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Sample records for trypanosomiasis vector control

  1. Prospects for Developing Odour Baits To Control Glossina fuscipes spp., the Major Vector of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Omolo, Maurice O.; Hassanali, Ahmed; Mpiana, Serge; Esterhuizen, Johan; Lindh, Jenny; Lehane, Mike J.; Solano, Philippe; Rayaisse, Jean Baptiste; Vale, Glyn A.; Torr, Steve J.; Tirados, Inaki

    2009-01-01

    We are attempting to develop cost-effective control methods for the important vector of sleeping sickness, Glossina fuscipes spp. Responses of the tsetse flies Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (in Kenya) and G. f. quanzensis (in Democratic Republic of Congo) to natural host odours are reported. Arrangements of electric nets were used to assess the effect of cattle-, human- and pig-odour on (1) the numbers of tsetse attracted to the odour source and (2) the proportion of flies that landed on a black target (1×1 m). In addition responses to monitor lizard (Varanus niloticus) were assessed in Kenya. The effects of all four odours on the proportion of tsetse that entered a biconical trap were also determined. Sources of natural host odour were produced by placing live hosts in a tent or metal hut (volumes≈16 m3) from which the air was exhausted at ∼2000 L/min. Odours from cattle, pigs and humans had no significant effect on attraction of G. f. fuscipes but lizard odour doubled the catch (P<0.05). Similarly, mammalian odours had no significant effect on landing or trap entry whereas lizard odour increased these responses significantly: landing responses increased significantly by 22% for males and 10% for females; the increase in trap efficiency was relatively slight (5–10%) and not always significant. For G. f. quanzensis, only pig odour had a consistent effect, doubling the catch of females attracted to the source and increasing the landing response for females by ∼15%. Dispensing CO2 at doses equivalent to natural hosts suggested that the response of G. f. fuscipes to lizard odour was not due to CO2. For G. f. quanzensis, pig odour and CO2 attracted similar numbers of tsetse, but CO2 had no material effect on the landing response. The results suggest that identifying kairomones present in lizard odour for G. f. fuscipes and pig odour for G. f. quanzensis may improve the performance of targets for controlling these species. PMID:19434232

  2. Tsetse Flies (Glossina) as Vectors of Human African Trypanosomiasis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Changasi, Robert Emojong

    2016-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) transmitted by the tsetse fly continues to be a public health issue, despite more than a century of research. There are two types of the disease, the chronic gambiense and the acute rhodesiense-HAT. Fly abundance and distribution have been affected by changes in land-use patterns and climate. However, disease transmission still continues. Here, we review some aspects of HAT ecoepidemiology in the context of altered infestation patterns and maintenance of the transmission cycle as well as emerging options in disease and vector control. PMID:27034944

  3. Improving the Cost-Effectiveness of Visual Devices for the Control of Riverine Tsetse Flies, the Major Vectors of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Esterhuizen, Johan; Rayaisse, Jean Baptiste; Tirados, Inaki; Mpiana, Serge; Solano, Philippe; Vale, Glyn A.; Lehane, Michael J.; Torr, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Control of the Riverine (Palpalis) group of tsetse flies is normally achieved with stationary artificial devices such as traps or insecticide-treated targets. The efficiency of biconical traps (the standard control device), 1×1 m black targets and small 25×25 cm targets with flanking nets was compared using electrocuting sampling methods. The work was done on Glossina tachinoides and G. palpalis gambiensis (Burkina Faso), G. fuscipes quanzensis (Democratic Republic of Congo), G. f. martinii (Tanzania) and G. f. fuscipes (Kenya). The killing effectiveness (measured as the catch per m2 of cloth) for small targets plus flanking nets is 5.5–15X greater than for 1 m2 targets and 8.6–37.5X greater than for biconical traps. This has important implications for the costs of control of the Riverine group of tsetse vectors of sleeping sickness. PMID:21829743

  4. Genome Sequence of the Tsetse Fly (Glossina morsitans): Vector of African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tsetse flies are the sole vectors of human African trypanosomiasis throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Both sexes of adult tsetse feed exclusively on blood and contribute to disease transmission. Notable differences between tsetse and other disease vectors include obligate microbial symbioses, viviparous reproduction, and lactation. Here, we describe the sequence and annotation of the 366-megabase Glossina morsitans morsitans genome. Analysis of the genome and the 12,308 predicted protein–encoding genes led to multiple discoveries, including chromosomal integrations of bacterial (Wolbachia) genome sequences, a family of lactation-specific proteins, reduced complement of host pathogen recognition proteins, and reduced olfaction/chemosensory associated genes. These genome data provide a foundation for research into trypanosomiasis prevention and yield important insights with broad implications for multiple aspects of tsetse biology. PMID:24763584

  5. Trypanosomiasis control in relation to other public health services*

    PubMed Central

    Fendall, N. R. E.; Southgate, B. A.; Berrie, J. R. H.

    1963-01-01

    The authors describe the aims and principles of trypanosomiasis control and discuss the individual techniques of control and the ways in which these can be channelled through a general rural health service. They argue that, given the circumstances at present prevailing in rural Africa, a broad-based general public health service should be established before specific campaigns for control or eradication of sleeping-sickness, or indeed any other specific diseases, are instituted. They emphasize the necessity of international co-operation for effective trypanomiasis control. PMID:13962907

  6. A review of recent knowledge of the ecology of the main vectors of trypanosomiasis*

    PubMed Central

    Langridge, W. P.; Kernaghan, R. J.; Glover, P. E.

    1963-01-01

    In this survey of recent ecological research on the main vectors of trypanosomiasis in those countries of East, Central and West Africa that are not predominantly French-speaking, the authors, after outlining the distribution of tsetse flies and the type of country in which they occur, discuss the direct and indirect effects of climate on these insects—particularly on their physiological water balance and on pupal fat reserves—and their recent advances into new areas. They review the considerable work that has been done on the resting habits and breeding-sites of different Glossina species, knowledge of which is important for effective control, and research on predators of pupae and adult flies and on the feeding activity of tsetse flies. Means of assessing populations and various factors affecting the size and nutritional status of tsetse flies are also discussed, as is the effect on the fly population of artificial changes in the habitat. Finally, a plea is made for a revision of present methods of land use and stock management, if full advantage is to be taken of achievements in fly control. PMID:13928678

  7. Predicting the effect of climate change on African trypanosomiasis: integrating epidemiology with parasite and vector biology

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean; Shrestha, Sourya; Tomlinson, Kyle W.; Vuong, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Climate warming over the next century is expected to have a large impact on the interactions between pathogens and their animal and human hosts. Vector-borne diseases are particularly sensitive to warming because temperature changes can alter vector development rates, shift their geographical distribution and alter transmission dynamics. For this reason, African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), a vector-borne disease of humans and animals, was recently identified as one of the 12 infectious diseases likely to spread owing to climate change. We combine a variety of direct effects of temperature on vector ecology, vector biology and vector–parasite interactions via a disease transmission model and extrapolate the potential compounding effects of projected warming on the epidemiology of African trypanosomiasis. The model predicts that epidemics can occur when mean temperatures are between 20.7°C and 26.1°C. Our model does not predict a large-range expansion, but rather a large shift of up to 60 per cent in the geographical extent of the range. The model also predicts that 46–77 million additional people may be at risk of exposure by 2090. Future research could expand our analysis to include other environmental factors that influence tsetse populations and disease transmission such as humidity, as well as changes to human, livestock and wildlife distributions. The modelling approach presented here provides a framework for using the climate-sensitive aspects of vector and pathogen biology to predict changes in disease prevalence and risk owing to climate change. PMID:22072451

  8. Cryptic Diversity within the Major Trypanosomiasis Vector Glossina fuscipes Revealed by Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwang-Shik; Darby, Alistair C.; Causse, Sandrine; Kapitano, Berisha; Hall, Martin J. R.; Steen, Keith; Lutumba, Pascal; Madinga, Joules; Torr, Steve J.; Okedi, Loyce M.; Lehane, Michael J.; Donnelly, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes s.l. is responsible for the transmission of approximately 90% of cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness. Three G. fuscipes subspecies have been described, primarily based upon subtle differences in the morphology of their genitalia. Here we describe a study conducted across the range of this important vector to determine whether molecular evidence generated from nuclear DNA (microsatellites and gene sequence information), mitochondrial DNA and symbiont DNA support the existence of these taxa as discrete taxonomic units. Principal Findings The nuclear ribosomal Internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) provided support for the three subspecies. However nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data did not support the monophyly of the morphological subspecies G. f. fuscipes or G. f. quanzensis. Instead, the most strongly supported monophyletic group was comprised of flies sampled from Ethiopia. Maternally inherited loci (mtDNA and symbiont) also suggested monophyly of a group from Lake Victoria basin and Tanzania, but this group was not supported by nuclear loci, suggesting different histories of these markers. Microsatellite data confirmed strong structuring across the range of G. fuscipes s.l., and was useful for deriving the interrelationship of closely related populations. Conclusion/Significance We propose that the morphological classification alone is not used to classify populations of G. fuscipes for control purposes. The Ethiopian population, which is scheduled to be the target of a sterile insect release (SIT) programme, was notably discrete. From a programmatic perspective this may be both positive, given that it may reflect limited migration into the area or negative if the high levels of differentiation are also reflected in reproductive isolation between this population and the flies to be used in the release programme. PMID:21858237

  9. Human African trypanosomiasis prevention, treatment and control costs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Keating, Joseph; Yukich, Joshua O; Sutherland, C Simone; Woods, Geordie; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-10-01

    The control and eventual elimination of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) requires the expansion of current control and surveillance activities. A systematic review of the published literature on the costs of HAT prevention, treatment, and control, in addition to the economic burden, was conducted. All studies that contained primary or secondary data on costs of prevention, treatment and control were considered, resulting in the inclusion of 42 papers. The geographically focal nature of the disease and a lack of standardization in the cost data limit the usefulness of the available information for making generalizations across diverse settings. More recent information on the costs of treatment and control interventions for HAT is needed to provide accurate information for analyses and planning. The cost information contained herein can be used to inform rational decision making in control and elimination programs, and to assess potential synergies with existing vector-borne disease control programs, but programs would benefit significantly from new cost data collection. PMID:26056739

  10. Challenges facing the elimination of sleeping sickness in west and central Africa: sustainable control of animal trypanosomiasis as an indispensable approach to achieve the goal.

    PubMed

    Simo, Gustave; Rayaisse, Jean Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiases are infectious diseases caused by trypanosomes. African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT) remains an important threat for livestock production in some affected areas whereas human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is targeted for elimination in 2020. In West and Central Africa, it has been shown that the parasites causing these diseases can coexist in the same tsetse fly or the same animal. In such complex settings, the control of these diseases must be put in the general context of trypanosomiasis control or "one health" concept where the coordination of control operations will be beneficial for both diseases. In this context, implementing control activities on AAT will help to sustain HAT control. It will also have a positive impact on animal health and economic development of the regions. The training of inhabitants on how to implement and sustain vector control tools will enable a long-term sustainability of control operations that will lead to the elimination of HAT and AAT. PMID:26671582

  11. Human African Trypanosomiasis Transmission, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Diabakana, Philemon Mansinsa; Mesu, Victor Kande Betu Ku; Manzambi, Emile Zola; Ollivier, Gaelle; Asonganyi, Tazoacha; Cuny, Gerard; Grébaut, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, 2 entomologic surveys were conducted in 2005. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and human-blood meals were found in tsetse fly midguts, which suggested active disease transmission. Vector control should be used to improve human African trypanosomiasis control efforts. PMID:17326955

  12. Control of human African trypanosomiasis in the Quiçama focus, Angola.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, José Antonio; Simarro, Pere P.; Josenando, Teofilo

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the epidemiological status of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Quiçama focus, province of Bengo, Angola, and to establish a HAT control programme. METHODS: In 1997, 8796 people (the population of 31 villages) were serologically screened for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the causative agent of HAT. In 1998 and 1999, surveys were carried out in villages where HAT cases had been identified in 1997. Individuals were screened using the card agglutination trypanosomiasis test (CATT), and then examined for the presence of the parasite. CATT- positive individuals in whom the presence of the parasite could not be confirmed were further tested with the CATT using serum dilutions, and those with a positive antibody end titre of 1-in-4 or above were followed-up. Patients with < or =10 white cells/micro l and no trypanosomes in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were classified as being in the first stage of the disease. Vector control was not considered necessary or feasible. FINDINGS: The main transmission areas were on the Kwanza riverbanks, where 5042 inhabitants live. In 1997, the HAT prevalence was 1.97%, but this decreased to 0.55% in 1998 and to 0.33% in 1999. The relapse rate was 3% in patients treated with pentamidine and 3.5% in patients treated with melarsoprol. In patients treated with pentamidine, there was no difference in the relapse rate for patients with initial CSF white cell counts of 0-5 cells/ micro l or 6-10 cells/micro l. The overall mortality rate was 0.6% and the rate of reactive arsenical encephalopathy among the melarsoprol-treated patients was 1.7%. CONCLUSION: The epidemiological status of the disease was updated and the transmission areas were defined. The control methods implemented allowed the disease prevalence to be reduced. PMID:12378293

  13. What can we hope to gain for trypanosomiasis control from molecular studies on tsetse biology ?

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Serap; Hao, Zhengrong; Strickler, Patricia M

    2002-01-01

    At times of crisis when epidemics rage and begin to take their toll on affected populations, as we have been witnessing with African trypanosomiasis in subSahara, the dichotomy of basic versus applied research deepens. While undoubtedly the treatment of thousands of infected people is the top priority, without continued research and development on the biology of disease agents and on ecological and evolutionary forces impacting these epidemics, little progress can be gained in the long run for the eventual control of these diseases. Here, we argue the need for additional research in one under-investigated area, that is the biology of the tsetse vector. Lacking are studies aimed to understand the genetic and cellular basis of tsetse interactions with trypanosomes as well as the genetic and biochemical basis of its ability to transmit these parasites. We discuss how this knowledge has the potential to contribute to the development of new vector control strategies as well as to improve the efficacy and affordability of the existing control approaches. PMID:12234385

  14. African trypanosomiasis and S. intercalatum infection in Equatorial Guinea: comparative epidemiology and feasibility of integrated control.

    PubMed

    Simarro, P P; Sima, F O; Mia, M

    1989-06-01

    The integration of schistosomiasis control with the activities of different endemic disease control or health programmes has been endorsed by a WHO Expert Committee on the Control of Schistosomiasis (WHO 1985). Endemic countries face increasing economic and manpower constraints which limit the coverage and effectiveness of control activities. Integration would be expected to optimize available resources for control. The feasibility of integration can be assessed by a comparative evaluation of: the epidemiology and distribution of the health problems; the techniques and methodology of control; and the requirements for maintenance and their relative health importance. This report presents a preliminary assessment of trypanosomiasis and schistosomiasis in Equatorial Guinea. The background and implementation of the operational national trypanosomiasis control programme are summarized. Population-based epidemiological investigations undertaken by the staff of the trypanosomiasis control programme are reported from a rural village and an urban suburb of Bata, Equatorial Guinea. The distribution and morbidity of S. intercalatum are compared, the public health importance of S. intercalatum is reviewed and the feasibility of integration of control of trypanosomiasis and schistosomiasis are assessed. PMID:2772519

  15. [Control of human African trypanosomiasis: back to square one].

    PubMed

    Jannin, J; Louis, F J; Lucas, P; Simarro, P P

    2001-01-01

    The natural history of sleeping sickness is cyclic. The first epidemic outbreak in the 19th century devastated the population and resolved spontaneously for lack of victims. Intensive development during the colonial period and the movement of population that it spawned led to another epidemic in the early 1920s that reached such severe proportions that drastic steps had to be taken. At that time, Jamot was given complete political, administrative, and financial freedom to combat the disease. This program led to the development of the mobile team concept and so-called vertically structured vector control strategy and was so successful that sleeping sickness ceased to be considered as a major public health problem at the beginning of the 1960s. In the ensuing years sleeping sickness was largely neglected. Monitoring the disease required specialized teams that were no longer considered as cost-effective. One by one the measures that had been implemented to control the disease disappeared, thus setting the scene for a new outbreak grew. In 1995, the incidence of sleeping sickness reached the same levels as in the 1920s. The current situation is a classic example of a neglected disease with a paucity of competent specialists, diagnostic tests, effective drugs, and operational facilities. It was not until 2001 that new hope appeared thanks to a combined public- and private-sector initiative allowing restructuring of treatment teams, renovation of facilities, free distribution of drugs, and research to develop new therapeutic agents. Also thanks to the PATTEC initiative, the governments of the African affected nations are showing new in interest in sleeping sickness. However the battle is far from won and much effort will be required. Time is running out and the stakes are high. PMID:11803838

  16. Disappearance of some human African trypanosomiasis transmission foci in Zambia in the absence of a tsetse fly and trypanosomiasis control program over a period of forty years.

    PubMed

    Mwanakasale, Victor; Songolo, Peter

    2011-03-01

    We conducted a situation analysis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in Zambia from January 2000 to April 2007. The aim of this survey was to identify districts in Zambia that were still recording cases of HAT. Three districts namely, Mpika, Chama, and Chipata were found to be still reporting cases of HAT and thus lay in HAT transmission foci in North Eastern Zambia. During the period under review, 24 cases of HAT were reported from these three districts. We thereafter reviewed literature on the occurrence of HAT in Zambia from the early 1960s to mid 1990s. This revealed that HAT transmission foci were widespread in Western, North Western, Lusaka, Eastern, Luapula, and Northern Provinces of Zambia during this period. In this article we have tried to give possible reasons as to why the distribution of HAT transmission foci is so different between before and after 2000 when there has been no active national tsetse fly and trypanosomiasis control program in Zambia. PMID:21276598

  17. Beyond Tsetse--Implications for Research and Control of Human African Trypanosomiasis Epidemics.

    PubMed

    Welburn, Susan C; Molyneux, David H; Maudlin, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Epidemics of both forms of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are confined to spatially stable foci in Sub-Saharan Africa while tsetse distribution is widespread. Infection rates of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in tsetse are extremely low and cannot account for the catastrophic epidemics of Gambian HAT (gHAT) seen over the past century. Here we examine the origins of gHAT epidemics and evidence implicating human genetics in HAT epidemiology. We discuss the role of stress causing breakdown of heritable tolerance in silent disease carriers generating gHAT outbreaks and see how peculiarities in the epidemiologies of gHAT and Rhodesian HAT (rHAT) impact on strategies for disease control. PMID:26826783

  18. Short-course eflornithine in Gambian trypanosomiasis: a multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Pépin, J.; Khonde, N.; Maiso, F.; Doua, F.; Jaffar, S.; Ngampo, S.; Mpia, B.; Mbulamberi, D.; Kuzoe, F.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine whether 7 days of intravenous eflornithine (100 mg/kg every 6 h) was as effective as the standard 14-day regimen in the treatment of late-stage Trypanosoma brucei gambiense trypanosomiasis. METHODS: A total of 321 patients (274 new cases, 47 relapsing cases) were randomized at four participating centres in Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda to one of these treatment regimens and followed up for 2 years. RESULTS: Six patients died during treatment, one of whom was on the 7-day regimen, whereas the other five had been on the 14-day regimen (P = 0.2). The response to eflornithine differed markedly between Uganda and other countries. Among new cases in Uganda, the 2-year probability of cure was 73% on the 14-day course compared with 62% on the 7-day regimen (hazard ratio (HR) for treatment failure, 7-day versus 14-day regimen: 1.45, 95% CI: 0.7, 3.1, P = 0.3). Among new cases in Côte d'Ivoire, Congo, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo combined, the 2-year probability of cure was 97% on the 14-day course compared with 86.5% on the 7-day regimen (HR for treatment failure, 7-day vs 14-day: 6.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.5, 31.0, P = 0.003). Among relapsing cases in all four countries, the 2-year probability of cure was 94% with 7 days and 100% with 14 days of treatment. Factors associated with a higher risk of treatment failure were: a positive lymph node aspirate (HR 4.1; 95% CI: 1.8-9.4), a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) white cell count > or = 100/mm3 (HR 3.5; 95% CI: 1.1-10.9), being treated in Uganda (HR 2.9; 95% CI: 1.4-5.9), and CSF trypanosomes (HR 1.9; 95% CI: 0.9-4.1). Being stuporous on admission was associated with a lower risk of treatment failure (HR 0.18; 95% CI: 0.02-1.4) as was increasing age (HR 0.977; 95% CI: 0.95-1.0, for each additional year of age). DISCUSSION: The 7-day course of eflornithine is an effective treatment of relapsing cases

  19. Chagas Disease (American trypanosomiasis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Commentaries 2014 Multimedia Contacts Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) Fact sheet Updated March 2016 Key facts About ... is essential. Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by ...

  20. Implications of Heterogeneous Biting Exposure and Animal Hosts on Trypanosomiasis brucei gambiense Transmission and Control.

    PubMed

    Stone, Chris M; Chitnis, Nakul

    2015-10-01

    The gambiense form of sleeping sickness is a neglected tropical disease, which is presumed to be anthroponotic. However, the parasite persists in human populations at levels of considerable rarity and as such the existence of animal reservoirs has been posited. Clarifying the impact of animal host reservoirs on the feasibility of interrupting sleeping sickness transmission through interventions is a matter of urgency. We developed a mathematical model allowing for heterogeneous exposure of humans to tsetse, with animal populations that differed in their ability to transmit infections, to investigate the effectiveness of two established techniques, screening and treatment of at-risk populations, and vector control. Importantly, under both assumptions, an integrated approach of human screening and vector control was supported in high transmission areas. However, increasing the intensity of vector control was more likely to eliminate transmission, while increasing the intensity of human screening reduced the time to elimination. Non-human animal hosts played important, but different roles in HAT transmission, depending on whether or not they contributed as reservoirs. If they did not serve as reservoirs, sensitivity analyses suggested their attractiveness may instead function as a sink for tsetse bites. These outcomes highlight the importance of understanding the ecological and environmental context of sleeping sickness in optimizing integrated interventions, particularly for moderate and low transmission intensity settings. PMID:26426854

  1. Implications of Heterogeneous Biting Exposure and Animal Hosts on Trypanosomiasis brucei gambiense Transmission and Control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Chris M.; Chitnis, Nakul

    2015-01-01

    The gambiense form of sleeping sickness is a neglected tropical disease, which is presumed to be anthroponotic. However, the parasite persists in human populations at levels of considerable rarity and as such the existence of animal reservoirs has been posited. Clarifying the impact of animal host reservoirs on the feasibility of interrupting sleeping sickness transmission through interventions is a matter of urgency. We developed a mathematical model allowing for heterogeneous exposure of humans to tsetse, with animal populations that differed in their ability to transmit infections, to investigate the effectiveness of two established techniques, screening and treatment of at-risk populations, and vector control. Importantly, under both assumptions, an integrated approach of human screening and vector control was supported in high transmission areas. However, increasing the intensity of vector control was more likely to eliminate transmission, while increasing the intensity of human screening reduced the time to elimination. Non-human animal hosts played important, but different roles in HAT transmission, depending on whether or not they contributed as reservoirs. If they did not serve as reservoirs, sensitivity analyses suggested their attractiveness may instead function as a sink for tsetse bites. These outcomes highlight the importance of understanding the ecological and environmental context of sleeping sickness in optimizing integrated interventions, particularly for moderate and low transmission intensity settings. PMID:26426854

  2. Research in vector control

    PubMed Central

    Quarterman, K. D.

    1963-01-01

    Current research on vector control is directed mainly at finding answers to the problem of resistance. Despite considerable advances in knowledge of the genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and ecology of resistant vectors, the only practical answer found so far has been the development of new, substitute insecticides. At present the operational needs of existing large-scale control or eradication programmes swallow up much of the funds, personnel and facilities that might otherwise be devoted to basic research. Moreover, to back up these programmes, there is a continuing need for applied research on such questions as the packaging of pesticides, improvements in equipment and the development of new formulations. The author gives examples of applied research already carried out or in progress and indicates some areas of both basic and applied research demanding urgent attention. Like other participants in the seminar, he stresses the fundamental importance of ecological studies. He also examines the concept of integrated vector control and points out that the realization of this concept presupposes close co-ordination between basic and applied research, laboratory and field studies, and investigations on chemical and non-chemical vector control measures. PMID:20604177

  3. [Control of human African trypanosomiasis in Luba in equatorial Guinea:evaluation of three methods].

    PubMed

    Simarro, P P; Sima, F O; Mir, M; Mateo, M J; Roche, J

    1991-01-01

    The object of this study was to (a) reduce the prevalence of sleeping sickness by serological testing, parasitological examination, and treatment of every infected person; (b) determine the maximum acceptable interval between serological surveys; and (c) define the impact of vector control, using monopyramidal non-impregnated traps, on the transmission. For this sero-parasitological survey, the focus in Luba was divided into three zones as follows: Epicentre A (with high prevalence, 27.5%), Epicentre B (with average prevalence, 8.3%), and Peripheral C (with moderate prevalence, 3.0%). Differences in the prevalence rates in the Epicentres and Peripheral zone permitted the use of three different approaches for control and epidemiological follow-up of the disease: (1) Serological examination of the entire population was carried out by the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT), with six-month intervals in Epicentres A and B and once a year in the Peripheral zone C. (2) DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT: all IFAT seropositives were examined in Luba hospital for parasites, and every parasitologically confirmed patient was treated according to the WHO protocol of 1983. Another serological test (CATT) was applied to cases in which trypanosomes were not present and if this was positive, the CSF was examined. Cases with parasites and abnormal CSF were treated with melarsoprol, and those with a normal CSF received pentamidine. CATT-negative and parasite-negative cases were considered to be false-positives by IFAT and free of the disease. (3) Vector control: 74 monopyramidal traps (18 traps per km2) were set up in Epicentre A. The flies captured were collected once a month and sent to the programme's laboratory where they were identified and counted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1934239

  4. Research priorities for Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a review and analysis of the research landscape for three diseases - Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis - that disproportionately afflict poor and remote populations with limited access to health services. It represents the work of the disease reference group on Chagas Disease, Human African Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis (DRG3) which was established to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholders' consultations. The diseases, which are caused by related protozoan parasites, are described in terms of their epidemiology and diseases burden, clinical forms and pathogenesis, HIV coinfection, diagnosis, drugs and drug resistance, vaccines, vector control, and health-care interventions. Priority areas for research are identified based on criteria such as public health relevance, benefit and impact on poor populations and equity, and feasibility. The priorities are found in the areas of diagnostics, drugs, vector control, asymptomatic infection, economic analysis of treatment and vector control methods, and in some specific issues such as surveillance methods or transmission-blocking vaccines for particular diseases. This report will be useful to researchers, policy and decision-makers, funding bodies, implementation organizations, and civil society. This is one of ten disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report for Research on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at: www.who.int/tdr/stewardship/global_report/en/index.html. PMID:23484340

  5. The impact of insecticide-resistance on control of vectors and vector-borne diseases

    PubMed Central

    Busvine, J. R.; Pal, R.

    1969-01-01

    A questionnaire inquiring into the nature of schemes for the insecticidal control of disease vectors, the development of resistance in these vectors, and the effect of any such resistance on their control and on the extent of disease was sent to more than 100 health authorities throughout the world. The replies to the questionnaire are summarized in this paper. Until recently, the use of insecticides in public health has been largely based on three organochlorine compounds—DDT, HCH and dieldrin. However, in some countries resistance to these has now severely affected control both of many insect species and of the diseases they transmit (e.g., malaria, yellow fever, filariasis, typhus, plague). Certain other public health problems (onchocerciasis, Chagas' disease, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis) have not so far been greatly affected by resistance, but it is difficult to be sure of the continued reliability of the organochlorines. Research in the past 5 years, much of it sponsored by WHO, has shown the value of various organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides as replacements for the organochlorines, although resistance to them, too, can occur. Attention must therefore be focused on all facets of the use of these newer compounds and particular scrutiny made of possible instances of resistance to them. PMID:5307234

  6. Improvements on Restricted Insecticide Application Protocol for Control of Human and Animal African Trypanosomiasis in Eastern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Muhanguzi, Dennis; Picozzi, Kim; Hatendorf, Jan; Thrusfield, Michael; Welburn, Susan Christina; Kabasa, John David; Waiswa, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background African trypanosomes constrain livestock and human health in Sub-Saharan Africa, and aggravate poverty and hunger of these otherwise largely livestock-keeping communities. To solve this, there is need to develop and use effective and cheap tsetse control methods. To this end, we aimed at determining the smallest proportion of a cattle herd that needs to be sprayed on the legs, bellies and ears (RAP) for effective Human and Animal African Trypanosomiasis (HAT/AAT) control. Methodology/Principal finding Cattle in 20 villages were ear-tagged and injected with two doses of diminazene diaceturate (DA) forty days apart, and randomly allocated to one of five treatment regimens namely; no treatment, 25%, 50%, 75% monthly RAP and every 3 month Albendazole drench. Cattle trypanosome re-infection rate was determined by molecular techniques. ArcMap V10.3 was used to map apparent tsetse density (FTD) from trap catches. The effect of graded RAP on incidence risk ratios and trypanosome prevalence was determined using Poisson and logistic random effect models in R and STATA V12.1 respectively. Incidence was estimated at 9.8/100 years in RAP regimens, significantly lower compared to 25.7/100 years in the non-RAP regimens (incidence rate ratio: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.22–0.65; P<0.001). Likewise, trypanosome prevalence after one year of follow up was significantly lower in RAP animals than in non-RAP animals (4% vs 15%, OR: 0.20, 95% CI: 0.08–0.44; P<0.001). Contrary to our expectation, level of protection did not increase with increasing proportion of animals treated. Conclusions/significance Reduction in RAP coverage did not significantly affect efficacy of treatment. This is envisaged to improve RAP adaptability to low income livestock keepers but needs further evaluation in different tsetse challenge, HAT/AAT transmission rates and management systems before adopting it for routine tsetse control programs. PMID:25356758

  7. Solid rocket thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Thrust vector control systems that superimpose a side force on the motor thrust, steering being achieved by the side force causing a moment about the vehicle center of gravity are described. A brief review of thrust vector control systems is presented, and two systems, flexible joint and liquid injection, are treated in detail. Treatment of the flexible-joint thrust vector control system is limited to the design of the flexible joint and its insulation against hot motor gases. Treatment of the liquid injection thrust vector control system is limited to discussion of the injectant, valves, piping, storage tanks, and pressurization system; no evaluation is presented of the nozzle except for (1) the effect of the injectant and erosion at the injection port and (2) the effect of injection on pressure distribution within the nozzle.

