatohepatitis from manipulations of diet and eating behavior. Numerous additional insights about hepatic lipid metabolism, which have been gained from genetically engineered mice, are also mentioned. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 535–550. PMID:21126212

  15. Chromosomal instability in rodents caused by pollution from Baikonur cosmodrome.

    PubMed

    Kolumbayeva, Saule; Begimbetova, Dinara; Shalakhmetova, Tamara; Saliev, Timur; Lovinskaya, Anna; Zhunusbekova, Benazir

    2014-09-01

    An assessment of the health status of ecosystems exposed to man-made pollution is a vital issue for many countries. Particularly it concerns the consequences of contamination caused by the activity of the space industry. Each rocket launch is accompanied by the introduction of parts of the rocket propellant into the environment. This study aims to scrutinize the effect of the components of rocket fuel on the induction of lipid peroxidation and chromosomal aberrations on rodents inhabiting the area exposed to pollution from Baikonur cosmodrome. The results showed the increase of the level of lipid hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde in the livers of Citellus pygmaeus Pallas and Mus musculus L., which indicates an augmentation of free radical activity and DNA damage. The cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow cells revealed that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations was a few times higher in the rodents from contaminated territory. The signs of oxidative stress and high level of chromosomal aberrations indicate the environmental impact of the cosmodrome, and its possible toxic and mutagenic effects on ecosystems. PMID:24990120

  16. Rodent ectoparasites from two locations in northwestern Florida.

    PubMed

    Durden, L A; Hu, R; Oliver, J H; Cilek, J E

    2000-12-01

    From Feb.-Apr. 1999, 19 species of ectoparasitic arthropods (2 sucking lice, 4 fleas, 4 ticks, 2 mesostigmatid mites, 5 chiggers, 2 fur mites) were recovered from 106 rodents belonging to 5 species (cotton mouse, Peromyscus gossypinus, n = 64; cotton rat, Sigmodon hispidus, n = 23; eastern woodrat, Neotoma floridana, n = 9; golden mouse, Ochrotomys nuttalli, n = 9; eastern gray squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis, n = 1) at Tall Timbers Research Station, Leon County, Florida. During the same period, 13 species of ectoparasites (2 sucking lice, 1 flea, 3 ticks, 3 mesostigmatid mites, 2 chiggers, 2 fur mites) were recovered from 57 rodents belonging to 3 species (S. hispidus, n = 40; black rat, Rattus rattus, n = 16; S. carolinensis, n = 1) from Panama City, Bay County, Florida. Noteworthy ectoparasite records include Ixodes minor from both sites, which extends the known geographical range of this tick, and Stenoponia americana from Tall Timbers that represents the second documented Florida record of this flea. Potential tick vectors (Dermacentor variabilis and Ixodes scapularis) of zoonotic pathogens (Rickettsia rickettsii and Borrelia burgdorferi) were collected at both sites. On S. hispidus, fleas were more prevalent at Tall Timbers but sucking lice, chiggers, ticks, mesostigmatid and listrophorid mites all were more prevalent at the Panama City site. Arthropods recovered from arboreal nests (n = 3) of O. nuttalli at Tall Timbers included 3 species of ectoparasites (1 tick, 2 laelapid mites). PMID:11217221

  17. Causal evidence between monsoon and evolution of rhizomyine rodents.

    PubMed

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Knoll, Fabien; Wan, Shiming; Flynn, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    The modern Asian monsoonal systems are currently believed to have originated around the end of the Oligocene following a crucial step of uplift of the Tibetan-Himalayan highlands. Although monsoon possibly drove the evolution of many mammal lineages during the Neogene, no evidence thereof has been provided so far. We examined the evolutionary history of a clade of rodents, the Rhizomyinae, in conjunction with our current knowledge of monsoon fluctuations over time. The macroevolutionary dynamics of rhizomyines were analyzed within a well-constrained phylogenetic framework coupled with biogeographic and evolutionary rate studies. The evolutionary novelties developed by these rodents were surveyed in parallel with the fluctuations of the Indian monsoon so as to evaluate synchroneity and postulate causal relationships. We showed the existence of three drops in biodiversity during the evolution of rhizomyines, all of which reflected elevated extinction rates. Our results demonstrated linkage of monsoon variations with the evolution and biogeography of rhizomyines. Paradoxically, the evolution of rhizomyines was accelerated during the phases of weakening of the monsoons, not of strengthening, most probably because at those intervals forest habitats declined, which triggered extinction and progressive specialization toward a burrowing existence. PMID:25759260

  18. The utility of rodent models of autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lazaro, Maria; Golshani, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review discusses the ways rodent models of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been used to gain critical information convergent molecular pathways, the mechanisms underlying altered microcircuit structure and function, and as a screen for potential cutting edge-treatments. Recent Findings There is convergent evidence that impaired developmental pruning of connections may be a common finding among several mouse models of ASDs. Recent studies have uncovered impaired autophagy by pathological mTOR activation as a potential contributor to microcircuit dysfunction and behavior. ASD related disinhibition and exaggerated synaptic plasticity in multiple distinct circuits in cortex and reward circuits in striatum also contribute to social dysfunction and repetitive behaviors. New exciting molecular therapeutic techniques have reversed cognitive deficits in models of ASD, indicating that mouse models could be used for preclinical translational studies of new treatments. Summary Rodent models of ASDs coupled to new emerging technologies for genome editing, cell-specific functional and structural imaging, and neuronal activity manipulation will yield critical insights into ASD pathogenesis and fuel the emergence of new treatments. PMID:25734952

  19. Studying Autism in Rodent Models: Reconciling Endophenotypes with Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Andrew; Gilby, Krista L.; Hill-Yardin, Elisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients commonly exhibit a variety of comorbid traits including seizures, anxiety, aggressive behavior, gastrointestinal problems, motor deficits, abnormal sensory processing, and sleep disturbances for which the cause is unknown. These features impact negatively on daily life and can exaggerate the effects of the core diagnostic traits (social communication deficits and repetitive behaviors). Studying endophenotypes relevant to both core and comorbid features of ASD in rodent models can provide insight into biological mechanisms underlying these disorders. Here we review the characterization of endophenotypes in a selection of environmental, genetic, and behavioral rodent models of ASD. In addition to exhibiting core ASD-like behaviors, each of these animal models display one or more endophenotypes relevant to comorbid features including altered sensory processing, seizure susceptibility, anxiety-like behavior, and disturbed motor functions, suggesting that these traits are indicators of altered biological pathways in ASD. However, the study of behaviors paralleling comorbid traits in animal models of ASD is an emerging field and further research is needed to assess altered gastrointestinal function, aggression, and disorders of sleep onset across models. Future studies should include investigation of these endophenotypes in order to advance our understanding of the etiology of this complex disorder. PMID:23898259

  20. Spontaneous and transgenic rodent models of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Jurjus, Abdo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder with many different putative influences mediating disease onset, severity, progression and diminution. Spontaneous natural IBD is classically expressed as Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) commonly found in primates; lymphoplasmocytic enteritis, eosinophilic gastritis and colitis, and ulcerative colitis with neuronal hyperplasia in dogs; and colitis in horses. Spontaneous inflammatory bowel disease has been noted in a number of rodent models which differ in genetic strain background, induced mutation, microbiota influences and immunopathogenic pathways. Histological lesions in Crohn's Disease feature noncaseating granulomatous inflammation while UC lesions typically exhibit ulceration, lamina propria inflammatory infiltrates and lack of granuloma development. Intestinal inflammation caused by CD and UC is also associated with increased incidence of intestinal neoplasia. Transgenic murine models have determined underlying etiological influences and appropriate therapeutic targets in IBD. This literature review will discuss current opinion and findings in spontaneous IBD, highlight selected transgenic rodent models of IBD and discuss their respective pathogenic mechanisms. It is very important to provide accommodation of induced putative deficits in activities of daily living and to assess discomfort and pain levels in the face of significant morbidity and/or mortality in these models. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis, and evaluating ways in which they influence disease expression represent potential investigative approaches with the greatest potential for new discoveries.

  1. Functional Evolution of the Feeding System in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Philip G.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Fagan, Michael J.; Herrel, Anthony; Pataky, Todd C.; Jeffery, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The masticatory musculature of rodents has evolved to enable both gnawing at the incisors and chewing at the molars. In particular, the masseter muscle is highly specialised, having extended anteriorly to originate from the rostrum. All living rodents have achieved this masseteric expansion in one of three ways, known as the sciuromorph, hystricomorph and myomorph conditions. Here, we used finite element analysis (FEA) to investigate the biomechanical implications of these three morphologies, in a squirrel, guinea pig and rat. In particular, we wished to determine whether each of the three morphologies is better adapted for either gnawing or chewing. Results show that squirrels are more efficient at muscle-bite force transmission during incisor gnawing than guinea pigs, and that guinea pigs are more efficient at molar chewing than squirrels. This matches the known diet of nuts and seeds that squirrels gnaw, and of grasses that guinea pigs grind down with their molars. Surprisingly, results also indicate that rats are more efficient as well as more versatile feeders than both the squirrel and guinea pig. There seems to be no compromise in biting efficiency to accommodate the wider range of foodstuffs and the more general feeding behaviour adopted by rats. Our results show that the morphology of the skull and masticatory muscles have allowed squirrels to specialise as gnawers and guinea pigs as chewers, but that rats are high-performance generalists, which helps explain their overwhelming success as a group. PMID:22558427

  2. MORPHOLOGICALLY MIXED CHEMICALELECTRICAL SYNAPSES FORMED BY PRIMARY AFFERENTS IN RODENT VESTIBULAR NUCLEI

    E-print Network

    Rash, John E.

    /electrical synapses in the lateral vestibular nucleus of rat were described over 40 years ago. Because gap junctionsMORPHOLOGICALLY MIXED CHEMICAL­ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES FORMED BY PRIMARY AFFERENTS IN RODENT VESTIBULAR the distribution and cellular localization of electrical synapses in the adult and develop- ing rodent vestibular

  3. Serosurvey of Wild Rodents for Hantaviruses in Panama, 2000-2002

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Salazar-Bravo; Blas Armien; Gerardo Suzan; Anibal Armien; Luis A. Ruedas; Mario Avila

    Five hundred fifty-six samples rep- resenting 24 species of small mammals (two species of marsupials and 22 rodents) were col- lected in Panama between February 2000 and July 2002. The samples were examined for an- tibodies to hantaviruses by means of enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay or immunoblot as- says. The serologic results indicated that several rodent species might act as

  4. Cellular Inductive Powering System for Weakly-Linked Resonant Rodent Implants

    E-print Network

    Genov, Roman

    delivery system shown in Fig. 1 for neural interfaces implanted in laboratory rodents. The designCellular Inductive Powering System for Weakly-Linked Resonant Rodent Implants Nima Soltani, Miaad S-- This paper presents a cellular inductive powering system for neural interface devices to facilitate chronic

  5. RAPID AND SIMPLE METHOD FOR SCREENING WILD RODENTS FOR ANTIBODIES TO SIN NOMBRE HANTAVIRUS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce Yee; Ivo A. Wortman; Robert A. Nofchissey; Diane Goade; Stephen G. Bennett; James P. Webb; William Irwin; Brian Hjelle

    Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV) is the primary etiologic agent of hantavirus cardio- pulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the United States and Canada. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome is a zoonotic disease. The most common reservoir is the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), although numerous other species of wild rodent can carry the viruses that cause HCPS throughout the Americas. Infected rodents show no signs

  6. Quantitative analysis of perinatal rodent oligodendrocyte lineage progression and its correlation with human

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Craig; Ning Ling Luo; Douglas J Beardsley; Nasiema Wingate-Pearse; David W Walker; A. Roger Hohimer; Stephen A Back

    2003-01-01

    The development of a rodent model in the perinatal rat or mouse that reproduces the principal features of human perinatal white matter injury (periventricular leukomalacia) has been hampered by uncertainty about the developmental window in the rodent that coincides temporally with cerebral white matter development in the premature infant. We recently determined oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage progression in human cerebral white

  7. RODENT MANAGEMENT FOR SURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION TUBING IN CORN, COTTON, AND PEANUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface drip (SD) irrigation of field crops has been gaining interest in the farming community. However, rodent damage is one of the major drawbacks for SD acceptance. This research documents the cost of repairing drip tubing and effectiveness of several rodent control methods. Four sites were used ...

  8. Diffusion and home range parameters for rodents: Peromyscus maniculatus in New Mexico

    E-print Network

    Diffusion and home range parameters for rodents: Peromyscus maniculatus in New Mexico G. Abramson a in the field. A basic assumption of that model is that the rodent movement may be regarded as diffusive and characterized by a parameter D, the diffusion coefficient. Various contributions to the understanding of animal

  9. Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition of a desertified grassland

    E-print Network

    Davidson, Ana

    Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition. Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition the geographic distributions of black-tailed prairie dogs Cynomys ludovicianus and banner-tailed kangaroo rats

  10. SEGMENTATION OF RODENT BRAINS FROM MRI BASED ON A NOVEL STATISTICAL STRUCTURE PREDICTION METHOD

    E-print Network

    SEGMENTATION OF RODENT BRAINS FROM MRI BASED ON A NOVEL STATISTICAL STRUCTURE PREDICTION METHOD in under- stating the relationships between anatomy and mental diseases in brains. Volumetric analysis the relationships between anatomy and mental diseases in brains [1]. Volumetric analysis of rodent brain structures

  11. Molecular evolution of the nuclear von Willebrand factor gene in mammals and the phylogeny of rodents.

    PubMed

    Huchon, D; Catzeflis, F M; Douzery, E J

    1999-05-01

    Nucleotide sequences of exon 28 of the von Willebrand Factor (vWF) were analyzed for a representative sampling of rodent families and eutherian orders, with one marsupial sequence as outgroup. The aim of this study was to test if inclusion of an increased taxonomic diversity in molecular analyses would shed light on three uncertainties concerning rodent phylogeny: (1) relationships between rodent families, (2) Rodentia monophyly, and (3) the sister group relationship of rodents and lagomorphs. The results did not give evidence of any particular rodent pattern of molecular evolution relative to a general eutherian pattern. Base compositions and rates of evolution of vWF sequences of rodents were in the range of placental variation. The 10 rodent families studied here cluster in five clades: Hystricognathi, Sciuridae and Aplodontidae (Sciuroidea), Muridae, Dipodidae, and Gliridae. Among hystricognaths, the following conclusions are drawn: a single colonization event in South America by Caviomorpha, a paraphyly of Old World and New World porcupines, and an African origin for Old World porcupines. Despite a broader taxonomic sampling diversity, we did not obtain a robust answer to the question of Rodentia monophyly, but in the absence of any other alternative, we cannot reject the hypothesis of a single origin of rodents. Moreover, the phylogenetic position of Lagomorpha remains totally unsettled. PMID:10335651

  12. A preliminary account of the rodents from Pleistocene levels at Grotte des Contrebandiers (Smuggler's Cave), Morocco

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denné N. Reed; W. Andrew Barr

    2010-01-01

    New excavations at Grotte des Contrebandiers, Temara, Morocco, have uncovered a micromammal fauna from Pleistocene levels of the cave comprising at least three rodent genera: Meriones, Gerbillus and Mus. This paper presents a preliminary systematic account of the rodents. Taphonomically, the assemblage is unusual for preserving micromammals in relatively low abundance compared with other, nearby cave sites of similar age.

  13. Teasing Apart the Effects of Seed Size and Energy Content on Rodent Scatter-Hoarding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    Scatter-hoarding rodents are known to play a crucial role in the seed dispersal of many plant species. Numerous studies have indicated that both seed size and the energy content of seeds can affect rodent foraging behavior. However, seed size is usually associated with energy content per seed, making it difficult to isolate how seed size and energy affect rodent foraging preferences. This study used 99 treatments of artificial seeds (11 seed sizes×9 levels of energy content) to tease apart the effect of seed size and energy content on rodent seed-caching behavior. Both seed traits showed significant effects, but their details depended on the stage of the rodent foraging process. Seeds with higher energy content were harvested more rapidly while seed size only had a modest effect on harvest rate. However, after harvesting, seed size showed a much stronger effect on rodent foraging behavior. Rodents’ choice of which seeds to remove and cache, as well as seed dispersal distance, seemed to reflect an optimal seed size. Our findings could be adapted in future studies to gain a better understanding of scatter-hoarding rodent foraging behavior, and the co-evolutionary dynamics between plant seed production and seed dispersers. PMID:25350369

  14. Translating Research from Animal Models: Does It Matter that Our Rodents are So Cold?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Does it matter that preclinical rodent models are routinely housed below their thermoneutral zone and are thereby cold-stressed? We compile evidence showing that rodents housed below their thermoneutral zone are cold-stressed, hypermetalbolic, hypertensive, sleep-deprived, obesi...

  15. Knowledge-Based Learning in Exploratory Science: Learning Rules to Predict Rodent Carcinogenicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yongwon Lee; Bruce G. Buchanan; John M. Aronis

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a multi-year collaboration among computer scientists, toxicologists, chemists, and a statistician, in which the RL induction program was used to assist toxicologists in analyzing relationships among various features of chemical compounds and their carcinogenicity in rodents. Our investigation demonstrated the utility of knowledge-based rule induction in the problem of predicting rodent carcinogenicity and the

  16. Ardiles et al. Memory loss in a rodent natural model of AD Biological Sciences, Neuroscience

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ardiles et al. Memory loss in a rodent natural model of AD 1 Biological Sciences, Neuroscience Post-synaptic dysfunction is associated with spatial and object recognition memory loss in a natural model of Alzheimer. Memory loss in a rodent natural model of AD 2 Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age

  17. Diversity of gastrointestinal helminths among murid rodents from northern and northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chaisiri, Kittipong; Chaeychomsri, Win; Siruntawineti, Jindawan; Ribas, Alexis; Herbreteau, Vincent; Morand, Serge

    2012-01-01

    The presence of gastrointestinal helminths (GI helminths) was investigated among 725 murid rodents, trapped in various habitats of Nan, Loei and Buri Ram Provinces, Thailand. The study revealed 17 species of rodents infected with 21 species or taxonomic groups of parasites (3 trematodes, 3 cestodes, 14 nematodes and 1 acanthocephalan). The overall prevalence of infection was 57.7% (418/725). Of the gastrointestinal (GI) helminths, the dominant parasitic group was members of the family Trichostrongylidae (24.3%), followed by the cestodes Raillietina sp (17.1%) and Hymenolepis diminuta (8.6%) and the nematode Syphacia muris (8.6%). The GI helminthic infection rates were highest in Mus caroli (81.8%), Mus cervicolor (76.5%), Leopoldamys edwardsi (75.0%), Bandicota indica (71.5%) and Bandicota savilei (71.4%). Highest rodent species richness (RSR) and helminth species richness (HSR) rates were found in Loei, followed by Nan and Buri Ram. The helminth prevalence rate was higher in rodents from Nan, followed by rodents from Loei and Buri Ram. Rodents from irrigated fields had the highest infection rates followed by rodents from upland or dry agricultural areas, forests and domestic habitats. Raillietina sp, Rodentolepis nana (syn. Hymenolepis nana), Hymenolepis diminuta, Moniliformis moniliformis and Cyclodontostomum purvisi, considered zoonotic parasites, were mainly found in rodents from domestic habitats and lowland irrigated fields. PMID:23082550

  18. Effectiveness of six species of rodents as dispersers of singleleaf piñon pine ( Pinus monophylla )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer L. Hollander; Stephen B. Vander Wall

    2004-01-01

    The effectiveness of six species of rodents as dispersers of singleleaf piñon pine (Pinus monophylla) was investigated in field enclosures. The rodent species were Panamint kangaroo rat (Dipodomys panamintinus), Great Basin pocket mouse (Perognathus parvus), pinyon mouse (Peromyscus truei), deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), least chipmunk (Tamias minimus), and white-tailed antelope ground squirrel (Ammospermophilus leucurus). Five measures of seed harvesting and

  19. Sound Localization in a Predatory Rodent, the Northern Grasshopper Mouse (Onychomys leucogaster )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rickye S. Heffner; Henry E. Heffner

    1988-01-01

    A comparison of the ability of mammals to localize sound revealed that among the animals examined to date, none of the rodents have been able to localize as accurately as the carnivores. Because all of these rodents are prey animals, the question arises as to whether their poor localization acuity is a phyletic trait of Rodentia or whether it is

  20. Kasetsart J. (Nat. Sci.) 43 : 106 -117 (2009) Relationship of Parasites and Pathogens Diversity to Rodents in

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2009-01-01

    and trypanosomiasis benefit from the proximity of rodents to domesticated animals to jump from one vector to another organisms to humans. Key words: rodents, zoonoses, parasites, toxoplasmosis, trypanosomiasis 1 Department

  1. 75Vol. 5, No. 1, JanuaryFebruary 1999 Emerging Infectious Diseases Hantaviruses, rodent-borne RNA viruses,

    E-print Network

    reservoir is the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). Hantavirus- infected rodents were identified those associated with Peromyscus species rodents), although the nucleotide sequences of many hantaviruses from Genetic Diversity and Distribution of Peromyscus-Borne Hantaviruses in North America Martha C

  2. Tropical Cyclogenesis in a Tropical Wave Critical Layer: Easterly Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerton, T. J.; Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, is identified herein as the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The recirculating Kelvin cat's eye within the critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis at the center of the cat's eye, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally the associated Lagrangian motions, one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. In this co-moving frame, streamlines are approximately equivalent to particle trajectories. The closed circulation is quasi-stationary, and a dividing streamline separates air within the cat's eye from air outside.

  3. Rodents on pig and chicken farms – a potential threat to human and animal health

    PubMed Central

    Backhans, Annette; Fellström, Claes

    2012-01-01

    Rodents can cause major problems through spreading various diseases to animals and humans. The two main species of rodents most commonly found on farms around the world are the house mouse (Mus musculus) and the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus). Both species are omnivorous and can breed year-round under favourable conditions. This review describes the occurrence of pathogens in rodents on specialist pig and chicken farms, which are usually closed units with a high level of bio-security. However, wild rodents may be difficult to exclude completely, even from these sites, and can pose a risk of introducing and spreading pathogens. This article reviews current knowledge regarding rodents as a hazard for spreading disease on farms. Most literature available regards zoonotic pathogens, while the literature regarding pathogens that cause disease in farm animals is more limited. PMID:22957130

  4. Genetic evidence of hantavirus infections in wild rodents from northwestern Colombia.

    PubMed

    Londoño, Andres F; Díaz, Francisco J; Agudelo-Flórez, Piedad; Levis, Silvana; Rodas, Juan D

    2011-06-01

    This report builds on recent serological evidence for the presence of hantavirus in northern Colombia by providing sequence-specific and phylogenetic data of hantavirus infections in wild rodents. From August 2007 to August 2008, 354 rodent specimens representing four families were collected in the northwestern Antioquia region of Colombia. Antibodies reactive to Sin Nombre virus and Maciel virus antigens by IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were found in 15 of 109 (14%) Cherries cane rats (Zygodontomys cherriei), the only sigmodontinae rodents captured. Lung tissue samples from 11 of the 15 seropositive rodents were RT-polymerase chain reaction positive for hantavirus RNA, using primers for the S and M genome segments. Eight of these amplicons were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses indicated RNA of a hantavirus closely related to Calabazo virus, previously found in Panama. This is the first report of the genetic characterization of a hantavirus in rodents in Colombia. PMID:21284514

  5. The influence of the cage environment on rodent physiology and behavior: Implications for reproducibility of pre-clinical rodent research.

    PubMed

    Toth, Linda A

    2015-08-01

    The reproducibility of pre-clinical research is an important concern that is now being voiced by constituencies that include the National Institutes of Health, the pharmaceutical industry, Congress, the public and the scientific community. An important facet of performing and publishing well-controlled reproducible pre-clinical research is to stabilize and more completely define the environment of the animal subjects. Scientists who use rodents in research generally recognize the importance of maintaining a stable animal environment. However, despite a theoretical and general awareness of these issues, many may lack a true appreciation of how significantly even seemingly minor variations in the environment can affect research outcomes. The purpose of this article is to help investigators gain a more comprehensive and substantiated understanding of the potentially significant impact of even seemingly minor environmental changes on the animals and the data. An important caveat to this article is that the examples presented were selected from a very large literature, admittedly in order to illustrate certain points. The goal of this article is not to provide an overview of the entire literature on how the environment affects rodents but rather to make preclinical scientists more aware of how these factors can potentially influence the experimental data and contribute to poor reproducibility of research. PMID:25913548

  6. Tropical Forests and the Global Carbon Cycle

    E-print Network

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    Tropical Forests and the Global Carbon Cycle Pascale Poussart Tropical forests play a key role in the global carbon cycle, encompass diverse ecosystems and are sensitive to extreme events such as El Niño

  7. Rodent and flea abundance fail to predict a plague epizootic in black-tailed prairie dogs.

    PubMed

    Brinkerhoff, Robert Jory; Collinge, Sharon K; Ray, Chris; Gage, Ken L

    2010-01-01

    Small rodents are purported to be enzootic hosts of Yersinia pestis and may serve as sources of infection to prairie dogs or other epizootic hosts by direct or flea-mediated transmission. Recent research has shown that small rodent species composition and small rodent flea assemblages are influenced by the presence of prairie dogs, with higher relative abundance of both small rodents and fleas at prairie dog colony sites compared to grasslands without prairie dogs. However, it is unclear if increased rodent or flea abundance predisposes prairie dogs to infection with Y. pestis. We tracked rodent and flea occurrence for 3 years at a number of prairie dog colony sites in Boulder County, Colorado, before, during, and after a local plague epizootic to see if high rodent or flea abundance was associated with plague-affected colonies when compared to colonies that escaped infection. We found no difference in preepizootic rodent abundance or flea prevalence or abundance between plague-positive and plague-negative colonies. Further, we saw no significant before-plague/after-plague change in these metrics at either plague-positive or plague-negative sites. We did, however, find that small rodent species assemblages changed in the year following prairie dog die-offs at plague-affected colonies when compared to unaffected colonies. In light of previous research from this system that has shown that landscape features and proximity to recently plagued colonies are significant predictors of plague occurrence in prairie dogs, we suggest that landscape context is more important to local plague occurrence than are characteristics of rodent or flea species assemblages. PMID:20158331

  8. Ground-based rodent control in a remote Hawaiian rainforest on Maui

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, T.R.; Swinnerton, K.J.; Groombridge, J.J.; Sparklin, B.D.; Brosius, C.N.; Vetter, J.P.; Foster, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Effective control of introduced mammalian predators is essential to the recovery of native bird species in Hawai'i. Between August 1996 and December 2004, introduced rodents were controlled within three home ranges of the Po'ouli Melamprosops phaeosoma, a critically endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper. Rats were controlled using a combination of ground-based rodenticide (0.005% diphacinone) application and snap traps. Beginning in August 2001, we monitored the effectiveness of these rodent control efforts. Relative abundances of Black Rats Rattus rattus and Polynesian Rats R. exulans were measured in each of five snap-trapping grids seven times over a 35-month period. Rat populations decreased inside of the rodent control areas, but control effectiveness differed between rat species. During the first year of monitoring, target control levels for R. rattus were consistently achieved in only one of the rodent control areas. Control techniques were refined in areas failing to meet targets. Subsequently, we achieved target control levels for R. rattus more consistently in all three rodent control areas. However, relative abundances of R. exulans did not differ between rodent control and reference areas, indicating that our rodent control techniques were insufficient to reduce population levels of this species. These findings signify a need for further improvement of rodent control methods in Hawai'i, especially for Polynesian Rats, and demonstrate the critical importance of periodic monitoring of the response of rodent populations to management. In the future, managers may need to design rodent control operations targeting R. rattus and R. exulans independently to achieve best results.

  9. Pollen analyses from a 50 000-yr rodent midden series in the southern Atacama Desert (25° 300' S)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maldonado, Antonio; Betancourt, Julio L.; Latorre, Claudio; Villagran, Carolina

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation in northern Chile is controlled by two great wind belts—the southern westerlies over the southern Atacama and points south (>24° S) and the tropical easterlies over the northern and central Atacama Desert (16–24° S). At the intersection of these summer and winter rainfall regimes, respectively, is a Mars-like landscape consisting of expansive surfaces devoid of vegetation (i.e. absolute desert) except in canyons that originate high enough to experience runoff once every few years. Pollen assemblages from 39 fossil rodent middens in one of these canyons, Quebrada del Chaco (25° 30' S), were used to infer the history of vegetation and precipitation at three elevations (2670–800 m; 3100–3200 m; 3450–3500 m) over the past 50 000 years. When compared to modern conditions and fossil records to the north and south, the pollen evidence indicates more winter precipitation at >52, 40–33, 24–17 k cal.yrBP, more precipitation in both seasons at 17–14 k cal. yr BP, and more summer precipitation from 14–11 k cal. yr BP. Younger middens are scarce at Quebrada del Chaco, and the few Holocene samples indicate hyperarid conditions comparable to today. The only exception is a pollen assemblage that indicates a brief but significant interlude of increased winter precipitation in the last millennium.

  10. Tropical Prediction Center: National Hurricane Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Hurricane Center contains news of active tropical systems; a hurricane awareness section about the hazards of hurricanes and what you can do to help protect yourself, your family, and your property; links to regional tropical cyclone centers; tropical weather outlooks, marine forecasts, and Sea Surface Temperature analyses; blank hurricane tracking charts; and current season summaries and tropical cyclone reports including synoptic history, meteorological statistics, casualties and damages, and the post-analysis best track.

  11. Transplantation in the tropics: lessons on prevention and management of tropical infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Pierrotti, Ligia C; Kotton, Camille N

    2015-07-01

    Tropical infectious diseases (IDs) remain a rare complication in transplant recipients even in tropical settings, but this topic has become increasingly important during the last decade due to multiple factors. Interestingly, non-tropical countries report most of the experiences with tropical diseases. The reported experience from non-endemic regions, however, does not always reflect the experience of endemic areas. Most of the guidelines and recommendations in the literature may not be applicable in tropical settings due to logistical difficulties, cost, and lack of proven benefit. In addition, certain post-transplant prevention measures, as prophylaxis and reducing exposure risk, are not feasible. Nonetheless, risk assessment and post-transplant management of tropical IDs in tropical areas should not be neglected, and clinicians need to have a higher clinical awareness for tropical ID occurring in this population. Herein, we review the more significant tropical ID in transplant patients, focusing on relevant experience reported by tropical settings. PMID:26031964

  12. International Center for Tropical Agriculture

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From cassavas to papayas, the International Center for Tropical Agriculture is concerned with the viability of crops across the world. Specifically, their stated mission is "to reduce hunger and poverty in the tropics through collaborative research that improves agricultural productivity and natural resource management." From their homepage, visitors can read press releases and statements about their most recent findings, and also look over timely documents such as "Integrated Soil Fertility Management in the Tropics" as well as their annual report. The "Research" section is another good place to wander around, as it contains reports on two of their primary areas of interest: agrobiodiversity and the interaction between people and agroecosystems. Finally, it is worth noting that many of the materials here are also available in Spanish.