  8. Epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Jose R; Simarro, Pere P; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Jannin, Jean G

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which is a chronic form of the disease present in western and central Africa, and by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which is an acute disease located in eastern and southern Africa. The rhodesiense form is a zoonosis, with the occasional infection of humans, but in the gambiense form, the human being is regarded as the main reservoir that plays a key role in the transmission cycle of the disease. The gambiense form currently assumes that 98% of the cases are declared; the Democratic Republic of the Congo is the most affected country, with more than 75% of the gambiense cases declared. The epidemiology of the disease is mediated by the interaction of the parasite (trypanosome) with the vectors (tsetse flies), as well as with the human and animal hosts within a particular environment. Related to these interactions, the disease is confined in spatially limited areas called “foci”, which are located in Sub-Saharan Africa, mainly in remote rural areas. The risk of contracting HAT is, therefore, determined by the possibility of contact of a human being with an infected tsetse fly. Epidemics of HAT were described at the beginning of the 20th century; intensive activities have been set up to confront the disease, and it was under control in the 1960s, with fewer than 5,000 cases reported in the whole continent. The disease resurged at the end of the 1990s, but renewed efforts from endemic countries, cooperation agencies, and nongovernmental organizations led by the World Health Organization succeeded to raise awareness and resources, while reinforcing national programs, reversing the trend of the cases reported, and bringing the disease under control again. In this context, sustainable elimination of the gambiense HAT, defined as the interruption of the transmission of the disease, was considered as a feasible target for 2030. Since rhodesiense HAT is a zoonosis

  9. Epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Franco, Jose R; Simarro, Pere P; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Jannin, Jean G

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which is a chronic form of the disease present in western and central Africa, and by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which is an acute disease located in eastern and southern Africa. The rhodesiense form is a zoonosis, with the occasional infection of humans, but in the gambiense form, the human being is regarded as the main reservoir that plays a key role in the transmission cycle of the disease. The gambiense form currently assumes that 98% of the cases are declared; the Democratic Republic of the Congo is the most affected country, with more than 75% of the gambiense cases declared. The epidemiology of the disease is mediated by the interaction of the parasite (trypanosome) with the vectors (tsetse flies), as well as with the human and animal hosts within a particular environment. Related to these interactions, the disease is confined in spatially limited areas called "foci", which are located in Sub-Saharan Africa, mainly in remote rural areas. The risk of contracting HAT is, therefore, determined by the possibility of contact of a human being with an infected tsetse fly. Epidemics of HAT were described at the beginning of the 20th century; intensive activities have been set up to confront the disease, and it was under control in the 1960s, with fewer than 5,000 cases reported in the whole continent. The disease resurged at the end of the 1990s, but renewed efforts from endemic countries, cooperation agencies, and nongovernmental organizations led by the World Health Organization succeeded to raise awareness and resources, while reinforcing national programs, reversing the trend of the cases reported, and bringing the disease under control again. In this context, sustainable elimination of the gambiense HAT, defined as the interruption of the transmission of the disease, was considered as a feasible target for 2030. Since rhodesiense HAT is a zoonosis, where

  10. Monitoring trypanosomiasis in space and time.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D J; Williams, B G

    1993-01-01

    The paper examines the possible contributions to be made by Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to studies on human and animal trypanosomiasis in Africa. The epidemiological characteristics of trypanosomiasis are reviewed in the light of the formula for the basic reproductive rate or number of vector-borne diseases. The paper then describes how important biological characteristics of the vectors of trypanosomiasis in West Africa may be monitored using data from the NOAA series of meteorological satellites. This will lead to an understanding of the spatial distribution of both vectors and disease. An alternative, statistical approach to understanding the spatial distribution of tsetse, based on linear discriminant analysis, is illustrated with the example of Glossina morsitans in Zimbabwe, Kenya and Tanzania. In the case of Zimbabwe, a single climatic variable, the maximum of the mean monthly temperature, correctly predicts the pre-rinderpest distribution of tsetse over 82% of the country; additional climatic and vegetation variables do not improve considerably on this figure. In the cases of Kenya and Tanzania, however, another variable, the maximum of the mean monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, is the single most important variable, giving correct predictions over 69% of the area; the other climatic and vegetation variables improve this to 82% overall. Such statistical analyses can guide field work towards the correct biological interpretation of the distributional limits of vectors and may also be used to make predictions about the impact of global change on vector ranges. Examples are given of the areas of Zimbabwe which would become climatically suitable for tsetse given mean temperature increases of 1, 2 and 3 degrees Centigrade. Five possible causes for sleeping sickness outbreaks are given, illustrated by the analysis of field data or from the output of mathematical models. One cause is abiotic (variation in rainfall), three are biotic

  11. Control of malaria and other vector-borne protozoan diseases in the tropics: enduring challenges despite considerable progress and achievements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne protozoan diseases represent a serious public health challenge, especially in the tropics where poverty together with vector-favorable climates are the aggravating factors. Each of the various strategies currently employed to face these scourges is seriously inadequate. Despite enormous efforts, vaccines—which represent the ideal weapon against these parasitic diseases—are yet to be sufficiently developed and implemented. Chemotherapy and vector control are therefore the sole effective attempts to minimize the disease burden. Nowadays, both strategies are also highly challenged by the phenomenon of drug and insecticide resistance, which affects virtually all interventions currently used. The recently growing support from international organizations and governments of some endemic countries is warmly welcome, and should be optimally exploited in the various approaches to drug and insecticide research and development to overcome the burden of these prevalent diseases, especially malaria, leishmaniasis, Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), and Chagas disease. PMID:24401663

  12. Management of trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Michael P.; Croft, Simon L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The current treatments for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), Chagas disease and leishmaniasis (collectively referred to as the kinetoplastid diseases) are far from ideal but, for some, there has been significant recent progress. For HAT the only advances in treatment over the past two decades have been the introduction of an eflornithine/nifurtimox co-administration and a shorter regime of the old standard melarsoprol. Sources of data PubMed. Areas of Agreement There is a need for new safe, oral drugs for cost-effective treatment of patients and use in control programmes for all the trypanosomatid diseases. Areas of controversy Cutaneous leishmaniasis is not on the agenda and treatments are lagging behind. Growing points There are three compounds in development for the treatment of the CNS stage of HAT: fexinidazole, currently due to entry into phase II clinical studies, a benzoxaborole (SCYX-7158) in phase I trials and a diamidine derivative (CPD-0802), in advanced pre-clinical development. For Chagas disease, two anti-fungal triazoles are now in clinical trial. In addition, clinical studies with benznidazole, a drug previously recommended only for acute stage treatment, are close to completion to determine the effectiveness in the treatment of early chronic and indeterminate Chagas disease. For visceral leishmaniasis new formulations, therapeutic switching, in particular AmBisome, and the potential for combinations of established drugs have significantly improved the opportunities for the treatment in the Indian subcontinent, but not in East Africa. Areas timely for developing research Improved diagnostic tools are needed to support treatment, for test of cure in clinical trials and for monitoring/surveillance of populations in control programmes. PMID:23137768

  13. Transcriptomics and disease vector control

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing can be used to compare transcriptomes under different conditions. A study in BMC Genomics applies this approach to investigating the effects of exposure to a range of xenobiotics on changes in gene expression in the larvae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue fever. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/216 PMID:20525113

  14. The effects of trypanosomiasis on rural economy*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S. G.; Morris, K. R. S.; Lewis, I. J.; Krog, E.

    1963-01-01

    Trypanosomiasis, both of humans and of livestock, is one of the most important factors restricting economic development in Africa today. The present paper outlines how this disease is limiting agricultural, veterinary and forestry development in the Sudan, Bechuanaland and West Africa. The present tsetse-fly distribution is reviewed. Glossina palpalis and G. morsitans occur in the south Sudan and G. morsitans in the Ngamiland district of Bechuanaland; G. morsitans, G. palpalis and G. tachinoides are the most important species in West Africa. These tsetse flies have altered the cattle distribution in all three regions and, in addition to causing widespread disease, have created local overstocking problems in the tsetse-free grazing areas, and have enforced nomadism on breeding herds and economic loss in slaughter cattle along the trade cattle routes in West Africa. Human trypanosomiasis is not now such an urgent problem and public health measures have led to its control in all three areas. Increased agricultural development, which can be a successful and economic method of reclaiming land from tsetse flies, must be intensified in all three areas. Forest conservation policy comes into conflict with tsetse control measures only in West Africa. Detailed tsetse-fly surveys and research, on which future plans can be firmly based, are now urgently required. ImagesFIG. 6 PMID:14001093

  15. Vector control activities, fiscal year 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, E.; Cooney, J.C.; McDuff, B.R.

    1984-07-01

    The goal of the Vector Control Program is to safeguard public health and well-being in the Tennessee Valley region by controlling arthropod pests of medical importance that are propagated on TVA lands or waters or that are produced as a result of TVA activities. To achieve this goal the program is divided into two major categories consisting of operations and support studies. The latter is geared to improving the operational effectiveness and efficiency of the control program and to identify additional vector control problems requiring TVA attention and study. Nonchemical methods of control are emphasized and are supplemented with chemical measures as needed.

  16. Vector control activities. Fiscal year, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, E.; Cooney, J.C.; McDuff, B.R.

    1983-06-01

    The goal of the TVA Vector Control Program is to protect the public from potential vectors of disease by controlling medically-important arthropod pests that are propagated on TVA lands or waters. In addition, freedom from annoying mosquitoes and other blood-sucking pests permits the development, use, and full enjoyment of the vast recreational opportunities offered by the many miles of freshwater lakes. To attain this goal the program is divided into operations and support studies. The support studies are designed to improve the operational effectiveness and efficiency of the control program and to identify other vector control problems that require TVA attention and study. Specifically, activities concerning water level management of TVA lakes, dewatering projects, plant growth control, drainage and insect control programs are detailed. Further, report is made of post-impoundment surveys, soil sampling studies of Mosquite larvae and ecological mosquito management studies.

  17. Intersectoral approaches to dengue vector control.

    PubMed

    Kay, B H

    1994-12-01

    Medical entomology in the context of urban vector control, especially for dengue, can be likened to the tail of a dog. Vertically structured Aedes aegypti campaigns such as run by Gorgas and Soper earlier this century relied on sufficient legislative backing for vector control to ensure that the tail was capable of wagging the dog. Under these conditions, especially where individual rights do not intrude, vertical programs will be successful. The global expansion of dengue, dengue hemorrhagic fever and its vectors, plus growing trends towards urban/periurban living indicate a more serious scenario than at present. In 1987, the Brundtland Report: "Our Common Future" decried sectoralism in problem solving. Following the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in 1992, the resulting Commission on Sustainable Development has promoted the intersectoral message of health, environment and development. The WHO/FAO/UNEP/UNCHS Panel of Experts on Environmental Management for Vector Control has promoted this for some time and is attempting to build multidisciplinary projects against urban vector borne disease. Adequate solid waste management and recycling will reduce numbers of water bearing containers infested with Aedes aegypti and provision of reliable piped water supplies will impact heavily on infested water storage containers. Both should be encouraged as viable control options. For much of the world, vertical programs have been reported as prohibitively expensive, and unacceptable intrusion on human rights and thus unsustainable in the modern economic context. However there are successful modern examples.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7844851

  18. Vector control activities: Fiscal Year, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The program is divided into two major components - operations and support studies. The support studies are designed to improve the operational effectiveness and efficiency of the control program and to identify other vector control problems requiring TVA attention and study. Nonchemical methods of control are emphasized and are supplemented with chemical measures as needed. TVA also cooperates with various concerned municipalities in identifying blood-sucking arthropod pest problems and demonstrating control techniques useful in establishing abatement programs, and provides technical assistance to other TVA programs and organizations. The program also helps Land Between The Lakes (LBL) plan and conduct vector control operations and tick control research. Specific program control activities and support studies are discussed.

  19. Control of Chagas disease vectors.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, J M; Schofield, C J

    2003-01-01

    Most Latin American countries are making dramatic progress in controlling Chagas disease, through a series of national and international initiatives focusing on elimination of domestic populations of Triatominae, improved screening of blood donors, and clinical support and treatment of persons infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Some countries, particularly Uruguay, Chile and Brazil, are sufficiently advanced in their programmes to initiate detailed planning of the subsequent phases of Chagas disease control, while others such as Peru, Ecuador, and Mexico, are currently applying only the initial phases of the control campaigns. In this review, we seek to provide a brief history of the campaigns as a basis for discussion of future interventions. Our aim is to relate operational needs to the underlying biological aspects that have made Chagas disease so serious in Latin America but have also revealed the epidemiological vulnerability of this disease. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html. PMID:12736992

  20. Glossina fuscipes populations provide insights for Human African Trypanosomiasis transmission in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa; Galvani, Alison P.; Okedi, Loyce M.

    2013-01-01

    Uganda has both forms of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT): the chronic gambiense disease in the northwest and the acute rhodesiense disease in the south. The recent spread of rhodesiense into central Uganda has raised concerns given the different control strategies the two diseases require. We present knowledge on the population genetics of the major vector species Glossina fuscipes fuscipes in Uganda with a focus on population structure, measures of gene flow between populations, and the occurrence of polyandry. The microbiome composition and diversity is discussed, focusing on their potential role on trypanosome infection outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for large-scale tsetse control programs, including suppression or eradication, being undertaken in Uganda and potential future genetic applications. PMID:23845311

  1. Ascent thrust vector control system test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Testing of the Ascent Thrust Vector Control System in support of the Ares 1-X program at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available

  2. Thrust vector control using electric actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, Robert T.; Hall, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Presently, gimbaling of launch vehicle engines for thrust vector control is generally accomplished using a hydraulic system. In the case of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters and main engines, these systems are powered by hydrazine auxiliary power units. Use of electromechanical actuators would provide significant advantages in cost and maintenance. However, present energy source technologies such as batteries are heavy to the point of causing significant weight penalties. Utilizing capacitor technology developed by the Auburn University Space Power Institute in collaboration with the Auburn CCDS, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Auburn are developing EMA system components with emphasis on high discharge rate energy sources compatible with space shuttle type thrust vector control requirements. Testing has been done at MSFC as part of EMA system tests with loads up to 66000 newtons for pulse times of several seconds. Results show such an approach to be feasible providing a potential for reduced weight and operations costs for new launch vehicles.

  3. Thrust Vector Control using movable probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalleri, Robert; Tiarn, Weihnurng; Readey, Harvey

    1990-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if movable probes or struts positioned in the nozzle can be used to provide Thrust Vector Control of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The study employed CFD to determine estimates of the shock standoff distance from the probe. An empirical correlation was used to construct the shock shape and the pressure distribution generated by the probe. The TVC performance for a single and multiple number of probes was then used to determine requirements for a maximum thrust angle offset of 7.5 degrees. Consideration was given to what materials would be suitable for the probe and if active cooling is required. Based on the performance analysis and thermal requirements, a Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) system was sized. Indications are that a PTVC system weight is in the 1500 1bm weight range, compared to the existing weight of 7500 1bm for the SRB nozzle gimble system.

  4. Prospects for vector control through sterilization procedures

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carroll N.

    1963-01-01

    Interest in sterilization as a possible method for controlling insects of public health importance can be said to have arisen first in the mid-fifties, when the screw-worm fly was successfully eradicated from the island of Curaçao by the release over the entire island of large numbers of male flies sterilized by gamma-radiation. Since then, many studies on the sterilization of various insect vectors of disease have been carried out. This paper reviews these studies and discusses the present position regarding vector control by sterilization procedures, with special reference to the use of chemosterilants. These compounds have certain advantages over radiation since they can be used not only as a substitute for X-rays or gamma-rays in the sterilization of insects specially reared for release in large numbers, but also as a means of inducing sterility in natural populations of insects. The author emphasizes that chemosterilants cannot at present be recommended as a practical control or eradication procedure for any vector species of insect, but considers that this extension of the sterilization method holds great promise and merits intensive investigation. PMID:20604181

  5. The public health significance of trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nwanyanwu, O C; Steele, J H; Osueke, S O; Carpenter, D J

    1985-03-01

    Although trypanosomiasis is no longer a major public health problem in the Federal Republic of Nigeria, it nevertheless remains a significant economic bane to farmers whose livestock suffer high morbidity and mortality and a significant loss of weight. This disease probably leaves many Nigerians, without adequate protein intake either from lost beef or from the inability of the cattle to produce milk. Ford (1970) stated that trypanosomiasis may be what is holding back the development of large areas of Africa--a statement which has credence especially when viewed in terms of the thousands of square miles of Nigeria which remain under the infestation of tsetse--land which could be employed in food production. It is therefore important that the history, epidemiology and control methods for this disease be reviewed from time to time in an attempt to ensure that the surveillance mechanisms in place are functional. PMID:4055267

  6. Controlling Vector Bessel Beams with Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Carl; Grbic, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    Unprecedented control of an electromagnetic wave front is demonstrated with reflectionless metasurfaces that can manipulate vector Bessel beams: cylindrical vector beams with a Bessel profile. First, two metasurfaces are developed to convert linearly and circularly polarized Gaussian beams into vector Bessel beams. Each unit cell of the metasurfaces provides polarization and phase control with high efficiency. Next, the reciprocal process is demonstrated: an incident radially polarized Bessel beam is transformed into collimated, linearly and circularly polarized beams. In this configuration, a planar Bessel beam launcher is integrated with a collimating metasurface lens to realize a low-profile lens-antenna. The lens-antenna achieves a high directivity (exceeding 20 dB) with a subwavelength overall thickness. Finally, a metasurface providing isotropic polarization rotation is used to transform a radially polarized Bessel beam into an azimuthally polarized Bessel beam. This work demonstrates that metasurfaces can be used to generate arbitrary combinations of radial and azimuthal polarizations for applications such as focus shaping or generating tractor beams.

  7. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    The advanced launch system (ALS), is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost-effective, highly reliable, and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. An electromechanical actuation (EMA) system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link power management and distribution (PMAD) technology and pulse population modulation (PPM) techniques to implement field-oriented vector control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a built-in test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance, and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA thrust vector control (TVC) system. The EMA system and work proposed for the future are discussed.

  8. 40 CFR 258.22 - Disease vector control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disease vector control. 258.22 Section... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.22 Disease vector control. (a) Owners or operators of all MSWLF units must prevent or control on-site populations of disease vectors using...

  9. 40 CFR 258.22 - Disease vector control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disease vector control. 258.22 Section... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.22 Disease vector control. (a) Owners or operators of all MSWLF units must prevent or control on-site populations of disease vectors using...

  10. 40 CFR 258.22 - Disease vector control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Disease vector control. 258.22 Section... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.22 Disease vector control. (a) Owners or operators of all MSWLF units must prevent or control on-site populations of disease vectors using...

  11. 40 CFR 258.22 - Disease vector control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disease vector control. 258.22 Section... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.22 Disease vector control. (a) Owners or operators of all MSWLF units must prevent or control on-site populations of disease vectors using...

  12. The biological control of the malaria vector.

    PubMed

    Kamareddine, Layla

    2012-09-01

    The call for malaria control, over the last century, marked a new epoch in the history of this disease. Many control strategies targeting either the Plasmodium parasite or the Anopheles vector were shown to be effective. Yet, the emergence of drug resistant parasites and insecticide resistant mosquito strains, along with numerous health, environmental, and ecological side effects of many chemical agents, highlighted the need to develop alternative tools that either complement or substitute conventional malaria control approaches. The use of biological means is considered a fundamental part of the recently launched malaria eradication program and has so far shown promising results, although this approach is still in its infancy. This review presents an overview of the most promising biological control tools for malaria eradication, namely fungi, bacteria, larvivorous fish, parasites, viruses and nematodes. PMID:23105979

  13. Molecular evidence of a Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sylvatic cycle in the human african trypanosomiasis foci of Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Cordon-Obras, Carlos; Rodriguez, Yasmin Fermin; Fernandez-Martinez, Amalia; Cano, Jorge; Ndong-Mabale, Nicolas; Ncogo-Ada, Policarpo; Ndongo-Asumu, Pedro; Aparicio, Pilar; Navarro, Miguel; Benito, Agustin; Bart, Jean-Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Gambiense trypanosomiasis is considered an anthroponotic disease. Consequently, control programs are generally aimed at stopping transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T. b. gambiense) by detecting and treating human cases. However, the persistence of numerous foci despite efforts to eliminate this disease questions this strategy as unique tool to pursue the eradication. The role of animals as a reservoir of T. b. gambiense is still controversial, but could partly explain maintenance of the infection at hypo-endemic levels. In the present study, we evaluated the presence of T. b. gambiense in wild animals in Equatorial Guinea. The infection rate ranged from 0.8% in the insular focus of Luba to more than 12% in Mbini, a focus with a constant trickle of human cases. The parasite was detected in a wide range of animal species including four species never described previously as putative reservoirs. Our study comes to reinforce the hypothesis that animals may play a role in the persistence of T. b. gambiense transmission, being particularly relevant in low transmission settings. Under these conditions the integration of sustained vector control and medical interventions should be considered to achieve the elimination of gambiense trypanosomiasis. PMID:26257727

  14. Using species distribution models to optimize vector control in the framework of the tsetse eradication campaign in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Dicko, Ahmadou H.; Lancelot, Renaud; Seck, Momar T.; Guerrini, Laure; Sall, Baba; Lo, Mbargou; Vreysen, Marc J. B.; Lefrançois, Thierry; Fonta, William M.; Peck, Steven L.; Bouyer, Jérémy

    2014-01-01

    Tsetse flies are vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in sub-Saharan Africa and are the target of the Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC). Glossina palpalis gambiensis (Diptera: Glossinidae) is a riverine species that is still present as an isolated metapopulation in the Niayes area of Senegal. It is targeted by a national eradication campaign combining a population reduction phase based on insecticide-treated targets (ITTs) and cattle and an eradication phase based on the sterile insect technique. In this study, we used species distribution models to optimize control operations. We compared the probability of the presence of G. p. gambiensis and habitat suitability using a regularized logistic regression and Maxent, respectively. Both models performed well, with an area under the curve of 0.89 and 0.92, respectively. Only the Maxent model predicted an expert-based classification of landscapes correctly. Maxent predictions were therefore used throughout the eradication campaign in the Niayes to make control operations more efficient in terms of deployment of ITTs, release density of sterile males, and location of monitoring traps used to assess program progress. We discuss how the models’ results informed about the particular ecology of tsetse in the target area. Maxent predictions allowed optimizing efficiency and cost within our project, and might be useful for other tsetse control campaigns in the framework of the PATTEC and, more generally, other vector or insect pest control programs. PMID:24982143

  15. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  16. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  17. Thrust vector control using electric actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, R.T.; Hall, D.K.

    1995-01-25

    Presently, gimbaling of launch vehicle engines for thrust vector control is generally accomplished using a hydraulic system. In the case of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters and main engines, these systems are powered by hydrazine auxiliary power units. Use of electromechanical actuators would provide significant advantages in cost and maintenance. However, present energy source technologies such as batteries are heavy to the point of causing significant weight penalties. Utilizing capacitor technology developed by the Auburn University Space Power Institute in collaboration with the Auburn CCDS, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Auburn are developing EMA system components with emphasis on high discharge rate energy sources compatible with space shuttle type thrust vector control requirements. Testing has been done at MSFC as part of EMA system tests with loads up to 66000 newtons for pulse times of several seconds. Results show such an approach to be feasible providing a potential for reduced weight and operations costs for new launch vehicles. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  18. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - American Trypanosomiasis (also known as Chagas Disease) Note: Javascript is ... see the DPDx Web site: Chagas disease (American Trypanosomiasis) Diagnostic Procedures: Blood Specimens Get Email Updates To ...

  19. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Detailed FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - American Trypanosomiasis (also known as Chagas Disease) Note: Javascript is ... cruzi infection) is also referred to as American trypanosomiasis. It is estimated that as many as 8 ...

  20. Vector and reservoir control for preventing leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    González, Urbà; Pinart, Mariona; Sinclair, David; Firooz, Alireza; Enk, Claes; Vélez, Ivan D; Esterhuizen, Tonya M; Tristan, Mario; Alvar, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is caused by the Leishmania parasite, and transmitted by infected phlebotomine sandflies. Of the two distinct clinical syndromes, cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) affects the skin and mucous membranes, and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) affects internal organs. Approaches to prevent transmission include vector control by reducing human contact with infected sandflies, and reservoir control, by reducing the number of infected animals. Objectives To assess the effects of vector and reservoir control interventions for cutaneous and for visceral leishmaniasis. Search methods We searched the following databases to 13 January 2015: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and WHOLIS, Web of Science, and RePORTER. We also searched trials registers for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of vector and reservoir control interventions in leishmaniasis-endemic regions. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently searched for trials and extracted data from included RCTs. We resolved any disagreements by discussion with a third review author. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results We included 14 RCTs that evaluated a range of interventions across different settings. The study methods were generally poorly described, and consequently all included trials were judged to be at high or unclear risk of selection and reporting bias. Only seven trials reported clinical outcome data which limits our ability to make broad generalizations to different epidemiological settings and cultures. Cutaneous leishmaniasis One four-arm RCT from Afghanistan compared indoor residual spraying (IRS), insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs), and insecticide-treated bedsheets, with no intervention. Over 15 months follow-up, all three insecticide-based interventions had a lower incidence of CL than the control area (IRS: risk

  1. Speed sensorless hybrid vector controlled induction motor drive

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, B.K.; Simoes, M.G.; Crecelius, D.R.; Rajashekara, K.; Martin, R.

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes a speed and flux sensorless vector-controlled induction motor drive primarily aimed for electric vehicle type applications. The stator flux oriented drive starts at zero speed in indirect vector control mode, transitions to direct vector control mode as the speed develops, and then transitions back to indirect vector control at zero speed. The vector control uses stator flux orientation in both indirect and direct vector control modes with the stator resistance variation compensated by measurement of stator temperature. The problem of integration at low stator frequency is solved by cascaded low pass filters with programmable time constants. The control strategy of the four-quadrant drive has been analyzed, validated by simulation study, and finally evaluated by experimental study on a laboratory 5 hp drive system.

  2. Population mobility and trypanosomiasis in Africa*

    PubMed Central

    Prothero, R. Mansell

    1963-01-01

    Population mobility has long been established as a feature of life in Africa south of the Sahara. Even though it appears to be a factor in the spread of sleeping-sickness there do not seem to have been serious epidemics until the latter part of the nineteenth century and the early decades of the twentieth century. Various types of population movement of the present day and their possible relevance to trypanosomiasis are discussed. Density of population and settlement patterns are also important. Some of the changes in these which are relevant to trypanosomiasis are outlined and the need for more detailed information on these and on population mobility is emphasized. PMID:13986384

  3. Application of remote sensing to arthropod vector surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Washino, R K; Wood, B L

    1994-01-01

    A need exists to further develop new technologies, such as remote sensing and geographic information systems analysis, for estimating arthropod vector abundance in aquatic habitats and predicting adult vector population outbreaks. A brief overview of remote sensing technology in vector surveillance and control is presented, and suggestions are made on future research opportunities in light of current and proposed remote sensing systems. PMID:8024079

  4. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  5. New Highly Dynamic Approach for Thrust Vector Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, M.; Ettl, J.; Grothe, D.; Hrbud, I.

    2015-09-01

    For a new launcher system a thrust vector control system is needed. This launch vehicle system consists of two rockets which are namely the VS-50 (two-stage suborbital vehicle) and the VLM-1 (three-stage microsatellite launch vehicle). VLM-1 and VS-50 are developed in a cooperation between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Brazilian Aeronautics and Space Institute (IAE). To keep these two rockets on its trajectory during flight a highly dynamic thrust vector control system is required. For the purpose of developing such a highly dynamic thrust vector control system a master thesis was written by the author. The development includes all mechanical constructions as well as control algorithms and electronics design. Moreover an optimization of control algorithms was made to increase the dynamic capabilities of the thrust vector control system. The composition of the right components plus the sophisticated control algorithm make the thrust vector control system highly dynamic.

  6. Preventing the transmission of American trypanosomiasis and its spread into non-endemic countries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis, commonly known as Chagas disease, is caused by the flagellate protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. An estimated eight million people infected with T. cruzi currently reside in the endemic regions of Latin America. However, as the disease has now been imported into many non-endemic countries outside of Latin America, it has become a global health issue. We reviewed the transmission patterns and current status of disease spread pertaining to American trypanosomiasis at the global level, as well as recent advances in research. Based on an analysis of the gaps in American trypanosomiasis control, we put forward future research priorities that must be implemented to stop the global spread of the disease. PMID:26715535

  7. 40 CFR 258.22 - Disease vector control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disease vector control. 258.22 Section 258.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.22 Disease vector control. (a) Owners or...

  8. Vector control in some countries of Southeast Asia: comparing the vectors and the strategies.

    PubMed

    Meek, S R

    1995-04-01

    The use of information on malaria vector behaviour in vector control is discussed in relation to the area of Southeast Asia comprising Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. The major vectors in the region are Anopheles dirus, An. minimus, An. maculatus and An. sundaicus, of which An. dirus is the most important. Options for vector control and the biological features of mosquitoes, which would make them amenable to control by these measures, are listed. The methods with the greatest potential for controlling each of the four vector species are described. Experiences of vector control by residual spraying, insecticide-treated nets and larva control and of personal protection against the four vectors are outlined, and it is noted that choice of control strategy is often determined by epidemiological, economic and political considerations, whilst entomological observations may help to explain failures of control and to indicate alternative strategies. Future research needs include basic entomological field studies using the most appropriate indicators to detect changes related to rapidly changing environmental conditions, such as loss of forest and climate change. Further studies of the efficacy of insecticide-treated mosquito nets, with greater attention to study design, are needed before it can be assumed that they will work in Southeast Asia. At the same time, research to improve sustainable utilization of nets is important, bearing in mind that nets are not the only means to control malaria and should not drain resources from supervision and training, which improve access to diagnosis and treatment of malaria and other diseases. Research is needed to make decisions on whether vector control is appropriate in different environments, and, if so, how to carry it out in different health systems. Researchers need to play a greater role in making operational research (entomological, epidemiological, social, economic and health systems research) of good quality

  9. [Epidemiology of human trypanosomiasis in the Luba focus, in Equatorial Guinea].

    PubMed

    Simarro, P P; Mas, J; Lancien, J; Ona Sima, F; Mateo, M J; Roche, J

    1990-01-01

    In Equatorial Guinea, the human trypanosomiasis, after an intensive surveillance beginning in the 30's, seemed to be controlled by the end of the 60's. A lack of surveillance provoked a surge of different foci, confirmed in 1982 by the spontaneous presentations of sick in the hospitals of the old foci. These processes have been observed in the Luba focus (ex San Carlos) on the island of Bioko (ex Fernando Poo). The situation was grave in 1985 and a survey was organized by the "Centro de Control de la Tripanosomiasis" (Ministerio de Sanidad de Guinea Ecuatorial--Agencia Española de Cooperación Internacional) to delimit the focus, to evaluate the presence of the disease in the different villages, to know the characteristics and the distribution of the vector, and evaluate the impact of the mono-pyramidal trap as the method of anti-vectorial control. The results have been obtained and presented in the conclusion. PMID:2131631

  10. Exploiting the potential of vector control for disease prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Townson, H.; Nathan, M. B.; Zaim, M.; Guillet, P.; Manga, L.; Bos, R.; Kindhauser, M.

    2005-01-01

    Although vector control has proven highly effective in preventing disease transmission, it is not being used to its full potential, thereby depriving disadvantaged populations of the benefits of well tried and tested methods. Following the discovery of synthetic residual insecticides in the 1940s, large-scale programmes succeeded in bringing many of the important vector-borne diseases under control. By the late 1960s, most vector-borne diseases--with the exception of malaria in Africa--were no longer considered to be of primary public health importance. The result was that control programmes lapsed, resources dwindled, and specialists in vector control disappeared from public health units. Within two decades, many important vector-borne diseases had re-emerged or spread to new areas. The time has come to restore vector control to its key role in the prevention of disease transmission, albeit with an increased emphasis on multiple measures, whether pesticide-based or involving environmental modification, and with a strengthened managerial and operational capacity. Integrated vector management provides a sound conceptual framework for deployment of cost-effective and sustainable methods of vector control. This approach allows for full consideration of the complex determinants of disease transmission, including local disease ecology, the role of human activity in increasing risks of disease transmission, and the socioeconomic conditions of affected communities. PMID:16462987

  11. Is Vector Control Sufficient to Limit Pathogen Spread in Vineyards?

    PubMed

    Daugherty, M P; O'Neill, S; Byrne, F; Zeilinger, A

    2015-06-01

    Vector control is widely viewed as an integral part of disease management. Yet epidemiological theory suggests that the effectiveness of control programs at limiting pathogen spread depends on a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic aspects of a pathosystem. Moreover, control programs rarely evaluate whether reductions in vector density or activity translate into reduced disease prevalence. In areas of California invaded by the glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis Germar), Pierce's disease management relies heavily on chemical control of this vector, primarily via systemic conventional insecticides (i.e., imidacloprid). But, data are lacking that attribute reduced vector pressure and pathogen spread to sharpshooter control. We surveyed 34 vineyards over successive years to assess the epidemiological value of within-vineyard chemical control. The results showed that imidacloprid reduced vector pressure without clear nontarget effects or secondary pest outbreaks. Effects on disease prevalence were more nuanced. Treatment history over the preceding 5 yr affected disease prevalence, with significantly more diseased vines in untreated compared with regularly or intermittently treated vineyards. Yet, the change in disease prevalence between years was low, with no significant effects of insecticide treatment or vector abundance. Collectively, the results suggest that within-vineyard applications of imidacloprid can reduce pathogen spread, but with benefits that may take multiple seasons to become apparent. The relatively modest effect of vector control on disease prevalence in this system may be attributable in part to the currently low regional sharpshooter population densities stemming from area-wide control, without which the need for within-vineyard vector control would be more pronounced. PMID:26313985

  12. The distribution of the vectors of African pathogenic trypanosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Ford, J.

    1963-01-01

    The author lists the species, subspecies and races of tsetse fly now recognized in three morphologically distinct groups. The distribution of each group is mapped and described in relation to climate and vegetation, with some indication of the part played by past climates and orogenies in determining the modern pattern. The importance of different species as vectors of human or bovine trypanosomiasis, or both, is noted, and examples are given of the part played by human settlement as a secondary limiting factor. The author suggests that many modern problems of control are the consequences of the recent invasion of the African ecosystem by the outside world. Although there are local exceptions, the broad pattern of Glossina distribution has not been significantly changed by the entomological approach to the trypanosomiasis problem. PMID:13958704

  13. From population structure to genetically-engineered vectors: new ways to control vector-borne diseases?

    PubMed

    Sparagano, O A E; De Luna, C J

    2008-07-01

    Epidemiological studies on vectors and the pathogens they can carry (such as Borrelia burgdorferi) are showing some correlations between infection rates and biodiversity highlighting the "dilution" effects on potential vectors. Meanwhile other studies comparing sympatric small rodent species demonstrated that rodent species transmitting more pathogens are parasitized by more ectoparasite species. Studies on population structure and size have also proven a difference on the intensity of the parasitic infection. Furthermore, preliminary results in genetic improvement in mosquitoes (genetic markers, sexing, and genetic sterilization) will also increase performance as it has already been shown in field applications in developing countries. Recent results have greatly improved the fitness of genetically-modified insects compared to wild type populations with new approaches such as the post-integration elimination of transposon sequences, stabilising any insertion in genetically-modified insects. Encouraging results using the Sterile Insect Technique highlighted some metabolism manipulation to avoid the viability of offspring from released parent insect in the wild. Recent studies on vector symbionts would also bring a new angle in vector control capabilities, while complete DNA sequencing of some arthropods could point out ways to block the deadly impact on animal and human populations. These new potential approaches will improve the levels of control or even in some cases would eradicate vector species and consequently the vector-borne diseases they can transmit. In this paper we review some of the population biology theories, biological control methods, and the genetic techniques that have been published in the last years that are recommended to control for vector-borne diseases. PMID:17560836

  14. The Interaction between Vector Life History and Short Vector Life in Vector-Borne Disease Transmission and Control.

    PubMed

    Brand, Samuel P C; Rock, Kat S; Keeling, Matt J

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological modelling has a vital role to play in policy planning and prediction for the control of vectors, and hence the subsequent control of vector-borne diseases. To decide between competing policies requires models that can generate accurate predictions, which in turn requires accurate knowledge of vector natural histories. Here we highlight the importance of the distribution of times between life-history events, using short-lived midge species as an example. In particular we focus on the distribution of the extrinsic incubation period (EIP) which determines the time between infection and becoming infectious, and the distribution of the length of the gonotrophic cycle which determines the time between successful bites. We show how different assumptions for these periods can radically change the basic reproductive ratio (R0) of an infection and additionally the impact of vector control on the infection. These findings highlight the need for detailed entomological data, based on laboratory experiments and field data, to correctly construct the next-generation of policy-informing models. PMID:27128163

  15. The Interaction between Vector Life History and Short Vector Life in Vector-Borne Disease Transmission and Control

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Samuel P. C.; Keeling, Matt J.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological modelling has a vital role to play in policy planning and prediction for the control of vectors, and hence the subsequent control of vector-borne diseases. To decide between competing policies requires models that can generate accurate predictions, which in turn requires accurate knowledge of vector natural histories. Here we highlight the importance of the distribution of times between life-history events, using short-lived midge species as an example. In particular we focus on the distribution of the extrinsic incubation period (EIP) which determines the time between infection and becoming infectious, and the distribution of the length of the gonotrophic cycle which determines the time between successful bites. We show how different assumptions for these periods can radically change the basic reproductive ratio (R0) of an infection and additionally the impact of vector control on the infection. These findings highlight the need for detailed entomological data, based on laboratory experiments and field data, to correctly construct the next-generation of policy-informing models. PMID:27128163

  16. Social factors affecting seasonal variation in bovine trypanosomiasis on the Jos Plateau, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background African Animal Trypanosomiasis (AAT) is a widespread disease of livestock in Nigeria and presents a major constraint to rural economic development. The Jos Plateau was considered free from tsetse flies and the trypanosomes they transmit due to its high altitude and this trypanosomiasis free status attracted large numbers of cattle-keeping pastoralists to the area. The Jos Plateau now plays a major role in the national cattle industry in Nigeria, accommodating approximately 7% of the national herd, supporting 300,000 pastoralists and over one million cattle. During the past two decades tsetse flies have invaded the Jos Plateau and animal trypanosomiasis has become a significant problem for livestock keepers. Here we investigate the epidemiology of trypanosomiasis as a re-emerging disease on the Plateau, examining the social factors that influence prevalence and seasonal variation of bovine trypanosomiasis. Methods In 2008 a longitudinal two-stage cluster survey was undertaken on the Jos Plateau. Cattle were sampled in the dry, early wet and late wet seasons. Parasite identification was undertaken using species-specific polymerase chain reactions to determine the prevalence and distribution of bovine trypanosomiasis. Participatory rural appraisal was also conducted to determine knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning animal husbandry and disease control. Results Significant seasonal variation between the dry season and late wet season was recorded across the Jos Plateau, consistent with expected variation in tsetse populations. However, marked seasonal variations were also observed at village level to create 3 distinct groups: Group 1 in which 50% of villages followed the general pattern of low prevalence in the dry season and high prevalence in the wet season; Group 2 in which 16.7% of villages showed no seasonal variation and Group 3 in which 33.3% of villages showed greater disease prevalence in the dry season than in the wet season. Conclusions

  17. Efficiency aspects of vector control applied to synchronous reluctance motors

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.E.; Williams, B.W.; Green, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    Core losses in a synchronous reluctance machine are modeled. The empirical model obtained is used to implement a control scheme to compensate for equivalent core loss currents. This enables accurate control of the magnetizing currents, hence torque. Efficiency over the base speed operating range of the machine is compared for two different vector control schemes. Methods of triplen series injection for vector controllers are discussed and a new method proposed. The new technique has advantages in terms of overall triplen content and computational requirements. Inductance ripple in the machine is estimated using direct torque ripple measurements and incorporated in a machine model valid for low speed operation.

  18. Parallel and vector computation for stochastic optimal control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, F. B.

    1989-01-01

    A general method for parallel and vector numerical solutions of stochastic dynamic programming problems is described for optimal control of general nonlinear, continuous time, multibody dynamical systems, perturbed by Poisson as well as Gaussian random white noise. Possible applications include lumped flight dynamics models for uncertain environments, such as large scale and background random atmospheric fluctuations. The numerical formulation is highly suitable for a vector multiprocessor or vectorizing supercomputer, and results exhibit high processor efficiency and numerical stability. Advanced computing techniques, data structures, and hardware help alleviate Bellman's curse of dimensionality in dynamic programming computations.

  19. Thrust vector control for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, D. N.; Brinton, B. C.

    1975-01-01

    Thrust vector control (TVC) for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) is obtained by omniaxis vectoring of the nozzle. The development and integration of the system are under the cognizance of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The nozzle and flexible bearing have been designed and will be built by Thiokol Corporation/Wasatch Division. The vector requirements of the system, the impact of multiple reuse on the components, and the unique problems associated with a large flexible bearing are discussed. The design details of each of the major TVC subcomponents are delineated. The subscale bearing development program and the overall development schedule also are presented.

  20. Robust nonlinear control of vectored thrust aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, John C.; Murray, Richard; Morris, John

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary program in robust control for nonlinear systems with applications to a variety of engineering problems is outlined. Major emphasis will be placed on flight control, with both experimental and analytical studies. This program builds on recent new results in control theory for stability, stabilization, robust stability, robust performance, synthesis, and model reduction in a unified framework using Linear Fractional Transformations (LFT's), Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMI's), and the structured singular value micron. Most of these new advances have been accomplished by the Caltech controls group independently or in collaboration with researchers in other institutions. These recent results offer a new and remarkably unified framework for all aspects of robust control, but what is particularly important for this program is that they also have important implications for system identification and control of nonlinear systems. This combines well with Caltech's expertise in nonlinear control theory, both in geometric methods and methods for systems with constraints and saturations.

  1. What role for insecticides in vector control programs?

    PubMed

    Gratz, N G; Jany, W C

    1994-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases including dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, malaria, leishmaniasis, and filariasis remain severe public health problems in most of the countries in which they are endemic. In some cases, their incidence is increasing and they are spreading to new geographic areas. For a number of the infections, the most effective manner of controlling their transmission is through control of their vectors. However, in some instances, such as dengue and Chagas' disease, there is no alternative. Most countries that are endemic for vector-borne diseases maintain vector control services, and most large tropical and semitropical cities also have pest control programs, mainly against pest mosquitoes. Virtually all of the vector and pest control programs depend on the use of insecticides formulated as larvicides, adulticides, baits, or insecticide impregnated bed nets. For many years, the development of new insecticides for use in public health programs was encouraged and supported by multilateral and bilateral health agencies, including the implementation of field trials in endemic areas. Due to the development of insecticide resistance, toxicologic and environmental considerations, and the cost of development and of registration, the number of compounds available for use has declined while the number of new insecticides submitted for laboratory and field trials to the World Health Organization has dwindled even more. The recrudescence of vector-borne diseases, the rapid pace of urbanization, lagging development of environmental services in many tropical cities, and difficulties encountered in ensuring the community's cooperation in its own protection through environmental measures make imperative the continued availability of pesticides for public health use. Since only the pesticide manufacturing industry has the combination of technical and financial resources to promulgate the research and development of new pesticides and pesticide groups, it is

  2. Identifying Transmission Cycles at the Human-Animal Interface: The Role of Animal Reservoirs in Maintaining Gambiense Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Sebastian; Nishiura, Hiroshi; Heesterbeek, Hans; Edmunds, W. John; Checchi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Many infections can be transmitted between animals and humans. The epidemiological roles of different species can vary from important reservoirs to dead-end hosts. Here, we present a method to identify transmission cycles in different combinations of species from field data. We used this method to synthesise epidemiological and ecological data from Bipindi, Cameroon, a historical focus of gambiense Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness), a disease that has often been considered to be maintained mainly by humans. We estimated the basic reproduction number of gambiense HAT in Bipindi and evaluated the potential for transmission in the absence of human cases. We found that under the assumption of random mixing between vectors and hosts, gambiense HAT could not be maintained in this focus without the contribution of animals. This result remains robust under extensive sensitivity analysis. When using the distributions of species among habitats to estimate the amount of mixing between those species, we found indications for an independent transmission cycle in wild animals. Stochastic simulation of the system confirmed that unless vectors moved between species very rarely, reintroduction would usually occur shortly after elimination of the infection from human populations. This suggests that elimination strategies may have to be reconsidered as targeting human cases alone would be insufficient for control, and reintroduction from animal reservoirs would remain a threat. Our approach is broadly applicable and could reveal animal reservoirs critical to the control of other infectious diseases. PMID:23341760

  3. A Quasioptical Vector Interferometer for Polarization Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Moseley, Harvey S.; Novak, Giles

    2005-01-01

    We present a mathematical description of a Quasioptical Vector Interferometer (QVI), a device that maps an input polarization state to an output polarization state by introducing a phase delay between two linear orthogonal components of the input polarization. The advantages of such a device over a spinning wave-plate modulator for measuring astronomical polarization in the far-infrared through millimeter are: 1. The use of small, linear motions eliminates the need for cryogenic rotational bearings, 2. The phase flexibility allows measurement of Stokes V as well as Q and U, and 3. The QVI allows for both multi-wavelength and broadband modulation. We suggest two implementations of this device as an astronomical polarization modulator. The first involves two such modulators placed in series. By adjusting the two phase delays, it is possible to use such a modulator to measure Stokes Q, U, and V for passbands that are not too large. Conversely, a single QVI may be used to measure Q and V independent of frequency. In this implementation, Stokes U must be measured by rotating the instrument. We conclude this paper by presenting initial laboratory results.

  4. Vector control and surveillance operations in the republic of singapore.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Minako Jen

    2013-06-01

    Singapore is known for its comprehensive vector control methods that keep mosquito populations at low levels in the urban, tropical, and green city-state. This report describes the measures taken by the National Environment Agency on the basis of observations of vector control and surveillance activities in residential areas, construction sites, and foreign worker quarters. The government-led active operations dealt not only with mosquito control but also social issues in urban residential buildings where people with varying preferences live, the responsibilities of the business sector, and the education of multi-cultural/lingual residents and foreign workers. The public health measures implemented in Singapore offer useful ideas to countries/cities that have not yet established vector control programs against mosquito-borne infectious diseases. PMID:23874140

  5. Vector Control and Surveillance Operations in the Republic of Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Minako Jen

    2013-01-01

    Singapore is known for its comprehensive vector control methods that keep mosquito populations at low levels in the urban, tropical, and green city-state. This report describes the measures taken by the National Environment Agency on the basis of observations of vector control and surveillance activities in residential areas, construction sites, and foreign worker quarters. The government-led active operations dealt not only with mosquito control but also social issues in urban residential buildings where people with varying preferences live, the responsibilities of the business sector, and the education of multi-cultural/lingual residents and foreign workers. The public health measures implemented in Singapore offer useful ideas to countries/cities that have not yet established vector control programs against mosquito-borne infectious diseases. PMID:23874140

  6. Trypanosomiasis re-emerges under cover of war.

    PubMed

    1997-09-01

    The incidence of trypanosomiasis has increased in southern Sudan along the border of the Central African Republic; up to 30% of the population is infected in some areas. A study conducted by CARE and the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has shown that the disease has spread to over 30,000 people in Tambura county alone; up to 4% of the local population is expected to die this year. According to the local coordinator for CARE, the pyramidal effect is great; when a tsetse fly bites a human, he or she becomes a host who is bitten by uninfected flies that then become carriers to other humans. The disease spreads exponentially. A tsetse fly can bite 3-4 humans/day, and there are thousands of flies in the area. A member of the CDC research team warns that the problem is regional; the annual incidence of the disease in the former Zaire is higher than at any time in the last 60 years, and the mortality associated with the disease is approaching that of AIDS. In a Ugandan outbreak in 1906, 4 million people died; at the turn of the century, trypanosomiasis was the greatest health threat in the tropics, greater even than malaria. Although tsetse fly control gradually reduced the incidence of the disease to less than 1% in the early 1980s, war and population displacement overturned these gains. CARE's director in southern Sudan warns that war and civil conflict are contributing to the reemergence of "super" diseases like sleeping sickness. The assessment team had to cease activities halfway through July 1997, when rebel soldiers commandeered the team's vehicles. PMID:12321240

  7. Spray characterization of ULV sprayers typically used in vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous spray machines are used to apply products for the control of human disease vectors, such as mosquitoes and flies. However, the selection and setup of these machines significantly affect the level of control achieved during an application. The droplet spectra produced by nine different ULV...

  8. Dengue and Chikungunya Vector Control Pocket Guide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This technical guide consolidates information and procedures for surveillance and control of mosquitoes that transmit dengue and chikungunya viruses. The guide focuses on mosquitoes that transmit dengue but also makes reference to chikungunya and yellow fever because the pathogens that cause these ...

  9. A literature review of economic evaluations for a neglected tropical disease: human African trypanosomiasis ("sleeping sickness").

    PubMed

    Sutherland, C Simone; Yukich, Joshua; Goeree, Ron; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a disease caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense. It is transmitted to humans via the tsetse fly. Approximately 70 million people worldwide were at risk of infection in 1995, and approximately 20,000 people across Africa are infected with HAT. The objective of this review was to identify existing economic evaluations in order to summarise cost-effective interventions to reduce, control, or eliminate the burden of HAT. The studies included in the review were compared and critically appraised in order to determine if there were existing standardised methods that could be used for economic evaluation of HAT interventions or if innovative methodological approaches are warranted. A search strategy was developed using keywords and was implemented in January 2014 in several databases. The search returned a total of 2,283 articles. After two levels of screening, a total of seven economic evaluations were included and underwent critical appraisal using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Methodology Checklist 6: Economic Evaluations. Results from the existing studies focused on the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the control and reduction of disease transmission. Modelling was a common method to forecast long-term results, and publications focused on interventions by category, such as case detection, diagnostics, drug treatments, and vector control. Most interventions were considered cost-effective based on the thresholds described; however, the current treatment, nifurtomix-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT), has not been evaluated for cost-effectiveness, and considerations for cost-effective strategies for elimination have yet to be completed. Overall, the current evidence highlights the main components that play a role in control; however, economic evaluations of HAT elimination strategies are needed to assist national decision makers, stakeholders, and

  10. A critical assessment of vector control for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Achee, Nicole L; Gould, Fred; Perkins, T Alex; Reiner, Robert C; Morrison, Amy C; Ritchie, Scott A; Gubler, Duane J; Teyssou, Remy; Scott, Thomas W

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the Vaccines to Vaccinate (v2V) initiative was reconfigured into the Partnership for Dengue Control (PDC), a multi-sponsored and independent initiative. This redirection is consistent with the growing consensus among the dengue-prevention community that no single intervention will be sufficient to control dengue disease. The PDC's expectation is that when an effective dengue virus (DENV) vaccine is commercially available, the public health community will continue to rely on vector control because the two strategies complement and enhance one another. Although the concept of integrated intervention for dengue prevention is gaining increasingly broader acceptance, to date, no consensus has been reached regarding the details of how and what combination of approaches can be most effectively implemented to manage disease. To fill that gap, the PDC proposed a three step process: (1) a critical assessment of current vector control tools and those under development, (2) outlining a research agenda for determining, in a definitive way, what existing tools work best, and (3) determining how to combine the best vector control options, which have systematically been defined in this process, with DENV vaccines. To address the first step, the PDC convened a meeting of international experts during November 2013 in Washington, DC, to critically assess existing vector control interventions and tools under development. This report summarizes those deliberations. PMID:25951103

  11. A Critical Assessment of Vector Control for Dengue Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Achee, Nicole L.; Gould, Fred; Perkins, T. Alex; Reiner, Robert C.; Morrison, Amy C.; Ritchie, Scott A.; Gubler, Duane J.; Teyssou, Remy; Scott, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the Vaccines to Vaccinate (v2V) initiative was reconfigured into the Partnership for Dengue Control (PDC), a multi-sponsored and independent initiative. This redirection is consistent with the growing consensus among the dengue-prevention community that no single intervention will be sufficient to control dengue disease. The PDC's expectation is that when an effective dengue virus (DENV) vaccine is commercially available, the public health community will continue to rely on vector control because the two strategies complement and enhance one another. Although the concept of integrated intervention for dengue prevention is gaining increasingly broader acceptance, to date, no consensus has been reached regarding the details of how and what combination of approaches can be most effectively implemented to manage disease. To fill that gap, the PDC proposed a three step process: (1) a critical assessment of current vector control tools and those under development, (2) outlining a research agenda for determining, in a definitive way, what existing tools work best, and (3) determining how to combine the best vector control options, which have systematically been defined in this process, with DENV vaccines. To address the first step, the PDC convened a meeting of international experts during November 2013 in Washington, DC, to critically assess existing vector control interventions and tools under development. This report summarizes those deliberations. PMID:25951103

  12. Genetics and evolution of triatomines: from phylogeny to vector control

    PubMed Central

    Gourbière, S; Dorn, P; Tripet, F; Dumonteil, E

    2012-01-01

    Triatomines are hemipteran bugs acting as vectors of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This parasite causes Chagas disease, one of the major parasitic diseases in the Americas. Studies of triatomine genetics and evolution have been particularly useful in the design of rational vector control strategies, and are reviewed here. The phylogeography of several triatomine species is now slowly emerging, and the struggle to reconcile the phenotypic, phylogenetic, ecological and epidemiological species concepts makes for a very dynamic field. Population genetic studies using different markers indicate a wide range of population structures, depending on the triatomine species, ranging from highly fragmented to mobile, interbreeding populations. Triatomines transmit T. cruzi in the context of complex interactions between the insect vectors, their bacterial symbionts and the parasites; however, an integrated view of the significance of these interactions in triatomine biology, evolution and in disease transmission is still lacking. The development of novel genetic markers, together with the ongoing sequencing of the Rhodnius prolixus genome and more integrative studies, will provide key tools to expanding our understanding of these important insect vectors and allow the design of improved vector control strategies. PMID:21897436

  13. Methods for control of tick vectors of Lyme Borreliosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaenson, T.G.T.; Fish, D.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Gray, J.S.; Mather, T.N.; Piesman, J.

    1991-01-01

    During the IVth International Conference on Lyme Borreliosis in Stockholm, 1990, a workshop on control of Lyme disease vectors briefly reviewed: basic ecological principles for tick control; biocontrol of ticks; chemical control, including the use of repellents and use of permethrin-treated rodent nest material; tick control by habitat modification; and reduction of tick host availability. It was concluded that, although much research work remains, Lyme borreliosis is to a large extent a preventable infection. Avoidance of heavily tick-infested areas, personal protection using proper clothing, and prompt removal of attached ticks remain the most effective protective measures. Many other prophylactic measures are available and could be efficiently integrated into schemes to reduce the abundance of vectors. However, since the ecology of the infection varies greatly between different localities it may be necessary to apply different combinations of control methods in different endemic regions.

  14. Vector Disparity Sensor with Vergence Control for Active Vision Systems

    PubMed Central

    Barranco, Francisco; Diaz, Javier; Gibaldi, Agostino; Sabatini, Silvio P.; Ros, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for computing vector disparity for active vision systems as used on robotics applications. The control of the vergence angle of a binocular system allows us to efficiently explore dynamic environments, but requires a generalization of the disparity computation with respect to a static camera setup, where the disparity is strictly 1-D after the image rectification. The interaction between vision and motor control allows us to develop an active sensor that achieves high accuracy of the disparity computation around the fixation point, and fast reaction time for the vergence control. In this contribution, we address the development of a real-time architecture for vector disparity computation using an FPGA device. We implement the disparity unit and the control module for vergence, version, and tilt to determine the fixation point. In addition, two on-chip different alternatives for the vector disparity engines are discussed based on the luminance (gradient-based) and phase information of the binocular images. The multiscale versions of these engines are able to estimate the vector disparity up to 32 fps on VGA resolution images with very good accuracy as shown using benchmark sequences with known ground-truth. The performances in terms of frame-rate, resource utilization, and accuracy of the presented approaches are discussed. On the basis of these results, our study indicates that the gradient-based approach leads to the best trade-off choice for the integration with the active vision system. PMID:22438737

  15. Discovering and Designing New Insecticides and their Development Vector Control.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The discovery and development of novel insecticides for vector control is a primary focus of toxicology research conducted at the Mosquito and Fly Research Unit, Gainesville, FL. To identify new active ingredients, the screening of large numbers of experimental compounds is conducted using a primary...

  16. Direct numerical simulation of vector-controlled free jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Ao, K.; Shakouchi, T.; Ando, T.

    2011-12-01

    We conduct DNS (direct numerical simulation) of vector controlled free jets. The inflow velocity of jet is periodically oscillated perpendicular to the jet axis. In order to realize the high accurate computation, a discretization in space is performed with hybrid scheme in which Fourier spectral and 6th order compact scheme are adopted. From visualized instantaneous vortex structures, it is found that the flow pattern considerably changes according to the oscillating frequency, i.e., according to the increasing the frequency, wave, bifurcating and flapping modes appear in turn. In order to quantify mixing efficiency under the vector control, as the mixing measure, statistical entropy is investigated. Compared to the uncontrolled jet, the mixing efficiency is improved in order of wavy, flapping and bifurcating modes. Thus the vector control can be expected for the improvement of mixing efficiency. Further to make clear the reason for the mixing enhancement, Snapshot POD and DMD method are applied. The primary flow structures under the vector control are demonstrated.