  13. APR-2 Tropical Cyclone Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, S. L.; Tanelli, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Second Generation Airborne Precipitation Radar (APR-2) participated in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in August and September of 2010, collecting a large volume of data in several tropical systems, including Hurricanes Earl and Karl. Additional measurements of tropical cyclone have been made by APR-2 in experiments prior to GRIP (namely, CAMEX-4, NAMMA, TC4); Table 1 lists all the APR-2 tropical cyclone observations. The APR-2 observations consist of the vertical structure of rain reflectivity at 13.4 and 35.6 GHz, and at both co-polarization and crosspolarization, as well as vertical Doppler measurements and crosswind measurements. APR-2 normally flies on the NASA DC-8 aircraft, as in GRIP, collecting data with a downward looking, cross-track scanning geometry. The scan limits are 25 degrees on either side of the aircraft, resulting in a roughly 10-km swath, depending on the aircraft altitude. Details of the APR-2 observation geometry and performance can be found in Sadowy et al. (2003).The multiparameter nature of the APR-2 measurements makes the collection of tropical cyclone measurements valuable for detailed studies of the processes, microphysics and dynamics of tropical cyclones, as well as weaker systems that are associated with tropical cyclone formation. In this paper, we give a brief overview of how the APR-2 data are processed. We also discuss use of the APR-2 cross-track winds to estimate various quantities of interest in in studies of storm intensification. Finally, we show examples of the standard products and derived information.

  14. Tropical rainforest canopies and climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NIGEL E. STORK; J. BALSTON; G. D. FARQUHAR; P. J. FRANKS; J. A. M. HOLTUM; M. J. LIDDELL

    2007-01-01

    There is less certainty about the impact of climate change on tropical rainforests than on temperate forests because of the comparative lack of background data and because few large scale experiments have been, and are being, carried out in tropical rainforests. Many of the factors critical to the future of tropical rainforests concern canopies, the key processes that take place

  15. Reflections on the tropical deforestation crisis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William F. Laurance

    1999-01-01

    Tropical forests do far more than sustain biodiversity; they are homes to indigenous peoples, pharmacopeias of natural products, and provide vital ecosystem services, such as flood amelioration and soil conservation. At regional and global scales, tropical forests also have a major influence on carbon storage and climate. I highlight these benefits, then assess the pattern and pace of tropical forest

  16. Conserving tropical nature: current challenges for ecologists

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johan T. du Toit; Brian H. Walker; Bruce M. Campbell

    2004-01-01

    Tropical biodiversity continues to erode unabated, which calls for ecologists to address the problem directly, placing less reliance on indirect interventions, such as community-based development schemes. Ecologists must become more assertive in providing scientifically formulated and adaptively managed interventions, involving biodiversity payments, to serve local, regional and global interests in tropical nature. Priorities for tropical ecologists thus include the identification

  17. Tropical curves, their Jacobians and Theta functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grigory Mikhalkin; Ilia Zharkov

    2006-01-01

    We study Jacobian varieties for tropical curves. These are real tori equipped with integral affine structure and symmetric bilinear form. We define tropical counterpart of the theta function and establish tropical versions of the Abel-Jacobi, Riemann-Roch and Riemann theta divisor theorems.

  18. Self-organized criticality in tropical convection?

    E-print Network

    Plant, Robert

    Self-organized criticality in tropical convection? Bob Plant Climate Thermodynamics Workshop 22nd picture of tropical convection What is self-organized criticality? Evidence for SOC in convection 1st attempt at SOC model of convection No conclusions, just open questions SOC in tropical convection? ­ p.1

  19. Glacial climate in the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States)

    1996-06-28

    New findings have caused ideas about the Earth`s climate during the Pleistocene glaciation to change. A consensus seems to be forming that during times of glaciation, climatic conditions in the tropics were quite different from those today. However still to be explained is why strontium-calcium measurements on corals and moble gas measurements of ground water suggest a tropical cooling of 4-6 C while foraminiferal speciation, oxygen isotope, and alkenone results suggest a cooling of no more than 3 C. This article discusses different aspects of the debate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Stress Responses in Tropical Sparrows: Comparing Tropical and Temperate Zonotrichia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haruka Wada; Ignacio T. Moore; Creagh W. Breuner; John C. Wingfield

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal modulation of the adrenocortical response appears to be ubiquitous in mid- to high-latitude vertebrates but has not been investigated in tropical vertebrates. Previous studies dem- onstrate that temperate passerines show seasonality in corti- costerone secretion and corticosteroid binding globulin capac- ities. We examined seasonal and sex differences in the stress response in an equatorial population of Zonotrichia capensis, the

  1. Roles of dental development and adaptation in rodent evolution.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Helder Gomes; Renaud, Sabrina; Charles, Cyril; Le Poul, Yann; Solé, Floréal; Aguilar, Jean-Pierre; Michaux, Jacques; Tafforeau, Paul; Headon, Denis; Jernvall, Jukka; Viriot, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    In paleontology, many changes affecting morphology, such as tooth shape in mammals, are interpreted as ecological adaptations that reflect important selective events. Despite continuing studies, the identification of the genetic bases and key ecological drivers of specific mammalian dental morphologies remains elusive. Here we focus on the genetic and functional bases of stephanodonty, a pattern characterized by longitudinal crests on molars that arose in parallel during the diversification of murine rodents. We find that overexpression of Eda or Edar is sufficient to produce the longitudinal crests defining stephanodonty in transgenic laboratory mice. Whereas our dental microwear analyses show that stephanodonty likely represents an adaptation to highly fibrous diet, the initial and parallel appearance of stephanodonty may have been facilitated by developmental processes, without being necessarily under positive selection. This study demonstrates how combining development and function can help to evaluate adaptive scenarios in the evolution of new morphologies. PMID:24051719

  2. Dependence Potential of Tramadol: Behavioral Pharmacology in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hye Jin; Song, Min Ji; Lee, Kwang-Wook; Kim, Eun Jung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Lee, Yunje; Seong, Won-Keun; Hong, Sa-Ik; Jang, Choon-Gon; Yoo, Han Sang; Jeong, Ho-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Tramadol is an opioid analgesic agent that has been the subject of a series of case reports suggesting potential for misuse or abuse. However, it is not a controlled substance and is not generally considered addictive in Korea. In this study, we examined the dependence potential and abuse liability of tramadol as well as its effect on the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in rodents. In animal behavioral tests, tramadol did not show any positive effects on the experimental animals in climbing, jumping, and head twitch tests. However, in the conditioned place preference and self-administration tests, the experimental animals showed significant positive responses. Taken together, tramadol affected the neurological systems related to abuse liability and has the potential to lead psychological dependence. PMID:25489425

  3. Behavioral Effects of Developmental Methylmercury Drinking Water Exposure in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Bisen-Hersh, Emily B.; Farina, Marcelo; Barbosa, Fernando; Rocha, Joao BT; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Early methylmercury (MeHg) exposure can have long-lasting consequences likely arising from impaired developmental processes, the outcome of which has been exposed in several longitudinal studies of affected populations. Given the large number of newborns at an increased risk of learning disabilities associated with in utero MeHg exposure, it is important to study neurobehavioral alterations using ecologically valid and physiologically relevant models. This review highlights the benefits of using the MeHg drinking water exposure paradigm and outlines behavioral outcomes arising from this procedure in rodents. Combination treatments that exacerbate or ameliorate MeHg-induced effects, and possible molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral impairment are also discussed. PMID:24210169

  4. Identification of novel anelloviruses with broad diversity in UK rodents.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Dutia, Bernadette M; Stewart, James P; Meredith, Anna L; Shaw, Darren J; Simmonds, Peter; Sharp, Colin P

    2014-07-01

    Anelloviruses are a family of small circular ssDNA viruses with a vast genetic diversity. Human infections with the prototype anellovirus, torque teno virus (TTV), are ubiquitous and related viruses have been described in a number of other mammalian hosts. Despite over 15 years of investigation, there is still little known about the pathogenesis and possible disease associations of anellovirus infections, arising in part due to the lack of a robust cell culture system for viral replication or tractable small-animal model. We report the identification of diverse anelloviruses in several species of wild rodents. The viruses are highly prevalent in wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) and field voles (Microtus agrestis), detectable at a low frequency in bank voles (Myodes glareolus), but absent from house mice (Mus musculus). The viruses identified have a genomic organization consistent with other anelloviruses, but form two clear phylogenetic groups that are as distinct from each other as from defined genera. PMID:24744300

  5. Identification of novel anelloviruses with broad diversity in UK rodents

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Dutia, Bernadette M.; Stewart, James P.; Meredith, Anna L.; Shaw, Darren J.; Simmonds, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Anelloviruses are a family of small circular ssDNA viruses with a vast genetic diversity. Human infections with the prototype anellovirus, torque teno virus (TTV), are ubiquitous and related viruses have been described in a number of other mammalian hosts. Despite over 15 years of investigation, there is still little known about the pathogenesis and possible disease associations of anellovirus infections, arising in part due to the lack of a robust cell culture system for viral replication or tractable small-animal model. We report the identification of diverse anelloviruses in several species of wild rodents. The viruses are highly prevalent in wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) and field voles (Microtus agrestis), detectable at a low frequency in bank voles (Myodes glareolus), but absent from house mice (Mus musculus). The viruses identified have a genomic organization consistent with other anelloviruses, but form two clear phylogenetic groups that are as distinct from each other as from defined genera. PMID:24744300

  6. Photoperiodic control of circadian activity rhythms in diurnal rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramm, K. R.; Kramm, Deborah A.

    1980-03-01

    The responses of red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) and eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) to complete and skeleton light-dark (LD) cycles were compared. The skeletons, comprised of two 1-h pulses of light per day, effectively simulated the complete photoperiods in the squirrels, but not the chipmunks. Skeleton photoperiods greater than 12-h caused the chipmunks to shift activity from the longer to the shorter of the two intervals between the pulses. To interpret the mechanism of phase control, squirrels and chipmunks were kept in continuous darkness and exposed to 1-h light pulses every 10 days. The time-course of entrainment was also quantified. Both techniques produced light-response curves. The data suggest that the parametric and non-parametric contributions to entrainment are different in these two rodent species.

  7. Historical control data on developmental toxicity studies in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Endoh, Katsumi; Fukushima, Ryou; Fujii, Sakiko; Hara, Hiroaki; Hirata-Koizumi, Mutsuko; Hirose, Akihiko; Hojo, Hitoshi; Horimoto, Masao; Hoshino, Nobuhito; Hosokawa, Yoshinori; Imai, Yukari; Inada, Hiroshi; Inawaka, Kunifumi; Itoh, Keiichi; Katsumata, Yoshihiro; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hirohito; Maeda, Maki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Matsuo, Seiki; Matsuoka, Toshiki; Matsuura, Ikuo; Mineshima, Hiroshi; Miwa, Yoji; Nakano, Nao; Naya, Masato; Noyori, Hiroko; Ohta, Takafumi; Oku, Harutaka; Ono, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Takakura, Ikuro; Tanaka, Ryota; Tateishi, Taishi; Tominaga, Yuko; Uesugi, Tohru; Urakawa, Chizuru; Yabe, Kaoru; Yamashita, Akihito; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Yokoi, Ryohei

    2014-08-01

    Historical control data on rodent developmental toxicity studies, performed between 1994 and 2010, were obtained from 19 laboratories in Japan, including 10 pharmaceutical and chemical companies and nine contract research organizations. Rats, mice, and hamsters were used for developmental toxicity studies. Data included maternal reproductive findings at terminal cesarean sections and fetal findings including the spontaneous incidences of external, visceral, and skeletal anomalies. No noticeable differences were observed in maternal reproductive data between laboratories. Inter-laboratory variations in the incidences of fetuses with anomalies appeared to be due to differences in the selection of observation parameters, observation criteria, classification of the findings, and terminology of fetal alterations. Historical control data are useful for the appropriate interpretation of experimental results and evaluation of the effects of chemical on reproductive and developmental toxicities. PMID:24666250

  8. [Structural characteristics of certain Rodents spines (Rodentia: Myomorpha, Hystricomorpha)].

    PubMed

    Chernova, O F; Kuznetsov, G V

    2001-01-01

    The architectonics of spines and hair was studied in Neacomys spinosus, Arvicanthis somalicus, Leopoldamys sabanus, L. edwardsi, Maxomys moi, M. surifer, Niviventer fulvescens, N. confucianus, N. cremoriventer, Acomys cahirinus, A. somalica, Hystrix indica, H. cristata, Atherurus macrourus, Erethizon dorsatum, Proechimys steerei, and Lonchotrix emiliae. The presence of a dorsal longitudinal furrow covered by a modified cuticle is a common structural feature of spines in all studied species except E. dorsatum, H. indica, and the frontal surface of the mosaic (scales located side by side) and terrace cuticle (steps between scales) varies in different species from smooth to rib-folded. A terminology has been proposed to describe the main structures of spine and hair. The adaptive significance of the spine architectonics in rodents is discussed. PMID:11525125

  9. ?-Cell Generation: Can Rodent Studies Be Translated to Humans?

    PubMed Central

    Carlotti, Françoise; Zaldumbide, Arnaud; Ellenbroek, Johanne H.; Spijker, H. Siebe; Hoeben, Rob C.; de Koning, Eelco J.

    2011-01-01

    ?-cell replacement by allogeneic islet transplantation is a promising approach for patients with type 1 diabetes, but the shortage of organ donors requires new sources of ? cells. Islet regeneration in vivo and generation of ?-cells ex vivo followed by transplantation represent attractive therapeutic alternatives to restore the ?-cell mass. In this paper, we discuss different postnatal cell types that have been envisaged as potential sources for future ?-cell replacement therapy. The ultimate goal being translation to the clinic, a particular attention is given to the discrepancies between findings from studies performed in rodents (both ex vivo on primary cells and in vivo on animal models), when compared with clinical data and studies performed on human cells. PMID:22007286

  10. Rodent auditory perception: Critical band limitations and plasticity.

    PubMed

    King, J; Insanally, M; Jin, M; Martins, A R O; D'amour, J A; Froemke, R C

    2015-06-18

    What do animals hear? While it remains challenging to adequately assess sensory perception in animal models, it is important to determine perceptual abilities in model systems to understand how physiological processes and plasticity relate to perception, learning, and cognition. Here we discuss hearing in rodents, reviewing previous and recent behavioral experiments querying acoustic perception in rats and mice, and examining the relation between behavioral data and electrophysiological recordings from the central auditory system. We focus on measurements of critical bands, which are psychoacoustic phenomena that seem to have a neural basis in the functional organization of the cochlea and the inferior colliculus. We then discuss how behavioral training, brain stimulation, and neuropathology impact auditory processing and perception. PMID:25827498

  11. Wheel-running behavior in 12 species of muroid rodents.

    PubMed

    Dewsbury, D A

    1980-09-01

    The objective of this research was to describe the levels and periodicity of wheel running in 12 species of muroid rodents in order that comparisons could be made among different measures of activity in a variety of species. Six males from each species (Peromyscus polionotus, P. eremicus, P. leucopus, P. maniculatus, P. gossypinus, Microtus pennysylvanicus, M. montanus, M. canicaudus, M. ochrogaster, Calomys callos us, Onychomys leucogaster, and Mus musculus) were tested in running wheels for 14 days, with the amount of running recorded hourly. There were significant species differences in amount of wheel running, with Peromyscus generally running more than Microtus. All species displayed marked nocturnality. Thus, Peromyscus display consistent nocturnality both across species, and for various behavioral patterns measured using a variety of methods. By contrast, Microtus display a nocturnal pattern of wheel running, but not of eating, drinking, and various other behavioral patterns. These differences appear to reflect adaptations related to habit and diet. PMID:24925276

  12. Seroepidemiologic studies of hantavirus infection among wild rodents in California.

    PubMed Central

    Jay, M.; Ascher, M. S.; Chomel, B. B.; Madon, M.; Sesline, D.; Enge, B. A.; Hjelle, B.; Ksiazek, T. G.; Rollin, P. E.; Kass, P. H.; Reilly, K.

    1997-01-01

    A total of 4,626 mammals were serologically tested for antibodies to Sin Nombre virus. All nonrodent species were antibody negative. Among wild rodents, antibody prevalence was 8.5% in murids, 1.4% in heteromyids, and < 0.1% in sciurids. Of 1,921 Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mice), 226 (11.8%) were antibody positive, including one collected in 1975. The highest antibody prevalence (71.4% of 35) was found among P. maniculatus on Santa Cruz Island, off the southern California coast. Prevalence of antibodies among deer mice trapped near sites of human cases (26.8% of 164) was significantly higher than that of mice from other sites (odds ratio = 4.5; 95% confidence interval = 1.7, 11.6). Antibody prevalence increased with rising elevation (> 1,200 meters) and correlated with a spatial cluster of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome cases in the Sierra Nevada. PMID:9204301

  13. Recent Pacific Northwest Laboratory beagle and rodent studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.; Park, J.F.; Cross, F.C.; Dagle, G.E.

    1990-07-01

    Analyses based on data from two experimental studies conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory will be presented. The first is a lifespan study of beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium. The objectives of this study are, first, to determine the biological effects in dogs of inhaled plutonium at various dose levels, and, second, to obtain dose-effect relationship data that can be used to estimate the risk of these effects in humans. In this study, eighteen-month-old beagle dogs were exposed through inhalation to six different levels and three different types of plutonium. The lowest level corresponds to the maximum permissible level for a plutonium worker, while the highest level is a level at which radiation pneumonitis is likely to cause early death. {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} was chosen because it is the form of plutonium to which people working in nuclear fuel processing and storage industries are likely to be exposed. {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} and {sup 239}Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} were chosen because they result in different spatial and temporal distribution of radiation dose, and thus can provide information on the influence of these factors on risk. The second experiment is a lifespan study of rodents exposed through inhalation to radon and radon progeny. For the rodent experiments to be considered in this presentation, exposures were initiated at about 90 days of age at rates of 5, 50, and 500 WLM per week. Cumulative exposure levels were 320, 640, 1280, 2560, and 5120 WLM for animals exposed at 50 and 500 WLM per week, and 320 WLM for animals exposed at 5 WLM per week. 7 refs.

  14. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, NASA has tasked its toxicology laboratory to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal/intrapharyngeal instillation. This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies are in progress to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated (ground) lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The results from the instillation studies will be useful for choosing exposure concentrations for the animal inhalation study. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The experiment with the simulate will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of instillation and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  15. Survey of studies on how spaceflight affects rodent skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fejtek, M B; Wassersug, R J

    1999-01-01

    Rodent muscles have been examined in more than 89 spaceflight studies over the last 25 years with much variation in the procedures and results. Mission duration ranged from four days to three weeks, postflight data collection ranged from a few hours to two days after landing, and there is great diversity in the number, size, and age of the rats that have flown. Several different types and sizes of animal enclosures have also been used--a significant factor because cage design affects animal activity and muscle loading. Only a small percentage (approximately 16%) of the total number of striated muscles in the rat have been examined. We have identified both substantial redundancy and inconsistencies in the results from studies to date. However, many of these appear unavoidable due to the great variation in experimental protocol of the different missions. Nevertheless these studies repeatedly confirm that exposure to spaceflight decreases the mass of limb muscles and leads to muscle atrophy. The majority of missions were flown by the former Soviet Union, but the majority of papers have been published by U.S. researchers. A relatively small number of investigators (about 50) clustered into fewer than 15 identifiable research groups worldwide account for most of the results to date. These groups have had access to rodent muscle tissue from two to seven spaceflights each. International cooperation in the post-cold war era and the publication of future work in peer-reviewed international journals should help greatly in reducing redundancy and enriching our knowledge of how gravity affects biological systems. PMID:10660771

  16. Sero-Prevalence of Rodent Pathogens in India

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, Shrruthi; Kulkarni, Prachet G.; Nagavelu, Krishnaveni; Samuel, Rosa J.; Srinivasan, Sandhya; Ramasamy, Nandhini; Hegde, Nagendra R.; Gudde, Ramachandra S.

    2015-01-01

    Health monitoring is an integral part of laboratory animal quality standards. However, current or past prevalence data as well as regulatory requirements dictate the frequency, type and the expanse of health monitoring. In an effort to understand the prevalence of rodent pathogens in India, a preliminary study was carried out by sero-epidemiology. Sera samples obtained from 26 public and private animal facilities were analyzed for the presence of antibodies against minute virus of mice (MVM), ectromelia virus (ECTV), lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), Sendai virus (SeV), and Mycoplasma pulmonis in mice, and SeV, rat parvo virus (RPV), Kilham’s rat virus (KRV) and sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV) in rats, by sandwich ELISA. It was observed that MHV was the most prevalent agent followed by Mycoplasma pulmonis and MVM in mice, and SDAV followed by RPV were prevalent in rats. On the other hand, none of the samples were positive for ECTV in mice, or SeV or KRV in rats. Multiple infections were common in both mice and rats. The incidence of MHV and Mycoplasma pulmonis was higher in facilities maintained by public organizations than in vivaria of private organizations, although the difference was not statistically different. On the other hand the prevalence of rodent pathogens was significantly higher in the northern part of India than in the South. These studies form the groundwork for detailed sero-prevalence studies which should further lay the foundations for country-specific guidelines for health monitoring of laboratory animals. PMID:26158453

  17. Dietary cholesterol enhances torpor in a rodent hibernator.

    PubMed

    Geiser, F; Kenagy, G J; Wingfield, J C

    1997-08-01

    Dietary cholesterol can affect both body lipid composition and steroid hormone concentration. We investigated whether a diet rich in cholesterol influences torpor patterns of hibernating chipmunks (Tamias amoenus) and, if so, whether these changes are better explained by diet-induced changes in body lipid composition or the concentration of testosterone, which at high levels inhibits torpor. Two groups of chipmunks were maintained either on a cholesterol diet (rodent chow containing 10% cholesterol) or a control diet (rodent chow) during pre-hibernation fattening and throughout the hibernation season. Torpid chipmunks on the cholesterol diet had significantly lower minimum body temperatures (-0.2 +/- 0.2 vs -0.6 +/- 0.2 degree C), lower metabolic rates (0.029 +/- 0.002 ml O2 g-1 h-1 vs 0.035 +/- 0.001 ml O2 g-1 h-1), and longer torpor bouts at -1 degree C (6.8 +/- 0.5 vs 4.1 +/- 1.0 days) than chipmunks on the control diet. Dietary cholesterol resulted in a significant increase in blood plasma cholesterol (sevenfold), liver cholesterol content (6.9-fold) and liver triglyceride content (3.5-fold) in comparison to controls. In contrast, dietary cholesterol had no detectable effect on the concentration of plasma testosterone, which was very low in both groups. Since torpor was deeper and longer in animals on the cholesterol diet our study suggests that torpor patterns of chipmunks were either directly affected by the dietary cholesterol or via changes in body lipid composition. PMID:9286090

  18. Deep brain stimulation with simultaneous FMRI in rodents.

    PubMed

    Younce, John Robert; Albaugh, Daniel L; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2014-01-01

    In order to visualize the global and downstream neuronal responses to deep brain stimulation (DBS) at various targets, we have developed a protocol for using blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to image rodents with simultaneous DBS. DBS fMRI presents a number of technical challenges, including accuracy of electrode implantation, MR artifacts created by the electrode, choice of anesthesia and paralytic to minimize any neuronal effects while simultaneously eliminating animal motion, and maintenance of physiological parameters, deviation from which can confound the BOLD signal. Our laboratory has developed a set of procedures that are capable of overcoming most of these possible issues. For electrical stimulation, a homemade tungsten bipolar microelectrode is used, inserted stereotactically at the stimulation site in the anesthetized subject. In preparation for imaging, rodents are fixed on a plastic headpiece and transferred to the magnet bore. For sedation and paralysis during scanning, a cocktail of dexmedetomidine and pancuronium is continuously infused, along with a minimal dose of isoflurane; this preparation minimizes the BOLD ceiling effect of volatile anesthetics. In this example experiment, stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) produces BOLD responses which are observed primarily in ipsilateral cortical regions, centered in motor cortex. Simultaneous DBS and fMRI allows the unambiguous modulation of neural circuits dependent on stimulation location and stimulation parameters, and permits observation of neuronal modulations free of regional bias. This technique may be used to explore the downstream effects of modulating neural circuitry at nearly any brain region, with implications for both experimental and clinical DBS. PMID:24561922

  19. Arctic Small Rodents Have Diverse Diets and Flexible Food Selection

    PubMed Central

    Soininen, Eeva M.; Ravolainen, Virve T.; Bråthen, Kari Anne; Yoccoz, Nigel G.; Gielly, Ludovic; Ims, Rolf A.

    2013-01-01

    The ecology of small rodent food selection is poorly understood, as mammalian herbivore food selection theory has mainly been developed by studying ungulates. Especially, the effect of food availability on food selection in natural habitats where a range of food items are available is unknown. We studied diets and selectivity of grey-sided voles (Myodes rufocanus) and tundra voles (Microtus oeconomus), key herbivores in European tundra ecosystems, using DNA metabarcoding, a novel method enabling taxonomically detailed diet studies. In order to cover the range of food availabilities present in the wild, we employed a large-scale study design for sampling data on food availability and vole diets. Both vole species had ingested a range of plant species and selected particularly forbs and grasses. Grey-sided voles also selected ericoid shrubs and tundra voles willows. Availability of a food item rarely affected its utilization directly, although seasonal changes of diets and selection suggest that these are positively correlated with availability. Moreover, diets and selectivity were affected by availability of alternative food items. These results show that the focal sub-arctic voles have diverse diets and flexible food preferences and rarely compensate low availability of a food item with increased searching effort. Diet diversity itself is likely to be an important trait and has previously been underrated owing to methodological constraints. We suggest that the roles of alternative food item availability and search time limitations for small rodent feeding ecology should be investigated. Nomenclature Annotated Checklist of the Panarctic Flora (PAF), Vascular plants. Available at: http://nhm2.uio.no/paf/, accessed 15.6.2012. PMID:23826371

  20. Ecosystem engineering by a colonial mammal: how prairie dogs structure rodent communities.

    PubMed

    VanNimwegen, Ron E; Kretzer, Justin; Cully, Jack F

    2008-12-01

    As ecosystem engineers, prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) physically alter their environment, but the mechanism by which these alterations affect associated faunal composition is not well known. We examined how rodent and vegetation communities responded to prairie dog colonies and landcover at the Cimarron National Grassland in southwest Kansas, USA. We trapped rodents and measured vegetation structure on and off colonies in 2000 and 2003. We plotted two separate ordinations of trapping grids: one based on rodent counts and a second based on vegetation variables. We regressed three factors on each ordination: (1) colony (on-colony and off-colony), (2) cover (shortgrass and sandsage), and (3) habitat (factorial cross of colony x cover). Rodent communities differed by colony but not cover. Vegetation differed across both gradients. Rodent responses to habitat reflected those of colony and cover, but vegetation was found to differ across cover only in the sandsage prairie. This interaction suggested that rodent composition responded to prairie dog colonies, but independently of vegetation differences. We conclude that burrowing and soil disturbance are more important than vegetation cropping in structuring rodent communities. PMID:19137937

  1. Sound localization in a predatory rodent, the northern grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster).

    PubMed

    Heffner, R S; Heffner, H E

    1988-03-01

    A comparison of the ability of mammals to localize sound revealed that among the animals examined to date, none of the rodents have been able to localize as accurately as the carnivores. Because all of these rodents are prey animals, the question arises as to whether their poor localization acuity is a phyletic trait of Rodentia or whether it is a trait common to prey species that may be under less selective pressure than predators to localize sound accurately. To answer this question, sound localization acuity was determined in a species that is both predatory and a rodent, the northern grasshopper mouse. Localization thresholds for a single 100-ms noise burst were determined for three grasshopper mice using a conditioned avoidance procedure. Their 50% discrimination threshold of 19 degrees is larger than that of any of the previously tested carnivores and well within the range of other rodents. However, calculations of the binaural sound localization cues available to rodents (based on their head size) suggest that the grasshopper mouse may make more efficient use of the available locus cues than other rodents. Thus, although the grasshopper mouse cannot localize as accurately as carnivores, it appears to be more accurate than predicted for a nonpredatory rodent of its size. PMID:3365945

  2. Tropical Depression Kyle, October 10, 2002

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lori Perkins

    2002-10-10

    Tropical Depression Kyle is expected to reach the northeast Florida coast in 24 hours. It is currently packing sustained winds of 30 mph. The storm developed on September 20, 2002 and has been classified as a sub-tropical depression, tropical storm, hurricane, tropical storm, and now a tropical depression. The visualization zooms down to the storm and then shows the overall rain structure of Kyle. Yellow represents areas where at least 0.5 inches of rain fell per hour. Green shows at least 1.0 inch of rain, and red depicts more than 2.0 inches of rain per hour.

  3. Seed removal by scatter-hoarding rodents: the effects of tannin and nutrient concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaolan

    2015-04-01

    The mutualistic interaction between scatter-hoarding rodents and seed plants have a long co-evolutionary history. Plants are believed to have evolved traits that influence the foraging behavior of rodents, thus increasing the probability of seed removal and caching, which benefits the establishment of seedlings. Tannin and nutrient content in seeds are considered among the most essential factors in this plant-animal interaction. However, most previous studies used different species of plant seeds, rendering it difficult to tease apart the relative effect of each single nutrient on rodent foraging behavior due to confounding combinations of nutrient contents across seed species. Hence, to further explore how tannin and different nutritional traits of seed affect scatter-hoarding rodent foraging preferences, we manipulated tannin, fat, protein and starch content levels, and also seed size levels by using an artificial seed system. Our results showed that both tannin and various nutrients significantly affected rodent foraging preferences, but were also strongly affected by seed size. In general, rodents preferred to remove seeds with less tannin. Fat addition could counteract the negative effect of tannin on seed removal by rodents, while the effect of protein addition was weaker. Starch by itself had no effect, but it interacted with tannin in a complex way. Our findings shed light on the effects of tannin and nutrient content on seed removal by scatter-hoarding rodents. We therefore, believe that these and perhaps other seed traits should interactively influence this important plant-rodent interaction. However, how selection operates on seed traits to counterbalance these competing interests/factors merits further study. PMID:25625425

  4. Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esther C. Peters; Nancy J. Gassman; Julie C. Firman; Robert H. Richmond; Elizabeth A. Power

    1997-01-01

    The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available

  5. Skin Diseases in the Tropics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahe, Antoine; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Common skin diseases are prevalent in tropical countries because of extreme weather conditions, mediocre hygiene, and lack of adequate treatment of infectious dermatoses. This guide describes the major endemic skin diseases and their signs for the purpose of helping unspecialized health agents train themselves and determine when a patient should…

  6. Tropical Cyclone Report Hurricane Irene

    E-print Network

    Tropical Cyclone Report Hurricane Irene (AL092011) 21-28 August 2011 Lixion A. Avila and John Cangialosi National Hurricane Center 14 December 2011 Updated 19 December 2011 to correct landfall pressure as a category 3 hurricane (on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale) but gradually weakened after crossing

  7. Postdoctoral Researcher in tropical ecology

    E-print Network

    contribute to the design of further studies of food webs, help apply for grant support and mentor graduate and productive postdoctoral researcher to join our international team studying tropical plant-insect food webs of large data sets on plant-insect food webs. In addition, s/he will be able to develop an independent

  8. Pathology of Rodent Models of Intestinal Cancer: Progress Report and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Mary Kay; Powell, Anne E.; Sullivan, Ruth; Sundberg, John; Wright, Nicholas; Coffey, Robert J.; Dove, William F.