  17. Application of Lanczos vectors to control design of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Su, Tzu-Jeng

    1990-01-01

    This report covers research conducted during the first year of the two-year grant. The research, entitled 'Application of Lanczos Vectors to Control Design of Flexible Structures' concerns various ways to obtain reduced-order mathematical models for use in dynamic response analyses and in control design studies. This report summarizes research described in several reports and papers that were written under this contract. Extended abstracts are presented for technical papers covering the following topics: controller reduction by preserving impulse response energy; substructuring decomposition and controller synthesis; model reduction methods for structural control design; and recent literature on structural modeling, identification, and analysis.

  18. [Monitoring human African trypanosomiasis in Central Africa in 2001 and cartography: results and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Lucas, P; Fanchey, G; Mouton, C; Jannin, J

    2001-01-01

    Cases of human African trypanosomiasis are distributed in changing geographical "outbreak areas" that can be visualized over time and space. Because of these variations in distribution, cartography and spatial analysis provide powerful tools for planning surveillance and control strategies. In 1996, the WHO in collaboration with the 15 most endemic countries in Central Africa undertook a program to develop a standardized inter-regional map of trypanosomiasis. This article provides a brief overview of the value of geomatic tools in public health followed by a description of the WHO program and its preliminary results. Also presented in this article is the Trypinfo site being development on the internet to increase the surveillance response-time and improve the feedback system. PMID:11803827

  19. Attitude control of a spinning rocket via thrust vectoring

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.

    1990-12-19

    Two controllers are developed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that has a thrust vectoring capability. The first controller has a single-input/single-output design that ignores the gyroscopic coupling between the control channels. The second controller has a multi-input/multi-output structure that is specifically intended to account for the gyroscopic coupling effects. A performance comparison between the two approached is conducted for a range of roll rates. Each controller is tested for the ability to track step commands, and for the amount of coupling impurity. Both controllers are developed via a linear-quadratic-regulator synthesis procedure, which is motivated by the multi-input/multi-output nature of second controller. Time responses and a singular value analysis are used to evaluate controller performance. This paper describes the development and comparison of two controllers that are designed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that is equipped with thrust vector control. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Design of high power electromechanical actuator for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J. R.; Myers, W. N.

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Marshall has undertaken the development of electromechanical actuators (EMAs) for thrust vector control (TVC) augmentation system implementation. The TVC EMA presented has as its major components two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two-pass gear-reduction system, and a roller screw for rotary-to-linear motion conversion. System control is furnished by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply; a pair of resolvers deliver position feedback to the controller, such that precise positioning is achieved. Peformance comparisons have been conducted between the EMA and comparable-performance hydraulic systems applicable to TVCs.

  1. Thrust vector control algorithm design for the Cassini spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enright, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary design of the thrust vector control algorithm for the interplanetary spacecraft, Cassini. Topics of discussion include flight software architecture, modeling of sensors, actuators, and vehicle dynamics, and controller design and analysis via classical methods. Special attention is paid to potential interactions with structural flexibilities and propellant dynamics. Controller performance is evaluated in a simulation environment built around a multi-body dynamics model, which contains nonlinear models of the relevant hardware and preliminary versions of supporting attitude determination and control functions.

  2. Controlling Compressor Vane Flow Vectoring Angles at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, Matthew; Rempfer, Dietmar; Williams, David; Acharya, Mukund

    2003-11-01

    The ability to control flow separation angles from compressor inlet guide vanes with a Coanda-type actuator is demonstrated using both wind tunnel experiments and finite element simulations. Vectoring angles up to 40 degrees from the uncontrolled baseline state were measured with helium schlieren visualization at transonic Mach numbers ranging from 0.1 to 0.6, and with airfoil chord Reynolds numbers ranging from 89,000 to 710,000. The magnitude of the vectoring angle is shown to depend upon the geometry of the trailing edge, and actuator slot size, and the momentum flux coefficient. Under certain conditions the blowing has no effect on the vectoring angle indicating that the Coanda effect is not present. DNS simulations with the finite element method investigated the effects of geometry changes and external flow. Continuous control of the vectoring angle is demonstrated, which has important implications for application to rotating machinery. The technique is shown to reduce the stall flow coefficient by 15 percent in an axial flow compressor.

  3. Attitude Control for an Aero-Vehicle Using Vector Thrusting and Variable Speed Control Moment Gyros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Lim, K. B.; Moerder, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    Stabilization of passively unstable thrust-levitated vehicles can require significant control inputs. Although thrust vectoring is a straightforward choice for realizing these inputs, this may lead to difficulties discussed in the paper. This paper examines supplementing thrust vectoring with Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscopes (VSCMGs). The paper describes how to allocate VSCMGs and the vectored thrust mechanism for attitude stabilization in frequency domain and also shows trade-off between vectored thrust and VSCMGs. Using an H2 control synthesis methodology in LMI optimization, a feedback control law is designed for a thrust-levitated research vehicle and is simulated with the full nonlinear model. It is demonstrated that VSCMGs can reduce the use of vectored thrust variation for stabilizing the hovering platform in the presence of strong wind gusts.

  4. Adaptive support vector regression for UAV flight control.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jongho; Jin Kim, H; Kim, Youdan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores an application of support vector regression for adaptive control of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Unlike neural networks, support vector regression (SVR) generates global solutions, because SVR basically solves quadratic programming (QP) problems. With this advantage, the input-output feedback-linearized inverse dynamic model and the compensation term for the inversion error are identified off-line, which we call I-SVR (inversion SVR) and C-SVR (compensation SVR), respectively. In order to compensate for the inversion error and the unexpected uncertainty, an online adaptation algorithm for the C-SVR is proposed. Then, the stability of the overall error dynamics is analyzed by the uniformly ultimately bounded property in the nonlinear system theory. In order to validate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive controller, numerical simulations are performed on the UAV model. PMID:20970303

  5. Fault tolerant vector control of induction motor drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odnokopylov, G.; Bragin, A.

    2014-10-01

    For electric composed of technical objects hazardous industries, such as nuclear, military, chemical, etc. an urgent task is to increase their resiliency and survivability. The construction principle of vector control system fault-tolerant asynchronous electric. Displaying recovery efficiency three-phase induction motor drive in emergency mode using two-phase vector control system. The process of formation of a simulation model of the asynchronous electric unbalance in emergency mode. When modeling used coordinate transformation, providing emergency operation electric unbalance work. The results of modeling transient phase loss motor stator. During a power failure phase induction motor cannot save circular rotating field in the air gap of the motor and ensure the restoration of its efficiency at rated torque and speed.

  6. A Research Agenda for Malaria Eradication: Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Different challenges are presented by the variety of malaria transmission environments present in the world today. In each setting, improved control for reduction of morbidity is a necessary first step towards the long-range goal of malaria eradication and a priority for regions where the disease burden is high. For many geographic areas where transmission rates are low to moderate, sustained and well-managed application of currently available tools may be sufficient to achieve local elimination. The research needs for these areas will be to sustain and perhaps improve the effectiveness of currently available tools. For other low-to-moderate transmission regions, notably areas where the vectors exhibit behaviours such as outdoor feeding and resting that are not well targeted by current strategies, new interventions that target predictable features of the biology/ecologies of the local vectors will be required. To achieve elimination in areas where high levels of transmission are sustained by very efficient vector species, radically new interventions that significantly reduce the vectorial capacity of wild populations will be needed. Ideally, such interventions should be implemented with a one-time application with a long-lasting impact, such as genetic modification of the vectorial capacity of the wild vector population. PMID:21311587

  7. Design and test of electromechanical actuators for thrust vector control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, J. R.; Weir, Rae Ann

    1993-05-01

    New control mechanisms technologies are currently being explored to provide alternatives to hydraulic thrust vector control (TVC) actuation systems. For many years engineers have been encouraging the investigation of electromechanical actuators (EMA) to take the place of hydraulics for spacecraft control/gimballing systems. The rationale is to deliver a lighter, cleaner, safer, more easily maintained, as well as energy efficient space vehicle. In light of this continued concern to improve the TVC system, the Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in a program to develop electromechanical actuators for the purpose of testing and TVC system implementation. Through this effort, an electromechanical thrust vector control actuator has been designed and assembled. The design consists of the following major components: Two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two pass gear reduction system, and a roller screw, which converts rotational input into linear output. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. A pair of resolvers and associated electronics deliver position feedback to the controller such that precise positioning is achieved. Testing and evaluation is currently in progress. Goals focus on performance comparisons between EMA's and similar hydraulic systems.

  8. Design and test of electromechanical actuators for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J. R.; Weir, Rae Ann

    1993-01-01

    New control mechanisms technologies are currently being explored to provide alternatives to hydraulic thrust vector control (TVC) actuation systems. For many years engineers have been encouraging the investigation of electromechanical actuators (EMA) to take the place of hydraulics for spacecraft control/gimballing systems. The rationale is to deliver a lighter, cleaner, safer, more easily maintained, as well as energy efficient space vehicle. In light of this continued concern to improve the TVC system, the Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in a program to develop electromechanical actuators for the purpose of testing and TVC system implementation. Through this effort, an electromechanical thrust vector control actuator has been designed and assembled. The design consists of the following major components: Two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two pass gear reduction system, and a roller screw, which converts rotational input into linear output. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. A pair of resolvers and associated electronics deliver position feedback to the controller such that precise positioning is achieved. Testing and evaluation is currently in progress. Goals focus on performance comparisons between EMA's and similar hydraulic systems.

  9. Interruption of vector transmission by native vectors and “the art of the possible”

    PubMed Central

    Salvatella, Roberto; Irabedra, Pilar; Castellanos, Luis G

    2013-01-01

    In a recent article in the Reader’s Opinion, advantages and disadvantages of the certification processes of interrupted Chagas disease transmission (American trypanosomiasis) by native vector were discussed. Such concept, accepted by those authors for the case of endemic situations with introduced vectors, has been built on a long and laborious process by endemic countries and Subregional Initiatives for Prevention, Control and Treatment of Chagas, with Technical Secretariat of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, to create a horizon target and goal to concentrate priorities and resource allocation and actions. With varying degrees of sucess, which are not replaceable for a certificate of good practice, has allowed during 23 years to safeguard the effective control of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi not to hundreds of thousands, but millions of people at risk conditions, truly “the art of the possible.” PMID:24626310

  10. Errors in paleomagnetism: Structural control on overlapped vectors - mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pintó, A.; Ramón, M. J.; Oliva-Urcia, B.; Pueyo, E. L.; Pocoví, A.

    2011-05-01

    The reliability of paleomagnetic data is a keystone to obtain trustable kinematics interpretations. The determination of the real paleomagnetic component recorded at certain time in the geological evolution of a rock can be affected by several sources of errors: inclination shallowing, declination biases caused by incorrect restoration to the ancient field, internal deformation of rock volumes and lack of isolation of the paleomagnetic primary vector during the laboratory procedures (overlapping of components). These errors will limit or impede the validity of paleomagnetism as the only three-dimension reference. This paper presents the first systematic modeling of the effect of overlapped vectors referred to declination, inclination and stability tests taking into account the key variables: orientation of a primary and secondary (overlapped to the primary) vectors, degree of overlapping (intensity ratio of primary and secondary paleomagnetic vectors) and the fold axis orientation and dip of bedding plane. In this way, several scenarios of overlapping have been modeled in different fold geometries considering both polarities and all the variables aforementioned, allowing to calculate the deviations of the vector obtained in the laboratory (overlapped) with respect to the paleomagnetic reference (not overlapped). Observations from the models confirm that declination errors are larger than the inclination ones. In addition to the geometry factor, errors are mainly controlled by the relative magnitude of the primary respect to the secondary component (P/S ratio). We observe larger asymmetries and bigger magnitudes of errors along the fold location if the primary and secondary records have different polarities. If the primary record (declination) and the fold axis orientation are perpendicular ( Ω = 90°), errors reach maximum magnitudes and larger asymmetries along the fold surface (different dips). The effect of overlapping in the fold and reversal tests is also

  11. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Lamour, Sabrina D; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Alibu, Vincent P; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease. PMID:26505639

  12. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, Sabrina D.; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A.; Alibu, Vincent P.; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease. PMID:26505639

  13. Man-fly contact in the Gambian trypanosomiasis focus of Nola-Bilolo (Central African Republic).

    PubMed

    Gouteux, J P; Kounda Gboumbi, J C; Noutoua, L; D'Amico, F; Bailly, C; Roungou, J B

    1993-09-01

    A study using bipyramid tetse fly traps in the Nola-Bilolo sleeping sickness focus (Central African Republic) reveals ecological and behavioural differences between two vectors, Glossina palpalis palpalis and G. fuscipes fuscipes. The latter species inhabits mainly open water sites and surrounding forest, whereas G. p. palpalis occurs mainly in coffe plantations near villages. Consequently, the man-fly contact differs considerably according to the species. The intensity of trypanosomiasis transmission, estimated by the probable distribution of cases, showed significant positive correlation with the density of the flies. Analysis of the fly blood meals in two villages show that, unlike G. g. palpalis, G. f. fuscipes feeds on men more than on pigs. Trypanosoma vivax infection was observed only in G. fuscipes fuscipes. The differences in occupation of the environment between the two vectors must be taken in account in trapping programmes which may modify this distribution. PMID:8256100

  14. Costs Of Using “Tiny Targets” to Control Glossina fuscipes fuscipes, a Vector of Gambiense Sleeping Sickness in Arua District of Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alexandra P. M.; Tirados, Inaki; Mangwiro, Clement T. N.; Esterhuizen, Johan; Lehane, Michael J.; Torr, Stephen J.; Kovacic, Vanja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the relative effectiveness of tsetse control methods, their costs need to be analysed alongside their impact on tsetse populations. Very little has been published on the costs of methods specifically targeting human African trypanosomiasis Methodology/Principal Findings In northern Uganda, a 250 km2 field trial was undertaken using small (0.5 X 0.25 m) insecticide-treated targets (“tiny targets”). Detailed cost recording accompanied every phase of the work. Costs were calculated for this operation as if managed by the Ugandan vector control services: removing purely research components of the work and applying local salaries. This calculation assumed that all resources are fully used, with no spare capacity. The full cost of the operation was assessed at USD 85.4 per km2, of which USD 55.7 or 65.2% were field costs, made up of three component activities (target deployment: 34.5%, trap monitoring: 10.6% and target maintenance: 20.1%). The remaining USD 29.7 or 34.8% of the costs were for preliminary studies and administration (tsetse surveys: 6.0%, sensitisation of local populations: 18.6% and office support: 10.2%). Targets accounted for only 12.9% of the total cost, other important cost components were labour (24.1%) and transport (34.6%). Discussion Comparison with the updated cost of historical HAT vector control projects and recent estimates indicates that this work represents a major reduction in cost levels. This is attributed not just to the low unit cost of tiny targets but also to the organisation of delivery, using local labour with bicycles or motorcycles. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken, investigating key prices and assumptions. It is believed that these costs are generalizable to other HAT foci, although in more remote areas, with denser vegetation and fewer people, costs would increase, as would be the case for other tsetse control techniques. PMID:25811956

  15. Vector control structure of an asynchronous motor at maximum torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chioncel, C. P.; Tirian, G. O.; Gillich, N.; Raduca, E.

    2016-02-01

    Vector control methods offer the possibility to gain high performance, being widely used. Certain applications require an optimum control in limit operating conditions, as, at maximum torque, that is not always satisfied. The paper presents how the voltage and the frequency for an asynchronous machine (ASM) operating at variable speed are determinate, with an accent on the method that keeps the rotor flux constant. The simulation analyses consider three load types: variable torque and speed, variable torque and constant speed, constant torque and variable speed. The final values of frequency and voltage are obtained through the proposed control schemes with one controller using the simulation language based on the Maple module. The dynamic analysis of the system is done for the case with P and PI controller and allows conclusions on the proposed method, which can have different applications, as the ASM in wind turbines.

  16. Energy-saving technology of vector controlled induction motor based on the adaptive neuro-controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E.; Kovalev, I. V.; Karandeev, D.

    2015-10-01

    The ongoing evolution of the power system towards a Smart Grid implies an important role of intelligent technologies, but poses strict requirements on their control schemes to preserve stability and controllability. This paper presents the adaptive neuro-controller for the vector control of induction motor within Smart Gird. The validity and effectiveness of the proposed energy-saving technology of vector controlled induction motor based on adaptive neuro-controller are verified by simulation results at different operating conditions over a wide speed range of induction motor.

  17. Paratransgenesis: a promising new strategy for mosquito vector control.

    PubMed

    Wilke, André Barretto Bruno; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2015-01-01

    The three main mosquito genera, Anopheles, Aedes and Culex, transmit respectively malaria, dengue and lymphatic filariasis. Current mosquito control strategies have proved unsuccessful, and there still is a substantial number of morbidity and mortality from these diseases. Genetic control methods have now arisen as promising alternative strategies, based on two approaches: the replacement of a vector population by disease-refractory mosquitoes and the release of mosquitoes carrying a lethal gene to suppress target populations. However, substantial hurdles and limitations need to be overcome if these methods are to be used successfully, the most significant being that a transgenic mosquito strain is required for every target species, making genetically modified mosquito strategies inviable when there are multiple vector mosquitoes in the same area. Genetically modified bacteria capable of colonizing a wide range of mosquito species may be a solution to this problem and another option for the control of these diseases. In the paratransgenic approach, symbiotic bacteria are genetically modified and reintroduced in mosquitoes, where they express effector molecules. For this approach to be used in practice, however, requires a better understanding of mosquito microbiota and that symbiotic bacteria and effector molecules be identified. Paratransgenesis could prove very useful in mosquito species that are inherently difficult to transform or in sibling species complexes. In this approach, a genetic modified bacteria can act by: (a) causing pathogenic effects in the host; (b) interfering with the host's reproduction; (c) reducing the vector's competence; and (d) interfering with oogenesis and embryogenesis. It is a much more flexible and adaptable approach than the use of genetically modified mosquitoes because effector molecules and symbiotic bacteria can be replaced if they do not achieve the desired result. Paratransgenesis may therefore become an important integrated

  18. Dengue vector control: present status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Yap, H H; Chong, N L; Foo, A E; Lee, C Y

    1994-12-01

    Dengue Fever (DF) and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) have been the most common urban diseases in Southeast Asia since the 1950s. More recently, the diseases have spread to Central and South America and are now considered as worldwide diseases. Both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are involved in the transmission of DF/DHF in Southeast Asian region. The paper discusses the present status and future prospects of Aedes control with reference to the Malaysian experience. Vector control approaches which include source reduction and environmental management, larviciding with the use of chemicals (synthetic insecticides and insect growth regulators and microbial insecticide), and adulticiding which include personal protection measures (household insecticide products and repellents) for long-term control and space spray (both thermal fogging and ultra low volume sprays) as short-term epidemic measures are discussed. The potential incorporation of IGRs and Bacillus thuringiensis-14 (Bti) as larvicides in addition to insecticides (temephos) is discussed. The advantages of using water-based spray over the oil-based (diesel) spray and the use of spray formulation which provide both larvicidal and adulticidal effects that would consequently have greater impact on the overall vector and disease control in DF/DHF are highlighted. PMID:7844836

  19. Microstructures fabricated by dynamically controlled femtosecond patterned vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Ping-Ping; Feng, Dan; Pan, Yue; Qian, Sheng-Xia; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-04-01

    We have presented and demonstrated a method for the fabrication of various complicated microstructures based on dynamically controlled patterned vector optical fields (PVOFs). We design and generate dynamic PVOFs by loading patterned holograms displayed on the spatial light modulator and moving traces of focuses with different patterns. We experimentally fabricate the various microstructures in z-cut lithium niobate plates. The method we present has some benefits such as no motion of the fabricated samples and high efficiency due to its parallel feature. Moreover, our approach is able to fabricate three-dimensional microstructures. PMID:27192265

  20. Modelling the risk of being bitten by malaria vectors in a vector control area in southern Benin, west Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The diversity of malaria vector populations, expressing various resistance and/or behavioural patterns could explain the reduced effectiveness of vector control interventions reported in some African countries. A better understanding of the ecology and distribution of malaria vectors is essential to design more effective and sustainable strategies for malaria control and elimination. Here, we analyzed the spatio-temporal risk of the contact between humans and the sympatric An. funestus and both M and S molecular forms of An. gambiae s.s. in an area of Benin with high coverage of vector control measures with an unprecedented level of resolution. Methods Presence-absence data for the three vectors from 1-year human-landing collections in 19 villages were assessed using binomial mixed-effects models according to vector control measures and environmental covariates derived from field and remote sensing data. After 8-fold cross-validations of the models, predictive maps of the risk of the contact between humans and the sympatric An. funestus and both molecular M and S forms of An. gambiae s.s. were computed. Results Model validations showed that the An. funestus, An. gambiae M form, and S form models provided an excellent (Area Under Curve>0.9), a good (AUC>0.8), and an acceptable (AUC>0.7) level of prediction, respectively. The distribution area of the probability of contact between human and An. funestus largely overlaps that of An. gambiae M form but this latter showed important seasonal variation. An. gambiae S form also showed seasonal variation but with different ecological preferences. Landscape data were useful to discriminate between the species’ distributions. Conclusions These results showed that available remote sensing data could help in predicting the human-vector contact for several species of malaria vectors at a village level scale. The predictive maps showed seasonal and spatial variations in the risk of human-vector contact for all three

  1. Silica nanoparticle: a potential new insecticide for mosquito vector control.

    PubMed

    Barik, Tapan K; Kamaraju, Raghavendra; Gowswami, Arunava

    2012-09-01

    Presently, there is a need for increased efforts to develop newer and effective methods to control mosquito vectors as the existing chemical and biological methods are not as effective as in earlier period owing to different technical and operational reasons. The use of nanomaterial products in various sectors of science including health increased during the last decade. We tested three types of nanosilica, namely lipophilic, hydrophilic and hydrophobic, to assess their larvicidal, pupicidal and growth inhibitor properties and also their influence on oviposition behaviour (attraction/deterrence) of mosquito species that transmit human diseases, namely malaria (Anopheles), yellow fever, chickungunya and dengue (Aedes), lymphatic filariasis and encephalitis (Culex and Aedes). Application of hydrophobic nanosilica at 112.5 ppm was found effective against mosquito species tested. The larvicidal effect of hydrophobic nanosilica on mosquito species tested was in the order of Anopheles stephensi > Aedes aegypti > Culex quinquefasciatus, and the pupicidal effect was in the order of A. stephensi > C. quinquefasciatus > Ae. aegypti. Results of combined treatment of hydrophobic nanosilica with temephos in larvicidal test indicated independent toxic action without any additive effect. This is probably the first report that demonstrated that nanoparticles particularly nanosilica could be used in mosquito vector control. PMID:22565400

  2. Cost of Dengue Vector Control Activities in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Packierisamy, P. Raviwharmman; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Dahlui, Maznah; Inbaraj, Jonathan; Balan, Venugopalan K.; Halasa, Yara A.; Shepard, Donald S.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever, an arbovirus disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, has recently spread rapidly, especially in the tropical countries of the Americas and Asia-Pacific regions. It is endemic in Malaysia, with an annual average of 37,937 reported dengue cases from 2007 to 2012. This study measured the overall economic impact of dengue in Malaysia, and estimated the costs of dengue prevention. In 2010, Malaysia spent US$73.5 million or 0.03% of the country's GDP on its National Dengue Vector Control Program. This spending represented US$1,591 per reported dengue case and US$2.68 per capita population. Most (92.2%) of this spending occurred in districts, primarily for fogging. A previous paper estimated the annual cost of dengue illness in the country at US$102.2 million. Thus, the inclusion of preventive activities increases the substantial estimated cost of dengue to US$175.7 million, or 72% above illness costs alone. If innovative technologies for dengue vector control prove efficacious, and a dengue vaccine was introduced, substantial existing spending could be rechanneled to fund them. PMID:26416116

  3. Cost of Dengue Vector Control Activities in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Packierisamy, P Raviwharmman; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Dahlui, Maznah; Inbaraj, Jonathan; Balan, Venugopalan K; Halasa, Yara A; Shepard, Donald S

    2015-11-01

    Dengue fever, an arbovirus disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, has recently spread rapidly, especially in the tropical countries of the Americas and Asia-Pacific regions. It is endemic in Malaysia, with an annual average of 37,937 reported dengue cases from 2007 to 2012. This study measured the overall economic impact of dengue in Malaysia, and estimated the costs of dengue prevention. In 2010, Malaysia spent US$73.5 million or 0.03% of the country's GDP on its National Dengue Vector Control Program. This spending represented US$1,591 per reported dengue case and US$2.68 per capita population. Most (92.2%) of this spending occurred in districts, primarily for fogging. A previous paper estimated the annual cost of dengue illness in the country at US$102.2 million. Thus, the inclusion of preventive activities increases the substantial estimated cost of dengue to US$175.7 million, or 72% above illness costs alone. If innovative technologies for dengue vector control prove efficacious, and a dengue vaccine was introduced, substantial existing spending could be rechanneled to fund them. PMID:26416116

  4. A Literature Review of Economic Evaluations for a Neglected Tropical Disease: Human African Trypanosomiasis (“Sleeping Sickness”)

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, C. Simone; Yukich, Joshua; Goeree, Ron; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a disease caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense. It is transmitted to humans via the tsetse fly. Approximately 70 million people worldwide were at risk of infection in 1995, and approximately 20,000 people across Africa are infected with HAT. The objective of this review was to identify existing economic evaluations in order to summarise cost-effective interventions to reduce, control, or eliminate the burden of HAT. The studies included in the review were compared and critically appraised in order to determine if there were existing standardised methods that could be used for economic evaluation of HAT interventions or if innovative methodological approaches are warranted. A search strategy was developed using keywords and was implemented in January 2014 in several databases. The search returned a total of 2,283 articles. After two levels of screening, a total of seven economic evaluations were included and underwent critical appraisal using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Methodology Checklist 6: Economic Evaluations. Results from the existing studies focused on the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the control and reduction of disease transmission. Modelling was a common method to forecast long-term results, and publications focused on interventions by category, such as case detection, diagnostics, drug treatments, and vector control. Most interventions were considered cost-effective based on the thresholds described; however, the current treatment, nifurtomix-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT), has not been evaluated for cost-effectiveness, and considerations for cost-effective strategies for elimination have yet to be completed. Overall, the current evidence highlights the main components that play a role in control; however, economic evaluations of HAT elimination strategies are needed to assist national decision makers, stakeholders, and

  5. Challenges and future perspective for dengue vector control in the Western Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Christophel, Eva Maria; Gopinath, Deyer; Abdur, Rashid Md.; Vectorborne, Other; Diseases, Parasitic

    2011-01-01

    Dengue remains a significant public health issue in the Western Pacific Region. In the absence of a vaccine, vector control is the mainstay for dengue prevention and control. In this paper we describe vector surveillance and vector control in the Western Pacific countries and areas. Vector surveillance and control strategies used by countries and areas of the Western Pacific Region vary. Vector control strategies include chemical, biological and environmental management that mainly target larval breeding sites. The use of insecticides targeting larvae and adult mosquitoes remains the mainstay of vector control programmes. Existing vector control tools have several limitations in terms of cost, delivery and long-term sustainability. However, there are several new innovative tools in the pipeline. These include Release of Insects Carrying a Dominant Lethal system and Wolbachia, an endosymbiotic bacterium, to inhibit dengue virus in the vector. In addition, the use of biological control such as larvivorous fish in combination with community participation has potential to be scaled up. Any vector control strategy should be selected based on evidence and appropriateness for the entomological and epidemiological setting and carried out in both inter-epidemic and epidemic periods. Community participation and interagency collaboration are required for effective and sustainable dengue prevention and control. Countries and areas are now moving towards integrated vector management. PMID:23908883

  6. Will integrated surveillance systems for vectors and vector-borne diseases be the future of controlling vector-borne diseases? A practical example from China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Ling, F; Hou, J; Guo, S; Wang, J; Gong, Z

    2016-07-01

    Vector-borne diseases are one of the world's major public health threats and annually responsible for 30-50% of deaths reported to the national notifiable disease system in China. To control vector-borne diseases, a unified, effective and economic surveillance system is urgently needed; all of the current surveillance systems in China waste resources and/or information. Here, we review some current surveillance systems and present a concept for an integrated surveillance system combining existing vector and vector-borne disease monitoring systems. The integrated surveillance system has been tested in pilot programmes in China and led to a 21·6% cost saving in rodent-borne disease surveillance. We share some experiences gained from these programmes. PMID:26899818

  7. Space transportation system solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, fail-safe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system has completed the major portion of qualification and verification tests and is prepared to be cleared for the first Shuttle flight (STS-1). Substantiation data will include analytical and test data.

  8. Space Transportation System solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, failsafe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system completed the required qualification and verification tests and is certified for the intended application. Substantiation data include analytical and test data.

  9. Community involvement in dengue vector control: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, M E; Rodríguez, M; Gomez, D; Baly, A; Benitez, J R; Van der Stuyft, P

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of an integrated community based environmental management strategy to control Aedes aegypti, the vector of dengue, compared with a routine strategy. Design Cluster randomised trial. Setting Guantanamo, Cuba. Participants 32 circumscriptions (around 2000 inhabitants each). Interventions The circumscriptions were randomly allocated to control clusters (n=16) comprising routine Aedes control programme (entomological surveillance, source reduction, selective adulticiding, and health education) and to intervention clusters (n=16) comprising the routine Aedes control programme combined with a community based environmental management approach. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was levels of Aedes infestation: house index (number of houses positive for at least one container with immature stages of Ae aegypti per 100 inspected houses), Breteau index (number of containers positive for immature stages of Ae aegypti per 100 inspected houses), and the pupae per inhabitant statistic (number of Ae aegypti pupae per inhabitant). Results All clusters were subjected to the intended intervention; all completed the study protocol up to February 2006 and all were included in the analysis. At baseline the Aedes infestation levels were comparable between intervention and control clusters: house index 0.25% v 0.20%, pupae per inhabitant 0.44×10−3 v 0.29×10−3. At the end of the intervention these indices were significantly lower in the intervention clusters: rate ratio for house indices 0.49 (95% confidence interval 0.27 to 0.88) and rate ratio for pupae per inhabitant 0.27 (0.09 to 0.76). Conclusion A community based environmental management embedded in a routine control programme was effective at reducing levels of Aedes infestation. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN88405796. PMID:19509031

  10. Determinants of Human African Trypanosomiasis Elimination via Paratransgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jennifer A.; Medlock, Jan; Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Aksoy, Serap

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), transmitted by tsetse flies, has historically infected hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last decade, concerted control efforts have reduced reported cases to below 10,000 annually, bringing complete elimination within reach. A potential technology to eliminate HAT involves rendering the flies resistant to trypanosome infection. This approach can be achieved through the introduction of transgenic Sodalis symbiotic bacteria that have been modified to produce a trypanocide, and propagated via Wolbachia symbionts, which confer a reproductive advantage to the paratransgenic tsetse. However, the population dynamics of these symbionts within tsetse flies have not yet been evaluated. Specifically, the key factors that determine the effectiveness of paratransgenesis have yet to be quantified. To identify the impact of these determinants on T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense transmission, we developed a mathematical model of trypanosome transmission that incorporates tsetse and symbiont population dynamics. We found that fecundity and mortality penalties associated with Wolbachia or recombinant Sodalis colonization, probabilities of vertical transmission, and tsetse migration rates are fundamental to the feasibility of HAT elimination. For example, we determined that HAT elimination could be sustained over 25 years when Wolbachia colonization minimally impacted fecundity or mortality, and when the probability of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission exceeded 99.9%. We also found that for a narrow range of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission probability (99.9–90.6% for T.b. gambiense and 99.9–85.8% for T.b. rhodesiense), cumulative HAT incidence was reduced between 30% and 1% for T.b. gambiense and between 21% and 3% for T.b. rhodesiense, although elimination was not predicted. Our findings indicate that fitness and mortality penalties associated with paratransgenic symbionts, as

  11. Determinants of Human African Trypanosomiasis Elimination via Paratransgenesis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jennifer A; Medlock, Jan; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Aksoy, Serap; Ndeffo Mbah, Martial; Galvani, Alison P

    2016-03-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), transmitted by tsetse flies, has historically infected hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last decade, concerted control efforts have reduced reported cases to below 10,000 annually, bringing complete elimination within reach. A potential technology to eliminate HAT involves rendering the flies resistant to trypanosome infection. This approach can be achieved through the introduction of transgenic Sodalis symbiotic bacteria that have been modified to produce a trypanocide, and propagated via Wolbachia symbionts, which confer a reproductive advantage to the paratransgenic tsetse. However, the population dynamics of these symbionts within tsetse flies have not yet been evaluated. Specifically, the key factors that determine the effectiveness of paratransgenesis have yet to be quantified. To identify the impact of these determinants on T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense transmission, we developed a mathematical model of trypanosome transmission that incorporates tsetse and symbiont population dynamics. We found that fecundity and mortality penalties associated with Wolbachia or recombinant Sodalis colonization, probabilities of vertical transmission, and tsetse migration rates are fundamental to the feasibility of HAT elimination. For example, we determined that HAT elimination could be sustained over 25 years when Wolbachia colonization minimally impacted fecundity or mortality, and when the probability of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission exceeded 99.9%. We also found that for a narrow range of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission probability (99.9-90.6% for T.b. gambiense and 99.9-85.8% for T.b. rhodesiense), cumulative HAT incidence was reduced between 30% and 1% for T.b. gambiense and between 21% and 3% for T.b. rhodesiense, although elimination was not predicted. Our findings indicate that fitness and mortality penalties associated with paratransgenic symbionts, as well

  12. Vector-borne parasitic diseases--an overview of recent changes.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, D H

    1998-06-01

    This paper summarises the impact of different changes (environmental, ecological, developmental) on the one hand, with the impact of control measures on the other. The former group of changes have tended to exacerbate the incidence and prevalence of vector-borne parasitic diseases while the reduced public funds available for the health sector have reduced disease surveillance systems. However, some vector control/eradication programmes have been successful. Vector control in onchocerciasis and Chagas' disease and immediate host control in Guinea worm have reduced the public health importance of these disease. This contrasts, with malaria, where the complexity of different ecological situations and the variable vector ecology have made control difficult and epidemics frequent and unpredictable. Advances in our knowledge of how to implement and sustain insecticide-impregnated bednets which reduce morbidity and mortality in under 5-year olds will be a key issue for the coming years. In African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis, where control is dependent on effective diagnosis and surveillance followed by high-cost drug treatment, the health services are faced with major challenges--lack of drug availability and diagnostics no vector control--the diseases in some areas assuming epidemic status yet health services are unable to respond. Human African trypanosomiasis and visceral leishmaniasis are fatal if untreated, and require an emergency response approach. Changing vector distribution of Glossina is related to the ability of riverine flies of Glossina palpalis group to adapt to new vegetation patterns. In leishmaniasis changes have occurred in the distribution of the disease associated with development impact, urbanisation, civil unrest and changed agroforestry practice. PMID:9673871

  13. Emergence and Prevalence of Human Vector-Borne Diseases in Sink Vector Populations

    PubMed Central

    Rascalou, Guilhem; Pontier, Dominique; Menu, Frédéric; Gourbière, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases represent a major public health concern in most tropical and subtropical areas, and an emerging threat for more developed countries. Our understanding of the ecology, evolution and control of these diseases relies predominantly on theory and data on pathogen transmission in large self-sustaining ‘source’ populations of vectors representative of highly endemic areas. However, there are numerous places where environmental conditions are less favourable to vector populations, but where immigration allows them to persist. We built an epidemiological model to investigate the dynamics of six major human vector borne-diseases in such non self-sustaining ‘sink’ vector populations. The model was parameterized through a review of the literature, and we performed extensive sensitivity analysis to look at the emergence and prevalence of the pathogen that could be encountered in these populations. Despite the low vector abundance in typical sink populations, all six human diseases were able to spread in 15–55% of cases after accidental introduction. The rate of spread was much more strongly influenced by vector longevity, immigration and feeding rates, than by transmission and virulence of the pathogen. Prevalence in humans remained lower than 5% for dengue, leishmaniasis and Japanese encephalitis, but substantially higher for diseases with longer duration of infection; malaria and the American and African trypanosomiasis. Vector-related parameters were again the key factors, although their influence was lower than on pathogen emergence. Our results emphasize the need for ecology and evolution to be thought in the context of metapopulations made of a mosaic of sink and source habitats, and to design vector control program not only targeting areas of high vector density, but working at a larger spatial scale. PMID:22629337

  14. Stakeholder Narratives on Trypanosomiasis, Their Effect on Policy and the Scope for One Health

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Catherine; Anderson, Neil; Machila, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper explores the framings of trypanosomiasis, a widespread and potentially fatal zoonotic disease transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina species) affecting both humans and livestock. This is a country case study focusing on the political economy of knowledge in Zambia. It is a pertinent time to examine this issue as human population growth and other factors have led to migration into tsetse-inhabited areas with little historical influence from livestock. Disease transmission in new human-wildlife interfaces such as these is a greater risk, and opinions on the best way to manage this are deeply divided. Methods A qualitative case study method was used to examine the narratives on trypanosomiasis in the Zambian policy context through a series of key informant interviews. Interviewees included key actors from international organisations, research organisations and local activists from a variety of perspectives acknowledging the need to explore the relationships between the human, animal and environmental sectors. Principal Findings Diverse framings are held by key actors looking from, variously, the perspectives of wildlife and environmental protection, agricultural development, poverty alleviation, and veterinary and public health. From these viewpoints, four narratives about trypanosomiasis policy were identified, focused around four different beliefs: that trypanosomiasis is protecting the environment, is causing poverty, is not a major problem, and finally, that it is a Zambian rather than international issue to contend with. Within these narratives there are also conflicting views on the best control methods to use and different reasoning behind the pathways of response. These are based on apparently incompatible priorities of people, land, animals, the economy and the environment. The extent to which a One Health approach has been embraced and the potential usefulness of this as a way of reconciling the aims of these framings and narratives is

  15. Plasmid vector with temperature-controlled gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, V.V.; Yamshchikov, V.F.; Pletnev, A.G.

    1986-02-01

    In plasmid pBR327, a fragment 169 b.p. long including promotor p/sub 3/ of the bla gene has been deleted. The deletional derivative so obtained (pSP2) has been used to construct a recombinant plasmid bearing a fragment of phage lambda DNA with the p/sub R/ promotor and the gene of the temperature-sensitive repressor cI. It has been shown that the plasmid vector so constructed (pCE119) with promotor cR performs repressor-cI-controlled transcription of the bla gene, as a result of which induction for an hour at 42/sup 0/C leads to an almost 100-fold increase in the amount of product of the bla gene as compared with that at 32/sup 0/C. The possibility of the use of plasmid cPE119 for the expression of other genes has been demonstrated for the case of the semisynthetic ..beta..-galactosidase gene of E. coli. In this case, on induction of the cells with recombinant plasmid pCEZ12 for 3 hours at 42/sup 0/C, a 300-fold increase in the amount of active ..beta..-galactosidase, as compared with that at 32/sup 0/C, was observed. It is important to point out that under these conditions (at 42/sup 0/C), at least 99% of the cells containing the plasmid retain the phenotype lacZ/sup +/, which indicates the stability of the proposed vector system

  16. Adult vector control, mosquito ecology and malaria transmission

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Oliver J.; Godfray, H. Charles J.; Tatem, Andrew J.; Gething, Peter W.; Cohen, Justin M.; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Alex Perkins, T.; Reiner, Robert C.; Tusting, Lucy S.; Scott, Thomas W.; Lindsay, Steven W.; Hay, Simon I.; Smith, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Standard advice regarding vector control is to prefer interventions that reduce the lifespan of adult mosquitoes. The basis for this advice is a decades-old sensitivity analysis of ‘vectorial capacity’, a concept relevant for most malaria transmission models and based solely on adult mosquito population dynamics. Recent advances in micro-simulation models offer an opportunity to expand the theory of vectorial capacity to include both adult and juvenile mosquito stages in the model. Methods In this study we revisit arguments about transmission and its sensitivity to mosquito bionomic parameters using an elasticity analysis of developed formulations of vectorial capacity. Results We show that reducing adult survival has effects on both adult and juvenile population size, which are significant for transmission and not accounted for in traditional formulations of vectorial capacity. The elasticity of these effects is dependent on various mosquito population parameters, which we explore. Overall, control is most sensitive to methods that affect adult mosquito mortality rates, followed by blood feeding frequency, human blood feeding habit, and lastly, to adult mosquito population density. Conclusions These results emphasise more strongly than ever the sensitivity of transmission to adult mosquito mortality, but also suggest the high potential of combinations of interventions including larval source management. This must be done with caution, however, as policy requires a more careful consideration of costs, operational difficulties and policy goals in relation to baseline transmission. PMID:25733562

  17. [Prevention and control of leishmaniasis vectors: current approaches].

    PubMed

    Maroli, M; Khoury, C

    2004-06-01

    Phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are the suspected or proven vectors of Leishmania spp. in at least 88 countries, including over 40 Phlebotomus species in the Old World and a further 30 belonging to the genus Lutzomyia in the New World. In recent years, both cutaneous (CL) and zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL) have become increasingly prevalent in urban areas, including large Latin American cities. A similar trend has been recorded in all Mediterranean areas during the last decade. Based on mathematical models, insecticidal control of sandflies appears to represent a more effective way of reducing Leishmania infantum transmission than the present strategy of culling infected dogs in Latin America as well as being more acceptable to the human population. Since man is a dead-end host of most Leishmania species, treatment of existing human cases generally does not affect transmission. Interruption of the cycle by vector control may offer a cheaper, more practical solution to treatment and improved knowledge of the alternatives available could lead to preventative measures being undertaken in more leishmaniasis foci. In this note a review of current knowledge on sandfly control is presented. Different measures to control phlebotomine sandflies, including residual spraying of dwellings and animal shelters, insecticide treated nets, application of repellents/insecticides to skin or to fabrics and impregnated dog collars are discussed. Although effective in urban areas with high concentrations of sandflies, residual spraying of insecticides is no often longer tenable in most situations. In rural areas where dwellings are more dispersed and surrounded by large, untargeted "reservoir" populations of sandflies, residual spraying of houses may be both impractical for logistic reasons and ineffective. Actually, this control measure depends on the availability of a suitable public health infrastructure, including adequate supplies of insecticide, spraying

  18. Climate Change: Potential Affect on Pesticide Application for Vector Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global climate change has and will in the future contribute to the global burden of vector-borne disease by affecting the spatial and tempral distribution of disease. These changes in disease distributions are a direct result of altering the ecology of immature and adult habitats of insect vectors....

  19. ProactiveVector control strategies and improved monitoring and evaluation practices for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Lars; Beaty, Barry J; Morrison, Amy C; Scott, Thomas W

    2009-11-01

    Despite tremendous efforts by public health organizations in dengue-endemic countries, it has proven difficult to achieve effective and sustainable control of the primary dengue virus vector Aedes aegypti (L.) and to effectively disrupt dengue outbreaks. This problem has multiple root causes, including uncontrolled urbanization, increased global spread of dengue viruses, and vector and dengue control programs not being provided adequate resources. In this forum article, we give an overview of the basic elements of a vector and dengue control program and describe a continuous improvement cyclical model to systematically and incrementally improve control program performance by regular efforts to identify ineffective methods and inferior technology, and then replacing them with better performing alternatives. The first step includes assessments of the overall resource allocation among vector/dengue control program activities, the efficacy of currently used vector control methods, and the appropriateness of technology used to support the program. We expect this will reveal that 1) some currently used vector control methods are not effective, 2) resource allocations often are skewed toward reactive vector control measures, and 3) proactive approaches commonly are underfunded and therefore poorly executed. Next steps are to conceptualize desired changes to vector control methods or technologies used and then to operationally determine in pilot studies whether these changes are likely to improve control program performance. This should be followed by a shift in resource allocation to replace ineffective methods and inferior technology with more effective and operationally tested alternatives. The cyclical and self-improving nature of the continuous improvement model will produce locally appropriate management strategies that continually are adapted to counter changes in vector population or dengue virus transmission dynamics. We discuss promising proactive vector control

  20. Integrated pest management and allocation of control efforts for vector-borne diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.S.

    2001-01-01

    Applications of various control methods were evaluated to determine how to integrate methods so as to minimize the number of human cases of vector-borne diseases. These diseases can be controlled by lowering the number of vector-human contacts (e.g., by pesticide applications or use of repellents), or by lowering the proportion of vectors infected with pathogens (e.g., by lowering or vaccinating reservoir host populations). Control methods should be combined in such a way as to most efficiently lower the probability of human encounter with an infected vector. Simulations using a simple probabilistic model of pathogen transmission suggest that the most efficient way to integrate different control methods is to combine methods that have the same effect (e.g., combine treatments that lower the vector population; or combine treatments that lower pathogen prevalence in vectors). Combining techniques that have different effects (e.g., a technique that lowers vector populations with a technique that lowers pathogen prevalence in vectors) will be less efficient than combining two techniques that both lower vector populations or combining two techniques that both lower pathogen prevalence, costs being the same. Costs of alternative control methods generally differ, so the efficiency of various combinations at lowering human contact with infected vectors should be estimated at available funding levels. Data should be collected from initial trials to improve the effects of subsequent interventions on the number of human cases.

  1. Using a Geographical-Information-System-Based Decision Support to Enhance Malaria Vector Control in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Mukonka, Victor Munyongwe; Mthembu, David; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Coetzer, Sarel; Shinondo, Cecilia Jill

    2012-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GISs) with emerging technologies are being harnessed for studying spatial patterns in vector-borne diseases to reduce transmission. To implement effective vector control, increased knowledge on interactions of epidemiological and entomological malaria transmission determinants in the assessment of impact of interventions is critical. This requires availability of relevant spatial and attribute data to support malaria surveillance, monitoring, and evaluation. Monitoring the impact of vector control through a GIS-based decision support (DSS) has revealed spatial relative change in prevalence of infection and vector susceptibility to insecticides and has enabled measurement of spatial heterogeneity of trend or impact. The revealed trends and interrelationships have allowed the identification of areas with reduced parasitaemia and increased insecticide resistance thus demonstrating the impact of resistance on vector control. The GIS-based DSS provides opportunity for rational policy formulation and cost-effective utilization of limited resources for enhanced malaria vector control. PMID:22548086

  2. Treatment options for second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Eperon, Gilles; Balasegaram, Manica; Potet, Julien; Mowbray, Charles; Valverde, Olaf; Chappuis, François

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis relied on toxic arsenic-based derivatives for over 50 years. The availability and subsequent use of eflornithine, initially in monotherapy and more recently in combination with nifurtimox (NECT), has drastically improved the prognosis of treated patients. However, NECT logistic and nursing requirements remain obstacles to its deployment and use in peripheral health structures in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Two oral compounds, fexinidazole and SCYX-7158, are currently in clinical development. The main scope of this article is to discuss the potential impact of new oral therapies to improve diagnosis-treatment algorithms and patients’ access to treatment, and to contribute to reach the objectives of the recently launched gambiense human African trypanosomiasis elimination program. PMID:25204360

  3. Application of genomics for understanding plant virus-insect vector interactions and insect vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to decipher DNA sequences provides new insights into the study of plant viruses and their interactions with host plants, including the intricate interactions that allow a virus to be transmitted by an insect vector. Next generation sequencing (NGS) provides a wealth of genetic informati...

  4. Human African trypanosomiasis of the CNS: current issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Peter G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa. Current therapy with melarsoprol for CNS HAT has unacceptable side-effects with an overall mortality of 5%. This review discusses the issues of diagnosis and staging of CNS disease, its neuropathogenesis, and the possibility of new therapies for treating late-stage disease. PMID:14966556

  5. Modeling and vector control of planar magnetic levitator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.; Trumper, D.L.; Lang, J.H.

    1998-11-01

    The authors designed and implemented a magnetically levitated stage with large planar motion capability. This planar magnetic levitator employs four novel permanent-magnet linear motors. Each motor generates vertical force for suspension against gravity, as well as horizontal force for drive. These linear levitation motors can be used as building blocks in the general class of multi-degree-of-freedom motion stages. In this paper, the authors discuss electromechanical modeling and real-time vector control of such a permanent-magnet levitator. They describe the dynamics in a dq frame introduced to decouple the forces acting on the magnetically levitated moving part, namely, the platen. A transformation similar to the Blondel-Park transformation is derived for commutation of the stator phase currents. The authors provide test results on step responses of the magnetically levitated stage. It shows 5-nm rms positioning noise in x and y, which demonstrates the applicability of such stages in the next-generation photolithography in semiconductor manufacturing.

  6. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Shiby M.; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  7. In vivo analysis of impaired macrophage bactericidal capacity during experimental African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Glick, D L; Jones, J F

    1984-01-01

    Since innate resistance of mice to Salmonella typhimurium depends on an intact macrophage system, we have used this bacterium to investigate the effect of Trypanosoma brucei subsp. rhodesiense infection on macrophage phagocytic and cytolytic function. CBA/CaJ mice infected with T. brucei subsp. rhodesiense have decreased resistance to S. typhimurium, since doubly infected mice rapidly succumb to sublethal doses of S. typhimurium. Although trypanosomiasis is known to suppress antibody formation, such a suppression of antibody does not seem to play a role in trypanosome-induced sensitivity to S. typhimurium. A trypanosome-induced blockade of the reticuloendothelial system also does not occur, since parasitized and control mice clear S. typhimurium from the blood equally well. Early killing (0 to 48 h) of S. typhimurium in the liver and spleen is mainly macrophage mediated, and mice infected with trypanosomes kill S. typhimurium in the liver and spleen very poorly. Apparently trypanosomiasis inhibits macrophage bactericidal activity, but has no effect on phagocytosis. PMID:6389356

  8. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Shiby M; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  9. A Review of Ecological Factors Associated with the Epidemiology of Wildlife Trypanosomiasis in the Luangwa and Zambezi Valley Ecosystems of Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Siamudaala, Victor; Munyeme, Musso; Nalubamba, King Shimumbo

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosomiasis has been endemic in wildlife in Zambia for more than a century. The disease has been associated with neurological disorders in humans. Current conservation strategies by the Zambian government of turning all game reserves into state-protected National Parks (NPs) and game management areas (GMAs) have led to the expansion of the wildlife and tsetse population in the Luangwa and Zambezi valley ecosystem. This ecological niche lies in the common tsetse fly belt that harbors the highest tsetse population density in Southern Africa. Ecological factors such as climate, vegetation and rainfall found in this niche allow for a favorable interplay between wild reservoir hosts and vector tsetse flies. These ecological factors that influence the survival of a wide range of wildlife species provide adequate habitat for tsetse flies thereby supporting the coexistence of disease reservoir hosts and vector tsetse flies leading to prolonged persistence of trypanosomiasis in the area. On the other hand, increase in anthropogenic activities poses a significant threat of reducing the tsetse and wildlife habitat in the area. Herein, we demonstrate that while conservation of wildlife and biodiversity is an important preservation strategy of natural resources, it could serve as a long-term reservoir of wildlife trypanosomiasis. PMID:22693499

  10. A review of ecological factors associated with the epidemiology of wildlife trypanosomiasis in the luangwa and zambezi valley ecosystems of zambia.

    PubMed

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Siamudaala, Victor; Munyeme, Musso; Nalubamba, King Shimumbo

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosomiasis has been endemic in wildlife in Zambia for more than a century. The disease has been associated with neurological disorders in humans. Current conservation strategies by the Zambian government of turning all game reserves into state-protected National Parks (NPs) and game management areas (GMAs) have led to the expansion of the wildlife and tsetse population in the Luangwa and Zambezi valley ecosystem. This ecological niche lies in the common tsetse fly belt that harbors the highest tsetse population density in Southern Africa. Ecological factors such as climate, vegetation and rainfall found in this niche allow for a favorable interplay between wild reservoir hosts and vector tsetse flies. These ecological factors that influence the survival of a wide range of wildlife species provide adequate habitat for tsetse flies thereby supporting the coexistence of disease reservoir hosts and vector tsetse flies leading to prolonged persistence of trypanosomiasis in the area. On the other hand, increase in anthropogenic activities poses a significant threat of reducing the tsetse and wildlife habitat in the area. Herein, we demonstrate that while conservation of wildlife and biodiversity is an important preservation strategy of natural resources, it could serve as a long-term reservoir of wildlife trypanosomiasis. PMID:22693499

  11. INTERIM ANALYSIS OF THE CONTRIBUTION OF HIGH-LEVEL EVIDENCE FOR DENGUE VECTOR CONTROL.

    PubMed

    Horstick, Olaf; Ranzinger, Silvia Runge

    2015-01-01

    This interim analysis reviews the available systematic literature for dengue vector control on three levels: 1) single and combined vector control methods, with existing work on peridomestic space spraying and on Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis; further work is available soon on the use of Temephos, Copepods and larvivorous fish; 2) or for a specific purpose, like outbreak control, and 3) on a strategic level, as for example decentralization vs centralization, with a systematic review on vector control organization. Clear best practice guidelines for methodology of entomological studies are needed. There is a need to include measuring dengue transmission data. The following recommendations emerge: Although vector control can be effective, implementation remains an issue; Single interventions are probably not useful; Combinations of interventions have mixed results; Careful implementation of vector control measures may be most important; Outbreak interventions are often applied with questionable effectiveness. PMID:26506739

  12. [Human African trypanosomiasis in an urban area: an emerging problem?].

    PubMed

    Louis, F J; Bilenge, C M; Simarro, P P; Meso, V Kande; Lucas, P; Jannin, J

    2003-08-01

    The human African trypanosomiasis is essentially a rural disease. The notification of cases in urban area has always been incidental; either a diagnosis made in town revealed a disease contracted in rural environment or it meant the preservation of a complete epidemiological cycle in a remaining urban micro-focus. In Kinshasa, in Democratic Republic of Congo, about forty cases have been notified each year. All of them came from the nearby foci of Bandundu, Lower Congo and Kasaï. In 1996 the number of cases reached suddenly 254 and today the average annual number comes up to 500 in spite of all the efforts undertaken to fight the disease. A study of cases in 1998 and 1999 shows that patients are essentially distributed in suburbs and that the most affected by the disease are the 15-49 year old ones whose job is related with agricultural or fishing activities. Two phenomena seem to explain this sudden increase: the massive inflow of refugees in outskirts of town coming from provinces where trypanosomiasis is endemic and a major economic crisis throwing out urban population in suburbs living on a subsistence micro-agriculture. These concomitant factors have contributed to the setting up of a trypanosomiasis belt around the capital. Today a strategy has to be reconsidered in order to fight against the disease in the capital itself and to make the medical staff aware of the diagnosis of a disease still unknown in their sanitary district. PMID:14582296

  13. Characterization of Truck Mounted Atomization Equipment Typically Used in Vector Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The control of arthropods that are vectors of human and animal disease is a high priority for both public health and military officials. As droplet size is a critical factor affecting vector control applications, the droplet size spectra produced by eleven sprayers and three spray formulations were...

  14. Bayesian Geostatistical Analysis and Prediction of Rhodesian Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Wardrop, Nicola A.; Atkinson, Peter M.; Gething, Peter W.; Fèvre, Eric M.; Picozzi, Kim; Kakembo, Abbas S. L.; Welburn, Susan C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The persistent spread of Rhodesian human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in Uganda in recent years has increased concerns of a potential overlap with the Gambian form of the disease. Recent research has aimed to increase the evidence base for targeting control measures by focusing on the environmental and climatic factors that control the spatial distribution of the disease. Objectives One recent study used simple logistic regression methods to explore the relationship between prevalence of Rhodesian HAT and several social, environmental and climatic variables in two of the most recently affected districts of Uganda, and suggested the disease had spread into the study area due to the movement of infected, untreated livestock. Here we extend this study to account for spatial autocorrelation, incorporate uncertainty in input data and model parameters and undertake predictive mapping for risk of high HAT prevalence in future. Materials and Methods Using a spatial analysis in which a generalised linear geostatistical model is used in a Bayesian framework to account explicitly for spatial autocorrelation and incorporate uncertainty in input data and model parameters we are able to demonstrate a more rigorous analytical approach, potentially resulting in more accurate parameter and significance estimates and increased predictive accuracy, thereby allowing an assessment of the validity of the livestock movement hypothesis given more robust parameter estimation and appropriate assessment of covariate effects. Results Analysis strongly supports the theory that Rhodesian HAT was imported to the study area via the movement of untreated, infected livestock from endemic areas. The confounding effect of health care accessibility on the spatial distribution of Rhodesian HAT and the linkages between the disease's distribution and minimum land surface temperature have also been confirmed via the application of these methods. Conclusions Predictive mapping indicates an

  15. Control of multiple arthropod vector infestations with subolesin/akirin vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; Villar, Margarita; Jiménez, Maribel; Pinal, Rocío; Estrada-Peña, Agustín; Molina, Ricardo; Lucientes, Javier; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2013-02-01

    Diseases transmitted by arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks and sand flies greatly impact human and animal health and thus their control is important for the eradication of vector-borne diseases (VBD). Vaccination is an environmentally friendly alternative for vector control that allows control of several VBD by targeting their common vector. Recent results have suggested that subolesin/akirin (SUB/AKR) is good candidate antigens for the control of arthropod vector infestations. Here we describe the comparative effect of vaccination with SUB, AKR and Q38 and Q41 chimeras containing SUB/AKR conserved protective epitopes on tick, mosquitoes and sand flies vector mortality, molting, oviposition and/or fertility. We demonstrated that SUB vaccination had the highest efficacy (E) across all vector species (54-92%), Q41 vaccination had the highest vaccine E in mosquitoes (99%) by reducing female survival and fertility, and Q38 vaccination had the highest effect on reducing mosquito (28%) and sand fly (26%) oviposition. The effect of vaccination on different developmental processes in several important arthropod vectors encourages the development of SUB/AKR universal vaccines for the control of multiple vector infestations and reduction of VBD. PMID:23291476

  16. Disruptive technology for vector control: the Innovative Vector Control Consortium and the US Military join forces to explore transformative insecticide application technology for mosquito control programmes.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Jennifer; Macdonald, Michael; Malone, David; Hamon, Nicholas; Richardson, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Malaria vector control technology has remained largely static for decades and there is a pressing need for innovative control tools and methodology to radically improve the quality and efficiency of current vector control practices. This report summarizes a workshop jointly organized by the Innovative Vector Control Consortium (IVCC) and the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (AFPMB) focused on public health pesticide application technology. Three main topics were discussed: the limitations with current tools and techniques used for indoor residual spraying (IRS), technology innovation to improve efficacy of IRS programmes, and truly disruptive application technology beyond IRS. The group identified several opportunities to improve application technology to include: insuring all IRS programmes are using constant flow valves and erosion resistant tips; introducing compression sprayer improvements that help minimize pesticide waste and human error; and moving beyond IRS by embracing the potential for new larval source management techniques and next generation technology such as unmanned "smart" spray systems. The meeting served to lay the foundation for broader collaboration between the IVCC and AFPMB and partners in industry, the World Health Organization, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and others. PMID:26409879

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi: adaptation to its vectors and its hosts

    PubMed Central

    Noireau, François; Diosque, Patricio; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2009-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis is a parasitic zoonosis that occurs throughout Latin America. The etiological agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, is able to infect almost all tissues of its mammalian hosts and spreads in the environment in multifarious transmission cycles that may or not be connected. This biological plasticity, which is probably the result of the considerable heterogeneity of the taxon, exemplifies a successful adaptation of a parasite resulting in distinct outcomes of infection and a complex epidemiological pattern. In the 1990s, most endemic countries strengthened national control programs to interrupt the transmission of this parasite to humans. However, many obstacles remain to the effective control of the disease. Current knowledge of the different components involved in elaborate system that is American trypanosomiasis (the protozoan parasite T. cruzi, vectors Triatominae and the many reservoirs of infection), as well as the interactions existing within the system, is still incomplete. The Triatominae probably evolve from predatory reduvids in response to the availability of vertebrate food source. However, the basic mechanisms of adaptation of some of them to artificial ecotopes remain poorly understood. Nevertheless, these adaptations seem to be associated with a behavioral plasticity, a reduction in the genetic repertoire and increasing developmental instability. PMID:19250627

  18. Visceral Leishmaniasis on the Indian Subcontinent: Modelling the Dynamic Relationship between Vector Control Schemes and Vector Life Cycles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a disease caused by two known vector-borne parasite species (Leishmania donovani, L. infantum), transmitted to man by phlebotomine sand flies (species: Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia), resulting in ≈50,000 human fatalities annually, ≈67% occurring on the Indian subcontinent. Indoor residual spraying is the current method of sand fly control in India, but alternative means of vector control, such as the treatment of livestock with systemic insecticide-based drugs, are being evaluated. We describe an individual-based, stochastic, life-stage-structured model that represents a sand fly vector population within a village in India and simulates the effects of vector control via fipronil-based drugs orally administered to cattle, which target both blood-feeding adults and larvae that feed on host feces. Principle findings Simulation results indicated efficacy of fipronil-based control schemes in reducing sand fly abundance depended on timing of drug applications relative to seasonality of the sand fly life cycle. Taking into account cost-effectiveness and logistical feasibility, two of the most efficacious treatment schemes reduced population peaks occurring from April through August by ≈90% (applications 3 times per year at 2-month intervals initiated in March) and >95% (applications 6 times per year at 2-month intervals initiated in January) relative to no control, with the cumulative number of sand fly days occurring April-August reduced by ≈83% and ≈97%, respectively, and more specifically during the summer months of peak human exposure (June-August) by ≈85% and ≈97%, respectively. Conclusions Our model should prove useful in a priori evaluation of the efficacy of fipronil-based drugs in controlling leishmaniasis on the Indian subcontinent and beyond. PMID:27537774

  19. Linear matrix inequalities for analysis and control of linear vector second-order systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adegas, Fabiano D.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-10-06

    Many dynamical systems are modeled as vector second-order differential equations. This paper presents analysis and synthesis conditions in terms of LMI with explicit dependence in the coefficient matrices of vector second-order systems. These conditions benefit from the separation between the Lyapunov matrix and the system matrices by introducing matrix multipliers, which potentially reduce conservativeness in hard control problems. Multipliers facilitate the usage of parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions as certificates of stability of uncertain and time-varying vector second-order systems. The conditions introduced in this work have the potential to increase the practice of analyzing and controlling systems directly in vector second-order form.