    2013-01-01

    In October 2010, a pathology review of rodent models of intestinal neoplasia was held at The Jackson Laboratory. This review complemented 2 other concurrent events: a workshop on methods of modeling colon cancer in rodents and a conference on current issues in murine and human colon cancer. We summarize the results of the pathology review and the committee’s recommendations for tumor nomenclature. A virtual high-resolution image slide box of these models has been developed. This report discusses significant recent developments in rodent modeling of intestinal neoplasia, including the role of stem cells in cancer and the creation of models of metastatic intestinal cancer. PMID:23415801

  9. Tula virus infection associated with fever and exanthema after a wild rodent bite.

    PubMed

    Schultze, D; Lundkvist, A; Blauenstein, U; Heyman, P

    2002-04-01

    Reported here is the first case of human acute infection with Tula virus, which occurred in a 12-year-old boy in Switzerland. This hantavirus had been considered apathogenic to humans, and in Switzerland only TULV-genome sequences have been demonstrated in wild rodents to date. In this case, paronychia, fever and exanthema occurred after the patient was bitten by a wild rodent, indicating an unusual route of hantavirus transmission. Thus, Tula virus infection should be taken into account in patients with appropriate clinical symptoms and contact with rodents. PMID:12072943

  10. Anti-dementia drugs and hippocampal-dependent memory in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Yuede, Carla M.; Dong, Hongxin; Csernansky, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in hippocampal structure and function are characteristics of early Alzheimer's disease (AD). Behavioral tests measuring hippocampal-dependent memory in rodents are often used to evaluate novel treatments for AD and other dementias. In this study, we review the effects of drugs marketed for the treatment of AD, such as the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine and the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid antagonist, memantine, in rodent models of memory impairment. We also briefly describe the effects of novel treatments for cognitive impairment in rodent models of memory impairment, and discuss issues concerning the selection of the animal model and behavioral tests. Suggestions for future research are offered. PMID:17762506

  11. Black Swan Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, K.; Lin, N.

    2012-12-01

    Virtually all assessments of tropical cyclone risk are based on historical records, which are limited to a few hundred years at most. Yet stronger TCs may occur in the future and at places that have not been affected historically. Such events lie outside the realm of historically based expectations and may have extreme impacts. Their occurrences are also often made explainable after the fact (e.g., Hurricane Katrina). We nickname such potential future TCs, characterized by rarity, extreme impact, and retrospective predictability, "black swans" (Nassim Nicholas Taleb, 2007). As, by definition, black swan TCs have yet to happen, statistical methods that solely rely on historical track data cannot predict their occurrence. Global climate models lack the capability to predict intense storms, even with a resolution as high as 14 km (Emanuel et al. 2010). Also, most dynamic downscaling methods (e.g., Bender et al. 2010) are still limited in horizontal resolution and are too expensive to implement to generate enough events to include rare ones. In this study, we apply a simpler statistical/deterministic hurricane model (Emanuel et al. 2006) to simulate large numbers of synthetic storms under a given (observed or projected) climate condition. The method has been shown to generate realistic extremes in various basins (Emanuel et al. 2008 and 2010). We also apply a hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC; Luettich et al. 1992) to simulate the storm surges generated by these storms. We then search for black swan TCs, in terms of the joint wind and surge damage potential, in the generated large databases. Heavy rainfall is another important TC hazard and will be considered in a future study. We focus on three areas: Tampa Bay in the U.S., the Persian Gulf, and Darwin in Australia. Tampa Bay is highly vulnerable to storm surge as it is surrounded by shallow water and low-lying lands, much of which may be inundated by a storm tide of 6 m. High surges are generated by storms with a broad spectrum of characteristics in our synthetic database, although no large surge has been recorded historically as only one moderate storm passed by the area. Tampa black swans are identified as those that move northward parallel to the west Florida coast with high intensities and resonant with the Florida-shelf edge waves to generate extreme surges up to 10 m in Tampa Bay. The Arabian Sea area has sea surface temperatures warm enough to support the development of severe TCs, but TC development has been limited by low humidity and high wind shear, and only one recorded TC (super cyclonic storm Gonu in 2007) moved close to the Persian Gulf, making landfall in Oman and Iran. Our analysis shows that black swan TCs can originate within the Persian Gulf and make landfall with high intensities in populous places; extreme surges over 9 m for Abu Dubai and Doha and over 7 m for Dubai are possible. Darwin experienced immense devastation from Cyclone Tracy of 1974, but the damage was mainly due to the strong winds (the surge was only about 1.6 m). Our analysis includes extremely intense black swan TCs that make landfall just south of Darwin, generating surges above 10 m; these results may prompt the city to reconsider its TC risk. We are currently analyzing the join probability of the extreme wind and surge of these black swan TCs to more clearly assess their full damage potentials.

  12. Tropical Storm Erin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Location: The Atlantic Ocean 210 miles south of Galveston, Texas Categorization: Tropical Storm Sustained Winds: 40 mph (60 km/hr)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared ImageMicrowave Image

    Infrared Images Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Images In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is therefore low. Thus the ocean also appears 'low temperature' in the AIRS microwave images and is assigned the color blue. Therefore deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. Land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Visible/Near-Infrared Images The AIRS instrument suite contains a sensor that captures radiation in four bands of the visible/near-infrared portion of the electromagetic spectrum. Data from three of these bands are combined to create 'visible' images similar to a snapshot taken with your camera.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Neural compass or epiphenomenon? Experimental and theoretical investigations into the rodent head direction cell system 

    E-print Network

    van der Meer, Matthijs

    2007-11-28

    How does the brain convert sensory information into abstract representations that can support complex behaviours? The rodent head-direction (HD) system, whose cell ensembles represent head direction in the horizontal plane, ...

  14. PREDICTING RODENT CARCINOGENICITY OF HALOGENATED HYDROCARBON BY IN VIVO BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forty halogenated hydrocarbons of known rodent carcinogenicity (24 carcinogens, 16 noncarcinogens), including many promoters of carcinogenesis, nongenotoxic carcinogens and hepatocarcinogens were selected for study. he effects of these 40 chemicals on four biochemical assays (hep...

  15. Incorporation of analgesics into rodent embryo transfer protocols: assessing the effects on reproductive outcomes 

    E-print Network

    Burckhardt, Heather Ann

    2009-05-15

    Surgical embryo transfer in rodents is a common procedure in today’s research laboratory, although little is known of the effect analgesics may have on not only the recipient female but also the embryos. Two perioperative analgesics, ketoprofen...

  16. Segment Specification for the Payload Segment of the Reusable Reentry Satellite: Rodent Module Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) System is composed of the payload segment (PS), vehicle segment (VS), and mission support (MS) segments. This specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the RRS Rodent Module (RM).

  17. Insights into relationships among rodent lineages based on mitochondrial genome sequence data 

    E-print Network

    Frabotta, Laurence John

    2006-04-12

    This dissertation has two major sections. In Chapter II, complete mitochondrial (mt DNA) genome sequences were used to construct a hypothesis for affinities of most major lineages of rodents that arose quickly in the Eocene ...

  18. Factors influencing repeated seed movements by scatter-hoarding rodents in an alpine forest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Jin; Corlett, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    Scatter-hoarding rodents are effective dispersal agents for many plant species. Several studies have shown that rodents repeatedly re-cache seeds. The re-caching process often has a significant impact on final seedling establishment, but the factors determining its occurrence are poorly understood. In this study, we followed the fate of 3564 artificial seeds that varied in size, nutrient content and tannin content. Seeds cached closer to their original releasing plots were more likely to be re-cached, and to a further distance. Larger seeds were more likely to be re-cached than smaller ones, while nutrient and tannin content had little effect. Most plant species that depend on scatter-hoarding rodents for seed dispersal bear relatively large seeds, and large seeds are usually more likely to be dispersed and to establish seedlings, suggesting that the caching preferences of scatter-hoarding rodents may have played an important role in the evolution of large seeds. PMID:24759374

  19. Behavioral assessment of depressive-like symptoms in a rodent model of spinal cord injury 

    E-print Network

    Luedtke, Kelsey 1988-

    2011-05-05

    -like behavior in rats) to assess depression following a moderate contusion injury. The proposed ethogram consisted of the sucrose preference test (SPT) and the forced swim test (FST), both common rodent paradigms for assessing depressive-like behavior...

  20. Development of and proposed applications for tetrodes in functional mapping of rodent sensorimotor striatum

    E-print Network

    Iyengar, Deepa Radhakrishna, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    The Wilson-McNaughton tetrode preparation for awake, behaving rodents was adapted by a group of investigators for use in dorsolateral striatum. Measures were taken to improve the reliability of reaching the target area in ...

  1. Methods and modeling for the reduced platen compression of cancellous bone in the rodent proximal tibia

    E-print Network

    Rogers, William Elliott

    2002-01-01

    This study focused on the reduced platen compression (RPC) test of cancellous bone in the rodent proximal tibia. The objective was to improve methods for this mechanical test, specifically in the areas of specimen location, specimen preparation...

  2. Characterizing the dynamic frequency structure of fast oscillations in the rodent hippocampus

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, David P.

    Fast oscillations or “ripples” are found in the local field potential (LFP) of the rodent hippocampus during awake and sleep states. Ripples have been found to correlate with memory related neural processing, however, the ...

  3. Electromechanical design of a body weight support system for a therapeutic robot for rodent studies

    E-print Network

    Mayalu, Michaëlle Ntala

    2010-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to better understand and treat locomotor disorders, an over-ground therapeutic robot prototype to study recovery of locomotion after spinal cord injury in rodents is under development. One key ...

  4. Factors influencing repeated seed movements by scatter-hoarding rodents in an alpine forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Jin; Corlett, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Scatter-hoarding rodents are effective dispersal agents for many plant species. Several studies have shown that rodents repeatedly re-cache seeds. The re-caching process often has a significant impact on final seedling establishment, but the factors determining its occurrence are poorly understood. In this study, we followed the fate of 3564 artificial seeds that varied in size, nutrient content and tannin content. Seeds cached closer to their original releasing plots were more likely to be re-cached, and to a further distance. Larger seeds were more likely to be re-cached than smaller ones, while nutrient and tannin content had little effect. Most plant species that depend on scatter-hoarding rodents for seed dispersal bear relatively large seeds, and large seeds are usually more likely to be dispersed and to establish seedlings, suggesting that the caching preferences of scatter-hoarding rodents may have played an important role in the evolution of large seeds. PMID:24759374

  5. Mutualistic interactions between granivorous heteromyid rodents and a preferred food resource, Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Granivorous heteromyid rodent species and Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides) are both widely distributed throughout North American deserts. The vast majority (~95%) of Indian ricegrass seedling recruitment occurs from seed clusters cached in shallowly-buried scatterhoards by heteromyids, espe...

  6. Comparative Studies of Diurnal and Nocturnal Rodents: Differences in Lifestyle Result in Alterations

    E-print Network

    Krubitzer, Leah A.

    organization of sensory cortex in four rodents: laboratory Norway rats (Long Evans; Rattus norvegicus), wild-caught Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), wild-caught California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi

  7. Stress responses in tropical sparrows: comparing tropical and temperate Zonotrichia.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Moore, Ignacio T; Breuner, Creagh W; Wingfield, John C

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal modulation of the adrenocortical response appears to be ubiquitous in mid- to high-latitude vertebrates but has not been investigated in tropical vertebrates. Previous studies demonstrate that temperate passerines show seasonality in corticosterone secretion and corticosteroid binding globulin capacities. We examined seasonal and sex differences in the stress response in an equatorial population of Zonotrichia capensis, the only Zonotrichia that breeds in the tropics, and compared the results with those of northern Zonotrichia. Seasonal differences in tropical Zonotrichia would presumably be independent of photoperiod and thus directly related to such activities as reproduction and feather molt. In addition, we investigated the possible role of binding globulin as a sex steroid binding globulin, as suggested for temperate passerines. Similar to northern congeners, Z. capensis show seasonal modulation in total corticosterone and binding globulin capacity with higher levels during breeding than molt. However, unlike many temperate passerines, there are no sex differences in corticosterone secretion or binding globulin capacity. Furthermore, the seasonal differences in total corticosterone diminish when the free levels are calculated. The contrast between equatorial and northern congeners indicates factors such as breeding environment and life-history strategy may play important roles in shaping stress response in these species. PMID:16826504

  8. Evidence for rodent-common and species-typical limb and digit use in eating, derived from a comparative analysis of ten rodent species.

    PubMed

    Whishaw, I Q; Sarna, J R; Pellis, S M

    1998-11-01

    Order Rodentia comprises a vast portion of mammalian species (1814 species), which occupy extremely diverse habitats requiring very distinct motor specializations (e.g. burrowing, hopping, climbing, flying and swimming). Although early classification of paw use ability suggests rodents are impoverished relative to primates and make little use of their paws, there have been no systematic investigations of paw use in rodents. The present study was undertaken to describe limb/paw movements in a variety of common rodents. The movements used for handling sunflower seeds and other foods were videorecorded and analyzed in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus), Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus), Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), laboratory mouse (Mus musculus), laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus), gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), Richardson's ground squirrel (Spermophilus richardsonni), prairie dog (Cynomus parvidens), and Canadian beaver (Castor americanus). The results suggested five order-common movements of food handling: (1) locating food by sniffing, (2) grasping food by mouth, (3) sitting back on the haunches to eat, (4) grasping the food using an elbow-in movement, and (5) manipulate the food with the digits. Different species displayed species-typical specializations including (1) bilateral grasping with the paws (gerbil), (2) unilateral grasping with a paw (beaver), (3) unilateral holding (ground squirrels), (4) various grip and digit postures (all species), (5) unilateral object removal from the mouth (gerbil), (6) bilateral thumb holding (squirrels), and (7) simultaneous holding/manipulation of two objects (squirrels). Only the guinea pig did not handle food with its paws, suggesting its behavior is regressive. The existence of a core pattern of paw and digit use in rodents suggests that skilled limb and paw movements originate at least with the common ancestors of the rodent, and likely the common ancestor to rodent and primate lineages, while species-typical movements suggest specialization/regression of limb use has occurred in a number of mammalian orders. PMID:9821545

  9. Pollination Systems of Colchicum (Colchicaceae) in Southern Africa: Evidence for Rodent Pollination

    PubMed Central

    Kleizen, Ciara; Midgley, Jeremy; Johnson, Steven D.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants adapted for pollination by rodents tend to exhibit a distinct floral syndrome that includes dull coloured and geoflorous inflorescences and nocturnal anthesis and nectar production. On the basis of their floral traits, it was predicted that two African Colchicum species (C. scabromarginatum and C. coloratum) are rodent-pollinated. Methods Field studies were carried out in the semi-arid Succulent Karoo region of South Africa. Live trapping of rodents was conducted and pollen loads on the rodents were quantified. The daily periodicity of nectar production was determined. Selective exclusion and controlled pollination experiments were also conducted. Key Results Live-trapped rodents were found to carry large amounts of Colchicum pollen on the fur of their snouts, and in their faeces. Birds were occasional pollinators of flowers of C. coloratum. During the evening, nectar volume and concentration increased for both species. When vertebrates were excluded from C. scabromarginatum and C. coloratum plants, there was a significant decrease in seed set compared with open control plants. By contrast, vertebrate exclusion did not significantly affect seed production of a congener, C. hantamense, which has floral traits associated with insect pollination. Breeding system experiments revealed that both C. scabromarginatum and C. coloratum require pollinators for seed production. Colchicum scabromarginatum is strictly self-incompatible, whereas C. coloratum is partially self-compatible. Conclusions Pollination by rodents occurs in two African Colchicum species. C. scabromarginatum appears to depend exclusively on rodents for seed production, while birds and autonomous selfing may contribute to seed production in C. coloratum. These are the first records of rodent pollination in the Colchicaceae. PMID:18723860

  10. Translating animal model research: does it matter that our rodents are cold?

    PubMed

    Maloney, Shane K; Fuller, Andrea; Mitchell, Duncan; Gordon, Christopher; Overton, J Michael

    2014-11-01

    Does it matter that rodents used as preclinical models of human biology are routinely housed below their thermoneutral zone? We compile evidence showing that such rodents are cold-stressed, hypermetabolic, hypertensive, sleep-deprived, obesity-resistant, fever-resistant, aging-resistant, and tumor-prone compared with mice housed at thermoneutrality. The same genotype of mouse has a very different phenotype and response to physiological or pharmacological intervention when raised below or at thermoneutrality. PMID:25362635

  11. Neogene paleobiogeography and East African paleoenvironments: contributions from the Tugen Hills rodents and lagomorphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alisa J. Winkler

    2002-01-01

    A minimum of 28 genera of rodents and one genus of lagomorph were recovered from the Tugen Hills, Baringo District, Kenya, from localities dating from over 15·5 to about 4·4Ma. The middle Miocene (sites dated between 15·8 and 15·3Ma) rodent fauna recovered primarily from the Kipsaramon site complex, Muruyur Formation, includes a mixture of characteristically early Miocene taxa, and more

  12. Epidemiology of Helicobacter Infection in Wild Rodents in the Xinjiang-Uygur Autonomous Region of China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuo Goto; Wei Jiang; Qiang Zheng; Yuzaburo Oku; Haruo Kamiya; Toshio Itoh; Mamoru Ito

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter species were detected in the feces of wild rodents captured in Qiemo and Ruoqiang in the Xinjiang-Uygur autonomous region of China by polymerase chain reaction and 16S rRNA partial sequence analysis. Forty-four wild rodents, including one Przewalski’s gerbil ( Brachiones przewalskii), three Northern three-toed jerboas ( Dipus sagitta), one long-eared jerboa ( Euchoreutes naso), 34 midday gerbils ( Meriones

  13. The Rates of Molecular Evolution in Rodent and Primate Mitochondrial DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel M. Weinreich

    2001-01-01

    .   A higher rate of molecular evolution in rodents than in primates at synonymous sites and, to a lesser extent, at amino acid\\u000a replacement sites has been reported previously for most nuclear genes examined. Thus in these genes the average ratio of amino\\u000a acid replacement to synonymous substitution rates in rodents is lower than in primates, an observation at odds

  14. Ultrasonic vocalisation emitted by infant rodents: a tool for assessment of neurobehavioural development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Igor Branchi; Daniela Santucci; Enrico Alleva

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasonic vocalisations (USVs) emitted by altricial rodent pups are whistle-like sounds with frequencies between 30 and 90 kHz. These signals play an important communicative role in mother–offspring interaction since they elicit in the dam a prompt response concerning caregiving behaviours. Both physical and social parameters modulate the USV emission in the infant rodent. Recently, a more detailed analysis of the

  15. Two-phase seed dispersal: linking the effects of frugivorous birds and seed-caching rodents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen B. Vander Wall; Kellie M. Kuhn; Jennifer R. Gworek

    2005-01-01

    Frugivorous birds disperse the seeds of many fruit-bearing plants, but the fate of seeds after defecation or regurgitation\\u000a is often unknown. Some rodents gather and scatter hoard seeds, and some of these may be overlooked, germinate, and establish\\u000a plants. We show that these two disparate modes of seed dispersal are linked in some plants. Rodents removed large (>25 mg)\\u000a seeds from

  16. Genome dynamics of Bartonella grahamii in micro-populations of woodland rodents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva C Berglund; Christian Ehrenborg; Olga Vinnere Pettersson; Fredrik Granberg; Kristina Näslund; Martin Holmberg; Siv GE Andersson

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rodents represent a high-risk reservoir for the emergence of new human pathogens. The recent completion of the 2.3 Mb genome of Bartonella grahamii, one of the most prevalent blood-borne bacteria in wild rodents, revealed a higher abundance of genes for host-cell interaction systems than in the genomes of closely related human pathogens. The sequence variability within the global B.

  17. Chemical cues used by prairie rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis) to follow trails of rodent prey.

    PubMed

    Chiszar, D; Melcer, T; Lee, R; Radcliffe, C W; Duvall, D

    1990-01-01

    Each of 10 prairie rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis) was exposed to three types of trails after striking rodent prey (Mus musculus). One trail was made with mouse urine, another was made with tap water, and the third consisted of materials from mouse integument. The snakes exhibited trailing behavior only when integumentary trails were available. It was concluded that prairie rattlesnakes do not utilize urinary cues; instead they attend to materials associated with rodent skin and fur. PMID:24264897

  18. Ecological and Control Techniques for Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) Associated with Rodent Reservoirs of Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Mascari, Thomas M.; Hanafi, Hanafi A.; Jackson, Ryan E.; Ouahabi, Souâd; Ameur, Btissam; Faraj, Chafika; Obenauer, Peter J.; Diclaro, Joseph W.; Foil, Lane D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis remains a global health problem because of the substantial holes that remain in our understanding of sand fly ecology and the failure of traditional vector control methods. The specific larval food source is unknown for all but a few sand fly species, and this is particularly true for the vectors of Leishmania parasites. We provide methods and materials that could be used to understand, and ultimately break, the transmission cycle of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis. Methods and Findings We demonstrated in laboratory studies that analysis of the stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes found naturally in plant and animal tissues was highly effective for linking adult sand flies with their larval diet, without having to locate or capture the sand fly larvae themselves. In a field trial, we also demonstrated using this technique that half of captured adult sand flies had fed as larvae on rodent feces. Through the identification of rodent feces as a sand fly larval habitat, we now know that rodent baits containing insecticides that have been shown in previous studies to pass into the rodents' feces and kill sand fly larvae also could play a future role in sand fly control. In a second study we showed that rubidium incorporated into rodent baits could be used to demonstrate the level of bloodfeeding by sand flies on baited rodents, and that the elimination of sand flies that feed on rodents can be achieved using baits containing an insecticide that circulates in the blood of baited rodents. Conclusions Combined, the techniques described could help to identify larval food sources of other important vectors of the protozoa that cause visceral or dermal leishmaniasis. Unveiling aspects of the life cycles of sand flies that could be targeted with insecticides would guide future sand fly control programs for prevention of leishmaniasis. PMID:24069489

  19. Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute: Bibliography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) is located in Panama (first reported on in the March 26, 2004, Scout Report), and hosts hundreds of "visiting scientists from academic and research institutions in the United States and around the world every year." The STRI Bibliography "cites publications by the staff, visitors, fellows and students that result from research supported by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute." The Bibliography contains thousands of references to theses, books, and articles ranging from 1911-2004. Scientists who are interested in conducting research at STRI can link from the Bibliography to the Research Applications section for an application form and information about scientific permits, fees, visiting Panama, and underwater diving.

  20. Molecular and Paleontological Evidence for a Post-Cretaceous Origin of Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaoyuan; Wu, Wenyu; Zhang, Fuchun; Ye, Jie; Ni, Xijun; Sun, Jimin; Edwards, Scott V.; Meng, Jin; Organ, Chris L.

    2012-01-01

    The timing of the origin and diversification of rodents remains controversial, due to conflicting results from molecular clocks and paleontological data. The fossil record tends to support an early Cenozoic origin of crown-group rodents. In contrast, most molecular studies place the origin and initial diversification of crown-Rodentia deep in the Cretaceous, although some molecular analyses have recovered estimated divergence times that are more compatible with the fossil record. Here we attempt to resolve this conflict by carrying out a molecular clock investigation based on a nine-gene sequence dataset and a novel set of seven fossil constraints, including two new rodent records (the earliest known representatives of Cardiocraniinae and Dipodinae). Our results indicate that rodents originated around 61.7–62.4 Ma, shortly after the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary, and diversified at the intraordinal level around 57.7–58.9 Ma. These estimates are broadly consistent with the paleontological record, but challenge previous molecular studies that place the origin and early diversification of rodents in the Cretaceous. This study demonstrates that, with reliable fossil constraints, the incompatibility between paleontological and molecular estimates of rodent divergence times can be eliminated using currently available tools and genetic markers. Similar conflicts between molecular and paleontological evidence bedevil attempts to establish the origination times of other placental groups. The example of the present study suggests that more reliable fossil calibration points may represent the key to resolving these controversies. PMID:23071573

  1. Indirect food web interactions mediated by predator–rodent dynamics: relative roles of lemmings and voles

    PubMed Central

    Ims, Rolf A.; Henden, John-André; Thingnes, Anders V.; Killengreen, Siw T.

    2013-01-01

    Production cycles in birds are proposed as prime cases of indirect interactions in food webs. They are thought to be driven by predators switching from rodents to bird nests in the crash phase of rodent population cycles. Although rodent cycles are geographically widespread and found in different rodent taxa, bird production cycles appear to be most profound in the high Arctic where lemmings dominate. We hypothesized that this may be due to arctic lemmings inducing stronger predator responses than boreal voles. We tested this hypothesis by estimating predation rates in dummy bird nests during a rodent cycle in low-Arctic tundra. Here, the rodent community consists of a spatially variable mix of one lemming (Lemmus lemmus) and two vole species (Myodes rufocanus and Microtus oeconomus) with similar abundances. In consistence with our hypothesis, lemming peak abundances predicted well crash-phase nest predation rates, whereas the vole abundances had no predictive ability. Corvids were found to be the most important nest predators. Lemmings appear to be accessible to the whole predator community which makes them particularly powerful drivers of food web dynamics. PMID:24173526

  2. Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) seeds are dispersed by seed-caching rodents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vander Wall, S. B.; Esque, T.; Haines, D.; Garnett, M.; Waitman, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) is a distinctive and charismatic plant of the Mojave Desert. Although floral biology and seed production of Joshua tree and other yuccas are well understood, the fate of Joshua tree seeds has never been studied. We tested the hypothesis that Joshua tree seeds are dispersed by seed-caching rodents. We radioactively labelled Joshua tree seeds and followed their fates at five source plants in Potosi Wash, Clark County, Nevada, USA. Rodents made a mean of 30.6 caches, usually within 30 m of the base of source plants. Caches contained a mean of 5.2 seeds buried 3-30 nun deep. A variety of rodent species appears to have prepared the caches. Three of the 836 Joshua tree seeds (0.4%) cached germinated the following spring. Seed germination using rodent exclosures was nearly 15%. More than 82% of seeds in open plots were removed by granivores, and neither microsite nor supplemental water significantly affected germination. Joshua tree produces seeds in indehiscent pods or capsules, which rodents dismantle to harvest seeds. Because there is no other known means of seed dispersal, it is possible that the Joshua tree-rodent seed dispersal interaction is an obligate mutualism for the plant.

  3. Indirect food web interactions mediated by predator-rodent dynamics: relative roles of lemmings and voles.

    PubMed

    Ims, Rolf A; Henden, John-André; Thingnes, Anders V; Killengreen, Siw T

    2013-01-01

    Production cycles in birds are proposed as prime cases of indirect interactions in food webs. They are thought to be driven by predators switching from rodents to bird nests in the crash phase of rodent population cycles. Although rodent cycles are geographically widespread and found in different rodent taxa, bird production cycles appear to be most profound in the high Arctic where lemmings dominate. We hypothesized that this may be due to arctic lemmings inducing stronger predator responses than boreal voles. We tested this hypothesis by estimating predation rates in dummy bird nests during a rodent cycle in low-Arctic tundra. Here, the rodent community consists of a spatially variable mix of one lemming (Lemmus lemmus) and two vole species (Myodes rufocanus and Microtus oeconomus) with similar abundances. In consistence with our hypothesis, lemming peak abundances predicted well crash-phase nest predation rates, whereas the vole abundances had no predictive ability. Corvids were found to be the most important nest predators. Lemmings appear to be accessible to the whole predator community which makes them particularly powerful drivers of food web dynamics. PMID:24173526

  4. Oxidative and nutrient stability of a standard rodent spaceflight diet during long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gwo-Shing; Tou, Janet C; Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra A; Hill, Esther L; Liittschwager, Kurt W; Girten, Beverly E; Pena-Yewkukhiw, Eugenia

    2012-09-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's standard spaceflight diet for rodents is the nutrient-upgraded rodent food bar (NuRFB). The shelf life of the NuRFB needs to be determined in order to avoid malnutrition of rodents and confounding of research results resulting from nutritional deficiency. The authors compared the oxidative and nutrient stability of NuRFBs stored at either ambient temperature (26 °C) or at refrigeration temperature (4 °C) for use in long-term rodent feeding experiments. After 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months (mo) of storage, lipid oxidation, fatty acid composition and amounts of specific vitamins and amino acids in NuRFBs were analyzed. No oxidative rancidity developed in NuRFBs stored at 4 °C for up to 12 mo, but NuRFBs stored at 26 °C for 6 mo developed oxidative rancidity and had reduced amounts of ?-linolenic acid (18:3n-6). Despite loss of vitamin E, vitamin A and thiamin after storage at 26 °C for 12 mo, vitamin levels in NuRFBs remained at or above the levels recommended for optimal rodent health. The amino acid profile of NuRFBs was unaffected by storage at 4 °C or 26 °C for 12 mo. The results suggest that NuRFBs stored at 4 °C for up to 12 mo and NuRFBs stored at 26 °C for up to 6 mo provide suitable nutrition for rodents in long-term experiments. PMID:22914028

  5. A comparison of bats and rodents as reservoirs of zoonotic viruses: are bats special?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luis, Angela D.; Hayman, David T.S.; O'Shea, Thomas J.; Cryan, Paul M.; Gilbert, Amy T.; Pulliam, Juliet R.C.; Mills, James N.; Timonin, Mary E.; Willis, Craig K.R.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Wood, James L.N.; Webb, Colleen T.

    2013-01-01

    Bats are the natural reservoirs of a number of high-impact viral zoonoses. We present a quantitative analysis to address the hypothesis that bats are unique in their propensity to host zoonotic viruses based on a comparison with rodents, another important host order. We found that bats indeed host more zoonotic viruses per species than rodents, and we identified life-history and ecological factors that promote zoonotic viral richness. More zoonotic viruses are hosted by species whose distributions overlap with a greater number of other species in the same taxonomic order (sympatry). Specifically in bats, there was evidence for increased zoonotic viral richness in species with smaller litters (one young), greater longevity and more litters per year. Furthermore, our results point to a new hypothesis to explain in part why bats host more zoonotic viruses per species: the stronger effect of sympatry in bats and more viruses shared between bat species suggests that interspecific transmission is more prevalent among bats than among rodents. Although bats host more zoonotic viruses per species, the total number of zoonotic viruses identified in bats (61) was lower than in rodents (68), a result of there being approximately twice the number of rodent species as bat species. Therefore, rodents should still be a serious concern as reservoirs of emerging viruses. These findings shed light on disease emergence and perpetuation mechanisms and may help lead to a predictive framework for identifying future emerging infectious virus reservoirs.

  6. Prevalence and Diversity of Bartonella Species in Commensal Rodents and Ectoparasites from Nigeria, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kamani, Joshua; Morick, Danny; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y.; Harrus, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Background Bartonellae are fastidious bacteria causing persistent bacteremia in humans and a wide variety of animals. In recent years there is an increasing interest in mammalian bartonelloses in general and in rodent bartonelloses in particular. To date, no studies investigating the presence of Bartonella spp. in rodents and ectoparasites from Nigeria were carried out. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of the current study was to investigate the presence of Bartonella spp. in commensal rodents and their ectoparasites in Nigeria. We report, for the first time, the molecular detection of Bartonella in 26% (46/177) of commensal rodents (Rattus rattus, R. norvegicus and Cricetomys gambianus) and 28% (9/32) of ectoparasite pools (Xenopsylla cheopis, Haemolaelaps spp., Ctenophthalmus spp., Hemimerus talpoides, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus) from Nigeria. Sequence analysis of the citrate synthase gene (gltA) revealed diversity of Bartonella spp. and genotypes in Nigerian rodents and their ectoparasites. Bartonella spp. identical or closely related to Bartonella elizabethae, Bartonella tribocorum and Bartonella grahamii were detected. Conclusions/Significance High prevalence of infection with Bartonella spp. was detected in commensal rodents and ectoparasites from Nigeria. The Bartonella spp. identified were previously associated with human diseases highlighting their importance to public health. Further studies need to be conducted to determine whether the identified Bartonella species could be responsible for human cases of febrile illness in Nigeria. PMID:23738028

  7. Environmental genotoxicity evaluation using cytogenetic end points in wild rodents.

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Bueno, A M; de Bragança Pereira, C A; Rabello-Gay, M N

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed cytogenetic end points in three populations of two species of wild rodents--Akodon montensis and Oryzomys nigripes--living in an industrial, an agricultural, and a preservation area at the Itajaí Valley, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Our purpose was to evaluate the performance of the following end points in the establishment of a genotoxic profile of each area: the polychromatic/normochromatic cell ratio; the mitotic index; the frequency of micronucleated cells both in the bone marrow and peripheral blood; and the frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations in the bone marrow. Preparations were obtained using conventional cytogenetic techniques. The results showed a) the role of the end points used as biomarkers in the early detection of genotoxic agents and in the identification of species and populations at higher risk; b) the difference in sensitivity of the species selected as bioindicators in relation to the cytogenetic end points analyzed; c) the need to use at least two sympatric species to detect the presence of genotoxins in each locality; and d) the need to use several end points when trying to establish a genotoxic profile of an area. PMID:11133397

  8. PhenoWorld: a new paradigm to screen rodent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Castelhano-Carlos, M; Costa, P S; Russig, H; Sousa, N

    2014-01-01

    Modeling depression in animals has inherent complexities that are augmented by intrinsic difficulties to measure the characteristic features of the disorder. Herein, we describe the PhenoWorld (PhW), a new setting in which groups of six rats lived in an ethological enriched environment, and have their feeding, locomotor activity, sleeping and social behavior automatically monitored. A battery of emotional and cognitive tests was used to characterize the behavioral phenotype of animals living in the PhW and in standard conditions (in groups of six and two rats), after exposure to an unpredictable chronic mild stress paradigm (uCMS) and antidepressants. Data reveal that animals living in the PhW displayed similar, but more striking, behavioral differences when exposed to uCMS, such as increased behavioral despair shown in the forced swimming test, resting/sleep behavior disturbances and reduced social interactions. Moreover, several PhW-cage behaviors, such as spontaneous will to go for food or exercise in running wheels, proved to be sensitive indicators of depressive-like behavior. In summary, this new ethological enriched paradigm adds significant discriminative power to screen depressive-like behavior, in particularly rodent's hedonic behavior. PMID:26126181

  9. Effect of predation risk on selectivity in heteromyid rodents.

    PubMed

    Leaver, Lisa A.; Daly, Martin

    2003-08-29

    Variations in predation risk affect the costs of foraging and may therefore warrant different foraging decisions. One class of models ("higher requisite profit") predicts that foragers should become more selective when predation risk increases, as low-profitability items that do not cover the increased costs are dropped from the diet. An alternative class of models ("reduced finickiness") predicts that foragers should become less selective when predation risk increases, because selectivity requires more extensive assessment and/or search behaviour, prolonging exposure to risk. We assessed the selectivity of foraging heteromyid rodents (Merriam's kangaroo rats, Dipodomys merriami, and pocket mice, Chaetodipus spp.) by comparing differences in "giving up densities" (GUD: the quantity of cryptic food left in a patch by animals for whom the diminishing marginal gains from foraging have dropped below the threshold for continued search) for foods of different value as a measure of selectivity in patches varying in predation risk. Data collected over two field seasons revealed that heteromyids were more selective when predation risk was highest; away from the protective cover of shrubs during the full moon. These findings support the predictions of higher requisite profit models. PMID:12914997

  10. Rodent and ruminant ingestive response to flavonoids in Euphorbia esula.

    PubMed

    Halaweish, F; Kronberg, S; Rice, J A

    2003-05-01

    Euphorbia esula, common name leafy spurge, was chemically evaluated for aversive phytochemicals that appear to minimize herbivory by rodents and cattle. A middle-layer extract elicited food aversions in rats as did the petroleum ether extract of the initial methanol extract. Kaempferol-3-0-beta-glucuronic acid and quercetin-3-0-beta-glucuronic acid were separated and identified from the middle-layer residue. This study is the first report of quercetin-3-0-beta-glucuronic acid in leafy spurge. Together these flavonoidal glucosides were mildly aversive to rats but showed less aversive activity when tested separately. The middle-layer extract produced no aversive response from cattle, while the petroleum ether extract elicited strong aversions in cattle. Flavonoidal compounds from leafy spurge that were aversive to rats, a monogastric mammal, were not aversive to cattle, a ruminant. Microbial degradation of the compounds before they reach the intestines and are absorbed into the bloodstream is likely a key advantage for cattle compared to rats. PMID:12857022

  11. The effects of dietary restriction on oxidative stress in rodents.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael E; Shi, Yun; Van Remmen, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is observed during aging and in numerous age-related diseases. Dietary restriction (DR) is a regimen that protects against disease and extends life span in multiple species. However, it is unknown how DR mediates its protective effects. One prominent and consistent effect of DR in a number of systems is the ability to reduce oxidative stress and damage. The purpose of this review is to comprehensively examine the hypothesis that dietary restriction reduces oxidative stress in rodents by decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and increasing antioxidant enzyme activity, leading to an overall reduction of oxidative damage to macromolecules. The literature reveals that the effects of DR on oxidative stress are complex and likely influenced by a variety of factors, including sex, species, tissue examined, types of ROS and antioxidant enzymes examined, and duration of DR. Here we present a comprehensive review of the existing literature on the effect of DR on mitochondrial ROS generation, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative damage. In a majority of studies, dietary restriction had little effect on mitochondrial ROS production or antioxidant activity. On the other hand, DR decreased oxidative damage in the majority of cases. Although the effects of DR on endogenous antioxidants are mixed, we find that glutathione levels are the most likely antioxidant to be increased by dietary restriction, which supports the emerging redox-stress hypothesis of aging. PMID:23743291

  12. A new gustometer for taste testing in rodents.

    PubMed

    Spector, Alan C; Blonde, Ginger D; Henderson, Ross P; Treesukosol, Yada; Hendrick, Paul; Newsome, Ryan; Fletcher, Fred H; Tang, Te; Donaldson, James A

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, to circumvent the interpretive limitations associated with intake tests commonly used to assess taste function in rodents, investigators have developed devices called gustometers to deliver small volumes of taste samples and measure immediate responses, thereby increasing confidence that the behavior of the animal is under orosensory control. Most of these gustometers can be used to measure unconditioned licking behavior to stimuli presented for short durations and/or can be used to train the animal to respond to various fluid stimuli differentially so as to obtain a reward and/or avoid punishment. Psychometric sensitivity and discrimination functions can thus be derived. Here, we describe a new gustometer design, successfully used in behavioral experiments, that was guided by our experience with an older version used for over 2 decades. The new computer-controlled gustometer features no dead space in stimulus delivery lines, effective cleaning of the licking substrate, and the ability to measure licking without passing electrical current through the animal. The parts and dimensions are detailed, and the benefits and limitations of certain design features are discussed. Schematics for key circuits are provided as supplemental information. Accordingly, it should be possible to fabricate this device in a fashion customized for one's needs. PMID:25616763

  13. Heterochrony and patterns of cranial suture closure in hystricognath rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2009-01-01

    Sutures, joints that allow one bone to articulate with another through intervening fibrous connective tissue, serve as major sites of bone expansion during postnatal craniofacial growth in the vertebrate skull and represent an aspect of cranial ontogeny which may exhibit functional and phylogenetic correlates. Suture evolution among hystricognath rodents, an ecologically diverse group represented here by 26 species, is examined using sequence heterochrony methods, i.e. event pairing and parsimov. Although minor nuances in suture closure sequence exist between species, the overall sequence was found to be conserved both across the hystricognath group and, to an increasing degree, within selected clades. At species level, suture closure pattern exhibited a significant positive correlation with patterns previously reported for hominoids. Patterns for most clades revealed the first sutures to close are those contacting the exoccipital, interparietal, and palatine bones. Heterochronic shifts were found along 19 of 35 branches within the hystricognath phylogeny. The number of shifts per node ranged from one to seven events and, overall, involved 21 of 34 suture sites. The topology generated by parsimony analyses of the event pair matrix yielded only one grouping that was congruent with the evolutionary relationships, compiled from morphological and molecular studies, taken as framework. Sutures contacting the exoccipital displayed the highest levels of most complete closure across all species. Level of suture closure is negatively correlated with cranial length (P < 0.05). Differing life history and locomotory strategies are coupled in part with differing suture closure patterns among several species. PMID:19245501

  14. Evolving communicative complexity: insights from rodents and beyond.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Kimberly A; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2012-07-01

    Social living goes hand in hand with communication, but the details of this relationship are rarely simple. Complex communication may be described by attributes as diverse as a species' entire repertoire, signallers' individualistic signatures, or complex acoustic phenomena within single calls. Similarly, attributes of social complexity are diverse and may include group size, social role diversity, or networks of interactions and relationships. How these different attributes of social and communicative complexity co-evolve is an active question in behavioural ecology. Sciurid rodents (ground squirrels, prairie dogs and marmots) provide an excellent model system for studying these questions. Sciurid studies have found that demographic role complexity predicts alarm call repertoire size, while social group size predicts alarm call individuality. Along with other taxa, sciurids reveal an important insight: different attributes of sociality are linked to different attributes of communication. By breaking social and communicative complexity down to different attributes, focused studies can better untangle the underlying evolutionary relationships and move us closer to a comprehensive theory of how sociality and communication evolve. PMID:22641825

  15. Electrically Induced Limbic Seizures: Preliminary Findings in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Kowski, Alexander B; Holtkamp, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In epilepsy, novel pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment approaches are commonly assessed in model systems of acute motor and often generalized seizures. We developed a rodent model with short-term electrical stimulation of the perforant path resulting in stereotyped limbic seizures. Limbic structures play a major role in human intractable epilepsy. In 10 rats, single electrical 5-second and 20-Hz stimuli to the perforant path reliably produced limbic seizures characterized by resting behavior and subtle motor signs. Electrophysiological recordings from the dentate gyrus demonstrated a seizure pattern with 4-Hz to 5-Hz discharges. Multiple inductions of seizures within 72 hours did not alter behavioral and electrophysiological seizure characteristics. Electrophysiological excitatory and inhibitory parameters assessed by evoked single and paired pulses did not change with increasing number of seizures. We present preliminary findings on a new model of electrically induced limbic seizures of mesiotemporal origin. This model may represent a reliable screening tool for new treatment approaches such as deep brain stimulation. PMID:25861223

  16. Social memories in rodents: methods, mechanisms and modulation by stress.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, Michael A; Sandi, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Intact social memory forms the basis of meaningful interactions between individuals. Many factors can modulate the quality of social memory, and these have been studied in detail in rodents. Social memory, however, cannot be considered a single entity. The term social memory reflects different processes, such as social recognition of a novel conspecific individual and social learning (or 'learning from others'). This review summarizes the findings obtained with behavioral paradigms that were developed for the study of memory formation by social recognition and social learning. In particular, we focus on studies that include tests for social habituation/discrimination paradigms, tests for memory of a previously established social hierarchy and the social transmission of the food preference test. The role of individual differences and the main neurobiological mechanisms (i.e., the brain regions and neurochemical systems involved) that have been implicated in each of these types of social-related memories are reviewed. In addition, we address the key modulatory influence of stress on the formation of these types of memories; discussing the contribution of central (corticotropin-releasing factor, CRF) and peripheral (glucocorticoids) stress systems and their interactions with the social neuropeptide systems. Overall, we present here a general overview of the current state of a thriving research area within the field of social neuroscience. PMID:22079398

  17. Neural-targeted gene therapy for rodent and primate hemiparkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Anton, R; Kordower, J H; Maidment, N T; Manaster, J S; Kane, D J; Rabizadeh, S; Schueller, S B; Yang, J; Rabizadeh, S; Edwards, R H

    1994-06-01

    Expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for catecholamine biosynthesis, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), via retroviral and plasmid expression vectors improved the efficacy of conditionally immortalized nigral neural cells in ameliorating rodent and nonhuman primate models of Parkinson's disease through neural transplantation. No improvement in rotational behavior occurred when sham transplants or nondopaminergic transplants were performed. Transplantation of the temperature-sensitive immortalized parental nigral neural line with a TH expression vector resulted in improvement for at least 2 months. Improvement was accompanied by HPLC evidence of increased L-DOPA production and immunocytochemical evidence of TH in the transfected cells increased over that of the parental line. No tumor formation was detected. These results suggest that: (1) temperature-sensitive immortalized neural cells may be genetically engineered successfully to improve their efficacy for the treatment of parkinsonism; and (2) a change in L-DOPA production, as opposed to growth factor production or other factors, is likely to account for the observed improvement, since the parental and derived lines differ by a single gene. PMID:7518394

  18. Protracted brain development in a rodent model of extreme longevity.

    PubMed

    Penz, Orsolya K; Fuzik, Janos; Kurek, Aleksandra B; Romanov, Roman; Larson, John; Park, Thomas J; Harkany, Tibor; Keimpema, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Extreme longevity requires the continuous and large-scale adaptation of organ systems to delay senescence. Naked mole rats are the longest-living rodents, whose nervous system likely undergoes life-long adaptive reorganization. Nevertheless, neither the cellular organization of their cerebral cortex nor indices of structural neuronal plasticity along extreme time-scales have been established. We find that adult neurogenesis and neuronal migration are not unusual in naked mole rat brains. Instead, we show the prolonged expression of structural plasticity markers, many recognized as being developmentally controlled, and multi-year-long postnatal neuromorphogenesis and spatial synapse refinement in hippocampal and olfactory structures of the naked mole rat brain. Neurophysiological studies on identified hippocampal neurons demonstrated that morphological differentiation is disconnected from the control of excitability in all neuronal contingents regardless of their ability to self-renew. Overall, we conclude that naked mole rats show an extremely protracted period of brain maturation that may permit plasticity and resilience to neurodegenerative processes over their decades-long life span. This conclusion is consistent with the hypothesis that naked mole rats are neotenous, with retention of juvenile characteristics to permit survival in a hypoxic environment, with extreme longevity a consequence of greatly retarded development. PMID:26118676

  19. Evolving communicative complexity: insights from rodents and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Kimberly A.; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Social living goes hand in hand with communication, but the details of this relationship are rarely simple. Complex communication may be described by attributes as diverse as a species' entire repertoire, signallers' individualistic signatures, or complex acoustic phenomena within single calls. Similarly, attributes of social complexity are diverse and may include group size, social role diversity, or networks of interactions and relationships. How these different attributes of social and communicative complexity co-evolve is an active question in behavioural ecology. Sciurid rodents (ground squirrels, prairie dogs and marmots) provide an excellent model system for studying these questions. Sciurid studies have found that demographic role complexity predicts alarm call repertoire size, while social group size predicts alarm call individuality. Along with other taxa, sciurids reveal an important insight: different attributes of sociality are linked to different attributes of communication. By breaking social and communicative complexity down to different attributes, focused studies can better untangle the underlying evolutionary relationships and move us closer to a comprehensive theory of how sociality and communication evolve. PMID:22641825

  20. An Experimental Model for Resistance Exercise in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Humberto; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy; da Luz, Claudia Ribeiro; Chaves, Daniela Fojo Seixas; Lancha, Antonio Herbert

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an equipment and system of resistance exercise (RE), based on squat-type exercise for rodents, with control of training variables. We developed an operant conditioning system composed of sound, light and feeding devices that allowed optimized RE performance by the animal. With this system, it is not necessary to impose fasting or electric shock for the animal to perform the task proposed (muscle contraction). Furthermore, it is possible to perform muscle function tests in vivo within the context of the exercise proposed and control variables such as intensity, volume (sets and repetitions), and exercise session length, rest interval between sets and repetitions, and concentric strength. Based on the experiments conducted, we demonstrated that the model proposed is able to perform more specific control of other RE variables, especially rest interval between sets and repetitions, and encourages the animal to exercise through short-term energy restriction and “disturbing” stimulus that do not promote alterations in body weight. Therefore, despite experimental limitations, we believe that this RE apparatus is closer to the physiological context observed in humans. PMID:22496606

  1. An experimental model for resistance exercise in rodents.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Humberto; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy; da Luz, Claudia Ribeiro; Chaves, Daniela Fojo Seixas; Lancha, Antonio Herbert

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an equipment and system of resistance exercise (RE), based on squat-type exercise for rodents, with control of training variables. We developed an operant conditioning system composed of sound, light and feeding devices that allowed optimized RE performance by the animal. With this system, it is not necessary to impose fasting or electric shock for the animal to perform the task proposed (muscle contraction). Furthermore, it is possible to perform muscle function tests in vivo within the context of the exercise proposed and control variables such as intensity, volume (sets and repetitions), and exercise session length, rest interval between sets and repetitions, and concentric strength. Based on the experiments conducted, we demonstrated that the model proposed is able to perform more specific control of other RE variables, especially rest interval between sets and repetitions, and encourages the animal to exercise through short-term energy restriction and "disturbing" stimulus that do not promote alterations in body weight. Therefore, despite experimental limitations, we believe that this RE apparatus is closer to the physiological context observed in humans. PMID:22496606

  2. Electrochemical Techniques for Subsecond Neurotransmitter Detection in Live Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in neurotransmission have been implicated in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Unfortunately, few techniques support the measurement of real-time changes in neurotransmitter levels over multiple days, as is essential for ethologic and pharmacodynamic testing. Microdialysis is commonly used for these research paradigms, but its poor temporal and spatial resolution make this technique inadequate for measuring the rapid dynamics (milliseconds to seconds) of fast signaling neurotransmitters, such as glutamate and acetylcholine. Enzymatic microelectrode arrays (biosensors) coupled with electrochemical recording techniques have demonstrated fast temporal resolution (less than 1 s), excellent spatial resolution (micron-scale), low detection limits (?200 nM), and minimal damage (50 to 100 µm) to surrounding brain tissue. Here we discuss the benefits, methods, and animal welfare considerations of using platinum microelectrodes on a ceramic substrate for enzyme-based electrochemical recording techniques for real-time in vivo neurotransmitter recordings in both anesthetized and awake, freely moving rodents. PMID:25296011

  3. Sexual Differentiation of the Rodent Brain: Dogma and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Kathryn M.; Nugent, Bridget M.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2012-01-01

    Steroid hormones of gonadal origin act on the neonatal brain to produce sex differences that underlie adult reproductive physiology and behavior. Neuronal sex differences occur on a variety of levels, including differences in regional volume and/or cell number, morphology, physiology, molecular signaling, and gene expression. In the rodent, many of these sex differences are determined by steroid hormones, particularly estradiol, and are established by diverse downstream effects. One brain region that is potently organized by estradiol is the preoptic area (POA), a region critically involved in many behaviors that show sex differences, including copulatory and maternal behaviors. This review focuses on the POA as a case study exemplifying the depth and breadth of our knowledge as well as the gaps in understanding the mechanisms through which gonadal hormones produce lasting neural and behavioral sex differences. In the POA, multiple cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, and microglia are masculinized by estradiol. Multiple downstream molecular mediators are involved, including prostaglandins, various glutamate receptors, protein kinase A, and several immune signaling molecules. Moreover, emerging evidence indicates epigenetic mechanisms maintain sex differences in the POA that are organized perinatally and thereby produce permanent behavioral changes. We also review emerging strategies to better elucidate the mechanisms through which genetics and epigenetics contribute to brain and behavioral sex differences. PMID:22363256

  4. Protracted brain development in a rodent model of extreme longevity

    PubMed Central

    Penz, Orsolya K.; Fuzik, Janos; Kurek, Aleksandra B.; Romanov, Roman; Larson, John; Park, Thomas J.; Harkany, Tibor; Keimpema, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Extreme longevity requires the continuous and large-scale adaptation of organ systems to delay senescence. Naked mole rats are the longest-living rodents, whose nervous system likely undergoes life-long adaptive reorganization. Nevertheless, neither the cellular organization of their cerebral cortex nor indices of structural neuronal plasticity along extreme time-scales have been established. We find that adult neurogenesis and neuronal migration are not unusual in naked mole rat brains. Instead, we show the prolonged expression of structural plasticity markers, many recognized as being developmentally controlled, and multi-year-long postnatal neuromorphogenesis and spatial synapse refinement in hippocampal and olfactory structures of the naked mole rat brain. Neurophysiological studies on identified hippocampal neurons demonstrated that morphological differentiation is disconnected from the control of excitability in all neuronal contingents regardless of their ability to self-renew. Overall, we conclude that naked mole rats show an extremely protracted period of brain maturation that may permit plasticity and resilience to neurodegenerative processes over their decades-long life span. This conclusion is consistent with the hypothesis that naked mole rats are neotenous, with retention of juvenile characteristics to permit survival in a hypoxic environment, with extreme longevity a consequence of greatly retarded development. PMID:26118676

  5. Chemoprophylaxis of Tropical Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    McBride, William J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Travelers to tropical countries are at risk for a variety of infectious diseases. In some cases effective vaccinations are available, but for other infections chemoprophylaxis can be offered. Malaria prevention has become increasingly complex as Plasmodium species become resistant to available drugs. In certain high risk settings, antibiotics can be used to prevent leptospirosis, scrub typhus and other infections. Post-exposure prophylaxis is appropriate for selected virulent infections. In this article the evidence for chemoprophylaxis will be reviewed.

  6. Geographic variation in rodent-flea relationships in the presence of black-tailed prairie dog colonies.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Bala; Cully, Jack F; Loughin, Thomas M; Montenieri, John A; Gage, Kenneth L

    2008-06-01

    We characterized the relationship between fleas and their rodent hosts in the presence of prairie dog colonies and compared them to adjacent assemblages away from colonies. We evaluated the rodent-flea relationship by quantifying prevalence, probability of infestation, flea load, and intensity of fleas on rodents. As prairie dog burrows provide refugia for fleas, we hypothesized that prevalence, flea load, and intensity would be higher for rodents that are associated with black-tailed prairie dog colonies. Rodents were trapped at off- and on-colony grids, resulting in the collection of 4,509 fleas from 1,430 rodents in six study areas. The rodent community composition varied between these study areas. Flea species richness was not different between prairie dog colonies and the surrounding grasslands (p = 0.883) but was positively correlated with rodent species richness (p = 0.055). Prairie dog colonies did not increase the prevalence of fleas (p > 0.10). Flea loads on rodents did not vary between off- and on-colony grids at three of the study areas (p > 0.10). Based on the prevalence, infestation rates, and flea loads, we identified Peromyscus maniculatus, Onychomys leucogaster, and two Neotoma species as important rodent hosts for fleas and Aetheca wagneri, Orchopeus leucopus, Peromyscopsylla hesperomys, Pleochaetis exilis, and Thrassisfotus as the most important fleas associated with these rodents. Prairie dog colonies did not seem to facilitate transmission of fleas between rodent hosts, and the few rodent-flea associations exhibited significant differences between off- and on-colony grids. PMID:18697322

  7. Flavonoids in tropical citrus species.

    PubMed

    Roowi, Suri; Crozier, Alan

    2011-11-23

    HPLC with PDA and MS(2) detection was used to identify and quantify flavonoids in the tropical citrus species Citrus microcarpa , Citrus hystrix , Citrus medica var. 1 and 2, and Citrus suhuiensis . Most of these species contained high amounts of flavones, flavanones, and dihydrochalcone C- and/or O-glycosides, which were identified on the basis of HPLC retention times, cochromatography with available authentic standards, absorbance spectra, and mass spectral fragmentation patterns. Among the major compounds detected were apigenin-6,8-di-C-glucoside, apigenin-8-C-glucosyl-2?-O-rhamnoside, phloretin-3',5'-di-C-glucoside, diosmetin-7-O-rutinoside, hesperetin-7-O-neohesperidoside, and hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside. Most of the dihydrochalcone and flavone C-glycosides have not previously been detected in tropical citrus. C. microcarpa contained a high amount of phloretin-3',5'-di-C-glucoside. Most of the tropical citrus flavanones were neohesperidoside conjugates, which are responsible for imparting a bitter taste to the fruit. Only C. suhuiensis fruit contains rutinoside, a nonbitter conjugate. PMID:21978223

  8. Medical geochemistry of tropical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, C. B.; Chandrajith, Rohana

    1999-10-01

    Geochemically, tropical environments are unique. This uniqueness stems from the fact that these terrains are continuously subjected to extreme rainfall and drought with resulting strong geochemical fractionation of elements. This characteristic geochemical partitioning results in either severe depletion of elements or accumulation to toxic levels. In both these situations, the effect on plant, animal and human health is marked. Medical geochemistry involves the study of the relationships between the geochemistry of the environment in which we live and the health of the population living in this particular domain. Interestingly, the relationships between geochemistry and health are most marked in the tropical countries, which coincidentally are among the poorest in the world. The very heavy dependence on the immediate environment for sustainable living in these lands enables the medical geochemist to observe correlations between particular geochemical provinces and the incidence of certain diseases unique to these terrains. The aetiology of diseases such as dental and skeletal fluorosis, iodine deficiency disorders, diseases of humans and animals caused by mineral imbalances among others, lie clearly in the geochemical environment. The study of the chemistry of the soils, water and stream sediments in relation to the incidence of geographically distributed diseases in the tropics has not only opened up new frontiers in multidisciplinary research, but has offered new challenges to the medical profession to seriously focus attention on the emerging field of medical geochemistry with the collaboration of geochemists and epidemiologists.

  9. [Tropical medicine/tropical dermatology training in Tanzania and Ghana : Personal experience and selected case reports].

    PubMed

    Völker, K

    2015-05-01

    As a consultant for dermatology with special interested in tropical diseases, I accepted my employers offer (German Armed Forces) to start my training in tropical medicine and tropical dermatology in Africa. The dermatological part of the training was completed at the Regional Dermatology Training Centre (RDTC) in Moshi, Tanzania. This was followed by tropical medicine training at the Presbyterian Hospital in Agogo, Ghana. In this article, I report on my experiences in Africa and present selected case reports. PMID:25911202

  10. Tropical forest preservation using economic incentives

    SciTech Connect

    Katzman, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Cale, W.G. Jr. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Indiana (USA))

    1990-12-01

    The authors address the problem of deforestation of the tropical forests in terms of economic factors. They outline the global effects, such as hydrological and climatological changes, that apparently small scale deforestation has, when the forest is destroyed in many different places. The authors suggest that industrialized nations should offer economic incentives for tropical nations to save their forests, since all the world will suffer the effects of tropical deforestation.

  11. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow. Christian; Hong, Ye

    1999-01-01

    The importance of quantitative knowledge of tropical rainfall, its associated latent heating and variability is summarized in the context of the global hydrologic cycle. Much of the tropics is covered by oceans. What land exists, is covered largely by rainforests that are only thinly populated. The only way to adequately measure the global tropical rainfall for climate and general circulation models is from space. To address these issues, the TRMM satellite was launched in Nov. 1997. It has been operating successfully ever since.

  12. Solar and anthropogenic forcing of tropical hydrology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Drew T. Shindell; Greg Faluvegi; Ron L. Miller; Gavin A. Schmidt; James E. Hansen; Shan Sun

    2006-01-01

    Holocene climate proxies suggest substantial correlations between tropical meteorology and solar variations, but these have thus far not been explained. Using a coupled ocean-atmosphere-composition model forced by sustained multi-decadal irradiance increases, we show that greater tropical temperatures alter the hydrologic cycle, enhancing the climatological precipitation maxima in the tropics while drying the subtropical subsidence regions. The shift is enhanced by

  13. Tropical intraseasonal rainfall variability in the CFSR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiande Wang; Wanqiu Wang; Xiouhua Fu; Kyong-Hwan Seo

    2011-01-01

    While large-scale circulation fields from atmospheric reanalyses have been widely used to study the tropical intraseasonal\\u000a variability, rainfall variations from the reanalyses are less focused. Because of the sparseness of in situ observations available\\u000a in the tropics and strong coupling between convection and large-scale circulation, the accuracy of tropical rainfall from\\u000a the reanalyses not only measures the quality of reanalysis

  14. A Student Guide to Tropical Forest Conservation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This student guide provides an introduction to the types and value of tropical forests, deforestation, the practice of forestry, forestry research, and tropical forestry. The guide shows how modern practices can help stem the tide of forest destruction while continuing to provide valuable products for people. Examples of sustainable forestry are cited, which could be used as models for protecting and managing tropical forests worldwide.

  15. Technology transfer in tropical animal health and production at the Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine (CTVM)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Scott; A. J. Smith

    1996-01-01

    Although this is an edition of the Journal celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine (CTVM), tropical veterinary medicine has been taught at the Edinburgh Veterinary School for 65 years. During that time the emphasis has changed from the training solely of British veterinarians for work in the tropics to training both veterinarians and those from

  16. Cloud system resolving model simulations of tropical cloud systems observed during the Tropical

    E-print Network

    Jakob, Christian

    the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The WRF model is configured with a highest-resolving domainCloud system resolving model simulations of tropical cloud systems observed during the Tropical #12;Abstract Nested cloud system resolving model simulations of tropical convective clouds observed

  17. Frequency of tropical precipitating clouds as observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar and

    E-print Network

    Frequency of tropical precipitating clouds as observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission July 2007. [1] Convective clouds in the tropics can be grouped into three categories: shallow clouds with cloud top heights near 2 km above the surface, midlevel congestus clouds with tops near the 0°C level

  18. A TROPICAL GARDEN FLORA, PLANTS CULTIVATED IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS AND OTHER TROPICAL AREAS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pemberton, R.W. A Tropical Garden Flora, Plants Cultivated in the Hawaiian Islands and Other Tropical Areas. Economic Botany This is an invited book review of an important new reference book on plants cultivated in the tropical and subtropical areas of the world. This is the long awaited update of ...

  19. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Alexey [Yale University] [Yale University

    2013-12-07

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  20. The ecology of tropical lakes and rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    This is self-contained text reviewing tropical limnology. It discusses a number of communities in detail, including plankton, benthic regions, and the water margins. It introduces the characteristic types and assemblies of animals and plants from tropical communities. The measurement and relative magnitude of such quantifiable aspects as abundance, biomass, primary production, secondary production, and decomposition are all outlined, drawing together the diverse threads of freshwater ecology over one of the earth's climatic belts. Deals with use and abuse of water in the tropics and looks at problems of diversity and diversification in tropical waters.

  1. Nitrous oxide flux following tropical land clearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luizao, Flavio; Luizao, Regina; Matson, Pamela; Livingston, Gerald; Vitousek, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The importance of seasonal cycles of N2O flux from tropical ecosystems and the possibility that tropical deforestation could contribute to the ongoing global increase in N2O concentrations were assessed by measuring N2O flux from forest, cleared land, and pasture over an annual cycle in the central Amazon. A pasture that had been converted from tropical forest had threefold greater annual N2O flux than a paired forest site; similar results were obtained in spot measurements in other pastures. If these results are general, such tropical pastures represent a globally significant source of increased N2O.