  20. Ecology and control of dengue vector mosquitoes in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y R; Hwang, J S; Guo, Y J

    1994-12-01

    Due to rapid urbanization, industrialization and social changes in recent years, the use of packing materials and tires has dramatically increased in the Taiwan area. What is more is that some parts of southern Taiwan are short of water resources and water preservation with huge containers becomes part of custom in those areas. Storage water containers, waste vessels and tires are good habitats for Aedes. Meanwhile, some persons traveling to dengue endemic countries bring the dengue disease back to Taiwan. Surveys taken since 1988 show that dengue occurs mainly in the urban and coastal areas where Aedes aegypti is prevalent. This species is the most important, if not the only, vector of dengue in Taiwan. It appears that the types of Aedes breeding have changed quickly. In dengue fever epidemic areas, the most popular breeding sites are ornamental containers (38.8%), storage water containers (30.1%), discarded containers (25.4%), receptacles (3.3%) and water collection in the basement (2.2%). In dengue fever epidemic areas, those building basements, huge water containers, waste vessels and waste tires in open fields are most difficult to clean up and manage and become the most popular Aedes habitats. We established a waste recycling system and promoted a breeding site reduction campaign for waste management, including the application of Temephos in containers to kill larvae. For the drinking water management, fish were released in water containers to prevent larval breeding. It should be mentioned that with the integrated pest control and regular inspections of Aedes larvae in Taiwan the density figures 1, 2-5, and 6 or above for Aedes aegypti were 38.7%, 42.9%, and 18.4%, respectively, in 1988, and in 1993 were 90.8%, 9.2% and 0%. The incidence of dengue fever cases has 98% decreased since 1988. In 1990 and 1993, there was no indigenous cases. We have concluded that integrated pest control is the best and most effective method for dengue fever control, including

  1. Vector control programs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador: successes and barriers to integrated vector management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) and mosquito control programs (MCPs) diverge in settings and countries, and lead control specialists need to be aware of the most effective control strategies. Integrated Vector Management (IVM) strategies, once implemented in MCPs, aim to reduce cost and optimize protection of the populations against VBDs. This study presents a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis to compare IVM strategies used by MCPs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador. This research evaluates MCPs strategies to improve vector control activities. Methods Methods included descriptive findings of the MCP operations. Information was obtained from vector control specialists, directors, and residents through field trips, surveys, and questionnaires. Evaluations of the strategies and assets of the control programs where obtained through SWOT analysis and within an IVM approach. Results Organizationally, the Floridian MCP is a tax-based District able to make decisions independently from county government officials, with the oversight of an elected board of commissioners. The Guayas program is directed by the country government and assessed by non-governmental organizations like the World health Organization. Operationally, the Floridian MCP conducts entomological surveillance and the Ecuadorian MCP focuses on epidemiological monitoring of human disease cases. Strengths of both MCPs were their community participation and educational programs. Weaknesses for both MCPs included limitations in budgets and technical capabilities. Opportunities, for both MCPs, are additional funding and partnerships with private, non-governmental, and governmental organizations. Threats experienced by both MCPs included political constraints and changes in the social and ecological environment that affect mosquito densities and control efforts. IVM pillars for policy making were used to compare the information among the programs. Differences

  2. High-Speed Current dq PI Controller for Vector Controlled PMSM Drive

    PubMed Central

    Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Chang, Tae Gyu

    2014-01-01

    High-speed current controller for vector controlled permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is presented. The controller is developed based on modular design for faster calculation and uses fixed-point proportional-integral (PI) method for improved accuracy. Current dq controller is usually implemented in digital signal processor (DSP) based computer. However, DSP based solutions are reaching their physical limits, which are few microseconds. Besides, digital solutions suffer from high implementation cost. In this research, the overall controller is realizing in field programmable gate array (FPGA). FPGA implementation of the overall controlling algorithm will certainly trim down the execution time significantly to guarantee the steadiness of the motor. Agilent 16821A Logic Analyzer is employed to validate the result of the implemented design in FPGA. Experimental results indicate that the proposed current dq PI controller needs only 50 ns of execution time in 40 MHz clock, which is the lowest computational cycle for the era. PMID:24574913

  3. Feedback control for counterflow thrust vectoring with a turbine engine: Experiment design and robust control design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dores, Delfim Zambujo Das

    2005-11-01

    Engineering research over the last few years has successfully demonstrated the potential of thrust vector control using counterflow at conditions up to Mach 2. Flow configurations that include the pitch vectoring of rectangular jets and multi-axis vector control in diamond and axisymmetric nozzle geometries have been studied. Although bistable (on-off) fluid-based control has been around for some time, the present counterflow thrust vector control is unique because proportional and continuous jet response can be achieved in the absence of moving parts, while avoiding jet attachment, which renders most fluidic approaches unacceptable for aircraft and missile control applications. However, before this study, research had been limited to open-loop studies of counterflow thrust vectoring. For practical implementation it was vital that the counterflow scheme be used in conjunction with feedback control. Hence, the focus of this research was to develop and experimentally demonstrate a feedback control design methodology for counterflow thrust vectoring. This research focused on 2-D (pitch) thrust vectoring and addresses four key modeling issues. The first issue is to determine the measured variable to be commanded since the thrust vector angle is not measurable in real time. The second related issue is to determine the static mapping from the thrust vector angle to this measured variable. The third issue is to determine the dynamic relationship between the measured variable and the thrust vector angle. The fourth issue is to develop dynamic models with uncertainty characterizations. The final and main goal was the design and implementation of robust controllers that yield closed-loop systems with fast response times, and avoid overshoot in order to aid in the avoidance of attachment. These controllers should be simple and easy to implement in real applications. Hence, PID design has been chosen. Robust control design is accomplished by using ℓ1 control theory in

  4. A Simplified Vector Control of Position Sensorless Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor for Electrical Household Appliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Iwaji, Yoshitaka; Endo, Tsunehiro

    A simplified vector control is proposed as a driving method of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) for electrical household appliances. Control structure is simplified by eliminating the speed regulator and the current regulator from the conventional vector controller. Output voltage references are determined by feedforward-like calculation using motor parameters, rotation speed command, and current references. In the static characteristic, the proposed vector control method is almost equal to the conventional one, because the voltage references are calculated in the vector space. A practical estimate equation of rotor position is proposed, and the phase locked loop control approach is employed to drive PMSM without position and speed sensors. Design method of two control gains is given. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed control is verified by simulation and experiments.

  5. An Experimental Research on Vector Control of Induction Motor Based on Simple Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhai; Ge, Jinfa; Liu, Weixia; Wang, Qin

    Given the heavy computation, easy saturation and cumulate errors of conventional direct vector control, the vector control of induction motor based on simple model is studied and the detailed scheme is described on the basis of the decomposing and approximating the rotor flux. Because of the direct closed-loop control of the magnetizing current and the torque current and the complex current regulator is completed by PI regulator, so the direct vector control of induction motor is simplified. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective in decreasing the dynamic disturbance and has the advantages of the simplicity of the code program, rare saturation and shocks.

  6. Determining the spatial autocorrelation of dengue vector populations: influences of mosquito sampling method, covariables, and vector control.

    PubMed

    Azil, Aishah H; Bruce, David; Williams, Craig R

    2014-06-01

    We investigated spatial autocorrelation of female Aedes aegypti L. mosquito abundance from BG-Sentinel trap and sticky ovitrap collections in Cairns, north Queensland, Australia. BG-Sentinel trap collections in 2010 show a significant spatial autocorrelation across the study site and over a smaller spatial extent, while sticky ovitrap collections only indicate a non-significant, weak spatial autocorrelation. The BG-Sentinel trap collections were suitable for spatial interpolation using ordinary kriging and cokriging techniques. The uses of Premise Condition Index and potential breeding container data have helped improve our prediction of vector abundance. Semiovariograms and prediction maps indicate that the spatial autocorrelation of mosquito abundance determined by BG-Sentinel traps extends farther compared to sticky ovitrap collections. Based on our data, fewer BG-Sentinel traps are required to represent vector abundance at a series of houses compared to sticky ovitraps. A lack of spatial structure was observed following vector control treatment in the area. This finding has implications for the design and costs of dengue vector surveillance programs. PMID:24820568

  7. Adaptative Variable Structure Control for an Online Tuning Direct Vector Controlled Induction Motor Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasaad, Sbita; Dalila, Zaltni; Naceurq, Abdelkrim Mohamed

    This study demonstrates that high performance speed control can be obtained by using an adaptative sliding mode control method for a direct vector controlled Squirrel Cage Induction Motor (SCIM). In this study a new method of designing a simple and effective adaptative sliding mode rotational speed control law is developed. The design includes an accurate sliding mode flux observation from the measured stator terminals and rotor speed. The performance of the Direct Field-Orientation Control (DFOC) is ensured by online tuning based on a Model Reference Adaptative System (MRAS) rotor time constant estimator. The control strategy is derived in the sense of Lyapunov stability theory so that the stable tracking performance can be guaranteed under the occurrence of system uncertainties and external disturbances. The proposed scheme is a solution for a robust and high performance induction motor servo drives. Simulation results are provided to validate the effectiveness and robustness of the developed methodology.

  8. Leucocytozoonosis and trypanosomiasis in redstarts in Finland.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, P T; Huhta, E; Jokimäki, J; Squires-Parsons, D

    1999-07-01

    Leucocytozoon spp. and Trypanosoma spp. blood parasites in the redstart (Phoenicurus phoenicurus) were studied during spring migration 1994 in southern Finland (53 individuals) and the breeding season 1992-1994 in northern Finland (69). Parasite prevalence was higher during the breeding season (48%) than during the migration period (13%), with no age or sex differences in the breeding site birds. In both periods, redstarts were infected by the same blood parasites Leucocytozoon shaartusicum (46% prevalence at the breeding site and 71% during the migration period) and Trypanosoma avium, complex (58% and 43%, respectively). One individual at the breeding site had contracted L. dubreuili and one at the stop-over site had T. everetti. Our results may support the assumption that tissue-hidden parasites relapse during the breeding season when birds may have diminished immune response related to egg production and brood rearing. Another explanation could be that the high abundance of ornithophilic vectors enhance parasite transmission during breeding season in northern Finland. PMID:10479101

  9. The bionomics of the malaria vector Anopheles farauti in Northern Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands: issues for successful vector control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The north coast of Guadalcanal has some of the most intense malaria transmission in the Solomon Islands. And, there is a push for intensified vector control in Guadalcanal, to improve the livelihood of residents and to minimize the number of cases, which are regularly exported to the rest of the country. Therefore, the bionomics of the target vector, Anopheles farauti, was profiled in 2007–08; which was after 20 years of limited surveillance during which time treated bed nets (ITNs) were distributed in the area. Methods In three villages on northern Guadalcanal, blood-seeking female mosquitoes were caught using hourly human landing catches by four collectors, two working indoors and two outdoors, from 18.00-06.00 for at least two nights per month from July 2007 to June 2008. The mosquitoes were counted, identified using morphological and molecular markers and dissected to determine parity. Results Seasonality in vector densities was similar in the three villages, with a peak at the end of the drier months (October to December) and a trough at the end of the wetter months (March to May). There was some variability in endophagy (indoor biting) and nocturnal biting (activity during sleeping hours) both spatially and temporally across the longitudinal dataset. The general biting pattern was consistent throughout all sample collections, with the majority of biting occurring outdoors (64%) and outside of sleeping hours (65%). Peak biting was 19.00-20.00. The proportion parous across each village ranged between 0.54-0.58. Parity showed little seasonal trend despite fluctuations in vector densities over the year. Conclusion The early, outdoor biting behaviour of An. farauti documented 20 years previously on north Guadalcanal was still exhibited. It is possible that bed net use may have maintained this biting profile though this could not be determined unequivocally. The longevity of these populations has not changed despite long-term ITN use. This early

  10. Olfactory disruption: towards controlling important insect vectors of disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical repellents are used to decrease contacts between insect disease vectors and their hosts, thus reducing the probability of disease transmission. The molecular mechanisms by which repellents have their effects are poorly understood and remain a controversial topic. Here we present recent re...

  11. Overview of current situation of dengue and dengue vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dengue is the most important arbovirus of humans in the world. It is caused by one of four closely related virus serotypes whose primary vector is Aedes aegypti and secondarily by Ae. albopictus. A global dengue pandemic began in Southeast Asia after World War II and has intensified during the las...

  12. An evidence-based vector control strategy for military deployments: the British Army experience.

    PubMed

    Croft, A M; Baker, D; von Bertele, M J

    2001-01-01

    We describe the British Army's current strategy for controlling arthropod vectors of disease during overseas deployments. Military commanders and medical officers have different, but complementary responsibilities in achieving vector control. In this paper we define a hierarchy of evidence-based vector control guidelines. Field guidelines must be based on the best available research evidence, preferably that derived from pragmatic randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and from systematic reviews of trials. Assessing the effectiveness of different vector control measures involves a trade-off between the relative benefits and harm of different technology options. There is compelling scientific evidence that bed nets and screens treated with a pyrethroid insecticide are highly effective in protecting against nocturnally active, anthropophilic arthropods (including ectoparasites), and will reduce the incidence of malaria, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis and Chagas' disease. Etofenprox and deltamethrin are the safest pyrethroids, and permethrin the least safe. Vector control strategies of probable effectiveness are the use of insecticide-treated clothing, the wearing of protective clothing, and the correct use of DEET-based topical insect repellents. Aerosol insecticides are of debatable effectiveness. Other effective vector control measures, of limited usefulness during deployments, include electric fans, mosquito coils/vaporising mats, and smoke. "Biological" vector control measures, and insect buzzers/electrocuters are ineffective. Practical insect avoidance measures, based on an understanding of vector biology, complete the military vector-control arsenal. We conclude that practical insect avoidance measures, combined with pyrethroid-treated nets and clothing, and DEET-based topical repellents, can achieve almost 100% protection against biting arthropods. PMID:11584666

  13. Multichannel vector field control module for LLRF control of superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Varghese, P; Chase, B.; Barnes, B.; Branlard, J.; Joireman, P.W.; Klepec, D.; Mavric, U.; Tupikov, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The field control of multiple superconducting RF cavities with a single Klystron, such as the proposed RF scheme for the ILC, requires high density (number of RF channels) signal processing hardware so that vector control may be implemented with minimum group delay. The MFC (Multichannel Field Control) module is a 33-channel, FPGA based down-conversion and signal processing board in a single VXI slot, with 4 channels of high speed DAC outputs. A 32-bit, 400MHz floating point DSP provides additional computational and control capability for calibration and implementation of more complex control algorithms. Multiple high speed serial transceivers on the front panel and the backplane bus allow a flexible architecture for inter-module real time data exchanges. An interface CPLD supports the VXI bus protocol for communication to a Slot0 CPU, with Ethernet connections for remote in system programming of the FPGA and DSP as well as data acquisition.

  14. A Performance Management Initiative for Local Health Department Vector Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, Justin; Kirshy, Micaela; Moran, John W.; Bialek, Ron; Lamers, Vanessa; Sarisky, John

    2016-01-01

    Local health department (LHD) vector control programs have experienced reductions in funding and capacity. Acknowledging this situation and its potential effect on the ability to respond to vector-borne diseases, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Public Health Foundation partnered on a performance management initiative for LHD vector control programs. The initiative involved 14 programs that conducted a performance assessment using the Environmental Public Health Performance Standards. The programs, assisted by quality improvement (QI) experts, used the assessment results to prioritize improvement areas that were addressed with QI projects intended to increase effectiveness and efficiency in the delivery of services such as responding to mosquito complaints and educating the public about vector-borne disease prevention. This article describes the initiative as a process LHD vector control programs may adapt to meet their performance management needs. This study also reviews aggregate performance assessment results and QI projects, which may reveal common aspects of LHD vector control program performance and priority improvement areas. LHD vector control programs interested in performance assessment and improvement may benefit from engaging in an approach similar to this performance management initiative. PMID:27429555

  15. Subolesin/Akirin vaccines for the control of arthropod vectors and vectorborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, J; Moreno-Cid, J A; Galindo, R C; Almazan, C; Kocan, K M; Merino, O; Perez de la Lastra, J M; Estrada-Peña, A; Blouin, E F

    2013-11-01

    Diseases transmitted by arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks and sand flies greatly impact human and animal health, and therefore, their control is important for the eradication of vectorborne diseases (VBD). Vaccination is an environmentally friendly alternative for vector control that allows control of several VBD by targeting their common vector. Recent results have suggested that subolesin (SUB) and its orthologue in insects, akirin (AKR) are good candidate antigens for the control of arthropod vector infestations and pathogen infection. SUB was discovered as a tick-protective antigen in Ixodes scapularis. Vaccination trials with recombinant SUB/AKR demonstrated effective control of arthropod vector infestations in various hard and soft tick species, mosquitoes, sand flies, poultry red mites and sea lice by reducing their numbers, weight, oviposition, fertility and/or moulting. SUB/AKR vaccination also reduced tick infection with tickborne pathogens, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, A. marginale, Babesia bigemina and Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of vaccination on different hosts, vector species, developmental stages and vectorborne pathogen infections demonstrated the feasibility of SUB/AKR universal vaccines for the control of multiple vector infestations and for reduction in VBD. PMID:24589118

  16. Ecology of West Nile virus across four European countries: review of weather profiles, vector population dynamics and vector control response.

    PubMed

    Chaskopoulou, Alexandra; L'Ambert, Gregory; Petric, Dusan; Bellini, Romeo; Zgomba, Marija; Groen, Thomas A; Marrama, Laurence; Bicout, Dominique J

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) represents a serious burden to human and animal health because of its capacity to cause unforeseen and large epidemics. Until 2004, only lineage 1 and 3 WNV strains had been found in Europe. Lineage 2 strains were initially isolated in 2004 (Hungary) and in 2008 (Austria) and for the first time caused a major WNV epidemic in 2010 in Greece with 262 clinical human cases and 35 fatalities. Since then, WNV lineage 2 outbreaks have been reported in several European countries including Italy, Serbia and Greece. Understanding the interaction of ecological factors that affect WNV transmission is crucial for preventing or decreasing the impact of future epidemics. The synchronous co-occurrence of competent mosquito vectors, virus, bird reservoir hosts, and susceptible humans is necessary for the initiation and propagation of an epidemic. Weather is the key abiotic factor influencing the life-cycles of the mosquito vector, the virus, the reservoir hosts and the interactions between them. The purpose of this paper is to review and compare mosquito population dynamics, and weather conditions, in three ecologically different contexts (urban/semi-urban, rural/agricultural, natural) across four European countries (Italy, France, Serbia, Greece) with a history of WNV outbreaks. Local control strategies will be described as well. Improving our understanding of WNV ecology is a prerequisite step for appraising and optimizing vector control strategies in Europe with the ultimate goal to minimize the probability of WNV infection. PMID:27590848

  17. Vector control of wind turbine on the basis of the fuzzy selective neural net*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E. A.; Kovalev, I. V.; Engel, N. E.

    2016-04-01

    An article describes vector control of wind turbine based on fuzzy selective neural net. Based on the wind turbine system’s state, the fuzzy selective neural net tracks an maximum power point under random perturbations. Numerical simulations are accomplished to clarify the applicability and advantages of the proposed vector wind turbine’s control on the basis of the fuzzy selective neuronet. The simulation results show that the proposed intelligent control of wind turbine achieves real-time control speed and competitive performance, as compared to a classical control model with PID controllers based on traditional maximum torque control strategy.

  18. Orchitis as an unusual manifestation of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Stephan; Lippert, Ute; Burchard, Gerd D; Sudeck, Hinrich

    2006-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a re-emerging disease. We report the case of an African patient whose predominant symptom was infertility due to a granulomatous orchitis. The patient was afebrile and had not been in Africa for years. Lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly led us eventually to the diagnosis of sleeping sickness. After treatment with suramin his spermiogram returned to normal. Sleeping sickness evolves through clinically different stages and leads to death if left untreated. The disease may, however, present clinically extremely variable and may thus be difficult to diagnose. PMID:15936085

  19. Insecticide Control of Vector-Borne Diseases: When Is Insecticide Resistance a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Ana; Vézilier, Julien; Weill, Mylène; Read, Andrew F.; Gandon, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Many of the most dangerous human diseases are transmitted by insect vectors. After decades of repeated insecticide use, all of these vector species have demonstrated the capacity to evolve resistance to insecticides. Insecticide resistance is generally considered to undermine control of vector-transmitted diseases because it increases the number of vectors that survive the insecticide treatment. Disease control failure, however, need not follow from vector control failure. Here, we review evidence that insecticide resistance may have an impact on the quality of vectors and, specifically, on three key determinants of parasite transmission: vector longevity, competence, and behaviour. We argue that, in some instances, insecticide resistance is likely to result in a decrease in vector longevity, a decrease in infectiousness, or in a change in behaviour, all of which will reduce the vectorial capacity of the insect. If this effect is sufficiently large, the impact of insecticide resistance on disease management may not be as detrimental as previously thought. In other instances, however, insecticide resistance may have the opposite effect, increasing the insect's vectorial capacity, which may lead to a dramatic increase in the transmission of the disease and even to a higher prevalence than in the absence of insecticides. Either way—and there may be no simple generality—the consequence of the evolution of insecticide resistance for disease ecology deserves additional attention. PMID:20700451

  20. A Heading and Flight-Path Angle Control of Aircraft Based on Required Acceleration Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitani, Naoharu

    This paper describes a control of heading and flight-path angles of aircraft to time-varying command angles. The controller first calculates an acceleration command vector (acV), which is vertical to the velocity vector. acV consists of two components; the one is feedforward acceleration obtained from the rates of command angles, and the other is feedback acceleration obtained from angle deviations by using PID control law. A bank angle command around the velocity vector and commands of pitch and yaw rates are then obtained to generate the required acceleration. A roll rate command is calculated from bank angle deviation. Roll, pitch and yaw rate commands are put into the attitude controller, which can be composed of any suitable control laws such as PID control. The control requires neither aerodynamic coefficients nor online calculation of the inverse dynamics of the aircraft. A numerical simulation illustrates the effects of the control.

  1. Two-DOF precision platform for spacecraft thrust vector control: control strategies and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kougen; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents control strategies and simulations of a two-DOF precision platform as an adaptive thruster mount structure with precision positioning and active vibration suppression capabilities for thrust vector control of space satellites. First, the configuration of the two-DOF precision platform is introduced, which is an intelligent tripod with two in-plane rotational degrees of freedom for the top device-plate. Precision positioning of this platform is achieved using active members that extend or contract to tilt the top device-plate where the thruster is mounted. Kinematic analysis of the platform is then presented and followed by two control strategies; namely local control strategy and global control strategy. In the local control strategy, the motion of each active member is controlled locally according to the kinematical feature of the platform and the local sensor information to achieve the desired tilt of the top device-plate. In the global control strategy, the motion of each active member is adjusted according to the system level information from a tilt sensor. Fuzzy logic control is employed and the two control strategies are simulated and compared.

  2. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem test report (D-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the sequence of tests performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem are presented. The operational characteristics of the thrust vector control subsystem components, as determined from the tests, are discussed. Special analyses of fuel consumption, basic steady state characteristics, GN2 spin, and actuator displacement were reviewed which will aid in understanding the performance of the auxiliary power unit. The possibility of components malfunction is also discussed.

  3. Linearization Method for Starting Control of Speed-Sensorless Vector-Controlled Induction Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinami, Kazuki; Kondo, Keiichiro

    A linearization method is proposed for controlling the start-up operation of a rotating induction motor. The dynamics of this motor are deteriorated when the starting operation is carried out at high frequencies. In this method, the characteristics of the method are analyzed to reveal that the aforementioned problem is caused by the low equivalent gain of the induced voltage during the rotor flux establishment. A method to compensate for the angle of the rotor-flux-induced voltage vector is proposed to overcome this problem. The proposed method is experimentally verified by a test set, and the influence of changes in the rotor resistance is analyzed.

  4. [American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) and the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Spina-Franca, A

    1988-01-01

    Ten to twelve million people irregularly distributed mainly through extensive rural areas of Latin America are afflicted by American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease). Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent, and it is naturally transmitted to humans by hematophagous hemiptera of Triatominae sub-family. These hemiptera feed by biting and usually defecate in the area near the puncture wound. Mucous membranes of breaks in the continuity of skin serve as passage ways for the parasite present in the excrement of the bug. Acute and chronic forms of American trypanosomiasis occur. Nervous system involvement in the acute form may give rise to meningoencephalitis. Central and/or peripheral signs of nervous system involvement can occur in the chronic form. Neuronal depopulation due to cell destruction by direct parasitism during the acute stage of the disease is the main pathogenetic way pointed out to explain chronic forms of nervous system involvement. Chronic Chagas cardiopathy usually produces mural thrombi. Fragments of thrombus situated in the left ventricle may become detached and migrate with the bloodstream to cause embolic phenomena in distant vessels--as in brain vessels--thus causing embolic cerebrovascular insults. Data on clinical and experimental studies are critically analysed. PMID:3143493

  5. Bioluminescence Imaging to Detect Late Stage Infection of African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Burrell-Saward, Hollie; Ward, Theresa H

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a multi-stage disease that manifests in two stages; an early blood stage and a late stage when the parasite invades the central nervous system (CNS). In vivo study of the late stage has been limited as traditional methodologies require the removal of the brain to determine the presence of the parasites. Bioluminescence imaging is a non-invasive, highly sensitive form of optical imaging that enables the visualization of a luciferase-transfected pathogen in real-time. By using a transfected trypanosome strain that has the ability to produce late stage disease in mice we are able to study the kinetics of a CNS infection in a single animal throughout the course of infection, as well as observe the movement and dissemination of a systemic infection. Here we describe a robust protocol to study CNS infections using a bioluminescence model of African trypanosomiasis, providing real time non-invasive observations which can be further analyzed with optional downstream approaches. PMID:27284970

  6. Developmental Testing of Electric Thrust Vector Control Systems for Manned Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Lisa B.; Young, David T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes recent developmental testing to verify the integration of a developmental electromechanical actuator (EMA) with high rate lithium ion batteries and a cross platform extensible controller. Testing was performed at the Thrust Vector Control Research, Development and Qualification Laboratory at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. Electric Thrust Vector Control (ETVC) systems like the EMA may significantly reduce recurring launch costs and complexity compared to heritage systems. Electric actuator mechanisms and control requirements across dissimilar platforms are also discussed with a focus on the similarities leveraged and differences overcome by the cross platform extensible common controller architecture.