  2. The diversity of microparasites of rodents: a comparative analysis that helps in identifying rodent-borne rich habitats in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Frédéric; Herbreteau, Vincent; Dupuy, Stéphane; Chaval, Yannick; Tran, Annelise; Morand, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Background Predicting habitats prone to favor disease transmission is challenging due to confounding information on habitats, reservoirs, and diseases. Comparative analysis, which aims at investigating ecological and evolutionary patterns among species, is a tool that may help. The emergence of zoonotic pathogens is a major health concern and is closely linked to habitat modifications by human activities. Risk assessment requires a better knowledge of the interactions between hosts, parasites, and the landscape. Methods We used information from a field spatial study that investigated the distribution of murid rodents, in various habitats of three countries in Southeast Asia, in combination with their status of infection by 10 taxa of microparasites obtained from the literature. Microparasite species richness was calculated by rodent species on 20,272 rodents of 13 species. Regression tree models and generalized linear models were used to explain microparasite diversity by the average distance between the trapping site and five categories of land cover: forest, steep agriculture land, flat agriculture land, water, and built-up surfaces. Another variable taken into account was the slope. Results We found that microparasite diversity was positively associated with flat agriculture land, in this context mainly rice fields, and negatively associated with slope. Microparasite diversity decreased sharply a 100 m or less from flat agriculture land. Conclusion We conclude that there is high microparasite circulation in rodents of flooded farmlands, meaning possibly a higher risk of disease for human inhabitants. PMID:23577229

  3. Investigation and characterization of the frozen feeder rodent industry in Texas following a multi-state Salmonella typhimurium outbreak associated with frozen vacuum-packed rodents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Salmonella outbreak investigation identified a frozen feeder rodent facility (Supplier A) served as the vector of a pathogenic Salmonella strain for pet snakes and humans. From Supplier A, seven Salmonella positive samples out of 45 environmental swabs were found, and only one adult mouse out of ...

  4. Ligand Directed Signaling Differences between Rodent and Human ?-Opioid Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Schattauer, Selena S.; Miyatake, Mayumi; Shankar, Haripriya; Zietz, Chad; Levin, Jamie R.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Rieder, Mark J.; Chavkin, Charles

    2012-01-01

    KOR activation of G?? dependent signaling results in analgesia, whereas the dysphoric effects of KOR agonists are mediated by a different pathway involving G protein receptor kinase and non-visual arrestin. Based on this distinction, a partial KOR agonist that does not efficiently activate arrestin-dependent biased signaling may produce analgesia without dysphoria. No KOR-selective partial agonists are currently available, and preclinical assessment is complicated by sequence differences between rodent (r) and human (h) KOR. In this study, we compared the signaling initiated by the available partial agonists. Pentazocine was significantly more potent at activating p38 MAPK in hKOR than rKOR expressed in HEK293 cells but equally potent at arrestin-independent activation of ERK1/2 in hKOR and rKOR. Similarly, butorphanol increased phospho-p38-ir in hKOR-expressing cells but did not activate p38 in rKOR-HEK293. Like pentazocine, butorphanol was equally efficacious at activating ERK1/2 in rKOR and hKOR. In contrast, levorphanol, nalorphine, and U50,488 did not distinguish between hKOR and rKOR in p38 MAPK activation. Consistent with its low potency at p38 activation, pentazocine did not produce conditioned place aversion in mice. hKOR lacks the Ser-369 phosphorylation site in rKOR required for G protein receptor kinase/arrestin-dependent p38 activation, but mutation of the Ser-358 to asparagine in hKOR blocked p38 activation without affecting the acute arrestin-independent activation of ERK1/2. This study shows that hKOR activates p38 MAPK through a phosphorylation and arrestin-dependent mechanism; however, activation differs between hKOR and rKOR for some ligands. These functional selectivity differences have important implications for preclinical screening of partial KOR agonists. PMID:23086943

  5. Hexavalent chromium reduction kinetics in rodent stomach contents.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Deborah M; Suh, Mina; Aylward, Lesa L; Kirman, Christopher R; Harris, Mark A; Thompson, Chad M; Gürleyük, Hakan; Gerads, Russell; Haws, Laurie C; Hays, Sean M

    2012-10-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) to trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) in the stomach prior to absorption is a well-recognized detoxification process thought to limit the toxicity of ingested Cr(VI). However, administration of high concentrations of Cr(VI) in drinking water cause mouse small intestinal tumors, and quantitative measures of Cr(VI) reduction rate and capacity for rodent stomach contents are needed for interspecies extrapolation using physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models. Ex vivo studies using stomach contents of rats and mice were conducted to quantify Cr(VI) reduction rate and capacity for loading rates (1-400 mg Cr(VI)L(-1) stomach contents) in the range of recent bioassays. Cr(VI) reduction was measured with speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry to quantify dynamic Cr(VI) and Cr(III) concentrations in stomach contents at select time points over 1 h. Cr(VI) reduction followed mixed second-order kinetics, dependent upon concentrations of both Cr(VI) and the native reducing agents. Approximately 16 mg Cr(VI)-equivalents of reducing capacity per L of fed stomach contents (containing gastric secretions, saliva, water and food) was found for both species. The second-order rate constants were 0.2 and 0.3 L mg(-1) h(-1) for mice and rats, respectively. These findings support that, at the doses that caused cancer in the mouse small intestine (? 20 mg Cr(VI)L(-1) in drinking water), the reducing capacity of stomach contents was likely exceeded. Thus, for extrapolation of target tissue dose in risk assessment, PBTK models are necessary to account for competing kinetic rates including second order capacity-limited reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). PMID:22682893

  6. Buffering and plasticity in vital rates of oldfield rodents.

    PubMed

    Reed, Aaron W; Slade, Norman A

    2012-09-01

    1. Under the hypothesis of environmental buffering, populations are expected to minimize the variance of the most influential vital rates; however, this may not be a universal principle. Species with a life span <1 year may be less likely to exhibit buffering because of temporal or seasonal variability in vital rate sensitivities. Further, plasticity in vital rates may be adaptive for species in a variable environment with reliable cues. 2. We tested for environmental buffering and plasticity in vital rates using stage-structured matrix models from long-term data sets in four species of grassland rodents. We used periodic matrices to estimate stochastic elasticity for each vital rate and then tested for correlations with a standardized coefficient of variation for each rate. 3. We calculated stochastic elasticities for individual months to test for an association between increased reproduction and the influence of reproduction, relative to survival, on the population growth rate. 4. All species showed some evidence of buffering. The elasticity of vital rates of Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque, 1818), Sigmodon hispidus Say & Ord, 1825 and Microtus ochrogaster (Wagner, 1842) was negatively related to vital rate CV. Elasticity and vital rate CV were negatively related in Peromyscus maniculatus (Wagner, 1845), but the relationship was not statistically significant. Peromyscus leucopus and M. ochrogaster showed plasticity in vital rates; reproduction was higher following months where elasticity for reproduction exceeded that of survival. 5. Our results suggest that buffering is common in species with fast life histories; however, some populations that exhibit buffering are capable of responding to short-term variability in environmental conditions through reproductive plasticity. PMID:22375923

  7. Stress induced obesity: lessons from rodent models of stress.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Zachary R; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Stress was once defined as the non-specific result of the body to any demand or challenge to homeostasis. A more current view of stress is the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc.), these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and lose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the elements that influence the metabolic outcome in order to further extend our understanding of stress-induced obesity. PMID:23898237

  8. Molecular systematics and paleobiogeography of the South American sigmodontine rodents.

    PubMed

    Engel, S R; Hogan, K M; Taylor, J F; Davis, S K

    1998-01-01

    The murid rodent subfamily Sigmodontinae contains 79 genera which are distributed throughout the New World. The time of arrival of the first sigmodontines in South America and the estimated divergence time(s) of the different lineages of South American sigmodontines have been controversial due to the lack of a good fossil record and the immense number of extant species. The "early-arrival hypothesis" states that the sigmodontines must have arrived in South America no later than the early Miocene, at least 20 MYA, in order to account for their vast present-day diversity, whereas the "late-arrival hypothesis" includes the sigmodontines as part of the Plio-Pleistocene Great American Interchange, which occurred approximately 3.5 MYA. The phylogenetic relationships among 33 of these genera were reconstructed using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data from the ND3, ND4L, arginine tRNA, and ND4 genes, which we show to be evolving at the same rate. A molecular clock was calibrated for these genes using published fossil dates, and the genetic distances were estimated from the DNA sequences in this study. The molecular clock was used to estimate the dates of the South American sigmodontine origin and the main sigmodontine radiation in order to evaluate the "early-" and "late-arrival" scenarios. We estimate the time of the sigmodontine invasion of South America as between approximately 5 and 9 MYA, supporting neither of the scenarios but suggesting two possible models in which the invading lineage was either (1) ancestral to the oryzomyines, akodonts, and phyllotines or (2) ancestral to the akodonts and phyllotines and accompanied by the oryzomyines. The sigmodontine invasion of South America provides an example of the advantage afforded to a lineage by the fortuitous invasion of a previously unexploited habitat, in this case an entire continent. PMID:9491603

  9. Lung imaging in rodents using dual energy micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Guo, X.; Clark, D.; Johnston, S. M.; Marshall, C.; Piantadosi, C.

    2012-03-01

    Dual energy CT imaging is expected to play a major role in the diagnostic arena as it provides material decomposition on an elemental basis. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of dual energy micro-CT for the estimation of vascular, tissue, and air fractions in rodent lungs using a post-reconstruction three-material decomposition method. We have tested our method using both simulations and experimental work. Using simulations, we have estimated the accuracy limits of the decomposition for realistic micro-CT noise levels. Next, we performed experiments involving ex vivo lung imaging in which intact lungs were carefully removed from the thorax, were injected with an iodine-based contrast agent and inflated with air at different volume levels. Finally, we performed in vivo imaging studies in (n=5) C57BL/6 mice using fast prospective respiratory gating in endinspiration and end-expiration for three different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Prior to imaging, mice were injected with a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. The mean accuracy values were for Air (95.5%), Blood (96%), and Tissue (92.4%). The absolute accuracy in determining all fraction materials was 94.6%. The minimum difference that we could detect in material fractions was 15%. As expected, an increase in PEEP levels for the living mouse resulted in statistically significant increases in air fractions at end-expiration, but no significant changes in end-inspiration. Our method has applicability in preclinical pulmonary studies where various physiological changes can occur as a result of genetic changes, lung disease, or drug effects.

  10. Psychoactive cannabinoids reduce gastrointestinal propulsion and motility in rodents.

    PubMed

    Shook, J E; Burks, T F

    1989-05-01

    Marijuana has been reported to be an effective antinauseant and antiemetic in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. Whether this is due to psychological changes, central antiemetic properties and/or direct effects on gastrointestinal (GI) function is not known. The purpose of these investigations was to determine whether the major constituents of marijuana and the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone have any effects on GI function which can be detected in rodent models of GI transit and motility. Intravenous delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) slowed the rate of gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in mice and in rats. Delta 9,11-THC, cannabinol and nabilone given i.v. also inhibited small intestinal transit in mice, but were less effective in reducing gastric emptying. Cannabidiol given i.v. had no effect on gastric emptying or intestinal transit. Those cannabinoids which inhibited GI transit did so at doses equal to, or lower, than those reported to produce central nervous system activity. In rats, delta 9-THC produced greater inhibition of gastric emptying and small intestinal transit than large bowel transit, indicating a selectivity for the more proximal sections of the gut. In addition, i.v. delta 9-THC decreased the frequency of both gastric and intestinal contractions without altering intraluminal pressure. Such changes probably reflect a decrease in propulsive activity, without change in basal tone. These data indicate that delta 9-THC, delta 9,11-THC, cannabinol and nabilone (but not cannabidiol) exert an inhibitory effect on GI transit and motility in rats. PMID:2542532

  11. Expensive Brains: “Brainy” Rodents have Higher Metabolic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Sobrero, Raúl; May-Collado, Laura J.; Agnarsson, Ingi; Hernández, Cristián E.

    2011-01-01

    Brains are the centers of the nervous system of animals, controlling the organ systems of the body and coordinating responses to changes in the ecological and social environment. The evolution of traits that correlate with cognitive ability, such as relative brain size is thus of broad interest. Brain mass relative to body mass (BM) varies among mammals, and diverse factors have been proposed to explain this variation. A recent study provided evidence that energetics play an important role in brain evolution (Isler and van Schaik, 2006). Using composite phylogenies and data drawn from multiple sources, these authors showed that basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlates with brain mass across mammals. However, no such relationship was found within rodents. Here we re-examined the relationship between BMR and brain mass within Rodentia using a novel species-level phylogeny. Our results are sensitive to parameter evaluation; in particular how species mass is estimated. We detect no pattern when applying an approach used by previous studies, where each species BM is represented by two different numbers, one being the individual that happened to be used for BMR estimates of that species. However, this approach may compromise the analysis. When using a single value of BM for each species, whether representing a single individual, or available species mean, our findings provide evidence that brain mass (independent of BM) and BMR are correlated. These findings are thus consistent with the hypothesis that large brains evolve when the payoff for increased brain mass is greater than the energetic cost they incur. PMID:21811456

  12. Ventilatory accommodation of changing oxygen demand in sciurid rodents.

    PubMed

    Chappell, M A

    1992-01-01

    Ventilation was measured across a range of O2 consumption rates in four sciurid rodents: Tamias minimus (47 g), Spermophilus lateralis (189 g), S. beecheyi (531 g), and Marmota flaviventris juveniles (1054 g) and adults (2989 g). Maximum thermogenic oxygen consumption was measured for all but adult M. flaviventris. Aerobic scopes (maximum/minimum O2 consumption rates) were 4.6, 3.8, 5.4, and 4.8 in T. minimus, S. lateralis, S. beecheyi, and juvenile M. flaviventris, respectively. Aerobic scope was at least 4.1 in adult M. flaviventris. Ventilatory accommodation of changing O2 consumption rate was qualitatively similar in the four species, with the bulk of accommodation resulting from changes in minute volume. Nevertheless, there were significant differences in the relative importance of frequency, tidal volume, and O2 extraction in accommodation. In all species, frequency and minute volume were strongly correlated to O2 consumption rate. Tidal volume was significantly correlated to O2 consumption rate in T. minimus and S. beecheyi, but not in the other species. Oxygen extraction was not significantly correlated to O2 consumption rate in any species. Analysis of factorial ventilation changes across a standardized 3.8-fold change in O2 consumption rate revealed significant differences among species in frequency and O2 extraction, but not in tidal or minute volume. When compared to a generalized allometry for mammalian resting ventilation, the four sciurid species had consistently lower respiration frequency and higher O2 extraction than predicted, perhaps because the sciurid measurements were made on unrestrained animals. There was no indication that ventilation constrained maximum O2 consumption rate. PMID:1494030

  13. Localization of Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 in the Rodent Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Neely, M. Diana; Robert, Elizabeth M.; Baucum, Anthony J.; Colbran, Roger J.; Muly, E. Chris; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) is expressed throughout the central nervous system, where four MEF2 isoforms play important roles in neuronal survival and differentiation and in synapse formation and maintenance. It is therefore somewhat surprising that there is a lack of detailed information on the localization of MEF2 isoforms in the mammalian brain. We have analyzed the regional, cellular, and subcellular expression of MEF2A and MEF2D in the rodent brain. These two MEF2 isoforms were co-expressed in virtually all neurons in the cortex and the striatum, but were not detected in astrocytes. MEF2A and MEF2D were localized to the nuclei of neurons in many forebrain areas, consistent with their roles as transcriptional regulators. However, in several subcortical sites we observed extensive cytoplasmic expression of MEF2A but not MEF2D. MEF2A was particularly enriched in processes of neurons in the lateral septum and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, as well as in several other limbic sites, including the central amygdala and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and thalamus. Ultrastructural examination similarly revealed MEF2A-ir in axons and dendrites as well as nuclei of the lateral septum and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis neurons. This study demonstrates for the first time extensive cytoplasmic localization of a MEF2 transcription factor in the mammalian brain in vivo. The extranuclear localization of MEF2A suggests novel roles for MEF2A in specific neuronal populations. PMID:19362076

  14. Neogene paleobiogeography and East African paleoenvironments: contributions from the Tugen Hills rodents and lagomorphs.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Alisa J

    2002-01-01

    A minimum of 28 genera of rodents and one genus of lagomorph were recovered from the Tugen Hills, Baringo District, Kenya, from localities dating from over 15.5 to about 4.4 Ma. The middle Miocene (sites dated between 15.8 and 15.3 Ma) rodent fauna recovered primarily from the Kipsaramon site complex, Muruyur Formation, includes a mixture of characteristically early Miocene taxa, and more derived forms. Composition of the African rodent fauna changes dramatically with the introduction of myocricetodontines, democricetodontines, and dendromurines, immigrants primarily from southern Asia. In the Tugen Hills, these taxa are first found in the Kabasero localities, Ngorora Formation, at sites dating from 12.5-12.33 Ma. A second major change in the African rodent fauna reflects the introduction of murines, immigrants from southern Asia. In the Tugen Hills murines are first encountered at Kapcheberek, Lukeino Formation, dated to 5.9-5.7 Ma. One rodent genus from the Lukeino Formation (Arvicanthis), and two from the Tabarin locality, Chemeron Formation (Heliosciurus, Paraxerus; 4.5-4.4 Ma), represent the earliest records of these extant African genera. A cricetomyine from the Ngorora Formation (12.5 Ma) is likely the earliest report of this exclusively African group. One of the earliest African records of porcupines (Hystricide) is from the Lukeino Formation. Lagomorphs are poorly represented, but include one of the earliest African occurrences of the family Leporidae from the Mpesida Beds (bracketed by dates of 7-6.2 Ma), and possibly a new genus of leporid from the Kapcheberek locality. Analysis of the Tugen Hills small mammals in association with other African records suggests several episodes of dispersal between Africa and Eurasia during the middle and late Miocene. Rodents from Kipsaramon are indicative of forests in conjunction with more open habitats. Those from the Kapcheberek locality are suggestive of a savanna habitat. The rodents from the Tabarin locality suggest a woodland environment. PMID:11795976

  15. Field evaluation of capsaicin as a rodent aversion agent for poultry feed.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Paul G; Curtis, Paul D; Dunn, Joseph A; Austic, Richard E; Richmond, Milo E

    2003-09-01

    Developing additional techniques for reducing animal feed contamination by rodents and controlling rodent populations is critical to efforts aimed at reducing the occurrence of Salmonella spp infection on poultry farms. Capsaicin, a compound found in chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, produces a burning sensation in the mouth of mammals and is used effectively as an animal deterrent for some pest species. Applied to poultry feed, capsaicin may be effective as an aversive agent to deter rodent feeding and enhance acceptability of rodenticide baits. We tested capsaicin-treated poultry diets (2000 and 3000 Scoville Heat Units, SHU) in no-choice feeding trials at four active New York farms in the winter of 1997-1998. At all farms, consumption of the 2000 SHU diet by rodents (Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk), and house mice, Mus musculus L) was significantly less than consumption of a control diet. Consumption of the 3000 SHU diet by rodents was significantly less than consumption of a control diet at three of the four farms. Overall, consumption of treated diets was 58-97% and 55-98% less than consumption of the control diet, for the 2000 and 3000 SHU diets, respectively. These reductions appeared to be related closely to the availability of alternative feed sources at these farms. Two-choice feeding trials involving a rodenticide bait (0.05 g kg(-1) brodifacoum) and the 3000 SHU diet demonstrated that Norway rats preferred the rodenticide to the capsaicin-treated poultry feed. Overall, rodenticide bait acceptance was high (95.6%) when offered simultaneously with capsaicin-treated poultry feed. Although poultry managers must utilize several techniques to manage rodent pests, the use of capsaicin-treated diets to reduce feed losses and increase rodenticide bait acceptance appears promising. Use of capsaicin-treated feed on poultry farms may substantially reduce feed contamination by rodents and ultimately the incidence of Salmonella infection in poultry. PMID:12974352

  16. Occurrence of ectoparasitic arthropods associated with rodents in Hail region northern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Asiry, Khalid A; Fetoh, Badr El-Sabah A

    2014-09-01

    Ectoparasitic arthropods are a diverse element of the Saudi fauna. Due to this, a survey of ectoparasites associated with rodents was conducted as a preliminary study in five districts of Hail region of northern Saudi Arabia for the first time. Ectoparasites extracted from 750 rodents were sampled and identified by recording their frequency of appearance. Results revealed that 1,287 ectoparasites infested 316 of the captured rodent hosts. These ectoparasites parasitized on four species of rodents including three species of rats Rattus rattus rattus, Rattus rattus frugivorus, and Rattus rattus alexandrinus and one species of mouse Acomys dimidiatus (Rodentia: Muridae). The ectoparasites belong to four different groups: ticks, fleas, lice, and mites. Ticks were the highest in the number, while fleas were the lowest among all the extracted ectoparasite groups. The collected ectoparasitic arthropods consisted of seven species. Ticks were of two species: Rhipicephalus turanicus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae), fleas were of two species: Xenopsylla cheopis and Xenopsyllus conformis mycerini (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), lice was a single species: Polyplax serrata (Anoplura: Hoplopleuridae), and mites were of two species: Laelaps nuttali and Laelaps echidninus (Mesostigmata: Laelapidae). The findings of the study showed that the intensity of infestation was varied between rodent host sexes, wherein females had the highest rate of parasitic infestation, and the parasitic index of appearance was very high for one group of parasites (i.e., ticks). The parasitic prevalence was 42.13 % on rodents, and mites were the most prevalent parasite species. Overall, this study was carried out to establish baseline data for ectoparasite-infested rodents in Hail region, Saudi Arabia, and may help for appropriate planning to control zoonotic diseases in this area. PMID:24838257

  17. Declines in large wildlife increase landscape-level prevalence of rodent-borne disease in Africa.

    PubMed

    Young, Hillary S; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Helgen, Kristofer M; McCauley, Douglas J; Billeter, Sarah A; Kosoy, Michael Y; Osikowicz, Lynn M; Salkeld, Daniel J; Young, Truman P; Dittmar, Katharina

    2014-05-13

    Populations of large wildlife are declining on local and global scales. The impacts of this pulse of size-selective defaunation include cascading changes to smaller animals, particularly rodents, and alteration of many ecosystem processes and services, potentially involving changes to prevalence and transmission of zoonotic disease. Understanding linkages between biodiversity loss and zoonotic disease is important for both public health and nature conservation programs, and has been a source of much recent scientific debate. In the case of rodent-borne zoonoses, there is strong conceptual support, but limited empirical evidence, for the hypothesis that defaunation, the loss of large wildlife, increases zoonotic disease risk by directly or indirectly releasing controls on rodent density. We tested this hypothesis by experimentally excluding large wildlife from a savanna ecosystem in East Africa, and examining changes in prevalence and abundance of Bartonella spp. infection in rodents and their flea vectors. We found no effect of wildlife removal on per capita prevalence of Bartonella infection in either rodents or fleas. However, because rodent and, consequently, flea abundance doubled following experimental defaunation, the density of infected hosts and infected fleas was roughly twofold higher in sites where large wildlife was absent. Thus, defaunation represents an elevated risk in Bartonella transmission to humans (bartonellosis). Our results (i) provide experimental evidence of large wildlife defaunation increasing landscape-level disease prevalence, (ii) highlight the importance of susceptible host regulation pathways and host/vector density responses in biodiversity-disease relationships, and (iii) suggest that rodent-borne disease responses to large wildlife loss may represent an important context where this relationship is largely negative. PMID:24778215

  18. The hip adductor muscle group in caviomorph rodents: anatomy and homology.

    PubMed

    García-Esponda, César M; Candela, Adriana M

    2015-06-01

    Anatomical comparative studies including myological data of caviomorph rodents are relatively scarce, leading to a lack of use of muscular features in cladistic and morphofunctional analyses. In rodents, the hip adductor muscles constitute an important group of the hindlimb musculature, having an important function during the beginning of the stance phase. These muscles are subdivided in several distinct ways in the different clades of rodents, making the identification of their homologies hard to establish. In this contribution we provide a detailed description of the anatomical variation of the hip adductor muscle group of different genera of caviomorph rodents and identify the homologies of these muscles in the context of Rodentia. On this basis, we identify the characteristic pattern of the hip adductor muscles in Caviomorpha. Our results indicate that caviomorphs present a singular pattern of the hip adductor musculature that distinguishes them from other groups of rodents. They are characterized by having a single m. adductor brevis that includes solely its genicular part. This muscle, together with the m. gracilis, composes a muscular sheet that is medial to all other muscles of the hip adductor group. Both muscles probably have a synergistic action during locomotion, where the m. adductor brevis reinforces the multiple functions of the m. gracilis in caviomorphs. Mapping of analyzed myological characters in the context of Rodentia indicates that several features are recovered as potential synapomorphies of caviomorphs. Thus, analysis of the myological data described here adds to the current knowledge of caviomorph rodents from anatomical and functional points of view, indicating that this group has features that clearly differentiate them from other rodents. PMID:25911542

  19. Rough-legged buzzards, Arctic foxes and red foxes in a tundra ecosystem without rodents.

    PubMed

    Pokrovsky, Ivan; Ehrich, Dorothée; Ims, Rolf A; Kondratyev, Alexander V; Kruckenberg, Helmut; Kulikova, Olga; Mihnevich, Julia; Pokrovskaya, Liya; Shienok, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Small rodents with multi-annual population cycles strongly influence the dynamics of food webs, and in particular predator-prey interactions, across most of the tundra biome. Rodents are however absent from some arctic islands, and studies on performance of arctic predators under such circumstances may be very instructive since rodent cycles have been predicted to collapse in a warming Arctic. Here we document for the first time how three normally rodent-dependent predator species-rough-legged buzzard, arctic fox and red fox - perform in a low-arctic ecosystem with no rodents. During six years (in 2006-2008 and 2011-2013) we studied diet and breeding performance of these predators in the rodent-free Kolguev Island in Arctic Russia. The rough-legged buzzards, previously known to be a small rodent specialist, have only during the last two decades become established on Kolguev Island. The buzzards successfully breed on the island at stable low density, but with high productivity based on goslings and willow ptarmigan as their main prey - altogether representing a novel ecological situation for this species. Breeding density of arctic fox varied from year to year, but with stable productivity based on mainly geese as prey. The density dynamic of the arctic fox appeared to be correlated with the date of spring arrival of the geese. Red foxes breed regularly on the island but in very low numbers that appear to have been unchanged over a long period - a situation that resemble what has been recently documented from Arctic America. Our study suggests that the three predators found breeding on Kolguev Island possess capacities for shifting to changing circumstances in low-arctic ecosystem as long as other small - medium sized terrestrial herbivores are present in good numbers. PMID:25692786

  20. Declines in large wildlife increase landscape-level prevalence of rodent-borne disease in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hillary S.; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Helgen, Kristofer M.; McCauley, Douglas J.; Kosoy, Michael Y.; Osikowicz, Lynn M.; Salkeld, Daniel J.; Young, Truman P.; Dittmar, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Populations of large wildlife are declining on local and global scales. The impacts of this pulse of size-selective defaunation include cascading changes to smaller animals, particularly rodents, and alteration of many ecosystem processes and services, potentially involving changes to prevalence and transmission of zoonotic disease. Understanding linkages between biodiversity loss and zoonotic disease is important for both public health and nature conservation programs, and has been a source of much recent scientific debate. In the case of rodent-borne zoonoses, there is strong conceptual support, but limited empirical evidence, for the hypothesis that defaunation, the loss of large wildlife, increases zoonotic disease risk by directly or indirectly releasing controls on rodent density. We tested this hypothesis by experimentally excluding large wildlife from a savanna ecosystem in East Africa, and examining changes in prevalence and abundance of Bartonella spp. infection in rodents and their flea vectors. We found no effect of wildlife removal on per capita prevalence of Bartonella infection in either rodents or fleas. However, because rodent and, consequently, flea abundance doubled following experimental defaunation, the density of infected hosts and infected fleas was roughly twofold higher in sites where large wildlife was absent. Thus, defaunation represents an elevated risk in Bartonella transmission to humans (bartonellosis). Our results (i) provide experimental evidence of large wildlife defaunation increasing landscape-level disease prevalence, (ii) highlight the importance of susceptible host regulation pathways and host/vector density responses in biodiversity–disease relationships, and (iii) suggest that rodent-borne disease responses to large wildlife loss may represent an important context where this relationship is largely negative. PMID:24778215

  1. Factors determining the abundance and distribution of rodents in a shrub-steppe ecosystem: the role of shrubs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert R. Parmenter; James A. MacMahon

    1983-01-01

    This study addressed the relative importances of shrub “resources” on a rodent community in a sagebrush dominated shrub-steppe ecosystem in southwestern Wyoming. Direct effects of shrubs (i.e., providing rodents with “food and cover”) were assessed by removing shrubs from a 1.25 ha study plot and monitoring both rodent populations and their food resources. Shrub architecture and shrub-related food resources were

  2. Objective classification of historical tropical cyclone intensity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Chenoweth

    2007-01-01

    Preinstrumental records of historical tropical cyclone activity require objective methods for accurately categorizing tropical cyclone intensity. Here wind force terms and damage reports from newspaper accounts in the Lesser Antilles and Jamaica for the period 1795-1879 are compared with wind speed estimates calculated from barometric pressure data. A total of 95 separate barometric pressure readings and colocated simultaneous wind force

  3. Objective classification of historical tropical cyclone intensity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Chenoweth

    2007-01-01

    Preinstrumental records of historical tropical cyclone activity require objective methods for accurately categorizing tropical cyclone intensity. Here wind force terms and damage reports from newspaper accounts in the Lesser Antilles and Jamaica for the period 1795–1879 are compared with wind speed estimates calculated from barometric pressure data. A total of 95 separate barometric pressure readings and colocated simultaneous wind force

  4. The Distribution of Annual Tropical Cyclone Frequency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. C. S. Thom

    1960-01-01

    In preparation for studying and fitting tropical cyclone frequency distributions certain time trends in the climatological series are tested statistically and explanations of their possible cause proposed. The annual frequency of tropical cyclones and hurricanes is hypo- thesized to be a rare-event type of series. On the basis of physical and statistical principles it is shown how the Poisson and

  5. Atmospheric Response Patterns Associated with Tropical Forcing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin P. Hoerling; Arun Kumar

    2002-01-01

    Atmospheric response patterns associated with tropical forcing are examined with general circulation models driven by global sea surface temperature (SST) variations during 1950-99. Specifically the sensitivity of midlatitude responses to the magnitude and position of tropical SST anomalies is explored. This controversial problem, spanning more than a quarter century now, centers on whether response patterns over the Pacific-North American region

  6. Mesoscale Interactions in Tropical Cyclone Genesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Simpson; E. Ritchie; G. J. Holland; J. Halverson; S. Stewart

    1997-01-01

    With the multitude of cloud clusters over tropical oceans, it has been perplexing that so few develop into tropical cyclones. The authors postulate that a major obstacle has been the complexity of scale interactions, particularly those on the mesoscale, which have only recently been observable. While there are well-known climatological requirements, these are by no means sufficient. A major reason

  7. TROPICAL MASS EXTINCTIONS AND THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kangas (1992), Undiscovered species and the falsifiability of the tropical mass extinction hypotheses, ESA Bulletin 73:124-125, 1992, argues that there is a paradox concerning the mass extinctions projected from current rates of tropical deforestation. he parameters; for a given ...

  8. The Nitrogen Paradox in Tropical Forest Ecosystems

    E-print Network

    in biotic composition and functional properties, it is often assumed that humid lowland tropical forestsThe Nitrogen Paradox in Tropical Forest Ecosystems Lars O. Hedin,1 E.N. Jack Brookshire,1 Duncan N.L. Menge,1,2 and Alexander R. Barron1 1 Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton

  9. TROPICAL SPIDERWORT STEM DESICCATION AND RECOVERY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical spiderwort has the curious ability to survive periods of drought stress, even as segmented pieces of stem. The purpose of this study was to establish the moisture level to which stems of tropical spiderwort (TSW) must desiccate in order to effectively kill the plant regenerative process. ...

  10. Tropical deforestation and atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Houghton

    1991-01-01

    Recent estimates of the net release of carbon to the atmosphere from deforestation in the tropics have ranged between 0.4 and 2.5 × 1015 g yr-1. Two things have happened to require a revision of these estimates. First, refinements of the methods used to estimate the stocks of carbon in the vegetation of tropical forests have produced new estimates that

  11. Tropical forests and atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yadvinder Malhi; John Grace

    2000-01-01

    Tropical forests play a major role in determining the current atmospheric concentration of CO2, as both sources of CO2 following deforestation and sinks of CO2 probably resulting from CO2 stimulation of forest photosynthesis. Recently, researchers have tried to quantify this role. The results suggest that both the carbon sources and sinks in tropical forests are significantly greater than previously thought.

  12. On the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Simpson; C. Kummerow; W.-K. Tao; R. F. Adler

    1996-01-01

    Summary The importance of quantitative knowledge of tropical rainfall, its associated latent heating and variability is summarized in the context of climate change. Since the tropics are mainly covered with oceans, with some deserts and jungles, the monthly precipitation is not known within a factor of two. Hence the only way to measure it adequately for climate and general circulation

  13. Tropical dry forests in New Caledonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    THOMAS W GILLESPIE; TANQUY JAFFRE

    2003-01-01

    Tropical dry forest is the most endangered major vegetation type in the New Caledonia biodiversity hotspot. Vegetation surveys following a transect method used by Gentry were undertaken in two tropical dry forest sites, Ouen-Toro and Pindai, in order to compare species richness, floristic composition, and structure. Pindai contained significantly higher species richness than Ouen-Toro, although there was little difference in

  14. OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE INTERACTION AND TROPICAL CLIMATE

    E-print Network

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    1 OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE INTERACTION AND TROPICAL CLIMATE Shang-Ping Xie International Pacific Research Meteorology Keywords: ocean-atmospheric feedback, tropical climate, climate variability, Intertropical-evaporation-SST feedback 4. Cloud feedback 5. Water vapor feedback 6. Ocean front-atmosphere interaction 7. Summary

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation needs adaptation: Tropical forestry

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation needs adaptation: Tropical forestry and climate change Manuel R adapt to this change. This paper discusses how tropical forestry practices can contribute to maintaining Forestry Research, P.O. Box 6596 JKPWB, Jakarta 10065, Indonesia e-mail: m.guariguata@cgiar.org J. P

  16. Priorities for Biodiversity Conservation in the Tropics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bunting, Gillian C.

    1998-01-01

    Biodiversity Bulletin No 1, from the World Conservation Monitoring Centre is now online and is entitled "Priorities for Biodiversity Conservation in the Tropics,"by Michael Green and others. The bulletin provides an assessment of "the extent to which habitats in the tropics are protected and guidance on prioritising conservation action from global and national perspectives."

  17. Modeling Climate Variability in Tropical Atlantic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wang

    2002-01-01

    The climate of the tropical Atlantic undergoes strong fluctuations on a variety of time--scales ranging from seasonal through decadal. These climate fluctuations are associated with massive disruptions of populations as well as changes to the environment. Here we examine climate variability in the tropical Atlantic sector as represented in six Atmospheric General Circulation Models (ECMWF, JMA, NCAR, NCEP, NSIPP and

  18. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR AUSTRALIA'S TROPICAL RIVERS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renee Bartolo; Rick van Dam; Peter Bayliss

    The objective of the Tropical Rivers Inventory and Assessment Project (TRIAP) ecological risk assessment sub-project is to develop a framework applicable to key focus catchments and significant locations that meet stakeholder needs. A broad overview of the major pressures on tropical Australia's aquatic ecosystems will be provided through this sub-project, in addition to more detailed risk assessments for the following

  19. The changing ecology of tropical forests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. L. Phillips

    1997-01-01

    The threat to tropical forests is often gauged in terms of deforestation rates and the total area remaining. Recently, however, there has been a growing realization that forest can appear intact on a satellite image yet be biologically degraded or vulnerable to degradation. The array of direct threats to humid tropical forest biodiversity, in addition to deforestation, includes: selective extraction

  20. Genomics of Tropical Fruit Tree Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic improvement of tropical fruit trees is limited when compared to progress achieved in temperate fruit trees and annual crops. Tropical fruit tree breeding programs require significant resources to develop new cultivars that are adapted to modern shipping and storage requirements. The use...

  1. Zinc Requirements of Tropical Legume Cover Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soils are deficient in essential plant nutrients, including zinc (Zn). Using cover crops in cropping systems is an important option to improve soil fertility for sustainable crop production. However, success of cover crops in highly weathered tropical infertile acid soils is greatly influen...

  2. Vulnerability of Tropical Pacific Fisheries and Aquaculture

    E-print Network

    3 Vulnerability of Tropical Pacific Fisheries and Aquaculture to Climate Change Edited by Johann D and Aquaculture to Climate Change Edited by Johann D Bell, Johanna E Johnson and Alistair J Hobday #12;ii of Tropical Pacific Fisheries and Aquaculture to Climate Change 1. Fishery management ­ Oceania. 2. Marine

  3. Citation patterns in tropical medicine journals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dirk Schoonbaert

    2004-01-01

    Summary Selections of most important journals in the field of tropical medicine have previously been identified with the help of resources such as bibliographical and citation databases. This article uses ISI's Journal Citation Reports (JSR) for 2002 to analyse the citation characteristics of the Tropical Medicine category. According to these data, this small but diverse group of 12 journals bestows

  4. Mechanisms for tropical upwelling in the stratosphere

    E-print Network

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Mechanisms for tropical upwelling in the stratosphere 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 7749EEDEC7C72DEEE E in the Stratosphere KIRILL SEMENIUK AND THEODORE G. SHEPHERD Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto of the tropical upwelling branch of the stratospheric Brewer­Dobson circulation are examined, with a particular

  5. Tropical Storm Iniki, Central Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Tropical Storm Iniki in the North Pacific (40.5N, 152.5W) was dissipating from hurricane status when this photo was taken. Two days prior, as a full fledged hurricane, with winds of about 150 mph and waves of over 15 ft., it swept over the Hawaiian island of Kauai. But, as Iniki moved over the colder waters of the North Pacific, it began to weaken as can be seen by the lack of a tight spiral gyre and the absence of an eye in the center.

  6. Survey for hantaviruses, tick-borne encephalitis virus, and Rickettsia spp. in small rodents in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Petra; Dobler, Gerhard; Markoti?, Alemka; Kurolt, Ivan-Christian; Speck, Stephanie; Habuš, Josipa; Vucelja, Marko; Krajinovi?, Lidija Cvetko; Tadin, Ante; Margaleti?, Josip; Essbauer, Sandra

    2014-07-01

    In Croatia, several rodent- and vector-borne agents are endemic and of medical importance. In this study, we investigated hantaviruses and, for the first time, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and Rickettsia spp. in small wild rodents from two different sites (mountainous and lowland region) in Croatia. In total, 194 transudate and tissue samples from 170 rodents (A. flavicollis, n=115; A. agrarius, n=2; Myodes glareolus, n=53) were tested for antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assays (IIFT) and for nucleic acids by conventional (hantaviruses) and real-time RT-/PCRs (TBEV and Rickettsia spp.). A total of 25.5% (24/94) of the rodents from the mountainous area revealed specific antibodies against hantaviruses. In all, 21.3% (20/94) of the samples from the mountainous area and 29.0% (9/31) from the lowland area yielded positive results for either Puumala virus (PUUV) or Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) using a conventional RT-PCR. All processed samples (n=194) were negative for TBEV by IIFT or real-time RT-PCR. Serological evidence of rickettsial infection was detected in 4.3% (4/94) rodents from the mountainous region. Another 3.2% (3/94) rodents were positive for Rickettsia spp. by real-time PCR. None of the rodents (n=76) from the lowland area were positive for Rickettsia spp. by real-time PCR. Dual infection of PUUV and Rickettsia spp. was found in one M. glareolus from the mountainous area by RT-PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of Rickettsia spp. in small rodents from Croatia. Phylogenetic analyses of S- and M-segment sequences obtained from the two study sites revealed well-supported subgroups in Croatian PUUV and DOBV. Although somewhat limited, our data showed occurrence and prevalence of PUUV, DOBV, and rickettsiae in Croatia. Further studies are warranted to confirm these data and to determine the Rickettsia species present in rodents in these areas. PMID:24866325

  7. A glimpse on the pattern of rodent diversification: a phylogenetic approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of phylogenetic methods that do not rely on fossils for the study of evolutionary processes through time have revolutionized the field of evolutionary biology and resulted in an unprecedented expansion of our knowledge about the tree of life. These methods have helped to shed light on the macroevolution of many taxonomic groups such as the placentals (Mammalia). However, despite the increase of studies addressing the diversification patterns of organisms, no synthesis has addressed the case of the most diversified mammalian clade: the Rodentia. Results Here we present a rodent maximum likelihood phylogeny inferred from a molecular supermatrix. It is based on 11 mitochondrial and nuclear genes that covers 1,265 species, i.e., respectively 56% and 81% of the known specific and generic rodent diversity. The inferred topology recovered all Rodentia clades proposed by recent molecular works. A relaxed molecular clock dating approach provided a time framework for speciation events. We found that the Myomorpha clade shows a greater degree of variation in diversification rates than Sciuroidea, Caviomorpha, Castorimorpha and Anomaluromorpha. We identified a number of shifts in diversification rates within the major clades: two in Castorimorpha, three in Ctenohystrica, 6 within the squirrel-related clade and 24 in the Myomorpha clade. The majority of these shifts occurred within the most recent familial rodent radiations: the Cricetidae and Muridae clades. Using the topological imbalances and the time line we discuss the potential role of different diversification factors that might have shaped the rodents radiation. Conclusions The present glimpse on the diversification pattern of rodents can be used for further comparative meta-analyses. Muroid lineages have a greater degree of variation in their diversification rates than any other rodent group. Different topological signatures suggest distinct diversification processes among rodent lineages. In particular, Muroidea and Sciuroidea display widespread distribution and have undergone evolutionary and adaptive radiation on most of the continents. Our results show that rodents experienced shifts in diversification rate regularly through the Tertiary, but at different periods for each clade. A comparison between the rodent fossil record and our results suggest that extinction led to the loss of diversification signal for most of the Paleogene nodes. PMID:22697210

  8. Spontaneous expression of magnetic compass orientation in an epigeic rodent: the bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus.

    PubMed

    Oliveriusová, Ludmila; N?mec, Pavel; Pavelková, Zuzana; Sedlá?ek, František

    2014-07-01

    Magnetoreception has been convincingly demonstrated in only a few mammalian species. Among rodents, magnetic compass orientation has been documented in four species of subterranean mole rats and two epigeic (i.e. active above ground) species-the Siberian hamster and the C57BL/6J mouse. The mole rats use the magnetic field azimuth to determine compass heading; their directional preference is spontaneous and unimodal, and their magnetic compass is magnetite-mediated. By contrast, the primary component of orientation response is learned in the hamster and the mouse, but both species also exhibit a weak spontaneous bimodal preference in the natural magnetic field. To determine whether the magnetic compass of wild epigeic rodents features the same functional properties as that of laboratory rodents, we investigated magnetic compass orientation in the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus (Cricetidae, Rodentia). The voles exhibited a robust spontaneous bimodal directional preference, i.e. built nests and slept preferentially along the north-south axis, and deflected their directional preference according to a shift in the direction of magnetic north, clearly indicating that they were deriving directional information from the magnetic field. Thus, bimodal, axially symmetrical directional choice seems to be a common feature shared by epigeic rodents. However, spontaneous directional preference in the bank vole appeared to be more pronounced than that reported in the hamster and the mouse. These findings suggest that bank voles are well suited for future studies investigating the adaptive significance and mechanisms of magnetic orientation in epigeic rodents. PMID:24913128

  9. Spontaneous expression of magnetic compass orientation in an epigeic rodent: the bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveriusová, Ludmila; N?mec, Pavel; Pavelková, Zuzana; Sedlá?ek, František

    2014-07-01

    Magnetoreception has been convincingly demonstrated in only a few mammalian species. Among rodents, magnetic compass orientation has been documented in four species of subterranean mole rats and two epigeic (i.e. active above ground) species—the Siberian hamster and the C57BL/6J mouse. The mole rats use the magnetic field azimuth to determine compass heading; their directional preference is spontaneous and unimodal, and their magnetic compass is magnetite-mediated. By contrast, the primary component of orientation response is learned in the hamster and the mouse, but both species also exhibit a weak spontaneous bimodal preference in the natural magnetic field. To determine whether the magnetic compass of wild epigeic rodents features the same functional properties as that of laboratory rodents, we investigated magnetic compass orientation in the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus (Cricetidae, Rodentia). The voles exhibited a robust spontaneous bimodal directional preference, i.e. built nests and slept preferentially along the north-south axis, and deflected their directional preference according to a shift in the direction of magnetic north, clearly indicating that they were deriving directional information from the magnetic field. Thus, bimodal, axially symmetrical directional choice seems to be a common feature shared by epigeic rodents. However, spontaneous directional preference in the bank vole appeared to be more pronounced than that reported in the hamster and the mouse. These findings suggest that bank voles are well suited for future studies investigating the adaptive significance and mechanisms of magnetic orientation in epigeic rodents.

  10. Estimation of wildlife hazard levels using interspecies correlation models and standard laboratory rodent toxicity data.

    PubMed

    Awkerman, Jill A; Raimondo, Sandy; Barron, Mace G

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity data from laboratory rodents are widely available and frequently used in human health assessments as animal model data. This study explores the possibility of using single rodent acute toxicity values to predict chemical toxicity to a diversity of wildlife species and estimate hazard levels from modeled species sensitivity distributions (SSD). Interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) models predict toxicity values for untested species using the sensitivity relationship between measured toxicity values of two species. Predicted toxicity values can subsequently populate SSD for application in ecological risk assessments. Laboratory mouse and rat toxicity values were used to estimate toxicity to wildlife and the predicted values then were used to derive SSD hazard dose levels. Toxicity values were predicted within fivefold of measured toxicity values for 78% of ICE models using laboratory rat or mouse toxicity as a surrogate value. Hazard dose levels (HD5) were within fivefold of measured estimates for 72% of SSD developed using laboratory rodent ICE models. Rodents were most often in the least sensitive quartile of species sensitivity distributions, and therefore toxicity values alone may not adequately represent the toxicity to many species of concern without appropriate safety or assessment factors. Laboratory rodent toxicity data offer an additional source of information that can be used to predict hazard levels for wildlife species, and thus offer a starting point for both health and ecological risk assessment. PMID:20077235

  11. Effects of land use on plague (Yersinia pestis) activity in rodents in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Douglas J; Salkeld, Daniel J; Young, Hillary S; Makundi, Rhodes; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Eckerlin, Ralph P; Lambin, Eric F; Gaffikin, Lynne; Barry, Michele; Helgen, Kristofer M

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the effects of land-use change on zoonotic disease risk is a pressing global health concern. Here, we compare prevalence of Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague, in rodents across two land-use types-agricultural and conserved-in northern Tanzania. Estimated abundance of seropositive rodents nearly doubled in agricultural sites compared with conserved sites. This relationship between land-use type and abundance of seropositive rodents is likely mediated by changes in rodent and flea community composition, particularly via an increase in the abundance of the commensal species, Mastomys natalensis, in agricultural habitats. There was mixed support for rodent species diversity negatively impacting Y. pestis seroprevalence. Together, these results suggest that land-use change could affect the risk of local transmission of plague, and raise critical questions about transmission dynamics at the interface of conserved and agricultural habitats. These findings emphasize the importance of understanding disease ecology in the context of rapidly proceeding landscape change. PMID:25711606

  12. Genotyping and subtyping of Giardia and Cryptosporidium isolates from commensal rodents in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Wang, R; Zhao, W; Qi, M; Zhao, J; Zhang, L; Li, J; Liu, A

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are two important zoonotic intestinal parasites responsible for diarrhoea in humans and other animals worldwide. Rodents, as reservoirs or carriers of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, are abundant and globally widespread. In the present study, we collected 232 fecal specimens from commensal rodents captured in animal farms and farm neighbourhoods in China. We collected 33 Asian house rats, 168 brown rats and 31 house mice. 6.0% (14/232) and 8.2% (19/232) of these rodents were microscopy-positive for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts, respectively. All 14 Giardia isolates were identified as Giardia duodenalis assemblage G at a minimum of one or maximum of three gene loci (tpi, gdh and bg). By small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequencing, Cryptosporidium parvum (n = 12) and Cryptosporidium muris (n = 7) were identified. The gp60 gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein was successfully amplified and sequenced in nine C. parvum isolates, all of which belonged to the IIdA15G1 subtype. Observation of the same IIdA15G1 subtype in humans (previously) and in rodents (here) suggests that rodents infected with Cryptosporidium have the potential to transmit cryptosporidiosis to humans. PMID:25579244

  13. Investigating neural correlates of behavior in freely behaving rodents using inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Subramaniam; Jin, Xin; Costa, Rui M; Carmena, Jose M

    2010-07-01

    Simultaneous behavior and multielectrode neural recordings in freely behaving rodents holds great promise to study the neural bases of behavior and disease models in combination with genetic manipulations. Here, we introduce the use of three-axis accelerometers to characterize the behavior of rats and mice during chronic neural recordings. These sensors were small and light enough to be worn by rodents and were used to record three-axis acceleration during freely moving behavior. A two-layer neural network-based pattern recognition algorithm was developed to extract the natural behavior of mice from the acceleration data. Successful recognition of resting, eating, grooming, and rearing are shown using this approach. The inertial sensors were combined with continuous 24-h recordings of neural data from the striatum of mice to characterize variations in neural activity with circadian cycles and to study the neural correlates of spontaneous action initiation. Finally, accelerometers were used to study the performance of rodents in traditional operant conditioning, where they were used to extract the reaction time of rodents. Thus the addition of accelerometer recordings of rodents to chronic multielectrode neural recordings provides great value for a number of neuroscience applications. PMID:20427622

  14. Fossil and molecular evidence constrain scenarios for the early evolutionary and biogeographic history of hystricognathous rodents.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Hesham M; Seiffert, Erik R; Steiper, Michael E; Simons, Elwyn L

    2009-09-29

    The early evolutionary and paleobiogeographic history of the diverse rodent clade Hystricognathi, which contains Hystricidae (Old World porcupines), Caviomorpha (the endemic South American rodents), and African Phiomorpha (cane rats, dassie rats, and blesmols) is of great interest to students of mammalian evolution, but remains poorly understood because of a poor early fossil record. Here we describe the oldest well-dated hystricognathous rodents from an earliest late Eocene (approximately 37 Ma) fossil locality in the Fayum Depression of northern Egypt. These taxa exhibit a combination of primitive and derived features, the former shared with Asian "baluchimyine" rodents, and the latter shared with Oligocene phiomorphs and caviomorphs. Phylogenetic analysis incorporating morphological, temporal, geographic, and molecular information places the new taxa as successive sister groups of crown Hystricognathi, and supports an Asian origin for stem Hystricognathi and an Afro-Arabian origin for crown Hystricognathi, stem Hystricidae, and stem Caviomorpha. Molecular dating of early divergences within Hystricognathi, using a Bayesian "relaxed clock" approach and multiple fossil calibrations, suggests that the split between Hystricidae and the phiomorph-caviomorph clade occurred approximately 39 Ma, and that phiomorphs and caviomorphs diverged approximately 36 Ma. These results are remarkably congruent with our phylogenetic results and the fossil record of hystricognathous rodent evolution in Afro-Arabia and South America. PMID:19805363

  15. Two-phase seed dispersal: linking the effects of frugivorous birds and seed-caching rodents.

    PubMed

    Vander Wall, Stephen B; Kuhn, Kellie M; Gworek, Jennifer R

    2005-09-01

    Frugivorous birds disperse the seeds of many fruit-bearing plants, but the fate of seeds after defecation or regurgitation is often unknown. Some rodents gather and scatter hoard seeds, and some of these may be overlooked, germinate, and establish plants. We show that these two disparate modes of seed dispersal are linked in some plants. Rodents removed large (>25 mg) seeds from simulated bird feces (pseudofeces) at rates of 8-50%/day and scatter hoarded them in soil. Ants (Formica sibylla) also harvested some seeds and carried them to their nests. Rodents carried seeds 2.5+/-3.2 m to cache sites (maximum 12 m) and buried seeds at 8+/-7 mm depth. Enclosure studies suggest that yellow pine chipmunks (Tamias amoenus) and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) made the caches. In spring, some seeds germinated from rodent caches and established seedlings, but no seedlings established directly from pseudofeces. This form of two-phase seed dispersal is important because each phase offers different benefits to plants. Frugivory by birds permits relatively long-range dispersal and potential colonization of new sites, whereas rodent caching moves seeds from exposed, low-quality sites (bird feces on the ground surface) to a soil environment that may help maintain seed viability and promote successful seedling establishment. PMID:15959820

  16. Prevalence and genetic diversity of Bartonella strains in rodents from northwestern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rubio, André V; Ávila-Flores, Rafael; Osikowicz, Lynn M; Bai, Ying; Suzán, Gerardo; Kosoy, Michael Y

    2014-12-01

    Bartonella infections were investigated in wild rodents from northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico. A total of 489 rodents belonging to 14 species were surveyed in four areas. Bartonella bacteria were cultured from 50.1% of rodent samples (245/489). Infection rates ranged from 0% to 83.3% per rodent species, with no significant difference between sites except for Cynomys ludovicianus. Phylogenetic analyses of the citrate synthase gene (gltA) of the Bartonella isolates revealed 23 genetic variants (15 novel and 8 previously described), clustering into five phylogroups. Three phylogroups were associated with Bartonella vinsonii subsp. vinsonii, B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis, and B. washoensis, respectively. The other two phylogroups were not genetically related to any known Bartonella species. The genetic variants and phylogenetic groups exhibited a high degree of host specificity, mainly at the genus and family levels. This is the first study that describes the genetic diversity of Bartonella strains in wild rodents from Mexico. Considering that some variants found in this study are associated with Bartonella species that have been reported as zoonotic, more investigations are needed to further understand the ecology of Bartonella species in Mexican wildlife and their implications for human health. PMID:25514119

  17. All Rodents Are Not the Same: A Modern Synthesis of Cortical Organization

    PubMed Central

    Krubitzer, Leah; Campi, Katharine L.; Cooke, Dylan F.

    2011-01-01

    Rodents are a major order of mammals that is highly diverse in distribution and lifestyle. Five suborders, 34 families, and 2,277 species within this order occupy a number of different niches and vary along several lifestyle dimensions such as diel pattern (diurnal vs. nocturnal), terrain niche, and diet. For example, the terrain niche of rodents includes arboreal, aerial, terrestrial, semi-aquatic, burrowing, and rock dwelling. Not surprisingly, the behaviors associated with particular lifestyles are also highly variable and thus the neocortex, which generates these behaviors, has undergone corresponding alterations across species. Studies of cortical organization in species that vary along several dimensions such as terrain niche, diel pattern, and rearing conditions demonstrate that the size and number of cortical fields can be highly variable within this order. The internal organization of a cortical field also reflects lifestyle differences between species and exaggerates behaviorally relevant effectors such as vibrissae, teeth, or lips. Finally, at a cellular level, neuronal number and density varies for the same cortical field in different species and is even different for the same species reared in different conditions (laboratory vs. wild-caught). These very large differences across and within rodent species indicate that there is no generic rodent model. Rather, there are rodent models suited for specific questions regarding the development, function, and evolution of the neocortex. PMID:21701141

  18. Low Level Primary Blast Injury in Rodent Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela B. L.; Kan, Enci Mary; Salim, Agus; Li, Zhaohui; Ng, Kian Chye; Moochhala, Shabbir M.; Ling, Eng-Ang; Tan, Mui Hong; Lu, Jia

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of blast attacks and resulting traumatic brain injuries has been on the rise in recent years. Primary blast is one of the mechanisms in which the blast wave can cause injury to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single sub-lethal blast over pressure (BOP) exposure of either 48.9?kPa (7.1?psi) or 77.3?kPa (11.3?psi) to rodents in an open-field setting. Brain tissue from these rats was harvested for microarray and histopathological analyses. Gross histopathology of the brains showed that cortical neurons were “darkened” and shrunken with narrowed vasculature in the cerebral cortex day 1 after blast with signs of recovery at day 4 and day 7 after blast. TUNEL-positive cells were predominant in the white matter of the brain at day 1 after blast and double-labeling of brain tissue showed that these DNA-damaged cells were both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes but were mainly not apoptotic due to the low caspase-3 immunopositivity. There was also an increase in amyloid precursor protein immunoreactive cells in the white matter which suggests acute axonal damage. In contrast, Iba-1 staining for macrophages or microglia was not different from control post-blast. Blast exposure altered the expression of over 5786 genes in the brain which occurred mostly at day 1 and day 4 post-blast. These genes were narrowed down to 10 overlapping genes after time-course evaluation and functional analyses. These genes pointed toward signs of repair at day 4 and day 7 post-blast. Our findings suggest that the BOP levels in the study resulted in mild cellular injury to the brain as evidenced by acute neuronal, cerebrovascular, and white matter perturbations that showed signs of resolution. It is unclear whether these perturbations exist at a milder level or normalize completely and will need more investigation. Specific changes in gene expression may be further evaluated to understand the mechanism of blast-induced neurotrauma. PMID:21541261

  19. Effects of HZE irradiation on chemical neurotransmission in rodent hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Mayumi

    Space radiation represents a significant risk to the CNS (central nervous system) during space missions. Most harmful are the HZE (high mass, highly charged (Z), high energy) particles, e.g. 56Fe, which possess high ionizing ability, dense energy deposition pattern, and high penetrance. Accumulating evidence suggests that radiation has significant impact on cognitive functions. In ground-base experiments, HZE radiation induces pronounced deficits in hippocampus dependent learning and memory in rodents. However, the mechanisms underlying these impairments are mostly unknown. Exposure to HZE radiation elevates the level of oxidation, resulting in cell loss, tissue damage and functional deficits through direct ionization and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). When hippocampal slices were exposed to ROS, neuronal excitability was reduced. My preliminary results showed enhanced radio-vulnerability of the hippocampus and reduction in basal and depolarization-evoked [3H]-norepinephrine release after HZE exposure. These results raised the possibility that HZE radiation deteriorates cognitive function through radiation-induced impairments in hippocampal chemical neurotransmission, the hypothesis of this dissertation. In Aim 1 I have focused on the effects of HZE radiation on release of major neurotransmitter systems in the hippocampus. I have further extended my research on the levels of receptors of these systems in Aim 2. In Aim 3, I have studied the level of oxidation in membranes of my samples. My research reveals that HZE radiation significantly reduces hyperosmotic sucrose evoked [3H]-glutamate and [14C]-GABA release both three and six months post irradiation. The same radiation regimen also significantly enhances oxidative stress as indicated by increased levels of lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus, suggesting that increased levels of lipid peroxidation may play a role in reduction of neurotransmitter release. HZE radiation also significantly reduces levels of neurotransmitter receptors critical to synaptic plasticity; glutamatergic NMDA (N-methyl D-aspartate) receptors and beta1 adrenergic receptors, three months post irradiation. By six months post irradiation, the levels of these receptors are returned to normal, implying that partial repair may take place. My findings demonstrate that a single dose of HZE radiation alters the neurochemical environment in the hippocampus, which may underlie radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction.

  20. A low cost setup for behavioral audiometry in rodents.

    PubMed

    Tziridis, Konstantin; Ahlf, Sönke; Schulze, Holger

    2012-01-01

    In auditory animal research it is crucial to have precise information about basic hearing parameters of the animal subjects that are involved in the experiments. Such parameters may be physiological response characteristics of the auditory pathway, e.g. via brainstem audiometry (BERA). But these methods allow only indirect and uncertain extrapolations about the auditory percept that corresponds to these physiological parameters. To assess the perceptual level of hearing, behavioral methods have to be used. A potential problem with the use of behavioral methods for the description of perception in animal models is the fact that most of these methods involve some kind of learning paradigm before the subjects can be behaviorally tested, e.g. animals may have to learn to press a lever in response to a sound. As these learning paradigms change perception itself (1,2) they consequently will influence any result about perception obtained with these methods and therefore have to be interpreted with caution. Exceptions are paradigms that make use of reflex responses, because here no learning paradigms have to be carried out prior to perceptual testing. One such reflex response is the acoustic startle response (ASR) that can highly reproducibly be elicited with unexpected loud sounds in naïve animals. This ASR in turn can be influenced by preceding sounds depending on the perceptibility of this preceding stimulus: Sounds well above hearing threshold will completely inhibit the amplitude of the ASR; sounds close to threshold will only slightly inhibit the ASR. This phenomenon is called pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) (3,4), and the amount of PPI on the ASR gradually depends on the perceptibility of the pre-pulse. PPI of the ASR is therefore well suited to determine behavioral audiograms in naïve, non-trained animals, to determine hearing impairments or even to detect possible subjective tinnitus percepts in these animals. In this paper we demonstrate the use of this method in a rodent model (cf. also ref. (5)), the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus), which is a well know model species for startle response research within the normal human hearing range (e.g. (6)). PMID:23117247

  1. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite is a joint mission between NASA and the National Space Development Agency (NSDA) of Japan. It is designed to monitor and study tropical rainfall and the associated release of energy that helps to power the global water cycle. The satellite can greatly enhance our understanding of the interactions which produce changes in global rainfall and climate. A detailed overview of TRMM covers why we need TRMM, which is broken into grade-specific explanations; questions and answers about TRMM; TRMM instruments; climate-related facts; the Mission to Planet Earth "Education" Homepage; and case studies comparing land and ocean storms. Images showing current conditions, as well as archived images, movies, and animations are provided on hurricanes, global datasets covering lightning, temperature, and rainfall, monthly mean rainrates from 1998 through 2000, monthly rainfall anomalies, data types and idealized data simulations. Also archived are press releases, refereed journals, and scientific documents related to TRMM data information. An Educational Resources section provides teacher's guides, animations and activities on topics such as latent heat of evaporation and the water cycle, hurricanes as heat engines, air pressure systems in the context of El Nino/La Nina, lightning formation and the role of ice in a thunderstorm, and remote sensing of precipitation. The ground-based validation efforts of the TRMM are outlined in detail. Related organizations, data sources, field experiments, and TRMM research are linked from this site.