  7. Multiaxis aircraft control power from thrust vectoring at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Mason, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive research programs conducted at the Langley Research Center have shown that thrust vectoring can be provided by multifunction (nonaxisymmetric) nozzles. Most of this research has been conducted on pitch vectoring at both static and forward flight conditions. Recent efforts have been aimed at evaluating yaw vectoring concepts at static (wind off) conditions. This paper summarizes results for three different twin-engine fighter configurations tested over a Mach number range of 0.15 to 2.47 at angles of attack up to 35 deg. The objective of these investigations was to determine the multiaxis control power characteristics provided by thrust vectoring. All three configurations employed two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles which provided pitch vectoring by differential deflection of the upper and lower nozzle divergent flaps. Three different means of yaw vectoring were tested: (1) a translating nozzle sidewall; (2) yaw flaps located in the nozzle sidewalls; and (3) canted nozzles. These investigations were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel and the Lewis 10x10-Foot Supersonic Tunnel. Longitudinal and direction control power from thrust vectoring was greater than that provided by aerodynamic control effectors at low speed or at high angles of attack.

  8. Experimental and theoretical comparison of the Probe Thrust Vector Control concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalleri, Robert; Tiarn, Weihnurng; Lewis, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    A concept that offers an alternate method for thrust vector control of liquid or solid propellant rockets is the use of a solid body or probe that is inserted on demand through the wall of the rocket nozzle. This Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) concept is an alternative to that of a gimbaled nozzle or a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector control system. The viability of the PTVC concept can be assessed either experimentally and/or with the use of CFD. A purely experimental assessment is time consuming and expensive, whereas a CFD assessment is time- and cost-effective. Two key requirements of the concept are PTVC vectoring performance and active cooling requirements for the probe to maintain its thermal and structural integrity. The objective of the work reported here is presentation of experimental subscale cold flow tests and comparison of these tests with CFD predictions and the response time of the PTVC system.

  9. A Simple Design Method Based on Vector Control of AC Machines with LC Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ryosuke; Kubota, Hisao

    This paper presents a simple voltage control system of AC machines using PWM voltage source inverter with output LC filters. By assuming a motor as a current source, the voltage is controlled by a simple proportional differential (PD) control. The vector control and PD control can be separately controlled in this system. A method for disturbance rejection is also described. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by simulations and experiments.

  10. Annual single-dose diethylcarbamazine plus ivermectin for control of bancroftian filariasis: comparative efficacy with and without vector control.

    PubMed

    Reuben, R; Rajendran, R; Sunish, I P; Mani, T R; Tewari, S C; Hiriyan, J; Gajanana, A

    2001-06-01

    Two intervention strategies for the control of bancroftian filariasis were compared in rural villages of southern India: annual mass treatment with single-dose diethylcarbamazine plus ivermectin, either on its own or combined with vector control. Vector control, based on the use of polystyrene beads and larvivorous fishes in the major breeding sites of Culex quinquefasciatus, brought about a drastic and sustained reduction in vector density and man-biting rates. After the first round of treatment, chemotherapy alone brought about a 60% drop in the annual transmission potential (ATP) whereas the integrated strategy reduced ATP by 96% (P < 0.05). After two annual rounds of treatment, the reduction in ATP was similar for both strategies (91%-96%), with the prevalences of microfilaraemia reduced by 88%-92%. However, when drug pressure was removed in the third and final year of the study, transmission was resumed in the absence of vector control whereas no infective female mosquitoes were detected in the villages with vector control. Vector control, though obviously not cost-effective in the short term, could play an important role in an integrated programme, by preventing re-establishment of transmission after chemotherapy is completed. PMID:11454246

  11. Retroviral vectors encoding ADA regulatory locus control region provide enhanced T-cell-specific transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Murine retroviral vectors have been used in several hundred gene therapy clinical trials, but have fallen out of favor for a number of reasons. One issue is that gene expression from viral or internal promoters is highly variable and essentially unregulated. Moreover, with retroviral vectors, gene expression is usually silenced over time. Mammalian genes, in contrast, are characterized by highly regulated, precise levels of expression in both a temporal and a cell-specific manner. To ascertain if recapitulation of endogenous adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression can be achieved in a vector construct we created a new series of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) based retroviral vector that carry human regulatory elements including combinations of the ADA promoter, the ADA locus control region (LCR), ADA introns and human polyadenylation sequences in a self-inactivating vector backbone. Methods A MuLV-based retroviral vector with a self-inactivating (SIN) backbone, the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter (PGK) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as a reporter gene, was generated. Subsequent vectors were constructed from this basic vector by deletion or addition of certain elements. The added elements that were assessed are the human ADA promoter, human ADA locus control region (LCR), introns 7, 8, and 11 from the human ADA gene, and human growth hormone polyadenylation signal. Retroviral vector particles were produced by transient three-plasmid transfection of 293T cells. Retroviral vectors encoding eGFP were titered by transducing 293A cells, and then the proportion of GFP-positive cells was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Non T-cell and T-cell lines were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1 and the yield of eGFP transgene expression was evaluated by FACS analysis using mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) detection. Results Vectors that contained the ADA LCR were preferentially expressed in T

  12. Novel Rigid External Distraction Device Improves Stability and Controls the Vector During Midfacial Advancement.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Cory M; Rottgers, Stephen Alex; Langenfeld, Christopher C; Mulliken, John B; Padwa, Bonnie L

    2016-06-01

    The major limitation of the rigid external devices currently used for midfacial distraction after subcranial Le Fort III osteotomies is the ductile wire that connects the midface to the device, which makes it difficult to control the vector and force during distraction. The authors describe a novel external appliance that addresses this and other problems of contemporary devices, and application of a custom cranial template that facilitates precise placement of the device to achieve the planned vector of distraction. PMID:27213737

  13. Global Trends in the Use of Insecticides to Control Vector-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Henk; Zaim, Morteza; Soares, Agnes; Ameneshewa, Birkinesh; Mnzava, Abraham; Hii, Jeffrey; Dash, Aditya Prasad; Ejov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    Background: Data on insecticide use for vector control are essential for guiding pesticide management systems on judicious and appropriate use, resistance management, and reduction of risks to human health and the environment. Objective: We studied the global use and trends of insecticide use for control of vector-borne diseases for the period 2000 through 2009. Methods: A survey was distributed to countries with vector control programs to request national data on vector control insecticide use, excluding the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LNs). Data were received from 125 countries, representing 97% of the human populations of 143 targeted countries. Results: The main disease targeted with insecticides was malaria, followed by dengue, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease. The use of vector control insecticides was dominated by organochlorines [i.e., DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)] in terms of quantity applied (71% of total) and by pyrethroids in terms of the surface or area covered (81% of total). Global use of DDT for vector control, most of which was in India alone, was fairly constant during 2000 through 2009. In Africa, pyrethroid use increased in countries that also achieved high coverage for LNs, and DDT increased sharply until 2008 but dropped in 2009. Conclusions: The global use of DDT has not changed substantially since the Stockholm Convention went into effect. The dominance of pyrethroid use has major implications because of the spread of insecticide resistance with the potential to reduce the efficacy of LNs. Managing insecticide resistance should be coordinated between disease-specific programs and sectors of public health and agriculture within the context of an integrated vector management approach. PMID:22251458

  14. A novel sliding-mode control of induction motor using space vector modulation technique.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tian-Jun; Xie, Wen-Fang

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a novel sliding-mode control method for torque control of induction motors. The control principle is based on sliding-mode control combined with space vector modulation technique. The sliding-mode control contributes to the robustness of induction motor drives, and the space vector modulation improves the torque, flux, and current steady-state performance by reducing the ripple. The Lyapunov direct method is used to ensure the reaching and sustaining of sliding mode and stability of the control system. The performance of the proposed system is compared with those of conventional sliding-mode controller and classical PI controller. Finally, computer simulation results show that the proposed control scheme provides robust dynamic characteristics with low torque ripple. PMID:16294775

  15. The interplay of vaccination and vector control on small dengue networks.

    PubMed

    Hendron, Ross-William S; Bonsall, Michael B

    2016-10-21

    Dengue fever is a major public health issue affecting billions of people in over 100 countries across the globe. This challenge is growing as the invasive mosquito vectors, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, expand their distributions and increase their population sizes. Hence there is an increasing need to devise effective control methods that can contain dengue outbreaks. Here we construct an epidemiological model for virus transmission between vectors and hosts on a network of host populations distributed among city and town patches, and investigate disease control through vaccination and vector control using variants of the sterile insect technique (SIT). Analysis of the basic reproductive number and simulations indicate that host movement across this small network influences the severity of epidemics. Both vaccination and vector control strategies are investigated as methods of disease containment and our results indicate that these controls can be made more effective with mixed strategy solutions. We predict that reduced lethality through poor SIT methods or imperfectly efficacious vaccines will impact efforts to control disease spread. In particular, weakly efficacious vaccination strategies against multiple virus serotype diversity may be counter productive to disease control efforts. Even so, failings of one method may be mitigated by supplementing it with an alternative control strategy. Generally, our network approach encourages decision making to consider connected populations, to emphasise that successful control methods must effectively suppress dengue epidemics at this landscape scale. PMID:27457093

  16. Automated innovative diagnostic, data management and communication tool, for improving malaria vector control in endemic settings.

    PubMed

    Vontas, John; Mitsakakis, Konstantinos; Zengerle, Roland; Yewhalaw, Delenasaw; Sikaala, Chadwick Haadezu; Etang, Josiane; Fallani, Matteo; Carman, Bill; Müller, Pie; Chouaïbou, Mouhamadou; Coleman, Marlize; Coleman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease that caused more than 400,000 deaths in sub-Saharan Africa in 2015. Mass prevention of the disease is best achieved by vector control which heavily relies on the use of insecticides. Monitoring mosquito vector populations is an integral component of control programs and a prerequisite for effective interventions. Several individual methods are used for this task; however, there are obstacles to their uptake, as well as challenges in organizing, interpreting and communicating vector population data. The Horizon 2020 project "DMC-MALVEC" consortium will develop a fully integrated and automated multiplex vector-diagnostic platform (LabDisk) for characterizing mosquito populations in terms of species composition, Plasmodium infections and biochemical insecticide resistance markers. The LabDisk will be interfaced with a Disease Data Management System (DDMS), a custom made data management software which will collate and manage data from routine entomological monitoring activities providing information in a timely fashion based on user needs and in a standardized way. The ResistanceSim, a serious game, a modern ICT platform that uses interactive ways of communicating guidelines and exemplifying good practices of optimal use of interventions in the health sector will also be a key element. The use of the tool will teach operational end users the value of quality data (relevant, timely and accurate) to make informed decisions. The integrated system (LabDisk, DDMS & ResistanceSim) will be evaluated in four malaria endemic countries, representative of the vector control challenges in sub-Saharan Africa, (Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Ethiopia and Zambia), highly representative of malaria settings with different levels of endemicity and vector control challenges, to support informed decision-making in vector control and disease management. PMID:27225553

  17. Position Sensorless Vector Control for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors Based on Maximum Torque Control Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Hajime; Tomigashi, Yoshio; Kishimoto, Keiji

    High efficiency drive can be achieved by the maximum torque-per-ampere (MTPA) control which used reluctance torque effectively. However, the calculations for estimating rotor position and for controlling the d-axis current are required. The motor parameters of inductance etc. that are easily affected by magnetic saturation are included in those calculations. This paper proposes a new MTPA control method, which is robust against changes of motor parameters caused by magnetic saturation. In addition, complex calculation for d-axis current or reference to the table is not necessary. In this method, we define a novel coordinate frame, which has one axis aligned with the current vector of the MTPA control, and estimate the frame directly. Because the parameter Lqm for estimating the frame is less affected by the magnetic saturation than the conventional Lq, the effect of magnetic saturation on the position estimation can be greatly suppressed. First, an extended electromotive force model based on the proposed frame and a parameter Lqm for an estimation of the frame are derived. Next, the effectiveness of this proposed method is confirmed by simulations and experiments.

  18. Seroprevalence of CANINE LEISHMANIASIS AND American trypanosomiasis in dogs from Grenada, West Indies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canine leishmaniasis and American trypanosomiasis (AT) are caused by related hemoflagellated parasites, Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi, which share several common host species. Dogs are reservoirs for human infections with both pathogens. We determined the prevalence of antibodies to Leishman...

  19. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - A 25th Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 25th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 81st Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in March 2015. The principal objective, for the previous 24 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spec...

  20. MOSQUITO VECTOR CONTROL AND BIOLOGY IN LATIN AMERICA - A 19TH SYMPOSIUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 19th Annual Latin American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 75th Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in April 2009. The principal objective, as for the previous 18 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control s...

  1. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 24th symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 24th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 80th Annual Meeting in Seattle, WA in February 2014. The principal objective, as for the previous 23 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spe...

  2. Mosquito vector biology and control in latin america-a 24th symposium.

    PubMed

    Clark, Gary G; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso

    2014-09-01

    The 24th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 80th Annual Meeting in Seattle, WA, in February 2014. The principal objective, for the previous 23 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control specialists, public health workers, and academicians from Latin America. This publication includes summaries of 26 presentations that were given orally in Spanish or presented as posters by participants from Colombia, Mexico, and the USA. Topics addressed in the symposium included: surveillance, ecology, chemical control, studies of dengue viruses, and insecticide resistance associated with Aedes aegypti; Anopheles vectors of malaria; essential oils; and ethnic groups and vector-borne diseases. PMID:25843096

  3. Sustainability of vector control strategies in the Gran Chaco Region: current challenges and possible approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2011-01-01

    Sustainability has become a focal point of the international agenda. At the heart of its range of distribution in the Gran Chaco Region, the elimination of Triatoma infestans has failed, even in areas subject to intensive professional vector control efforts. Chagas disease control programs traditionally have been composed of two divorced entities: a vector control program in charge of routine field operations (bug detection and insecticide spraying) and a disease control program in charge of screening blood donors, diagnosis, etiologic treatment and providing medical care to chronic patients. The challenge of sustainable suppression of bug infestation and Trypanosoma cruzi transmission can be met through integrated disease management, in which vector control is combined with active case detection and treatment to increase impact, cost-effectiveness and public acceptance in resource-limited settings. Multi-stakeholder involvement may add sustainability and resilience to the surveillance system. Chagas vector control and disease management must remain a regional effort within the frame of sustainable development rather than being viewed exclusively as a matter of health pertinent to the health sector. Sustained and continuous coordination between governments, agencies, control programs, academia and the affected communities is critical. PMID:19753458

  4. Challenges encountered using standard vector control measures for dengue in Boa Vista, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Problem In 2010, dengue virus (DENV) serotype–4 was detected during a dengue outbreak in the Amazonian city of Boa Vista. At that time Brazil was already endemic for DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-3. This was the first time DENV-4 was observed in the country after it was initially detected and eliminated in 1981. Approach To hinder the spread of DENV-4 throughout Brazil, standard vector control measures were intensified. Vector control professionals visited 56 837 households in 22 out of 31 districts of Boa Vista, to eliminate mosquito-breeding sites. Water storage containers were treated with the larvicide diflubenzuron, and deltamethrin was sprayed for adult Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Fifteen days later, a second larvae survey and additional deltamethrin applications were performed. Local setting In Brazil, dengue vector control is managed at all three government levels. Regular surveillance of Aedes aegypti is done four to six times a year to strengthen mosquito control activities in areas with high-vector density. Educational dengue control campaigns in communities are scarce, especially between outbreaks. Relevant changes In spite of extensive implementation of all standard control actions recommended by the Brazilian dengue control programme, only a slight decrease in mosquito density was detected. Lessons learnt There is a need to redesign all levels of dengue control. Public consultation and engagement, behaviour change and actions that go beyond technical impositions are required. Vector control programme managers need to reflect on what constitutes good practices and whether intermittent information campaigns are effective measures for dengue prevention and control. PMID:25378760

  5. Rotating vector methods for smooth torque control of a switched reluctance motor drive

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, N.J.; Lorenz, R.D.

    2000-04-01

    This paper has two primary contributions to switched reluctance motor (SRM) control: a systematic approach to smooth torque production and a high-performance technique for sensorless motion control. The systematic approach to smooth torque production is based on development of novel rotating spatial vectors methods that can be used to predict the torque produced in an arbitrary SRM. This analysis directly leads to explicit, insightful methods to provide smooth torque control of SRM's. The high-performance technique for sensorless motion control is based on a rotating vector method for high bandwidth, high resolution, position, and velocity estimation suitable for both precise torque and motion control. The sensorless control and smooth torque control methods are both verified experimentally.

  6. [Control of vectors of human onchocerciasis in intertropical Africa (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Philippon, B; Le Berre, R

    1978-01-01

    First the authors make short comments on the two Simuliidae species complexes vectors of African human onchocerciasis (S. damnosum s.l. and S. neavei), as well as on the reasons for renewed interest in the control of those vectors; then they review the various possible methods of control (ecological, biological, genetical and chemical methods) and they finally detail the methodology of anti-S. damnosum chemical larviciding which is the only kind or large scale control presently used against onchocerciasis vectors. The experiences and results of the previous campaigns resulted in the large Onchocerciasis Control Programme in Volta River Basin (O.C.P.) which now appears as a model for present and future control measures against S. damnosum. This Programme is briefly described, together with its results, problems (reinvasion) and orientations. As a conclusion, the excellent level of control of the vectors and onchocerciasis transmission which is obtained is emphasized and it is expected that in the future new large scale campaigns using O.C.P. experience may be initiated. PMID:745534

  7. Fighting Arbovirus Transmission: Natural and Engineered Control of Vector Competence in Aedes Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Joy; Rainey, Stephanie M.; McFarlane, Melanie; Donald, Claire L.; Schnettler, Esther; Kohl, Alain; Pondeville, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    Control of aedine mosquito vectors, either by mosquito population reduction or replacement with refractory mosquitoes, may play an essential role in the fight against arboviral diseases. In this review, we will focus on the development and application of biological approaches, both natural or engineered, to limit mosquito vector competence for arboviruses. The study of mosquito antiviral immunity has led to the identification of a number of host response mechanisms and proteins that are required to control arbovirus replication in mosquitoes, though more factors influencing vector competence are likely to be discovered. We will discuss key aspects of these pathways as targets either for selection of naturally resistant mosquito populations or for mosquito genetic manipulation. Moreover, we will consider the use of endosymbiotic bacteria such as Wolbachia, which in some cases have proven to be remarkably efficient in disrupting arbovirus transmission by mosquitoes, but also the use of naturally occurring insect-specific viruses that may interfere with arboviruses in mosquito vectors. Finally, we will discuss the use of paratransgenesis as well as entomopathogenic fungi, which are also proposed strategies to control vector competence. PMID:26463078

  8. Investigations on the control of bilharziasis vectors in Israel*

    PubMed Central

    Saliternik, Z.; Witenberg, G.

    1959-01-01

    In spite of the arrival in Israel over the past decade of large numbers of immigrants infected with bilharziasis and although during that period there have been two sporadic outbreaks of the disease, there seems little immediate danger of bilharziasis spreading in the country. However, hydrographical, agricultural and economic conditions are subject to rapid changes in Israel and the present favourable situation may not be lasting. In anticipation, therefore, of possible outbreaks, laboratory experiments have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy in the control of Bulinus ova and adult snails and schistosome cercariae of a number of known molluscides and other substances. Although similar studies have been made in several other countries, it was felt advisable to repeat them under local hydrological conditions, particularly in view of the high carbonate content of the local waters. While most of the substances tested exert some molluscicidal action, only copper sulfate, sodium pentachlorophenate and common salt were found to be of practical value. PMID:14441019

  9. A Cluster-Randomized Trial of Insecticide-Treated Curtains for Dengue Vector Control in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Audrey; Trongtokit, Yuwadee; Alexander, Neal; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Satimai, Wichai; Vanlerberghe, Veerle; Van der Stuyft, Patrick; McCall, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of insecticide-treated window curtains (ITCs) for dengue vector control was evaluated in Thailand in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. A total of 2,037 houses in 26 clusters was randomized to receive the intervention or act as control (no treatment). Entomological surveys measured Aedes infestations (Breteau index, house index, container index, and pupae per person index) and oviposition indices (mean numbers of eggs laid in oviposition traps) immediately before and after intervention, and at 3-month intervals over 12 months. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in entomological indices between intervention and control clusters, although oviposition indices were lower (P < 0.01) in ITC clusters during the wet season. It is possible that the open housing structures in the study reduced the likelihood of mosquitoes making contact with ITCs. ITCs deployed in a region where this house design is common may be unsuitable for dengue vector control. PMID:23166195

  10. A Vector Control for Grid-connected Wind Power Generation with Doubly Fed Induction Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yuji; Kaneda, Hirotoshi; Kobayashi, Daichi; Tanaka, Akio

    Recently, doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) and synchronous generator are mostly applied for wind power generation due to high efficiently for wind energy capture. An inverter system is required to control wind turbine speed and power factor in those generators. The inverter rating of the synchronous generator equals to generator rating. However, DFIG has the advantage that the inverter rating is about 25% to the generator rating. The paper describes a vector control of DFIG inter-connected to power line. The performance of proposed vector control is examined using power system simulation software PSCAD/EMTDC for the DFIG inter-connected to 6.6kv distribution line. The results show good dynamic responses and high accuracy to the stator active power control and the stator reactive power control.

  11. A Simplified Sensorless Vector Control Based on Average DC Bus Current for Fan Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumita, Satoshi; Tobari, Kazuaki; Aoyagi, Shigehisa; Maeda, Daisuke

    This paper describes a simplified sensorless vector control based on the average DC bus current for PMSM. This method can be used to design a drive control system at a relatively low cost because the microcontroller does not require a precise timer and the calculation load is slight. In the proposed method, one of the two possible current estimation processes is chosen according to the operation mode. First, the controller estimates d-axis current and identifies the back-EMF parameter in the synchronous operation mode at low speeds. The error in the back-EMF identification affects the efficiency of the proposed system, so it needs to be zero. Second, the controller estimates q-axis current in vector control mode. The identified parameter and q-axis current define voltage reference to realize high efficiency drive. The obtained experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. A cluster-randomized trial of insecticide-treated curtains for dengue vector control in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Audrey; Trongtokit, Yuwadee; Alexander, Neal; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Satimai, Wichai; Vanlerberghe, Veerle; Van der Stuyft, Patrick; McCall, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of insecticide-treated window curtains (ITCs) for dengue vector control was evaluated in Thailand in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. A total of 2,037 houses in 26 clusters was randomized to receive the intervention or act as control (no treatment). Entomological surveys measured Aedes infestations (Breteau index, house index, container index, and pupae per person index) and oviposition indices (mean numbers of eggs laid in oviposition traps) immediately before and after intervention, and at 3-month intervals over 12 months. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in entomological indices between intervention and control clusters, although oviposition indices were lower (P < 0.01) in ITC clusters during the wet season. It is possible that the open housing structures in the study reduced the likelihood of mosquitoes making contact with ITCs. ITCs deployed in a region where this house design is common may be unsuitable for dengue vector control. PMID:23166195

  13. Analysis of Power Converter Losses in Vector Control System of a Self-Excited Induction Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bašić, Mateo; Vukadinović, Dinko; Polić, Miljenko

    2014-03-01

    This paper provides analysis of losses in the hysteresis-driven three-phase power converter with IGBTs and free-wheeling diodes. The converter under consideration is part of the self-excited induction generator (SEIG) vector control system. For the analysis, the SEIG vector control system is used in which the induction generator iron losses are taken into account. The power converter losses are determined by using a suitable loss estimation algorithm reported in literature. The chosen algorithm allows the power converter losses to be determined both by type (switching/conduction losses) and by converter component (IGBT/diode losses). The overall power converter losses are determined over wide ranges of rotor speed, dc-link voltage and load resistance, and subsequently used for offline correction of the overall control system's losses (efficiency) obtained through control system simulations with an ideal power converter. The control system's efficiency values obtained after the correction are compared with the measured values.

  14. Prevention and control of neglected tropical diseases: overview of randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kappagoda, Shanthi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To analyse evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the prevention and control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) and to identify areas where evidence is lacking. Methods The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and PubMed were searched for RCTs and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and PubMed were searched for meta-analyses and systematic reviews, both from inception to 31 December 2012. Findings Overall, 258 RCTs were found on American trypanosomiasis, Buruli ulcer, dengue, geohelminth infection, leishmaniasis, leprosy, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, rabies, schistosomiasis or trachoma. No RCTs were found on cysticercosis, dracunculiasis, echinococcosis, foodborne trematodes, or human African trypanosomiasis. The most studied diseases were geohelminth infection (51 RCTs) and leishmaniasis (46 RCTs). Vaccines, chemoprophylaxis and interventions targeting insect vectors were evaluated in 113, 99 and 39 RCTs, respectively. Few addressed how best to deliver preventive chemotherapy, such as the choice of dosing interval (10) or target population (4), the population coverage needed to reduce transmission (2) or the method of drug distribution (1). Thirty-one publications containing 32 systematic reviews (16 with and 16 without meta-analyses) were found on American trypanosomiasis, dengue, geohelminths, leishmaniasis, leprosy, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis or trachoma. Together, they included only 79 of the 258 published RCTs (30.6%). Of 36 interventions assessed, 8 were judged effective in more than one review. Conclusion Few RCTs on the prevention or control of the principal NTDs were found. Trials on how best to deliver preventive chemotherapy were particularly rare. PMID:24839325

  15. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem verification test (V-2) report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the verification testing sequence V-2 performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem are presented. A detailed history of the hot firings plus additional discussion of the auxiliary power unit and the hydraulic component performance is presented. The test objectives, data, and conclusions are included.

  16. Blazed vector gratings fabricated using photosensitive polymer liquid crystals and control of polarization diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Kuzuwata, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Noda, Kohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-01

    The blazed vector grating possessing antisymmetric distributions of the birefringence were fabricated by exposing the line-focused linearly polarized ultraviolet light on the photosensitive polymer liquid crystals. The polarization states of the diffraction beams can be highly and widely controlled by designing the blazed structures, and the diffraction properties were well-explained by Jones calculus.

  17. Evaluation of spray droplet spectrum of sprayers used for vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Droplet spectra data were collected from spray equipment intended for use in vector control by the US Department of Defense pest management programs to determine if they produce droplets in the ultra-low volume (ULV) spectrum. Droplets generated by 26 sprayers utilizing water + non-ionic surfactant...

  18. Intrusive versus domiciliated triatomines and the challenge of adapting vector control practices against Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Waleckx, Etienne; Gourbière, Sébastien; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease prevention remains mostly based on triatomine vector control to reduce or eliminate house infestation with these bugs. The level of adaptation of triatomines to human housing is a key part of vector competence and needs to be precisely evaluated to allow for the design of effective vector control strategies. In this review, we examine how the domiciliation/intrusion level of different triatomine species/populations has been defined and measured and discuss how these concepts may be improved for a better understanding of their ecology and evolution, as well as for the design of more effective control strategies against a large variety of triatomine species. We suggest that a major limitation of current criteria for classifying triatomines into sylvatic, intrusive, domiciliary and domestic species is that these are essentially qualitative and do not rely on quantitative variables measuring population sustainability and fitness in their different habitats. However, such assessments may be derived from further analysis and modelling of field data. Such approaches can shed new light on the domiciliation process of triatomines and may represent a key tool for decision-making and the design of vector control interventions. PMID:25993504

  19. Mosquito Vector Control and Biology in Latin America - A 17th Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 17th Annual Latin America American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 73rd Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL, in April 2007. The principal objective, as for the previous 16 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector cont...

  20. Characterization of Spatial Repellent, Contact Irritant and Toxicant Chemical Actions of Standard Vector Control Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previously described modular high-throughput screening system (HITTS) was used to characterize the spatial repellent, contact irritant and toxicant chemical actions of 14 compounds with a history of use in vector control. The response of F1-F4 Aedes aegypti to various concentrations of four organo...