  2. Oxytocin-mediated GABA inhibition during delivery attenuates autism pathogenesis in rodent offspring.

    PubMed

    Tyzio, Roman; Nardou, Romain; Ferrari, Diana C; Tsintsadze, Timur; Shahrokhi, Amene; Eftekhari, Sanaz; Khalilov, Ilgam; Tsintsadze, Vera; Brouchoud, Corinne; Chazal, Genevieve; Lemonnier, Eric; Lozovaya, Natalia; Burnashev, Nail; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2014-02-01

    We report that the oxytocin-mediated neuroprotective ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) excitatory-inhibitory shift during delivery is abolished in the valproate and fragile X rodent models of autism. During delivery and subsequently, hippocampal neurons in these models have elevated intracellular chloride levels, increased excitatory GABA, enhanced glutamatergic activity, and elevated gamma oscillations. Maternal pretreatment with bumetanide restored in offspring control electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes. Conversely, blocking oxytocin signaling in naïve mothers produced offspring having electrophysiological and behavioral autistic-like features. Our results suggest a chronic deficient chloride regulation in these rodent models of autism and stress the importance of oxytocin-mediated GABAergic inhibition during the delivery process. Our data validate the amelioration observed with bumetanide and oxytocin and point to common pathways in a drug-induced and a genetic rodent model of autism. PMID:24503856

  3. Effect of body size on the abundance of ectoparasitic mites on the wild rodent Oligoryzomys nigripes.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fernanda Rodrigues; Cruz, Leonardo Dominici; Linhares, Arício Xavier; Zuben, Claudio José Von

    2015-09-01

    The abundance of parasites on a host can be affected by several factors; in this study, we investigated the influence of sex and body size of the host rodent Oligoryzomys nigripes on the abundance of ectoparasitic mites (Acari: Mesostigmata). The generalized linear model indicated that body size (indicative of age) of the host rodent O. nigripes significantly contributed to the variation in the abundance of mites on host rodents at the Experimental Station of Itirapina. This trend of increased parasitism on hosts with larger body sizes may be linked to the fact that larger individuals are able to support the coexistence of a larger number of parasites, and being more mobile, are more exposed to infection by parasites. PMID:26204011

  4. [Role of endoparasites of fleas of wild rodents in plague enzootia].

    PubMed

    Chumakova, I V; Tokhov, Iu M

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory studies of fleas for gregarines have established that it is the latter inhabiting the intestine and stomach of the fleas of wild rodents which are of much interest as protozoa, in whose organism, parasitic species of bacteria can survive. Penetration of plague bacteria into the endoplasm ofgregarines and their possible survival in the cysts may create an additional component in the chain of an epizootic process, which ensures its function, without involving the rodents at the nesting biocenotic level following the pattern: flea imagoes - nesting litter infected with gregarine spores, cysts - flea larvae - flea imagoes infected with cysts, with the plague pathogen emerging into a rodent population through the imago of blocked fleas. PMID:23805483

  5. Ecology, Genetic Diversity, and Phylogeographic Structure of Andes Virus in Humans and Rodents in Chile?

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Rafael A.; Torres-Perez, Fernando; Galeno, Hector; Navarrete, Maritza; Vial, Pablo A.; Palma, R. Eduardo; Ferres, Marcela; Cook, Joseph A.; Hjelle, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is the predominant etiologic agent of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in southern South America. In Chile, serologically confirmed human hantavirus infections have occurred throughout a wide latitudinal distribution extending from the regions of Valparaíso (32 to 33°S) to Aysén (46°S) in southern Patagonia. In this study, we found seropositive rodents further north in the Coquimbo region (30°S) in Chile. Rodent seroprevalence was 1.4%, with Oligoryzomys longicaudatus displaying the highest seroprevalence (5.9%), followed by Abrothrix longipilis (1.9%) and other species exhibiting ?0.6% seropositivity. We sequenced partial ANDV small (S) segment RNA from 6 HCPS patients and 32 rodents of four different species collected throughout the known range of hantavirus infection in Chile. Phylogenetic analyses showed two major ANDV South (ANDV Sout) clades, congruent with two major Chilean ecoregions, Mediterranean (Chilean matorral [shrubland]) and Valdivian temperate forest. Human and rodent samples grouped according to geographic location. Phylogenetic comparative analyses of portions of S and medium segments (encoding glycoproteins Gn and Gc) from a subset of rodent specimens exhibited similar topologies, corroborating two major ANDV Sout clades in Chile and suggesting that yet unknown factors influence viral gene flow and persistence throughout the two Chilean ecoregions. Genetic algorithms for recombination detection identified recombination events within the S segment. Molecular demographic analyses showed that the virus is undergoing purifying selection and demonstrated a recent exponential growth in the effective number of ANDV Sout infections in Chile that correlates with the increased number of human cases reported. Although we determined virus sequences from four rodent species, our results confirmed O. longicaudatus as the primary ANDV Sout reservoir in Chile. While evidence of geographic differentiation exists, a single cosmopolitan lineage of ANDV Sout remains the sole etiologic agent for HCPS in Chile. PMID:19116256

  6. Habitat-specific shaping of proliferation and neuronal differentiation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis of wild rodents

    PubMed Central

    Cavegn, Nicole; van Dijk, R. Maarten; Menges, Dominik; Brettschneider, Helene; Phalanndwa, Mashudu; Chimimba, Christian T.; Isler, Karin; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Slomianka, Lutz; Amrein, Irmgard

    2013-01-01

    Daily life of wild mammals is characterized by a multitude of attractive and aversive stimuli. The hippocampus processes complex polymodal information associated with such stimuli and mediates adequate behavioral responses. How newly generated hippocampal neurons in wild animals contribute to hippocampal function is still a subject of debate. Here, we test the relationship between adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) and habitat types. To this end, we compare wild Muridae species of southern Africa [Namaqua rock mouse (Micaelamys namaquensis), red veld rat (Aethomys chrysophilus), highveld gerbil (Tatera brantsii), and spiny mouse (Acomys spinosissimus)] with data from wild European Muridae [long-tailed wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus), pygmy field mice (Apodemus microps), yellow-necked wood mice (Apodemus flavicollis), and house mice (Mus musculus domesticus)] from previous studies. The pattern of neurogenesis, expressed in normalized numbers of Ki67- and Doublecortin(DCX)-positive cells to total granule cells (GCs), is similar for the species from a southern African habitat. However, we found low proliferation, but high neuronal differentiation in rodents from the southern African habitat compared to rodents from the European environment. Within the African rodents, we observe additional regulatory and morphological traits in the hippocampus. Namaqua rock mice with previous pregnancies showed lower AHN compared to males and nulliparous females. The phylogenetically closely related species (Namaqua rock mouse and red veld rat) show a CA4, which is not usually observed in murine rodents. The specific features of the southern environment that may be associated with the high number of young neurons in African rodents still remain to be elucidated. This study provides the first evidence that a habitat can shape adult neurogenesis in rodents across phylogenetic groups. PMID:23616743

  7. Effect of an invasive plant and moonlight on rodent foraging behavior in a coastal dune ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew D; De León, Yesenia L

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how invasive plants may alter predator avoidance behaviors is important for granivorous rodents because their foraging can trigger ripple effects in trophic webs. Previous research has shown that European beach grass Ammophila arenaria, an invasive species in coastal California, affects the predation of other seeds by the rodents Microtus californicus, Peromyscus maniculatus, and Reithrodontomys megalotis. This may be due to lower perceived predation risk by rodents foraging in close proximity to the cover provided by Ammophila, but this mechanism has not yet been tested. We examined the perceived predation risk of rodents by measuring the 'giving up density' of food left behind in experimental patches of food in areas with and without abundant cover from Ammophila and under varying amount of moonlight. We found strong evidence that giving up density was lower in the thick uniform vegetation on Ammophila-dominated habitat than it was in the more sparsely and diversely vegetated restored habitat. There was also evidence that moonlight affected giving up density and that it mediated the effects of habitat, although with our design we were unable to distinguish the effects of lunar illumination and moon phase. Our findings illustrate that foraging rodents, well known to be risk-averse during moonlit nights, are also affected by the presence of an invasive plant. This result has implications for granivory and perhaps plant demography in invaded and restored coastal habitats. Future research in this system should work to unravel the complex trophic links formed by a non-native invasive plant (i.e., Ammophila) providing cover favored by native rodents, which likely forage on and potentially limit the recruitment of native and non-native plants, some of which have ecosystem consequences of their own. PMID:25679785

  8. Effect of an Invasive Plant and Moonlight on Rodent Foraging Behavior in a Coastal Dune Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew D.; De León, Yesenia L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how invasive plants may alter predator avoidance behaviors is important for granivorous rodents because their foraging can trigger ripple effects in trophic webs. Previous research has shown that European beach grass Ammophila arenaria, an invasive species in coastal California, affects the predation of other seeds by the rodents Microtus californicus, Peromyscus maniculatus, and Reithrodontomys megalotis. This may be due to lower perceived predation risk by rodents foraging in close proximity to the cover provided by Ammophila, but this mechanism has not yet been tested. We examined the perceived predation risk of rodents by measuring the ‘giving up density’ of food left behind in experimental patches of food in areas with and without abundant cover from Ammophila and under varying amount of moonlight. We found strong evidence that giving up density was lower in the thick uniform vegetation on Ammophila-dominated habitat than it was in the more sparsely and diversely vegetated restored habitat. There was also evidence that moonlight affected giving up density and that it mediated the effects of habitat, although with our design we were unable to distinguish the effects of lunar illumination and moon phase. Our findings illustrate that foraging rodents, well known to be risk-averse during moonlit nights, are also affected by the presence of an invasive plant. This result has implications for granivory and perhaps plant demography in invaded and restored coastal habitats. Future research in this system should work to unravel the complex trophic links formed by a non-native invasive plant (i.e., Ammophila) providing cover favored by native rodents, which likely forage on and potentially limit the recruitment of native and non-native plants, some of which have ecosystem consequences of their own. PMID:25679785

  9. The impact of climate change on global tropical storm damages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Mendelsohn; Kerry Emanuel; Shun Chonabayashi

    2011-01-01

    This paper constructs an integrated assessment model of tropical cyclones in order to quantify the impact that climate change may have on tropical cyclone damages in countries around the world. The paper relies on a tropical cyclone generator in each oceanand several climate models to predict tropical cyclones with and without climate change. A damage model is constructed to compute

  10. The naked mole rat--a new record for the oldest living rodent.

    PubMed

    Buffenstein, Rochelle; Jarvis, Jennifer U M

    2002-05-29

    We report a new record for the world's longest-lived rodent, a male naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber). On the basis of his weight at capture, this animal was approximately 1 year old when collected near Mtito Andei, Kenya in July/August 1974. He died in April 2002, indicating that he lived for more than 28 years. As such, his life-span surpassed the previous longevity record for a rodent, which was held by a porcupine (Hystrix brachyura) that lived for 27 years and 4 months. PMID:14602989

  11. Evaluation of different rodenticidal baits against rodent population in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) crop fields.

    PubMed

    Sabhlok, V P; Pasahan, S C; Kumar, P; Singal, R K

    1997-06-01

    The baits used consisted of 2% zinc phosphide and 0.005% bromadiolone. The baitings were carried out at the flowering stage of cucumber crop. Double baiting treatments comprising zinc phosphide and bromadiolone in different combinations resulted in better reduction of rodent population and crop damage. Deployment of different rodenticidal treatments saved yield loss from 7.00 to 11.82q/ha. Thus, accomplishing cost benefit ratio of 1:88 to 1:107. Bromadiolone followed by bromadiolone, the most profitable combination is suggested for control of rodent population in cucumber crop fields. PMID:9357178

  12. Sensing through friction: the biomechanics of texture perception in rodents and primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debrégeas, Georges; Boubenec, Yves

    2015-10-01

    Rodents and primates possess an exquisite tactile sensitivity, which allows them to extract a wealth of information about their immediate environment. They can distinguish subtle differences in surface roughness through tactile exploration in a much more precise way than they can do visually. In both sensory systems, tactile information is contained in the sequence of deformation of the tactile organ--the facial hair for rodents (the whiskers), the digital skin for primates -- elicited by active rubbing on the probed surface (Figure 8.1). These deformations, registered by mechanosensitive neurons located in inner tissues, are processed by the central nervous system to produce a sensory representation of the surface...

  13. Short report: prevalence of hantavirus infection in rodents associated with two fatal human infections in California.

    PubMed

    Turell, M J; Korch, G W; Rossi, C A; Sesline, D; Enge, B A; Dondero, D V; Jay, M; Ludwig, G V; Li, D; Schmaljohn, C S

    1995-02-01

    Rodents living near two fatal human cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in California were surveyed for evidence of hantavirus infection. Seventeen (15%) (14 Peromyscus maniculatus and one each of P. truei, Eutamias minimus, and Microtus californicus) of 114 rodents tested had evidence (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or polymerase chain reaction) of hantavirus infection. This suggests that Peromyscus mice, and P. maniculatus in particular, may be the reservoir for the virus causing this newly recognized disease in California, as previously reported for New Mexico and Arizona. PMID:7872450

  14. Acute kidney injury in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; George, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most challenging problems faced by clinicians in the tropics owing to its fast-changing burden. AKI in the tropics is strikingly different from that in the developed world in terms of etiology and presentation. In addition, there is a stark contrast between well-developed and poor areas in the tropics. The true epidemiological picture of AKI in the tropics is not well understood due to the late presentation of patients to tertiary centers. Infections remain the major culprit in most cases of AKI, with high mortality rates in the tropics. Human immunodeficiency virus–related AKI, related to nephrotoxicity due to antiretroviral therapy, is on the rise. Acute tubular necrosis and thrombotic microangiopathy are the most common mechanisms of AKI. A notable problem in the tropics is the scarcity of resources in health centers to support patients who require critical care due to AKI. This article reviews the unique and contrasting nature of AKI in the tropics and describes its management in each situation. PMID:21911980

  15. Issues in the Design and Interpretation of Chronic Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies in Rodents: Approaches to Dose Selection

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than three decades chronic studies in rodents have been the benchmark for assessing the potential long-term toxicity, and particularly the carcinogenicity, of chemicals. With doses typically administered for about 2 years (18 months to lifetime), the rodent bioassay has ...

  16. Occurrence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in wild rodents and marsupials from the Atlantic forest, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that infects a large spectrum of warm-blooded animals, including humans. Small mammals and rodents play an important role in the epidemiology of T. gondii because they are sources of infection for domestic and feral cats. Serum samples from 151 rodents and 4...

  17. The past, present, and future of National Aeronautics and Space Administration spaceflight diet in support of microgravity rodent experiments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gwo-Shing; Tou, Janet C; Yu, Diane; Girten, Beverly E; Cohen, Jacob

    2014-02-01

    Rodents have been the most frequently flown animal model used to study physiological responses to the space environment. In support of future of space exploration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) envisions an animal research program focused on rodents. Therefore, the development of a rodent diet that is suitable for the spaceflight environment including long duration spaceflight is a high priority. Recognizing the importance of nutrition in affecting spaceflight physiological responses and ensuring reliable biomedical and biological science return, NASA developed the nutrient-upgraded rodent food bar (NuRFB) as a standard diet for rodent spaceflight. Depending on future animal habitat hardware and planned spaceflight experiments, modification of the NuRFB or development of a new diet formulation may be needed, particularly for long term spaceflights. Research in this area consists primarily of internal technical reports that are not readily accessible. Therefore, the aims of this contribution are to provide a brief history of the development of rodent spaceflight diets, to review the present diet used in rodent spaceflight studies, and to discuss some of the challenges and potential solutions for diets to be used in future long-term rodent spaceflight studies. PMID:24012282

  18. Community composition and size structure of murid rodents in relation to the biogeography of the Japanese archipelago

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virginie Millien-Parra; Michel Loreau

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the geographical patterns of community composition and size structure of murid rodent assemblages in Japan. Rodent faunal composition showed three biogeographic zones in the studied area (Hokkaido, northern Honshu and southern Honshu), which are characterized by endemic species or genera. There was a large discrepancy between distribution patterns of murine species, which are generalist and widespread in Japan,

  19. Modeling Tropical Forests: Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, S.; Uriarte, M.; Wood, T. E.; Cavaleri, M. A.; Lugo, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest that tropical forests may respond dramatically to climate change and - because these systems exchange more carbon dioxide with the atmosphere than any other class of terrestrial ecosystem - understanding the consequences for associated carbon cycling feedbacks is critical to climate predictions at the global-scale. Indeed, poor model representation of tropical forest carbon cycling and response to change (due in part to a paucity of data) is the most significant source of terrestrial uncertainty in projections of Earth's future climate. Here we provide an ecological perspective on aspects of tropical forest structure and function that will present distinctive challenges to the Earth System Modeling community. Specifically, we will discuss: (1) high diversity of species, climate, soil types, and land use history within and among tropical forests and how this diversity influences forest responses to perturbation; (2) nutrient regulation of tropical carbon cycling responses to global change, including limitation by phosphorus; and (3) a lack of physiological data specific for tropical plant and microbial communities (e.g., photosynthetic optima, soil microbial carbon use efficiencies). With the goal of determining which processes and/or measurements should be better constrained in order to improve the capacity to model the tropics, we will examine a set of relevant Earth System Model parameters in the context of data synthesized from the literature and of new tropical forest physiological measurements we have recently made. The objective of this talk is not to discourage modelers from attempting to model the tropics, but rather to support this important work by offering research directions likely to reduce uncertainty in future predictions of Earth System Models.

  20. Variability in subtropical-tropical cells drives oxygen levels in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duteil, Olaf; Böning, Claus W.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies found a negative trend in oxygen concentrations in tropical regions during the last decades. Employing a biogeochemical circulation model, we highlight the importance of wind-driven ocean transport associated with the Subtropical-Tropical Cells (STCs) in setting the oxygen levels in the tropical ocean. The observed and simulated slowdown of the STCs by 30% from the 1960s to the 1990s caused a decrease in oxygen transport to the tropics. Transport of phosphate was similarly reduced, decreasing export production and respiration. The effects of physical transport and biological consumption partly compensate, damping oxygen interannual and decadal variability. Our results suggest that the observed residual oxygen trend in the tropical Pacific is mainly driven by changes in oxygen transport. Accordingly, the observed recent strengthening of the STCs leads us to expect a pause in the oxygen decrease or even an increase of tropical Pacific oxygen values in the near future.

  1. Tropical medicine: Telecommunications and technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legters, Llewellyn J.

    1991-01-01

    The potential for global outbreaks of tropical infectious diseases, and our ability to identify and respond to such outbreaks is a major concern. Rapid, efficient telecommunications is viewed as part of the solution to this set of problems - the means to link a network of epidemiological field stations via satellite with U.S. academic institutions and government agencies, for purposes of research, training in tropical medicine, and observation of and response to epidemic emergencies. At a workshop, telecommunications and technology transfer were addressed and applications of telecommunications technology in long-distance consultation, teaching and disaster relief were demonstrated. Applications in teaching and consultation in tropical infectious diseases is discussed.

  2. Trypanosoma from rodents as potential source of infection in human-shaped landscapes of South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Pumhom, Pornpan; Morand, Serge; Tran, Annelise; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Desquesnes, Marc

    2015-03-15

    Reports of atypical human cases of Trypanosoma lewisi or T. lewisi-like and Trypanosoma evansi infections have increased in South-East Asia, urging to investigate the possible links between humans, animal reservoirs and habitats. We tested how habitat structure affects the infection by Trypanosoma species of common murine rodents, inhabiting human-dominated landscapes in South East Asia. For this, we used geo-referenced data of rodents investigated for Trypanosoma infection and land cover maps produced for seven study sites in Thailand, Cambodia and Lao PDR. High prevalence of infection by T. lewisi was observed in rodents living near human settlement and in areas with high cover of built-up habitat, while the infection of rodents by T. evansi was explained by increased landscape patchiness and high cover of rain-fed agriculture lands. These results suggest a likely role of wild rodents as reservoir and possible source of atypical human infection by animal trypanosomes. PMID:25613476

  3. Evaluation of three feed-through insecticides using two rodent and two sand fly species as models.

    PubMed

    Mascari, T M; Stout, R W; Foil, L D

    2012-09-01

    The efficacy of 3 rodent feed-through insecticides (novaluron, pyriproxyfen, and ivermectin) was determined against larvae of the sand flies Phlebotomus duboscqi and P. papatasi using Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) and Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) as laboratory models. For each insecticide, there were no significant differences between the longevity or percentage survival of sand fly larvae that had been fed feces of treated rodents for each sand fly or rodent species pairing. The results of this study suggest that larvae of P. duboscqi and P. papatasi are equally susceptible to the concentrations of the rodent feed-through insecticides tested in this study and that these insecticides are pharmacologically compatible with different rodent/sand fly interactions. PMID:23833909

  4. Thermal comfort in tropical classrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, A.G. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Architecture

    1998-10-01

    This paper examines the comfort criteria of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55-1992 for their applicability in tropical classrooms. A field study conducted in Hawaii used a variety of methods to collect the data: survey questionnaires, physical measurements, interviews, and behavioral observations. A total of 3,544 students and teachers completed questionnaires in 29 naturally ventilated and air-conditioned classrooms in six schools during two seasons. The majority of classrooms failed to meet the physical specifications of the Standard 55 comfort zone. Thermal neutrality, preference, and acceptability results are compared with other field studies and the Standard 55 criteria. Acceptability votes by occupants of both naturally ventilated and air-conditioned classrooms exceeded the standard`s 80% acceptability criteria, regardless of whether physical conditions were in or out of the comfort zone. Responses from these two school populations suggest not only a basis for separate comfort standards but energy conservation opportunities through raising thermostat set points.

  5. Microphysical Characteristics of Tropical Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grainger, Cedric A.; Anderson, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the analysis of data collected by the University of North Dakota Citation II measurement platform during three TRMM Field measurement campaigns. The Citation II made cloud measurements during TEFLUN B in Florida, the LBA program in Brazil, and KWAJEX in Kwajalein. The work performed can be divided into two parts. The first part consisted of reformatting the Citation data into a form more easily used to compare to the satellite information. The second part consisted of examination of the cloud data in order to characterize the properties of the tropical clouds. The reformatting of the Citation data was quite labor intensive and, due to the fact that the aircraft was involved in three of the field campaigns, it required a substantial number of person-hours to complete. Much of the analysis done on the second part was done in conjunction with the thesis work of Nicholas Anderson, then a graduate student at the University of North Dakota.

  6. Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Isabel

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This detailed description of Hurricane Isabel, a long-lived Cape Verde hurricane that reached Category 5 status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, contains a synoptic history, meteorological statistics, casualty and damage statistics, and a forecast and warning critique. The storm made landfall near Drum Inlet on the Outer Banks of North Carolina as a category 2 hurricane and is considered to be one of the most significant tropical cyclones to affect portions of northeastern North Carolina and east-central Virginia since Hurricane Hazel in 1954 and the Chesapeake-Potomac Hurricane of 1933. Voluminous charts include best track, selected ship reports, selected surface observations, and rainfall. A warnings chart is also included along with a best track map.

  7. Predictability of the tropical atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J.

    1981-01-01

    An examination of the deterministic predictability for tropics and middle-latitudes separately indicates that the theoretical upper limit of deterministic predictability for low latitudes is shorter than that for middle latitudes. Variability of time averages in low latitudes is mainly determined by the location and intensity of the large-scale Hadley and Walker circulations. Since these are largely influenced by the slowly varying boundary conditions of sea surface temperature and soil moisture, and since synoptic instabilities are not strong enough to change drastically the large scale flow, there is larger potential for predictability of monthly and seasonal means in low latitudes. It is conjectured that for short and medium range deterministic prediction, a prescribed diabatic heating field due to moist convection may be more useful than their explicit calculation from the evolving flow.

  8. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dust in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been contemplating returning astronauts to the moon for long-duration habitation and research and using it as a stepping-stone to Mars. Other spacefaring nations are planning to send humans to the moon for the first time. The surface of the moon is covered by a layer of fine dust. Fine terrestrial dusts, if inhaled, are known to pose a health risk to humans. Some Apollo crews briefly exposed to moon dust that adhered to spacesuits and became airborne in the Lunar Module reported eye and throat irritation. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle or outpost would inevitably become contaminated with lunar dust. To assess the health risks of exposure of humans to airborne lunar dust, we evaluated the toxicity of Apollo 14 moon dust in animal lungs. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally first done by intratracheal instillation (ITI) of aqueous suspensions of the test dust into the lungs of rodents. If a test dust is irritating or cytotoxic to the lungs, the alveolar macrophages, after phagocytizing the dust particles, will release cellular messengers to recruit white blood cells (WBCs) and to induce dilation of blood capillary walls to make them porous, allowing the WBCs to gain access to the alveolar space. The dilation of capillary walls also allows serum proteins and water entering the lung. Besides altering capillary integrity, a toxic dust can also directly kill the cells that come into contact with it or ingest it, after which the dead cells would release their contents, including lactate dehydrogenase (a common enzyme marker of cell death or tissue damage). In the treated animals, we lavaged the lungs 1 and 4 weeks after the dust instillation and measured the concentrations of these biomarkers of toxicity in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluids to determine the toxicity of the dust. To assess whether the inflammation and cellular injury observed in the biomarker study would lead to persistent or progressive histopathological changes, a similar study was conducted to microscopically examine rat lung tissue and the associated lymph nodes for lesions, including fibrosis, 1 or 3 months after the instillation. The results from this ITI study led us to select two concentrations (20 and 60 mg/cu m) for an inhalation study, in which rats were exposed to lunar dust 6 h daily for 4 weeks (5d/wk). Similar biochemical and histopathological assessments were carried out in these rats 1 day or 1, 4, or 13 weeks after the dust exposure. Rats exposed to lunar dust by ITI or inhalation showed effects indicating that the dust is moderately toxic. The data will be useful to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in a lunar habitat and also help engineers designing dust mitigation systems for lunar vehicles and habitats.

  9. Biological sources and sinks of methane in tropical habitats and tropical atmospheric chemistry. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The contents of this study include: two methods for measuring methane emission from a tropical lake; methane emission by bubbling from Gatun Lake, Panama; methane emission from wetlands in central Panama; consumption of atmospheric methane in soils of central Panama: effects of agricultural development; a seasonal study of soil-atmosphere methane, carbon dioxide, and 222Rn flux in a tropical moist forest; and the effects of tropical deforestation on global and regional atmospheric chemistry.

  10. HydrologyWithin Tropical Natural Forests

    E-print Network

    Chappell, Nick A

    evaporation (sometimes ambiguously called "interception loss"), transpiration, soil evaporation, and open studies within forested and adjacent land uses--whether in the Humid Tropics or across all global biomes

  11. Tropical cyclone-ocea~ interactions Isaac Ginis

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Hurricane Andrew in 1992 exceeded 60 with nearly $30 billion damage. Tropical cyclone modeling efforts over of hurricane track predictions over the last 30 years, in contrast there has been no perceptible improvement

  12. Elements of tropical Pacific decadal variability 

    E-print Network

    Fuckar, Neven-Stjepan

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of decadal variability in the tropical Pacific is investigated using a global assimilation reanalysis. At the nexus of this study are monthly means of an ocean general circulation model coupled with a data assimilation routine...

  13. Tropical Storm Faxai - Duration: 13 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA/JAXA's TRMM Satellite provided data of developing Tropical Storm Faxai to make this 3-D image that showed some towering thunderstorms in the area were reaching altitudes of up to 15.5km/~9.6 m...

  14. Tropical Deforestation in the Bolivian Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Compton J.; Steininger, Marc K.; Townshend, John R. G.; Killeen, Timothy R.; Desch, Arthur

    2000-01-01

    Landsat satellite images from the mid-1980s and early 1990s were used to map tropical forest extent and deforestation in approximately 800,000 sq km of Amazonian Bolivia. Forest cover extent, including tropical deciduous forest, totalled 472,000 sq km while the area of natural non-forest formations totalled 298,000 sq km. The area deforested totalled 15,000 sq km in the middle 1980s and 28,800 sq km by the early 1990s. The rate of tropical deforestation in the >1,000 mm/y precipitation forest zone of Bolivia was 2,200 sq km/y from 1985-1986 to 1992-1994. We document a spatially-concentrated "deforestation zone" in Santa Cruz Department where >60% of the Bolivian deforestation is occurring at an accelerating rate in areas of tropical deciduous dry forest.

  15. Comparative Effects of Dieldrin on Hepatic Ploidy, Cell Proliferation, and Apoptosis in Rodent Liver

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa M. Kamendulis; Kyle L. Kolaja; Donald E. Stevenson; Earl F. Walborg Jr; James E. Klaunig

    2001-01-01

    Dieldrin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, which is seen only in the mouse, apparently occurs through a nongenotoxic mechanism. Previous studies have demonstrated that dieldrin induces hepatic DNA synthesis in mouse, but not rat liver. A number of nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens have been shown to increase hepatocyte nuclear ploidy following acute and subchronic treatment in rodents, suggesting that an induction of hepatocyte DNA synthesis may

  16. Prediction of Chemical Carcinogenicity in Rodents from in vitro Genetic Toxicity Assays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond W. Tennant; Barry H. Margolin; Michael D. Shelby; Errol Zeiger; Joseph K. Haseman; Judson Spalding; William Caspary; Michael Resnick; Stanley Stasiewicz; Beth Anderson; Robert Minor

    1987-01-01

    Four widely used in vitro assays for genetic toxicity were evaluated for their ability to predict the carcinogenicity of selected chemicals in rodents. These assays were mutagenesis in Salmonella and mouse lymphoma cells and chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Seventy-three chemicals recently tested in 2-year carcinogenicity studies conducted by the National Cancer Institute and

  17. First Report of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti in Rodents in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Begon, Michael; Birtles, Richard J.; Bown, Kevin J.; Koskela, Esa; Mappes, Tapio; Watts, Phillip C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tick-borne diseases pose an increasingly important public health problem in Europe. Rodents are the reservoir host for many tick-transmitted pathogens, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti, which can cause human granulocytic anaplasmosis and babesiosis, respectively. To estimate the presence of these pathogens in rodents in Finland, we examined blood samples from 151 bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and demonstrate, for the first time, that A. phagocytophilum and B. microti commonly infect bank voles (in 22% and 40% of animals, respectively) in Finland. Sequence analysis of a fragment of 18S rRNA showed that the B. microti strain isolated was identical to the Munich strain, which is considered to be nonzoonotic. The A. phagocytophilum strain (based on a fragment of the msp4 gene) was identical to one found earlier in rodents in the United Kingdom that is transmitted by the tick Ixodes trianguliceps, all the life stages of which feed on small mammals. The infection probability of B. microti in the bank voles was the greater the older the individual was, and males were more often infected than females. A. phagocytophilum infection probability first increased and then decreased with the age of individual without any difference between sexes. While these pathogens presumably pose a limited zoonotic risk to humans in Finland, they might have important interactions with other rodent pathogens and therefore affect infection dynamics of, for example, zoonotic pathogens. PMID:24848684

  18. First report of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti in rodents in Finland.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Eva R; Begon, Michael; Birtles, Richard J; Bown, Kevin J; Koskela, Esa; Mappes, Tapio; Watts, Phillip C

    2014-06-01

    Tick-borne diseases pose an increasingly important public health problem in Europe. Rodents are the reservoir host for many tick-transmitted pathogens, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti, which can cause human granulocytic anaplasmosis and babesiosis, respectively. To estimate the presence of these pathogens in rodents in Finland, we examined blood samples from 151 bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and demonstrate, for the first time, that A. phagocytophilum and B. microti commonly infect bank voles (in 22% and 40% of animals, respectively) in Finland. Sequence analysis of a fragment of 18S rRNA showed that the B. microti strain isolated was identical to the Munich strain, which is considered to be nonzoonotic. The A. phagocytophilum strain (based on a fragment of the msp4 gene) was identical to one found earlier in rodents in the United Kingdom that is transmitted by the tick Ixodes trianguliceps, all the life stages of which feed on small mammals. The infection probability of B. microti in the bank voles was the greater the older the individual was, and males were more often infected than females. A. phagocytophilum infection probability first increased and then decreased with the age of individual without any difference between sexes. While these pathogens presumably pose a limited zoonotic risk to humans in Finland, they might have important interactions with other rodent pathogens and therefore affect infection dynamics of, for example, zoonotic pathogens. PMID:24848684

  19. Rodent malaria parasites suffer from the presence of conspecific clones in three-clone

    E-print Network

    Read, Andrew

    Rodent malaria parasites suffer from the presence of conspecific clones in three-clone Plasmodium genetically distinct clones ­ 1 less virulent than the other 2 ­ either on their own or in mixtures. During the acute phase of infection, total numbers of asexual parasites in mixed-clone infections were equal

  20. Early Pleistocene zapodid rodents from the Java Local Fauna of north-central South Dakota

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert A. Martin

    1989-01-01

    Zapodid rodents are described from the early Pleistocene Java Local Fauna, Walworth County, South Dakota. The fauna includes a new species of Zapus related to the extinct Z. sandersi. The fossil record of Zapus is briefly reviewed, and the Ms of Z. rinkeri and an undescribed species from the Wendell Fox Pasture Local Fauna are illustrated for the first time.

  1. Development of a cost-effective torsional unit for rodent long bone assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Saunders; R. B. Burger; B. Kalantari; A. D. Nichols; C. Witman

    2010-01-01

    Thorough mechanical testing of rodent bones requires an understanding of bone behavior in a variety of loading modes including tension, compression, bending and shear. While these tests are easily conducted with single axis mechanical testing machines, it may also be desirable to determine torsional properties of bone. Although higher-end materials testing machines will enable torsional and\\/or rotational testing, simpler, less

  2. Differential generation of oligodendrocytes from human and rodent embryonic spinal cord neural precursors.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Siddharthan; Compston, Alastair; Jauniaux, Eric; Gilson, Jennifer; Blakemore, William; Svendsen, Clive

    2004-09-01

    Human neural precursors are considered to have widespread therapeutic possibilities on account of their ability to provide large numbers of cells whilst retaining multipotentiality. Application to human demyelinating diseases requires improved understanding of the signalling requirements underlying the generation of human oligodendrocytes from immature cell populations. In this study, we compare and contrast the capacity of neural precursors derived from the developing human and rodent spinal cord to generate oligodendrocytes. We show that the developing human spinal cord (6-12 weeks of gestation) displays a comparable ventrodorsal gradient of oligodendrocyte differentiation potential to the embryonic rodent spinal cord. In contrast, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) expanded human neural precursors derived from both isolated ventral or dorsal cultures show a reduced capacity to generate oligodendrocytes, whereas comparable rodent cultures demonstrate a marked increase in oligodendrocyte formation following FGF-2 treatment. In addition, we provide evidence that candidate growth factors suggested from rodent studies, including FGF-2 and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) do not stimulate proliferation of human oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Finally, we show that the in vivo environment of the acutely demyelinating adult rat spinal cord is insufficient to stimulate the differentiation of immature human spinal cord cells to oligodendrocytes. These results provide further evidence for inter-species difference in the capacity of neural precursors to generate oligodendrocytes. PMID:15293229

  3. AMPHETAMINE EFFECTS IN MICROTINE RODENTS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY USING MONOGAMOUS AND PROMISCUOUS VOLE SPECIES

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zuoxin

    AMPHETAMINE EFFECTS IN MICROTINE RODENTS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY USING MONOGAMOUS AND PROMISCUOUS VOLE in the nucleus accumbens of vole species that exhibit differing mating systems to examine potential interactions extracellular dopamine, however, monogamous voles had greater and longer-lasting increases in extracellular

  4. The rodent malaria lactate dehydrogenase assay provides a high throughput solution for in vivo vaccine studies.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Hitoshi; Yokouchi, Yuki; Iyoku, Natsumi; Tachibana, Mayumi; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Torii, Motomi

    2015-08-01

    Rodent malaria is a useful model for evaluating the efficacy of malaria vaccine candidates; however, labor-intensive microscopic parasite counting hampers the use of an in vivo parasite challenge in high-throughput screening. The measurement of malaria parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) activity, which is commonly used in the in vitro growth inhibition assay of Plasmodium falciparum, may be the cheapest and simplest alternative to microscopic parasite counting. However, the pLDH assay has not been applied in the in vivo rodent malaria model. Here, we showed that the pLDH assay is reliable and accurately determines parasitemia in the rodent malaria model. pLDH activity measured using a chromogenic substrate reflects the parasite number in the blood; it allows fast and easy assessment using a conventional microplate reader. To validate this approach, we synthesized recombinant PyMSP1-19 protein (rPyMSP1-19) using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system and immunized mice with rPyMSP1-19. The antisera showed specific reactivity on the surface of the Plasmodium yoelii merozoite and immunized mice were protected against a lethal P. yoelii 17 XL challenge. The pLDH assay quickly and easily demonstrated a significant reduction of the parasite numbers in the immunized mice. Accordingly, the pLDH assay proved to be an efficient alternative to rodent malaria parasite counting, and may therefore accelerate in vivo vaccine candidate screening. PMID:25701649

  5. Linking human behavior to environmental effects using a case study of urban rodent control

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pest control is common practice in many land use activities worldwide. Although often inadvertent, pest control can affect non-target species, sometimes fatally. Using social survey data about residential rodent control behavior in two areas in California, we applied a framewor...

  6. Evaluation of different recording parameters to establish a standard for flash electroretinography in rodents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas U Bayer; Philip Cook; Scott E Brodie; Klaus-Peter Maag; Thom Mittag

    2001-01-01

    Different electrodes and stimulus protocols commonly used for electroretinography in rodent eyes were compared for convenience of use, degree of damage to corneal epithelium, and for magnitude of amplitude, reproducibility, left versus right eye accuracy, and reliability of recorded parameters of the flash electroretinogram (ERG). Adult C57BL\\/6 pigmented mice and albino Wistar rats were used to determine scotopic ERGs in

  7. Serological study of rickettsial diseases in human and rodent population in Chittoor dist. (A.P.).

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, A; Lal, Sohan; Biswas, Shyamal; Vinoth, S; Asraf, Ali S; Mittal, Veena

    2010-09-01

    In India the presence of Rickettsial disease in human is documented in many states however, the data on presence of Rickettsial infection in Andhra Pradesh is very scare. Therefore, a study was undertaken in Chittoor district (A.P.) to see the prevalence of Rickettsial infection in human and rodent population. 3-5 ml of human blood samples were collected from the patients attending the nearest hospitals of Tirumala, Tirupathi, Palmner and Chittoor areas. Live rodents were trapped and blood samples were collected from them during January and February 2008. Sera was separated and tested by Weil Felix test. Two hundred human sera samples were tested. Of these 39 samples were found reactive with Weil Felix antigen. Of the 39 reactive, 31 were male and 8 female. All the human samples were showing reactivity at 1:20 dilution. Out of the 343 rodents samples tested, only 24 samples were showing reactivity. These were reactive at 1:20, 1:40 and 1:80 dilutions with different types of Weil Felix antigens. Eight rodent sera samples were having titer 1:80 with Proteus OXK which is suggestive of presence of Scrub typhus in this region. PMID:22471185

  8. Rodent and Germplasm Trafficking: Risks of Microbial Contamination in a High-Tech Biomedical World

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esther Mahabir; Beth Bauer; Jörg Schmidt

    High-tech biomedical advances have led to increases both in the number of mice used for research and in exchanges of mice and\\/or their tissues between institutions. The latter are associated with the risk of dissemination of infectious agents. Because of the lack of international standardization of health surveillance programs, health certificates for im- ported rodents may be informative but may

  9. Spatial distribution of commensal rodents in regions with high and low Lassa fever prevalence in Guinea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabeth Fichet-Calvet; Kékoura Koulémou; Lamine Koivogui; Barré Soropogui; Oumar Sylla; Emilie Lecompte; Stéphane Daffis; Allali Kouadio; Stéphane Kouassi; Chantal Akoua-Koffi; Christiane Denys

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic fever caused by an arenavirus, which affects approximately 150,000 per- sons per year in West Africa. It is principally transmitted by rodents of the genus Mastomys, which serve as both reservoir and vector of the virus. This study tested the hypothesis that human Lassa fever in Guinea is related to the occurrence rate of the

  10. Regulation of VEGF and VEGF Receptor Expression in the Rodent Mammary Gland During Pregnancy,

    E-print Network

    Lane, Timothy F.

    Regulation of VEGF and VEGF Receptor Expression in the Rodent Mammary Gland During Pregnancy growth factors (VEGFs) are endothelial cell-specific mi- togens with potent angiogenic and vascular per- meability-inducing properties. VEGF, VEGF-C, and VEGFRs -1, -2, and -3 were found to be ex- pressed in post

  11. Comparative evaluation of establishing a human gut microbial community within rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Bleich, André; Oxley, Andrew P.A.; Kahl, Silke; Janus, Lydia M.; Smoczek, Anna; Nahrstedt, Hannes; Pils, Marina C.; Taudien, Stefan; Platzer, Matthias; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Medina, Eva; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the human gut microbial community is determined by host genetics and environmental factors, where alterations in its structure have been associated with the onset of different diseases. Establishing a defined human gut microbial community within inbred rodent models provides a means to study microbial-related pathologies, however, an in-depth comparison of the established human gut microbiota in the different models is lacking. We compared the efficiency of establishing the bacterial component of a defined human microbial community within germ-free (GF) rats, GF mice and antibiotic-treated specific pathogen-free mice. Remarkable differences were observed between the different rodent models. While the majority of abundant human-donor bacterial phylotypes were established in the GF rats, only a subset was present in the GF mice. Despite the fact that members of the phylum Bacteriodetes were well established in all rodent models, mice enriched for phylotypes related to species of Bacteroides. In contrary to the efficiency of Clostridiales to populate the GF rat in relative proportions to that of the human-donor, members of Clostridia cluster IV only poorly colonize the mouse gut. Thus, the genetic background of the different recipient rodent systems (that is, rats and mice) strongly influences the nature of the populating human gut microbiota, determining each model’s biological suitability. PMID:22572831

  12. Comparative evaluation of establishing a human gut microbial community within rodent models.

    PubMed

    Wos-Oxley, Melissa; Bleich, André; Oxley, Andrew P A; Kahl, Silke; Janus, Lydia M; Smoczek, Anna; Nahrstedt, Hannes; Pils, Marina C; Taudien, Stefan; Platzer, Matthias; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Medina, Eva; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the human gut microbial community is determined by host genetics and environmental factors, where alterations in its structure have been associated with the onset of different diseases. Establishing a defined human gut microbial community within inbred rodent models provides a means to study microbial-related pathologies, however, an in-depth comparison of the established human gut microbiota in the different models is lacking. We compared the efficiency of establishing the bacterial component of a defined human microbial community within germ-free (GF) rats, GF mice, and antibiotic-treated specific pathogen-free mice. Remarkable differences were observed between the different rodent models. While the majority of abundant human-donor bacterial phylotypes were established in the GF rats, only a subset was present in the GF mice. Despite the fact that members of the phylum Bacteriodetes were well established in all rodent models, mice enriched for phylotypes related to species of Bacteroides. In contrary to the efficiency of Clostridiales to populate the GF rat in relative proportions to that of the human-donor, members of Clostridia cluster IV only poorly colonize the mouse gut. Thus, the genetic background of the different recipient rodent systems (that is, rats and mice) strongly influences the nature of the populating human gut microbiota, determining each model's biological suitability. PMID:22572831

  13. Helminthes of synanthropic rodents (Rodentia: Muridae) from Dakahlia and Menoufia, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elshazly, Atef M; Awad, Soha I; Azab, Manar S; Elsheikha, Hany M; Abdel-Gawad, Abdel Gawad E; Khalil, Hazem H M; Morsy, Tosson A

    2008-12-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to monitor and compare the prevalence of helminthes in rodents from Dakahlia and Menoufia governorates. The domestic rodents (271) were Rattus norvegicus, Rattus rattus frugivorous, Rattus r. alexandrinus, & Mus musculus. The overall prevalence of helminthes was 52.8%. In Dakahlia, 72/145 rats (49.6%) were infected. The highest prevalence of infection was in R. r. frugivorous 43 (60.4%), then R. r. alexandrinus 44 (47.7%), R. norvegicus 38 (44.7%), and the lowest was M. musculus 20 (40%). In Menoufia, 71/126 rats (56.3%) were infected. The highest prevalence of infection was in R. r. frugivorous 36 (77.7%), then M. musculus 27 (48.1%), R. norvegicus 23 (47.8%), and the lowest was in R. r. alexandrinus 40 (47.5%). A total of 24 species of helminthes (11 trematodes, 4 cestodes & 10 nematodes) were identified among the 271 rodents. The commonest trematode was Mesostephanus aegypticus followed by Stictodora tridactyla. The commonest cestode was Hymenolepis diminuta followed by Taenia taeniaformis. The commonest nematode was Capillaria hepatica followed by Trichurus muris. Given the zoonotic potential of rodents' parasites and since several residential, commercial, and agricultural sites exist in the examined geographic areas, the potential health risk should not be ignored. PMID:19209758

  14. The rodent estrous cycle: Characterization of vaginal cytology and its utility in toxicological studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation of the estrous cycle in laboratory rodents can be a useful measure of the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian reproductive axis. It can also serve as a way of insuring that animals exhibiting abnormal cycling patterns are disincluded from a study prior t...

  15. The potential importance of nut removal by rodents from Australian macadamia orchards.

    PubMed

    Elmouttie, David; Wilson, John

    2005-10-01

    Extensive crop damage due to rodents, predominantly the black rat (Rattus rattus) is a major concern to both the Hawaiian and Australian macadamia industries. Within Australian systems, indicated the importance of adjacent non-crop habitats in the damage process with damage being directly related to the size and temporal stability of these habitats. It was also suggested that the current estimates of crop loss might be underestimates as R. rattus may remove nuts into adjacent non-crop habitats, however, the economic significance of nut removal was not investigated. This study has determined that the crop loss due to nut removal is equivalent to the crop loss due to in-crop feeding within the first row of the orchard, with nuts being removed and consumed under the cover provided by weedy adjacent habitats. Previous studies (White et al.,1997; Horskins et al.,1998; White et al.,1998) investigating the impact of rodents on crop damage have ignored the nut removal component of the damage process and hence rodents have a far greater impact on the Australian macadamia industry than previously suggested. This study also indicates that the cost-benefit of habitat manipulation as a rodent management strategy is much greater than that suggested by . Habitat manipulation is not only a cost-effective means of damage control but is also sustainable, having none of the potentially adverse public health and environmental effects of continual rodenticide use. PMID:15950371

  16. Geometric morphometrics of the scapula of South American caviomorph rodents (Rodentia: Hystricognathi): Form, function and phylogeny

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cecilia C. Morgan

    2009-01-01

    The scapula of the ecomorphologically diverse South American caviomorph rodents was studied through geometric morphometric techniques, using landmarks and semilandmarks to capture the shape of this complex morphological structure. Representatives of 33 species from all caviomorph superfamilies, as well as Hystrix cristata for comparisons, were analyzed. Marked differences in scapular shape were found among the major caviomorph lineages analyzed, particularly

  17. Integrated management to reduce rodent damage to lowland rice crops in Indonesia

    E-print Network

    Krebs, Charles J.

    to approximately 36 million t, i.e. enough to feed the population of Indonesia (215 million people) for 12 monthsIntegrated management to reduce rodent damage to lowland rice crops in Indonesia Grant R-Subang, 41256 West Java, Indonesia Received 25 November 2003; received in revised form 31 August 2004; accepted

  18. Mating types in yeast, vomeronasal organ in rodents, homosexuality in humans: Does a guiding thread exist?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniele Oliva

    Pheromones and their receptors are the molecules used by very different organ- isms in order to join two haploid cells. It happens evidently in yeast, since the two blending haploid cells are also the two mating organisms, whereas in rodents phero- mone receptors are the triggers of the vomeronasal system which, supervising sexual behaviors, is responsible for copulation and therefore

  19. Successional processes in a Texas savanna woodland: the role of birds and rodents 

    E-print Network

    Huebotter, Neal Harvey

    1991-01-01

    at the Ls Copita Research Area 19 5 Number of each microhabitst selected, number of traps placed in each microhabitat, and mean(SE) trap density on the rodent study ares 6 Capture locations for individual white-footed mice and short-tailed grasshopper...

  20. Rodent Community Structure and Andes Virus Infection in Sylvan and Peridomestic Habitats in Northwestern Patagonia, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Monteverde, Martin J.; Walker, R. Susan; Douglass, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Modifications of natural habitat in peridomestic rural areas could affect original rodent community composition, diversity, and evenness. In zoonoses such as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, the presence of a diverse community can dilute the impact of the principal reservoir, reducing risk to humans. The goal of this study was to examine rodent community composition, abundance of Andes virus (ANDV) host (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus), ANDV prevalence, and temporal variability associated with rural peridomestic settings in Patagonia, Argentina. We trapped rodents in peridomestic settings and nearby sylvan areas for 2 years. The numerically dominant species differed between peridomestic and sylvan settings. O. longicaudatus was the most abundant species in peridomestic settings (>50% of individuals). Diversity and evenness in peridomestic settings fluctuated temporally, with an abrupt decline in evenness coinciding with peaks in ANDV prevalence. The probability of finding an ANDV-positive mouse in peridomestic settings was 2.44 times greater than in sylvan habitats. Changes in rodent communities in peridomestic settings may increase the probability for human exposure to ANDV because those settings promote the presence of O. longicaudatus with high ANDV antibody prevalence. High O. longicaudatus relative abundance in an unstable community associated with peridomestic settings may favor intraspecific contact, leading to a higher probability of virus transmission. PMID:21332352

  1. Diffusion MRI of Rodent Glioma at 21T National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Weston, Ken

    Diffusion MRI of Rodent Glioma at 21T National High Magnetic Field Laboratory NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging Facility User Program, Florida State University In-vivo sodium and proton diffusion demonstrate with corresponding alterations of tumors' water diffusion is attracting particular attention in the efforts

  2. Arrival and diversification of caviomorph rodents and platyrrhine primates in America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Céline Poux; Pascale Chevret; Dorothée Huchon; Wilfried W. de Jong; Emmanuel J. P. Douzery

    2006-01-01

    Platyrrhine primates and caviomorph rodents are clades of mammals that colonized South America during its period of isolation from the other continents, between 100 and 3 million years ago (Mya). Until now, no molecular study investigated the timing of the South American colonization by these two lineages with the same molecular data set. Using sequences from three nuclear genes (ADRA2B,

  3. PREDICTING RODENT CARCINOGENICITY OF AMES TEST "FALSE POSITIVES" BY IN VIVO BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty-eight chemicals known to be mutagenic in the Ames test but not carcinogenic in rodent bioassays were selected for study. The effects of these chemicals on four biochemical assays (hepatic DNA damage by alkaline elution (DD), hepatic ornithine decarboxylase activity (ODC), ...

  4. Protein kinase C and ERK involvement in dendritic spine plasticity in cultured rodent hippocampal neurons

    E-print Network

    Segal, Menahem

    Protein kinase C and ERK involvement in dendritic spine plasticity in cultured rodent hippocampal was followed by a protein synthesis-dependent formation of novel dendritic spines. An extracellular receptor and the formation of novel spines. A selective protein kinase C agonist, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, caused

  5. Infant Rodent Ultrasounds – A Gate to the Understanding of Sound Communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Günter Ehret

    2005-01-01

    Components of the communication system between infant and adult rodents based on ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) of infants are analyzed. USVs are most often emitted from a pup lost outside the nest in response to changes of: (i) body temperature, (ii) contact with adults\\/littermates, (iii) handling, and (iv) smell. These changes modulate the state of arousal and the emotional\\/motivational states and,

  6. THE LOSS OF SODIUM HOMEOSTASIS AND APOPTOSIS DURING RODENT GLIOMA THERAPY

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    THE LOSS OF SODIUM HOMEOSTASIS AND APOPTOSIS DURING RODENT GLIOMA THERAPY 1National High Magnetic There is growing evidence that the disruption of sodium homeostasis is one of the first and most essential their sodium homeostasis. This conclusion is in agreement with the fact that the continuing tumor cell

  7. Maripa Hantavirus in French Guiana: Phylogenetic Position and Predicted Spatial Distribution of Rodent Hosts

    PubMed Central

    de Thoisy, Benoît; Matheus, Séverine; Catzeflis, François; Clément, Luc; Barrioz, Sébastien; Guidez, Amandine; Donato, Damien; Cornu, Jean-François; Brunaux, Olivier; Guitet, Stéphane; Lacoste, Vincent; Lavergne, Anne

    2014-01-01

    A molecular screening of wild-caught rodents was conducted in French Guiana, South America to identify hosts of the hantavirus Maripa described in 2008 in a hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) case. Over a 9-year period, 418 echimyids and murids were captured. Viral RNA was detected in two sigmodontine rodents, Oligoryzomys fulvescens and Zygodontomys brevicauda, trapped close to the house of a second HPS case that occurred in 2009 and an O. fulvescens close to the fourth HPS case identified in 2013. Sequences from the rodents had 96% and 97% nucleotide identity (fragment of S and M segments, respectively) with the sequence of the first human HPS case. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on the complete sequence of the S segment show that Maripa virus is closely related to Rio Mamore hantavirus. Using environmental descriptors of trapping sites, including vegetation, landscape units, rain, and human disturbance, a maximal entropy-based species distribution model allowed for identification of areas of higher predicted occurrence of the two rodents, where emergence risks of Maripa virus are expected to be higher. PMID:24752689

  8. Serologic Evidence for Borrelia hermsii Infection in Rodents on Federally Owned Recreational Areas in California

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Jessica R.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is endemic in mountainous regions of the western United States. In California, the principal agent is the spirochete Borrelia hermsii, which is transmitted by the argasid tick Ornithodoros hermsi. Humans are at risk of TBRF when infected ticks leave an abandoned rodent nest in quest of a blood meal. Rodents are the primary vertebrate hosts for B. hermsii. Sciurid rodents were collected from 23 sites in California between August, 2006, and September, 2008, and tested for serum antibodies to B. hermsii by immunoblot using a whole-cell sonicate and a specific antigen, glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (GlpQ). Antibodies were detected in 20% of rodents; seroprevalence was highest (36%) in chipmunks (Tamias spp). Seroprevalence in chipmunks was highest in the Sierra Nevada (41%) and Mono (43%) ecoregions and between 1900 and 2300 meters elevation (43%). The serological studies described here are effective in implicating the primary vertebrate hosts involved in the maintenance of the ticks and spirochetes in regions endemic for TBRF. PMID:23488454

  9. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 64:893901 (2010) Automatic Segmentation of Rodent Spinal Cord Diffusion

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 64:893­901 (2010) Automatic Segmentation of Rodent Spinal Cord tool for noninvasive spinal cord lesion analysis; however, accurate, quantitative methods maximization algorithm, is pro- posed for MRI segmentation of spinal cord tissues. Diffusion tensor imaging

  10. Diversity trends and their ontogenetic basis: an exploration of allometric disparity in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A. B.; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that most morphological evolution occurs by allometric differentiation. Because rodents encapsulate a phenomenal amount of taxonomic diversity and, among several clades, contrasting levels of morphological diversity, they represent an excellent subject to address the question: how variable are allometric patterns during evolution? We investigated the influence of phylogenetic relations and ecological factors on the results of the first quantification of allometric disparity among rodents by exploring allometric space, a multivariate morphospace here derived from, and encapsulating all, the ontogenetic trajectories of 34 rodent species from two parallel phylogenetic radiations. Disparity was quantified using angles between ontogenetic trajectories for different species and clades. We found an overlapping occupation of allometric space by muroid and hystricognath species, revealing both clades possess similar abilities to evolve in different directions of phenotypic space, and anatomical diversity does not act to constrain the labile nature of allometric patterning. Morphological features to enable efficient processing of food serve to group rodents in allometric space, reflecting the importance of convergent morphology, rather than shared evolutionary history, in the generation of allometric patterns. Our results indicate that the conserved level of morphological integration found among primates cannot simply be extended to all mammals. PMID:20018789

  11. Phylogeny of Neotropical oryzomyine rodents (Muridae: Sigmodontinae) based on the nuclear IRBP exon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcelo Weksler

    2003-01-01

    Sigmodontine rodents are the most diverse family-level mammalian clade in the Neotropical region, with about 70 genera and 320 recognized species. Partial sequences (1266bp) from the first exon of the nuclear gene encoding the Interphotoreceptor Retinoid Binding Protein (IRBP) were used to infer the phylogenetic relationships among 44 species representing all 16 currently recognized genera of the largest sigmodontine tribe,

  12. Implication of Phylogenetic Systematics of Rodent-Borne Hantaviruses Allows Understanding of their Distribution

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Implication of Phylogenetic Systematics of Rodent-Borne Hantaviruses Allows Understanding, other mammals may be involved in the cycle of hantaviruses. Additional work is needed out, this paper revisits the coevolution of the virus by examining the evolutionary relationship of the S genes

  13. Effect of plant cover on seed removal by rodents in the Monte Desert (Mendoza, Argentina)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paula A. Taraborelli; Mariana Dacar; Stella M. Giannoni

    2003-01-01

    In desert areas, predation risk is one of the highest costs of foraging and is a major influence on animal behaviour. Several strategies are used by foragers for surviving and reproducing in desert areas. The foraging strategies of the small mammals of South American deserts are still poorly known. In this study, we investigated the foraging strategies of rodents of

  14. Review of experimental attempts of islet allotransplantation in rodents: Parameters involved and viability of the procedure

    PubMed Central

    Iuamoto, Leandro Ryuchi; Meyer, Alberto; Chaib, Eleazar; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to organize the parameters involved in experimental allotransplantation in rodents to elaborate the most suitable model to supply the scarcity of islet donors. We used the PubMed database to systematically search for published articles containing the keywords “rodent islet transplantation” to review. We included studies that involved allotransplantation experiments with rodents’ islets, and we reviewed the reference lists from the eligible publications that were retrieved. We excluded articles related to isotransplantation, autotransplantation and xenotransplantation, i.e., transplantation in other species. A total of 25 studies related to allotransplantation were selected for systematic review based on their relevance and updated data. Allotransplantation in rodents is promising and continues to develop. Survival rates of allografts have increased with the discovery of new immunosuppressive drugs and the use of different graft sites. These successes suggest that islet transplantation is a promising method to overcome the scarcity of islet donors and advance the treatment options for type 1 diabetes. PMID:25309081

  15. Variance of molecular datings, evolution of rodents and the phylogenetic affinities between Ctenodactylidae and Hystricognathi.

    PubMed

    Huchon, D; Catzeflis, F M; Douzery, E J

    2000-02-22

    The von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene has been used to understand the origin and timing of Rodentia evolution in the context of placental phylogeny vWF exon 28 sequences of 15 rodent families and eight non-rodent eutherian clades are analysed with two different molecular dating methods (uniform clock on a linearized tree; quartet dating). Three main conclusions are drawn from the study of this nuclear exon. First, Ctenodactylidae (gundis) and Hystricognathi (e.g. porcupines, guinea-pigs, chinchillas) robustly cluster together in a newly recognized clade, named 'Ctenohystrica'. The Sciurognathi monophyly is subsequently rejected. Pedetidae (springhares) is an independent and early diverging rodent lineage, suggesting a convergent evolution of the multiserial enamel of rodent incisors. Second, molecular date estimates are here more influenced by accuracy and choice of the palaeontological temporal references used to calibrate the molecular clock than by either characters analysed (nucleotides versus amino acids) or species sampling. The caviomorph radiation at 31 million years (Myr) and the pig porpoise split at 63 Myr appear to be reciprocally compatible dates. Third, during the radiation of Rodentia, at least three lineages (Gliridae, Sciuroidea and Ctenohystrica) emerged close to the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, and their common ancestor separated from other placental orders in the Late Cretaceous. PMID:10722222

  16. Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rodents to study the neurobiology of motivation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elena H Chartoff; William A Carlezon

    2007-01-01

    It has become increasingly important to assess mood states in laboratory animals. Tests that reflect reward, reduced ability to experience reward (anhedonia) and aversion (dysphoria) are in high demand because many psychiatric conditions that are currently intractable in humans (e.g., major depression, bipolar disorder, addiction) are characterized by dysregulated motivation. Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) can be utilized in rodents (rats, mice)

  17. Variance of molecular datings, evolution of rodents and the phylogenetic affinities between Ctenodactylidae and Hystricognathi.

    PubMed Central

    Huchon, D; Catzeflis, F M; Douzery, E J

    2000-01-01

    The von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene has been used to understand the origin and timing of Rodentia evolution in the context of placental phylogeny vWF exon 28 sequences of 15 rodent families and eight non-rodent eutherian clades are analysed with two different molecular dating methods (uniform clock on a linearized tree; quartet dating). Three main conclusions are drawn from the study of this nuclear exon. First, Ctenodactylidae (gundis) and Hystricognathi (e.g. porcupines, guinea-pigs, chinchillas) robustly cluster together in a newly recognized clade, named 'Ctenohystrica'. The Sciurognathi monophyly is subsequently rejected. Pedetidae (springhares) is an independent and early diverging rodent lineage, suggesting a convergent evolution of the multiserial enamel of rodent incisors. Second, molecular date estimates are here more influenced by accuracy and choice of the palaeontological temporal references used to calibrate the molecular clock than by either characters analysed (nucleotides versus amino acids) or species sampling. The caviomorph radiation at 31 million years (Myr) and the pig porpoise split at 63 Myr appear to be reciprocally compatible dates. Third, during the radiation of Rodentia, at least three lineages (Gliridae, Sciuroidea and Ctenohystrica) emerged close to the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, and their common ancestor separated from other placental orders in the Late Cretaceous. PMID:10722222

  18. OBESTATIN PARTIALLY AFFECTS GHRELIN STIMULATION OF FOOD INTAKE AND GH SECRETION IN RODENTS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Title: OBESTATIN PARTIALLY AFFECTS GHRELIN STIMULATION OF FOOD INTAKE AND GH SECRETION IN RODENTS, JACQUES EPELBAUM, MARIE THERESE BLUET-PAJOT. Key words: Obestatin, Ghrelin, GH, food intake, mouse, rat author manuscript Endocrinology 04/2007; 148(4): 1648-53 #12;2 Abstract: Administration of ghrelin

  19. Neurodevelopmental sequelae of postnatal maternal care in rodents: clinical and research implications of molecular insights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arie Kaffman; Michael J. Meaney

    2007-01-01

    Parental care plays an important role in the emotional and cognitive development of the offspring. Children who have been exposed to abuse or neglect are more likely to develop numerous psychopa- thologies, while good parent-infant bonding is associated with improved resiliency to stress. Similar observations have also been reported in non-human primates and rodents, suggesting that at least some neurodevelopmental

  20. Mode of Action Profiles for Pesticide Compounds with Rodent Liver Tumor Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mode of action (MOA) provides a central framework for assessing human relevance of adverse health outcomes observed in nonclinical safety studies. The goal of this study was to characterize MOA profiles for known rodent liver tumorigens identified from a database of pesticides as...