  1. An innovative ecohealth intervention for Chagas disease vector control in Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Waleckx, Etienne; Camara-Mejia, Javier; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Cruz-Chan, Vladimir; Rosado-Vallado, Miguel; Vazquez-Narvaez, Santos; Najera-Vazquez, Rosario; Gourbière, Sébastien; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-domiciliated (intrusive) triatomine vectors remain a challenge for the sustainability of Chagas disease vector control as these triatomines are able to transiently (re-)infest houses. One of the best-characterized examples is Triatoma dimidiata from the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico, where adult insects seasonally infest houses between March and July. Methods We focused our study on three rural villages in the state of Yucatan, Mexico, in which we performed a situation analysis as a first step before the implementation of an ecohealth (ecosystem approach to health) vector control intervention. Results The identification of the key determinants affecting the transient invasion of human dwellings by T. dimidiata was performed by exploring associations between bug presence and qualitative and quantitative variables describing the ecological, biological and social context of the communities. We then used a participatory action research approach for implementation and evaluation of a control strategy based on window insect screens to reduce house infestation by T. dimidiata. Conclusions This ecohealth approach may represent a valuable alternative to vertically-organized insecticide spraying. Further evaluation may confirm that it is sustainable and provides effective control (in the sense of limiting infestation of human dwellings and vector/human contacts) of intrusive triatomines in the region. PMID:25604765

  2. The Cost of Dengue Vector Control Activities in Malaysia by Different Service Providers.

    PubMed

    Packierisamy, P Raviwharmman; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Dahlui, Maznah; Venugopalan, B; Halasa, Yara A; Shepard, Donald S

    2015-11-01

    We examined variations in dengue vector control costs and resource consumption between the District Health Departments (DHDs) and Local Authorities (LAs) to assist informed decision making as to the future roles of these agencies in the delivery of dengue vector control services in Malaysia. Data were collected from the vector control units of DHDs and LAs in 8 selected districts. We captured costs and resource consumption in 2010 for premise inspection for mosquito breeding sites, fogging to destroy adult mosquitoes and larviciding of potential breeding sites. Overall, DHDs spent US$5.62 million or US$679 per case and LAs spent US$2.61 million or US$499 per case. The highest expenditure for both agencies was for fogging, 51.0% and 45.8% of costs for DHDs and LAs, respectively. The DHDs had higher resource costs for human personnel, vehicles, pesticides, and equipment. The findings provide some evidence to rationalize delivery of dengue vector control services in Malaysia. PMID:26047628

  3. Population control of the malaria vector Anopheles pseudopunctipennis by habitat manipulation.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, J. Guillermo; Rojas, Julio C.; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I.; Quiroz-Martínez, Humberto; Valle, Javier; Williams, Trevor

    2004-01-01

    Insect vector-borne diseases continue to present a major challenge to human health. Understanding the factors that regulate the size of mosquito populations is considered fundamental to the ability to predict disease transmission rates and for vector population control. The mosquito, Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, a vector of Plasmodium spp., breeds in riverside pools containing filamentous algae in Mesoamerica. Breeding pools along 3 km sections of the River Coatan, Chiapas, Mexico were subjected to algal extraction or left as controls in a cross-over trial extending over 2 years. Initial densities of An. pseudopunctipennis larvae were directly proportional to the prevalence of filamentous algae in each breeding site. The extraction of algae brought about a striking decline in the density of An. pseudopunctipennis larvae sustained for about six weeks, and a concurrent reduction in the adult population in both years of the study. Mark-release experiments indicated that dispersal from adjacent untreated areas was unlikely to exert an important influence on the magnitude of mosquito control that we observed. Habitat manipulation by extraction of filamentous algae offers a unique opportunity for sustainable control of this malaria vector. This technique may represent a valuable intervention, complimenting insecticide spraying of households, to minimize Plasmodium transmission rates in Mesoamerica. PMID:15475337

  4. Further evaluation of spray characterization of sprayers typically used in vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Droplet size spectra from different sprayers used to generate sprays for controlling insects that may vector diseases were measured by a laser diffraction instrument. The objective of this work was to measure the droplet size generated by different sprayers with water- and oil-based spray solutions...

  5. Revising EPA's guidance for controlling pathogens and vector attraction in biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.E. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    EPA's guidance document, Environmental Regulations and Technology: Control of Pathogens and Vector Attraction in Sewage Sludge (so called White House Document) is under revision. Planned changes, additions, and clarifications relate to the following topics: additional information on pathogens in the environment, intent and application of time and temperature requirements, intent and application site access restrictions, meeting vector attraction reduction requirements, composting guidelines, testing frequency and methodology, and role of the Pathogen Equivalency Committee (PEC). Comments received in the more than six years since the 40CFR Part 503 Regulation went into effect and from regulatory personnel as well as the regulated community and their consultants are being addressed.

  6. A direct torque control scheme for permanent magnet synchronous motors based on space vector modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiao-hui; Xu, Shu-Ping

    2013-03-01

    In order to solve the problem of direct torque control (DTC) for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) related to the flux and the torque ripple and the uncertainty of switching frequency, A novel direct torque control system based on space vector modulation(SVM-DTC) for permanent magnet synchronous motor was proposed. In this method flux and torque are controlled through stator voltage components in stator flux linkage coordinate axes and space vector modulation is used to control inverters. Therefore, the errors of torque and flux linkage could be compensated accurately. The whole system has only one easily adjustable PI adjuster and needs no high for hardware and easy for realize. The simulation results verify the feasibility of this method, reduction of the flux and the torque ripple, and the good performance of DTC.

  7. Thailand Momentum on Policy and Practice in Local Legislation on Dengue Vector Control

    PubMed Central

    Bhumiratana, Adisak; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Chujun, Suriyo; Kaewwaen, Wuthichai; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa; Koyadun, Surachart

    2014-01-01

    Over a past decade, an administrative decentralization model, adopted for local administration development in Thailand, is replacing the prior centralized (top-down) command system. The change offers challenges to local governmental agencies and other public health agencies at all the ministerial, regional, and provincial levels. A public health regulatory and legislative framework for dengue vector control by local governmental agencies is a national topic of interest because dengue control program has been integrated into healthcare services at the provincial level and also has been given priority in health plans of local governmental agencies. The enabling environments of local administrations are unique, so this critical review focuses on the authority of local governmental agencies responsible for disease prevention and control and on the functioning of local legislation with respect to dengue vector control and practices. PMID:24799896

  8. Genetic shifting: a novel approach for controlling vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jeffrey R; Tabachnick, Walter J

    2014-06-01

    Rendering populations of vectors of diseases incapable of transmitting pathogens through genetic methods has long been a goal of vector geneticists. We outline a method to achieve this goal that does not involve the introduction of any new genetic variants to the target population. Rather we propose that shifting the frequencies of naturally occurring alleles that confer refractoriness to transmission can reduce transmission below a sustainable level. The program employs methods successfully used in plant and animal breeding. Because no artificially constructed genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are introduced into the environment, the method is minimally controversial. We use Aedes aegypti and dengue virus (DENV) for illustrative purposes but point out that the proposed program is generally applicable to vector-borne disease control. PMID:24794113

  9. Legal aspects of public health: difficulties in controlling vector-borne and zoonotic diseases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Marcílio S; de Moraes, Josué

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, vector-borne and zoonotic diseases have become a major challenge for public health. Dengue fever and leptospirosis are the most important communicable diseases in Brazil based on their prevalence and the healthy life years lost from disability. The primary strategy for preventing human exposure to these diseases is effective insect and rodent control in and around the home. However, health authorities have difficulties in controlling vector-borne and zoonotic diseases because residents often refuse access to their homes. This study discusses aspects related to the activities performed by Brazilian health authorities to combat vector-borne and zoonotic diseases, particularly difficulties in relation to the legal aspect, which often impede the quick and effective actions of these professionals. How might it be possible to reconcile the need to preserve public health and the rule on the inviolability of the home, especially in the case of abandoned properties or illegal residents and the refusal of residents to allow the health authority access? Do residents have the right to hinder the performance of health workers even in the face of a significant and visible focus of disease transmission? This paper argues that a comprehensive legal plan aimed at the control of invasive vector-borne and zoonotic diseases including synanthropic animals of public health importance should be considered. In addition, this paper aims to bridge the gap between lawyers and public health professionals and to facilitate communication between them. PMID:25051187

  10. Drivers, dynamics, and control of emerging vector-borne zoonotic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Randolph, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging vector-borne diseases represent an important issue for global health. Many vector-borne pathogens have appeared in new regions in the past two decades, and many endemic diseases have increased in incidence. Although introductions and local emergence are frequently considered distinct processes, many emerging endemic pathogens are in fact invading at a local scale coincident with habitat change. We highlight key differences in the dynamics and disease burden that result from increased pathogen transmission following habitat change compared with the introduction of pathogens to new regions. Truly in situ emergence is commonly driven by changes in human factors as much as by enhanced enzootic cycles whereas pathogen invasion results from anthropogenic trade and travel and suitable conditions for a pathogen, including hosts, vectors, and climate. Once established, ecological factors related to vector characteristics shape the evolutionary selective pressure on pathogens that may result in increased use of humans as transmission hosts. We describe challenges inherent in the control of vector-borne zoonotic diseases and some emerging non-traditional strategies that may be more effective in the long term. PMID:23200503

  11. Options for Field Diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Chappuis, François; Loutan, Louis; Simarro, Pere; Lejon, Veerle; Büscher, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense remains highly prevalent in several rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa and is lethal if left untreated. Therefore, accurate tools are absolutely required for field diagnosis. For T. b. gambiense HAT, highly sensitive tests are available for serological screening but the sensitivity of parasitological confirmatory tests remains insufficient and needs to be improved. Screening for T. b. rhodesiense infection still relies on clinical features in the absence of serological tests available for field use. Ongoing research is opening perspectives for a new generation of field diagnostics. Also essential for both forms of HAT is accurate determination of the disease stage because of the high toxicity of melarsoprol, the drug most widely used during the neurological stage of the illness. Recent studies have confirmed the high accuracy of raised immunoglobulin M levels in the cerebrospinal fluid for the staging of T. b. gambiense HAT, and a promising simple assay (LATEX/IgM) is being tested in the field. Apart from the urgent need for better tools for the field diagnosis of this neglected disease, improved access to diagnosis and treatment for the population at risk remains the greatest challenge for the coming years. PMID:15653823

  12. Human African Trypanosomiasis in a Rural Community, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Lutumba, Pascal; Makieya, Eric; Shaw, Alexandra; Meheus, Filip

    2007-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) (sleeping sickness) caused the loss of ≈1.5 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in 2002. We describe the effect of HAT during 2000–2002 in Buma, a rural community near Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We used retrospective questionnaire surveys to estimate HAT-related household costs and DALYs. The HAT outbreak in Buma involved 57 patients and affected 47 (21%) households. The cost to each household was equivalent to 5 months’ income for that household. The total number of HAT-related DALYs was 2,145, and interventions to control HAT averted 1,408 DALYs. The cost per DALY averted was US $17. Because HAT has a serious economic effect on households and control interventions are cost-effective, considering only global burden of disease rankings for resource allocation could lead to misguided priority setting if applied without caution in HAT-affected countries. PMID:17479887

  13. Vista/F-16 Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) control law design and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwerneman, W. D.; Eller, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    For the Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) program, a new control law was developed using multi-axis thrust vectoring to augment the aircraft's aerodynamic control power to provide maneuverability above the normal F-16 angle of attack limit. The control law architecture was developed using Lockheed Fort Worth's offline and piloted simulation capabilities. The final flight control laws were used in flight test to demonstrate tactical benefits gained by using thrust vectoring in air-to-air combat. Differences between the simulator aerodynamics data base and the actual aircraft aerodynamics led to significantly different lateral-directional flying qualities during the flight test program than those identified during piloted simulation. A 'dial-a-gain' flight test control law update was performed in the middle of the flight test program. This approach allowed for inflight optimization of the aircraft's flying qualities. While this approach is not preferred over updating the simulator aerodynamic data base and then updating the control laws, the final selected gain set did provide adequate lateral-directional flying qualities over the MATV flight envelope. The resulting handling qualities and the departure resistance of the aircraft allowed the 422nd_squadron pilots to focus entirely on evaluating the aircraft's tactical utility.

  14. An Assessment of Participatory Integrated Vector Management for Malaria Control in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mbogo, Charles; Mwangangi, Joseph; Imbahale, Susan; Kibe, Lydia; Orindi, Benedict; Girma, Melaku; Njui, Annah; Lwande, Wilber; Affognon, Hippolyte; Gichuki, Charity; Mukabana, Wolfgang Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends integrated vector management (IVM) as a strategy to improve and sustain malaria vector control. However, this approach has not been widely adopted. Objectives We comprehensively assessed experiences and findings on IVM in Kenya with a view to sharing lessons that might promote its wider application. Methods The assessment used information from a qualitative external evaluation of two malaria IVM projects implemented between 2006 and 2011 and an analysis of their accumulated entomological and malaria case data. The project sites were Malindi and Nyabondo, located in coastal and western Kenya, respectively. The assessment focused on implementation of five key elements of IVM: integration of vector control methods, evidence-based decision making, intersectoral collaboration, advocacy and social mobilization, and capacity building. Results IVM was more successfully implemented in Malindi than in Nyabondo owing to greater community participation and multistakeholder engagement. There was a significant decline in the proportion of malaria cases among children admitted to Malindi Hospital, from 23.7% in 2006 to 10.47% in 2011 (p < 0.001). However, the projects’ operational research methodology did not allow statistical attribution of the decline in malaria and malaria vectors to specific IVM interventions or other factors. Conclusions Sustaining IVM is likely to require strong participation and support from multiple actors, including community-based groups, non-governmental organizations, international and national research institutes, and various government ministries. A cluster-randomized controlled trial would be essential to quantify the effectiveness and impact of specific IVM interventions, alone or in combination. Citation Mutero CM, Mbogo C, Mwangangi J, Imbahale S, Kibe L, Orindi B, Girma M, Njui A, Lwande W, Affognon H, Gichuki C, Mukabana WR. 2015. An assessment of participatory integrated vector

  15. Design development of the Apollo command and service module thrust vector attitude control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the Apollo thrust vector control digital autopilot (TVC DAP) was summarized. This is the control system that provided pitch and yaw attitude control during velocity change maneuvers using the main rocket engine on the Apollo service module. A list of ten primary functional requirements for this control system are presented, each being subordinate to a more general requirement appearing earlier on the list. Development process functions were then identified and the essential information flow paths were explored. This provided some visibility into the particular NASA/contractor interface, as well as relationships between the many individual activities.

  16. Mosquito Vector Biology and Control in Latin America-A 25TH Symposium.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    The 25th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 81st Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in March 2015. The principal objective, as for the previous 24 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control specialists, public health workers, and academicians from Latin America. This publication includes summaries of 24 presentations that were given orally in Spanish by participants from Colombia, Mexico, and the USA. Topics addressed in the symposium included: surveillance, operations, ecology, chemical control, studies of dengue viruses, and insecticide resistance. Insect vectors included Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquitoes in addition to phlebotomine sand flies and triatomine bugs. PMID:26375913

  17. Rational spatio-temporal strategies for controlling a Chagas disease vector in urban environments

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Malaga Chavez, Fernando S.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan G.; Vilhena, Daril A.; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2010-01-01

    The rational design of interventions is critical to controlling communicable diseases, especially in urban environments. In the case of the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans, successful control is stymied by the return of the insect after the effectiveness of the insecticide wanes. Here, we adapt a genetic algorithm, originally developed for the travelling salesman problem, to improve the spatio-temporal design of insecticide campaigns against T. infestans, in a complex urban environment. We find a strategy that reduces the expected instances of vector return 34-fold compared with the current strategy of sequential insecticide application to spatially contiguous communities. The relative success of alternative control strategies depends upon the duration of the effectiveness of the insecticide, and it shows chaotic fluctuations in response to unforeseen delays in a control campaign. We use simplified models to analyse the outcomes of qualitatively different spatio-temporal strategies. Our results provide a detailed procedure to improve control efforts for an urban Chagas disease vector, as well as general guidelines for improving the design of interventions against other disease agents in complex environments. PMID:20061346

  18. Insecticide susceptibility of Phlebotomus argentipes & assessment of vector control in two districts of West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Shankar, Lokesh; Kesari, Shreekant; Bhunia, Gouri Shankar; Dinesh, Diwakar Singh; Mandal, Rakesh; Das, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Kala-azar or visceral leishmanisis (VL) is known to be endemic in several States of India including West Bengal (WB). Only meager information is available on the vector dynamics of its vector species, Phlebotomus argentipes particularly in relation to control measure from this State. Hence, a pilot study was undertaken to assess the control strategy and its impact on vector in two endemic districts of WB, India. Methods: Two villages each from the two districts, Maldah and Burdwan, were selected for the study. Seasonal variation of sandflies was observed during pre-monsoon, post-monsoon and winter seasons. Susceptibility test of P. argentipes against DDT and bioassay on DDT sprayed wall and on long lasting insecticide nets (LN) Perma Net® 2.0 were conducted as per the WHO standard methods. Results: P. argentipes density was high during March to October. Susceptibility status of P. argentipes ranged from 40 to 61.54 per cent. Bioassay test showed 57.89 per cent mortality against LN PermaNet®-2.0. and 50 per cent against DDT on wall within 30 min of exposure. Interpretation & conclusions: Despite the integrated vector management approach, the sandfly population was high in the study area. The reason could be development of resistance in P. argentipes against DDT and low effectiveness of LN PermaNet®-2.0. The more pragmatic step will be to conduct large studies to monitor the susceptibility level in P. argentipes against DDT. PMID:26354219

  19. Vectorial capacity and vector control: reconsidering sensitivity to parameters for malaria elimination

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Oliver J.; Godfray, H. Charles J.; Tatem, Andrew J.; Gething, Peter W.; Cohen, Justin M.; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Perkins, T. Alex; Reiner, Robert C.; Tusting, Lucy S.; Sinka, Marianne E.; Moyes, Catherine L.; Eckhoff, Philip A.; Scott, Thomas W.; Lindsay, Steven W.; Hay, Simon I.; Smith, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Major gains have been made in reducing malaria transmission in many parts of the world, principally by scaling-up coverage with long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying. Historically, choice of vector control intervention has been largely guided by a parameter sensitivity analysis of George Macdonald's theory of vectorial capacity that suggested prioritizing methods that kill adult mosquitoes. While this advice has been highly successful for transmission suppression, there is a need to revisit these arguments as policymakers in certain areas consider which combinations of interventions are required to eliminate malaria. Methods and Results Using analytical solutions to updated equations for vectorial capacity we build on previous work to show that, while adult killing methods can be highly effective under many circumstances, other vector control methods are frequently required to fill effective coverage gaps. These can arise due to pre-existing or developing mosquito physiological and behavioral refractoriness but also due to additive changes in the relative importance of different vector species for transmission. Furthermore, the optimal combination of interventions will depend on the operational constraints and costs associated with reaching high coverage levels with each intervention. Conclusions Reaching specific policy goals, such as elimination, in defined contexts requires increasingly non-generic advice from modelling. Our results emphasize the importance of measuring baseline epidemiology, intervention coverage, vector ecology and program operational constraints in predicting expected outcomes with different combinations of interventions. PMID:26822603

  20. Can community-based integrated vector control hasten the process of LF elimination?

    PubMed

    Sunish, I P; Kalimuthu, M; Kumar, V Ashok; Munirathinam, A; Nagaraj, J; Tyagi, B K; White, Graham B; Arunachalam, N

    2016-06-01

    Community-based integrated vector control (IVC) using polystyrene beads (EPS) and pyrethroid impregnated curtains (PIC) as an adjunct to mass drug administration (MDA) was implemented for lymphatic filariasis elimination, in the filaria endemic villages of Tirukoilur, south India. In all the villages, MDA was carried out by the state health machinery, as part of the national filariasis elimination programme. Thirty-six difficult-to-control villages were grouped as, viz, MDA alone, MDA + EPS and MDA + EPS + PIC arms. Implementation and monitoring of IVC was carried out by the community. After 3 years of IVC, higher reductions in filariometric indices were observed in both the community and vector population. Decline in antigenaemia prevalence was higher in MDA + IVC as compared to MDA alone arm. Vector density dropped significantly (P < 0.05) in both the IVC arms, and nil transmission was observed during post-IVC period. Almost 53.8 and 75.8 % of the cesspits in MDA + EPS and MDA + EPS + PIC arms were closed by the householders, due to the enhanced awareness on vector breeding. The paper presents the key elements of IVC implementation through social mobilization in a LF prevalent area. Thus, community-based IVC strategy can hasten LF elimination, as it reduced the transmission and filariometric indices significantly. Indices were maintained at low level with nil transmission, by the community through IVC tools. PMID:26969179

  1. Biosynthesized silver nanoparticles using floral extract of Chrysanthemum indicum L.--potential for malaria vector control.

    PubMed

    Arokiyaraj, Selvaraj; Dinesh Kumar, Vannam; Elakya, Vijay; Kamala, Tamilselvan; Park, Sung Kwon; Ragam, Muthiah; Saravanan, Muthupandian; Bououdina, Mohomad; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Vincent, Savariar

    2015-07-01

    Mosquitoes transmit serious human diseases, causing millions of deaths every year. The use of synthetic insecticides to control vector mosquitoes has caused physiological resistance and adverse environmental effects in addition to high operational cost. Insecticides synthesized of natural products for vector control have been a priority in this area. In the present study, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were green-synthesized using a floral extract of Chrysanthemum indicum screened for larvicidal and pupicidal activity against the first to fourth instar larvae and pupae of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. The synthesized Ag NPs were characterized by using UV-vis absorption, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. The textures of the yielded Ag NPs were found to be spherical and polydispersed with a mean size in the range of 25-59 nm. Larvae and pupae were exposed to various concentrations of aqueous extract of C. indicum and synthesized Ag NPs for 24 h, and the maximum mortality was observed from the synthesized Ag NPs against the vector A. stephensi (LC50 = 5.07, 10.35, 14.19, 22.81, and 35.05 ppm; LC90 = 29.18, 47.15, 65.53, 87.96, and 115.05 ppm). These results suggest that the synthesized Ag NPs have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of A. stephensi. Additionally, this study provides the larvicidal and pupicidal properties of green-synthesized Ag NPs with the floral extract of C. indicum against vector mosquito species from the geographical location of India. PMID:25637241

  2. Multi-cavity complex controller with vector simulator for TESLA technology linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Szewinski, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A digital control, as the main part of the Low Level RF system, for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented. The FPGA based controller, supported by MATLAB system, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The complex control algorithm based on the non-linear system identification is the proposal verified by the preliminary experimental results. The general idea is implemented as the Multi-Cavity Complex Controller (MCC) and is still under development. The FPGA based controller executes procedure according to the prearranged control tables: Feed-Forward, Set-Point and Corrector unit, to fulfill the required cavity performance: driving in the resonance during filling and field stabilization for the flattop range. Adaptive control algorithm is applied for the feed-forward and feedback modes. The vector Simulator table has been introduced for an efficient verification of the FPGA controller structure. Experimental results of the internal simulation, are presented for a cavity representative condition.

  3. Animal trypanosomiasis in South America. Current status, partnership, and information technology.

    PubMed

    Dávila, A M; Silva, R A

    2000-01-01

    Animal trypanosome species of economical importance in South America include T. vivax and T. evansi. Both species are described in Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, French Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. In Argentina and Guyana, only T. evansi and T. vivax are found, respectively. Our studies on T. vivax indicated that the parasite was spreading around 1.3 km per day in Bolivia. We found severe leukopenia in bovines from Pantanal (Brazil) and the Department of Santa Cruz (Bolivia). Because it can cause immunosuppression, the importance of trypanosomiasis control in ensuring success of vaccination campaigns against foot and mouth disease (FMD) in the Pantanal and Bolivia should be considered. The use of one needle for several animals during FMD campaigns in Brazil and Bolivia could also contribute to the spread of T. vivax. The anticipated losses due to T. vivax could exceed $160 million, assuming there are 11 million head of cattle in the Brazilian Pantanal and Bolivian lowlands. International collaboration among research institutes is needed to deal with these diseases and parasites. Previous efforts using information technologies resulted in the creation of two discussion lists (Tryplink and Trypan), the edition of the on-line version of Trypnews and Internet conferences. PMID:11193622

  4. Recent Updates on Development of Drug Molecules for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Singh Grewal, Ajmer; Pandita, Deepti; Bhardwaj, Shashikant; Lather, Viney

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, better called as sleeping sickness), caused by two morphologically identicalprotozoan parasite Trypanosoma bruceiis transmitted by the bite of tsetse flies of Glossinagenus, mainly in the rural areas of the sub-Saharan Africa. HAT is one of the neglected tropical diseases and is characterized by sleep disturbance as the main symptom, hence is called as sleeping sickness. As it is epidemic in the poorest population of Africa, there is limited availability of safe and cost-effective tools for controlling the disease. Trypanosoma bruceigambiense causes sleeping sickness in Western and Central Africa, whereas Trypanosoma bruceirhodesiense is the reason for prevalence of sleeping sickness in Eastern and Southern Africa. For the treatment of sleeping sickness, only five drugs have been approved suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol, eflornithine and nifurtimox. Various small molecules of diverse chemical nature have been synthesized for targeting HAT and many of them are in the clinical trialsincluding fexinidazole (phase I completed) and SCYX-7158 (advanced in phase I). The present work has been planned to review various types of small molecules developed in the last 10 years having potent antitrypanosoma activity likely to be beneficial in sleeping sickness along with different natural anti-HAT agents. PMID:27072715

  5. [New vector control measures implemented between 2005 and 2011 on Reunion Island: lessons learned from chikungunya epidemic].

    PubMed

    Bâville, M; Dehecq, J S; Reilhes, O; Margueron, T; Polycarpe, D; Filleul, L

    2012-03-01

    A major chikungunya outbreak concerned 38% of people living in Reunion Island in 2005-2006. Chikungunya is an arthropod-born-virus disease conveyed by mosquitoes called Aedes albopictus. The health agency in Indian Ocean is responsible for vector control. Previously, in the early 40s, vector control concerned only malaria prophylaxis in La Réunion. Then, during the chikungunya outbreak, a new vector control team was installed and learned from this epidemic. The lessons drawn from chikungunya outbreak in La Réunion are about global executive management and organization linked the local partners and population. The lessons also concern technical topics such as the need of scientific research about vectors and vector-control methods. Finally, the regional cooperation in Indian Ocean (Réunion, Maurice, Seychelles, Comoros, Madagascar) has to be developed to share epidemiologic and entomologic data in order to prevent new chikungunya or dengue outbreak. PMID:22693927

  6. Rotor Speed Detection Method for Vector Control of Induction Motor without Speed Sensor Utilizing Slot Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyotake, Hirofumi; Shinohara, Katsuji; Yamamoto, Kichiro

    Speed sensorless vector controlled induction motor drives are the standard choice in many industrial applications, but this can hardly control torque and rotor speed at low speed. Recently, a method based on the high-frequency signal injection has been studied. This paper presents a method for suppressing the effects of the saturation saliency by using high pass filter, and a new approach to estimate the rotor speed. The effectiveness of these methods are demonstrated through experimental results showing both good suppression of saturation harmonics and good sensorless speed control at low speed.

  7. Hydrologic modeling to screen potential environmental management methods for malaria vector control in Niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianotti, Rebecca L.; Bomblies, Arne; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes the first use of Hydrology-Entomology and Malaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS), a physically based distributed hydrology model, to investigate environmental management methods for malaria vector control in the Sahelian village of Banizoumbou, Niger. The investigation showed that leveling of topographic depressions where temporary breeding habitats form during the rainy season, by altering pool basin microtopography, could reduce the pool persistence time to less than the time needed for establishment of mosquito breeding, approximately 7 days. Undertaking soil surface plowing can also reduce pool persistence time by increasing the infiltration rate through an existing pool basin. Reduction of the pool persistence time to less than the rainfall interstorm period increases the frequency of pool drying events, removing habitat for subadult mosquitoes. Both management approaches could potentially be considered within a given context. This investigation demonstrates that management methods that modify the hydrologic environment have significant potential to contribute to malaria vector control in water-limited, Sahelian Africa.

  8. Using Hydrologic Modeling to Screen Potential Environmental Management Methods for Malaria Vector Control in Niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianotti, R. L.; Bomblies, A.; Eltahir, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    This study describes the use of HYDREMATS, a physically-based distributed hydrology model, to investigate environmental management methods for malaria vector control in the Sahelian village of Banizoumbou, Niger. The model operates at fine spatial and temporal scales to enable explicit simulation of individual pool dynamics and isolation of mosquito breeding habitats. The results showed that leveling of topographic depressions where temporary breeding habitats form during the rainy season could reduce the persistence time of a pool to less than the time needed for establishment of mosquito breeding, approximately 7 days. Increasing the surface soil permeability by ploughing could also reduce the persistence time of a pool but this technique was not as effective as leveling. Therefore it is considered that leveling should be the preferred of the two options where possible. This investigation demonstrates that management methods that modify the hydrologic environment have significant potential to contribute to malaria vector control and human health improvement in Sahelian Africa.

  9. Preliminary design study of a lateral-directional control system using thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary design of a lateral-directional control system for a fighter airplane capable of controlled operation at extreme angles of attack is developed. The subject airplane is representative of a modern twin-engine high-performance jet fighter, is equipped with ailerons, rudder, and independent horizontal-tail surfaces. Idealized bidirectional thrust-vectoring engine nozzles are appended to the mathematic model of the airplane to provide additional control moments. Optimal schedules for lateral and directional pseudo control variables are calculated. Use of pseudo controls results in coordinated operation of the aerodynamic and thrust-vectoring controls with minimum coupling between the lateral and directional airplane dynamics. Linear quadratic regulator designs are used to specify a preliminary flight control system to improve the stability and response characteristics of the airplane. Simulated responses to step pilot control inputs are stable and well behaved. For lateral stick deflections, peak stability axis roll rates are between 1.25 and 1.60 rad/sec over an angle-of-attack range of 10 deg to 70 deg. For rudder pedal deflections, the roll rates accompanying the sideslip responses can be arrested by small lateral stick motions.

  10. Modeling and path-following control of a vector-driven stratospheric satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zewei; Chen, Tian; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The stratospheric satellite driven by steady prevailing winds in the stratosphere must be controlled in its longitudinal excursion to keep a latitudinal orbital flight. In a reliable and high-precision control system, an available system model must come first. In this paper, we study the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) modeling and path-following problem of a novel stratospheric satellite which consists of a high-altitude helium balloon, a truss and two vector-motor-driven propellers. To keep a latitudinal flight orbit, an algorithm for accurate latitudinal path following is proposed based on the theories of vector field and sliding mode control. Moreover, a forward velocity controller is added to the control algorithm to maintain a constant velocity. Finally, a series of open-loop control simulations are completed to verify the effectiveness of the model in the performance of the stratospheric satellite dynamics, and path-following control simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm.