Science.gov

Sample records for tumble rates rendezvousing

  1. Optical Survey of the Tumble Rates of Retired GEO Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binz, C.; Davis, M.; Kelm, B.; Moore, C.

    2014-09-01

    The Naval Research Lab (NRL) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) have made significant progress toward robotic rendezvous and docking between spacecraft, however the long-term attitude motion evolution of uncontrolled resident space objects has never been well-characterized. This effort set out to identify the motion exhibited in retired satellites at or near geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Through analysis of the periodic structure of observed reflected light curves, estimated tumble rates were determined for several retired satellites, typically in a super-GEO disposal orbit. The NRL's 1-meter telescope at Midway Research Center was used to track and observe the objects while the sun-satellite-observer geometry was most favorable; typically over a one- to two-hour period, repeated multiple times over the course of weeks. By processing each image with calibration exposures, the relative apparent magnitude of the brightness of the object over time was determined. Several tools, including software developed internally, were used for frequency analysis of the brightness curves. Results show that observed satellites generally exhibit a tumble rate well below the notional bounding case of one degree per second. When harmonics are found to exist in the data, modeling and simulation of the optical characteristics of the satellite can help to resolve ambiguities. This process was validated on spacecraft for which an attitude history is known, and agreement was found.

  2. Automated rendezvous and docking: A parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, R.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for achieving autonomous rendezvous and docking of two orbiting space vehicles is described. Results of a digital computer simulation of the technique are presented and used to evaluate its performance under a wide variety of conditions, including docking with tumbling spacecraft. The interrelationships between initial range, tumbling rates, fuel consumption, and time requirements are explored. Factors which limit performance are identified and beneficial modifications proposed.

  3. Study of effects of uncertainties of comet and asteroid encounter and contact guidance requirements. Part 2: Tumbling problem studies. [development of navigation and guidance techniques for space rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of determining the rotational motion of a tumbling celestial body of the asteroid type using spacecraft-acquired data is addressed. The rotational motion of the body is modeled by free-Eulerian motion of a triaxial, rigid body and its translational motion with respect, to a nonrotating, observing spacecraft, which is not thrusting, is assumed to be uniform during the time observations are made. The mathematical details which form the basis for a digital simulation of the motion and observations are presented. Two algorithms for determining the motion from observations for the special case of uniform rotational motion are given.

  4. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-01

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R1 of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R1 vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S-I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole 14N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of 27Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  5. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-28

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1} of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R{sub 1} vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S–I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole {sup 14}N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of {sup 27}Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  6. Comet rendezvous mission study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, A. L.; Wells, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Four periodic comets with perihelia between 1980 and 1986 (Encke, d'Arrest, Kipff, and Halley) are used as candidates for the comet rendezvous mission study. All these comet apparitions are especially favorable for rendezvous missions, because of early earth-based comet recovery, good opportunities to view their activity from earth, and reasonable launch vehicle and trajectory requirements for nominal payloads.

  7. CTV rendezvous techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Jerry L.; Anderson, Robert L.

    The cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) requires the capability to perform automated rendezvous with Space Station Freedom (SSF) using onboard sensors and algorithms. The current approach to CTV rendezvous applies techniques developed during the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) program which have been mechanized for automatic, onboard execution. The initial catch up sequence can be described as a passive rendezvous without explicit time of arrival control. The ultimate requirement for this rendezvous technique is to place the CTV on the SSF V-bar axis at some specified downrange distance. The launch vehicle will use yaw steering during orbit injection to achieve the proper phantom plane for nodal biasing. This presentation describes the primary components of the CTV rendezvous scheme.

  8. CTV rendezvous techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Jerry L.; Anderson, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) requires the capability to perform automated rendezvous with Space Station Freedom (SSF) using onboard sensors and algorithms. The current approach to CTV rendezvous applies techniques developed during the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) program which have been mechanized for automatic, onboard execution. The initial catch up sequence can be described as a passive rendezvous without explicit time of arrival control. The ultimate requirement for this rendezvous technique is to place the CTV on the SSF V-bar axis at some specified downrange distance. The launch vehicle will use yaw steering during orbit injection to achieve the proper phantom plane for nodal biasing. This presentation describes the primary components of the CTV rendezvous scheme.

  9. Effect of geometry, static stability, and mass distribution on the tumbling characteristics of generic flying-wing models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. M.; Vairo, D. M.; Whipple, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Results from an investigation to determine the low-speed tumbling characteristics of twelve generic flying-wing models are summarized. There is a concern that airplanes with flying-wing planforms could inadvertently enter an out-of-control tumbling motion under certain conditions. The objectives of this investigation were to: 1) identify the geometric and mass-related parameters that cause flying wings to be capable of sustained tumbling, 2) analyze some of the driving mechanisms that cause tumbling, and 3) determine the feasibility of using computer simulations to predict the tumbling characteristics of flying wings. Free-tumble and free-to-pitch tests were conducted with dynamically-scaled, generic flying wing models. The use of computer simulations as a predictive tool for tumbling was explored. Results indicated that center-of-gravity location, mass distribution, and geometric aspect ratio strongly affected the tumbling characteristics of the models tested and that positive static stability did not necessarily preclude tumbling. The magnitude of dynamic effects were found to be of the same order as static effects for the models undergoing autorotation-in-pitch. The simulations indicated that the dynamic terms in the equations of motion used to predict tumbling must be obtained using experimental methods that account for the large amplitude/high pitch-rate environment that characterizes tumbling.

  10. Experimental Configuration Effects on ICE Tumble Flow Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Bryan; Puzinauskas, Paulius

    2014-11-01

    The generation of ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) in-cylinder charge motions, such as swirl and tumble, have shown positive effects on reducing fuel consumption and exhaust emission levels at partial engine loads. Tumble flow is commonly measured utilizing a steady-flow rig and two-dimensional PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) systems, among others. In order to optimize the tumble flow, it is important to retrieve accurate measurements. The tumble flow values could be affected by variations in the geometry and/or design of the steady-flow rig utilized during flow tests. In this research, a four-valve per cylinder head was tested on a steady flow bench, varying several aspects of the configuration to evaluate how they influence bulk momentum as well as PIV measurements. The configuration variations included symmetrical, asymmetrical and runner-fed configurations throughout testing. Volumetric flow rate and tumble strength flow measurements were retrieved at the selected L/D ratios. Additionally, several PIV seeding particles were characterized for size and shape. Corresponding PIV flow measurements using each type of seeding were made to evaluate how the particles influence the results. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported Bryan Santana Rivera as an REU student.

  11. Usage and User Experience of Communication before and during Rendezvous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colbert, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports a field evaluation of the mobile phone as a "package" of device and services. The evaluation compares 44 university students' usage and user experience of communication before and during rendezvous. During a rendezvous (en route), students rated many aspects of the experience of phone use less favourably than before a rendezvous…

  12. Tumbling of a rigid rod in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, J. M. J.; Blöte, H. W. J.

    2014-09-01

    The tumbling of a rigid rod in a shear flow is analyzed in the high viscosity limit. Following Burgers, the Master Equation is derived for the probability distribution of the orientation of the rod. The equation contains one dimensionless number, the Weissenberg number, which is the ratio of the shear rate and the orientational diffusion constant. The equation is solved for the stationary state distribution for arbitrary Weissenberg numbers, in particular for the limit of high Weissenberg numbers. The stationary state gives an interesting flow pattern for the orientation of the rod, showing the interplay between flow due to the driving shear force and diffusion due to the random thermal forces of the fluid. The average tumbling time and tumbling frequency is calculated as a function of the Weissenberg number. A simple crossover function is proposed which covers the whole regime from small to large Weissenberg numbers.

  13. On the tumbling toast problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Riccardo

    2012-09-01

    A didactical revisitation of the so-called tumbling toast problem is presented here. The numerical solution of the related Newton's equations has been found in the space domain, without resorting to the complete time-based law of motion, with a considerable reduction of the mathematical complexity of the problem. This could allow the effect of the different physical mechanisms ruling the overall dynamics to be appreciated in a more transparent way, even by undergraduates. Moreover, the availability from the literature of experimental investigations carried out on tumbling toast allows us to propose different theoretical models of growing complexity in order to show the corresponding improvement of the agreement between theory and observation.

  14. Rendezvous with Zarya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Backdropped against a blanket of heavy cloud cover, the Russian-built FGB, also called Zarya, nears the Space Shuttle Endeavour and the U.S.-built Node 1, also called Unity (foreground). Inside Endeavour's cabin, the STS-88 crew readies the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) for Zarya capture as they await the carefully choreographed dance of the rendezvous.

  15. Spin State Estimation of Tumbling Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Corwin; Russell, Ryan P.; Bhaskaran, Shyam

    2016-06-01

    It is expected that a non-trivial percentage of small bodies that future missions may visit are in non-principal axis rotation (i.e. "tumbling"). The primary contribution of this paper is the application of the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) method to estimate the small body spin state, mass, and moments of inertia; the spacecraft position and velocity; and the surface landmark locations. The method uses optical landmark measurements, and an example scenario based on the Rosetta mission is used. The SLAM method proves effective, with order of magnitude decreases in the spacecraft and small body spin state errors after less than a quarter of the comet characterization phase. The SLAM method converges nicely for initial small body angular velocity errors several times larger than the true rates (effectively having no a priori knowledge of the angular velocity). Surface landmark generation and identification are not treated in this work, but significant errors in the initial body-fixed landmark positions are effectively estimated. The algorithm remains effective for a range of different truth spin states, masses, and center of mass offsets that correspond to expected tumbling small bodies throughout the solar system.

  16. Spin State Estimation of Tumbling Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Corwin; Russell, Ryan P.; Bhaskaran, Shyam

    2016-02-01

    It is expected that a non-trivial percentage of small bodies that future missions may visit are in non-principal axis rotation (i.e. "tumbling"). The primary contribution of this paper is the application of the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) method to estimate the small body spin state, mass, and moments of inertia; the spacecraft position and velocity; and the surface landmark locations. The method uses optical landmark measurements, and an example scenario based on the Rosetta mission is used. The SLAM method proves effective, with order of magnitude decreases in the spacecraft and small body spin state errors after less than a quarter of the comet characterization phase. The SLAM method converges nicely for initial small body angular velocity errors several times larger than the true rates (effectively having no a priori knowledge of the angular velocity). Surface landmark generation and identification are not treated in this work, but significant errors in the initial body-fixed landmark positions are effectively estimated. The algorithm remains effective for a range of different truth spin states, masses, and center of mass offsets that correspond to expected tumbling small bodies throughout the solar system.

  17. Atmospheric rendezvous feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaezler, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the feasibility of using atmospheric rendezvous to increase the efficiency of space transportation and to determine the most effective implementation. It is concluded that atmospheric rendezvous is feasible and can be utilized in a space transportation system to reduce size of the orbiter vehicle, provide a powered landing with go-around capability for every mission, and achieve lateral range performance that exceeds requirements. A significantly lighter booster and reduced launch fuel requirements are additional benefits that can be realized with a system that includes a large subsonic airplane for recovery of the orbiter. Additional reduction in booster size is possible if the airplane is designed for recovery of the booster by towing. An airplane about the size of the C-5A is required.

  18. Trajectory shaping rendezvous guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    The Space Station will bring a great increase in rendezvous traffic. Formerly, rendezvous has been expensive in terms of time and crew involvement. Multiple trajectory adjustments on separate orbits have been required to meet safety, lighting, and geometry requirements. This paper describes a new guidance technique in which the approach trajectory is shaped by a sequence of velocity increments in order to satisfy multiple constraints within a single orbit. The approach phase is planned before the mission, leaving a group of free parameters that are optimized by onboard guidance. Fuel penalties are typically a few percent, compared to unshaped Hohmann transfers, and total fuel costs can be less than those of more time-consuming ways of meeting the same requirements.

  19. Generalized YORP evolution: Onset of tumbling and new asymptotic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokrouhlický, D.; Breiter, S.; Nesvorný, D.; Bottke, W. F.

    2007-11-01

    Asteroids have a wide range of rotation states. While the majority spin a few times to several times each day in principal axis rotation, a small number spin so slowly that they have somehow managed to enter into a tumbling rotation state. Here we investigate whether the Yarkovsky-Radzievskii-O'Keefe-Paddack (YORP) thermal radiation effect could have produced these unusual spin states. To do this, we developed a Lie-Poisson integrator of the orbital and rotational motion of a model asteroid. Solar torques, YORP, and internal energy dissipation were included in our model. Using this code, we found that YORP can no longer drive the spin rates of bodies toward values infinitely close to zero. Instead, bodies losing too much rotation angular momentum fall into chaotic tumbling rotation states where the spin axis wanders randomly for some interval of time. Eventually, our model asteroids reach rotation states that approach regular motion of the spin axis in the body frame. An analytical model designed to describe this behavior does a good job of predicting how and when the onset of tumbling motion should take place. The question of whether a given asteroid will fall into a tumbling rotation state depends on the efficiency of its internal energy dissipation and on the precise way YORP modifies the spin rates of small bodies.

  20. The tumbling spin state of (99942) Apophis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, P.; Scheirich, P.; Ďurech, J.; Pollock, J.; Kušnirák, P.; Hornoch, K.; Galád, A.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Harris, A. W.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Opitom, C.; Gillon, M.; Colas, F.; Oey, J.; Vraštil, J.; Reichart, D.; Ivarsen, K.; Haislip, J.; LaCluyze, A.

    2014-05-01

    Our photometric observations of Asteroid (99942) Apophis from December 2012 to April 2013 revealed it to be in a state of non-principal axis rotation (tumbling). We constructed its spin and shape model and found that it is in a moderately excited Short Axis Mode (SAM) state with a ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to the basic spin state energy E/E0=1.024±0.013. (All quoted uncertainties correspond to 3σ.) The greatest and intermediate principal moments of inertia are nearly the same with I2/I3=0.965-0.015+0.009, but the smallest principal moment of inertia is substantially lower with I1/I3=0.61-0.08+0.11; the asteroid’s dynamically equivalent ellipsoid is close to a prolate ellipsoid. The precession and rotation periods are Pϕ=27.38±0.07 h and Pψ=263±6 h, respectively; the strongest observed lightcurve amplitude for the SAM case is in the 2nd harmonic of P1=P=30.56±0.01 h. The rotation is retrograde with the angular momentum vector’s ecliptic longitude and latitude of 250° and -75° (the uncertainty area is approximately an ellipse with the major and minor semiaxes of 27° and 14°, respectively). An implication of the retrograde rotation is a somewhat increased probability of the Apophis’ impact in 2068, but it is still very small with the risk level on the Palermo Scale remaining well below zero. Apophis is a member of the population of slowly tumbling asteroids. Applying the theory of asteroid nutational damping by Breiter et al. (Breiter, S., Rożek, A., Vokrouhlický, D. [2012]. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 427, 755-769), we found that slowly tumbling asteroids predominate in the spin rate-size range where their estimated damping times are greater than about 0.2 Gyr. The appearance that the PA/NPA rotators transition line seems to follow a line of constant damping time may be because there are two or more asteroid spin evolution mechanisms in play, or the factor of μQ (the elastic modulus times the quality factor) is not constant but it may

  1. Calculation of tumbling boundaries of a generic wing-only airliner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrabrov, A.; Sidoryuk, M.

    2015-06-01

    The aerodynamic model of a generic wing-only airliner configuration is developed for a whole range of angles of attack (-180°. . . +180°), based on experimental data obtained in wind tunnels using static, and forced oscillations. Two different approaches for the tumbling boundaries calculation are used. In the first approach, the steady pitch autorotation is calculated. In the second approach, for various angles of attack, the minimum pitch rate disturbance is considered which can result in tumbling. The tumbling boundaries are calculated via the use of a continuation technique. The dependence of these boundaries on such parameters as flight altitude, aircraft center of gravity position, and total velocity is analyzed.

  2. Maximising somersault rotation in tumbling.

    PubMed

    King, M A Mark A; Yeadon, M R Maurice R

    2004-04-01

    Performing complex somersaulting skills during the flight phase of tumbling requires the generation of linear and angular momenta during the approach and takeoff phases. This paper investigates how approach characteristics and takeoff technique affect performance with a view to maximising somersault rotation in tumbling. A five-segment planar simulation model, customised to an elite gymnast, was used to produce a simulation which closely matched a recorded performance of a double layout somersault by the elite gymnast. Three optimisations were carried out to maximise somersault rotation with different sets of initial conditions. Using the same initial linear and angular momentum as the double layout somersault and varying the joint torque activation timings allowed a double straight somersault to be performed with 19% more rotation potential than the actual performance. Increasing the approach velocity to a realistic maximum of 7 ms(-1) resulted in a 42% reduction in rotation potential when the activation timings were unchanged but allowed a triple layout somersault to be performed with an increase of 31% in rotation potential when activation timings were re-optimised. Increasing also the initial angular momentum to a realistic maximum resulted in a 4% reduction in rotation potential when the activation timings were unchanged but allowed a triple straight somersault to be performed with a further increase of 9% in rotation potential when activation timings were re-optimised. It is concluded that the limiting factor to maximising somersault rotation is the ability to generate high linear and angular velocities during the approach phase coupled with the ability to adopt consonant activation timings during the takeoff phase. PMID:14996558

  3. Control of tumbling during the locust jump

    PubMed Central

    Cofer, David; Cymbalyuk, Gennady; Heitler, William J.; Edwards, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    Locust can jump precisely to a target, yet they can also tumble during the trajectory. We propose two mechanisms that would allow the locust to control tumbling during the jump. The first is that prior to the jump, locusts adjust the pitch of their body to move the center of mass closer to the intended thrust vector. The second is that contraction of the dorsolongitudinal muscles during the jump will produce torques that counter the torque produced by thrust. We found that locusts increased their take-off angle as the initial body pitch increased, and that little tumbling occurred for jumps that observed this relationship. Simulations of locust jumping demonstrated that a pitch versus take-off angle relationship that minimized tumbling in simulated jumps was similar to the relationship observed in live locusts. Locusts were strongly biased to pitch head-upward, and performed dorsiflexions far more often than ventral flexions. The direction and magnitude of tumbling could be controlled in simulations by adjusting the tension in the dorsolongitudinal muscles. These mechanisms allowed the simulations to match the data from the live animals. Control of tumbling was also found to influence the control of jump elevation. The bias to pitch head-upwards may have an evolutionary advantage when evading a predator and so make control of tumbling important for the locust. PMID:20833932

  4. Control of tumbling during the locust jump.

    PubMed

    Cofer, David; Cymbalyuk, Gennady; Heitler, William J; Edwards, Donald H

    2010-10-01

    Locust can jump precisely to a target, yet they can also tumble during the trajectory. We propose two mechanisms that would allow the locust to control tumbling during the jump. The first is that prior to the jump, locusts adjust the pitch of their body to move the center of mass closer to the intended thrust vector. The second is that contraction of the dorsolongitudinal muscles during the jump will produce torques that counter the torque produced by thrust. We found that locusts increased their take-off angle as the initial body pitch increased, and that little tumbling occurred for jumps that observed this relationship. Simulations of locust jumping demonstrated that a pitch versus take-off angle relationship that minimized tumbling in simulated jumps was similar to the relationship observed in live locusts. Locusts were strongly biased to pitch head-upward, and performed dorsiflexions far more often than ventral flexions. The direction and magnitude of tumbling could be controlled in simulations by adjusting the tension in the dorsolongitudinal muscles. These mechanisms allowed the simulations to match the data from the live animals. Control of tumbling was also found to influence the control of jump elevation. The bias to pitch head-upwards may have an evolutionary advantage when evading a predator and so make control of tumbling important for the locust. PMID:20833932

  5. STS-133: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    At 1:15 p.m. EST Saturday, space shuttle Discovery began the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or "backflip." With Commander Steve Lindsey at the helm, Discovery rotated 360 degrees backward t...

  6. STS-134: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 18, 2011, space shuttle Endeavour performed the Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or "backflip." With Commander Mark Kelly at the helm, Endeavour rotated 360 degrees backward to enable Internationa...

  7. STS-135: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    On July 10, 2011, space shuttle Atlantis performed the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or “backflip.” With Commander Chris Ferguson at the helm, Atlantis rotated 360 degrees backward to ...

  8. Near Earth asteroid rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Spacecraft Design Course is the capstone design class for the M.S. in astronautics at the Naval Postgraduate School. The Fall 92 class designed a spacecraft for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Mission (NEAR). The NEAR mission uses a robotic spacecraft to conduct up-close reconnaissance of a near-earth asteroid. Such a mission will provide information on Solar System formation and possible space resources. The spacecraft is intended to complete a NEAR mission as a relatively low-budget program while striving to gather as much information about the target asteroid as possible. A complete mission analysis and detailed spacecraft design were completed. Mission analysis includes orbit comparison and selection, payload and telemetry requirements, spacecraft configuration, and launch vehicle selection. Spacecraft design includes all major subsystems: structure, electrical power, attitude control, propulsion, payload integration, and thermal control. The resulting spacecraft demonstrates the possibility to meet the NEAR mission requirements using existing technology, 'off-the-shelf' components, and a relatively low-cost launch vehicle.

  9. Rendezvous and docking with remote piloted vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheal, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The man-in-the-loop control system requirements for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are examined. Since many similarities exist between the Teleoperator Retrieval System (TRS) and the unfolding OMV concept, a review of the TRS control system baseline along with selected design trades which led to that baseline are discussed. TRS program issues relevant to the man-in-the-loop control system design include thruster size, communication delays and TV bandwidth compression, range/range rate radar, tumbling targets, shimmed docking interface, and control system definition. A TRS vs. OMV simulation comparative study is summarized, and the major issues currently facing the control system designer on OMV are discussed.

  10. History of Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2011-01-01

    This technical history is intended to provide a technical audience with an introduction to the rendezvous and proximity operations history of the Space Shuttle Program. It details the programmatic constraints and technical challenges encountered during shuttle development in the 1970s and over thirty years of shuttle missions. An overview of rendezvous and proximity operations on many shuttle missions is provided, as well as how some shuttle rendezvous and proximity operations systems and flight techniques evolved to meet new programmatic objectives. This revised edition provides additional information on Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and Apollo/Soyuz. Some chapters on the Space Shuttle have been updated and expanded. Four special focus chapters have been added to provide more detailed information on shuttle rendezvous. A chapter on the STS-39 mission of April/May 1991 describes the most complex deploy/retrieve mission flown by the shuttle. Another chapter focuses on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. A third chapter gives the reader a detailed look at the February 2010 STS-130 mission to the International Space Station. The fourth chapter answers the question why rendezvous was not completely automated on the Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle vehicles.

  11. 40. THIS TUMBLING MILL IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. THIS TUMBLING MILL IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY IS USED TO TUMBLE CASTINGS OVER EACH OTHER TO BREAK OFF RUNNERS AND SPRUES. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. 75 FR 44794 - Rendezvous International v.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Rendezvous International v. Chief Cargo Services, Inc., Kaiser Apparel, Inc., Edco Logistics, Inc., Oriental... complaint has been filed with the Federal Maritime Commission (``Commission'') by Rendezvous...

  13. Nutation damping in viscoelastic tumbling rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouard, Julien; Efroimsky, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Presently, 138 asteroids show signs of being in non-principal spin states (Warner et al. 2009, updated September 2015). Such spin is often called `tumble' or `wobble'. The instantaneous rotation axis of a wobbling body performs nutation about the direction of the (conserved) angular-momentum vector. Incited by collisions and YORP, wobble is mitigated by internal dissipation due to the nutation-caused alternating stresses inside the asteroid.The knowledge of the timescale related to the damping of the nutation angle is complementary to the knowledge of the timescales associated with collisions and YORP. Previous evaluations of the nutation relaxation rate were based on an inherently inconsistent approach that may be called "Q-model". First, the elastic energy in a periodically deforming rotator was calculated in assumption of the deformation being elastic. Therefrom, the energy dissipation rate was determined by introducing an ad hoc quality factor Q. This ignored the fact that friction (and the ensuing existence of Q) is due to deviation from elasticity.We use the viscoelastic Maxwell model which naturally implies dissipation (as any other viscoelastic model would). In this approach, we compute the power and damping time for an oblate ellipsoid and a prism. Now, the viscosity assumes the role of the product μQ in the empirical Q-model, with μ being the rigidity. Contrarily to the Q-model, our model naturally gives a null dissipation for a shape tending to a sphere. We also explore when the constant part of the stress can be ignored in the derivation of the damping time. The neglect of prestressing turns out to be legitimate for the mean viscosity exceeding a certain threshold value.

  14. 14 CFR 1214.111 - Rendezvous services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S. Government, Reimbursable Customers § 1214.111 Rendezvous services. (a) A rendezvous mission involves the rendezvous of the Space Shuttle orbiter... Space Shuttle flight. (2) Exchange of a spacecraft (or part thereof) delivered to orbit on a...

  15. 14 CFR 1214.111 - Rendezvous services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S. Government, Reimbursable Customers § 1214.111 Rendezvous services. (a) A rendezvous mission involves the rendezvous of the Space Shuttle orbiter... Space Shuttle flight. (2) Exchange of a spacecraft (or part thereof) delivered to orbit on a...

  16. Hydra Rendezvous and Docking Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred; Carrington, Connie

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. technology to support a CEV AR&D activity is mature and was developed by NASA and supporting industry during an extensive research and development program conducted during the 1990's and early 2000 time frame at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous/docking sensor was identified early in the AR&D Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proxinity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous/docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) was developed and successfully flown on STS 87 and again on STS 95, proving the concept of a video-based sensor. Advances in both video and signal processing technologies and the lessons learned from the two successful flight experiments provided a baseline for the development of a new generation of video based rendezvous/docking sensor. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) has greatly increased performance and additional capability for longer-range operation. A Demonstration Automatic Rendezvous Technology (DART) flight experiment was flown in April 2005 using AVGS as the primary proximity operations sensor. Because of the absence of a docking mechanism on the target satellite, this mission did not demonstrate the ability of the sensor to coltrold ocking. Mission results indicate that the rendezvous sensor operated successfully in "spot mode" (2 km acquisition of the target, bearing data only) but was never commanded to "acquire and track" the docking target. Parts obsolescence issues prevent the construction of current design AVGS units to support the NASA Exploration initiative. This flight proven AR&D technology is being modularized and upgraded with additional capabilities through the Hydra project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Hydra brings a unique engineering approach and sensor architecture to the table, to solve the continuing issues of parts obsolescence and multiple sensor integration. This paper presents an approach to

  17. Autonomous spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Almand, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A storyboard display is presented which summarizes work done recently in design and simulation of autonomous video rendezvous and docking systems for spacecraft. This display includes: photographs of the simulation hardware, plots of chase vehicle trajectories from simulations, pictures of the docking aid including image processing interpretations, and drawings of the control system strategy. Viewgraph-style sheets on the display bulletin board summarize the simulation objectives, benefits, special considerations, approach, and results.

  18. STS-134 Re-Rendezvous Design History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuit, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    In preparation to provide the capability for the Orion spacecraft to rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS), a new suite of relative navigation sensors are in development and will be tested on one of the final Space Shuttle missions to ISS. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) commissioned a flight test of prototypes of the instruments on STS-134, in order to test their performance in the space environment during the nominal rendezvous and docking, as well as a re-rendezvous dedicated to testing the prototype sensors following the undocking of the Space Shuttle Orbiter at the end of the mission. Unlike the initial rendezvous and docking, the re-rendezvous profile would replicate the newly designed Orion coelliptic approach trajectory, something never before attempted with the Shuttle Orbiter. Therefore, there were a number of new parameters that needed to be conceived of, designed, and tested for this re-rendezvous to make the flight test successful. And all of this work had to be integrated with the normal operations of the ISS and Shuttle and had to conform to the constraints of the mission and vehicles. The result of this work is a separation and re-rendezvous trajectory design that will prove not only the design of the relative navigation sensors for the Orion vehicle, but also will serve as a proof of concept for the Orion rendezvous trajectory itself. This document presents the analysis and decision making process involved in attaining the final STS-134 re-rendezvous design.

  19. Orbital maneuvers and space rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2015-12-01

    Several possibilities of launching a space vehicle from the orbital station are considered and compared. Orbital maneuvers discussed in the paper can be useful in designing a trajectory for a specific space mission. The relative motion of orbiting bodies is investigated on examples of spacecraft rendezvous with the space station that stays in a circular orbit around the Earth. An elementary approach is illustrated by an accompanying simulation computer program and supported by a mathematical treatment based on fundamental laws of physics and conservation laws. Material is appropriate for engineers and other personnel involved in space exploration, undergraduate and graduate students studying classical physics and orbital mechanics.

  20. Tumbling and spaceflight: the Gemini VIII experience.

    PubMed

    Mohler, S R; Nicogossian, A E; McCormack, P D; Mohler, S R

    1990-01-01

    A malfunctioning orbital flight attitude thruster during the flight of Gemini VIII led to acceleration forces on astronauts Neil Armstrong (commander) and David Scott (pilot) that created the potential for derogation of oculo-vestibular and eye-hand coordination effects. The spacecraft attained an axial tumbling rotation of 50 rpm and would have exceeded this had not the commander accurately diagnosed the problem and taken immediate corrective action. By the time counter-measure controls were applied, both astronauts were experiencing vertigo and the physiological effects of the tumbling acceleration. Data from the recorders reveal that one astronaut experienced -Gy of 0.92 G-units, and the other +Gy of 0.92 for approximately 46 s. Both received a -Gz of 0.89 G-units from the waist up with a +Gz of 0.05 from the waist down. A substantial increase of time and/or an increase in rpm would ultimately have produced incapacitation of both astronauts. NASA corrected the Gemini thruster problem by changing the ignition system wiring. Future space-craft undertaking long-term missions could be equipped with unambiguous thruster fault displays and could have computer-controlled automatic cutoffs to control excessive thruster burns. PMID:2302130

  1. Boom Rendezvous Alternative Docking Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    Space rendezvous and docking has always been attempted with primarily one philosophic methodology. The slow matching of one vehicle's orbit by a second vehicle and then a final closing sequence that ends in matching the orbits with perfect precision and with near zero relative velocities. The task is time consuming, propellant intensive, risk inherent (plume impingement, collisions, fuel depletion, etc.) and requires substantial hardware mass. The historical background and rationale as to why this approach is used is discussed in terms of the path-not-taken and in light of an alternate methodology. Rendezvous and docking by boom extension is suggested to have inherent advantages that today s technology can readily exploit. Extension from the primary spacecraft, beyond its inherent large inertia, allows low inertia connections to be made rapidly and safely. Plume contamination issues are eliminated as well as the extra propellant mass and risk required for the final thruster (docking) operations. Space vehicle connection hardware can be significantly lightened. Also, docking sensors and controls require less fidelity; allowing them to be more robust and less sensitive. It is the potential safety advantage and mission risk reduction that makes this approach attractive, besides the prospect of nominal time and mass savings.

  2. Automated rendezvous and capture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kader, Jack B.; Caulfield, John H.; Vikram, Chandra S.; Patrick, Steve

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an ARC system that is an attempt to simplify opration, reduce energy requirements, reduce weight, and provide longterm use and reliability. The ARC system is a laser/optical/holographic (LOH) control system for guidance, rendezvous, and docking (RVD). The LOH/RVD utilizes a hologram, residing at the target platform. Excited by a laser diode, the hologram projects an image at a given distance from the platform. A vision system in the automated chase vehicle sees the projected image and, by optical comparisons, guides the chase vehicle to that image, reaching a proximity conductive to soft docking. The vision system then shifts to a second hologram image holding at close proximity (2mm) to the target platform and guides to it for controlled, precise docking at the rendezvous point. The holographic image projections from the target platform, are composed of color hues and may be circular, triangular or of any other shape and texture that may enhance the ability of the chase vehicle's vision system to analyze information pertinent to velocity, attitude, and roll of the target platform. Any movement of the image, whether planned or errant, will be translated by the vision system into synchronous adjustments throughout the vehicle approach path.

  3. Tilting and Tumbling of Janus Nanoparticles at Sheared Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rezvantalab, Hossein; Shojaei-Zadeh, Shahab

    2016-05-24

    We investigate the response of a single Janus nanoparticle adsorbed at an oil-water interface to imposed shear flows using molecular dynamics simulations. We consider particles of different geometry, including spheres, cylinders, and discs, and tune their degree of amphiphilicity by controlling the affinity of their two sides to the fluid phases. We observe that depending on the shape, amphiphilicity, and the applied shear rate, two modes of rotational dynamics takes place: a smooth tilt or a tumbling motion. We demonstrate that irrespective of this dynamic behavior, a steady-state orientation is eventually achieved as a result of the balance between the shear- and capillary-induced torques, which can be tuned by controlling the surface property and flow parameters. Our findings provide insight on using flow fields to tune particle orientation at an interface and to utilize it to direct their assembly into ordered monolayers. PMID:27124323

  4. NASA MSFC hardware in the loop simulations of automatic rendezvous and capture systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Naumann, Charles B.; Sutton, William; Bryan, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Two complementary hardware-in-the-loop simulation facilities for automatic rendezvous and capture systems at MSFC are described. One, the Flight Robotics Laboratory, uses an 8 DOF overhead manipulator with a work volume of 160 by 40 by 23 feet to evaluate automatic rendezvous algorithms and range/rate sensing systems. The other, the Space Station/Station Operations Mechanism Test Bed, uses a 6 DOF hydraulic table to perform docking and berthing dynamics simulations.

  5. Rocket rendezvous at preassigned destinations with optimum entry trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nangia, A. K.

    Optimum entry rendezvous trajectories of commuter rockets between initial noncoaxial coplanar elliptic orbits and destination orbits in an inverse square gravitational field have been determined. Results are presented for an optimum entry rendezvous between earth and Mars. For a given interception angle, the results show that the launch angle for optimum entry rendezvous is smaller than that for the optimum exit rendezvous.

  6. Contactless prompt tumbling rebound of drops from a sublimating slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Carlo; Jung, Stefan; Wetzel, Andreas; Heer, Emmanuel; Schoch, Philippe; Moqaddam, Ali Mazloomi; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya; Marengo, Marco; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-05-01

    We have uncovered a drop rebound regime, characteristic of highly viscous liquids impacting tilted sublimating surfaces. Here the drops, rather than showing a slide, spread, recoil, and rebound behavior, exhibit a prompt tumbling rebound. As a result, glycerol surprisingly rebounds faster than three orders of magnitude less viscous water. When a viscous drop impacts a sublimating surface, part of its initial linear momentum is converted into angular momentum: Lattice Boltzmann simulations confirmed that tumbling owes its appearance to the rapid transition of the internal angular velocity prior to rebound to a constant value, as in a tumbling solid body.

  7. Tumbling and quasi-tumbling motions of E.coli over a solid surface under shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Flow shear is known to alter bacterial motility by inducing Jeffery Orbit, rheotaxis, and trapping cells in the high shear region. Over a solid surface flow shear Interferes with hydrodynamic interaction of cells with solid surface. Our previous study shows that in the quiescent condition the tumbles of wild E.coli are suppressed and tumbling reorientation of cells is restricted to the surface parallel direction. In the current study, we exposed bacteria to the well controlled shear flows inside a microchannel and applying Digital Holography Microscopy to track them over time. The results show that flow shear promotes tumbling of E.coli and preserve reorientation of the cells during tumbles. Our hydrodynamic model indicates that in the low shear levels the tumble enhancement is due to shear induced flagella unbundling, while in the high shear flow regime, Jeffery Orbit causes rapid cell re-orientation which causes quasi-tumbles with similar angular displacement one would expect during a tumbling. NIH, GoMRI.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 3A Rendezvous Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Connor, C.; Moy, E.; Smith, D.; Myslinski, M.; Markley, L.; Vernacchio, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) hardware complement includes six gas bearing, pulse rebalanced rate integrating gyros, any three of which are sufficient to conduct the science mission. After the loss of three gyros between April 1997 and April 1999 due to a known corrosion mechanism, NASA decided to split the third HST servicing mission into SM3A, accelerated to October 1999, and SM3B, scheduled for November 2001. SM3A was developed as a quick turnaround 'Launch on Need' mission to replace all six gyros. Loss of a fourth gyro in November 1999 caused HST to enter Zero Gyro Sunpoint (ZGSP) safemode, which uses sun sensors and magnetometers for attitude determination and momentum bias to maintain attitude stability during orbit night. Several instances of large attitude excursions during orbit night were observed, but ZGSP performance was adequate to provide power-positive sun pointing and to support low gain antenna communications. Body rates in ZGSP were estimated to exceed the nominal 0.1 deg/sec rendezvous limit, so rendezvous operations were restructured to utilize coarse, limited life, Retrieval Mode Gyros (RMGs) under Hardware Sunpoint (HWSP) safemode. Contingency procedures were developed to conduct the rendezvous in ZGSP in the event of RMGA or HWSP computer failure. Space Shuttle Mission STS-103 launched on December 19, 1999 after a series of weather and Shuttle-related delays. After successful rendezvous and grapple under HWSP/RMGA, the crew changed out all six gyros. Following deploy and systems checkout, HST returned to full science operations.

  9. Comprehensive description of NMR cross-correlated relaxation under anisotropic molecular tumbling and correlated local dynamics on all time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vögeli, Beat

    2010-07-01

    A simple general expression for the NMR cross-correlated relaxation rate under anisotropic molecular tumbling is presented for globular proteins. The derivation includes effects of fast and slow motion of the interaction tensors and correlation between them. Expressions suitable for practical analysis are tailored in dependence of standard order parameters of the individual interactions. It is shown that these order parameters must be sensitive to slow motion (slower than molecular tumbling) for detection of slow correlated motion. Such order parameters are those obtained from residual dipolar couplings but not those obtained from T1, T2, and heteronuclear Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement measurements.

  10. NEA 2015 VY105: A New Tumbling Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbognani, Albino; Buzzi, Luca

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of photometric observations on near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 2015 VY105. Lightcurve analysis shows that it is a tumbling asteroid with synodic rotation periods P1 = 0.0386 ± 0.0001 h with amplitude A1 = 0.96 mag and P2 = 0.061 ± 0.001 h with amplitude A2 = 0.57 mag. After 2008 TC3, this NEA is the fastest and smallest tumbling asteroid.

  11. Credit PSR. This interior view shows the vacuum tumble dryer. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit PSR. This interior view shows the vacuum tumble dryer. The tumble dryer is lined with a water jacket to maintain temperature during the drying of ammonium perchlorate ("AP"); water enters and exits the dryer jacket through the pipe fittings along the horizontal center line of the dryer. The wall at the right is constructed to blow out in the event of an explosion - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Oxidizer Dryer Building, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. A testbed for visual based navigation and control during space rendezvous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Marco; Palmerini, Giovanni B.; Gasbarri, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Visual based navigation systems are considered essential tools in the framework of close proximity space operations, such as rendezvous and docking, both in the role of primary devices and in the role of back-up systems. Autonomy in such operations is a requirement that has been increasingly underlined, especially in the case of non-cooperative tumbling targets, as for example in the active debris removal concepts. In such a case the time delays and the partial communication coverage make the human intervention unsuitable. On the other hand, robustness of the guidance and control system is certainly an issue for autonomous docking missions. In this paper, algorithms for autonomous relative navigation by means of a single camera are detailed, and tested both numerically and experimentally. At the same time a guidance strategy has been defined in order to increase the system robustness. In order to prove the soundness of the proposed navigation and guidance approach a docking mission has been successfully performed by means of two free floating platforms - a chaser and a target - on an air-bearing table, both in a nominal and in a non-nominal (i.e. with a tumbling target) scenarios.

  13. European rendezvous and docking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pairot, J. M.; Frezet, M.; Tailhades, J.; Fehse, W.; Tobias, A.; Getzschmann, A.

    This paper first describes the major design drivers and the key features of the European RendezVous and Docking System Concept. Stemming from technology activities led by the European Space Agency (ESA) with European Industry and National Space Agencies since the beginning of the eighties, the concept has been developed and integrated in the frame of an ESA RVD System Pre-Development Programme initiated at ESTEC in 1989, with MATRA as main contractor. The objective is to verify the overall concept and the main elements within a RVD Proof of Concept Programme in order to provide an early proof of validity to the user projects, the first of which will be the Hermes manned space shuttle. The selected mission scenarii, the RVD functions addressed and the overall system architecture are described. The results of supporting safety, performance and operations analyses are presented. The paper further presents the verification objectives and the major results obtained in the RVD System Pre-Development Programme. This verification approach involves hardware breadboards, software prototypes, development of test facilities in four main development areas: test of RV sensors on a 6 d.o.f. kinematic test facility, test of a docking mechanism front-end mock-up on the docking dynamics test facility, closed-loop test of a prototype RV control software, test of man-in-the-loop concept involving both supervisory control and manual control modes.

  14. Tumbling in Turbulence: How much does particle shape effect particle motion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variano, E. A.; Andersson, H. I.; Zhao, L.; Byron, M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural particles suspended in surface water are often non-spherical. We explore the ways in which particle shape effects particle motion, focusing specifically on how particle rotation is divided into spinning and tumbling components. This, in turn, will effect particle collision, clustering, and settling rates. We focus on idealized axisymmetric particles shaped as rods, discs, and spheroids. They are chosen so as to explain the physics of aspherical-particle motion that will be relevant for natural particles such as plankton, sediment, or aggregates (e.g. oil-mineral aggregates, clay flocs, or bio-sediment aggregates held together by TEP). Our work begins with laboratory measurements of particle motion in a turbulence tank built to mimic the flow found in rivers, estuaries, and the ocean surface mixed layer. We then proceed to direct numerical simulation of particle-flow interactions in sheared turbulence similar to that which is found in the surface water of creeks and rivers. We find that shape has only a very weak effect on particle angular velocity, which is a quantity calculated with respect the global reference frame (i.e. east/north/up). If we analyze rotation in a particle's local frame (i.e. the particle's principle axes of rotation), then particle shape has a strong effect on rotation. In the local frame, rotation is described by two components: tumbling and spinning. We find that rod-shaped particles spin more than they tumble, and we find that disc-shaped particles tumble more than they spin. Such behavior is indicative of how particles respond the the directional influence of vortex tubes in turbulence, and such response has implications for particle motion other than rotation. Understanding particle alignment is relevant for predicting particle-particle collision rates, particle-wall collision rates, and the shear-driven breakup of aggregates. We discuss these briefly in the context of what can be concluded from the rotation data discussed above.

  15. Optical Signature Analysis of Tumbling Rocket Bodies via Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Liou, J.-C.; Ojakangas, G.; Mulrooney, M.

    2012-09-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has acquired telescopic lightcurve data on massive intact objects, specifically spent rocket bodies (R/Bs), to ascertain tumble rates in support of the Active Debris Removal (ADR) studies to help remediate the LEO environment. Tumble rates are needed to plan and develop proximity and docking operations for potential future ADR operations. To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC emulates illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC employs a 75-W Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The OMC does not attempt to replicate the rotation rates, but focuses on ascertaining how an object is rotating as seen from multiple phase angles. The two targets studied are scaled (1:48) SL-8 Cosmos 3M second stages. The first target is painted in the standard Russian government "gray" scheme and the second target is white/orange as used for commercial missions. This paper summarizes results of the two scaled rocket bodies, each observed in three independent rotation states: (a) spin-stabilized rotation (about the long axis), (b) end-over-end rotation, and (c) a 10 degree wobble about the center of mass. The first two cases represent simple spin about either primary axis. The third - what we call "wobble" - represents maximum principal axis rotation, with an inertia tensor that is offset from the symmetry axes. By comparing the resultant phase and orientation-dependent laboratory signatures with actual lightcurves derived from telescopic observations of orbiting R/Bs, we intend to assess the intrinsic R/B rotation states. In the simplest case, simulated R/B behavior coincides with principal axis spin states, while more complex R

  16. The Rendezvous Monitoring Display Capabilities of the Rendezvous and Proximity Operations Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack; Spehar, Pete; Clark, Fred; Foster, Chris; Eldridge, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The Rendezvous and Proximity Operations Program (RPOP) is a laptop computer- based relative navigation tool and piloting aid that was developed during the Space Shuttle program. RPOP displays a graphical representation of the relative motion between the target and chaser vehicles in a rendezvous, proximity operations and capture scenario. After being used in over 60 Shuttle rendezvous missions, some of the RPOP display concepts have become recognized as a minimum standard for cockpit displays for monitoring the rendezvous task. To support International Space Station (ISS) based crews in monitoring incoming visiting vehicles, RPOP has been modified to allow crews to compare the Cygnus visiting vehicle s onboard navigated state to processed range measurements from an ISS-based, crew-operated Hand Held Lidar sensor. This paper will discuss the display concepts of RPOP that have proven useful in performing and monitoring rendezvous and proximity operations.

  17. Development of an autonomous video rendezvous and docking system, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field-of-view limitations proved troublesome. Higher resolution was required. Side thrusters were too weak. The strategy logic was improved and the Kalman filter was augmented to estimate target attitude and tumble rate. Two separate filters were used. The new filter estimates target attitude and angular momentum. The Newton-Raphson iteration improves image interpretation.

  18. A plan for spacecraft automated rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, A. W.; Lomas, J. J.; Mullins, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    An automated rendezvous approach has been developed that utilizes advances in technology to reduce real-time/near real-time flight operations support personnel to an acceptable level that is near the minimum without jeopardizing the success of the mission. The on-board flight targeting uses a rule-based system to select the pursuit vehicle phasing orbits and uses precise navigation updates from the pursuit/target spacecraft made possible by the global positioning system receivers/processors on both spacecraft to adjust the phasing orbits and achieve rendezvous. The ascent-to-orbit targeting for the pursuit vehicle has been successfully decoupled from the on-orbit orbit transfer phasing targeting. Typical launch window data have been developed for the heavy lift launch vehicle and cargo transfer vehicle for a Space Station Freedom rendezvous mission.

  19. Electro-optical rendezvous and docking sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, David J.; Kesler, Lynn O.; Sirko, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Electro-optical sensors provide unique and critical functionality for space missions requiring rendezvous, docking, and berthing. McDonnell Douglas is developing a complete rendezvous and docking system for both manned and unmanned missions. This paper examines our sensor development and the systems and missions which benefit from rendezvous and docking sensors. Simulation results quantifying system performance improvements in key areas are given, with associated sensor performance requirements. A brief review of NASA-funded development activities and the current performance of electro-optical sensors for space applications is given. We will also describe current activities at McDonnell Douglas for a fully functional demonstration to address specific NASA mission needs.

  20. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith A.; Quaid, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) was designed at Motorola's Strategic Electronics Division in Chandler, Arizona, to be a key subsystem aboard NASA's Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The unmanned OMV, which was under development at TRW's Federal Systems Division in Redondo Beach, California, was designed to supplement the Shuttle's satellite delivery, retrieval, and maneuvering activities. The RRS was to be used to locate and then provide the OMV with vectoring information to the target satellite (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum fuel consumption approach and rendezvous. The OMV development program was halted by NASA in 1990 just as parts were being ordered for the RRS engineering model. The paper presented describes the RRS design and then discusses new technologies, either under development or planned for development at Motorola, that can be applied to radar or alternative sensor solutions for the Automated Rendezvous and Capture problem.

  1. Onboard rendezvous navigation for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, A. D.; Devezin, H. G.

    The onboard rendezvous navigation software for Shuttle flight 41-C are described. Particular attention is given to the inputs, models, and outputs of the software. The performance of the rendezvous navigation system is compared to predicted performance profiles in connection with the relative vehicle geometry, as well as the location of the navigation sensor tracking arcs. The methods used to process navigational sensor measurements in order to update the state vector are also summarized. A table listing the sources of maneuver targeting errors is provided.

  2. 14 CFR § 1214.111 - Rendezvous services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S. Government, Reimbursable Customers § 1214.111 Rendezvous services. (a) A rendezvous mission involves the rendezvous of the Space Shuttle orbiter... Space Shuttle flight. (2) Exchange of a spacecraft (or part thereof) delivered to orbit on a...

  3. Study of a comet rendezvous mission. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Appendices to the comet Encke rendezvous mission consider relative positions of comet, earth and sun; viewing condition for Encke; detection of Taurid meteor streams; ephemeris of comet Encke; microwave and optical techniques in rendezvous mission; approach instruments; electrostatic equilibrium of ion engine spacecraft; comet flyby data for rendezvous spacecraft assembly; observations of P/Encke extracted from a compilation; and summary of technical innovations.

  4. Optical Signature Analysis of Tumbling Rocket Bodies via Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Liou, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has acquired telescopic lightcurve data on massive intact objects, specifically spent rocket bodies, in order to ascertain tumble rates in support of the Active Debris Removal (ADR) task to help remediate the LEO environment. Rotation rates are needed to plan and develop proximity operations for potential future ADR operations. To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC emulates illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC employs a 75-watt Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The light source is mounted on a rotary arm, allowing access any phase angle between 0 -- 360 degrees. The OMC does not attempt to replicate the rotation rates, but focuses on how an object is rotating as seen from multiple phase angles. The two targets studied are scaled (1:48), SL-8 Cosmos 3M second stages. The first target is painted in the standard government "gray" scheme and the second target is primary white, as used for commercial missions. This paper summarizes results of the two scaled rocket bodies, each rotated about two primary axes: (a) a spin-stabilized rotation and (b) an end-over-end rotation. The two rotation states are being investigated as a basis for possible spin states of rocket bodies, beginning with simple spin states about the two primary axes. The data will be used to create a database of potential spin states for future works to convolve with more complex spin states. The optical signatures will be presented for specific phase angles for each rocket body and shown in conjunction with acquired optical data from multiple telescope sources.

  5. Multiple NEO Rendezvous Using Solar Sail Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Fabisinski, Leo; Heaton, Andy; Miernik, Janie; Stough, Rob; Wright, Roosevelt; Young, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office performed an assessment of the feasibility of using a near-term solar sail propulsion system to enable a single spacecraft to perform serial rendezvous operations at multiple Near Earth Objects (NEOs) within six years of launch on a small-to-moderate launch vehicle. The study baselined the use of the sail technology demonstrated in the mid-2000 s by the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Project and is scheduled to be demonstrated in space by 2014 as part of the NASA Technology Demonstration Mission Program. The study ground rules required that the solar sail be the only new technology on the flight; all other spacecraft systems and instruments must have had previous space test and qualification. The resulting mission concept uses an 80-m X 80-m 3-axis stabilized solar sail launched by an Athena-II rocket in 2017 to rendezvous with 1999 AO10, Apophis and 2001 QJ142. In each rendezvous, the spacecraft will perform proximity operations for approximately 30 days. The spacecraft science payload is simple and lightweight; it will consist of only the multispectral imager flown on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission to 433 Eros and 253 Mathilde. Most non-sail spacecraft systems are based on the Messenger mission spacecraft. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the solar sail technology to be employed, the spacecraft system and subsystems, as well as the overall mission profile.

  6. Multiple NEO Rendezvous Using Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Fabisinski, Leo; Heaton, Andy; Miernik, Janie; Stough, Rob; Wright, Roosevelt; Young, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Mission concept is to assess the feasibility of using solar sail propulsion to enable a robotic precursor that would survey multiple Near Earth Objects (NEOs) for potential future human visits. Single spacecraft will rendezvous with and image 3 NEOs within 6 years of launch

  7. Artist's rendering of Lunar Ascent and Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Lunar Ascent and Rendezvous: After the asstronauts return to the spacecraft and rest for several hours, they fire the ascent engine to leave the Moon and rejoin the Command Module. The descent stage remains on the Moon and the ascent stage is ejected after docking and transfer back to the Command Module.

  8. Optimal cooperative power-limited rendezvous between neighboring circular orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coverstone-Carroll, Victoria; Prussing, John E.

    1993-01-01

    A minimum-fuel rendezvous of two power-limited spacecraft is investigated. Both vehicles are active and provide thrust to complete the rendezvous. Total propellant consumption is minimized. Analytical solutions are obtained for cooperative rendezvous in the linearized Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire gravity field. The optimal solutions depend in a complicated way on the power-to-mass ratios of the spacecraft, the initial orbits, and the specified transfer time. For comparison purposes, analytical solutions for active-passive rendezvous in the linearized gravity field are also determined. Cooperative rendezvous requires smaller total propellant consumption, resulting in greater payload capability.

  9. Tumbling chemotaxis mutants of Escherichia coli: possible gene-dependent effect of methionine starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, H

    1980-01-01

    Some mutants defective in chemotaxis show incessant tumbling behavior and are called tumbling mutants. Previously described tumbling mutations lie in two genes, cheB and cheZ (41.5 min on Escherichia coli map). Genetic analysis of various tumbling mutants, however, revealed that two more genetic loci, cheC (43 min) and cheE (99.2 min), could also mutate to produce tumbling mutants. The genetic map around cheC was revised: his flaP flaQ flaR flbD flaA (= cheC) flaE. flbD is a new gene. When cells were starved for methionine, the tumbling mutants changed their swimming behavior depending on the che gene mutated. cheZ mutants, like wild-type bacteria, ceased tumbling shortly after removal of methionine. The tumbling of cheB or cheE mutants was depressed after prolonged methionine starvation in the presence of a constant level of an attractant. cheC tumbling mutants appeared unique in that they did not cease tumbling even when cells were deprived of methionine. By contrast, arsenate treatment of the tumbling mutants resulted in smooth swimming of the cells in every case. These results suggest that two different processes are involved in regulation of tumbling; one requiring methionine and the other requiring some phosphorylated compound. PMID:6991478

  10. Running and tumbling with E. coli in polymeric solutions

    PubMed Central

    Patteson, A. E.; Gopinath, A.; Goulian, M.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    Run-and-tumble motility is widely used by swimming microorganisms including numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here, we experimentally investigate the run-and-tumble dynamics of the bacterium E. coli in polymeric solutions. We find that even small amounts of polymer in solution can drastically change E. coli dynamics: cells tumble less and their velocity increases, leading to an enhancement in cell translational diffusion and a sharp decline in rotational diffusion. We show that suppression of tumbling is due to fluid viscosity while the enhancement in swimming speed is mainly due to fluid elasticity. Visualization of single fluorescently labeled DNA polymers reveals that the flow generated by individual E. coli is sufficiently strong to stretch polymer molecules and induce elastic stresses in the fluid, which in turn can act on the cell in such a way to enhance its transport. Our results show that the transport and spread of chemotactic cells can be independently modified and controlled by the fluid material properties. PMID:26507950

  11. Running and tumbling with E. coli in polymeric solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patteson, A. E.; Gopinath, A.; Goulian, M.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-10-01

    Run-and-tumble motility is widely used by swimming microorganisms including numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here, we experimentally investigate the run-and-tumble dynamics of the bacterium E. coli in polymeric solutions. We find that even small amounts of polymer in solution can drastically change E. coli dynamics: cells tumble less and their velocity increases, leading to an enhancement in cell translational diffusion and a sharp decline in rotational diffusion. We show that suppression of tumbling is due to fluid viscosity while the enhancement in swimming speed is mainly due to fluid elasticity. Visualization of single fluorescently labeled DNA polymers reveals that the flow generated by individual E. coli is sufficiently strong to stretch polymer molecules and induce elastic stresses in the fluid, which in turn can act on the cell in such a way to enhance its transport. Our results show that the transport and spread of chemotactic cells can be independently modified and controlled by the fluid material properties.

  12. Running and tumbling with E. coli in polymeric solutions.

    PubMed

    Patteson, A E; Gopinath, A; Goulian, M; Arratia, P E

    2015-01-01

    Run-and-tumble motility is widely used by swimming microorganisms including numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here, we experimentally investigate the run-and-tumble dynamics of the bacterium E. coli in polymeric solutions. We find that even small amounts of polymer in solution can drastically change E. coli dynamics: cells tumble less and their velocity increases, leading to an enhancement in cell translational diffusion and a sharp decline in rotational diffusion. We show that suppression of tumbling is due to fluid viscosity while the enhancement in swimming speed is mainly due to fluid elasticity. Visualization of single fluorescently labeled DNA polymers reveals that the flow generated by individual E. coli is sufficiently strong to stretch polymer molecules and induce elastic stresses in the fluid, which in turn can act on the cell in such a way to enhance its transport. Our results show that the transport and spread of chemotactic cells can be independently modified and controlled by the fluid material properties. PMID:26507950

  13. Designing the STS-134 Re-Rendezvous: A Preparation for Future Crewed Rendezvous Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuit, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    In preparation to provide the capability for the Orion spacecraft, also known as the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), to rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS) and future spacecraft, a new suite of relative navigation sensors are in development and were tested on one of the final Space Shuttle missions to ISS. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) commissioned a flight test of prototypes of the Orion relative navigation sensors on STS-134, in order to test their performance in the space environment during the nominal rendezvous and docking, as well as a re-rendezvous dedicated to testing the prototype sensors following the undocking of the Space Shuttle orbiter at the end of the mission. Unlike the rendezvous and docking at the beginning of the mission, the re-rendezvous profile replicates the newly designed Orion coelliptic approach trajectory, something never before attempted with the shuttle orbiter. Therefore, there were a number of new parameters that needed to be conceived of, designed, and tested for this rerendezvous to make the flight test successful. Additionally, all of this work had to be integrated with the normal operations of the ISS and shuttle and had to conform to the constraints of the mission and vehicles. The result of this work is a separation and rerendezvous trajectory design that would not only prove the design of the relative navigation sensors for the Orion vehicle, but also would serve as a proof of concept for the Orion rendezvous trajectory itself. This document presents the analysis and decision making process involved in attaining the final STS-134 re-rendezvous design.

  14. Concept definition study for recovery of tumbling satellites. Volume 2: Supporting research and technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, D. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Cathcart, J. A.; Keeley, M. G.; Madayev, L.; Nguyen, T. K.; Preese, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    A number of areas of research and laboratory experiments were identified which could lead to development of a cost efficient remote, disable satellite recovery system. Estimates were planned of disabled satellite motion. A concept is defined as a Tumbling Satellite Recovery kit which includes a modular system, composed of a number of subsystem mechanisms that can be readily integrated into varying combinations. This would enable the user to quickly configure a tailored remote, disabled satellite recovery kit to meet a broad spectrum of potential scenarios. The capability was determined of U.S. Earth based satellite tracking facilities to adequately determine the orientation and motion rates of disabled satellites.

  15. Tracking techniques for space shuttle rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The space shuttle rendezvous radar has a requirement to track cooperative and non-cooperative targets. For this reason the Lunar Module (LM) Rendezvous Radar was modified to incorporate the capability of tracking a non-cooperative target. The modifications are discussed. All modifications except those relating to frequency diversity were completed, and system tests were performed to confirm proper performance in the non-cooperative mode. Frequency diversity was added to the radar and to the special test equipment, and then system tests were performed. This last set of tests included re-running the tests of the non-cooperative mode without frequency diversity, followed by tests with frequency diversity and tests of operation in the original cooperative mode.

  16. Laser space rendezvous and docking tradeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S.; Levinson, S.; Raber, P.; Weindling, F.

    1974-01-01

    A spaceborne laser radar (LADAR) was configured to meet the requirements for rendezvous and docking with a cooperative object in synchronous orbit. The LADAR, configurated using existing pulsed CO2 laser technology and a 1980 system technology baseline, is well suited for the envisioned space tug missions. The performance of a family of candidate LADARS was analyzed. Tradeoff studies as a function of size, weight, and power consumption were carried out for maximum ranges of 50, 100, 200, and 300 nautical miles. The investigation supports the original contention that a rendezvous and docking LADAR can be constructed to offer a cost effective and reliable solution to the envisioned space missions. In fact, the CO2 ladar system offers distinct advantages over other candidate systems.

  17. Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Conference, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This document consists of the presentation submitted at the Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (ARD) Conference. It contains three volumes: ARD hardware technology; ARD software technology; and ARD operations. The purpose of this conference is to identify the technologies required for an on orbit demonstration of the ARD, assess the maturity of these technologies, and provide the necessary insight for a quality assessment of the programmatic management, technical, schedule, and cost risks.

  18. Lunar Ascent and Rendezvous Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sostaric, Ronald R.; Merriam, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The Lunar Lander Ascent Module (LLAM) will leave the lunar surface and actively rendezvous in lunar orbit with the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). For initial LLAM vehicle sizing efforts, a nominal trajectory, along with required delta-V and a few key sensitivities, is very useful. A nominal lunar ascent and rendezvous trajectory is shown, along with rationale and discussion of the trajectory shaping. Also included are ascent delta-V sensitivities to changes in target orbit and design thrust-to-weight of the vehicle. A sample launch window for a particular launch site has been completed and is included. The launch window shows that budgeting enough delta-V for two missed launch opportunities may be reasonable. A comparison between yaw steering and on-orbit plane change maneuvers is included. The comparison shows that for large plane changes, which are potentially necessary for an anytime return from mid-latitude locations, an on-orbit maneuver is much more efficient than ascent yaw steering. For a planned return, small amounts of yaw steering may be necessary during ascent and must be accounted for in the ascent delta-V budget. The delta-V cost of ascent yaw steering is shown, along with sensitivity to launch site latitude. Some discussion of off-nominal scenarios is also included. In particular, in the case of a failed Powered Descent Initiation burn, the requirements for subsequent rendezvous with the Orion vehicle are outlined.

  19. Multiple exposure of Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Multiple exposure of Rendezvous Docking Simulator. Francis B. Smith, described the simulator as follows: 'The rendezvous and docking operation of the Gemini spacecraft with the Agena and of the Apollo Command Module with the Lunar Excursion Module have been the subject of simulator studies for several years. [This figure] illustrates the Gemini-Agena rendezvous docking simulator at Langley. The Gemini spacecraft was supported in a gimbal system by an overhead crane and gantry arrangement which provided 6 degrees of freedom - roll, pitch, yaw, and translation in any direction - all controllable by the astronaut in the spacecraft. Here again the controls fed into a computer which in turn provided an input to the servos driving the spacecraft so that it responded to control motions in a manner which accurately simulated the Gemini spacecraft.' Published in Barton C. Hacker and James M. Grimwood, On the Shoulders of Titans: A History of Project Gemini, NASA SP-4203; Francis B. Smith, 'Simulators for Manned Space Research,' Paper presented at the 1966 IEEE International convention, March 21-25, 1966.

  20. Radiation environment for rendezvous and docking with nuclear rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. R.; Warman, E. A.; Lindsey, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Radiation environment data for the NERVA engine are provided which may be utilized in estimating radiation exposures associated with various space maneuvers. Spatial distributions of neutron and gamma tissue kerma rates produced during full thrust operation of the engine are presented. Final rendezvous with an orbiting space station would be achieved subsequent to full thrust operation during a period of 10 or more hours duration in which impulse is delivered by the propellant used for removal of decay heat. Consequently, post operation radiation levels are of prime importance in estimating space station exposures. Maps of gamma kerma rates around the engine are provided for decay times of 4 and 24 hours after a representative firing. Typical decay curves illustrating the dependence of post operation kerma rates on decay time and operating history are included. Examples of the kerma distributions around the engine which result from integration over specific exposure periods are shown.

  1. Orion Handling Qualities During ISS Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy J.; Stephens, J. P.; Spehar, P.; Bilimoria, K.; Foster, C.; Gonzalex, R.; Sullivan, K.; Jackson, B.; Brazzel, J.; Hart, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft was designed to rendezvous with multiple vehicles in low earth orbit (LEO) and beyond. To perform the required rendezvous and docking task, Orion must provide enough control authority to perform coarse translational maneuvers while maintaining precision to perform the delicate docking corrections. While Orion has autonomous docking capabilities, it is expected that final approach and docking operations with the International Space Station (ISS) will initially be performed in a manual mode. A series of evaluations was conducted by NASA and Lockheed Martin at the Johnson Space Center to determine the handling qualities (HQ) of the Orion spacecraft during different docking and rendezvous conditions using the Cooper-Harper scale. This paper will address the specifics of the handling qualities methodology, vehicle configuration, scenarios flown, data collection tools, and subject ratings and comments. The initial Orion HQ assessment examined Orion docking to the ISS. This scenario demonstrates the Translational Hand Controller (THC) handling qualities of Orion. During this initial assessment, two different scenarios were evaluated. The first was a nominal docking approach to a stable ISS, with Orion initializing with relative position dispersions and a closing rate of approximately 0.1 ft/sec. The second docking scenario was identical to the first, except the attitude motion of the ISS was modeled to simulate a stress case ( 1 degree deadband per axis and 0.01 deg/sec rate deadband per axis). For both scenarios, subjects started each run on final approach at a docking port-to-port range of 20 ft. Subjects used the THC in pulse mode with cues from the docking camera image, window views, and range and range rate data displayed on the Orion display units. As in the actual design, the attitude of the Orion vehicle was held by the automated flight control system at 0.5 degree deadband per axis. Several error sources were modeled including Reaction

  2. Hyperbolic Rendezvous at Mars: Risk Assessments and Mitigation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Ricky; Landau, Damon; Whitley, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Given the current interest in the use of flyby trajectories for human Mars exploration, a key requirement is the capability to execute hyperbolic rendezvous. Hyperbolic rendezvous is used to transport crew from a Mars centered orbit, to a transiting Earth bound habitat that does a flyby. Representative cases are taken from future potential missions of this type, and a thorough sensitivity analysis of the hyperbolic rendezvous phase is performed. This includes early engine cutoff, missed burn times, and burn misalignment. A finite burn engine model is applied that assumes the hyperbolic rendezvous phase is done with at least two burns.

  3. KU-Band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    The preparation of a real time computer simulation model of the KU band rendezvous radar to be integrated into the shuttle mission simulator (SMS), the shuttle engineering simulator (SES), and the shuttle avionics integration laboratory (SAIL) simulator is described. To meet crew training requirements a radar tracking performance model, and a target modeling method were developed. The parent simulation/radar simulation interface requirements, and the method selected to model target scattering properties, including an application of this method to the SPAS spacecraft are described. The radar search and acquisition mode performance model and the radar track mode signal processor model are examined and analyzed. The angle, angle rate, range, and range rate tracking loops are also discussed.

  4. Transient tumbling chaos and damping identification for parametric pendulum.

    PubMed

    Horton, Bryan; Wiercigroch, Marian; Xu, Xu

    2008-03-13

    The aim of this study is to provide a simple, yet effective and generally applicable technique for determining damping for parametric pendula. The proposed model is more representative of system dynamics because the numerical results describe the qualitative features of experimentally exhibited transient tumbling chaotic motions well. The assumption made is that the system is accurately modelled by a combination of viscous and Coulomb dampings; a parameter identification procedure is developed from this basis. The results of numerical and experimental time histories of free oscillations are compared with the model produced from the parameters identified by the classic logarithmic decrement technique. The merits of the present method are discussed before the model is verified against experimental results. Finally, emphasis is placed on a close corroboration between the experimental and theoretical transient tumbling chaotic trajectories. PMID:17947205

  5. Coping with perturbations to a layout somersault in tumbling.

    PubMed

    King, M A; Yeadon, M R

    2003-07-01

    Tumbling is a dynamic movement requiring control of the linear and angular momenta generated during the approach and takeoff phases. Both of these phases are subject to some variability even when the gymnast is trying to perform a given movement repeatedly. This paper used a simulation model of tumbling takeoff to establish how well gymnasts can cope with perturbations of the approach and takeoff phases. A five segment planar simulation model with torque generators at each joint was developed to simulate tumbling takeoffs. The model was customised to an elite gymnast by determining subject specific inertia and torque parameters and a simulation was produced which closely matched a performance of a layout somersault by the gymnast. The performance of a layout somersault was found to be sensitive to the approach characteristics and the activation timings but relatively insensitive to the elasticity of the track and maximum muscle strength. Appropriate variation of the activation timings used during the takeoff phase was capable of coping with moderate perturbations of the approach characteristics. A model of aerial movement established that variation of body configuration in the flight phase was capable of adjusting for takeoff perturbations that would lead to rotation errors of up to 8%. Providing the errors in perceiving approach characteristics are less than 5% or 5 degrees and the errors in timing activations are less than 7ms, perturbations in the approach can be accommodated using adjustments during takeoff and flight. PMID:12757800

  6. Running and tumbling with E. coli in polymeric solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patteson, Alison; Gopinath, Arvind; Arratia, Paulo

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria commonly utilize a run-and-tumble swimming behavior to navigate through complex environments such as mucus in the lungs or digestive system. This swimming behavior has been extensively studied in water-like fluids; yet, investigations on the role of particles or polymers in the ambient fluid on the run-and-tumble behavior are limited. Here, we experimentally investigate the swimming dynamics of E. coli in polymeric solutions. We find that small amounts of polymer drastically change the run-and-tumble behavior of E. coli cells, significantly enhancing translational diffusion and reducing rotational diffusion. The average cell velocity increases with polymer concentration (and viscosity) and the mean run times are enhanced. By varying polymer molecular weight and visualizing interactions between single E. coli and fluorescently-stained DNA-polymer molecules, we show that enhanced translation is a result of two mechanisms: (1) suppression of cell wobbling due to elasticity and (2) enhancement of run times due to viscosity. Our results show that the transport of chemotactic cells can be independently modified by viscosity and elasticity. This work was supported by NSF-DMR-1104705 and NSF-CBET-1437482.

  7. A Diffusion Approximation Based on Renewal Processes with Applications to Strongly Biased Run-Tumble Motion.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2016-03-01

    We consider organisms which use a renewal strategy such as run-tumble when moving in space, for example to perform chemotaxis in chemical gradients. We derive a diffusion approximation for the motion, applying a central limit theorem due to Anscombe for renewal-reward processes; this theorem has not previously been applied in this context. Our results extend previous work, which has established the mean drift but not the diffusivity. For a classical model of tumble rates applied to chemotaxis, we find that the resulting chemotactic drift saturates to the swimming velocity of the organism when the chemical gradients grow increasingly steep. The dispersal becomes anisotropic in steep gradients, with larger dispersal across the gradient than along the gradient. In contrast to one-dimensional settings, strong bias increases dispersal. We next include Brownian rotation in the model and find that, in limit of high chemotactic sensitivity, the chemotactic drift is 64% of the swimming velocity, independent of the magnitude of the Brownian rotation. We finally derive characteristic timescales of the motion that can be used to assess whether the diffusion limit is justified in a given situation. The proposed technique for obtaining diffusion approximations is conceptually and computationally simple, and applicable also when statistics of the motion is obtained empirically or through Monte Carlo simulation of the motion. PMID:27012850

  8. X-ray Scattering Studies of Director Tumbling Dynamics in a Nematic Surfactant Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, F.; Burghardt, W.

    1998-03-01

    Many cationic surfactants self-assemble into wormlike micelles. At high concentrations, these micellar solutions may then form liquid crystalline nematic phases. Recent studies have demonstrated that the rheology of such solutions is quite similar to that observed in lyotropic liquid crystalline polymers, particularly with respect to stress oscillations in transient flows that are attributed to director tumbling. Here we present complementary rheological and x-ray scattering data on an aqueous solution of cetylpyridinium chloride/hexanol(Sample kindly supplied by L. Walker and J.-F. Berret) to compare the mechanical and structural response. Time-resolved synchtrotron x-ray scattering under shear(Experiments performed at DND-CAT at the APS) is used to measure the average micelle orientation state during transient flows such as step increases and decreases in shear rate, and reversals in flow direction. There is a strong connection between the rheology and the fluid structure: stress minima are well correlated with high instantaneous micellar orientation. The experimental observations are compared with the predictions of the Larson-Doi tumbling polydomain model, which captures many aspects of the observed behavior.

  9. Radar Performance Improvement. Angle Tracking Modification to Fire Control Radar System for Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The AN/APQ-153 fire control radar modified to provide angle tracking was evaluated for improved performance. The frequency agile modifications are discussed along with the range-rate improvement modifications, and the radar to computer interface. A parametric design and comparison of noncoherent and coherent radar systems are presented. It is shown that the shuttle rendezvous range and range-rate requirements can be made by a Ku-Band noncoherent pulse radar.

  10. Development of Ku-band rendezvous radar tracking and acquisition simulation programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The fidelity of the Space Shuttle Radar tracking simulation model was improved. The data from the Shuttle Orbiter Radar Test and Evaluation (SORTE) program experiments performed at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) were reviewed and analyzed. The selected flight rendezvous radar data was evaluated. Problems with the Inertial Line-of-Sight (ILOS) angle rate tracker were evaluated using the improved fidelity angle rate tracker simulation model.

  11. Concept definition study for recovery of tumbling satellites. Volume 1: Executive summary, study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, D. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Cathcart, J. A.; Keeley, M. G.; Madayev, L.; Nguyen, T. K.; Preese, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The first assessment is made of the design requirements and conceptual definition of a front end kit to be transported on the currently defined Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) and the Space Transportation System Shuttle Orbiter, to conduct remote, teleoperated recovery of disabled and noncontrollable, tumbling satellites. Previous studies did not quantify the dynamic characteristics of a tumbling satellite, nor did they appear to address the full spectrum of Tumbling Satellite Recovery systems requirements. Both of these aspects are investigated with useful results.

  12. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith; Parks, Howard

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RRS was to be used to locate, and then provide vectoring information to, target satellites (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum-fuel-consumption approach and rendezvous. The RRS design is that of an X-Band, all solid-state, monopulse tracking, frequency hopping, pulse-Doppler radar system. The development of the radar was terminated when the OMV prime contract to TRW was terminated by NASA. At the time of the termination, the development was in the circuit design stage. The system design was virtually completed, the PDR had been held. The RRS design was based on Motorola's experiences, both in the design and production of radar systems for the US Army and in the design and production of hi-rel communications systems for NASA space programs. Experience in these fields was combined with the latest digital signal processor and micro-processor technology to design a light-weight, low-power, spaceborne radar. The antenna and antenna positioner (gimbals) technology developed for the RRS is now being used in the satellite-to-satellite communication link design for Motorola's Iridium telecommunications system.

  13. Regular and Chaotic Flow Behavior and Orientational Dynamics of Tumbling Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S.; Heidenreich, S.; Ilg, P.; Kröger, M.

    2006-05-01

    We consider liquid crystalline polymers under plane Couette flow and investigate the influence of fluctuating shear rates on the orientational dynamics. With help of phase portraits and time evolution diagrams of the alignment tensor components, we discuss the effect of fluctuations on the flow-aligned, isotropic and periodic solutions. To explore the effect of fluctuations on the chaotic behavior we calculated the greatest Lyapunov exponent for different fluctuation strengths. We found that fluctuations of the shear rate in general have little effect on the dynamics of tumbling nematics. Further we present a new amended potential modeling the isotropic-to-nematic transition. In contrast to the Landau-de Gennes potential our potential has the advantage to restrict the order parameter to physically admissible values. In the end we present some results of the orientational dynamics for a spatially inhomogeneous system.

  14. Optimal search strategies of run-and-tumble walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupprecht, Jean-François; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    The run-and-tumble walk, consisting of randomly reoriented ballistic excursions, models phenomena ranging from gas kinetics to bacteria motility. We evaluate the mean time required for this walk to find a fixed target within a two- or three-dimensional spherical confinement. We find that the mean search time admits a minimum as a function of the mean run duration for various types of boundary conditions and run duration distributions (exponential, power-law, deterministic). Our result stands in sharp contrast to the pure ballistic motion, which is predicted to be the optimal search strategy in the case of Poisson-distributed targets.

  15. In situ tumbling of the AcrySof intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Rao, S K; Leung, A T; Lam, D S; Padmanabhan, P

    2000-02-01

    The small incision through which foldable acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs) are implanted does not allow easy explantation of the lens in the event of intraoperative complications. Reversal of the IOL optic during insertion, although rare, can predispose to postoperative complications such as pupillary capture of the IOL, capsule bag distension syndrome, and refractive problems. Explanting the IOL can damage it, the cataract wound, or both. We describe a technique of in situ tumbling of the AcrySof IOL to correct reversed-optic implantation that preserves the integrity of the IOL and anterior segment structures. PMID:10683784

  16. Polishing and local planarization of plastic spherical capsules using tumble finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratwala, T. I.; Steele, W. A.; Feit, M. D.; Moreno, K.; Stadermann, M.; Fair, J.; Chen, K.; Nikroo, A.; Youngblood, K.; Wu, K.

    2012-11-01

    A new method (a variant of tumble finishing) for polishing and achieving local planarization on precision spherical, plastic capsules is described. Such capsules have niche applications, such as ablators used in high-peak-power laser targets for fusion energy research. The as-manufactured ablators contain many shallow domes (many 100's of nm high and a few 10's of μm wide) on the outer surface which are undesirable due to contributions to instabilities during implosion. These capsules were polished (i.e., tumble finished) by rotating a cylindrical vial containing the capsule, many borosilicate glass or zirconia media, and an aqueous-based colloidal silica polishing slurry. During tumble finishing, the relative media/capsule motions cause multiple, random sliding spherical-spherical Hertzian contacts, resulting in material removal, and possibly plastic deformation, on the capsule. As a result, the domes were observed to locally planarize (i.e., converge to lower heights). Utilizing the correct kinematics (i.e., the characteristics of the media/capsule motions), as controlled by the vial rotation rate and the fill fraction of media and slurry, the high velocity downward circumferential media motions were avoided, preventing fracturing of the fragile capsules. Also, the resulting post-polished surface roughness on the capsule was found to scale with the initial media surface roughness. Hence, pre-polishing the media greatly reduced the roughness of the media and thus the roughness of the polished capsule. A material removal model is described based on the Preston model and spherical-spherical Hertzian contacts which shows reasonable agreement with measured average removal rates of 35 ± 15 nm/day and which serves as a valuable tool to scale the polishing behavior with changes in process variables. Narrow domes were observed to planarize more rapidly than wider domes. A local planarization convergence model is also described, based on the concept of workpiece

  17. Orbital rendezvous mission planning using mixed integer nonlinear programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Tang, Guo-jin; Luo, Ya-Zhong; Li, Hai-yang

    2011-04-01

    The rendezvous and docking mission is usually divided into several phases, and the mission planning is performed phase by phase. A new planning method using mixed integer nonlinear programming, which investigates single phase parameters and phase connecting parameters simultaneously, is proposed to improve the rendezvous mission's overall performance. The design variables are composed of integers and continuous-valued numbers. The integer part consists of the parameters for station-keeping and sensor-switching, the number of maneuvers in each rendezvous phase and the number of repeating periods to start the rendezvous mission. The continuous part consists of the orbital transfer time and the station-keeping duration. The objective function is a combination of the propellant consumed, the sun angle which represents the power available, and the terminal precision of each rendezvous phase. The operational requirements for the spacecraft-ground communication, sun illumination and the sensor transition are considered. The simple genetic algorithm, which is a combination of the integer-coded and real-coded genetic algorithm, is chosen to obtain the optimal solution. A practical rendezvous mission planning problem is solved by the proposed method. The results show that the method proposed can solve the integral rendezvous mission planning problem effectively, and the solution obtained can satisfy the operational constraints and has a good overall performance.

  18. Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) Project Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumford, TImothy E.

    2003-01-01

    Since the 1960's, NASA has performed numerous rendezvous and docking missions. The common element of all US rendezvous and docking is that the spacecraft has always been piloted by astronauts. Only the Russian Space Program has developed and demonstrated an autonomous capability. The Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) project currently funded under NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Cycle I, provides a key step in establishing an autonomous rendezvous capability for the United States. DART's objective is to demonstrate, in space, the hardware and software necessary for autonomous rendezvous. Orbital Sciences Corporation intends to integrate an Advanced Video Guidance Sensor and Autonomous Rendezvous and Proximity Operations algorithms into a Pegasus upper stage in order to demonstrate the capability to autonomously rendezvous with a target currently in orbit. The DART mission will occur in April 2004. The launch site will be Vandenburg AFB and the launch vehicle will be a Pegasus XL equipped with a Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System 4th stage. All mission objectives will be completed within a 24 hour period. The paper provides a summary of mission objectives, mission overview and a discussion on the design features of the chase and target vehicles.

  19. Pathfinder autonomous rendezvous and docking project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Stephen (Editor); Mccandless, Wayne (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Capabilities are being developed and demonstrated to support manned and unmanned vehicle operations in lunar and planetary orbits. In this initial phase, primary emphasis is placed on definition of the system requirements for candidate Pathfinder mission applications and correlation of these system-level requirements with specific requirements. The FY-89 activities detailed are best characterized as foundation building. The majority of the efforts were dedicated to assessing the current state of the art, identifying desired elaborations and expansions to this level of development and charting a course that will realize the desired objectives in the future. Efforts are detailed across all work packages in developing those requirements and tools needed to test, refine, and validate basic autonomous rendezvous and docking elements.

  20. Autonomous rendezvous and capture development infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Thomas C.; Roe, Fred; Coker, Cindy; Nelson, Pam; Johnson, B.

    1991-01-01

    In the development of the technology for autonomous rendezvous and docking, key infrastructure capabilities must be used for effective and economical development. This involves facility capabilities, both equipment and personnel, to devise, develop, qualify, and integrate ARD elements and subsystems into flight programs. One effective way of reducing technical risks in developing ARD technology is the use of the ultimate test facility, using a Shuttle-based reusable free-flying testbed to perform a Technology Demonstration Test Flight which can be structured to include a variety of additional sensors, control schemes, and operational approaches. This conceptual testbed and flight demonstration will be used to illustrate how technologies and facilities at MSFC can be used to develop and prove an ARD system.

  1. Rendezvous missions with minimoons from L1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Patterson, G.

    2014-07-01

    We propose to present asteroid capture missions with the so-called minimoons. Minimoons are small asteroids that are temporarily captured objects on orbits in the Earth-Moon system. It has been suggested that, despite their small capture probability, at any time there are one or two meter diameter minimoons, and progressively greater numbers at smaller diameters. The minimoons orbits differ significantly from elliptical orbits which renders a rendezvous mission more challenging, however they offer many advantages for such missions that overcome this fact. First, they are already on geocentric orbits which results in short duration missions with low Delta-v, this translates in cost efficiency and low-risk targets. Second, beside their close proximity to Earth, an advantage is their small size since it provides us with the luxury to retrieve the entire asteroid and not only a sample of material. Accessing the interior structure of a near-Earth satellite in its morphological context is crucial to an in-depth analysis of the structure of the asteroid. Historically, 2006 RH120 is the only minimoon that has been detected but work is ongoing to determine which modifications to current observation facilities is necessary to provide detection algorithm capabilities. In the event that detection is successful, an efficient algorithm to produce a space mission to rendezvous with the detected minimoon is highly desirable to take advantage of this opportunity. This is the main focus of our work. For the design of the mission we propose the following. The spacecraft is first placed in hibernation on a Lissajoux orbit around the liberation point L1 of the Earth-Moon system. We focus on eight-shaped Lissajoux orbits to take advantage of the stability properties of their invariant manifolds for our transfers since the cost to minimize is the spacecraft fuel consumption. Once a minimoon has been detected we must choose a point on its orbit to rendezvous (in position and velocities

  2. Combined radiologic and endoscopic treatment (using the "rendezvous technique") of a biliary fistula following left hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Gracient, Aurélien; Rebibo, Lionel; Delcenserie, Richard; Yzet, Thierry; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-14

    Despite the ongoing decrease in the frequency of complications after hepatectomy, biliary fistulas still occur and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Here, we report on an unusual technique for managing biliary fistula following left hepatectomy in a patient in whom the right posterior segmental duct joined the left hepatic duct. The biliary fistula was treated with a combined radiologic and endoscopic procedure based on the "rendezvous technique". The clinical outcome was good, and reoperation was not required. PMID:27570431

  3. Expert system isssues in automated, autonomous space vehicle rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Mary Ann; Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1987-01-01

    The problems involved in automated autonomous rendezvous are briefly reviewed, and the Rendezvous Expert (RENEX) expert system is discussed with reference to its goals, approach used, and knowledge structure and contents. RENEX has been developed to support streamlining operations for the Space Shuttle and Space Station program and to aid definition of mission requirements for the autonomous portions of rendezvous for the Mars Surface Sample Return and Comet Nucleus Sample return unmanned missions. The experience with REMEX to date and recommendations for further development are presented.

  4. Atlas-Agena Target Vehicle Launched for Gemini 12 Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Launched atop an Atlas booster, the Agena target vehicle (ATV) was a spacecraft used by NASA to develop and practice orbital space rendezvous and docking techniques in preparation for the Apollo program lunar missions. This particular launch preceded the Gemini 12, which launched aboard a Titan launch vehicle one and one half hours later. The objective was for Agena and Gemini to rendezvous in space and practice docking procedures. An intermediate step between Project Mercury and the Apollo Program, the Gemini Program's major objectives were to subject two men and supporting equipment to long duration flights, to perfect rendezvous and docking with other orbiting vehicles, methods of reentry, and landing of the spacecraft.

  5. The "long tail" of the protein tumbling correlation function: observation by (1)H NMR relaxometry in a wide frequency and concentration range.

    PubMed

    Roos, Matthias; Hofmann, Marius; Link, Susanne; Ott, Maria; Balbach, Jochen; Rössler, Ernst; Saalwächter, Kay; Krushelnitsky, Alexey

    2015-12-01

    Inter-protein interactions in solution affect the auto-correlation function of Brownian tumbling not only in terms of a simple increase of the correlation time, they also lead to the appearance of a weak slow component ("long tail") of the correlation function due to a slowly changing local anisotropy of the microenvironment. The conventional protocol of correlation time estimation from the relaxation rate ratio R1/R2 assumes a single-component tumbling correlation function, and thus can provide incorrect results as soon as the "long tail" is of relevance. This effect, however, has been underestimated in many instances. In this work we present a detailed systematic study of the tumbling correlation function of two proteins, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin, at different concentrations and temperatures using proton field-cycling relaxometry combined with R1ρ and R2 measurements. Unlike high-field NMR relaxation methods, these techniques enable a detailed study of dynamics on a time scale longer than the normal protein tumbling correlation time and, thus, a reliable estimate of the parameters of the "long tail". In this work we analyze the concentration dependence of the intensity and correlation time of the slow component and perform simulations of high-field (15)N NMR relaxation data demonstrating the importance of taking the "long tail" in the analysis into account. PMID:26582718

  6. Run-and-tumble dynamics in a crowded environment: Persistent exclusion process for swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    The effect of crowding on the run-and-tumble dynamics of swimmers such as bacteria is studied using a discrete lattice model of mutually excluding particles that move with constant velocity along a direction that is randomized at a rate α. In stationary state, the system is found to break into dense clusters in which particles are trapped or stopped from moving. The characteristic size of these clusters predominantly scales as α-0.5 in both one and two dimensions. For a range of densities, due to cooperative effects, the stopping time scales as T1d0.85 and as T2d0.8, where Td is the diffusive time associated with the motion of cluster boundaries. Our findings might be helpful in understanding the early stages of biofilm formation.

  7. Automatic rendezvous and docking systems functional and performance requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A generalized mission design scheme which utilizes a standard mission profile for all OMV rendezvous operations, recognizes typical operational constraints, and minimizes propellant penalties due to nodal regression effects was developed. This scheme has been used to demonstrate a unified guidance and navigation maneuver processor (the UMP), which supports all mission phases through station-keeping. The initial demonstration version of the Orbital Rendezvous Mission Planner (ORMP) was provided for evaluation purposes, and program operation was discussed.

  8. Shuttle on-orbit rendezvous targeting: Circular orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    The strategy and logic used in a space shuttle on-orbit rendezvous targeting program are described. The program generates ascent targeting conditions for boost to insertion into an intermediate parking orbit, and generates on-orbit targeting and timeline bases for each maneuver to effect rendezvous with a space station. Time of launch is determined so as to eliminate any plane change, and all work was performed for a near-circular space station orbit.

  9. Optimal terminal maneuver for a cooperative impulsive rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prussing, John E.; Conway, Bruce A.

    1989-01-01

    An optimal terminal maneuver is presently defined for the cooperative impulsive rendezvous of two spacecraft, in which each vehicle is capable of furnishing all or a part of the velocity change required for the rendezvous. In this maneuver, the final masses of the two vehicles are maximized in a fashion that is equivalent to minimum total propellant consumption. If neither propellant mass fraction constraint is active, one vehicle will supply all of the required velocity change.

  10. Automated Rendezvous and Capture System Development and Simulation for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.; Murphy, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The United States does not have an Automated Rendezvous and Capture Docking (AR&C) capability and is reliant on manned control for rendezvous and docking of orbiting spacecraft. T h i s reliance on the labor intensive manned interface for control of rendezvous and docking vehicles has a significant impact on the cost of the operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and precludes the use of any U.S. expendable launch capabilities for Space Station resupply. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture (or docking) (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. This A M C system was tested extensively using hardware-in-the-loop simulations in the Flight Robotics Laboratory, and a rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor was developed and successfully flown on the Space Shuttle on flights STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. Further developments in sensor technology and vehicle and target configuration have lead to continued improvements and changes in AR&C system development and simulation. A new Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) with target will be utilized as the primary navigation sensor on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies (DART) flight experiment in 2004. Realtime closed-loop simulations will be performed to validate the improved AR&C systems prior to flight.

  11. Automated rendezvous and capture system development and simulation for NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.; Murphy, Leslie

    2004-09-01

    The United States does not have an Automated Rendezvous and Capture/Docking (AR&C) capability and is reliant on manned control for rendezvous and docking of orbiting spacecraft. This reliance on the labor intensive manned interface for control of rendezvous and docking vehicles has a significant impact on the cost of the operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and precludes the use of any U.S. expendable launch capabilities for Space Station resupply. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture (or docking) (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. This AR&C system was tested extensively using hardware-in-the-loop simulations in the Flight Robotics Laboratory, and a rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor was developed and successfully flown on the Space Shuttle on flights STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. Further developments in sensor technology and vehicle and target configuration have lead to continued improvements and changes in AR&C system development and simulation. A new Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) with target will be utilized as the primary navigation sensor on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies (DART) flight experiment in 2004. Realtime closed-loop simulations will be performed to validate the improved AR&C systems prior to flight.

  12. Liquid crystal Janus emulsion droplets: preparation, tumbling, and swimming.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Gross, Adam; Wei, Wei-Shao; Tu, Fuquan; Lee, Daeyeon; Collings, Peter J; Yodh, A G

    2015-09-14

    This study introduces liquid crystal (LC) Janus droplets. We describe a process for the preparation of these droplets, which consist of nematic LC and polymer compartments. The process employs solvent-induced phase separation in emulsion droplets generated by microfluidics. The droplet morphology was systematically investigated and demonstrated to be sensitive to the surfactant concentration in the background phase, the compartment volume ratio, and the possible coalescence of multiple Janus droplets. Interestingly, the combination of a polymer and an anisotropic LC introduces new functionalities into Janus droplets, and these properties lead to unusual dynamical behaviors. The different densities and solubilities of the two compartments produce gravity-induced alignment, tumbling, and directional self-propelled motion of Janus droplets. LC Janus droplets with remarkable optical properties and dynamical behaviors thus offer new avenues for applications of Janus colloids and active soft matter. PMID:26171829

  13. Production of mineral aggregates in quartz tumbling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørnberg, Per; Finster, Kai; Pall Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur; Knak Jensen, Svend; Merrison, Jonathan Peter

    2013-04-01

    Introduction Tumbling experiments with quartz sand with the purpose of tracing the effect of broken bonds in mineral surfaces resulted in an unexpected production of aggregates. These aggregates are a few microns in diameter, spherical and resembling tiny white "snowballs." Particle comminution by aeolian and other natural weathering processes are known in soil science and is often seen as an increase of fine particles towards the top of soil profiles (Nørnberg, P. 1987, 1988, 2002, J.S. Wright 2007). When mineral grains collide in aeolian processes they break up along weakness zones in the crystal lattice. This mechanism causes broken bonds between atoms in the crystal lattice and results in reactive groups in the mineral surface. This mechanism provides the background for experiments to investigate the oxidation processes of magnetite on the planet Mars. The primary magnetic iron oxide phase on Mars is to day known to be magnetite and the colour of the dust on Mars is most likely due to hematite. To investigate if the oxidation process could take place without going over dissolution and precipitation in water, experiments with tumbling of quartz grains in sealed glass containers along with magnetite were started. The idea was that activated bonds at the surface of quartz could oxidize magnetite and convert it to hematite over time. This proved to be the case (Merrison, J.P. et al. 2010). However, in these experiments we observed the formation of the white aggregates which has been the subject of the study that we present here. Results of tumbling experiments Commercially available quarts (Merck) was sieved to obtain the fraction between 125 and 1000 µm. This fraction was tumbled in glass containers for months and resulted in production of a significant amount of fine grained material (Merrison, J.P et al. 2010). A part of this fine fraction consists of the "snowball"-like aggregates which is a fragile element with relatively high specific surface. The physical

  14. Robot Acting on Moving Bodies (RAMBO): Interaction with tumbling objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Larry S.; Dementhon, Daniel; Bestul, Thor; Ziavras, Sotirios; Srinivasan, H. V.; Siddalingaiah, Madhu; Harwood, David

    1989-01-01

    Interaction with tumbling objects will become more common as human activities in space expand. Attempting to interact with a large complex object translating and rotating in space, a human operator using only his visual and mental capacities may not be able to estimate the object motion, plan actions or control those actions. A robot system (RAMBO) equipped with a camera, which, given a sequence of simple tasks, can perform these tasks on a tumbling object, is being developed. RAMBO is given a complete geometric model of the object. A low level vision module extracts and groups characteristic features in images of the object. The positions of the object are determined in a sequence of images, and a motion estimate of the object is obtained. This motion estimate is used to plan trajectories of the robot tool to relative locations rearby the object sufficient for achieving the tasks. More specifically, low level vision uses parallel algorithms for image enhancement by symmetric nearest neighbor filtering, edge detection by local gradient operators, and corner extraction by sector filtering. The object pose estimation is a Hough transform method accumulating position hypotheses obtained by matching triples of image features (corners) to triples of model features. To maximize computing speed, the estimate of the position in space of a triple of features is obtained by decomposing its perspective view into a product of rotations and a scaled orthographic projection. This allows use of 2-D lookup tables at each stage of the decomposition. The position hypotheses for each possible match of model feature triples and image feature triples are calculated in parallel. Trajectory planning combines heuristic and dynamic programming techniques. Then trajectories are created using dynamic interpolations between initial and goal trajectories. All the parallel algorithms run on a Connection Machine CM-2 with 16K processors.

  15. Advanced Multipurpose Rendezvous Tracking System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, R. J.; Sterzer, F.

    1982-01-01

    Rendezvous and docking (R&D) sensors needed to support Earth orbital operations of vehicles were investigated to determine the form they should take. An R&D sensor must enable an interceptor vehicle to determine both the relative position and the relative attitude of a target vehicle. Relative position determination is fairly straightforward and places few constraints on the sensor. Relative attitude determination, however, is more difficult. The attitude is calculated based on relative position measurements of several reflectors placed in a known arrangement on the target vehicle. The constraints imposed on the sensor by the attitude determination method are severe. Narrow beamwidth, wide field of view (fov), high range accuracy, and fast random scan capability are all required to determine attitude by this method. A consideration of these constraints as well as others imposed by expected operating conditions and the available technology led to the conclusion that the sensor should be a cw optical radar employing a semiconductor laser transmitter and an image dissector receiver.

  16. Interstellar rendezvous missions employing fission propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenard, Roger X.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    There has been a conventionally held nostrum that fission system specific power and energy content is insufficient to provide the requisite high accelerations and velocities to enable interstellar rendezvous missions within a reasonable fraction of a human lifetime. As a consequence, all forms of alternative mechanisms that are not yet, and may never be technologically feasible, have been proposed, including laser light sails, fusion and antimatter propulsion systems. In previous efforts, [Lenard and Lipinski, 1999] the authors developed an architecture that employs fission power to propel two different concepts: one, an unmanned probe, the other a crewed vehicle to Alpha Centauri within mission times of 47 to 60 years. The first portion of this paper discusses employing a variant of the ``Forward Resupply Runway'' utilizing fission systems to enable both high accelerations and high final velocities necessary for this type of travel. The authors argue that such an architecture, while expensive, is considerably less expensive and technologically risky than other technologically advanced concepts, and, further, provides the ability to explore near-Earth stellar systems out to distances of 8 light years or so. This enables the ability to establish independent human societies which can later expand the domain of human exploration in roughly eight light-year increments even presuming that no further physics or technology breakthroughs or advances occur. In the second portion of the paper, a technology requirement assessment is performed. The authors argue that reasonable to extensive extensions to known technology could enable this revolutionary capability. .

  17. WISE Observations of Rendezvous Mission Candidate Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Bauer, J. M.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Walker, R. G.; Meech, K. J.; Grav, T.; Weissman, P. R.; Kramer, E.; Stevenson, R.

    2012-10-01

    In 1992, Osip et al. wrote: "Several comet flyby and/or rendezvous missions are currently being planned, for which supporting groundbased data from previous apparitions should prove useful. Here, we discuss groundbased narrowband photometry obtained over the last 15 years for nine candidate comets, five of which have been observed on multiple apparitions -- we derive limits on the size of each cometary nucleus. In order to facilitate spacecraft mission planning, we also present molecular abundance ratios, note variations in cometary activity as a function of orbital position and between apparitions, and note the overall degree of dustiness. A detailed analysis of the characteristics of these nine viable mission candidates will provide necessary information for prioritizing targets for any future missions." In this work, we update Osip et al.'s 1992 work using recent photometric infrared observations of the best candidate comet spacecraft targets observed by WISE and other (IRAS, MSX, ISO, Spitzer) infrared space telescopes. The comets studied include 2P/Encke, 9P/Tempel 1, 10P Tempe1 2, 19P/Borrelly, 22P/Kopff, 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 81P/Wild, 103P/Hartley 2, 107P/Wilson-Harrington. We present imagery, photometry, and temporal trend data, and derived estimates of the dust mass, spatial distribution, albedo/emissivity, and PSD for each comet.

  18. Current status of laparoendoscopic rendezvous in the treatment of cholelithiasis with concomitant choledocholithiasis.

    PubMed

    Baloyiannis, Ioannis; Tzovaras, George

    2015-06-25

    The current evidence in favor of the laparoendoscopic rendezvous is promising and demonstrates the main advantages of this technique in regard to shorter hospital stay and selective cannulation of the common bile duct (CBD), avoiding thus the inadvertent cannulation of the pancreatic duct. In addition, in the rendezvous technique the contrast medium is not injected retrogradely as during the traditional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), when the medium accidentally could be injected under pressure into the pancreatic duct. The RV technique minimizes that risk. Both these main advantages of the RV technique over the classic ERCP, are related with a significant lower incidence of hyperamylasemia and post-ERCP pancreatitis, compared with the traditional two stage procedure. Choledocholithiasis is present in 10% to 15% of patients undergoing cholecystectomy. To date, the ideal management of CBD stones remains controversial. Prospective randomized trials have shown that laparoscopic management of the CBD stones, as a single stage procedure, is the most efficient and cost effective method of treatment. Laparoendoscopic rendezvous has been proposed as an alternative single stage approach. Several studies have shown the effective use of this technique in the treatment of CBD stones by improving patient compliance and clinical results including shorter hospital stay, higher success rate and less cost. The current evidence about the use of this technique presented in this review article is promising and demonstrates the main advantages of the procedure. PMID:26140098

  19. Imaging Flash Lidar for Safe Landing on Solar System Bodies and Spacecraft Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Roback, Vincent E.; Bulyshev, Alexander E.; Brewster, Paul F.; Carrion, William A; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Hines, Glenn D.; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Noe, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA has been pursuing flash lidar technology for autonomous, safe landing on solar system bodies and for automated rendezvous and docking. During the final stages of the landing from about 1 kilometer to 500 meters above the ground, the flash lidar can generate 3-Dimensional images of the terrain to identify hazardous features such as craters, rocks, and steep slopes. The onboard flight computer can then use the 3-D map of terrain to guide the vehicle to a safe location. As an automated rendezvous and docking sensor, the flash lidar can provide relative range, velocity, and bearing from an approaching spacecraft to another spacecraft or a space station. NASA Langley Research Center has developed and demonstrated a flash lidar sensor system capable of generating 16,000 pixels range images with 7 centimeters precision, at 20 Hertz frame rate, from a maximum slant range of 1800 m from the target area. This paper describes the lidar instrument and presents the results of recent flight tests onboard a rocket-propelled free-flyer vehicle (Morpheus) built by NASA Johnson Space Center. The flights were conducted at a simulated lunar terrain site, consisting of realistic hazard features and designated landing areas, built at NASA Kennedy Space Center specifically for this demonstration test. This paper also provides an overview of the plan for continued advancement of the flash lidar technology aimed at enhancing its performance to meet both landing and automated rendezvous and docking applications.

  20. Shape and trajectory of a tumbling elastic sheet of paper II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Daniel; Robitaille, Michael; Kudrolli, Arshad; Bush, John

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical coupling between the tumbling motion and elastic deformation of a paper strip freely falling in air. Recent experiments suggest the existence of a critical length above which the strip bends as it tumbles. We demonstrate that this bending is caused by the centripetal force associated with its tumbling motion. A simple theory predicts that bending occurs above a critical length in much the same way that buckling occurs in a compressed beam. We further discuss the influence of bending on the trajectory of paper strips, as well as biological implications for the dispersal of seed pods.

  1. Automated Rendezvous and Capture System Development and Simulation for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.; Murphy, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The United States does not have an Automated Rendezvous and Capture/Docking (AR and C) capability and is reliant on manned control for rendezvous and docking of orbiting spacecraft. This reliance on the labor intensive manned interface for control of rendezvous and docking vehicles has a significant impact on the cost of the operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and precludes the use of any U.S. expendable launch capabilities for Space Station resupply. The Soviets have the capability to autonomously dock in space, but their system produces a hard docking with excessive force and contact velocity. Automated Rendezvous and Capture/Docking has been identified as a key enabling technology for the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Program, DARPA Orbital Express and other DOD Programs. The development and implementation of an AR&C capability can significantly enhance system flexibility, improve safety, and lower the cost of maintaining, supplying, and operating the International Space Station. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture (or docking) (AR and C) system for U.S. space vehicles. This AR&C system was tested extensively using hardware-in-the-loop simulations in the Flight Robotics Laboratory, and a rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor was developed and successfully flown on the Space Shuttle on flights STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. Further developments in sensor technology and vehicle and target configuration have lead to continued improvements and changes in AR&C system development and simulation. A new Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) with target will be utilized on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies (DART) flight experiment in 2004.

  2. The ion drive program - Comet rendezvous issues for SEPS developers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary steps have been taken in a joint high-priority project between NASA and the European Space Agency, whereby a Solar Electric Propulsion System (SEPS), using ion drive of a 25-30 kilowatt power level, will be utilized for the first time, as part of the Space Transportation System, in powering a probe to be deployed toward Halley's comet in 1985 and a separate spacecraft which will rendezvous with the Temple 2 comet in 1988 and study it for one year. Unlike ballistically-launched vehicles, an unprecedented long-term interaction between the SEPS, the primary source of power and attitude control, and the spacecraft, responsible for data handling (at a rate of 10-120 kilobits per second), and command and telecommunications to earth (requiring capabilities at both X- and S-band frequencies, for dual-frequency navigational tracking), is required, as mission phases alternate between powered flight and science data-taking. Different design sensitivities are presented graphically.

  3. Rendezvous and Proximity Operations of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Space Shuttle rendezvous missions present unique challenges that were not fully recognized when the Shuttle was designed. Rendezvous targets could be passive (i.e., no lights or transponders), and not designed to facilitate Shuttle rendezvous, proximity operations, and retrieval. Shuttle reaction control system jet plume impingement on target spacecraft presented induced dynamics, structural loading, and contamination concerns. These issues, along with limited reaction control system propellant in the Shuttle nose, drove a change from the legacy Gemini/Apollo coelliptic profile to a stable orbit profile, and the development of new proximity operations techniques. Multiple scientific and on-orbit servicing missions, and crew exchange, assembly and replenishment flights to Mir and to the International Space Station drove further profile and piloting technique changes. These changes included new proximity operations, relative navigation sensors, and new computer generated piloting cues. However, the Shuttle's baseline rendezvous navigation system has not required modification to place the Shuttle at the proximity operations initiation point for all rendezvous missions flown.

  4. Rendezvous missions to temporarily captured near Earth asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelsford, S.; Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Patterson, G.

    2016-04-01

    Missions to rendezvous with or capture an asteroid present significant interest both from a geophysical and safety point of view. They are key to the understanding of our solar system and are stepping stones for interplanetary human flight. In this paper, we focus on a rendezvous mission with 2006 RH120, an asteroid classified as a Temporarily Captured Orbiter (TCO). TCOs form a new population of near Earth objects presenting many advantages toward that goal. Prior to the mission, we consider the spacecraft hibernating on a Halo orbit around the Earth-Moon's L2 libration point. The objective is to design a transfer for the spacecraft from the parking orbit to rendezvous with 2006 RH120 while minimizing the fuel consumption. Our transfers use indirect methods, based on the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, combined with continuation techniques and a direct method to address the sensitivity of the initialization. We demonstrate that a rendezvous mission with 2006 RH120 can be accomplished with low delta-v. This exploratory work can be seen as a first step to identify good candidates for a rendezvous on a given TCO trajectory.

  5. Unsteady aerodynamic forces and torques on falling parallelograms in coupled tumbling-helical motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Kapil; Chang, Song; Wang, Z. Jane

    2013-05-01

    Falling parallelograms exhibit coupled motion of autogyration and tumbling, similar to the motion of falling tulip seeds, unlike maple seeds which autogyrate but do not tumble, or rectangular cards which tumble but do not gyrate. This coupled tumbling and autogyrating motion are robust, when card parameters, such as aspect ratio, internal angle, and mass density, are varied. We measure the three-dimensional (3D) falling kinematics of the parallelograms and quantify their descending speed, azimuthal rotation, tumbling rotation, and cone angle in each falling. The cone angle is insensitive to the variation of the card parameters, and the card tumbling axis does not overlap with but is close to the diagonal axis. In addition to this connection to the dynamics of falling seeds, these trajectories provide an ideal set of data to analyze 3D aerodynamic force and torque at an intermediate range of Reynolds numbers, and the results will be useful for constructing 3D aerodynamic force and torque models. Tracking these free falling trajectories gives us a nonintrusive method for deducing instantaneous aerodynamic forces. We determine the 3D aerodynamic forces and torques based on Newton-Euler equations. The dynamical analysis reveals that, although the angle of attack changes dramatically during tumbling, the aerodynamic forces have a weak dependence on the angle of attack. The aerodynamic lift is dominated by the coupling of translational and rotational velocities. The aerodynamic torque has an unexpectedly large component perpendicular to the card. The analysis of the Euler equation suggests that this large torque is related to the deviation of the tumbling axis from the principle axis of the card.

  6. Dynamics and control of escape and rescue from a tumbling spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    The results of 18 months of investigations are reported. A movable mass control system to convert the tumbling motion of a spacecraft into simple spin was studied along with the optimization techniques for generating displacement profiles for a tumbling asymmetrical body. Equations of motion are discussed for two asymmetrical vehicles with flexible beams and one spacecraft with flexible solar arrays. The characteristics which allow reasonable safety and reliability in bailout are also discussed.

  7. Rendezvous missions: From ISS to lunar space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazin, Rafail

    2014-08-01

    There was a lot of experience gained in the rendezvous of different vehicles in the LEO during the years of human space exploration. In the framework of the Apollo program when the astronauts landed on the surface of the Moon, the docking of the Lunar Module launched from the Moon's surface to the Apollo Command Module was successfully implemented in the near-Moon orbit. Presently many space agencies are considering a return to the Moon. It is necessary to solve the new task of docking the vehicle launched from the Earth to the long-term near-Moon orbital station taking into account specific constraints. Based on the ISS experience the author proposes a number of ballistic rendezvous strategies that provide for docking to the near-Moon orbital station with minimum propellant consumption. The trade-off analysis of the given rendezvous strategies is presented.

  8. SEPS comet rendezvous performance assessment. [Solar Electric Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, C. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of delivered payload capability for a number of selected rendezvous missions to periodic comets with launch opportunities through the years 1986-1996. These missions are chosen using a selection criteria that considers both expected scientific interest and earth-based sighting considerations. Some 22 mission opportunities are found that satisfies the selection criteria. Spacecraft performance is presented for each mission opportunity based on use of a space shuttle, a twin stage inertial-upper-stage, and a conceptual solar-electric-propulsion-system with a nominal rendezvous 50 days before comet perihelion. Additional trajectory and propulsion enhancements are investigated for several comet rendezvous missions in order to improve spacecraft performance. An indirect transfer trajectory for an Encke mission is shown to offer substantial delivered payload. In addition the use of concentrator solar arrays is considered for several of the more interesting comet missions.

  9. Automated space vehicle control for rendezvous proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    Rendezvous during the unmanned space exploration missions, such as a Mars Rover/Sample Return will require a completely automatic system from liftoff to docking. A conceptual design of an automated rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking system is being implemented and validated at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The emphasis is on the progress of the development and testing of a prototype system for control of the rendezvous vehicle during proximity operations that is currently being developed at JSC. Fuzzy sets are used to model the human capability of common sense reasoning in decision making tasks and such models are integrated with the expert systems and engineering control system technology to create a system that performs comparably to a manned system.

  10. Automated space vehicle control for rendezvous proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    Rendezvous during the unmanned space exploration missions, such as a Mars Rover/Sample Return will require a completely automatic system from liftoff to docking. A conceptual design of an automated rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking system is being implemented and validated at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The emphasis is on the progress of the development and testing of a prototype system for control of the rendezvous vehicle during proximity operations that is currently being developed at JSC. Fuzzy sets are used to model the human capability of common sense reasoning in decision-making tasks and such models are integrated with the expert systems and engineering control system technology to create a system that performs comparably to a manned system.

  11. Chemotaxis in Escherichia coli proceeds efficiently from different initial tumble frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, R M; Koshland, D E

    1990-01-01

    The relationships between the level of tumbling, tumble frequency, and chemotactic ability were tested by constructing two Escherichia coli strains with the same signaling apparatus but with different adapted levels of tumbling, above and below the level of wild-type E. coli. This was achieved by introducing two different aspartate receptor genes into E. coli: a wild-type (wt-tars) and a mutant (m-tars) Salmonella typhimurium receptor gene. These cells were compared with each other and with wild-type E. coli (containing the wild-type E. coli aspartate receptor gene, wt-tare). It was found that in spite of the differences in the adapted levels of tumbling, the three strains had essentially equal response times and chemotactic ability toward aspartate. This shows that the absolute level of the tumbling can be varied without impairing chemotaxis if the signal processing system is normal. It also appears that a largely smooth-swimming mutant may undergo chemotaxis by increasing tumbling frequency in negative gradients. PMID:2404936

  12. Robustness of the periodic and chaotic orientational behavior of tumbling nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Ilg, Patrick; Hess, Siegfried

    2006-06-01

    The dynamical behavior of molecular alignment strongly affects physical properties of nematic liquid crystals. A theoretical description can be made by a nonlinear relaxation equation of the order parameter and leads to the prediction that rather complex even chaotic orientational behavior occur. Here the influence of fluctuating shear rates on the orientational dynamics especially on chaotic solutions is discussed. With the help of phase portraits and time evolution diagrams, we investigated the influence of different fluctuation strengths on the flow aligned, isotropic, and periodic solutions. To explore the effect of fluctuations on the chaotic behavior, we calculated the largest Lyapunov exponent for different fluctuation strengths. We found in all cases that small fluctuations of the shear rate do not affect the basic features of the dynamics of tumbling nematics. Furthermore, we present an amended potential modeling the isotropic to nematic transition and discuss the equivalence and difference to the commonly used Landau-de Gennes potential. In contrast to the Landau-de Gennes potential, our potential has the advantage to restrict the order parameter to physically admissible values. In the case of extensional flow, we show that the amended potential leads for increasing extensional rate to a better agreement with experimental results. PMID:16906852

  13. Quantitative characterization of agglomerate abrasion in a tumbling blender by using the Stokes number approach.

    PubMed

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Nguyen, Tien Thanh; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2013-03-01

    Removal of microcrystalline cellulose agglomerates in a dry-mixing system (lactose, 100 M) predominantly occurs via abrasion. The agglomerate abrasion rate potential is estimated by the Stokes abrasion (StAbr) number of the system. The StAbr number equals the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. Basically, the StAbr number concept describes the blending condition of the dry-mixing system. The concept has been applied to investigate the relevance of process parameters on agglomerate abrasion in tumbling blenders. Here, process parameters such as blender rotational speed and relative fill volumes were investigated. In this study, the StAbr approach revealed a transition point between abrasion rate behaviors. Below this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerate abrasion is dominated by the kinetic energy density of the powder blend. Above this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerates show (undesirable) slow abrasion rates. In this situation, the blending condition is mainly determined by the high fill volume of the filler. PMID:23250711

  14. Robustness of the periodic and chaotic orientational behavior of tumbling nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Hess, Siegfried; Ilg, Patrick

    2006-06-15

    The dynamical behavior of molecular alignment strongly affects physical properties of nematic liquid crystals. A theoretical description can be made by a nonlinear relaxation equation of the order parameter and leads to the prediction that rather complex even chaotic orientational behavior occur. Here the influence of fluctuating shear rates on the orientational dynamics especially on chaotic solutions is discussed. With the help of phase portraits and time evolution diagrams, we investigated the influence of different fluctuation strengths on the flow aligned, isotropic, and periodic solutions. To explore the effect of fluctuations on the chaotic behavior, we calculated the largest Lyapunov exponent for different fluctuation strengths. We found in all cases that small fluctuations of the shear rate do not affect the basic features of the dynamics of tumbling nematics. Furthermore, we present an amended potential modeling the isotropic to nematic transition and discuss the equivalence and difference to the commonly used Landau-de Gennes potential. In contrast to the Landau-de Gennes potential, our potential has the advantage to restrict the order parameter to physically admissible values. In the case of extensional flow, we show that the amended potential leads for increasing extensional rate to a better agreement with experimental results.

  15. Modifying the properties of finely ground limestone by tumbling granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, Oliver; Eckert, Maroš; Tomášová, Barbora; Peciar, Peter; Ščasný, Martin; Fekete, Roman; Peciar, Marián

    2016-06-01

    Calcium carbonate in the form of finely ground limestone is a material that has found its application in a wide range of industries, in the chemical, rubber, agricultural, and paper industries, is used for desulfurization of boilers and other. In civil engineering, ground limestone is used for the production of building materials, plaster and mortar mixtures, as a filler in concrete mixtures, in road construction, and as an essential component of mastic asphalt. This paper deals with examining the modification of the properties of finely ground limestone by the tumbling agglomeration method. It has been shown that the components of concrete with a round grain have a positive effect on the pumping of concrete in comparison with an elongated grain or the rough surface of crushed stone. The experiments will be carried out on a granulation plate using a variety of granulation liquid. The agglomerates and their properties were compared with untreated finely ground limestone, with a focus on detecting changes in compressibility, density and particle size. The output of this paper is a description and graphical representation of the changes in the properties of ground limestone before and after the agglomeration process.

  16. Robust H∞ Control for Spacecraft Rendezvous with a Noncooperative Target

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu-Nan; Zhou, Wen-Ya; Tan, Shu-Jun; Wu, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The robust H∞ control for spacecraft rendezvous with a noncooperative target is addressed in this paper. The relative motion of chaser and noncooperative target is firstly modeled as the uncertain system, which contains uncertain orbit parameter and mass. Then the H∞ performance and finite time performance are proposed, and a robust H∞ controller is developed to drive the chaser to rendezvous with the non-cooperative target in the presence of control input saturation, measurement error, and thrust error. The linear matrix inequality technology is used to derive the sufficient condition of the proposed controller. An illustrative example is finally provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controller. PMID:24027446

  17. Laser space rendezvous and docking system study continuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S.; Heynau, H.; Levinson, S.; Weindling, F.

    1977-01-01

    Investigations were made of a configuration for a spaceborne laser radar (ladar) to meet the requirements for rendezvous and docking with a cooperative object in synchronous orbit. An analysis was completed of laser phase locking techniques, while experimental verification was made of pulse repetition frequency and resonant scanning control loops. Data measurements on a satellite mock-up were also made. The investigation supports the original contention that a rendezvous and docking ladar can be configured to offer a cost effective and reliable solution to envisioned space missions.

  18. Thermal control of a solar sail. [for Halley's Comet rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpson, L. D.; Greenfield, M. L.; Jaworski, W.; Wolf, F.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal control concepts for the square and the heliogyro solar sail designs under consideration for a Halley's Comet rendezvous mission are presented. The mission, involving a 1982 launch, navigation to a 0.25-AU cranking orbit about the sun in order to develop a retrograde orbit, and rendezvous with the comet in 1986, would subject surfaces of the sail vehicle to solar constant values ranging from 16 to 0.1. A highly reflective coating to produce propulsive force is needed for one surface of the sail, while the other surface requires a highly emittive coating. The problem of maintaining the sail wrinkle-free is discussed.

  19. Preliminary results of experimental and analytical investigations of the tumbling phenomenon for an advanced configuration. [X-29 research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.; Croom, M. A.; Fears, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    A sustained autorotative pitching motion usually called 'tumbling' has been observed during dynamic model tests of the X-29A configuration. The X-29 is an advanced design incorporating forward-swept wings and canards in a highly relaxed static stability condition. Beginning with a historical review of the tumbling phenomenon, this paper discusses the current experimental results of dynamic model tumbling tests of the X-29 and the initial efforts to establish an aerodynamic and mathematical model for analysis.

  20. Successful Development of an Automated Rendezvous and Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.

    2002-01-01

    During the 1990's, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture/docking system for U.S. space vehicles. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous sensor was identified early in the AR&C Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proximity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) was developed and successfully flown on STS 87 and again on STS 95, proving the concept of a video-based sensor. Advances in both video and signal processing technologies and the lessons learned from the two successful flight experiments provided a baseline for the development, by the MSFC, of a new generation of video based rendezvous sensor. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) has greatly increased performance and additional capability for longer-range operation with a new Target designed as a direct replacement for existing ISS hemispherical reflectors. A ground demonstration of the entire system and software was successfully tested.

  1. Autonomous rendezvous and feature detection system using TV imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. B., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Algorithms and equations are used for conversion of standard television imaging system information into directly usable spatial and dimensional information. System allows utilization of spacecraft imagery system as sensor in application to operations such as deriving spacecraft steering signal, tracking, autonomous rendezvous and docking and ranging.

  2. Rendezvous radar modification and evaluation. [for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to continue the implementation and evaluation of the changes necessary to add the non-cooperative mode capability with frequency diversity and a doppler filter bank to the Apollo Rendezvous Radar while retaining the cooperative mode capability.

  3. Autonomous spacecraft executive and its application to rendezvous and docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komura, Fuminobu; Furuya, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Toshiro; Anderson, Robert L.; Tsugawa, Roy K.

    1994-01-01

    Autonomy is needed for future spacecraft to solve the problems of human operator overload and transmission delay. This paper describes the autonomous spacecraft executive for rendezvous and docking. It is an onboard expert system and has decision making capability for mission planning of nominal and contingency cases. The executive has been developed and verified using a hardware motion based simulator.

  4. Test Results for the Automated Rendezvous and Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruzen, Craig; Dabney, Richard; Lomas, James

    1999-01-01

    The Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) system was designed and tested at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to demonstrate technologies and mission strategies for automated rendezvous and docking of spacecraft in Earth orbit, The system incorporates some of the latest innovations in Global Positioning, System space navigation, laser sensor technologies and automated mission sequencing algorithms. The system's initial design and integration was completed in 1998 and has undergone testing at MSFC. This paper describes the major components of the AR&C system and presents results from the official system tests performed in MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory with digital simulations and hardware in the loop tests. The results show that the AR&C system can safely and reliably perform automated rendezvous and docking missions in the absence of system failures with 100 percent success. When system failures are included, the system uses its automated collision avoidance maneuver logic to recover in a safe manner. The primary objective of the AR&C project is to prove that by designing a safe and robust automated system, mission operations cost can be reduced by decreasing the personnel required for mission design, preflight planning and training required for crewed rendezvous and docking missions.

  5. Autonomous rendezvous and docking for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, James L., Jr.; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D) for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: requirements for AR&D experience; Comet spacecraft performance; AR&D mission profile; analytical models for approach trajectory, loosely coupled configuration, and contact dynamics; and application to space infrastructure.

  6. Fast-tumbling bicelles constructed from native Escherichia coli lipids.

    PubMed

    Liebau, Jobst; Pettersson, Pontus; Zuber, Philipp; Ariöz, Candan; Mäler, Lena

    2016-09-01

    Solution-state NMR requires small membrane mimetic systems to allow for acquiring high-resolution data. At the same time these mimetics should faithfully mimic biological membranes. Here we characterized two novel fast-tumbling bicelle systems with lipids from two Escherichia coli strains. While strain 1 (AD93WT) contains a characteristic E. coli lipid composition, strain 2 (AD93-PE) is not capable of synthesizing the most abundant lipid in E. coli, phosphatidylethanolamine. The lipid and acyl chain compositions were characterized by (31)P and (13)C NMR. Depending on growth temperature and phase, the lipid composition varies substantially, which means that the bicelle composition can be tuned by using lipids from cells grown at different temperatures and growth phases. The hydrodynamic radii of the bicelles were determined from translational diffusion coefficients and NMR spin relaxation was measured to investigate lipid properties in the bicelles. We find that the lipid dynamics are unaffected by variations in lipid composition, suggesting that the bilayer is in a fluid phase under all conditions investigated here. Backbone glycerol carbons are the most rigid positions in all lipids, while head-group carbons and the first carbons of the acyl chain are somewhat more flexible. The flexibility increases down the acyl chain to almost unrestricted motion at its end. Carbons in double bonds and cyclopropane moieties are substantially restricted in their motional freedom. The bicelle systems characterized here are thus found to faithfully mimic E. coli inner membranes and are therefore useful for membrane interaction studies of proteins with E. coli inner membranes by solution-state NMR. PMID:27317394

  7. Autonomous rendezvous and docking technologies: status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, James R.; Bell, Robert

    2003-08-01

    In general, autonomous rendezvous and docking requires that two spacecraft start at a remote distance (i.e., out of sight of each other), come together into a common orbit, rendezvous, dock, and control the new combined spacecraft in both orbit and attitude. Doing this requires developing and testing a variety of new technologies including absolute and relative autonomous navigation, autonomous rendezvous and docking hardware and software (both sensors and actuators), and autonomous control of a "new" spacecraft with different mass and inertia properties than either of the two original spacecraft. While these are very workable technologies, they do require a significant change in mindset -- turning over control of thrusters and other actuators to an on-board computer. While there is substantial potential for cost savings, risk reduction, and new mission modes by use of these technologies, there is a very strong reticence to allowing operational spacecraft to control their own destiny, particularly in firing thrusters. This paper summarizes work at Microcosm and elsewhere in each of the above technologies. Autonomous navigation and absolute orbit control have been demonstrated on orbit. In conjunction with Michigan Aerospace, autonomous rendezvous and docking hardware and algorithms have been demonstrated in parabolic flights and zero-g simulations. Approaches have been proposed for more precise and robust autonomous navigation and autonomous on-orbit estimation of combined mass and inertia properties, leading to efficient orbit and attitude control of the combined spacecraft. Many of these technologies can be tested at low cost in parabolic flights, suborbital flights, and evaluation of data from existing or planned missions. Thus, a "coordinated attack" on the complete problem of fully autonomous rendezvous and docking is both feasible and potentially very low cost.

  8. Coarsening and clustering in run-and-tumble dynamics with short-range exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepúlveda, Néstor; Soto, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of clustering and coarsening in crowded ensembles of self-propelled agents is studied using a lattice model in one dimension. The persistent exclusion process, where particles move at directions that change randomly at a low tumble rate α , is extended allowing sites to be occupied by more than one particle, with a maximum nmax per site. Three phases are distinguished. For nmax=1 a gas of clusters form, with sizes distributed exponentially and no coarsening takes place. For nmax≥3 and small values of α , coarsening takes place and few large clusters appear, with a large fraction of the total number of particles in them. In the same range of nmax but for larger values of α , a gas phase where a negligible fraction of particles takes part of clusters. Finally, nmax=2 corresponds to a crossover phase. The character of the transitions between phases is studied extending the model to allow nmax to take real values and jumps to an occupied site are probabilistic. The transition from the gas of clusters to the coarsening phase is continuous and the mass of the large clusters grows continuously when varying the maximum occupancy, and the crossover found corresponds to values close to the transition. The second transition, from the coarsening to the gaseous phase, can be either continuous or discontinuous depending on the parameters, with a critical point separating both cases.

  9. Development of automated rendezvous and proximity operations techniques for rendezvous and close-in operations and satellite servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. W.; Anderson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The development of freeflyer maneuvering system and shuttle orbiter flight profiles and hardware/software requirements that will provide and automated rendezvous, station keeping, and docking capability is discussed. Automated control techniques, sensors, target vehicle requirements, and a soft docking system are addressed.

  10. Enchanted rendezvous: John C. Houbolt and the genesis of the lunar-orbit rendezvous concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This is the fourth publication of the 'Monographs in Aerospace History' series, prepared by the NASA History Office. These publications are intended to be tightly focused in terms of subject, relatively short in length, and reproduced to allow timely and broad dissemination to researchers in aerospace history. This publication details the arguments of John C. Houbolt, an engineer at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, in his 1961-1962 campaign to support the lunar-orbit rendezvous (LOR). The LOR was eventually selected during Project Apollo as the method of flying to the Moon, landing on the surface, and returning to Earth. The LOR opted to send the entire lunar spacecraft up in one launch, enter into the lunar orbit, and dispatch a small lander to the lunar surface. It was the simplest of the various methods, both in terms of development and operational costs, but it was risky. There was no room for error or the crew could not get home; and the more difficult maneuvers had to be done when the spacecraft was committed to a circumlunar flight. Houbolt was one of the most vocal people supporting the LOR.

  11. Abrasion in pyroclastic density currents: Insights from tumbling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Putz, Constanze; Spieler, Oliver; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2012-01-01

    During granular mass movements of any kind, particles may interact with one another. The degree of interaction is a function of several variables including; grain-size distribution, particle concentration, density stratification and degree of fluidisation. The impact of particle interaction is additionally influenced by the relative speed, impact angle and clast temperature. Thus, both source conditions and transport-related processes are expected to influence the flow dynamics of pyroclastic density currents and their subsequent deposition. Here, we use tumbling experiments to shed light on the susceptibility of porous clasts to abrasion. We investigated the abrasion of unaltered volcanic rocks (5.7-80 vol.% porosity) from Unzen (Japan), Bezymianny (Russia) and Santorini (Greece) volcanoes as well as one synthetic analogue material, an insulating material with the trade name Foamglas® (95 vol.% porosity). Each experiment started with angular fragments generated in a jaw crusher from larger clasts. Two experimental series were performed; on samples with narrow and broader grain-size distributions, respectively. The dry samples were subject to rotational movement at constant speed and ambient temperature in a gum rotational tumbler for durations of 15, 30, 45, 60 and 120 min. The amount of volcanic ash (particles <2 mm) generated was evaluated as a function of experimental duration and sample porosity. We term “abrasion” as the ash fraction generated during the experiments. The observed increase of “abrasion” with increasing sample porosity and experimental duration is initially non-linear but becomes linear for experiments of 30 min duration or longer. For any given sample, abrasion appears to be more effective for coarser samples and larger initial mass. The observed range of ash generated in our experiments is between 1 and 35 wt.%. We find that this amount generally increases with increasing initial clast size or increasing breadth of the initial grain

  12. Space Debris Attitude Simulation - IOTA (In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzler, R.; Schildknecht, T.; Lips, T.; Fritsche, B.; Silha, J.; Krag, H.

    Today, there is little knowledge on the attitude state of decommissioned intact objects in Earth orbit. Observational means have advanced in the past years, but are still limited with respect to an accurate estimate of motion vector orientations and magnitude. Especially for the preparation of Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions as planned by ESA's Clean Space initiative or contingency scenarios for ESA spacecraft like ENVISAT, such knowledge is needed. The In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis tool (IOTA) is a prototype software, currently in development within the framework of ESA's “Debris Attitude Motion Measurements and Modelling” project (ESA Contract No. 40000112447), which is led by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB). The project goal is to achieve a good understanding of the attitude evolution and the considerable internal and external effects which occur. To characterize the attitude state of selected targets in LEO and GTO, multiple observation methods are combined. Optical observations are carried out by AIUB, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is performed by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IWF) and radar measurements and signal level determination are provided by the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR). Developed by Hyperschall Technologie Göttingen GmbH (HTG), IOTA will be a highly modular software tool to perform short- (days), medium- (months) and long-term (years) propagation of the orbit and attitude motion (six degrees-of-freedom) of spacecraft in Earth orbit. The simulation takes into account all relevant acting forces and torques, including aerodynamic drag, solar radiation pressure, gravitational influences of Earth, Sun and Moon, eddy current damping, impulse and momentum transfer from space debris or micro meteoroid impact, as well as the optional definition of particular spacecraft specific influences like tank sloshing, reaction wheel behaviour

  13. Suppression of E. coli tumbling and wobbling in dilute polymeric fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patteson, Alison; Gopinath, Arvind; Arratia, Paulo

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria commonly utilize a run-and-tumble swimming behavior to navigate through complex environments, such as mucus in the lungs or digestive system. This swimming behavior has been extensively studied in water-like fluids; yet, studies on the role of particles/polymers on the run-and-tumble technique are limited. Here, we experimentally investigate the role of polymer concentration on the swimming dynamics of E. coli. We find that small amounts of polymer drastically change the run-and-tumble behavior of E. coli cells, significantly enhancing the translational diffusion. The average cell velocity increases with polymer concentration (and viscosity) and the mean run times are enhanced. By varying polymer molecular weight, we show that enhanced translation is a result of two mechanisms: (1) suppression of cell wobbling due to elasticity and (2) enhancement of run times due to viscosity. Our results show that the transport of chemotactic cells can be independently modified by viscosity and elasticity.

  14. Effect of Different Tumbling Marination Treatments on the Quality Characteristics of Prepared Pork Chops

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tian; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Jiang, Yun; Ma, Ruixue; Song, Lei; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different tumbling marination treatments (control group, CG; conventional static marination, SM; vacuum continuous tumbling marination, CT; vacuum intermittent tumbling marination, IT) on the quality characteristics of prepared pork chops was investigated under simulated commercial conditions. The CT treatment increased (p<0.05) the pH value, b* value, product yield, tenderness, overall flavor, sensory juiciness and overall acceptability in comparison to other treatments for prepared boneless pork chops. The CT treatment decreased (p<0.05) cooking loss, shear force value, hardness, gumminess and chewiness compared with other treatments. In addition, CT treatment effectively improved springiness and sensory color more than other treatments. However, IT treatment achieved the numerically highest (p<0.05) L* and a* values. These results suggested that CT treatment obtained the best quality characteristics of prepared pork chops and should be adopted as the optimal commercial processing method for this prepared boneless pork chops. PMID:25557823

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, G. V.; Harrington, J. K.; Eastman, M. P.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of EPR line shapes by the method of Polnaszek, Bruno, and Freed is made for slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in viscous nematic liquid crystals. The use of typical vanadyl complexes as spin probes for nematic liquid crystals is shown to simplify the theoretical analysis and the subsequent interpretation. Rotational correlation times tau and orientational ordering parameters S sub Z where slow tumbling effects are expected to be observed in vanadyl EPR spectra are indicated in a plot. Analysis of the inertial effects on the probe reorientation, which are induced by slowly fluctuating torque components of the local solvent structure, yield quantitative values for tau and S sub Z. The weakly ordered probe VOAA is in the slow tumbling region and displays these inertial effects throughout the nematic range of BEPC and Phase V. VOAA exhibits different reorientation behavior near the isotropic-nematic transition temperature than that displayed far below this transition temperature.

  16. Emergent Run-and-Tumble Behavior in a Simple Model of Chlamydomonas with Intrinsic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Rachel R.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2013-04-01

    Recent experiments on the green alga Chlamydomonas that swims using synchronized beating of a pair of flagella have revealed that it exhibits a run-and-tumble behavior similar to that of bacteria such as E. coli. Using a simple purely hydrodynamic model that incorporates a stroke cycle and an intrinsic Gaussian white noise, we show that a stochastic run-and-tumble behavior could emerge due to the nonlinearity of the combined synchronization-rotation-translation dynamics. Our study suggests that nonlinear mechanics could be a significant contributing factor to how the trajectories of the microorganism are selected.

  17. Theory of Tumbling Bodies Entering Planetary Atmospheres with Application to Probe Vehicles and the Australian Tektites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, Murray; Peterson, Victor L.

    1964-01-01

    The tumbling motion of aerodynamically stable bodies entering planetary atmospheres is analyzed considering that the tumbling, its arrest, and the subsequent oscillatory motion are governed by the equation for the fifth Painleve' transcendent. Results based on the asymptotic behavior of the transcendent are applied to study (1) the oscillatory behavior of planetary probe vehicles in relation to aerodynamic heating and loads and (2) the dynamic behavior of the Australian tektites on entering the Earth's atmosphere, under the hypothesis that their origin was the Moon.

  18. Investigations of Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Northrop N-9M Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDougall, George F., Jr.

    1947-01-01

    The tumbling characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Northrop N-9M airplane have been determined in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel for various configurations and loading conditions of the model. The investigation included tests to determine whether recovery from a tumble could be effected by the use of parachutes. An estimation of the forces due to acceleration acting on the pilot during a tumble was made. The tests were performed at an equivalent test altitude of 15,000 feet. The results of the model tests indicate that if the airplane is stalled with its nose up and near the vertical, or if an appreciable amount of pitching rotation is imparted to the airplane as through the action of a strong gust, the airplane will either tumble or oscillate in pitch through a range of angles of the order of +/-120 deg. The normal flying controls will probably be ineffective in preventing or in terminating the tumbling motion. The results of the model tests indicate that deflection of the landing flaps full down immediately upon the initiation of pitching rotation will tend to prevent the development of a state of tumbling equilibrium. The simultaneous opening of two-7-foot diameter parachutes having drag coefficients of 0.7, one parachute attached to the rear portion of each wing tip with a towline between 10 and 30 feet long, will provide recovery from a tumble. The accelerations acting on the pilot during a tumble will be dangerous.

  19. Rendezvous and Proximity Operations of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Space Shuttle rendezous missions presented unique challenges that were not fully recognized when the Shuttle was designed. Rendezvous targets could be passive (i.e., no lights or transponders), and not designed to facilitate Shuttle rendezvous, proximity operations and retrieval. Shuttle reaction control system jet plume impingement on target spacecraft presented induced dynamics, structural loading and contamination concerns. These issues, along with limited forward reaction control system propellant, drove a change from the Gemimi/Apollo coelliptic profile heritage to a stable orbit profile, and the development of new proximity operations techniques. Multiple scientific and on-orbit servicing missions and crew exchange, assembly and replinishment flights to Mir and to the International Space Station drove further profile and piloting technique changes, including new relative navigation sensors and new computer generated piloting cues.

  20. Design of the Automated Rendezvous and Capture Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruzen, Craig A.; Lomas, James J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) system that was designed and is being tested at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The AR&C system incorporates some of the latest innovations in Global Positioning System (GPS), laser sensor technologies and automated mission sequencing algorithms as well as the capability for ground and crew monitoring and commanding. This paper summarizes the variety of mission scenarios supported by the AR&C system. It also describes the major components of the AR&C system including the Guidance, Navigation and Control system, GPS receivers, relative navigation filter and the Video Guidance Sensor. A discussion of the safety and reliability issues confronted during the design follows. By designing a safe and robust automated system, space mission operations cost can be reduced by decreasing the number of ground personnel required for the extensive mission design, preflight planning and training typically required for rendezvous and docking missions.

  1. Supervised autonomous rendezvous and docking system technology evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.

    1991-01-01

    Technology for manned space flight is mature and has an extensive history of the use of man-in-the-loop rendezvous and docking, but there is no history of automated rendezvous and docking. Sensors exist that can operate in the space environment. The Shuttle radar can be used for ranges down to 30 meters, Japan and France are developing laser rangers, and considerable work is going on in the U.S. However, there is a need to validate a flight qualified sensor for the range of 30 meters to contact. The number of targets and illumination patterns should be minimized to reduce operation constraints with one or more sensors integrated into a robust system for autonomous operation. To achieve system redundancy, it is worthwhile to follow a parallel development of qualifying and extending the range of the 0-12 meter MSFC sensor and to simultaneously qualify the 0-30(+) meter JPL laser ranging system as an additional sensor with overlapping capabilities. Such an approach offers a redundant sensor suite for autonomous rendezvous and docking. The development should include the optimization of integrated sensory systems, packaging, mission envelopes, and computer image processing to mimic brain perception and real-time response. The benefits of the Global Positioning System in providing real-time positioning data of high accuracy must be incorporated into the design. The use of GPS-derived attitude data should be investigated further and validated.

  2. Trajectory Control of Rendezvous with Maneuver Target Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Zhinqiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear trajectory control algorithm of rendezvous with maneuvering target spacecraft is presented. The disturbance forces on the chaser and target spacecraft and the thrust forces on the chaser spacecraft are considered in the analysis. The control algorithm developed in this paper uses the relative distance and relative velocity between the target and chaser spacecraft as the inputs. A general formula of reference relative trajectory of the chaser spacecraft to the target spacecraft is developed and applied to four different proximity maneuvers, which are in-track circling, cross-track circling, in-track spiral rendezvous and cross-track spiral rendezvous. The closed-loop differential equations of the proximity relative motion with the control algorithm are derived. It is proven in the paper that the tracking errors between the commanded relative trajectory and the actual relative trajectory are bounded within a constant region determined by the control gains. The prediction of the tracking errors is obtained. Design examples are provided to show the implementation of the control algorithm. The simulation results show that the actual relative trajectory tracks the commanded relative trajectory tightly. The predicted tracking errors match those calculated in the simulation results. The control algorithm developed in this paper can also be applied to interception of maneuver target spacecraft and relative trajectory control of spacecraft formation flying.

  3. Design and fabrication of an autonomous rendezvous and docking sensor using off-the-shelf hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, Gary E.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Howard, Richard T.; Book, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed and tested an engineering model of an automated rendezvous and docking sensor system composed of a video camera ringed with laser diodes at two wavelengths and a standard remote manipulator system target that has been modified with retro-reflective tape and 830 and 780 mm optical filters. TRW has provided additional engineering analysis, design, and manufacturing support, resulting in a robust, low cost, automated rendezvous and docking sensor design. We have addressed the issue of space qualification using off-the-shelf hardware components. We have also addressed the performance problems of increased signal to noise ratio, increased range, increased frame rate, graceful degradation through component redundancy, and improved range calibration. Next year, we will build a breadboard of this sensor. The phenomenology of the background scene of a target vehicle as viewed against earth and space backgrounds under various lighting conditions will be simulated using the TRW Dynamic Scene Generator Facility (DSGF). Solar illumination angles of the target vehicle and candidate docking target ranging from eclipse to full sun will be explored. The sensor will be transportable for testing at the MSFC Flight Robotics Laboratory (EB24) using the Dynamic Overhead Telerobotic Simulator (DOTS).

  4. A new approach for teleoperation rendezvous and docking with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, JianYong; Jiang, ZiCheng; Tang, GuoJin

    2012-02-01

    Teleoperation rendezvous and docking can be used as a backup for autonomous rendezvous and docking (RVD) for an unmanned spacecraft or for guiding the chaser docking with an uncooperative target. The inherent teleoperation time delay is a rigorous problem, especially when the chaser is teleoperated on the ground. To eliminate the effect of time delay, a new approach for teleoperation RVD is studied. The characteristics of teleoperation RVD are analyzed by comparisons with the teleoperation robot and with manually controlled RVD; the relative motion of the chaser is predicted based on the C-W equation; and the processed measure information with time delay through the Kalman filter is utilized to correct the current prediction. Experimental results verify that the approach produces an 18% enhanced success rate of teleoperation RVD compared with direct visual feedback, and consumes less time and fuel. The developed approach also solves the time delay problem effectively. Teleoperation RVD using this method can be applied as a useful backup for autonomous RVD.

  5. Mission options for rendezvous with the most accessible Near-Earth Asteroid - 1989 ML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcadams, Jim V.

    1992-01-01

    The recent discovery of the Amor-class 1989 ML, the most accessible known asteroid for minimum-energy rendezvous missions, has expedited the search for frequent, low-cost Near-Earth Asteroid rendezvous and round-trip missions. This paper identifies trajectory characteristics and assesses mass performance for low Delta V ballistic rendezvous opportunities to 1989 ML during the period 1996-2010. This asteroid also offers occasional unique extended mission opportunities, such as the lowest known Delta V requirement for any asteroid sample return mission as well as pre-rendezvous asteroid flyby and post-rendezvous comet flyby opportunities requiring less than 5.25 km/sec total Delta V. This paper also briefly comments concerning mission opportunities for asteroid 1991 JW, which recently replaced other known asteroids as the most accessible Near-Earth Asteroid for fast rendezvous and round-trip missions.

  6. Is Father-Child Rough-and-Tumble Play Associated with Attachment or Activation Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Daniel; Dumont, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The activation relationship theory, primarily focused on parental stimulation of risk-taking along with parental control during exploration, predicts that boys will be activated more than girls by their fathers. This theory may explain why fathers engage in rough-and-tumble play (RTP) with children more frequently than mothers, especially with…

  7. 76 FR 2076 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Tumbling Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 35751), including the draft economic analysis of the proposed designation of critical... information on the proposed rule (75 FR 35751) during the initial comment period from June 23, 2010, to August... the Federal Register on June 23, 2010 (75 FR 35751). Additional information on the Tumbling...

  8. 76 FR 37663 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Tumbling Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... cavesnail, refer to the final listing rule published in the Federal Register on August 14, 2002 (67 FR 52879... Federal Actions The Tumbling Creek cavesnail was emergency listed on December 27, 2001 (66 FR 66803) and subsequently listed as endangered on August 14, 2002 (67 FR 52879). At the time of listing, we determined...

  9. Rough and Tumble Play Quality: Theoretical Foundations for a New Measure of Father-Child Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Richard; StGeorge, Jennifer; Freeman, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relationships. Animal studies have demonstrated positive developmental effects of peer-peer play-wrestling, influencing cognitive and social outcomes. The purpose of this paper is…

  10. 75 FR 35751 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Tumbling Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... on August 14, 2002 (67 FR 52879), and the Tumbling Creek Cavesnail Recovery Plan (published in the Federal Register on September 22, 2003 (68 FR 55060)), available on the Internet at http://ecos.fws.gov... on December 27, 2001 (66 FR 66803) and subsequently listed as endangered on August 14, 2002 (67...

  11. Simulation of collective behaviour in micro-scale swimmers: Effects of tumbling and rotary diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Deepak; Subramanian, Ganesh

    2013-11-01

    Recent experiments have shown that suspensions of swimming micro-organisms are characterized by complex dynamics involving enhanced swimming speeds, large-scale correlated motions and enhanced tracer diffusion. Understanding this dynamics is of fundamental interest and also has relevance to biological systems. In this work we develop a particle-based computational model to study a suspension of hydrodynamically interacting rod-like swimmers with the relation between the swimming velocity and intrinsic stress being enforced from slender body theory. Such an a priori specification reduces the computational cost since one now has a ``kinematic'' simulation with a fixed interaction law between swimmers; this does not restrict our study of the dynamics since the destabilizing mechanism has been attributed to the intrinsic (rather than the induced) stress field. Importantly, the model will include intrinsic de-correlation mechanisms found in bacteria such as rotary diffusion and tumbling whose effects have so far not been studied via simulations. Using this model we predict a box-size independent stability threshold based on the suspension concentration, tumble-time (duration between subsequent tumble events) and rotary diffusivity. Comparisons are made with the linear stability theory predictions by Subramanian & Koch (JFM 2009). We demonstrate that the effect of tumbling and rotary diffusion is to stabilize the suspension.

  12. Preschool Teachers' Perceptions of Rough and Tumble Play vs. Aggression in Preschool-Aged Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Cynthia F.; Baumgartner, Jennifer; Ota, Carrie; Jenkins, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Rough and tumble play has been found to be positive for physical, social and cognitive development; it is often erroneously misinterpreted as aggression and generally stopped by preschool teachers. The current study sought to examine the relationship between teacher training and education and judgements about aggression in children. Ninety-four…

  13. Fiber laser-based scanning lidar for space rendezvous and docking.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; He, Yan; Gao, Min; Zhou, Cuiyun; Zang, Huaguo; Lei, Linjun; Xie, Kedi; Yang, Yan; Shi, Wei; Hou, Xia; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-03-20

    Lidar systems have played an important role in space rendezvous and docking (RVD). A new type of scanning lidar is developed using a high-repetition-rate pulsed fiber laser and a position detector. It will be a candidate for autonomous space RVD between two spacecrafts. The lidar can search and track cooperative targets in a large region without artificial guidance. The lidar's operational range spans from 18 m to 20 km, and the relative angle between two aircrafts can be measured with high accuracy. A novel fiber laser with tunable pulse energy and repetition rate is developed to meet the wide dynamic detection range of the lidar. This paper presents the lidar system's composition, performance, and experimental results in detail. PMID:25968536

  14. Effect of Different Tumbling Marination Methods and Time on the Water Status and Protein Properties of Prepared Pork Chops

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tian; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Jiang, Yun; Yin, Maowen; Liu, Yang; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    The combined effect of tumbling marination methods (vacuum continuous tumbling marination, CT; vacuum intermittent tumbling marination, IT) and effective tumbling time (4, 6, 8, and 10 h) on the water status and protein properties of prepared pork chops was investigated. Results showed that regardless of tumbling time, CT method significantly decreased the muscle fiber diameter (MD) and significantly increased the total moisture content, product yield, salt soluble proteins (SSP) solubility, immobilized water component (p<0.05) compared with IT method. With the effective tumbling time increased from 4 h to 10 h, the fat content and the MD were significantly decreased (p<0.05), whereas the SSP solubility of prepared pork chops increased firstly and then decreased. Besides, an interactive effect between CT method and effective tumbling time was also observed for the chemical composition and proportion of immobilized water (p<0.05). These results demonstrated that CT method of 8 h was the most beneficial for improving the muscle structure and water distribution status, increasing the water-binding capacity and accelerating the marinade efficiency of pork chops; and thus, it should be chosen as the most optimal treatment method for the processing production of prepared pork chops. PMID:26104408

  15. Shuttle rendezvous radar performance evaluation and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, John W.; Lindberg, Andrew C.; Ahn, Thomas B.; Harton, Paul L.

    1988-01-01

    The US Space Shuttle's Ku-band system was specifically designed for communications and tracking functions which are required during on-orbit operations with other spacecraft. Operating modes permit search and acquisition to be accomplished by computer designation or under manual control by the astronaut. Ku-band system data channels drive on-board dedicated displays and are incorporated into state vector updates by Shuttle guidance and navigation computers. Radar-cross-section estimates were used in computer simulations to predict the range at which radar detection and acquisition can be expected. Validity of the simulationi model and the radar design and performance were verified by flight tests on the White Sands test range. It is concluded that results of the testing established confidence in the capability of the system to provide the relative position and rate information which is needed for Shuttle work involving other spacecraft.

  16. Reference equations of motion for automatic rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis presented in this paper defines the reference coordinate frames, equations of motion, and control parameters necessary to model the relative motion and attitude of spacecraft in close proximity with another space system during the Automatic Rendezvous and Capture phase of an on-orbit operation. The relative docking port target position vector and the attitude control matrix are defined based upon an arbitrary spacecraft design. These translation and rotation control parameters could be used to drive the error signal input to the vehicle flight control system. Measurements for these control parameters would become the bases for an autopilot or feedback control system (FCS) design for a specific spacecraft.

  17. Virtual reality applications to automated rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph; Oneil, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a rapidly developing Human/Computer Interface (HCI) technology. The evolution of high-speed graphics processors and development of specialized anthropomorphic user interface devices, that more fully involve the human senses, have enabled VR technology. Recently, the maturity of this technology has reached a level where it can be used as a tool in a variety of applications. This paper provides an overview of: VR technology, VR activities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), applications of VR to Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C), and identifies areas of VR technology that requires further development.

  18. The glideslope approach. [to orbiting spacecraft at rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Don J.

    1989-01-01

    The problems associated with optimum approaches to an orbiting spacecraft at the completion of rendezvous are exacerbated when the maneuvering spacecraft is to dock with such large and extended structures as the NASA Space Station, which also has a torque equilibrium attitude due to which the docking port does not point directly into the orbital track. Attention is presently given to a candidate 'operationally optimum' approach to a local vertical-local horizontal stabilized target; this glideslope approach is derived on the basis of Hill's relative-motion equations, which have been expanded to encompass constant relative accelerations in a closed form solution. The motion is described in polar coordinates.

  19. Orbit prediction and shuttle rendezvous strategy for eureca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkrad, H.; Janin, G.

    The European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) is a platform to be launched, deployed and retrieved in low Earth orbit by the Space Shuttle. A newly developed analytical orbit prediction method is described which meets the severe requirements for EURECA's orbit propagation. It is based on an averaging procedure including the Earth's zonal harmonics J2, J3 and J4 and a refined treatment of the air drag perturbation where EURECA's large solar panels are taken into account. Some orbit prediction results are included. In order to offer more flexibility for the Shuttle retrieval of EURECA, it is proposed to execute a part of the rendezvous manoeuvres by EURECA. A corresponding strategy is described.

  20. Low-thrust mission risk analysis, with application to a 1980 rendezvous with the comet Encke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, C. L.; Smith, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized failure process simulation procedure is used to evaluate the risk in a solar electric space mission. The procedure uses currently available thrust-subsystem reliability data and performs approximate simulations of the thrust sybsystem burn operation, the system failure processes, and the retargeting operations. The method is applied to assess the risks in carrying out a 1980 rendezvous mission to the comet Encke. Analysis of the results and evaluation of the effects of various risk factors on the mission show that system component failure rates are the limiting factors in attaining a high mission relability. It is also shown that a well-designed trajectory and system operation mode can be used effectively to partially compensate for unreliable thruster performance.

  1. SEP ENCKE-87 and Halley rendezvous studies and improved S/C model implementation in HILTOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horsewood, J. L.; Mann, F. I.

    1978-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the performance requirements for projected state-of-the-art SEP spacecrafts boosted by the Shuttle/IUS to perform a rendezvous with the comet Halley and a rendezvous with the comet Encke during its 1977 apparition. The spacecraft model of the standard HILTOP computer program was assumed. Numerical and graphical results summarizing the studies are presented.

  2. Constant propellant use rendezvous scenario across a launch window for refueling missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hametz, M. E.; Whittier, R.

    1990-01-01

    Active rendezvous of an unmanned spacecraft with the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle for refueling missions is investigated. The operational constraints facing both the maneuvering spacecraft and the Shuttle during a rendezvous sequence are presented. For example, the user spacecraft must arrive in the generic Shuttle control box at a specified time after Shuttle launch. In addition, the spacecraft must be able to initiate the transfer sequence from any point in its orbit. The standard four-burn rendezvous sequence, consisting of two Hohmann transfers and an intermediate phasing orbit, is presented as a low-energy solution for rendezvous and retrieval missions. However, for refueling missions, the Shuttle must completely refuel the spacecraft and return to Earth with no excess fuel. This additional constraint is not satisfied by the standard four-burn sequence. Therefore, a variation of the four-burn rendezvous, the constant delta-V scenario, was developed to satisfy the added requirement.

  3. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ruel Edwin

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990 the Autonomous Rendezvous & Docking (AR&D) system was first demonstrated for members of NASA's Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware from the Cruise Missile and Advanced Centaur Avionics systems. The object was to show that all the accuracy, reliability and operational requirements established for a space craft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed system. The rapid prototyping capabilities of the Advanced Avionics Systems Development Laboratory were used to evaluate the proposed system in a real time, hardware in the loop simulation of the rendezvous and docking reference mission. The simulation permits manual, supervised automatic and fully autonomous operations to be evaluated. It is also being upgraded to be able to test an Autonomous Approach and Landing (AA&L) system. The AA&L and AR&D systems are very similar. Both use inertial guidance and control systems supplemented by GPS. Both use an Image Processing System (IPS), for target recognition and tracking. The IPS includes a general purpose multiprocessor computer and a selected suite of sensors that will provide the required relative position and orientation data. Graphic displays can also be generated by the computer, providing the astronaut / operator with real-time guidance and navigation data with enhanced video or sensor imagery.

  4. Stabilization and parameter identification of tumbling space debris with bounded torque in postcapture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Teng; Yue, Xiaokui; Ning, Xin; Yuan, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a new control scheme for the problem of a space robot after capturing an unknown tumbling target, such as space debris. Robotic capturing the target may destabilize the base of spacecraft and control torque is bounded which would affect the performance of attitude control system. To stabilize the base with bounded torque in postcapture scenario, a new control scheme which utilizes the control torque to balance angular momentum and motion of the manipulator to compensate limitation of the torque, is proposed. Considering uncertainties of the target, parameter identification technique for tumbling target with linear momentum is utilized to correct parameters of the controller. To verify validity and feasibility of the proposed concept, a planar space robot capturing small, medium and large target with or without linear momentum is studied. The results show that the whole system is stabilized finally and all the inertial parameters of the target converge to their real values.

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, G. V.; Harrington, J. K.; Eastman, M. P.

    1978-01-01

    The purposes of this vanadyl spin probe study are threefold: (1) to establish when the breakdown of motionally narrowed formulas occurs; (2) to analyze the experimental vanadyl EPR line shapes by the stochastic Lioville method as developed by Polnaszek et al. (1973) for slow tumbling in an anisotropic liquid; and (3) to compare the vanadyl probe study results with those of Polnaszek and Freed (1975). Spectral EPR line shapes are simulated for experimental spectra of vanadyl acetylacetonate (VOAA) in nematic liquid crystal butyl p-(p-ethoxyphenoxycarbonyl) phenyl carbonate (BEPC) and Phase V of EM laboratories. It is shown that the use of typical vanadyl complexes as spin probes for nematic liquid crystals simplifies the theoretical analysis and the subsequent interpretation. Guidelines for the breakdown of motionally narrowed formulas are established. Both the slow tumbling aspects and the effects of non-Brownian rotation should be resolved in order to extract quantitative information about molecular ordering and rotational mobility.

  6. Global optimization of fuel consumption in rendezvous scenarios by the method of interval analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2015-03-01

    To reduce the optimal but large Δv of the fixed-short-time two impulse Lambert rendezvous between two spacecrafts along two coplanar circular orbits, the three-impulse Lambert rendezvous optimized via the optimization algorithm-interval analysis (IA) is proposed in this paper. The purpose of optimization is to minimize the velocity increment of the fixed-short-time three-impulse Lambert rendezvous. The optimization algorithm IA is given for solving the rendezvous optimization problem with multiple uncertain variables, and strong nonlinearity and nonconvexity. Numerical examples of the time-open, coplanar-circular-orbit, multiple-revolution Lambert rendezvous with a parking time optimized via the optimization algorithm IA are firstly undertaken to validate the feasibility of the optimization algorithm IA by comparing the optimization results with those of the globally optimal Hohmann transfer. The results indicate that the globally optimal parameters of the time-open coplanar-circular-orbit multiple-revolution Lambert rendezvous can be obtained by the optimization algorithm IA, and the initial separation angle of two spacecrafts with different orbit radius can be adjusted to obtain the globally optimal and small Δv by distributing an optimal parking time. After that, for the fixed-short-time two-impulse Lambert rendezvous problem without sufficient time to adjust the separation angle by distributing a parking time like the open-time Lambert rendezvous problem, three-impulse Lambert rendezvous involving multiple optimization variables is given and the variables are optimized by the optimization algorithm IA to obtain an optimal and small Δv. Numerical simulation indicates that the optimal and small Δv of the fixed short time, three-impulse Lambert rendezvous can be obtained using the optimization algorithm IA.

  7. ESR studies of the slow tumbling of vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, M. P.; Bruno, G. V.; Lawson, J. O.

    1977-01-01

    ESR line shapes that are appropriate for slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in viscous nematic liquid crystals were calculated by the stochastic Liouville method. Because of the symmetry possessed by vanadyl, the analysis and interpretation of these line shapes was simplified considerably. Spectral line shapes agreed well with experimental spectra of VOAcAc in the nematic liquid crystal Phase V and BEPC. Deviations from Brownian rotational diffusion were noted. A slowly fluctuating torque analysis yielded good agreement with the experimental spectra.

  8. STS-41 MS Akers tumbles out of JSC's CCT during egress exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), tumbles out of JSC's crew compartment trainer (CCT) during side hatch emergency egress exercises. Using the crew escape system (CES) pole, Akers simulated the procedures necessary to bailout of the Shuttle during the ascent phase. A technician assists Akers, rolling across an inflated safety pad, as a second technician looks on. In the open side hatch, another crewmember prepares for egress.

  9. Determination of Eros Physical Parameters for Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Orbit Phase Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. K.; Antreasian, P. J.; Georgini, J.; Owen, W. M.; Williams, B. G.; Yeomans, D. K.

    1995-01-01

    Navigation of the orbit phase of the Near Earth steroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission will re,quire determination of certain physical parameters describing the size, shape, gravity field, attitude and inertial properties of Eros. Prior to launch, little was known about Eros except for its orbit which could be determined with high precision from ground based telescope observations. Radar bounce and light curve data provided a rough estimate of Eros shape and a fairly good estimate of the pole, prime meridian and spin rate. However, the determination of the NEAR spacecraft orbit requires a high precision model of Eros's physical parameters and the ground based data provides only marginal a priori information. Eros is the principal source of perturbations of the spacecraft's trajectory and the principal source of data for determining the orbit. The initial orbit determination strategy is therefore concerned with developing a precise model of Eros. The original plan for Eros orbital operations was to execute a series of rendezvous burns beginning on December 20,1998 and insert into a close Eros orbit in January 1999. As a result of an unplanned termination of the rendezvous burn on December 20, 1998, the NEAR spacecraft continued on its high velocity approach trajectory and passed within 3900 km of Eros on December 23, 1998. The planned rendezvous burn was delayed until January 3, 1999 which resulted in the spacecraft being placed on a trajectory that slowly returns to Eros with a subsequent delay of close Eros orbital operations until February 2001. The flyby of Eros provided a brief glimpse and allowed for a crude estimate of the pole, prime meridian and mass of Eros. More importantly for navigation, orbit determination software was executed in the landmark tracking mode to determine the spacecraft orbit and a preliminary shape and landmark data base has been obtained. The flyby also provided an opportunity to test orbit determination operational procedures that will be

  10. A Study of the Inclination of Satellites of a Planet After Spin Axis Forced Tumbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrin, Luiz Augusto; Winter, O.; Vieira Neto, E.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In order to analyze the theory of satellite loss resulting from a giant impact on Uranus, we decided to do few a study about this problem using forced tumbling of the spin axis of planet. We used two different kinds of forced tumbling to simulate the obliquity variation: linear variation and damped variation. To do this, we made numerical simulations of N-body problem with J2 oblateness coefficient of the central body. First, we studied the relation of the time tumbling of Uranus' spin axis and the semi-major axis of the hypothetical satellite with a specific final inclination. In both cases the results are a power law. Later we study the final inclination of the satellite in relation to the number of collisions (pseudo collision). And finally we studied the final inclination of several different initial conditions (orbital elements) of the satellites. We concluded that the initial inclination and initial longitude of ascending node are important to the final satellite inclination. For future studies we want implement a more realistic model using the attitude equations of the central body and study the origin of the obliquity of the others planets of the solar system. Aknowledments: FAPESP, CAPES and CNPq.

  11. Attitude determination of a spinning and tumbling rocket using data from 2 orthogonal magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, S. T.

    1981-04-01

    This technical note reports on the attitude determination of Air Force Rocket No. A31.603 on which an ion emission experiment was performed. Two orthogonal magnetometers, one facing forward along the rocket spin axis and the other facing sideways, provide magnetic field component data. The bias-offset and scaling (signal conversion) factor are not given, but can be determined in a sinusoidal approximation. The algorithm used for generating magnetic pitch angles is discussed and an error analysis is provided. In a local vertical coordinate system, two sets of elevation angles are found for the tumbling rocket, and the set that satisfies an initial condition exactly is the correct one. The deviation of the rocket tumbling plane from the vertical plane can be determined at the times of closest encounter of the magnetic field vector and rocket vector. The deviation at all times can be approximately determined by sinusoidal curve fitting with tumbling frequency. The angles between the rocket vector and moonlight vector during the instants of moonviews at the onboard camera are also calculated.

  12. Combined radiologic and endoscopic treatment (using the “rendezvous technique”) of a biliary fistula following left hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gracient, Aurélien; Rebibo, Lionel; Delcenserie, Richard; Yzet, Thierry; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ongoing decrease in the frequency of complications after hepatectomy, biliary fistulas still occur and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Here, we report on an unusual technique for managing biliary fistula following left hepatectomy in a patient in whom the right posterior segmental duct joined the left hepatic duct. The biliary fistula was treated with a combined radiologic and endoscopic procedure based on the “rendezvous technique”. The clinical outcome was good, and reoperation was not required. PMID:27570431

  13. Tumbling experiments to test fragmentation and abrasion of rocks from the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, F.; Fluekiger, L.; Cox, S. C.; Beyssac, O.

    2011-12-01

    Detrital cobbles and pebbles were collected from rivers draining the Southern Alps in the South Island of New Zealand. Our objective was to obtain a time-series of abrasion and fragmentation processes, in order to replicate fluvial processes and understand the relative erosion resistance of bedrock lithologies. Lithologies included variably metamorphosed greywacke-sandstone, semischist and schist, reflecting the range of rocks in the hangingwall of the Alpine Fault exhumed by differential uplift, and granite and gneiss in the footwall. Rocks were cut into 3cm cubes, weighed individually and washed in millipore water, then photographed. Experimental sample sets, matching the proportions of rock lithologies observed in the riverbeds, were placed in rectangular 20 litre containers together with 2 litres of fresh rainwater. Containers were rotated in a concrete mixer at 26 revolutions per minute for 2, 4, 12 and 49 hours, with a duplicate geochemical blank sample left for 50 hrs without tumbing. Each set of tumbled material was then extracted, photographed, classified, sorted into size fractions, weighed and saved for further analysis. Samples of sand, silt, rock-contaminated water and suspended sediment were also collected for filtering of suspended sediment, petrography and chemical analysis. Tumbling produced dramatic differences in the behaviour of different rocks, particularly in the relative strength of sandstone, semischist and schist lithologies. Cubes of schist fragmented into tabular pieces and rounded quickly, within two hours, compared with semischist and sandstone which retained cuboid forms and suffered only minor rounding of edges after 49 hours tumbling. Fine-grained material produced as a by-product was dominated by a silt/clay fraction that increased in quantity with tumbling time. Relatively little sand-sized sediment was generated, and its quantity decreased with tumbling time as it was also transformed into finer material. The experiment highlights

  14. Top physics departments tumble in new RAE review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Placing numerical scores on research by UK universities has always been a controversial task, and the new system of "quality profiles" used to evaluate departments in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) should keep number-crunchers busy through 2009. While previous RAEs ranked departments using single numbers on a seven-point scale, the 2008 exercise instead lists the percentage of research activity rated at each of five levels, from a "world-leading" 4* to an unclassified "below standard".

  15. The Evolution of the Rendezvous Profile During the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summa, William R.

    2010-01-01

    The rendezvous and proximity operations approach design techniques for space shuttle missions has changed significantly during the life of the program in response to new requirements that were not part of the original mission design. The flexibility of the shuttle onboard systems design and the mission planning process has allowed the program to meet these requirements. The design of the space shuttle and the shift from docking to grappling with a robotic ann prevented use of legacy Apollo rendezvous techniques. Over the life of the shuttle program the rendezvous profile has evolved due to several factors, including lowering propellant consumption and increasing flexibility in mission planning. Many of the spacecraft that the shuttle rendezvoused with had unique requirements that drove the creation of mission-unique proximity operations. The dockings to the Russian Mir space station and International Space Station (ISS) required further evolution of rendezvous and proximity operations techniques and additional sensors to enhance crew situational awareness. After the Columbia accident, a Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver (RPM) was added to allow tile photography from ISS. Lessons learned from these rendezvous design changes are applicable to future vehicle designs and operations concepts.

  16. Gossip-Based Solutions for Discrete Rendezvous in Populations of Communicating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Christopher D.; Wu, Annie S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the rendezvous problem is to construct a method that enables a population of agents to agree on a spatial (and possibly temporal) meeting location. We introduce the buffered gossip algorithm as a general solution to the rendezvous problem in a discrete domain with direct communication between decentralized agents. We compare the performance of the buffered gossip algorithm against the well known uniform gossip algorithm. We believe that a buffered solution is preferable to an unbuffered solution, such as the uniform gossip algorithm, because the use of a buffer allows an agent to use multiple information sources when determining its desired rendezvous point, and that access to multiple information sources may improve agent decision making by reinforcing or contradicting an initial choice. To show that the buffered gossip algorithm is an actual solution for the rendezvous problem, we construct a theoretical proof of convergence and derive the conditions under which the buffered gossip algorithm is guaranteed to produce a consensus on rendezvous location. We use these results to verify that the uniform gossip algorithm also solves the rendezvous problem. We then use a multi-agent simulation to conduct a series of simulation experiments to compare the performance between the buffered and uniform gossip algorithms. Our results suggest that the buffered gossip algorithm can solve the rendezvous problem faster than the uniform gossip algorithm; however, the relative performance between these two solutions depends on the specific constraints of the problem and the parameters of the buffered gossip algorithm. PMID:25397882

  17. Importance of chain tumbling and finite extension on the start-up and relaxation behavior of transient networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Michelle; Wang, Zhen-Gang; McKinley, Gareth; Olsen, Bradley

    2015-03-01

    Associative polymer networks are ubiquitous in tissue and biomedical engineering. However, the particular molecular attributes that contribute to the macroscopic behavior like shear thinning, self-healing, and yield stress are less well known. Here we incorporate chemical kinetics in the the Smoluchowski Equation capable of modeling the full network chain end-to-end distance distribution while tracking the fraction of looped, bridged, and dangling chains in the gel. In steady shear, we see the development of non-monotonic flow instabilities when the rate of chain association and dissociation are slower than the rate of chain relaxation. These instabilities arise due to a combination of chain finite extensibility and tumbling. During start-up of steady shear, the combination of these two phenomena also results in stress overshoots followed by multiple damped oscillations toward steady-state. The timescale of chain relaxation after the cessation of shear is dominated by the chain kinetics of association and dissociation as a function of the fraction of dangling chains present at any time post-shear. Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Department of Defense National Defense Science and Engineering Fellowship Program.

  18. The effects of low salt concentrations on the mechanism of adhesion between two pieces of pork semimembranosus muscle following tumbling and cooking.

    PubMed

    Bombrun, Laure; Gatellier, Philippe; Carlier, Martine; Kondjoyan, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to gain deeper insight into the effect of salt content on the adhesion between pieces of semimembranosus pork muscle bound by a tumbling exudate gel. Hydrophobic site number, free thiol and carbonyl content were measured in tumbling exudate and meat protein to evaluate the protein-protein interactions involved in the adhesion process. Proteins were far more oxidized in exudate than in meat, and under our experimental conditions, salt content increased protein bonding in the exudate but not in the meat. Breaking stress increased between non-salted meat and 0.8%-salted meat but did not depend on the protein physicochemical properties of the tumbling exudate. Modifying the meat surface by tumbling alone, tumbling and salting, or scarification had no effect on breaking stress. It is suggested that the break between the meat pieces occurred between the tumbling exudate and the meat surface due to weaker chemical bonds at this location. PMID:23896131

  19. Single photon lidar demonstrator for asteroid rendezvous missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, Michael; Michalek, Vojtech; Peca, Marek; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Djurovic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    We present compact single photon lidar demonstrator dedicated for asteroid rendezvous missions. The instrument provides crucial data on altitude and terrain profile for altitudes exceeding 5km with a precision of less than 10 cm fulfilling the Rayleigh criterion. Transmitter and receiver optics designs are discussed, control and processing electronics based on a single rad-hard compatible FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) is analyzed. The FPGA electronics subsystems are TDC (Time-to-Digit Converter), laser trigger pulse generator and gate generator. Indoor calibration procedures of the whole demonstrator chain are proposed and evaluated. The calibration covers positioning of receiver and transmitter optics related to detector and laser, aligning of transmitter and receiver optical common paths. The retrieving strategy of terrain elevation profile is proposed and via indoor tests validated. Theory for surface slope and scanning is established, simulation and measurement results are compared and discussed.

  20. A Comparison Between Orion Automated and Space Shuttle Rendezvous Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, Jose O,; Hart, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft will replace the space shuttle and will be the first human spacecraft since the Apollo program to leave low earth orbit. This vehicle will serve as the cornerstone of a complete space transportation system with a myriad of mission requirements necessitating rendezvous to multiple vehicles in earth orbit, around the moon and eventually beyond . These goals will require a complex and robust vehicle that is, significantly different from both the space shuttle and the command module of the Apollo program. Historically, orbit operations have been accomplished with heavy reliance on ground support and manual crew reconfiguration and monitoring. One major difference with Orion is that automation will be incorporated as a key element of the man-vehicle system. The automated system will consist of software devoted to transitioning between events based on a master timeline. This effectively adds a layer of high level sequencing that moves control of the vehicle from one phase to the next. This type of automated control is not entirely new to spacecraft since the shuttle uses a version of this during ascent and entry operations. During shuttle orbit operations however many of the software modes and hardware switches must be manually configured through the use of printed procedures and instructions voiced from the ground. The goal of the automation scheme on Orion is to extend high level automation to all flight phases. The move towards automation represents a large shift from current space shuttle operations, and so these new systems will be adopted gradually via various safeguards. These include features such as authority-to-proceed, manual down modes, and functional inhibits. This paper describes the contrast between the manual and ground approach of the space shuttle and the proposed automation of the Orion vehicle. I will introduce typical orbit operations that are common to all rendezvous missions and go on to describe the current Orion automation

  1. Rendezvous Integration Complexities of NASA Human Flight Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack P.; Goodman, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Propellant-optimal trajectories, relative sensors and navigation, and docking/capture mechanisms are rendezvous disciplines that receive much attention in the technical literature. However, other areas must be considered. These include absolute navigation, maneuver targeting, attitude control, power generation, software development and verification, redundancy management, thermal control, avionics integration, robotics, communications, lighting, human factors, crew timeline, procedure development, orbital debris risk mitigation, structures, plume impingement, logistics, and in some cases extravehicular activity. While current and future spaceflight programs will introduce new technologies and operations concepts, the complexity of integrating multiple systems on multiple spacecraft will remain. The systems integration task may become more difficult as increasingly complex software is used to meet current and future automation, autonomy, and robotic operation requirements.

  2. Mission opportunity maps for rendezvous with earth-crossing asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, C.-W. L.

    1984-01-01

    Rendezvous missions for earth-crossing asteroids are of interest to NASA, for scientific purposes as well as for technological applications and ecological implications. To provide a comprehensive data base for planners of such missions, a mission opportunity map (MOM) has been created for eight relatively easy-to-access asteroids. A MOM presents such mission data as launch dates, flight times, and launch and postlaunch delta-V requirements for all useful mission opportunities. The merits of a MOM are: (1) searches for all useful mission opportunities are completed in the process of generating a MOM, and (2) a clear view of good and bad opportunities, the extent of performance variations, and the repeatability of the missions.

  3. Mission opportunity maps for rendezvous with earth-crossing asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Chen-Wan L.

    1989-01-01

    Rendezvous missions to earth-crossing asteroids are of interest to NASA, for scientific purposes as well as for technological applications and ecological implications. To provide a comprehensive data base for planners of such missions, a mission opportunity map (MOM) has been created for eight relatively easy-to-access asteroids. A MOM presents such mission data as launch dates, flight times, and launch and postlaunch delta V requirements for all useful mission opportunities. The merits of a MOM are: (1) searches for all useful mission oportunities are completed in the process of generating a MOM, and (2) a MOM provides a clear view of good and bad opportunities, the extent of performance variations, and the repeatability of the missions.

  4. Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Spacecraft/Delta II launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft undergoing preflight preparation in the Spacecraft Assembly Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). NEAR will perform two critical mission events - Mathilde flyby and the Deep-Space maneuver. NEAR will fly-by Mathilde, a 38-mile (61-km) diameter C-type asteroid, making use of its imaging system to obtain useful optical navigation images. The primary science instrument will be the camera, but measurements of magnetic fields and mass also will be made. The Deep-Space Maneuver (DSM) will be executed about a week after the Mathilde fly-by. The DSM represents the first of two major burns during the NEAR mission of the 100-pound bi-propellant (Hydrazine/nitrogen tetroxide) thruster. This maneuver is necessary to lower the perihelion distance of NEAR's trajectory. The DSM will be conducted in two segments to minimize the possibility of an overburn situation.

  5. Optimal propellantless rendez-vous using differential drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell`Elce, L.; Kerschen, G.

    2015-04-01

    Optimization of fuel consumption is a key driver in the design of spacecraft maneuvers. For this reason, growing interest in propellant-free maneuvers is observed in the literature. Because it allows us to turn the often-undesired drag perturbation into a control force for relative motion, differential drag is among the most promising propellantless techniques for low-Earth orbiting satellites. An optimal control approach to the problem of orbital rendez-vous using differential drag is proposed in this paper. Thanks to the scheduling of a reference maneuver by means of a direct transcription, the method is flexible in terms of cost function and can easily account for constraints of various nature. Considerations on the practical realization of differential-drag-based maneuvers are also provided. The developments are illustrated by means of high-fidelity simulations including coupled 6-degree-of-freedom simulations and an advanced aerodynamic model.

  6. STS 63 flight day 4 highlights/MIR-Shuttle rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-02-01

    STS 63 Flight, day 4, the MIR-Shuttle rendezvous is highlighted in this video. The six-member team in the Shuttle are introduced and discuss their functions and tests for this day of the flight. There is actual footage of earth from space, of the MIR Space Station, a tour of the Shuttle cockpit, some footage from the MIR of the Space Shuttle, and footage from inside the MIR with the cosmonauts. Mission control communications with the Shuttle, communication between the Shuttle and MIR, and an historic communication between the Shuttle's astronauts and President Bill Clinton are included. President Clinton interviews each of the six-member team and discusses the upcoming space walk by Dr. Bernard Harris, the first black astronaut to walk in space. This video was recorded on February 6, 1995.

  7. Rendezvous, proximity operations and capture quality function deployment report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Stephen L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, and Capture (RPOC) is a missions operations area which is extremely important to present and future space initiatives and must be well planned and coordinated. To support this, a study team was formed to identify a specific plan of action using the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) process. This team was composed of members from a wide spectrum of engineering and operations organizations which are involved in the RPOC technology area. The key to this study's success is an understanding of the needs of potential programmatic customers and the technology base available for system implementation. To this end, the study team conducted interviews with a variety of near term and future programmatic customers and technology development sponsors. The QFD activity led to a thorough understanding of the needs of these customers in the RPOC area, as well as the relative importance of these needs.

  8. Some impulsive rendezvous trajectories and their possible optimality.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Two- and three-impulse trajectories are investigated for fixed-time, fixed-angle rendezvous between vacant circular coplanar orbits, for trip angles less than, or equal to 2 pi in magnitude. For two-impulse trajectories, general features of the characteristic velocity function are outlined. Parameters of the intermediate orbit are reviewed. Attention is given to limiting cases. Computation of the adjoint system helps to define the domain of possible optimality foajectories: it is a closed domain in the trip time, trip angle plane. Waiting periods on terminal orbits are considered. The domain of possible optimality is defined using Lawden's primer vrtory. This domain extends to infinity if the radius ratio of terminal orbits is less than 15.6. Three-impulse trajectories are tried in cases where two-impulse trajectories, with or without cost, have been found nonoptimal. Improvements on the characteristic velocity are thus obtained.

  9. Study of a comet rendezvous mission, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility, scientific objectives, modes of exploration and implementation alternatives of a rendezvous mission to Encke's comet in 1984 are considered. Principal emphasis is placed on developing the scientific rationale for such a mission, based on available knowledge and best estimates of this comet's physical characteristics, including current theories of its origin, evolution and composition. Studied are mission profile alternatives, performance tradeoffs, preferred exploration strategy, and a spacecraft design concept capable of performing this mission. The study showed that the major scientific objectives can be met by a Titan IIID/Centaur-launched 17.5 kw solar electric propulsion spacecraft which carries 60 kg of scientific instruments and is capable of extensive maneuvering within the comet envelope to explore the coma, tail and nucleus.

  10. NASA Automated Rendezvous and Capture Review. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In support of the Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) Definition Studies in FY-92, the Advanced Program Development division of the Office of Space Flight at NASA Headquarters conducted an evaluation and review of the United States capabilities and state-of-the-art in Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C). This review was held in Williamsburg, Virginia on 19-21 Nov. 1991 and included over 120 attendees from U.S. government organizations, industries, and universities. One hundred abstracts were submitted to the organizing committee for consideration. Forty-two were selected for presentation. The review was structured to include five technical sessions. Forty-two papers addressed topics in the five categories below: (1) hardware systems and components; (2) software systems; (3) integrated systems; (4) operations; and (5) supporting infrastructure.

  11. Orion Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, and Docking Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Hanak, F. Chad; Spehar, Pete; Clark, Fred D.; Jackson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The Orion vehicle will be required to perform rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and the Earth Departure Stage (EDS)/Lunar Landing Vehicle (LLV) stack in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) as well as with the Lunar Landing Vehicle in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). The RPOD system, which consists of sensors, actuators, and software is being designed to be flexible and robust enough to perform RPOD with different vehicles in different environments. This paper will describe the design and the analysis which has been performed to date to allow the vehicle to perform its mission. Since the RPOD design touches on many areas such as sensors selection and placement, trajectory design, navigation performance, and effector performance, it is inherently a systems design problem. This paper will address each of these issues in order to demonstrate how the Orion RPOD has been designed to accommodate and meet all the requirements levied on the system.

  12. New developments in astrodynamics algorithms for autonomous rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, Allan R.

    1991-01-01

    A the core of any autonomous rendezvous guidance system must be two algorithms for solving Lambert's and Kepler's problems, the two fundamental problems in classical astrodynamics. Lambert's problem is to determine the trajectory connecting specified initial and terminal position vectors in a specified transfer time. The solution is the initial and terminal velocity vectors. Kepler's problem is to determine the trajectory that stems from a given initial state (position and velocity). The solution is the state of an earlier or later specified time. To be suitable for flight software, astrodynamics algorithms must be totally reliable, compact, and fast. Although solving Lambert's and Kepler's problems has challenged some of the world's finest minds for over two centuries, only in the last year have algorithms appeared that satisfy all three requirements just stated. This paper presents an evaluation of the most highly regarded Lambert and Kepler algorithms.

  13. On Torque and Tumbling in Swimming Escherichia coli▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Darnton, Nicholas C.; Turner, Linda; Rojevsky, Svetlana; Berg, Howard C.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria swim by rotating long thin helical filaments, each driven at its base by a reversible rotary motor. When the motors of peritrichous cells turn counterclockwise (CCW), their filaments form bundles that drive the cells forward. We imaged fluorescently labeled cells of Escherichia coli with a high-speed charge-coupled-device camera (500 frames/s) and measured swimming speeds, rotation rates of cell bodies, and rotation rates of flagellar bundles. Using cells stuck to glass, we studied individual filaments, stopping their rotation by exposing the cells to high-intensity light. From these measurements we calculated approximate values for bundle torque and thrust and body torque and drag, and we estimated the filament stiffness. For both immobilized and swimming cells, the motor torque, as estimated using resistive force theory, was significantly lower than the motor torque reported previously. Also, a bundle of several flagella produced little more torque than a single flagellum produced. Motors driving individual filaments frequently changed directions of rotation. Usually, but not always, this led to a change in the handedness of the filament, which went through a sequence of polymorphic transformations, from normal to semicoiled to curly 1 and then, when the motor again spun CCW, back to normal. Motor reversals were necessary, although not always sufficient, to cause changes in filament chirality. Polymorphic transformations among helices having the same handedness occurred without changes in the sign of the applied torque. PMID:17189361

  14. The comet rendezvous asteroid flyby mission to Comet Kopff - Getting there is half the fun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweetser, Theodore H.; Kiedron, Krystyna

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby mission (CRAF) is to fly 'outward to the beginning', to examine closely what are thought to be remnants of the origins of the solar system. In particular, the CRAF spacecraft will use a two-year delta-V-earth-gravity-assist (delta-V-EGA) trajectory to reach a rendezvous point near the aphelion of the Comet Kopff, flying by the asteroid 449 Hamburga on the way. This paper discusses the trajectory used to get to the comet. Topics covered include the launch period, possible additional asteroid flybys, the earth flyby, the Hamburga flyby, and the rendezvous with Comet Kopff.

  15. Longitudinal Trim and Tumble Characteristics of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane, TED NO. NACA DE311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert L.

    1948-01-01

    Based on results of longitudinal trim and tumble tests of a 0.057-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane, the following conclusions regarding the trim and tumble characteristics of the airplane have been drawn: 1. The airplane will not trim at any unusual or uncontrolled angles of attack. 2. The airplane will not tumble with the center of gravity located forward of 24 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord. When the center of gravity is located at 24 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord and slats are extended and elevators are deflected full up, the airplane may tumble if given an external positive pitching moment. 3. The tumbling motion obtained will be readily terminated by deflecting the elevators full down so as to oppose the rotation. 4. The accelerations encountered during an established tumble may be dangerous to the pilot and, therefore, action should be taken to terminate a tumble immediately upon its inception. 5. Simultaneous opening of two wing-tip parachutes having diameters of 4 feet or larger and having drag coefficients of approximately 0.7 will effectively terminate the tumble. 6. Model results indicate that the pilot will not be struck by the airplane if it becomes necessary to leave the airplane during a tumble. The pilot may require aid from an ejection-seat arrangement.

  16. Numerical study of viscosity and inertial effects on tank-treading and tumbling motions of vesicles under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongsam; Lai, Ming-Chih

    2012-12-01

    An inextensible vesicle under shear flow experiences a tank-treading motion on its membrane if the viscosity contrast between the interior and exterior fluids is small. Above a critical threshold of viscosity contrast, the vesicle undergoes a tumbling bifurcation. In this paper, we extend our previous work [Kim and Lai, J. Comput. Phys.JCTPAH0021-999110.1016/j.jcp.2010.03.020 229, 4840 (2010)] to the case of different viscosity and investigate the transition between the tank-treading and tumbling motions in detail. The present numerical results are in a good agreement with other numerical and theoretical studies qualitatively. In addition, we study the inertial effect on this transition and find that the inertial effect might inhibit the tumbling motion in favor of the tank-treading motion, which is observed recently in the literature. The critical viscosity contrast for the transition to the tumbling motion usually increases as the reduced area increases in the Stokes regime. However, we surprisingly observe that the critical viscosity contrast decreases as the reduced area increases to some point in the flow of slightly higher Reynolds number. Our numerical result also shows that the inertial effect has stronger inhibition to tumbling motion when the reduced area is small.

  17. RendezVous sensor for automatic guidance of transfer vehicles to the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, Karl-Hermann; Moebius, Bettina G.

    2000-10-01

    Based on a Predevelopment Program, initiated by the European Space Agency, an automatically operating RendezVous Sensor (RVS) is currently developed. This paper describes in more detail the RVS concept emphasizing the electro-optical elements of the sensor.

  18. Solar electric propulsion for terminal flight to rendezvous with comets and asteroids. [using guidance algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, A.

    1973-01-01

    A guidance algorithm that provides precise rendezvous in the deterministic case while requiring only relative state information is developed. A navigation scheme employing only onboard relative measurements is built around a Kalman filter set in measurement coordinates. The overall guidance and navigation procedure is evaluated in the face of measurement errors by a detailed numerical simulation. Results indicate that onboard guidance and navigation for the terminal phase of rendezvous is possible with reasonable limits on measurement errors.

  19. On-board expert system for manned rendez-vous operation assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Saint-Vincent, A.; Marchal, Ph.

    A 'rendezvous operator assistant concept' is currently being studied by MATRA. It is a real time interactive system, based on Al techniques and directed toward situation assessment and short-term reactions for safety, and also mission replanning. The paper describes the system functionalities and preliminary breadboarding, and addresses the main original features raised by the rendezvous problematics, such as the man-machine interaction and the real-time aspects.

  20. Fault tolerant cooperative control for UAV rendezvous problem subject to actuator faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, T.; Meskin, N.; Sobhani-Tehrani, E.; Khorasani, K.; Rabbath, C. A.

    2007-04-01

    This paper investigates the problem of fault tolerant cooperative control for UAV rendezvous problem in which multiple UAVs are required to arrive at their designated target despite presence of a fault in the thruster of any UAV. An integrated hierarchical scheme is proposed and developed that consists of a cooperative rendezvous planning algorithm at the team level and a nonlinear fault detection and isolation (FDI) subsystem at individual UAV's actuator/sensor level. Furthermore, a rendezvous re-planning strategy is developed that interfaces the rendezvous planning algorithm with the low-level FDI. A nonlinear geometric approach is used for the FDI subsystem that can detect and isolate faults in various UAV actuators including thrusters and control surfaces. The developed scheme is implemented for a rendezvous scenario with three Aerosonde UAVs, a single target, and presence of a priori known threats. Simulation results reveal the effectiveness of our proposed scheme in fulfilling the rendezvous mission objective that is specified as a successful intercept of Aerosondes at their designated target, despite the presence of severe loss of effectiveness in Aerosondes engine thrusters.

  1. NEP for a Kuiper Belt Object Rendezvous Mission

    SciTech Connect

    HOUTS,MICHAEL G.; LENARD,ROGER X.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; PATTON,BRUCE; POSTON,DAVID I.; WRIGHT,STEVEN A.

    1999-11-03

    Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are a recently-discovered set of solar system bodies which lie at about the orbit of Pluto (40 AU) out to about 100 astronomical units (AU). There are estimated to be about 100,000 KBOS with a diameter greater than 100 km. KBOS are postulated to be composed of the pristine material which formed our solar system and may even have organic materials in them. A detailed study of KBO size, orbit distribution, structure, and surface composition could shed light on the origins of the solar system and perhaps even on the origin of life in our solar system. A rendezvous mission including a lander would be needed to perform chemical analysis of the surface and sub-surface composition of KBOS. These requirements set the size of the science probe at around a ton. Mission analyses show that a fission-powered system with an electric thruster could rendezvous at 40 AU in about 13.0 years with a total {Delta}V of 46 krnk. It would deliver a 1000-kg science payload while providing ample onboard power for relaying data back to earth. The launch mass of the entire system (power, thrusters, propellant, navigation, communication, structure, science payload, etc.) would be 7984 kg if it were placed into an earth-escape trajectory (C=O). Alternatively, the system could be placed into a 700-km earth orbit with more propellant,yielding a total mass in LEO of 8618 kg, and then spiral out of earth orbit to arrive at the KBO in 14.3 years. To achieve this performance, a fission power system with 100 kW of electrical power and a total mass (reactor, shield, conversion, and radiator) of about 2350 kg. Three possible configurations are proposed: (1) a UZrH-fueled, NaK-cooled reactor with a steam Rankine conversion system, (2) a UN-fueled gas-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system, and (3) a UN-fueled heatpipe-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system. (Boiling and condensation in the Rankine system is a technical risk at present

  2. Autonomous Mission Manager for Rendezvous, Inspection and Mating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimpfer, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    To meet cost and safety objectives, space missions that involve proximity operations between two vehicles require a high level of autonomy to successfully complete their missions. The need for autonomy is primarily driven by the need to conduct complex operations outside of communication windows, and the communication time delays inherent in space missions. Autonomy also supports the goals of both NASA and the DOD to make space operations more routine, and lower operational costs by reducing the requirement for ground personnel. NASA and the DoD have several programs underway that require a much higher level of autonomy for space vehicles. NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program has ambitious goals of reducing costs by a factor or 10 and improving safety by a factor of 100. DARPA has recently begun its Orbital Express to demonstrate key technologies to make satellite servicing routine. The Air Force's XSS-ll program is developing a protoflight demonstration of an autonomous satellite inspector. A common element in space operations for many NASA and DOD missions is the ability to rendezvous, inspect anclJor dock with another spacecraft. For DARPA, this is required to service or refuel military satellites. For the Air Force, this is required to inspect un-cooperative resident space objects. For NASA, this is needed to meet the primary SLI design reference mission of International Space Station re-supply. A common aspect for each of these programs is an Autonomous Mission Manager that provides highly autonomous planning, execution and monitoring of the rendezvous, inspection and docking operations. This paper provides an overview of the Autonomous Mission Manager (AMM) design being incorporated into many of these technology programs. This AMM provides a highly scalable level of autonomous operations, ranging from automatic execution of ground-derived plans to highly autonomous onboard planning to meet ground developed mission goals. The AMM provides the

  3. Practitioner expertise: creating quality within the daily tumble of events in youth settings.

    PubMed

    Larson, Reed W; Rickman, Aimee N; Gibbons, Colleen M; Walker, Kathrin C

    2009-01-01

    Practitioners in youth settings experience life on the ground as a tumble of events, shaped by a confluence of youth needs, institutional expectations, and other inputs. The quality of the setting is determined in part by practitioners' expertise in shaping and responding to these events. The situations that arise in practice, and how staff respond, can be turning points, good or bad, in youths' experience of the setting. They can also be opportunities for youth development. This article examines the wide-ranging events, situations, or "dilemmas of practice" that occur in the daily life of youth development programs. Research shows that these varied situations are shaped by the ecology of diverse people and systems that influence the setting. They involve considerations that may entail everything from the psychology of different youth, to how parents from a cultural group think, to the dynamics of government systems. Expert youth practitioners, it is found, are able to identify more considerations than novices in these situations, and they possess a wider repertoire of responses. They also formulate more responses that are youth centered and address multiple considerations. Expertise involves being able to balance diverse concerns, including how to create and sustain conditions for the development of young people. Researchers can contribute by helping us better understand this array of situations and how experts respond. Improvement in the quality of youth settings can be achieved through greater knowledge of the tumble of events that occur and by helping train practitioners in skills for responding to it. PMID:19358186

  4. Pollinators' mating rendezvous and the evolution of floral advertisement.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Michael A; Hadany, Lilach

    2013-01-01

    Successful cross-fertilization in plant species that rely on animal pollinators depends not just on the number of pollinator visits, but also on these visits' duration. Furthermore, in non-deceptive pollination, a visit's duration depends on the magnitude of the reward provided to the pollinator. Accordingly, plants that rely on biotic pollination have to partition their investment in cross-fertilization assurance between attracting pollinator visits - advertisement, and rewarding visitors to assure that the visit is of productive duration. Here we analyze these processes by a combination of optimality methods and game theoretical modeling. Our results indicate that the optimality in such allocation of resources depends on the types of reward offered to the pollinators. More precisely, we show that plants that offer both food reward and mating rendezvous to pollinators will evolve to allocate a higher proportion of their cross-fertilization assurance budget to advertisement than plants that offer only food reward. That is, our results indicate that pollinators' mating habits may play a role in floral evolution. PMID:23023108

  5. Hubble Servicing Challenges Drive Innovation of Shuttle Rendezvous Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Walker, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing, performed by Space Shuttle crews, has contributed to what is arguably one of the most successful astronomy missions ever flown. Both nominal and contingency proximity operations techniques were developed to enable successful servicing, while lowering the risk of damage to HST systems, and improve crew safety. Influencing the development of these techniques were the challenges presented by plume impingement and HST performance anomalies. The design of both the HST and the Space Shuttle was completed before the potential of HST contamination and structural damage by shuttle RCS jet plume impingement was fully understood. Relative navigation during proximity operations has been challenging, as HST was not equipped with relative navigation aids. Since HST reached orbit in 1990, proximity operations design for servicing missions has evolved as insight into plume contamination and dynamic pressure has improved and new relative navigation tools have become available. Servicing missions have provided NASA with opportunities to gain insight into servicing mission design and development of nominal and contingency procedures. The HST servicing experiences and lessons learned are applicable to other programs that perform on-orbit servicing and rendezvous, both human and robotic.

  6. Video-Guidance Design for the DART Rendezvous Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, Michael; Tracy, Chisholm

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) mission will validate a number of different guidance technologies, including state-differenced GPS transfers and close-approach video guidance. The video guidance for DART will employ NASA/Marshall s Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS). This paper focuses on the terminal phase of the DART mission that includes close-approach maneuvers under AVGS guidance. The closed-loop video guidance design for DART is driven by a number of competing requirements, including a need for maximizing tracking bandwidths while coping with measurement noise and the need to minimize RCS firings. A range of different strategies for attitude control and docking guidance have been considered for the DART mission, and design decisions are driven by a goal of minimizing both the design complexity and the effects of video guidance lags. The DART design employs an indirect docking approach, in which the guidance position targets are defined using relative attitude information. Flight simulation results have proven the effectiveness of the video guidance design.

  7. Ku-Band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, H. G.; Goff, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    All work performed on the Ku-band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model program since the release of the preliminary final report is summarized. Developments on the program fall into three distinct categories: (1) modifications to the existing Ku-band radar tracking performance computer model; (2) the addition of a highly accurate, nonrealtime search and acquisition performance computer model to the total software package developed on this program; and (3) development of radar cross section (RCS) computation models for three additional satellites. All changes in the tracking model involved improvements in the automatic gain control (AGC) and the radar signal strength (RSS) computer models. Although the search and acquisition computer models were developed under the auspices of the Hughes Aircraft Company Ku-Band Integrated Radar and Communications Subsystem program office, they have been supplied to NASA as part of the Ku-band radar performance comuter model package. Their purpose is to predict Ku-band acquisition performance for specific satellite targets on specific missions. The RCS models were developed for three satellites: the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft, the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft, and the Space Telescopes.

  8. Multi-sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Carrington, Connie K.

    2008-01-01

    During the past two years, many sensors have been tested in an open-loop fashion in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL) to both determine their suitability for use in Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) systems and to ensure the test facility is prepared for future multi-sensor testing. The primary focus of this work was in support of the CEV AR&D system, because the AR&D sensor technology area was identified as one of the top risks in the program. In 2006, four different sensors were tested individually or in a pair in the MSFC FRL. In 2007, four sensors, two each of two different types, were tested simultaneously. In each set of tests, the target was moved through a series of pre-planned trajectories while the sensor tracked it. In addition, a laser tracker "truth" sensor also measured the target motion. The tests demonstrated the functionality of testing four sensors simultaneously as well as the capabilities (both good and bad) of all of the different sensors tested. This paper outlines the test setup and conditions, briefly describes the facility, summarizes the earlier results of the individual sensor tests, and describes in some detail the results of the four-sensor testing. Post-test analysis includes data fusion by minimum variance estimation and sequential Kalman filtering. This Sensor Technology Project work was funded by NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program.

  9. Cross Cutting Relative Navigation Technologies for Improved Landing Accuracy and Vehicle-to-Vehicle Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Masciarelli, J.; Rohrschneider, R. R.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation addresses recent development and test progress, as well as future technology advancement plans for precision landing and Autonomous Rendezvous, Proximity Operations and Docking (ARPOD).

  10. Space shuttle Ku-band integrated rendezvous radar/communications system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of work performed on the Space Shuttle Ku-Band Integrated Rendezvous Radar/Communications System Study. The recommendations and conclusions are included as well as the details explaining the results. The requirements upon which the study was based are presented along with the predicted performance of the recommended system configuration. In addition, shuttle orbiter vehicle constraints (e.g., size, weight, power, stowage space) are discussed. The tradeoffs considered and the operation of the recommended configuration are described for an optimized, integrated Ku-band radar/communications system. Basic system tradeoffs, communication design, radar design, antenna tradeoffs, antenna gimbal and drive design, antenna servo design, and deployed assembly packaging design are discussed. The communications and radar performance analyses necessary to support the system design effort are presented. Detailed derivations of the communications thermal noise error, the radar range, range rate, and angle tracking errors, and the communications transmitter distortion parameter effect on crosstalk between the unbalanced quadriphase signals are included.

  11. Simulator Investigation of Controls and Display Required for Terminal Phase of Coplanar Orbital Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolowicz, Chester H.; Drake, Hubert M.; Videan, Edward N.

    1960-01-01

    A simulator study was made of presentations and control requirements for a manned astrovehicle employed in the interception of artificial satellites during the terminal phase of an orbital rendezvous of the satellite. The study was considered in terms of a manned interceptor having a home berth at a manned space station which is in circular orbit 500 miles above the earth. Interceptions were restricted to coplanar conditions and ranges of one-half mile. The results are believed to be generally applicable to conditions wherein the target is in the terminal area. Presentations which do not provide for attitude indications of the intercepting vehicle are not satisfactory. A direct-visual-observation presentation employing a screen, a projected star background, and a projected image of the target provided a feeling of "realism" in tracking and would be a satisfactory pilot-training aid. Use of longitudinal-translation and attitude controls alone is inadequate. Use of translation control alone, parallel and normal to the axis of the intercepting vehicle, is effective; the addition of attitude control enhanced the effectiveness, provided the control was used discriminately. Direct-visual-observation interceptions can be performed effectively without the aid of range and rate-of-closure-of-range meters at speeds up to approximately 50 feet per second; however, higher speeds of interception require the use of these instruments.

  12. Handling Neighbor Discovery and Rendezvous Consistency with Weighted Quorum-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Own, Chung-Ming; Meng, Zhaopeng; Liu, Kehan

    2015-01-01

    Neighbor discovery and the power of sensors play an important role in the formation of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and mobile networks. Many asynchronous protocols based on wake-up time scheduling have been proposed to enable neighbor discovery among neighboring nodes for the energy saving, especially in the difficulty of clock synchronization. However, existing researches are divided two parts with the neighbor-discovery methods, one is the quorum-based protocols and the other is co-primality based protocols. Their distinction is on the arrangements of time slots, the former uses the quorums in the matrix, the latter adopts the numerical analysis. In our study, we propose the weighted heuristic quorum system (WQS), which is based on the quorum algorithm to eliminate redundant paths of active slots. We demonstrate the specification of our system: fewer active slots are required, the referring rate is balanced, and remaining power is considered particularly when a device maintains rendezvous with discovered neighbors. The evaluation results showed that our proposed method can effectively reschedule the active slots and save the computing time of the network system. PMID:26404297

  13. Handling Neighbor Discovery and Rendezvous Consistency with Weighted Quorum-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Own, Chung-Ming; Meng, Zhaopeng; Liu, Kehan

    2015-01-01

    Neighbor discovery and the power of sensors play an important role in the formation of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and mobile networks. Many asynchronous protocols based on wake-up time scheduling have been proposed to enable neighbor discovery among neighboring nodes for the energy saving, especially in the difficulty of clock synchronization. However, existing researches are divided two parts with the neighbor-discovery methods, one is the quorum-based protocols and the other is co-primality based protocols. Their distinction is on the arrangements of time slots, the former uses the quorums in the matrix, the latter adopts the numerical analysis. In our study, we propose the weighted heuristic quorum system (WQS), which is based on the quorum algorithm to eliminate redundant paths of active slots. We demonstrate the specification of our system: fewer active slots are required, the referring rate is balanced, and remaining power is considered particularly when a device maintains rendezvous with discovered neighbors. The evaluation results showed that our proposed method can effectively reschedule the active slots and save the computing time of the network system. PMID:26404297

  14. An Automatic Terminal Guidance System for Rendezvous with a Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Terrance M.

    1961-01-01

    This study includes a consideration of the design philosophy for an automatic terminal guidance system, a derivation of guidance equations required, and an outline of the general type of instrumentation necessary to provide the essential information. A control system for a sample vehicle is analyzed. A representative case, rendezvous with a satellite in circular orbit at 400 nautical miles, was examined. Terminal-stage nominal burning times of 200 and 400 seconds were used. For the 200-second case, initial errors in circumferential displacement of +/- 25,000 feet, in radial displacement of 7,000 to -9,000 feet, and in lateral displacement of +/- 20,000 feet were within the capabilities of the system. Velocity errors of 300 to -400 ft/sec in the circumferential direction, 180 to -200 ft/sec in the radial direction, and velocity offsets of at least 20 (+/- 800 ft/sec) in the lateral direction could also be handled. The 400-second case was capable of correcting larger errors, but limits were not determined. The dependence of required characteristic velocity on initial errors was determined and it was found that increases over the nominal terminal-stage characteristic velocity of the order of 15 percent covered most of the previously mentioned in-plane errors. The requirements were more severe for cases with lateral velocity offsets. A simplified set of guidance equations was tested and produced only slight variations in performance. Overall velocity requirements and mass ratios were determined for terminal-stage burning times of 100, 200, 300, and 400 seconds and for a range of transfer angles by using exact calculations for the terminal stage and an impulsive launching velocity. These results indicated that the shortest burning time consistent with the launch guidance errors expected gave the best mass ratio.

  15. Integrated GPS/INS navigation system design for autonomous spacecraft rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaylor, David Edward

    2003-10-01

    The goal of the NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program is to advance the technologies for the next generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The SLI program has identified automated rendezvous and docking as an area requiring further research and development. Currently, the Space Shuttle uses a partially manual system for rendezvous, but a fully automated system could be safer and more reliable. Previous studies have shown that it is feasible to use the Global Positioning System (GPS) for spacecraft navigation during rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS). However, these studies have not accounted for the effects of GPS signal blockage and multipath in the vicinity of the ISS, which make a GPS-only navigation system less accurate and reliable. One possible solution is to combine GPS with an inertial navigation system (INS). The integration of GPS and INS can be achieved using a Kalman filter. GPS/INS systems have been used in aircraft for many years and have also been used in launch vehicles. However, the performance of GPS/INS systems in orbit and during spacecraft rendezvous has not been characterized. The primary objective of this research is to evaluate the ability of an integrated GPS/INS to provide accurate navigation solutions during a rendezvous scenario where the effects of ISS signal blockage, multipath and delta-v maneuvers degrade GPS-only navigation. In order to accomplish this, GPS-only and GPS/INS Kalman filters have been developed for both absolute and relative navigation, as well as a new statistical multipath model for spacecraft operating near the ISS. Several factors that affect relative navigation performance were studied, including: filter tuning, GPS constellation geometry, rendezvous approach direction, and inertial sensor performance. The results showed that each of these factors has a large impact on relative navigation performance. Finally, it has been demonstrated that a GPS/INS system based on medium accuracy aircraft

  16. Physical Activity Play and Preschool Children's Peer Acceptance: Distinctions between Rough-and-Tumble and Exercise Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Two forms of exercise play (toy mediated and non-mediated) and 2 forms of rough-and-tumble (R&T) play (chase and fighting) were examined in relation to preschoolers' peer competence. A total of 148 preschoolers (78 boys, 89 Euro-Americans) were observed during free play at their university-sponsored child care center.…

  17. Preschool Teachers' Perceptions of Children's Rough-and-Tumble Play (R&T) in Indoor and Outdoor Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storli, Rune; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores teacher-reported prevalence of rough-and-tumble play (R&T) in preschool and investigates how their restriction to such play varies in different play environments (indoor and outdoor). An electronic questionnaire exploring preschool teachers' beliefs and practices regarding children's dramatic play themes was conducted by…

  18. Monsters, Magic and Mr Psycho: A Biocultural Approach to Rough and Tumble Play in the Early Years of Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Pam

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the developmental role of rough and tumble (R&T) play with particular attention to the narratives that children use to underpin such activities. A review of the literature suggests that current early years research and practice pays scant attention to children's outdoor free play activities. A piece of original research is…

  19. Level of decontamination after washing textiles at 60°C or 70°C followed by tumble drying

    PubMed Central

    Tano, Eva; Melhus, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Background Several major outbreaks in healthcare facilities have occurred with the emergence of multi-resistant bacteria. A possible route for dissemination is the hospital textiles and inadequate laundering of them. The aim of this study was to develop an easy-to-use method for simulating the laundering process of hospital textiles, and thereafter apply the method when evaluating the decontaminating efficacy of two different washing temperatures. Methods The laundering process, including tumble drying, took place at two professional laundries. Enterococcus faecium was used as bioindicator. Results The results showed that a lowering of the washing temperature from 70°C to 60°C did not affect the decontamination efficacy; the washing cycle alone reduced the number of bacteria with 3–5 log10 CFU, whereas the following tumble drying reduced the bacterial numbers with another 3–4 log10 CFU, yielding the same final result independent of washing temperature. Without tumble drying, there was an obvious risk of adding non-fermenting gram-negative bacteria to the fabric. These bacteria originated from the washing cycle. Conclusion A simple method to simulate hospital laundering was developed. To save energy, it is possible to use a washing temperature of 60°C, but the washing cycle should be followed by tumble drying, and the whole laundering process needs to be monitored to maintain sufficient textile hygiene. PMID:25413829

  20. Translocation and Fate of Shiga toxin-producting Escherichia coli in subprimals following blade tenderization and vacuum tumbling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens, such as Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), a natural inhabitant on raw meat, may be transferred from the surface of the meat into the deeper layers of tissue following enhancement by blade tenderization and vacuum tumbling. Therefore, the consumption of enhanced beef...

  1. Flight data results of estimate fusion for spacecraft rendezvous navigation from shuttle mission STS-69

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Bishop, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    A recently developed rendezvous navigation fusion filter that optimally exploits existing distributed filters for rendezvous and GPS navigation to achieve the relative and inertial state accuracies of both in a global solution is utilized here to process actual flight data. Space Shuttle Mission STS-69 was the first mission to date which gathered data from both the rendezvous and Global Positioning System filters allowing, for the first time, a test of the fusion algorithm with real flight data. Furthermore, a precise best estimate of trajectory is available for portions of STS-69, making possible a check on the performance of the fusion filter. In order to successfully carry out this experiment with flight data, two extensions to the existing scheme were necessary: a fusion edit test based on differences between the filter state vectors, and an underweighting scheme to accommodate the suboptimal perfect target assumption made by the Shuttle rendezvous filter. With these innovations, the flight data was successfully fused from playbacks of downlinked and/or recorded measurement data through ground analysis versions of the Shuttle rendezvous filter and a GPS filter developed for another experiment. The fusion results agree with the best estimate of trajectory at approximately the levels of uncertainty expected from the fusion filter's covariance matrix.

  2. Recent developments in electropolishing and tumbling R&D at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.; Brandt, J.; Cooley, L.; Ge, M.; Harms, E.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ozelis, J.; Boffo, C.; /Babcock Noell, Wuerzburg

    2009-10-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Lab (Fermilab) is continuing to improve its infrastructure for research and development on the processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities. A single cell 3.9 GHz electropolishing tool built at Fermilab and operated at an industrial partner was recently commissioned. The EP tool was used to produce a single cell 3.9 GHz cavity that reached an accelerating gradient of 30 MV/m with a quality factor of 5 x 10{sup 9}. A single cell 1.3 GHz cavity was also electropolished at the same industrial vendor using the vendor's vertical full-immersion technique. On their first and only attempt the vendor produced a single cell 1.3 GHz cavity that reached 30 MV/m with a quality factor of 1 x 10{sup 10}. These results will be detailed along with preliminary tumbling results.

  3. Jamming and Attraction of Interacting Run-and-Tumble Random Walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowman, A. B.; Evans, M. R.; Blythe, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study a model of bacterial dynamics where two interacting random walkers perform run-and-tumble motion on a one-dimensional lattice under mutual exclusion and find an exact expression for the probability distribution in the steady state. This stationary distribution has a rich structure comprising three components: a jammed component, where the particles are adjacent and block each other; an attractive component, where the probability distribution for the distance between particles decays exponentially; and an extended component in which the distance between particles is uniformly distributed. The attraction between the particles is sufficiently strong that even in the limit where continuous space is recovered for a finite system, the two walkers spend a finite fraction of time in a jammed configuration. Our results potentially provide a route to understanding the motility-induced phase separation characteristic of active matter from a microscopic perspective.

  4. Jamming and Attraction of Interacting Run-and-Tumble Random Walkers.

    PubMed

    Slowman, A B; Evans, M R; Blythe, R A

    2016-05-27

    We study a model of bacterial dynamics where two interacting random walkers perform run-and-tumble motion on a one-dimensional lattice under mutual exclusion and find an exact expression for the probability distribution in the steady state. This stationary distribution has a rich structure comprising three components: a jammed component, where the particles are adjacent and block each other; an attractive component, where the probability distribution for the distance between particles decays exponentially; and an extended component in which the distance between particles is uniformly distributed. The attraction between the particles is sufficiently strong that even in the limit where continuous space is recovered for a finite system, the two walkers spend a finite fraction of time in a jammed configuration. Our results potentially provide a route to understanding the motility-induced phase separation characteristic of active matter from a microscopic perspective. PMID:27284675

  5. An Assessment of the Technology of Automated Rendezvous and Capture in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study to assess the technology of automated rendezvous and capture (AR&C) in space. The outline of the paper is as follows. First, the history of manual and automated rendezvous and capture and rendezvous and dock is presented. Next, the need for AR&C in space is established. Then, today's technology and ongoing technology efforts related to AR&C in space are reviewed. In light of these, AR&C systems are proposed that meet NASA's future needs, but can be developed in a reasonable amount of time with a reasonable amount of money. Technology plans for developing these systems are presented; cost and schedule are included.

  6. Automated terminal guidance for a Shuttle rendezvous to Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olszewski, Oscar W.

    1990-01-01

    An automated terminal guidance for a Shuttle rendezvous based on the Clohessy-Wiltshire (CW) linear equations of relative motion is described. The algorithm guides the Shuttle from the last rendezvous midcourse maneuver (MC4) through docking with Space Station Freedom (SSF). The uniqueness of this algorithm is that it makes it possible to use the CW equations to fly a line-of-sight (LOS) Vbar or Rbar in the final-approach docking phase. The algorithm is made of two parts, in and out-of-plane, and can also be used for station keeping during final approaches. Simulation results of the guidance integrated with the Shuttle's flight control system in the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) at NASA Johnson are discussed. Plans to add a laser radar docking sensor to the SES and integrate it with the Shuttle's rendezvous navigation are examined.

  7. Robust rendezvous maneuver point conditions. M.S. Thesis - Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogle, Debra Ann

    1992-01-01

    This study develops rendezvous maneuver point conditions that are robust to one dimensional errors in state estimation and burn execution. Allowing small deviations in the time of intercept provides a degree of freedom that can be used to compensate for these errors. The direction of allowable burn deviation is developed for errors in state estimation and burn execution. The maneuver points for which the error is aligned with the insensitive direction provide excellent rendezvous initiation points. The method is applied to sample rendezvous for vehicles in circular and elliptic orbits. Robust maneuver points are selected and the vehicles' relative motion plotted, demonstrating the validity of the maneuver points. Finally, a graphical illustration of the error focusing effect is demonstrated by means of a Monte Carlo simulation.

  8. Methodology for Developing a Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model of Spacecraft Rendezvous and Dockings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farnham, Steven J., II; Garza, Joel, Jr.; Castillo, Theresa M.; Lutomski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 NASA was preparing to send two new visiting vehicles carrying logistics and propellant to the International Space Station (ISS). These new vehicles were the European Space Agency s (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), the Jules Verne, and the Japanese Aerospace and Explorations Agency s (JAXA) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The ISS Program wanted to quantify the increased risk to the ISS from these visiting vehicles. At the time, only the Shuttle, the Soyuz, and the Progress vehicles rendezvoused and docked to the ISS. The increased risk to the ISS was from an increase in vehicle traffic, thereby, increasing the potential catastrophic collision during the rendezvous and the docking or berthing of the spacecraft to the ISS. A universal method of evaluating the risk of rendezvous and docking or berthing was created by the ISS s Risk Team to accommodate the increasing number of rendezvous and docking or berthing operations due to the increasing number of different spacecraft, as well as the future arrival of commercial spacecraft. Before the first docking attempt of ESA's ATV and JAXA's HTV to the ISS, a probabilistic risk model was developed to quantitatively calculate the risk of collision of each spacecraft with the ISS. The 5 rendezvous and docking risk models (Soyuz, Progress, Shuttle, ATV, and HTV) have been used to build and refine the modeling methodology for rendezvous and docking of spacecrafts. This risk modeling methodology will be NASA s basis for evaluating the addition of future ISS visiting spacecrafts hazards, including SpaceX s Dragon, Orbital Science s Cygnus, and NASA s own Orion spacecraft. This paper will describe the methodology used for developing a visiting vehicle risk model.

  9. Halley comet rendezvous with a SEPS vehicle. [Solar Electric Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of the performance of a Solar Electric Propulsion System (SEPS) vehicle rendezvousing with Halley's comet just prior to its Frebruary 1986 perihelion is described. A calculus of variations mathematical formulation is used to maximize Halley arrival mass while giving effect to the influence of solar array size, launch date, arrival date, and insertion hyperbolic excess velocity. Numerical sensitivity relief, thrust system modeling, trajectory characteristics and ion engine operating conditions are discussed and illustrated. Results indicate a rendezvous is feasible with a minimal advance in solar cell and ion engine technology.

  10. NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking convened on May 24 and 25, 1994. Based on the meetings, the Task Force made the following recommendations: at a minimum, the mission commander and payload commander for all subsequent Shuttle-Mir missions should be named at least 18 months in advance of the scheduled launch date; in order to derive early operational experience in advance of the first Mir docking mission, the primary objective of STS-63 should be Mir rendezvous and proximity operations; and if at all possible, the launch date for STS-63 should be moved forward.

  11. Scheme of rendezvous mission to lunar orbital station by spacecraft launched from Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazin, R. F.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, great experience has been accumulated in manned flight astronautics for rendezvous in near-Earth orbit. During flights of Apollo spacecraft with crews that landed on the surface of the Moon, the problem of docking a landing module launched from the Moon's surface with the Apollo spacecraft's command module in a circumlunar orbit was successfully solved. A return to the Moon declared by leading space agencies requires a scheme for rendezvous of a spacecraft launched from an earth-based cosmodromee with a lunar orbital station. This paper considers some ballistic schemes making it possible to solve this problem with minimum fuel expenditures.

  12. Six-impulse maneuvers for rendezvous of spacecraft in near-circular noncoplanar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. A.; Roldugin, D. S.

    2012-11-01

    The problem of a rendezvous of two spacecraft in close near-circular noncoplanar orbits is considered. The angles of applying velocity impulses and their orientation are determined from necessary conditions of optimality derived using the basis vector theory. For non-degenerate six-impulse solutions the analytical formulas are found that approximate the dependence of moments of applying velocity impulses and angles determining their orientation on the rendezvous duration. The total characteristic velocity of six-impulse solutions (or five-impulse solutions derived from them) is compared to the total characteristic velocity obtained when solving the Lambert problem.

  13. Result of Rendezvous Docking Experiment of ETS.35zw .5zw .25mmVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Isao; Mokuno, Masaaki; Suzuki, Takashi; Koyama, Hiroshi; Kunugi, Makoto

    ETS VII is a test satellite to perform in-orbit demonstration of autonomous rendezvous docking (RVD) technology, which will be necessary for advanced space activities in the early 21st century. ETS VII performed three RVD experiment flights, and verified all technical items. ETS VII demonstrated first autonomous RVD between unmanned vehicles, and remote piloted rendezvous flight position accuracy at docking was about 1cm, and acceleration was less than 1.5mG (low impact docking). In the second RVD experiment flight, ETS VII detected attitude anomaly and executed disable abort for safety insurance. We present the results and evaluation of three RVD experiment flights in this paper.

  14. Rendezvous terminal phase automatic braking sequencing and targeting. [for space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachmar, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the rendezvous terminal phase braking program is to provide the means of automatically bringing the primary orbiter within desired station keeping boundaries relative to the target satellite. A detailed discussion is presented on the braking program and its navigation, targeting, and guidance functions.

  15. Sensory fusion for planetary surface robotic navigation, rendezvous, and manipulation operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, T.; Cheng, Y.; Baumgartner, E. T.; Robinson, M.; Schenker, P. S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports some of the ongoing work at JPL in the areas of autonomous sensory fusion of both raw and derived inputs for better localization during long traverses, precision rendezvous operations with both labeled and unlabeled targets, and precision manipulation of targets.

  16. Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation for Spacecraft Rendezvous Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy J.; Valasek, John

    2007-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle necessitates higher levels of automation than previous NASA vehicles, due to program requirements for automation, including Automated Rendezvous and Docking. Studies of spacecraft development often point to the locus of decision-making authority between humans and computers (i.e. automation) as a prime driver for cost, safety, and mission success. Therefore, a critical component in the Crew Exploration Vehicle development is the determination of the correct level of automation. To identify the appropriate levels of automation and autonomy to design into a human space flight vehicle, NASA has created the Function-specific Level of Autonomy and Automation Tool. This paper develops a methodology for prototyping increased levels of automation for spacecraft rendezvous functions. This methodology is used to evaluate the accuracy of the Function-specific Level of Autonomy and Automation Tool specified levels of automation, via prototyping. Spacecraft rendezvous planning tasks are selected and then prototyped in Matlab using Fuzzy Logic techniques and existing Space Shuttle rendezvous trajectory algorithms.

  17. Rendezvous and Docking Strategy for Crewed Segment of the Asteroid Redirect Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather D.; Cryan, Scott P.; D'Souza, Christopher; Dannemiller, David P.; Brazzel, Jack P.; Condon, Gerald L.; Othon, William L.; Williams, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This paper will describe the overall rendezvous, proximity operations and docking (RPOD) strategy in support of the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM), as part of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). The focus of the paper is on the crewed mission phase of ARM, starting with the establishment of Orion in the Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO) and ending with docking to the Asteroid Redirect Vechicle (ARV). The paper will detail the sequence of maneuvers required to execute the rendezvous and proximity operations mission phases along with the on-board navigation strategies, including the final approach phase. The trajectories to be considered will include target vehicles in a DRO. The paper will also discuss the sensor requirements for rendezvous and docking and the various trade studies associated with the final sensor selection. Building on the sensor requirements and trade studies, the paper will include a candidate sensor concept of operations, which will drive the selection of the sensor suite; concurrently, it will be driven by higher level requirements on the system, such as crew timeline constraints and vehicle consummables. This paper will address how many of the seemingly competing requirements will have to be addressed to create a complete system and system design. The objective is to determine a sensor suite and trajectories that enable Orion to successfully rendezvous and dock with a target vehicle in trans lunar space. Finally, the paper will report on the status of a NASA action to look for synergy within RPOD, across the crewed and robotic asteroid missions.

  18. Star tracker axis-to-sunlit earth horizon angle constraint evaluations for rendezvous operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of a study initiated to evaluate the star tracker axis-to-sunlit earth horizon angle constraint with respect to limitations imposed on the passive target rendezvous capability. The data presented include considerations for dispersions and sensor pointing capabilities and generalizations with respect to the uncertainties associated with the angle constraint available in practice.

  19. Space shuttle earth orbital rendezvous targeting techniques for near circular target satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    The targeting techniques are developed which are required to determine the guidance reference release time of the space shuttle navigation system, the orbital insertion targeting values, and a time line of orbital maneuvers. An extension is made for rendezvous with a target satellite in an elliptical orbit.

  20. S/W concept for an autonomous rendezvous and docking mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, J.

    The onboard software required for a typical rendezvous and docking mission profile is discussed. The mission profiles for the MATRA and MBB/ERNO satellites are given along with corresponding satellite configurations. The navigational algorithms used in the individual mission phases are briefly explained, and the corresponding structure of the application software and the related service software are addressed.

  1. "Ultra-rapid" sequential treatment in cholecystocholedocholithiasis: alternative same-day approach to laparoendoscopic rendezvous.

    PubMed

    Borreca, Dario; Bona, Alberto; Bellomo, Maria Paola; Borasi, Andrea; De Paolis, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    There is still no consensus about timing of laparoscopic cholecystectomy after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the treatment of cholecystocholedocholithiasis. The aim of our retrospective study is to analyze the optimal timing of surgical treatment in patients presenting concurrent choledocholithiasis, choosing to perform a sequential endoscopic plus surgical approach, introducing a same-day two-stage alternative. All cases of cholecystocholedocholithiasis occurred between January 2007 and December 2014 in "Gradenigo" Hospital (Turin-Italy) were reviewed. Patients were divided into three groups, based on the timing of cholecystectomy after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and compared. Out of 2233 cholecystectomies performed in the mentioned time interval, have been identified 93 patients that fulfill the selection criteria. 36 patients were treated with a same-day approach, while 29 within first 72 h and 28 with delayed surgery. The overall length of stay was significantly lower in patients that were treated with a same-day approach (4.7 days), compared with other groups (p = 0.001), while no significant differences were found in terms of length of surgical intervention, intraoperative complications and conversions to open procedure, postoperative stay, morbidity and mortality. Patients treated with delayed surgery had a 18 % recurrency rate of biliary events, with an odds ratio of 14.13 (p = 0.018). Same-day two-stage approach should be performed in suitable patients at the index admission, reducing overall risks, improving the patients' quality-of-life, preventing recurrency, leading to a significant cost abatement; furthermore, this approach allows same outcomes of laparoendoscopic rendezvous, avoiding technical and organizational troubles. PMID:26659267

  2. Usage of pre-flight data in short rendezvous mission of Soyuz-TMA spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazin, Rafail; Petrov, Nikolay

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the reduction of the vehicle autonomous flight duration before docking to the ISS. The Russian Soyuz-TMA spacecraft dock to the ISS two days after launch. Due to the limited volume inside Soyuz-TMA the reduction of time until docking to the ISS is very important, since the long stay of the cosmonauts in the limited volume adds to the strain of the space flight. In the previous papers of the authors it was shown that the existing capabilities of Soyuz-TMA, the ISS and the ground control loop make it possible to transfer to the five-orbit rendezvous profile. However, the analysis of the cosmonauts' schedule on the launch day shows that its duration is at the allowable limit and that is why it is necessary to find a way to further reduce the flight duration of Soyuz-TMA before docking to less than five orbits. In a traditional rendezvous profile, the calculation of rendezvous burns begins only after determination of the actual vehicle insertion orbit. The paper describes an approach in which the first two rendezvous burns are performed as soon as the spacecraft reaches the reference orbit and the values of the burns are calculated prior to the launch based on the pre-flight data for the nominal insertion. This approach decreases the duration of the rendezvous by one orbit. The demonstration flight of a Progress vehicle using the proposed profile was implemented on August 1, 2012 and completely confirmed the correctness of the imbedded principles. The paper considers the possible improvements of the proposed approach and recovery from the contingencies.

  3. Rough-and-tumble play as a window on animal communication.

    PubMed

    Palagi, Elisabetta; Burghardt, Gordon M; Smuts, Barbara; Cordoni, Giada; Dall'Olio, Stefania; Fouts, Hillary N; Řeháková-Petrů, Milada; Siviy, Stephen M; Pellis, Sergio M

    2016-05-01

    Rough-and-tumble play (RT) is a widespread phenomenon in mammals. Since it involves competition, whereby one animal attempts to gain advantage over another, RT runs the risk of escalation to serious fighting. Competition is typically curtailed by some degree of cooperation and different signals help negotiate potential mishaps during RT. This review provides a framework for such signals, showing that they range along two dimensions: one from signals borrowed from other functional contexts to those that are unique to play, and the other from purely emotional expressions to highly cognitive (intentional) constructions. Some animal taxa have exaggerated the emotional and cognitive interplay aspects of play signals, yielding admixtures of communication that have led to complex forms of RT. This complexity has been further exaggerated in some lineages by the development of specific novel gestures that can be used to negotiate playful mood and entice reluctant partners. Play-derived gestures may provide new mechanisms by which more sophisticated communication forms can evolve. Therefore, RT and playful communication provide a window into the study of social cognition, emotional regulation and the evolution of communication systems. PMID:25619897

  4. Tools and Techniques for a Systematic Approach to Safe Rendezvous and Proximity Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Rob; Rishikof, Brian

    2010-09-01

    Among the most demanding operations facing manned spaceflight is the ability to successfully and safely complete Rendezvous Proximity Operations & Capture(RPOC) operations with a target vehicle. While perhaps made to look routine from a safety perspective for some vehicles and developers regularly docking to the International Space Station(namely the Space Shuttle, and Russian Progress and Soyuz vehicles), international partners and commercial vehicle developers are finding it among the most difficult engineering challenges. Whether docking with the International Space Station in low earth orbit, or rendezvousing with a returning spacecraft in low lunar orbit, successfully and systematically accounting for all the combinations of risks and failures which lead to failed rendezvous or collisions can be daunting. Systems such as propulsion, avionics, software, and command and data handling(C&DH) must all work as a single integrated system; and the guidance, navigation, and control(GN&C) systems arguably forms the heart of that unit. In response to this challenge, Odyssey Space Research(Odyssey) utilizes their core GN&C engineering competencies, systems engineering capabilities and associated simulation tools to address the safety of RPOC. These simulations provide for high-level mission scenario analysis, systems design, mission planning, monitoring, and implementation, covering all flight phases of rendezvous from orbit insertion, phasing and transfer orbits, far-range rendezvous operations, proximity operations, and capture. Combined with a systems engineering approach, it allows our team to analyze functional system capabilities, propose design modifications and then perform the safety engineering aspect of evaluating that vehicle’s safety compliance. The simulation, modeling and analysis tools(such as domain specific RPOC models, and visualization and virtual reality) allow for detailed design and development and/or help provide the independent assessment

  5. Diffusion, sedimentation equilibrium, and harmonic trapping of run-and-tumble nanoswimmers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjia; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-05-14

    The diffusion of self-propelling nanoswimmers is explored by dissipative particle dynamics in which a nanoswimmer swims by forming an instantaneous force dipole with one of its nearest neighboring solvent beads. Our simulations mimic run-and-tumble behavior by letting the swimmer run for a time τ, then it randomly changes its direction for the next run period. Our simulations show that the swimming speed (ν(a)) of a nanoswimmer is proportional to the propulsion force and the mobility of a pusher is the same as that of a puller. The effective diffusivity is determined by three methods: mean squared displacement, velocity autocorrelation function, and sedimentation equilibrium. The active colloid undergoes directed propulsion at short time scales but changes to random motion at long time scales. The velocity autocorrelation function decreases with time and becomes zero beyond the run time. Under gravity, the concentration profile of active colloids follows Boltzmann distribution with a sedimentation length consistent with that acquired from the drift-diffusion equation. In our simulation, all three methods yield the same result, the effective diffusivity of an active colloid is the sum of the diffusivity of a passive colloid and ν(a)²τ/6. When the active colloids are confined by a harmonic well, they are trapped within a confinement length defined by the balance between the swimmer active force and restoring force of the well. When the confinement length is large compared to the run length, the stationary density profile follows the Boltzmann distribution. However, when the run length exceeds the confinement length, the density distribution is no longer described by Boltzmann distribution, instead we found a bimodal distribution. PMID:24718999

  6. 3D kinematic and dynamic analysis of the front crawl tumble turn in elite male swimmers.

    PubMed

    Puel, F; Morlier, J; Avalos, M; Mesnard, M; Cid, M; Hellard, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify kinematic and dynamic variables related to the best tumble turn times (3mRTT, the turn time from 3-m in to 3-m out, independent variable) in ten elite male swimmers using a three-dimensional (3D) underwater analysis protocol and the Lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) as statistical method. For each swimmer, the best-time turn was analyzed with five stationary and synchronized underwater cameras. The 3D reconstruction was performed using the Direct Linear Transformation algorithm. An underwater piezoelectric 3D force platform completed the set-up to compute dynamic variables. Data were smoothed by the Savitzky-Golay filtering method. Three variables were considered relevant in the best Lasso model (3mRTT=2.58-0.425 RD+0.204 VPe+0.0046 TD): the head-wall distance where rotation starts (RD), the horizontal speed at the force peak (VPe), and the 3D length of the path covered during the turn (TD). Furthermore, bivariate analysis showed that upper body (CUBei) and lower limb extension indexes at first contact (CLLei) were also linked to the turn time (r=-0.65 and p<0.05 for both variables). Thus the best turn times were associated with a long RD, slower VPe and reduced TD. By an early transverse rotation, male elite swimmers reach the wall with a slightly flexed posture that results in fast extension. These swimmers opt for a movement that is oriented forward and they focus on reducing the distance covered. PMID:22176710

  7. Relative position and attitude estimation of spacecrafts based on dual quaternion for rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Bing; Tang, Shuren; Ma, Kexin; Liu, Zhenya

    2013-10-01

    The capacity to acquire the relative position and attitude information between the chaser and the target satellites in real time is one of the necessary prerequisites for the successful implementation of autonomous rendezvous and docking. This paper addresses a vision based relative position and attitude estimation algorithm for the final phase of spacecraft rendezvous and docking. By assuming that the images of feature points on the target satellite lie within the convex regions, the estimation of the relative position and attitude is converted into solving a convex optimization problem in which the dual quaternion method is employed to represent the rotational and translational transformation between the chaser body frame and the target body frame. Due to the point-to-region correspondence instead of the point-to-point correspondence is used, the proposed estimation algorithm shows good performance in robustness which is verified through computer simulations.

  8. Six degree of freedom simulation system for evaluating automated rendezvous and docking spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rourke, Kenneth H.; Tsugawa, Roy K.

    1991-01-01

    Future logistics supply and servicing vehicles such as cargo transfer vehicles (CTV) must have full 6 degree of freedom (6DOF) capability in order to perform requisite rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture operations. The design and performance issues encountered when developing a 6DOF maneuvering spacecraft are very complex with subtle interactions which are not immediately obvious or easily anticipated. In order to deal with these complexities and develop robust maneuvering spacecraft designs, a simulation system and associated family of tools are used at TRW for generating and validating spacecraft performance requirements and guidance algorithms. An overview of the simulator and tools is provided. These are used by TRW for autonomous rendezvous and docking research projects including CTV studies.

  9. Mission options for the first SEPS application. [rendezvous with near earth asteroids and comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, C.-W. L.

    1981-01-01

    Missions to comets and asteroids are primary candidates for Solar Electric Propulsion System (SEPS) applications. NASA estimates that the first SEPS mission might be launched as early as 1988. This paper presents mission opportunities available for launches between 1988 and early 1991 and discusses the performance capabilities of the current SEPS. Use of a Shuttle Two-Stage IUS and/or a Shuttle Wide Tank Centaur launch vehicle is assumed in the performance assessment. The list of possible first SEPS missions consists of nine missions to comets of primary interest and examples of multiple asteroid rendezvous missions. Both an earth crossing asteroid and a main belt asteroid are considered as first possible targets in the multiple asteroid rendezvous examples. Mission opportunity and performance maps for Eros and Anteros are presented which provide exact performance data and optimal launch and arrival dates for any launch year.

  10. The asteroid rendezvous spacecraft. An adaptation study of TIROS/DMSP technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using the TIROS/DMSP Earth orbiting meteorological satellite in application to a near Earth asteroid rendezvous mission. System and subsystems analysis was carried out to develop a configuration of the spacecraft suitable for this mission. Mission analysis studies were also done and maneuver/rendezvous scenarios developed for baseline missions to both Anteros and Eros. The fact that the Asteroid mission is the most complex of the Pioneer class missions currently under consideration notwithstanding, the basic conclusion very strongly supports the suitability of the basic TIROS bus for this mission in all systems and subsystems areas, including science accommodation. Further, the modifications which are required due to the unique mission are very low risk and can be accomplished readily. The key issue is that in virtually every key subsystem, the demands of the Asteroid mission are a subset of the basic meteorological satellite mission. This allows a relatively simple reconfiguration to be accomplished without a major system redesign.

  11. A mission design for the Halley comet rendezvous using Ion Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boain, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Ion Drive propulsion system, a derivative of the old Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) technology is considered adequate to perform all mission objectives of a proposed Halley's comet rendezvous (scheduled for launch in 1982) except one: control of thermal energy from the concentrating solar arrays. This problem can be solved, however, by adding a separable tail probe to the baseline system. The system consists of an Ion Propulsion Module (IPM) and a Mission Module (MM). Scientific objectives include a determination of the structure of the comet nucleus, an evaluation of nucleus evolution, an assay of the comet's atmosphere and ionosphere, and a study of the interaction between the comet and the interplanetary medium. Attention is given to the navigation parameters necessary for heliocentric transfer and post-rendezvous circumnavigation of the comet.

  12. Fuel optimal low thrust rendezvous with outer planets via gravity assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, TieDing; Jiang, FangHua; Baoyin, HeXi; LI, JunFeng

    2011-04-01

    Low thrust propulsion and gravity assist (GA) are among the most promising techniques for deep space explorations. In this paper the two techniques are combined and treated comprehensively, both on modeling and numerical techniques. Fuel optimal orbit rendezvous via multiple GA is first formulated as optimal guidance with multiple interior constraints and then the optimal necessary conditions, various transversality conditions and stationary conditions are derived by Pontryagin's Maximum Principle (PMP). Finally the initial orbit rendezvous problem is transformed into a multiple point boundary value problem (MPBVP). Homotopic technique combined with random searching globally and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), is adopted to handle the numerical difficulty in solving the above MPBVP by single shooting method. Two scenarios in the end show the merits of the present approach.

  13. Systematic low-thrust trajectory optimization for a multi-rendezvous mission using adjoint scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fanghua; Tang, Gao

    2016-04-01

    A deep-space exploration mission with low-thrust propulsion to rendezvous with multiple asteroids is investigated. Indirect methods, based on the optimal control theory, are implemented to optimize the fuel consumption. The application of indirect methods for optimizing low-thrust trajectories between two asteroids is briefly given. An effective method is proposed to provide initial guesses for transfers between close near-circular near-coplanar orbits. The conditions for optimality of a multi-asteroid rendezvous mission are determined. The intuitive method of splitting the trajectories into several legs that are solved sequentially is applied first. Then the results are patched together by a scaling method to provide a tentative guess for optimizing the whole trajectory. Numerical examples of optimizing three probe exploration sequences that contain a dozen asteroids each demonstrate the validity and efficiency of these methods.

  14. Mission and vehicle management and FDIR functions for GNC systems for rendezvous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soppa, U.; Sommer, J.; Tobias, A.; Panicucci, M.; Olivier-Martin, L.

    1991-12-01

    In the forthcoming European scenarios of LEO (Low Earth Orbit), spacecraft will perform frequent complex rendezvous and proximity operations maneuvers. The ESA set up a RVD (Rendezvous and Docking) Proof of Concept program (RVD-POC) aimed at the definition and verification of RVD concepts that encompass those of the Hermes and Columbus projects. The approach to collision avoidance, in the scenarios covered by the RVD-POC, and the concepts defined for Mission and Vehicle Management (MVM) and Failure Detection Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) are described. The verification approach for these and other GNC related concepts, and the planned tests and expected results in the RVD-POC on these matters are presented.

  15. Model predictive control application to spacecraft rendezvous in mars sample return scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponara, M.; Barrena, V.; Bemporad, A.; Hartley, E. N.; Maciejowski, J.; Richards, A.; Tramutola, A.; Trodden, P.

    2013-12-01

    Model Predictive Control (MPC) is an optimization-based control strategy that is considered extremely attractive in the autonomous space rendezvous scenarios. The Online Recon¦guration Control System and Avionics Architecture (ORCSAT) study addresses its applicability in Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission, including the implementation of the developed solution in a space representative avionic architecture system. With respect to a classical control solution High-integrity Autonomous RendezVous and Docking control system (HARVD), MPC allows a signi¦cant performance improvement both in trajectory and in propellant save. Furthermore, thanks to the online optimization, it allows to identify improvements in other areas (i. e., at mission de¦nition level) that could not be known a priori.

  16. An approximate analytical method for short-range impulsive orbit rendezvous using relative Lambert solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Zhou, Di; Mortari, Daniele

    2012-12-01

    A new approximate analytical method for the two-body impulsive orbit rendezvous problem with short range is presented. The classical analytical approach derives the initial relative velocity from the state transition matrix of linear relative motion equations. This paper proposes a different analytical approach based on the relative Lambert solutions. An approximate expression for the transfer time is obtained as a function of chaser's and target's semi-major axes difference. This results in first and second order estimates of the chaser's semi-major axis. Singularity points of rendezvous time for the classical and proposed new methods are both analyzed. As compared with the classical method, the new solution is simpler, more accurate, and has fewer singularity points. Moreover, the proposed method can be easily expanded to higher order solutions. A numerical example quantifies the accuracy gain for multiple-revolution cases.

  17. Low-Cost Innovation in Spaceflight: The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Shoemaker Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCurdy, Howard E.

    2005-01-01

    On a spring day in 1996, at their research center in the Maryland countryside, representatives from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) presented Administrator Daniel S. Goldin of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with a check for $3.6 million. 1 Two and a half years earlier, APL officials had agreed to develop a spacecraft capable of conducting an asteroid rendezvous and to do so for slightly more than $122 million. This was a remarkably low sum for a spacecraft due to conduct a planetaryclass mission. By contrast, the Mars Observer spacecraft launched in 1992 for an orbital rendezvous with the red planet had cost $479 million to develop, while the upcoming Cassini mission to Saturn required a spacecraft whose total cost was approaching $1.4 billion. In an Agency accustomed to cost overruns on major missions, the promise to build a planetary-class spacecraft for about $100 million seemed excessively optimistic.

  18. Guidance and Navigation for Rendezvous and Proximity Operations with a Non-Cooperative Spacecraft at Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent William; Carpenter, J. Russell; Heatwole, Scott; Markley, F. Landis; Moreau, Michael; Naasz, Bo J.; VanEepoel, John

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility and benefits of various spacecraft servicing concepts are currently being assessed, and all require that the servicer spacecraft perform rendezvous, proximity, and capture operations with the target spacecraft to be serviced. Many high-value spacecraft, which would be logical targets for servicing from an economic point of view, are located in geosynchronous orbit, a regime in which autonomous rendezvous and capture operations are not commonplace. Furthermore, existing GEO spacecraft were not designed to be serviced. Most do not have cooperative relative navigation sensors or docking features, and some servicing applications, such as de-orbiting of a non-functional spacecraft, entail rendezvous and capture with a spacecraft that may be non-functional or un-controlled. Several of these challenges have been explored via the design of a notional mission in which a nonfunctional satellite in geosynchronous orbit is captured by a servicer spacecraft and boosted into super-synchronous orbit for safe disposal. A strategy for autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture is developed, and the Orbit Determination Toolbox (ODTBX) is used to perform a relative navigation simulation to assess the feasibility of performing the rendezvous using a combination of angles-only and range measurements. Additionally, a method for designing efficient orbital rendezvous sequences for multiple target spacecraft is utilized to examine the capabilities of a servicer spacecraft to service multiple targets during the course of a single mission.

  19. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat'hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  20. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T.; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  1. Short range and proximity sensor for autonomous rendez-vous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamenbaum, S.; Bomer, T.; Jamet, J.; Turon, P.; Krebs, J. P.

    1986-10-01

    Rendezvous and docking (RVD) sensors have currently been the subject of investigation on the part of MATRA and SODERN. The paper presents the 'future flight sensor' together with estimates of accuracy, mass, power, and reliability. The imager sensor for the short range and proximity phases of RVD appears to be the most suitable and promising in terms of performance capability. Moreover, this concept conforms to the present-day Columbus and Hermes specifications.

  2. Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Williamson, Marlin L.; Johnston, Albert S.; Brewster, Linda L.; Mitchell, Jennifer D.; Cryan, Scott P.; Strack, David; Key, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as Automated Rendezvous and Docking, (AR&D).) The crewed versions of the spacecraft may also perform AR&D, possibly with a different level of automation and/or autonomy, and must also provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the CEV requirements. The relatively low technology readiness of relative navigation sensors for AR&D has been carried as one of the CEV Projects top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce this risk by increasing technology maturation of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through testing and simulation, and to allow the CEV Project to assess the relative navigation sensors.

  3. Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J.; Johnston, A.; Howard, R.; Williamson, M.; Brewster, L.; Strack, D.; Cryan, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as Automated Rendezvous and Docking, AR&D). The crewed versions may also perform AR&D, possibly with a different level of automation and/or autonomy, and must also provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the CEV requirements. The relatively low technology readiness of relative navigation sensors for AR&D has been carried as one of the CEV Projects top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce this risk by increasing technology maturation of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through testing and simulation, and to allow the CEV Project to assess the relative navigation sensors.

  4. Rapid design and optimization of low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectory for asteroid deflection missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Zhu, Yongsheng; Wang, Yukai

    2014-02-01

    Asteroid deflection techniques are essential in order to protect the Earth from catastrophic impacts by hazardous asteroids. Rapid design and optimization of low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectories is considered as one of the key technologies to successfully deflect potentially hazardous asteroids. In this paper, we address a general framework for the rapid design and optimization of low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectories for future asteroid deflection missions. The design and optimization process includes three closely associated steps. Firstly, shape-based approaches and genetic algorithm (GA) are adopted to perform preliminary design, which provides a reasonable initial guess for subsequent accurate optimization. Secondly, Radau pseudospectral method is utilized to transcribe the low-thrust trajectory optimization problem into a discrete nonlinear programming (NLP) problem. Finally, sequential quadratic programming (SQP) is used to efficiently solve the nonlinear programming problem and obtain the optimal low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectories. The rapid design and optimization algorithms developed in this paper are validated by three simulation cases with different performance indexes and boundary constraints.

  5. A feasibility study of unmanned rendezvous and docking in Mars orbit. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technical feasibility of achieving automatic rendezvous and docking in Mars orbit as a part of a surface sample return mission was investigated based on using as much existing Viking '75 Orbiter and Lander hardware as possible. Both 1981 and 1983/84 mission opportunities were considered. The principle result of the study was the definition of a three stage 289 kg Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) capable of accepting a 1 kg sample, injecting itself into a 2200 km circular orbit, and rendezvousing with an orbiting spacecraft carrying an earth return vehicle. Conclusions are that with state of the art systems plus limited application of new developments in areas where feasibility has already been demonstrated, e.g., solid rocket motor sterilization, it is possible to land a small ascent vehicle capable of automatically ascending and rendezvousing with a modified Viking '75 orbiter spacecraft. The mission can be flown in 1981 or 1983/84, but a dual launch or a larger launch vehicle than the Viking Titan 3 Centaur, or the use of space storable propellants for Mars orbit injection, would be required in the 1983/84 opportunity.

  6. The Data Transfer Kit: A geometric rendezvous-based tool for multiphysics data transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, S. R.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Pawlowski, R. P.

    2013-07-01

    The Data Transfer Kit (DTK) is a software library designed to provide parallel data transfer services for arbitrary physics components based on the concept of geometric rendezvous. The rendezvous algorithm provides a means to geometrically correlate two geometric domains that may be arbitrarily decomposed in a parallel simulation. By repartitioning both domains such that they have the same geometric domain on each parallel process, efficient and load balanced search operations and data transfer can be performed at a desirable algorithmic time complexity with low communication overhead relative to other types of mapping algorithms. With the increased development efforts in multiphysics simulation and other multiple mesh and geometry problems, generating parallel topology maps for transferring fields and other data between geometric domains is a common operation. The algorithms used to generate parallel topology maps based on the concept of geometric rendezvous as implemented in DTK are described with an example using a conjugate heat transfer calculation and thermal coupling with a neutronics code. In addition, we provide the results of initial scaling studies performed on the Jaguar Cray XK6 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for a worse-case-scenario problem in terms of algorithmic complexity that shows good scaling on 0(1 x 104) cores for topology map generation and excellent scaling on 0(1 x 105) cores for the data transfer operation with meshes of O(1 x 109) elements. (authors)

  7. A Ground Testbed to Advance US Capability in Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This project will advance the Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) GNC system by testing it on hardware, particularly in a flight processor, with a goal of testing it in IPAS with the Waypoint L2 AR&D scenario. The entire Agency supports development of a Commodity for Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (CARD) as outlined in the Agency-wide Community of Practice whitepaper entitled: "A Strategy for the U.S. to Develop and Maintain a Mainstream Capability for Automated/Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking in Low Earth Orbit and Beyond". The whitepaper establishes that 1) the US is in a continual state of AR&D point-designs and therefore there is no US "off-the-shelf" AR&D capability in existence today, 2) the US has fallen behind our foreign counterparts particularly in the autonomy of AR&D systems, 3) development of an AR&D commodity is a national need that would benefit NASA, our commercial partners, and DoD, and 4) an initial estimate indicates that the development of a standardized AR&D capability could save the US approximately $60M for each AR&D project and cut each project's AR&D flight system implementation time in half.

  8. Theoretical reason for the lack of influence of 1H-14N cross-relaxation on the water proton T 1 NMRD profile in slow tumbling proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westlund, P.-O.

    2012-09-01

    For immobilized protein the water proton T 1-NMRD profile displays three enhanced relaxation peaks (QP). For slow tumbling proteins these relaxation peaks are not experimentally observed. However, the theoretically determined QP effect on the amide proton T 1-NMRD profile displays a distorted Lorentzian dispersion profile. The question arises as to whether there is also a distortion of the water-proton T 1-NMRD profile due to QP. The model of Sunde and Halle [J. Magn. Reson. 203, 257 (2010)] predicts a decreasing QP relaxation contribution and, with the aid of a model for tumbling proteins [P.-O. Westlund, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 12, 3136 (2010)], it is shown that the QP effect is absent in water-proton T 1-NMRD profiles for slow tumbling proteins with τR < 1 µs, τI.

  9. Effect of field size, head motion, and rotational velocity on roll vection and illusory self-tilt in a tumbling room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, R. S.; Howard, I. P.; Zacher, J. E.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of field size, velocity, and visual fixation upon the perception of self-body rotation and tilt was examined in a rotating furnished room. Subjects sat in a stationary chair in the furnished room which could be rotated about the body roll axis. For full-field conditions, complete 360 degrees body rotation (tumbling) was the most common sensation (felt by 80% of subjects). Constant tilt or partial tumbling (less than 360 degrees rotation) occurred more frequently with a small field of view (20 deg). The number of subjects who experienced complete tumbling increased with increases in field of view and room velocity (for velocities between 15 and 30 degrees s-1). The speed of perceived self-rotation relative to room rotation also increased with increasing field of view.

  10. The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) and Closed-loop Hardware Testing for Orion Rendezvous System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Milenkovich, Zoran; Wilson, Zachary; Huich, David; Bendle, John; Kibler, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) at the Lockheed Martin (LM) Waterton Campus in Littleton, Colorado is a dynamic test environment focused on Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) development testing and risk reduction activities. The SOSC supports multiple program pursuits and accommodates testing Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) algorithms for relative navigation, hardware testing and characterization, as well as software and test process development. The SOSC consists of a high bay (60 meters long by 15.2 meters wide by 15.2 meters tall) with dual six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) motion simulators and a single fixed base 6DOF robot. The large testing area (maximum sensor-to-target effective range of 60 meters) allows for large-scale, flight-like simulations of proximity maneuvers and docking events. The facility also has two apertures for access to external extended-range outdoor target test operations. In addition, the facility contains four Mission Operations Centers (MOCs) with connectivity to dual high bay control rooms and a data/video interface room. The high bay is rated at Class 300,000 (. 0.5 m maximum particles/m3) cleanliness and includes orbital lighting simulation capabilities.

  11. Saturn ring rendezvous mission utilizing a tethered sub-satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Larry E.

    1990-01-01

    By combining the advanced technologies of constant-thrust propulsion and space tethers in a planetary mission, it may be feasible to perform a complete radial and azimuthal survey of the Saturnian ring system from close range (about 10 km) in a period of some 300 days. Constant-thrust propulsion would provide the means of 'hovering' above the rings while simultaneously spiraling radially inward toward Saturn. Use of a tethered sub-satellite at a distance of 500-1000 km from the main spacecraft would permit an instrumented package to achieve a significant azimuthal angular rate relative to the rings. Exhaustive 360 deg azimuthal mapping at one or two selected distances from Saturn could be performed in a few tens of days.

  12. An overview of autonomous rendezvous and docking system technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kurt D.

    1991-01-01

    The Centaur upper stage was selected for an airborne avionics modernization program. The parts used in the existing avionics units were obsolete. Continued use of existing hardware would require substantial redesign, yet would result in the use of outdated hardware. Out of date processes, with very expensive and labor intensive technologies, were being used for manufacturing. The Atlas/Centaur avionics were to be procured at a fairly high rate that demanded the use of modern components. The new avionics also reduce size, weight, power, and parts count with a dramatic improvement in reliability. Finally, the cost leverage derived from upgrading the avionics as opposed to any other subsystem for the existing Atlas/Centaur was a very large consideration in the upgrade decision. The upgrade program is a multiyear effort that began in 1989. It includes telemetry, guidance and navigation, control electronics, thrust vector control, and redundancy levels.

  13. Third Report of the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In May 1994, the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions was established by the NASA Advisory Council. Its purpose is to review Phase 1 (Shuttle-Mir) planning, training, operations, rendezvous and docking, and management and to provide interim reports containing specific recommendations to the Advisory Council. Phase 1 represents the building block to create the experience and technical expertise for an International Space Station. The Phase 1 program brings together the United States and Russia in a major cooperative and contractual program that takes advantage of both countries' capabilities. The content of the Phase 1 program consists of the following elements as defined by the Phase 1 Program Management Plan, dated October 6, 1994: Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking missions; astronaut long duration presence on Mir Requirements for Mir support of Phase 1 when astronauts are not on board; outfitting Spektr and Priroda modules with NASA science, research, and risk mitigation equipment Related ground support requirements of NASA and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) to support Phase 1 Integrated NASA and RSA launch schedules and manifests The first meeting of the Task Force was held at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) on May 24 and 25, 1994 with a preliminary report submitted to the NASA Advisory Council on June 6, 1994. The second meeting of the Task Force was held at JSC on July 12 and 13, 1994 and a detailed report containing a series of specific recommendations was submitted on July 29, 1994. This report reflects the results of the third Task Force meeting which was held at JSC on 11 and 12 October, 1994. The briefings presented at that meeting reviewed NASA's response to the Task Force recommendations made to date and provided background data and current status on several critical areas which the Task Force had not addressed in its previous reports.

  14. SPARTAN: A High-Fidelity Simulation for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turbe, Michael A.; McDuffie, James H.; DeKock, Brandon K.; Betts, Kevin M.; Carrington, Connie K.

    2007-01-01

    bd Systems (a subsidiary of SAIC) has developed the Simulation Package for Autonomous Rendezvous Test and ANalysis (SPARTAN), a high-fidelity on-orbit simulation featuring multiple six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) vehicles. SPARTAN has been developed in a modular fashion in Matlab/Simulink to test next-generation automated rendezvous and docking guidance, navigation,and control algorithms for NASA's new Vision for Space Exploration. SPARTAN includes autonomous state-based mission manager algorithms responsible for sequencing the vehicle through various flight phases based on on-board sensor inputs and closed-loop guidance algorithms, including Lambert transfers, Clohessy-Wiltshire maneuvers, and glideslope approaches The guidance commands are implemented using an integrated translation and attitude control system to provide 6DOF control of each vehicle in the simulation. SPARTAN also includes high-fidelity representations of a variety of absolute and relative navigation sensors that maybe used for NASA missions, including radio frequency, lidar, and video-based rendezvous sensors. Proprietary navigation sensor fusion algorithms have been developed that allow the integration of these sensor measurements through an extended Kalman filter framework to create a single optimal estimate of the relative state of the vehicles. SPARTAN provides capability for Monte Carlo dispersion analysis, allowing for rigorous evaluation of the performance of the complete proposed AR&D system, including software, sensors, and mechanisms. SPARTAN also supports hardware-in-the-loop testing through conversion of the algorithms to C code using Real-Time Workshop in order to be hosted in a mission computer engineering development unit running an embedded real-time operating system. SPARTAN also contains both runtime TCP/IP socket interface and post-processing compatibility with bdStudio, a visualization tool developed by bd Systems, allowing for intuitive evaluation of simulation results. A

  15. Constant-thrust glideslope guidance algorithm for time-fixed rendezvous in real halo orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yijun; Meng, Yunhe; Tang, Guojian; Liu, Luhua

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a fixed-time glideslope guidance algorithm that is capable of guiding the spacecraft approaching a target vehicle on a quasi-periodic halo orbit in real Earth-Moon system. To guarantee the flight time is fixed, a novel strategy for designing the parameters of the algorithm is given. Based on the numerical solution of the linearized relative dynamics of the Restricted Three-Body Problem (expressed in inertial coordinates with a time-variant nature), the proposed algorithm breaks down the whole rendezvous trajectory into several arcs. For each arc, a two-impulse transfer is employed to obtain the velocity increment (delta-v) at the joint between arcs. Here we respect the fact that instantaneous delta-v cannot be implemented by any real engine, since the thrust magnitude is always finite. To diminish its effect on the control, a thrust duration as well as a thrust direction are translated from the delta-v in the context of a constant thrust engine (the most robust type in real applications). Furthermore, the ignition and cutoff delays of the thruster are considered as well. With this high-fidelity thrust model, the relative state is then propagated to the next arc by numerical integration using a complete Solar System model. In the end, final corrective control is applied to insure the rendezvous velocity accuracy. To fully validate the proposed guidance algorithm, Monte Carlo simulation is done by incorporating the navigational error and the thrust direction error. Results show that our algorithm can effectively maintain control over the time-fixed rendezvous transfer, with satisfactory final position and velocity accuracies for the near-range guided phase.

  16. Orbit Modification of Earth-Crossing Asteroids/Comets Using Rendezvous Spacecraft and Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sang-Young; Mazanek, Daniel D.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the approach and results of an end-to-end simulation to deflect a long-period comet (LPC) by using a rapid rendezvous spacecraft and laser ablation system. The laser energy required for providing sufficient deflection DELTA V and an analysis of possible intercept/rendezvous spacecraft trajectories are studied in this analysis. These problems minimize a weighted sum of the flight time and required propellant by using an advanced propulsion system. The optimal thrust-vector history and propellant mass to use are found in order to transfer a spacecraft from the Earth to a targeted celestial object. One goal of this analysis is to formulate an optimization problem for intercept/rendezvous spacecraft trajectories. One approach to alter the trajectory of the object in a highly controlled manner is to use pulsed laser ablative propulsion. A sufficiently intense laser pulse ablates the surface of a near-Earth object (NEO) by causing plasma blowoff. The momentum change from a single laser pulse is very small. However, the cumulative effect is very effective because the laser can interact with the object over long periods of time. The laser ablation technique can overcome the mass penalties associated with other nondisruptive approaches because no propellant is required to generate the DELTA V (the material of the celestial object is the propellant source). Additionally, laser ablation is effective against a wide range of surface materials and does not require any landing or physical attachment to the object. For diverting distant asteroids and comets, the power and optical requirements of a laser ablation system on or near the Earth may be too extreme to contemplate in the next few decades. A hybrid solution would be for a spacecraft to carry a laser as a payload to a particular celestial body. The spacecraft would require an advanced propulsion system capable of rapid rendezvous with the object and an extremely powerful electrical generator, which is

  17. Application of neural networks to autonomous rendezvous and docking of space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Marshall has investigated the feasibility of numerous autonomous rendezvous and docking (ARD) candidate techniques. Neural networks have been studied as a viable basis for such systems' implementation, due to their intrinsic representation of such nonlinear functions as those for which analytical solutions are either difficult or nonexistent. Neural networks are also able to recognize and adapt to changes in their dynamic environment, thereby enhancing redundancy and fault tolerance. Outstanding performance has been obtained from ARD azimuth, elevation, and roll networks of this type.

  18. Embedded Relative Navigation Sensor Fusion Algorithms for Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKock, Brandon K.; Betts, Kevin M.; McDuffie, James H.; Dreas, Christine B.

    2008-01-01

    bd Systems (a subsidiary of SAIC) has developed a suite of embedded relative navigation sensor fusion algorithms to enable NASA autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D) missions. Translational and rotational Extended Kalman Filters (EKFs) were developed for integrating measurements based on the vehicles' orbital mechanics and high-fidelity sensor error models and provide a solution with increased accuracy and robustness relative to any single relative navigation sensor. The filters were tested tinough stand-alone covariance analysis, closed-loop testing with a high-fidelity multi-body orbital simulation, and hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL).

  19. Use of the docking dynamics test facility for rendezvous and docking final approach verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noirault, P.; Pairot, J. M.

    1991-12-01

    The Docking and Dynamics Test Facility (DDTF) and its current areas of investigation are reviewed. The following topics are described: tests of an automatic scenario with a closed loop control of the approach to docking using a RV (Rendezvous) sensor breadboard; tests with a representative mockup of the future Docking/Berthing System (DBS), to derive relevant allocation between the GNC (Guidance, Navigation, and Control) system performances and the DBS capabilities; and tests on the last 5 m translation with full human control of the chaser for the Hermes/Columbus mission, where astronauts performed the docking mission. Some recommendations for a future dynamical test bench are given in conclusion.

  20. Elements of solar sail navigation with application to a Halley's comet rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.; Thornton, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of interplanetary navigation of a solar sail spacecraft is examined and found to be analogous to that of solar electric spacecraft. The dominant navigation error sources are shown to be accelerations that are unaccounted for in the description of the vehicle's motion, due to the inability to precisely model the solar radiation pressure. A strategy for navigation in the presence of these accelerations is devised, based on techniques previously developed for solar electric vehicles. An evaluation of the strategy is made for a Halley's comet rendezvous mission, and the results of that evaluation indicate that the strategy gives acceptable performance.

  1. A study of central cryogenic cooling system for the comet rendezvous spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, R. P.; Metzger, A. E.; Wu, Y. C.; Malcolm, J.

    1981-01-01

    Several science instruments required temperatures between 100 K and 120 K on a proposed Halley Flyby, Tempel-2 Rendezvous Mission. Significant features of the thermal environment are a large variation in heliocentric as well as comet distance, very large solar panels for a Solar Electric Propulsion stage, and the comet dust environment. The best cooling is achieved by one central radiative cooler connected by insulated cryogenic heat pipes to the instruments. The conceptual design is of a single-stage rectangular shielded radiator deployed on a boom some distance from the spacecraft bus and solar panels. Thermal modeling determined sensitivity to solar and comet distance and was used to optimize cooler geometry.

  2. Manned Mars lander launch-to-rendezvous analysis for a 1981 Venus-swingby mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, N. L.; Murtagh, T. B.

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of the return of a manned Mars lander by a launch from the surface of Mars to some intermediate orbit, with subsequent maneuvers to rendezvous with a primary spacecraft (called the orbiter) in a Mars parking orbit. The type of Mars mission used to demonstrate the analytical technique includes a Venus swingby on the Mars-to-Earth portion of the trajectory in order to reduce the total mission velocity requirement. The total velocity requirement for the mission considered (if inplane launches are assumed) is approximately 17,500 ft/sec.

  3. NASA Automated Rendezvous and Capture Review. A compilation of the abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document presents a compilation of abstracts of papers solicited for presentation at the NASA Automated Rendezvous and Capture Review held in Williamsburg, VA on November 19-21, 1991. Due to limitations on time and other considerations, not all abstracts could be presented during the review. The organizing committee determined however, that all abstracts merited availability to all participants and represented data and information reflecting state-of-the-art of this technology which should be captured in one document for future use and reference. The organizing committee appreciates the interest shown in the review and the response by the authors in submitting these abstracts.

  4. Perspective and Practices to Address Rough-and-Tumble Play in the School Setting: A Survey of School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Teams in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basinger, Jason Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Prior research of rough-and-tumble play (RTP) has shown mixed results--different definitions, varying functions, and positive and negative outcomes. Few researchers have studied interventions to address RTP in school settings. With unclear evidence of RTP outcomes and the extent school interventions are addressing RTP in school settings, this…

  5. Androgen and the Development of Human Sex-Typical Behavior: Rough-and-Tumble Play and Sex of Preferred Playmates in Children with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Melissa; Kaufman, Francine R.

    1994-01-01

    Examined the rough-and-tumble play and gender of preferred playmates in three- to eight-year olds with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH)--hypothesized to masculinize behaviors that show sex differences--and in unaffected three- to eight-year-old relatives. Found that CAH girls did not exhibit increased levels of masculine behavior when compared…

  6. Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) Rendezvous Proximity Operations Design and Trade Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbach, J.; Westphal, J. J.; Roscoe, C.; Hawes, D. R.; Carrico, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) program is to demonstrate rendezvous proximity operations (RPO), formation flying, and docking with a pair of 3U CubeSats. The program is sponsored by NASA Ames via the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) in support of its Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP). The goal of the mission is to demonstrate complex RPO and docking operations with a pair of low-cost 3U CubeSat satellites using passive navigation sensors. The program encompasses the entire system evolution including system design, acquisition, satellite construction, launch, mission operations, and final disposal. The satellite is scheduled for launch in Fall 2015 with a 1-year mission lifetime. This paper provides a brief mission overview but will then focus on the current design and driving trade study results for the RPO mission specific processor and relevant ground software. The current design involves multiple on-board processors, each specifically tasked with providing mission critical capabilities. These capabilities range from attitude determination and control to image processing. The RPO system processor is responsible for absolute and relative navigation, maneuver planning, attitude commanding, and abort monitoring for mission safety. A low power processor running a Linux operating system has been selected for implementation. Navigation is one of the RPO processor's key tasks. This entails processing data obtained from the on-board GPS unit as well as the on-board imaging sensors. To do this, Kalman filters will be hosted on the processor to ingest and process measurements for maintenance of position and velocity estimates with associated uncertainties. While each satellite carries a GPS unit, it will be used sparsely to conserve power. As such, absolute navigation will mainly consist of propagating past known states, and relative navigation will be considered to be of greater importance. For relative observations

  7. Measurement of radial expansion and tumbling motion of a high-speed rotor using an optical sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, P.; Dreier, F.; Pfister, T.; Czarske, J.; Haupt, T.; Hufenbach, W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the load capacity and the strength properties of high-speed rotors, dynamic deformation and vibration measurements are of importance, in particular at lightweight composite devices which cannot be simulated reliably. This is a challenging task in metrology since non-contact inspection techniques are required which offer micron uncertainties and high temporal resolution simultaneously, also under vacuum conditions. In order to meet these requirements, a non-incremental laser Doppler distance sensor system was developed using fiber and diffractive optics. In this paper we present for the first time high-speed deformation measurements of a cylindrical steel rotor using this novel sensor system. The radial rotor expansion of only some microns was determined despite the presence of an unsteady tumbling motion of the rotor, which was measured simultaneously. Future prospects are discussed including the possibility to measure non-metallic devices such as fiber-reinforced composites.

  8. Optimization of maneuvers and resources for the rendezvous of a servicing vehicle to a space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magne, Jacques; Canu, Richard; Joulot, Antoine

    Addressing the generation of flight scenarios for the rendezvous of a servicing vehicle to a space station, solutions in terms of sequences of maneuvers shall be found that meet a generally complex set of mission constraints while optimizing the needed resources. For the optimization of maneuvers and resources during rendezvous, this paper describes a methodology based on the parametric optimization of a sequence of genetic non-impulsional thrust maneuvers which are defined by the user from a standard catalog, allowing to cope with both translations and rotations. The method uses a reduced gradient algorithm to find an optimal trajectory that meet every mission constraint. Most attention has been paid to the standard of realism in the modeling of the chaser and target dynamics, and in the formalization of the constraints on the approach trajectories; these last ones are defined as the terminal position, the attitude and kinematic capture conditions for berthing or docking, the maximal duration allocated to the approach, path constraints, the propulsive capacities of the chaser and a `safety' constraint, which in other words means that any failure on the chaser during the approach shall result in collision avoiding trajectories or in a mechanical contract to the station within safe limits. The criterion for scenarios optimization can be minimization of propellant consumption or phase duration, or a weighed combination of both. For illustration purpose, example results are given for the final approach of a servicing vehicle to an Earth-pointed space station.

  9. A Comparison of Trajectory Optimization Methods for the Impulsive Minimum Fuel Rendezvous Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P.; Mailhe, Laurie M.; Guzman, Jose J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present, a comparison of trajectory optimization approaches for the minimum fuel rendezvous problem. Both indirect and direct methods are compared for a variety of test cases. The indirect approach is based on primer vector theory. The direct approaches are implemented numerically and include Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP). Quasi- Newton and Nelder-Meade Simplex. Several cost function parameterizations are considered for the direct approach. We choose one direct approach that appears to be the most flexible. Both the direct and indirect methods are applied to a variety of test cases which are chosen to demonstrate the performance of each method in different flight regimes. The first test case is a simple circular-to-circular coplanar rendezvous. The second test case is an elliptic-to-elliptic line of apsides rotation. The final test case is an orbit phasing maneuver sequence in a highly elliptic orbit. For each test case we present a comparison of the performance of all methods we consider in this paper.

  10. Space Shuttle Guidance, Navigation, and Rendezvous Knowledge Capture Reports. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2011-01-01

    This document is a catalog and readers guide to lessons learned, experience, and technical history reports, as well as compilation volumes prepared by United Space Alliance personnel for the NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) Flight Dynamics Division.1 It is intended to make it easier for future generations of engineers to locate knowledge capture documentation from the Shuttle Program. The first chapter covers observations on documentation quality and research challenges encountered during the Space Shuttle and Orion programs. The second chapter covers the knowledge capture approach used to create many of the reports covered in this document. These chapters are intended to provide future flight programs with insight that could be used to formulate knowledge capture and management strategies. The following chapters contain descriptions of each knowledge capture report. The majority of the reports concern the Space Shuttle. Three are included that were written in support of the Orion Program. Most of the reports were written from the years 2001 to 2011. Lessons learned reports concern primarily the shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) upgrade and the knowledge capture process. Experience reports on navigation and rendezvous provide examples of how challenges were overcome and how best practices were identified and applied. Some reports are of a more technical history nature covering navigation and rendezvous. They provide an overview of mission activities and the evolution of operations concepts and trajectory design. The lessons learned, experience, and history reports would be considered secondary sources by historians and archivists.

  11. Orbital Express Autonomous Rendezvous and Capture Sensor System (ARCSS) flight test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinz, Manny R.; Chen, Chih-Tsai; Beaven, Michael W.; Weismuller, Thomas P.; Caballero, David L.; Gaumer, William B.; Sabasteanski, Peter W.; Scott, Peter A.; Lundgren, Mark A.

    2008-04-01

    The Orbital Express flight demonstration was established by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop and validate key technologies required for cost-effective servicing of next-generation satellites. A contractor team led by Boeing Advanced Network and Space Systems built two mated spacecraft launched atop an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on March 8, 2007. The low earth orbit test flight demonstrated on orbit transfer of hydrazine propellant, transfer of a spare battery between spacecraft and the ability to replace a spacecraft computer on orbit. It also demonstrated autonomous rendezvous and capture (AR&C) using advanced sensor, guidance, and relative navigation hardware and software. This paper summarizes the results of the on-orbit performance testing of the ARCSS (Autonomous Rendezvous and Capture Sensor System). ARCSS uses onboard visible, infrared and laser rangefinder sensors to provide real time data and imagery to the onboard sensor computer. The Boeing-developed Vis-STAR software executing on the sensor computer uses the ARCSS data to provide precision real-time client bearing, range and attitude as needed, from long range to soft capture. The paper summarizes the ARCSS and Vis-STAR on orbit performance.

  12. An integrated autonomous rendezvous and docking system architecture using Centaur modern avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    The avionics system for the Centaur upper stage is in the process of being modernized with the current state-of-the-art in strapdown inertial guidance equipment. This equipment includes an integrated flight control processor with a ring laser gyro based inertial guidance system. This inertial navigation unit (INU) uses two MIL-STD-1750A processors and communicates over the MIL-STD-1553B data bus. Commands are translated into load activation through a Remote Control Unit (RCU) which incorporates the use of solid state relays. Also, a programmable data acquisition system replaces separate multiplexer and signal conditioning units. This modern avionics suite is currently being enhanced through independent research and development programs to provide autonomous rendezvous and docking capability using advanced cruise missile image processing technology and integrated GPS navigational aids. A system concept was developed to combine these technologies in order to achieve a fully autonomous rendezvous, docking, and autoland capability. The current system architecture and the evolution of this architecture using advanced modular avionics concepts being pursued for the National Launch System are discussed.

  13. An integrated autonomous rendezvous and docking system architecture using Centaur modern avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Kurt

    The avionics system for the Centaur upper stage is in the process of being modernized with the current state-of-the-art in strapdown inertial guidance equipment. This equipment includes an integrated flight control processor with a ring laser gyro based inertial guidance system. This inertial navigation unit (INU) uses two MIL-STD-1750A processors and communicates over the MIL-STD-1553B data bus. Commands are translated into load activation through a Remote Control Unit (RCU) which incorporates the use of solid state relays. Also, a programmable data acquisition system replaces separate multiplexer and signal conditioning units. This modern avionics suite is currently being enhanced through independent research and development programs to provide autonomous rendezvous and docking capability using advanced cruise missile image processing technology and integrated GPS navigational aids. A system concept was developed to combine these technologies in order to achieve a fully autonomous rendezvous, docking, and autoland capability. The current system architecture and the evolution of this architecture using advanced modular avionics concepts being pursued for the National Launch System are discussed.

  14. Progress in navigation filter estimate fusion and its application to spacecraft rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    1994-01-01

    A new derivation of an algorithm which fuses the outputs of two Kalman filters is presented within the context of previous research in this field. Unlike other works, this derivation clearly shows the combination of estimates to be optimal, minimizing the trace of the fused covariance matrix. The algorithm assumes that the filters use identical models, and are stable and operating optimally with respect to their own local measurements. Evidence is presented which indicates that the error ellipsoid derived from the covariance of the optimally fused estimate is contained within the intersections of the error ellipsoids of the two filters being fused. Modifications which reduce the algorithm's data transmission requirements are also presented, including a scalar gain approximation, a cross-covariance update formula which employs only the two contributing filters' autocovariances, and a form of the algorithm which can be used to reinitialize the two Kalman filters. A sufficient condition for using the optimally fused estimates to periodically reinitialize the Kalman filters in this fashion is presented and proved as a theorem. When these results are applied to an optimal spacecraft rendezvous problem, simulated performance results indicate that the use of optimally fused data leads to significantly improved robustness to initial target vehicle state errors. The following applications of estimate fusion methods to spacecraft rendezvous are also described: state vector differencing, and redundancy management.

  15. COMPASS Final Report: Near Earth Asteroids Rendezvous and Sample Earth Returns (NEARER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the Collaborative Modeling for Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team completed a design for a multi-asteroid (Nereus and 1996 FG3) sample return capable spacecraft for the NASA In-Space Propulsion Office. The objective of the study was to support technology development and assess the relative benefits of different electric propulsion systems on asteroid sample return design. The design uses a single, heritage Orion solar array (SA) (approx.6.5 kW at 1 AU) to power a single NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster ((NEXT) a spare NEXT is carried) to propel a lander to two near Earth asteroids. After landing and gathering science samples, the Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) vehicle spirals back to Earth where it drops off the first sample s return capsule and performs an Earth flyby to assist the craft in rendezvousing with a second asteroid, which is then sampled. The second sample is returned in a similar fashion. The vehicle, dubbed Near Earth Asteroids Rendezvous and Sample Earth Returns (NEARER), easily fits in an Atlas 401 launcher and its cost estimates put the mission in the New Frontier s (NF's) class mission.

  16. Autonomous rendezvous and docking operations of unmanned expendable cargo transfer vehicles (e.g. Centaur) with Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmet, Brian R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the feasibility study using Centaur or other CTV's to deliver payloads to the Space Station Freedom (SSF). During this study was examined the requirements upon unmanned cargo transfer stages (including Centaur) for phasing, rendezvous, proximity operations and docking/berthing (capture).

  17. The Successful Development of an Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) System for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.

    2003-01-01

    During the 1990's, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture/docking (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous sensor was identified early in the AR&C Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proximity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. A ground demonstration of the entire system and software was successfully tested. Advances in both video and signal processing technologies and the lessons learned from the two successful flight experiments provided a baseline for the development, by the MSFC, of a new generation of video based rendezvous sensor. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AGS) has greatly increased performance and additional capability for longer-range operation with a new target designed as a direct replacement for existing ISS hemispherical reflectors.

  18. Q-Learning and p-persistent CSMA based rendezvous protocol for cognitive radio networks operating with shared spectrum activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Clifton L.; Biswas, Subir

    2014-06-01

    With an increasing demand for spectrum, dynamic spectrum access (DSA) has been proposed as viable means for providing the flexibility and greater access to spectrum necessary to meet this demand. Within the DSA concept, unlicensed secondary users temporarily "borrow" or access licensed spectrum, while respecting the licensed primary user's rights to that spectrum. As key enablers for DSA, cognitive radios (CRs) are based on software-defined radios which allow them to sense, learn, and adapt to the spectrum environment. These radios can operate independently and rapidly switch channels. Thus, the initial setup and maintenance of cognitive radio networks are dependent upon the ability of CR nodes to find each other, in a process known as rendezvous, and create a link on a common channel for the exchange of data and control information. In this paper, we propose a novel rendezvous protocol, known as QLP, which is based on Q-learning and the p-persistent CSMA protocol. With the QLP protocol, CR nodes learn which channels are best for rendezvous and thus adapt their behavior to visit those channels more frequently. We demonstrate through simulation that the QLP protocol provides a rendevous capability for DSA environments with different dynamics of PU activity, while attempting to achieve the following performance goals: (1) minimize the average time-to-rendezvous, (2) maximize system throughput, (3) minimize primary user interference, and (4) minimize collisions among CR nodes.

  19. Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, Linda L.; Howard, Richard T.; Johnston, A. S.; Carrington, Connie; Mitchell, Jennifer D.; Cryan, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success ofthe Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-Ioop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of "pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL

  20. Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, L.; Johnston, A.; Howard, R.; Mitchell, J.; Cryan, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-loop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of"pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL

  1. Mars Orbit Rendezvous Strategy for the Mars 2003/2005 Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAmario, Louis A.; Bollman, Willard E.; Lee, Wayne J.; Roncoli, Ralph B.; Smith, John C.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of the Mars 2003/2005 Sample Return Project is to return Martian surface materials to Earth from two different sites by the year 2008. The baseline mission plan relies heavily on the use of a Mars orbit rendezvous strategy similar to the lunar orbit rendezvous scheme used for the Apollo missions. The 2003 mission consists of a single spacecraft comprised of a Lander, Rover, and Mars ascent vehicle (MAV). The 2003 mission will be launched on a Delta-III-class launch vehicle in May/June 2003 and arrive at Mars in December 2003/January 2004. The Lander deploys the Rover to collect surface samples from several sites and return them to the Lander where they are transferred to a sample canister onboard the MAV. The MAV is launched into a low Mars orbit (targeted for 600 km circular, 45 deg inclination) and releases the sample canister to await retrieval by an Orbiter launched in 2005. (The sample canister is a passive vehicle with no maneuvering capability.) The duration of Mars surface operations is at most about 90 days. The 2005 mission consists of two separate spacecraft: a Lander/Rover/MAV spacecraft identical to that used for the 2003 mission and an Orbiter carrying an Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV). Both spacecraft will be launched on a single Ariane-5 in August 2005 and arrive at Mars in July/August 2006. A second sample canister is delivered to Mars orbit using the same scenario as was used for the 2003 mission. The Orbiter uses aerocapture for insertion into Mars orbit (targeted for 250 x 1400 km, 45 deg inclination). During its approximately one-year stay at Mars, the Orbiter will search for and attempt to rendezvous first with the 2003 sample canister and then with the 2005 sample canister. After retrieval, each sample canister is transferred to the EEV. The Orbiter departs Mars in July 2007 and returns to Earth in October 2008 on a trajectory targeted for landing at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR). After deploying the EEV, the

  2. Model analysis of remotely controlled rendezvous and docking with display prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milgram, P.; Wewerinke, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Manual control of rendezvous and docking (RVD) of two spacecraft in low earth orbit by a remote human operator is discussed. Experimental evidence has shown that control performance degradation for large transmission delays (between spacecraft and operations control center) can be substantially improved by the introduction of predictor displays. An intial Optimal Control Model (OCM) analysis of RVD translational and rotational perturbation control was performed, with emphasis placed on the predictive capabilities of the combined Kalman estimator/optimal predictor with respect to control performance, for a range of time delays, motor noise levels and tracking axes. OCM predictions are then used as a reference for comparing tracking performance with a simple predictor display, as well as with no display prediction at all. Use is made here of an imperfect internal model formulation, whereby it is assumed that the human operator has no knowledge of the system transmission delay.

  3. Autonomous rendezvous and docking: A commercial approach to on-orbit technology validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchoryk, Peter, Jr.; Whitten, Raymond P.

    1991-01-01

    SpARC, in conjunction with its corporate affiliates, is planning an on-orbit validation of autonomous rendezvous and docking (ARD) technology. The emphasis in this program is to utilize existing technology and commercially available components wherever possible. The primary subsystems to be validated by this demonstration include GPS receivers for navigation, a video-based sensor for proximity operations, a fluid connector mechanism to demonstrate fluid resupply capability, and a compliant, single-point docking mechanism. The focus for this initial experiment will be ELV based and will make use of two residual Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) service modules. The first COMET spacecraft will be launched in late 1992 and will serve as the target vehicle. After the second COMET spacecraft has been launched in late 1994, the ARD demonstration will take place. The service module from the second COMET will serve as the chase vehicle.

  4. Report of the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In October 1992, Russia and the U.S. agreed to conduct a fundamentally new program of human cooperation in space. This original 'Shuttle-Mir' project encompassed combined astronaut-cosmonaut activities on the Shuttle, Soyuz, and Mir spacecraft. At that time, the project was limited to: the STS-60 Shuttle mission, which was completed in February 1994 and carried the first Russian cosmonaut; the planned March 1995 Soyuz 18 launch which will carry a U.S. astronaut to the Mir space station for a three month mission; and the STS-71 Shuttle mission which is scheduled to rendezvous and dock with the Mir space station in June 1995. The Task Force's specific recommendations are given.

  5. Development of an autonomous video rendezvous and docking system, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Richardson, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    The critical elements of an autonomous video rendezvous and docking system were built and used successfully in a physical laboratory simulation. The laboratory system demonstrated that a small, inexpensive electronic package and a flight computer of modest size can analyze television images to derive guidance information for spacecraft. In the ultimate application, the system would use a docking aid consisting of three flashing lights mounted on a passive target spacecraft. Television imagery of the docking aid would be processed aboard an active chase vehicle to derive relative positions and attitudes of the two spacecraft. The demonstration system used scale models of the target spacecraft with working docking aids. A television camera mounted on a 6 degree of freedom (DOF) simulator provided imagery of the target to simulate observations from the chase vehicle. A hardware video processor extracted statistics from the imagery, from which a computer quickly computed position and attitude. Computer software known as a Kalman filter derived velocity information from position measurements.

  6. Optimal Control for a Cooperative Rendezvous Between Two Spacecraft from Determined Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weiming; Han, Liping; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Di; Yang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    The mathematical model of a far-distance cooperative rendezvous between two spacecraft in a non-Keplerian orbit was established. Approximate global optimization was performed by a type of hybrid algorithm consisting of particle swarm optimization and differential evolution. In this process, the double-fitness function was established according to the objective function and the constraints; the double-fitness function was used to enable a better choice between the solutions obtained by the two algorithms at every iteration. In addition, the costate variables obtained were set as the initial values of the sequential quadratic programming to greatly increase the possibility of finding the approximate global optimal solution. After performing the calculations and simulations, it was concluded that the fuel required for orbiting was not influenced by the initial positions of the two spacecraft if the initial orbits of the two spacecraft were determined. However, the time consumption is strongly influenced in this situation.

  7. Rendezvous strategy impacts on CTV avionics design, system reliability requirements, and available collision avoidance maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, William J.; Davis, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Rockwell International is conducting an ongoing program to develop avionics architectures that provide high intrinsic value while meeting all mission objectives. Studies are being conducted to determine alternative configurations that have low life-cycle cost and minimum development risk, and that minimize launch delays while providing the reliability level to assure a successful mission. This effort is based on four decades of providing ballistic missile avionics to the United States Air Force and has focused on the requirements of the NASA Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) program in 1991. During the development of architectural concepts it became apparent that rendezvous strategy issues have an impact on the architecture of the avionics system. This is in addition to the expected impact on propulsion and electrical power duration, flight profiles, and trajectory during approach.

  8. Rendezvous strategy impacts on CTV avionics design, system reliability requirements, and available collision avoidance maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, William J.; Davis, John E.

    Rockwell International is conducting an ongoing program to develop avionics architectures that provide high intrinsic value while meeting all mission objectives. Studies are being conducted to determine alternative configurations that have low life-cycle cost and minimum development risk, and that minimize launch delays while providing the reliability level to assure a successful mission. This effort is based on four decades of providing ballistic missile avionics to the United States Air Force and has focused on the requirements of the NASA Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) program in 1991. During the development of architectural concepts it became apparent that rendezvous strategy issues have an impact on the architecture of the avionics system. This is in addition to the expected impact on propulsion and electrical power duration, flight profiles, and trajectory during approach.

  9. Robust adaptive backstepping neural networks control for spacecraft rendezvous and docking with input saturation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kewei; Huo, Wei

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a robust adaptive neural networks control strategy for spacecraft rendezvous and docking with the coupled position and attitude dynamics under input saturation. Backstepping technique is applied to design a relative attitude controller and a relative position controller, respectively. The dynamics uncertainties are approximated by radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs). A novel switching controller consists of an adaptive neural networks controller dominating in its active region combined with an extra robust controller to avoid invalidation of the RBFNNs destroying stability of the system outside the neural active region. An auxiliary signal is introduced to compensate the input saturation with anti-windup technique, and a command filter is employed to approximate derivative of the virtual control in the backstepping procedure. Globally uniformly ultimately bounded of the relative states is proved via Lyapunov theory. Simulation example demonstrates effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. PMID:26892402

  10. Avionic Architecture for Model Predictive Control Application in Mars Sample & Return Rendezvous Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponara, M.; Tramutola, A.; Creten, P.; Hardy, J.; Philippe, C.

    2013-08-01

    Optimization-based control techniques such as Model Predictive Control (MPC) are considered extremely attractive for space rendezvous, proximity operations and capture applications that require high level of autonomy, optimal path planning and dynamic safety margins. Such control techniques require high-performance computational needs for solving large optimization problems. The development and implementation in a flight representative avionic architecture of a MPC based Guidance, Navigation and Control system has been investigated in the ESA R&T study “On-line Reconfiguration Control System and Avionics Architecture” (ORCSAT) of the Aurora programme. The paper presents the baseline HW and SW avionic architectures, and verification test results obtained with a customised RASTA spacecraft avionics development platform from Aeroflex Gaisler.

  11. Libration point orbit rendezvous using PWPF modulated terminal sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yijun; Tang, Guojian

    2013-12-01

    The near-range rendezvous problem of two libration point orbit spacecraft in the Earth-Moon system is studied using the terminal sliding mode control which enables a time-fixed process with the flight time prescribed a priori. The underlying dynamics are the full nonlinear equations of motion for a complete Solar System model. For practical purposes, two means of pulse-width pulse-frequency (PWPF) modulation are employed to realize the theoretical continuous control with a series of thrust pulses. Extensive simulations with major errors taken into account show that the sliding mode controller can successfully guide the chaser to a given staging node with the final position and velocity errors, on average, lower than 20 m and 1 mm/s, respectively. Compared with the glideslope guidance previously studied, the proposed approach outperforms the former by saving approximately 50-60% of total delta-v.

  12. Analysis of a Linear System for Variable-Thrust Control in the Terminal Phase of Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, Richard A.; Durling, Barbara J.

    1961-01-01

    A linear system for applying thrust to a ferry vehicle in the 3 terminal phase of rendezvous with a satellite is analyzed. This system requires that the ferry thrust vector per unit mass be variable and equal to a suitable linear combination of the measured position and velocity vectors of the ferry relative to the satellite. The variations of the ferry position, speed, acceleration, and mass ratio are examined for several combinations of the initial conditions and two basic control parameters analogous to the undamped natural frequency and the fraction of critical damping. Upon making a desirable selection of one control parameter and requiring minimum fuel expenditure for given terminal-phase initial conditions, a simplified analysis in one dimension practically fixes the choice of the remaining control parameter. The system can be implemented by an automatic controller or by a pilot.

  13. Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Revised Eros Orbit Phase Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfrich, J; Miller, J. K.; Antreasian, P. G.; Carranza, E.; Williams, B. G.; Dunham, D. W.; Farquhar, R. W.; McAdams, J. V.

    1999-01-01

    Trajectory design of the orbit phase of the NEAR mission involves a new process that departs significantly from those procedures used in previous missions. In most cases, a precise spacecraft ephemeris is designed well in advance of arrival at the target body. For NEAR, the uncertainty in the dynamic environment around Eros does not allow the luxury of a precise spacecraft trajectory to be defined in advance. The principal cause of this uncertainty is the limited knowledge oi' the gravity field a,-id rotational state of Eros. As a result, the concept for the NEAR trajectory design is to define a number of rules for satisfying spacecraft, mission, and science constraints, and then apply these rules to various assumptions for the model of Eros. Nominal, high, and low Eros mass models are used for testing the trajectory design strategy and to bracket the ranges of parameter variations that are expected upon arrival at the asteroid. The final design is completed after arrival at Eros and determination of the actual gravity field and rotational state. As a result of the unplanned termination of the deep space rendezvous maneuver on December 20, 1998, the NEAR spacecraft passed within 3830 km of Eros on December 23, 1998. This flyby provided a brief glimpse of Eros, and allowed for a more accurate model of the rotational parameters and gravity field uncertainty. Furthermore, after the termination of the deep space rendezvous burn, contact with the spacecraft was lost and the NEAR spacecraft lost attitude control. During the subsequent gyrations of the spacecraft, hydrazine thruster firings were used to regain attitude control. This unplanned thruster activity used Much of the fuel margin allocated for the orbit phase. Consequently, minimizing fuel consumption is now even more important.

  14. A Summary of the Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, Docking, and Undocking (RPODU) Lessons Learned from the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Orbital Express (OE) Demonstration System Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Carpenter, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT) sponsored Dr. J. Russell Carpenter, a Navigation and Rendezvous Subject Matter Expert (SME) from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), to provide support to the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Orbital Express (OE) rendezvous and docking flight test that was conducted in 2007. When that DARPA OE mission was completed, Mr. Neil Dennehy, NASA Technical Fellow for GN&C, requested Dr. Carpenter document his findings (lessons learned) and recommendations for future rendezvous missions resulting from his OE support experience. This report captures lessons specifically from anomalies that occurred during one of OE's unmated operations.

  15. A combined open-loop and autonomous search and rendezvous navigation system for the CNES/NASA Mars Premier Orbiter mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, J. E.; Guinn, J.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, J. B.; Geller, D.; Katchmar, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper will describe the search methods to be used using the radio and optical observations, and will provide a description of the methods and performance of the autonomous onboard rendezvous navigation system.

  16. Evaluation of GPS position and attitude determination for automated rendezvous and docking missions. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diprinzio, Marc D.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    The use of the Global Positioning System for position and attitude determination is evaluated for an automated rendezvous and docking mission. The typical mission scenario involves the chaser docking with the target for resupply or repair purposes, and is divided into three sections. During the homing phase, the chaser utilizes coarse acquisition pseudorange data to approach the target; guidance laws for this stage are investigated. In the second phase, differential carrier phase positioning is utilized. The chaser must maintain a quasiconstant distance from the target, in order to resolve the initial integer ambiguities. Once the ambiguities are determined, the terminal phase is entered, and the rendezvous is completed with continuous carrier phase tracking. Attitude knowledge is maintained in all phases through the use of the carrier phase observable. A Kalman filter is utilized to estimate all states from the noisy measurement data. The effects of selective availability and cycle slips are also investigated.

  17. Aerobraking of a low L/D manned vehicle from Geo return to rendezvous with the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, J. D.; Cerimele, C. J.; Spratlin, K.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a study of the airbraking portion of the flight of an Apollo class vehicle designed for a sortie from the Orbiter to Geo and return to Leo for Orbiter retrieval are presented. An ablative heat shield would be used on the vehicle to shed velocity to speeds commensurate with Orbiter rendezvous. A reference design was selected for a spacecraft configuration with an L/D ratio of 0.3 and a weight to lift surface ratio of 236 lb/sq ft. Atmospheric guidance would consist of using the bank angle for altitude and inclination angle control and an equilibrium bank angle was defined. The vehicle would have a maximum temperature, considering a reference sphere, of 4800 F and a peak load of about 2 g. Atmospheric exit parameters were also determined, together with minimum delta-V for rendezvous.

  18. Opportunity options for rendezvous, flyby and sample return mission to different spectral-type asteroids for the 2015-2025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qiao; Pingyuan, Cui; Yamin, Wang

    2012-03-01

    The feasible rendezvous, flyby and sample return mission scenario to different spectral-type asteroids for the 2015-2025 are investigated. The emphasis is put on the potential target selection and the design of preliminary interplanetary transfer trajectory in this paper. First, according to different scientific motivations, some potential targets with different spectral-type and physical property are selected. Then, some optimal rendezvous and sample return opportunities for different spectral-type asteroids are presented by using pork-chop plots method and Sequential Quadratic-Programming (SQP) algorithm. In order to reduce the launch energy and total velocity increments for sample return mission, the Earth swingby strategy is used. In addition, the feasible trajectory profiles of flyby and rendezvous with two different spectral-type asteroids in one mission are discussed. A hybrid optimization method combing the Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm and SQP algorithm is introduced as a trajectory design method for the mission. Finally, some important parameters of transfer trajectory are analyzed, which would have a direct impact on the design of spacecraft subsystem, such as communication, power and thermal control subsystem.

  19. Two-level optimization approach for Mars orbital long-duration, large non-coplanar rendezvous phasing maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Luo, Ya-Zhong; Zhang, Jin

    2013-09-01

    A relative dynamics equation-set based on orbital element differences with J2 effects is derived, based on which a two-level approach is proposed to optimize the Mars orbital rendezvous phasing with a large difference in the initial ascending node. The up-level problem uses the revolution deviation between the target spacecraft and the chaser as the design variable, and employs a linear search to find the optimum. The low-level problem uses the maneuver revolutions, locations, and impulses as the design variables, and is solved using a hybrid genetic algorithm combined with sequential quadratic programming. To improve the solution accuracy, an iteration method is developed to satisfy the terminal constraints of the absolute numerical integration trajectory. Test cases involving Mars sample return missions with large initial node differences are presented, which show that the relative dynamics, two-level optimization model, and hybrid optimization algorithm are efficient and robust. Compared with previously published results, the total velocity increment has been further reduced by utilizing this proposed approach. It is found that a five-impulse plan requires the least quantity of propellant, and a propellant-optimal minimum rendezvous duration exists for this long-duration, large non-coplanar rendezvous problem.

  20. Fourth Report of the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On December 6, 1994, the NASA Administrator, Mr. Daniel Goldin, requested that Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, in his role as the Chairman of the NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions, lead a team composed of several Task Force members and technical advisors' to Russia with the goal of reviewing preparations and readiness for the upcoming international Space Station Phase 1 missions. In his directions to Gen. Stafford, Mr. Goldin requested that the review team focus its initial efforts on safety of flight issues for the following Phase 1A missions: the Soyuz TM-21 mission which will carry U.S. astronaut Dr. Norman Thagard and cosmonauts Lt. Col. Vladimir Dezhurov and Mr. Gennady Strekalov aboard a Soyuz spacecraft to the Mir Station; the Mir 18 Main Expedition during which Thagard and his fellow cosmonauts, Dezhurov and Strokalov, will spend approximately three months aboard the Mir Station; the STS-71 Space Shuttle mission which will perform the first Shuttle-Mir docking, carry cosmonauts Col. Anatoly SoloViev and Mr. Nikolai Budarin to the Mir Station, and return Thagard, Dezhurov, and Strekalov to Earth.

  1. The Ion Propulsion System on NASA's Space Technology 4/Champollion Comet Rendezvous Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles E.; Weiss, Jeffery M.

    1999-01-01

    The ST4/Champollion mission is designed to rendezvous with and land on the comet Tempel 1 and return data from the first-ever sampling of a comet surface. Ion propulsion is an enabling technology for this mission. The ion propulsion system on ST4 consists of three ion engines each essentially identical to the single engine that flew on the DS1 spacecraft. The ST4 propulsion system will operate at a maximum input power of 7.5 kW (3.4 times greater than that demonstrated on DS1), will produce a maximum thrust of 276 mN, and will provide a total (Delta)V of 11.4 km/s. To accomplish this the propulsion system will carry 385 kg of xenon. All three engines will be operated simultaneously for the first 168 days of the mission. The nominal mission requires that each engine be capable of processing 118 kg. If one engine fails after 168 days, the remaining two engines can perform the mission, but must be capable of processing 160 kg of xenon, or twice the original thruster design requirement. Detailed analyses of the thruster wear-out failure modes coupled with experience from long-duration engine tests indicate that the thrusters have a high probability of meeting the 160-kg throughput requirement.

  2. Endoscopic dilation of complete oesophageal obstructions with a combined antegrade-retrograde rendezvous technique

    PubMed Central

    Bertolini, Reto; Meyenberger, Christa; Putora, Paul Martin; Albrecht, Franziska; Broglie, Martina Anja; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Sulz, Michael Christian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic rendezvous technique for complete oesophageal obstruction and the swallowing outcome. METHODS: This single-centre case series includes consecutive patients who were unable to swallow due to complete oesophageal obstruction and underwent combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic dilation (CARD) within the last 10 years. The patients’ demographic characteristics, clinical parameters, endoscopic therapy, adverse events, and outcomes were obtained retrospectively. Technical success was defined as effective restoration of oesophageal patency. Swallowing success was defined as either percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG)-tube independency and/or relevant improvement of oral food intake, as assessed by the functional oral intake scale (FOIS) (≥ level 3). RESULTS: The cohort consisted of six patients [five males; mean age 71 years (range, 54-74)]. All but one patient had undergone radiotherapy for head and neck or oesophageal cancer. Technical success was achieved in five out of six patients. After discharge, repeated dilations were performed in all five patients. During follow-up (median 27 mo, range, 2-115), three patients remained PEG-tube dependent. Three of four patients achieved relevant improvement of swallowing (two patients: FOIS 6, one patient: FOIS 7). One patient developed mediastinal emphysema following CARD, without a need for surgery. CONCLUSION: The CARD technique is safe and a viable alternative to high-risk blind antegrade dilation in patients with complete proximal oesophageal obstruction. Although only half of the patients remained PEG-tube independent, the majority improved their ability to swallow. PMID:26900299

  3. Rosetta—one comet rendezvous and two asteroid fly-bys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, R.

    2009-08-01

    One of the two planetary cornerstone missions of the European Space Agency is the Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Rosetta is a rendezvous mission with a comet nucleus, which combines an Orbiter with a Lander. It will monitor the evolution of the comet nucleus and the coma as a function of increasing and decreasing solar flux input along the comet’s pre- and post-perihelion orbit. Different instrumentations will be used in parallel, from multi-wavelength spectrometry to in-situ measurements of coma and nucleus composition and physical properties. Rosetta will go in orbit around the nucleus of its target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, when it is still far from the Sun and accompany the comet along its way to perihelion and beyond. In addition the Rosetta Lander Philae will land on the nucleus surface, before the comet is too active to permit such a landing (i.e. at around r = 3 AU) and examine the surface and subsurface composition of the comet nucleus as well as its physical properties.

  4. A new terminal guidance sensor system for asteroid intercept or rendezvous missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyzhoft, Joshua; Basart, John; Wie, Bong

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the initial conceptual study results of a new terminal guidance sensor system for asteroid intercept or rendezvous missions, which explores the use of visual, infrared, and radar devices. As was demonstrated by NASA's Deep Impact mission, visual cameras can be effectively utilized for hypervelocity intercept terminal guidance for a 5 kilometer target. Other systems such as Raytheon's EKV (Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle) employ a different scheme that utilizes infrared target information to intercept ballistic missiles. Another example that uses infrared information is the NEOWISE telescope, which is used for asteroid detection and tracking. This paper describes the signal-to-noise ratio estimation problem for infrared sensors, minimum and maximum range of detection, and computational validation using GPU accelerated simulations. Small targets (50-100 m in diameter) are considered, and scaled polyhedron models of known objects, such as the Rosetta mission's Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 101,955 Bennu, target of the OSIRIS-REx mission, and asteroid 433 Eros, are utilized. A parallelized ray tracing algorithm to simulate realistic surface-to-surface shadowing of a given celestial body is developed. By using the simulated models and parameters given from the formulation of the different sensors, impact mission scenarios are used to verify the feasibility for intercepting a small target.

  5. The influence of spatial ability and experience on performance during spaceship rendezvous and docking

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yijing; Tian, Yu; Huang, Weifen; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    Manual rendezvous and docking (manual RVD) is a challenging space task for astronauts. Previous research showed a correlation between spatial ability and manual RVD skills among participants at early stages of training, but paid less attention to experts. Therefore, this study tried to explore the role of spatial ability in manual RVD skills in two groups of trainees, one relatively inexperienced and the other experienced operators. Additionally, mental rotation has been proven essential in RVD and was tested in this study among 27 male participants, 15 novices, and 12 experts. The participants performed manual RVD tasks in a high fidelity simulator. Results showed that experience moderated the relation between mental rotation ability and manual RVD performance. On one hand, novices with high mental rotation ability tended to perform that RVD task more successfully; on the other hand, experts with high mental rotation ability showed not only no performance advantage in the final stage of the RVD task, but had certain disadvantages in their earlier processes. Both theoretical and practical implications were discussed. PMID:26236252

  6. Coherent Doppler lidar for automated space vehicle rendezvous, stationkeeping and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The inherent spatial resolution of laser radar makes ladar or lidar an attractive candidate for Automated Rendezvous and Capture application. Previous applications were based on incoherent lidar techniques, requiring retro-reflectors on the target vehicle. Technology improvements (reduced size, no cryogenic cooling requirement) have greatly enhanced the construction of coherent lidar systems. Coherent lidar permits the acquisition of non-cooperative targets at ranges that are limited by the detection capability rather than by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requirements. The sensor can provide translational state information (range, velocity, and angle) by direct measurement and, when used with any array detector, also can provide attitude information by Doppler imaging techniques. Identification of the target is accomplished by scanning with a high pulse repetition frequency (dependent on the SNR). The system performance is independent of range and should not be constrained by sun angle. An initial effort to characterize a multi-element detection system has resulted in a system that is expected to work to a minimum range of 1 meter. The system size, weight and power requirements are dependent on the operating range; 10 km range requires a diameter of 3 centimeters with overall size at 3 x 3 x 15 to 30 cm, while 100 km range requires a 30 cm diameter.

  7. The applications of laser tracking and ranging technology in space rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Wenji; Gao, Limin; Zhou, Liang; Li, Dawei; Wang, Rong

    2013-09-01

    With the development of space technology, more and more Rendezvous and Docking (RVD) mission require more precise measurement of relative position and attitude between tracking spacecraft and target spacecraft. In the procedure of docking between near spacecraft , the optical retroreflector on the target Spacecraft were tracked by the laser tracking and ranging device on the tracking spacecraft , the distance data were provided by laser ranging system, and the azimuth data were provided by tracking gimbal, Synthesized the distance data and azimuth data, the relative position information between two spacecraft were provided to the target spacecraft. Furthermore, through tracking more than three point on the target spacecraft ,the complete information of relative position and attitude between two spacecraft were calculated rapidly by the measurement system,which were presented to the control system during the whole RVD operating stage. The laser tracking technology guaranteed continuous measurement and supplied accurate azimuth information, and the laser ranging technology ensured high accuracy of distance information. In addition, the untouched measure mode give no disturbance to the docking operation, moreover, the monochromaticity of laser make the tracking and ranging procedure avoiding to be disturbed by parasitic light of space, thus there will be a effective measurement accompanying the whole docking operating procedure and affording valid data to the control system of docking.

  8. Fuzzy logic techniques for rendezvous and docking of two geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Guillermo

    1995-01-01

    Large assemblings in space require the ability to manage rendezvous and docking operations. In future these techniques will be required for the gradual build up of big telecommunication platforms in the geostationary orbit. The paper discusses the use of fuzzy logic to model and implement a control system for the docking/berthing of two satellites in geostationary orbit. The system mounted in a chaser vehicle determines the actual state of both satellites and generates torques to execute maneuvers to establish the structural latching. The paper describes the proximity operations to collocate the two satellites in the same orbital window, the fuzzy guidance and navigation of the chaser approaching the target and the final Fuzzy berthing. The fuzzy logic system represents a knowledge based controller that realizes the close loop operations autonomously replacing the conventional control algorithms. The goal is to produce smooth control actions in the proximity of the target and during the docking to avoid disturbance torques in the final assembly orbit. The knowledge of the fuzzy controller consists of a data base of rules and the definitions of the fuzzy sets. The knowledge of an experienced spacecraft controller is captured into a set of rules forming the Rules Data Base.

  9. Autonomous reconfigurable GPS/INS navigation and pointing system for rendezvous and docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upadhyay, Triveni M.

    1991-01-01

    The briefing describes work using the Global Positioning System to determine position of spacecraft and the development of computer tools to utilize these position determinations to enable autonomous rendezvous. Using GPS data in conjunction with Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) provides the capability for absolute spacecraft navigation, navigation of one spacecraft relative to another, and attitude determination. Some results presented are based on limited observations, though simulation results are documented. A GPS/INS navigation flight experiment could provide a platform for evaluating approaches for autonomous operation and reconfigurability of the navigation and attitude determination subsystem for future space vehicles. Current emphasis is on the development and demonstration of an Onboard Mission Manager (OMM) and a Multi-Mode Navigation Kalman filter. Sensor data will be handed over to the OMM, which will determine the appropriate response and generate commands for the Kalman filter to use to reconfigure itself. Global Positioning System measurements and INS data will be processed in the integrated navigation filter and used to compute errors in position, velocity, and attitude. Inertial Navigation Systems instrument errors (biases, scale factors, etc.) also can be estimated. The OMM then will use a knowledge base to determine appropriate system response. The GPS is good for missions that have attitude pointing accuracy requirements within the 100 to 200 arcsecond range.

  10. Autonomous rendezvous and docking: A commercial approach to on-orbit technology validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchoryk, Peter, Jr.; Dobbs, Michael E.; Conrad, David J.; Apley, Dale J.; Whitten, Raymond P.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Automation and Robotics Center (SpARC), a NASA-sponsored Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), in conjunction with its corporate affiliates, is planning an on-orbit validation of autonomous rendezvous and docking (ARD) technology. The emphasis in this program is to utilize existing technology and commercially available components whenever possible. The primary subsystems that will be validated by this demonstration include GPS receivers for navigation, a video-based sensor for proximity operations, a fluid connector mechanism to demonstrate fluid resupply capability, and a compliant, single-point docking mechanism. The focus for this initial experiment will be expendable launch vehicle (ELV) based and will make use of two residual Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) service modules. The first COMET spacecraft will be launched in late 1992 and will serve as the target vehicle. The ARD demonstration will take place in late 1994, after the second COMET spacecraft has been launched. The service module from the second COMET will serve as the chase vehicle.

  11. Inverse simulation system for manual-controlled rendezvous and docking based on artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wanmeng; Wang, Hua; Tang, Guojin; Guo, Shuai

    2016-09-01

    The time-consuming experimental method for handling qualities assessment cannot meet the increasing fast design requirements for the manned space flight. As a tool for the aircraft handling qualities research, the model-predictive-control structured inverse simulation (MPC-IS) has potential applications in the aerospace field to guide the astronauts' operations and evaluate the handling qualities more effectively. Therefore, this paper establishes MPC-IS for the manual-controlled rendezvous and docking (RVD) and proposes a novel artificial neural network inverse simulation system (ANN-IS) to further decrease the computational cost. The novel system was obtained by replacing the inverse model of MPC-IS with the artificial neural network. The optimal neural network was trained by the genetic Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, and finally determined by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. In order to validate MPC-IS and ANN-IS, the manual-controlled RVD experiments on the simulator were carried out. The comparisons between simulation results and experimental data demonstrated the validity of two systems and the high computational efficiency of ANN-IS.

  12. The influence of spatial ability and experience on performance during spaceship rendezvous and docking.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yijing; Tian, Yu; Huang, Weifen; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    Manual rendezvous and docking (manual RVD) is a challenging space task for astronauts. Previous research showed a correlation between spatial ability and manual RVD skills among participants at early stages of training, but paid less attention to experts. Therefore, this study tried to explore the role of spatial ability in manual RVD skills in two groups of trainees, one relatively inexperienced and the other experienced operators. Additionally, mental rotation has been proven essential in RVD and was tested in this study among 27 male participants, 15 novices, and 12 experts. The participants performed manual RVD tasks in a high fidelity simulator. Results showed that experience moderated the relation between mental rotation ability and manual RVD performance. On one hand, novices with high mental rotation ability tended to perform that RVD task more successfully; on the other hand, experts with high mental rotation ability showed not only no performance advantage in the final stage of the RVD task, but had certain disadvantages in their earlier processes. Both theoretical and practical implications were discussed. PMID:26236252

  13. Three-dimensional location and attitude evaluation for rendezvous and docking operation using a single camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiling; Losito, S.; Mugnuolo, Raffaele; Pasquariello, Guido

    1993-01-01

    In the automatic rendezvous and docking manoeuvre (RVD) of space activity, determining the 3-D location and attitude between two vehicles is most important. A vision system to perform the docking manipulation in RVD is described in this paper. An improved algorithm is used for calibrating the geometric parameters of a camera fixed on the tracking vehicle off-line. Because the line-off-sight angles of four markers on the target vehicle to the lens center of the camera can be computed according to the optical principle and vector theory, the locations of the vehicle are obtained from the solution for a set of nonlinear equations from the triangular theory. The attitude angles for the vehicles are solved by a translational matrix of target frame to vehicle frame. As the vehicle closes in to the target, sets of markers having different distance intervals or a list of calibration parameters for cameras with different fields of view are selected at the proper moment to improve the situation when at least one of the markers exceeds the field of camera view. The series of experiments is given. The vision system is run on a SUN-4/330 Sparc station system equipped with one image board IT-151 and a CCD TV camera. All software is written in C language.

  14. An overview of autonomous rendezvous and docking system technology development at General Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuenzel, Fred

    1991-01-01

    The Centaur avionics suite is undergoing a dramatic modernization for the commercial, DoD Atlas and Titan programs. The system has been upgraded to the current state-of-the-art in ring laser gyro inertial sensors and Mil-Std-1750A processor technology. The Cruise Missile avionic system has similarly been evolving for many years. Integration of GPS into both systems has been underway for over five years with a follow-on cruise missile system currently in flight test. Rendezvous and Docking related studies have been conducted for over five years in support of OMV, CTV, and Advanced Upper Stages, as well as several other internal IR&D's. The avionics system and AR&D simulator demonstrated to the SATWG in November 1990 has been upgraded considerably under two IR&D programs in 1991. The Centaur modern avionics system is being flown in block upgrades which started in July of 1990. The Inertial Navigation Unit will fly in November of 1991. The Cruise Missile avionics systems have been fully tested and operationally validated in combat. The integrated AR&D system for space vehicle applications has been under development and testing since 1990. A Joint NASA / GD ARD&L System Test Program is currently being planned to validate several aspects of system performance in three different NASA test facilities in 1992.

  15. Upgrading the free flying rendezvous and docking simulator and the orbital servicer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Recommendations are made for upgrading two teleoperator/robotics test and simulation systems based upon a review of latest technology advances in the involved disciplines. A second generation Free Flying Mobility Unit is recommended which adds a sixth degree of freedom and incorporates other improvements which greatly expand the center's capability to perform evaluation tests and demonstrations of advanced systems concepts for rendezvous and docking in support of the Teleoperator Maneuvering System (TMS) Program. The Orbital Servicer System provides the capability for testing and demonstrating concepts for on orbit servicing of compatibly designed satellites/payloads. The TMS is to be the transporting vehicle for the servicer. The manipulator arm of the Orbital service System is presently computer controlled in the trajectory portion of the module transfer operation. The ultimate objective is to fully automte its operation requiring additional capabilities in sensors, artificial intelligence, image analysis, communications, computer programming, pattern recognition, kinematics, and manipulator design. It is recommended that the Electronics and Control Laboratory move to acquire the basic competencies in robotics necessary to achieve full automation.

  16. String method for calculation of minimum free-energy paths in Cartesian space in freely-tumbling systems.

    PubMed

    Branduardi, Davide; Faraldo-Gómez, José D

    2013-09-10

    The string method is a molecular-simulation technique that aims to calculate the minimum free-energy path of a chemical reaction or conformational transition, in the space of a pre-defined set of reaction coordinates that is typically highly dimensional. Any descriptor may be used as a reaction coordinate, but arguably the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms involved are the most unprejudiced and intuitive choice. Cartesian coordinates, however, present a non-trivial problem, in that they are not invariant to rigid-body molecular rotations and translations, which ideally ought to be unrestricted in the simulations. To overcome this difficulty, we reformulate the framework of the string method to integrate an on-the-fly structural-alignment algorithm. This approach, referred to as SOMA (String method with Optimal Molecular Alignment), enables the use of Cartesian reaction coordinates in freely tumbling molecular systems. In addition, this scheme permits the dissection of the free-energy change along the most probable path into individual atomic contributions, thus revealing the dominant mechanism of the simulated process. This detailed analysis also provides a physically-meaningful criterion to coarse-grain the representation of the path. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method we analyze the isomerization of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum and the chair-to-inverted-chair transition of β-D mannose in explicit water. Notwithstanding the simplicity of these systems, the SOMA approach reveals novel insights into the atomic mechanism of these isomerizations. In both cases, we find that the dynamics and the energetics of these processes are controlled by interactions involving only a handful of atoms in each molecule. Consistent with this result, we show that a coarse-grained SOMA calculation defined in terms of these subsets of atoms yields nearidentical minimum free-energy paths and committor distributions to those obtained via a highly-dimensional string. PMID

  17. Concluding Report of Free-Spinning, Tumbling, and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Ryan X-13 Airplane, Coord. No. AF-199

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1957-01-01

    An investigation has been completed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/18-scale model of the Ryan X-13 airplane to determine its spin, recovery, and tumbling characteristics, and to determine the minimum altitude from which a belly landing could be made in case of power failure in hovering flight. Model spin tests were conducted with and without simulated engine rotation. Tests without simulated engine rotation indicated two types of spins: one, a slightly oscillatory flat spin; and the other, a violently oscillatory spin. Tests with simulated engine rotation indicated that spins to the left were fast rotating and steep and those to the right were slow rotating and flat. The optimum technique for recovery is reversal of the rudder to against the spin and simultaneous movement of the ailerons to full with the spin followed by movement of the elevators to neutral after the spin rotation ceases. Tumbling tests made on the model indicated that although the Ryan X-13 airplane will not tumble in the ordinary sense (end-over-end pitching motion), it may instead tend to enter a wild gyrating'motion. Tests made to simulate power failure in hovering flight by dropping the model indicated that the model entered what appeared to be a right spin. An attempt should be made to stop this motion immediately by moving the rudder to oppose the rotation (left pedal), moving the ailerons to with the spin (stick right), and moving the stick forward after the spin rotation ceases to obtain flying speed for pullout. The minimum altitude required for a belly landing in case of power failure in hovering flight was indicated to be about 4,200 feet.

  18. Proximity Operations for Space Situational Awareness Spacecraft Rendezvous and Maneuvering using Numerical Simulations and Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, T.; Langster, T.; Carrico, J.; Alfano, S.; Loucks, M.; Vallado, D.

    The authors present several spacecraft rendezvous and close proximity maneuvering techniques modeled with a high-precision numerical integrator using full force models and closed loop control with a Fuzzy Logic intelligent controller to command the engines. The authors document and compare the maneuvers, fuel use, and other parameters. This paper presents an innovative application of an existing capability to design, simulate and analyze proximity maneuvers; already in use for operational satellites performing other maneuvers. The system has been extended to demonstrate the capability to develop closed loop control laws to maneuver spacecraft in close proximity to another, including stand-off, docking, lunar landing and other operations applicable to space situational awareness, space based surveillance, and operational satellite modeling. The fully integrated end-to-end trajectory ephemerides are available from the authors in electronic ASCII text by request. The benefits of this system include: A realistic physics-based simulation for the development and validation of control laws A collaborative engineering environment for the design, development and tuning of spacecraft law parameters, sizing actuators (i.e., rocket engines), and sensor suite selection. An accurate simulation and visualization to communicate the complexity, criticality, and risk of spacecraft operations. A precise mathematical environment for research and development of future spacecraft maneuvering engineering tasks, operational planning and forensic analysis. A closed loop, knowledge-based control example for proximity operations. This proximity operations modeling and simulation environment will provide a valuable adjunct to programs in military space control, space situational awareness and civil space exploration engineering and decision making processes.

  19. Coherent Doppler lidar for automated space vehicle, rendezvous, station-keeping and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkin, James A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in eye-safe, short wavelength solid-state lasers offer real potential for the development of compact, reliable, light-weight, efficient coherent lidar. Laser diode pumping of these devices has been demonstrated, thereby eliminating the need for flash lamp pumping, which has been a major drawback to the use of these lasers in space based applications. Also these lasers now have the frequency stability required to make them useful in coherent lidar, which offers all of the advantages of non-coherent lidar, but with the additional advantage that direct determination of target velocity is possible by measurement of the Doppler shift. By combining the Doppler velocity measurement capability with the inherent high angular resolution and range accuracy of lidar it is possible to construct Doppler images of targets for target motion assessment. A coherent lidar based on a Tm,Ho:YAG 2-micrometer wavelength laser was constructed and successfully field tested on atmospheric targets in 1990. This lidar incorporated an all solid state (laser diode pumped) master oscillator, in conjunction with a flash lamp pumped slave oscillator. Solid-state laser technology is rapidly advancing, and with the advent of high efficiency, high power, semiconductor laser diodes as pump sources, all-solid-state, coherent lidars are a real possibility in the near future. MSFC currently has a feasibility demonstration effort under way which will involve component testing, and preliminary design of an all-solid-state, coherent lidar for automatic rendezvous, and capture. This two year effort, funded by the Director's Discretionary Fund is due for completion in 1992.

  20. A Prediction Method of TV Camera Image for Space Manual-control Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Huang; Qing, Yang; Wenrui, Wu

    Space manual-control rendezvous and docking (RVD) is a key technology for accomplishing the RVD mission in manned space engineering, especially when automatic control system is out of work. The pilot on chase spacecraft manipulates the hand-stick by the image of target spacecraft captured by TV camera. From the TV image, the relative position and attitude of chase and target spacecrafts can be shown. Therefore, the size, the position, the brightness and the shadow of the target on TV camera are key to guarantee the success of manual-control RVD. A method of predicting the on-orbit TV camera image at different relative positions and light conditions during the process of RVD is discussed. Firstly, the basic principle of capturing the image of cross drone on target spacecraft by TV camera is analyzed theoretically, based which the strategy of manual-control RVD is discussed in detail. Secondly, the relationship between the displayed size or position and the real relative distance of chase and target spacecrafts is presented, the brightness and reflection by the target spacecraft at different light conditions are decribed, the shadow on cross drone caused by the chase or target spacecraft is analyzed. Thirdly, a prediction method of on-orbit TV camera images at certain orbit and light condition is provided, and the characteristics of TV camera image during the RVD is analyzed. Finally, the size, the position, the brightness and the shadow of target spacecraft on TV camera image at typical orbit is simulated. The result, by comparing the simulated images with the real images captured by the TV camera on Shenzhou manned spaceship , shows that the prediction method is reasonable

  1. Rendezvous, Landing and Sample Return Mission to Jupiter Trojans by the Solar Power Sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Hajime; Matsuura, Shuji; Mori, Osamu; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Sekine, Yasuhito; Abe, Shinsuke

    JAXA/ISAS has been preparing for the Solar Power Sail mission, Japan’s first outer planet region exploration. Its precursor was successfully realized by IKAROS, the world's first deep space solar sail spacecraft, in 2010 between the Earth and Venus orbits. The Solar Power Sail is defined primarily as a technology demonstration mission; yet it will also present game-changing opportunities for both space astronomy and solar system exploration. The former will benefit the cruising operation, which will enable ”dust free” infrared astronomy beyond the cocoon of the zodiacal light to search for the first generation light of the Universe. Interplanetary-long baseline will allow gamma-ray burst observation to identify their source locations much more precise than ever. As for solar system exploration, the Solar Power Sail, which is not depended upon RTG technology, will offer the world's first possibility of rendezvous, landing and sample return from the outer planet region, i.e., in the Jupiter region and beyond. With this technology, we are aiming to visit Jupiter Trojan asteroids, one of the last uncharted frontiers of the Solar System. Jupiter Trojans may hold fundamental clues of the Solar System formation and revolution discussed by two competing hypotheses between the classic model and the planetary migration model. The former suggests that Trojan asteroids are mainly survivors of building blocks of the Jupiter system, while the latter claims that they must be intruders from outer regions after the planetary migration of gas planets settled. This paper outlines scientific objectives of Jupiter Trojan exploration, its mission design and major aspects of the spacecraft system, nature of candidate target asteroids, in-situ observation and lander instruments including optical camera, imaging spectrometer, high-resolution TOF mass spectrometer, and large-area dust counter, together with a strategy of the sample return option from the surface of a Trojan asteroid.

  2. A new way in intelligent recognition improves control accuracy and efficiency for spacecrafts' rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, JiaQing; Lu, Yaodong; Wang, JiaFa

    2013-08-01

    Spacecrafts rendezvous and docking (RVD) by human or autonomous control is a complicated and difficult problem especially in the final approach stage. Present control methods have their key technology weakness. It is a necessary, important and difficult step for RVD through human's aiming chaser spacecraft at target spacecraft in a coaxial line by a three-dimension bulge cross target. At present, there is no technology to quantify the alignment in image recognition direction. We present a new practical autonomous method to improve the accuracy and efficiency of RVD control by adding image recognition algorithm instead of human aiming and control. Target spacecraft has a bulge cross target which is designed for chaser spacecraft's aiming accurately and have two center points, one is a plate surface center point(PSCP), another is a bulge cross center point(BCCP), while chaser spacecraft has a monitoring ruler cross center point(RCCP) of the video telescope optical system for aiming . If the three center points are coincident at the monitoring image, the two spacecrafts keep aligning which is suitable for closing to docking. Using the trace spacecraft's video telescope optical system to acquire the real-time monitoring image of the target spacecraft's bulge cross target. Appling image processing and intelligent recognition algorithm to get rid of interference source to compute the three center points' coordinate and exact digital offset of two spacecrafts' relative position and attitude real-timely, which is used to control the chaser spacecraft pneumatic driving system to change the spacecraft attitude in six direction: up, down, front, back, left, right, pitch, drift and roll precisely. This way is also practical and economical because it needs not adding any hardware, only adding the real-time image recognition software into spacecrafts' present video system. It is suitable for autonomous control and human control.

  3. Rendezvous with Toutatis from the Moon: The Chang'e-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Tang, X.; Meng, L.

    2014-07-01

    Chang'e-2 probe was the second lunar probe of China, with the main objectives to demonstrate some key features of the new lunar soft landing technology, and its applications to future exploration missions. After completing the planned mission successfully, Chang'e-2 flew away from the Moon and entered into the interplanetary space. Later, at a distance of 7 million km from the Earth, Chang'e-2 encountered asteroid (4179) Toutatis with a very close fly-by distance and obtained colorful images with a 3-m resolution. Given some surplus velocity increment as well as the promotion of autonomous flight ability and improvement of control, propulsion, and thermal systems in the initial design, Chang'e-2 had the capabilities necessary for escaping from the Moon. By taking advantage of the unique features of the Lagrangian point, the first close fly-by of asteroid Toutatis was realized despite the tight constraints of propellant allocation, spacecraft-Earth communication, and coordination of execution sequences. Chang'e-2 realized the Toutatis flyby with a km-level distance at closest approach. In the absence of direct measurement method, based on the principle of relative navigation and through the use of the sequence of target images, we calculated the rendezvous parameters such as relative distance and image resolution. With the help of these parameters, some fine and new scientific discoveries about the asteroid were obtained by techniques of optical measurements and image processing. Starting with an innovative design, followed by high-fidelity testing and demonstration, elaborative implementation, and optimal usage of residual propellant, Chang'e-2 has for the first time successfully explored the Moon, L2 point and an asteroid, while achieving the purpose of 'faster, better, cheaper'. What Chang'e-2 has accomplished was far beyond our expectations. *J. Huang is the chief designer (PI) of Chang'e-2 probe, planned Chang'e-2's multi-objective and multitasking exploration

  4. Fifth Report of the NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking missions examine a number of specific issues related to the Shuttle-Mir program. Three teams composed of Task Force members and technical advisors were formed to address the follow issues: preliminary results from STS-71 and the status of preparations for STS-74; NASA's presence in Russia; and NASA's automated data processing and telecommunications (ADP/T) infrastructure in Russia. The three review team reports have been included in the fifth report of the Task Force.

  5. Application of solar electric propulsion to comet and asteroid rendezvous and docking /CARD/ missions with sample return.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odom, P. R.; Cikanek, H. A.; Allen, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    Summary of a feasibility study of CARD mission/system concepts for comet Encke and asteroid Eros missions in the late 1970s. A common planetary vehicle employing a modular SEP (solar electric propulsion) system and a direct rendezvous/docking mode with a staged science/sampling module appears feasible based on 1973 technology. The SEP system utilizes 3.5-kW, 3500-sec Isp mercury ion thrusters and rollout solar arrays sized at 36 (Encke) and 13 (Eros) kW based on the Titan III family launch vehicles. Science payloads, sampling concepts, and supporting spacecraft subsystems are defined. Problem areas are identified, and programmatic considerations are discussed.

  6. NASA's Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensor Development and Its Applicability to the GER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Cryan, Scott; DSouza, Christopher; Strube, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper will address how a common Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensor suite can support Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) missions, and discuss how the model of common capability development to support multiple missions can enable system capability level partnerships and further GER objectives. NASA has initiated efforts to develop AR&D/C sensors, that are directly applicable to GER. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a three-dimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. NASA's AR&D/C sensor development path could benefit the International Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) and support the GER mission scenario by providing a common sensor suite upon which GER objectives could be achieved while

  7. Guidance Algorithms for Non-Drifting Trajectory Generation and Control in RendezVous Missions into Elliptical Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiSotto, Emanuele; Bastante, Juan Carlos; Drai, Remi

    2007-01-01

    Safety requirement represents one of the most critical aspect when defining the operational profile for a RendezVous mission. This requirement specially affects the design of the guidance algorithms that need to be tailored to guarantee what is normally referred to as Passive Trajectory Protection . The basic idea of passive trajectory protection is to design all the trajectory elements in an approach sequence such that if, at any point of the trajectory, thrust control ceases, the resulting free drift motion will remain collision free during a certain amount of time. This paper deals with the design and performances assessment of specific guidance algorithm addressing this issue. Firstly the problem is addressed for circular orbit using the Traveling Ellipse formulation for the relative motion. Secondly a solution for the RendezVous into a generic elliptical orbit is presented. This is based on a reduced transition matrix obtained through a description of the relative motion based on the first order variation of the orbital elements.

  8. An Investigation of Multipath Effects on the GPS System During Auto-Rendezvous and Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richie, James E.; Forest, Francis W.

    1995-01-01

    The proposed use of a Cargo Transport Vehicle (CTV) to carry hardware to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) during the construction phase of the SSF project requires remote maneuvering of the CTV. The CTV is not a manned vehicle. Obtaining the relative positions of the CTV and SSF for remote auto-rendezvous and capture (AR&C) scenarios will rely heavily on the Global Positioning System (GPS). The GPS system is expected to guide the CTV up to a distance of 100 to 300 meters from the SSF. At some point within this range, an optical docking system will take over the remote guidance for capture. During any remote guidance by GPS it is possible that significant multipath signals may be caused by large objects in the vicinity of the module being remotely guided. This could alter the position obtained by the GPS system from the actual position. Due to the nature of the GPS signals, it has been estimated that if the difference in distance between the Line of Sight (LOS) path and the multipath is greater than 300 meters, the GPS system is capable of discriminating between the direct signal and the reflected (or multipath) signal. However, if the path difference is less than 300 meters, one must be concerned. This report details the work accomplished by the Electromagnetic Simulations Laboratory at Marquette University over the period December 1993 to May 1995. This work is an investigation of the strength and phase of a multipath signal arriving at the CTV relative to the direct or line of sight (LOS) signal. The signal originates at a GPS satellite in half geo-stationary orbit and takes two paths to the CTV: (1) the direct or LOS path from the GPS satellite to the CTV; and (2) a scattered path from the GPS satellite to the SSF module and then to the CTV. The scattering from a cylinder has been computed using the physical optics approximation for the current. No other approximations or assumptions have been made including no assumptions regarding the far field or Fresnel field

  9. Laser rangefinder for the near-earth asteroid rendezvous (NEAR) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Timothy D.; Boies, Mark T.; El-Dinary, Ashruf S.; Reiter, R. Alan; Rodriguez, Daniel E.; Heins, Robert J.; Le, Binh Q.; Moore, Robert C.; Grote, Michael G.; Culpepper, Charles; Stillman, Lee

    1995-12-01

    The near-earth asteroid rendezvous (NEAR) mission is the first of the NASA discovery programs. Discovery-class programs emphasize small, low-cost, quick turnaround space missions that provide significant science returns. The NEAR spacecraft and ground control system are currently being developed and tested at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). The NEAR spacecraft will orbit, 433 Eros, possibly the most studied of the near-Earth asteroids. Subsequent to a 3-year cruise, the NEAR spacecraft is inserted into a 50-km-altitude orbit about Eros for 1 year to permit data collection in the infrared, visible, x-ray and gamma-ray regions. One instrument, the NEAR laser rangefinder (NLR), will provide altimetry data useful in characterizing the geophysical nature of Eros. In addition, ranging data from the NLR will support navigation functions associated with spacecraft station-keeping and orbit maintenance. The NLR instrument uniquely applies several technologies for use in space. Our configuration uses a direct-detection, bistatic design employing a gallium arsenide (GaAs) diode-pumped Cr:Nd:YAG laser for the 1.064-micrometer transmitter and an enhanced-silicon avalanche-photodiode (APD) detector for the receiver. Transmitter pulse energy provides the required signal-to-noise power ratio, SNRp, for reliable operation at 50 km. The selected APD exhibited low noise, setting the level achievable for noise equivalent power, NEP, by the receiver. The lithium-niobate (LiNbO3) Q-switched transmitter emits 12-ns pulses at 15.3 mJ/pulse, permitting reliable NLR operation beyond the required 50-km altitude. Cavity aperturing and a 9.3X Galilean telescope reduce beam divergence for high spatial sampling of Eros's surface. Our receiver design is an f/3.4 Dall-Kirkham Cassegrain with a 7.62-cm clear aperture -- we emphasized receiver aperture area, Arx, over transmitter power, Pt, in our design based on the range advantage attainable according to the simplified range equation, Rmax

  10. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  11. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-ray and Gamma-ray Spectrometer (XGRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  12. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  13. Ground assisted rendezvous with geosynchronous satellites for the disposal of space debris by means of Earth-oriented tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chobotov, Vladimir; Melamed, Nahum; Ailor, William H.; Campbell, W. Spencer

    2009-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that extended length Earth-oriented tethers in the geosynchronous (GEO) region can be used to re-orbit satellites to disposal orbits. One such approach involves the extension of a GEO based tether, collection of a debris object, and retraction of the tether, which transfers the retracted configuration to a higher energy orbit for debris disposal. The re-extension of the tether after debris disposal returns the configuration to the near-GEO altitude. The practical feasibility of such a system depends on the ability to collect GEO debris objects, attach them to a deployed tether system, and retract the tethers for transfer to the disposal orbits. This study addresses the collection and delivery of debris objects to the deployed tether system in GEO. The investigation considers the number, type and the characteristics of the debris objects as well as the collection tug that can be ground controlled to detect, rendezvous and dock with the debris objects for their delivery to the tethers system. A total of more than 400 objects are in drift orbits crossing all longitudes either below or above the geostationary radius. More than 130 objects are also known to librate around the stable points in GEO with periods of libration up to five or more years. A characterization of the position and velocity of the debris objects relative to the collection tug is investigated. Typical rendezvous performance requirements for uncooperative GEO satellites are examined, and the similarities with other approaches such as the ESA's CX-OLEV commercial mission proposal to extend the life of geostationary telecommunication satellites are noted.

  14. Electron Spin Relaxation Rates for Semiquinones between 25 and 295 K in Glass-Forming Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Kathirvelu, Velavan; Sato, Hideo; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2009-01-01

    Electron spin lattice relaxation rates for five semiquinones (2,5-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,5-di-t-amyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,5-di-phenyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,6-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, tetrahydroxy-1,4-benzosemiquione) were studied by long-pulse saturation recovery EPR in 1:4 glycerol:ethanol, 1:1 glycerol:ethanol, and triethanolamine between 25 and 295 K. Although the dominant process changes with temperature, relaxation rates vary smoothly with temperature, even near the glass transition temperatures, and could be modeled as the sum of contributions that have the temperature dependence that is predicted for the direct, Raman, local mode and tumbling dependent processes. At 85 K, which is in a temperature range where the Raman process dominates, relaxation rates along the gxx (g~2.006) and gyy (g~2.005) axes are about 2.7 to 1.5 times faster than along the gzz axis (g = 2.0023). In highly viscous triethanolamine, contributions from tumbling-dependent processes are negligible. At temperatures above 100 K relaxation rates in triethanolamine are unchanged between X-band (9.5 GHz) and Q-band (34 GHz), so the process that dominates in this temperature interval was assigned as a local mode rather than a thermally-activated process. Because the largest proton hyperfine couplings are only 2.2 G, spin rotation makes a larger contribution than tumbling-dependent modulation of hyperfine anisotropy. Since g anisotropy is small, tumbling dependent modulation of g anisotropy make a smaller contribution than spin rotation at X-band. Although there was negligible impact of methyl rotation on T1, rotation of t-butyl or t-amyl methyl groups enhances spin echo dephasing between 85 and 150 K. PMID:19223213

  15. Magnetometer-Only Attitude and Rate Estimates for Spinning Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challa, M.; Natanson, G.; Ottenstein, N.

    2000-01-01

    A deterministic algorithm and a Kalman filter for gyroless spacecraft are used independently to estimate the three-axis attitude and rates of rapidly spinning spacecraft using only magnetometer data. In-flight data from the Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) during its tumble, and the Fast Auroral Snapshot Explorer (FAST) during its nominal mission mode are used to show that the algorithms can successfully estimate the above in spite of the high rates. Results using simulated data are used to illustrate the importance of accurate and frequent data.

  16. Mechanisms and Rates of Bacterial Colonization of Sinking Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Ploug, Helle; Tang, Kam

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying the rate at which bacteria colonize aggregates is a key to understanding microbial turnover of aggregates. We used encounter models based on random walk and advection-diffusion considerations to predict colonization rates from the bacteria's motility patterns (swimming speed, tumbling frequency, and turn angles) and the hydrodynamic environment (stationary versus sinking aggregates). We then experimentally tested the models with 10 strains of bacteria isolated from marine particles: two strains were nonmotile; the rest were swimming at 20 to 60 μm s−1 with different tumbling frequency (0 to 2 s−1). The rates at which these bacteria colonized artificial aggregates (stationary and sinking) largely agreed with model predictions. We report several findings. (i) Motile bacteria rapidly colonize aggregates, whereas nonmotile bacteria do not. (ii) Flow enhances colonization rates. (iii) Tumbling strains colonize aggregates enriched with organic substrates faster than unenriched aggregates, while a nontumbling strain did not. (iv) Once on the aggregates, the bacteria may detach and typical residence time is about 3 h. Thus, there is a rapid exchange between attached and free bacteria. (v) With the motility patterns observed, freely swimming bacteria will encounter an aggregate in <1 day at typical upper-ocean aggregate concentrations. This is faster than even starving bacteria burn up their reserves, and bacteria may therefore rely solely on aggregates for food. (vi) The net result of colonization and detachment leads to a predicted equilibrium abundance of attached bacteria as a function of aggregate size, which is markedly different from field observations. This discrepancy suggests that inter- and intraspecific interactions among bacteria and between bacteria and their predators may be more important than colonization in governing the population dynamics of bacteria on natural aggregates. PMID:12147501

  17. Detection of nano-second internal motion and determination of overall tumbling times independent of the time scale of internal motion in proteins from NMR relaxation data.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Göran; Martinez, Gary; Schleucher, Jürgen; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2003-12-01

    The usual analysis of (15)N relaxation data of proteins is straightforward as long as the assumption can be made that the backbone of most residues only undergoes fast (ps), small amplitude internal motions. If this assumption cannot be made, as for example for proteins which undergo domain motions or for unfolded or partially folded proteins, one needs a method to establish for each residue whether it undergoes fast (ps) or slow (ns) internal motion. Even then it is impossible to determine the correct overall tumbling time, tau(m)(0), via the usual method from the ratio of the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times, if the majority of residues do not undergo fast, small amplitude internal motions. The latter problem is solved when tau(m)(0) can be determined independent of the time scale, tau(i), or the amplitude, S(2), of the internal motion. We propose a new protocol, called PINATA, for analyzing (15)N relaxation data acquired at minimally two field strengths, where no a priori assumption about time scales or amplitude of internal motions needs to be made, and overall tumbling can either be isotropic or anisotropic. The protocol involves four steps. First, for each residue, it is detected whether it undergoes ps- or ns-internal motion, via the combination of the ratio of the longitudinal relaxation time at two fields and the hetero-nuclear NOE. Second, for each residue tau(m)(0) and the exchange broadening, Rex, are iteratively determined. The accuracy of the determination of tau(m)(0) is ca. +/-0.5 ns and of Rex ca +/- 0.7 s(-1), when the relaxation data are of good quality and tau(m)(0)>5 ns, S(2)>0.3, and tau(i)< approximately 3 ns. Third, given tau(m)(0) and Rex, step 1 is repeated to iteratively improve on the internal motion and obtain better estimates of the internal parameter values. Fourth, final time scales and amplitudes for internal motions are determined via grid search based fitting and chi(2)-analysis. The protocol was successfully tested on

  18. Free-Spinning, Longitudinal-Trim, and Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultke MX-813 (Prototype of XP-92) Airplane as Determined in the Langley 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Ralph W., Jr.; White, Richard P.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to evaluate the spin, longitudinal-trim, and tumbling characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee MX-813 airplane. The effects of control position were determined for the model ballasted to represent the airplane in its design gross weight loading. The model, in general, would not spin but demonstrated a tendency to trim at very high stalled angles of attack. Static tests substantiated the dynamic tests as regards the trim characteristics. Movement of the elevator, however, from up to slightly down was effective in pitching the model from stalled to normal trim attitudes. The model would not tumble.

  19. RendezVous sensor for automatic guidance of transfer vehicles to ISS concept of the operational modes depending on actual optical and geometrical-dynamical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Bettina G.; Kolk, Karl-Hermann

    2000-10-01

    Based on an ATV RendezVous Predevelopment Program initiated by ESTEC, an automatically operating Rendez Vous Sensor has been developed. The sensor--a Scanning Tele-Goniometer--shall guide docking and retreat of the European Automatic Transfer Vehicle as well as berthing and retreat of the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle. The sensor performance will be strongly connected with the properties of cooperative targets, consisting of an arrangement of retro reflectors mounted on ISS each.

  20. The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) and Closed-Loop Hardware Testing for Orion Rendezvous System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milenkovic, Zoran; DSouza, Christopher; Huish, David; Bendle, John; Kibler, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The exploration goals of Orion / MPCV Project will require a mature Rendezvous, Proximity Operations and Docking (RPOD) capability. Ground testing autonomous docking with a next-generation sensor such as the Vision Navigation Sensor (VNS) is a critical step along the path of ensuring successful execution of autonomous RPOD for Orion. This paper will discuss the testing rationale, the test configuration, the test limitations and the results obtained from tests that have been performed at the Lockheed Martin Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) to evaluate and mature the Orion RPOD system. We will show that these tests have greatly increased the confidence in the maturity of the Orion RPOD design, reduced some of the latent risks and in doing so validated the design philosophy of the Orion RPOD system. This paper is organized as follows: first, the objectives of the test are given. Descriptions of the SOSC facility, and the Orion RPOD system and associated components follow. The details of the test configuration of the components in question are presented prior to discussing preliminary results of the tests. The paper concludes with closing comments.

  1. Coordinated Radio, Electron, and Waves Experiment (CREWE) for the NASA Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, Jack D.

    1992-01-01

    The Coordinated Radio, Electron, and Waves Experiment (CREWE) was designed to determine density, bulk velocity and temperature of the electrons for the NASA Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby Spacecraft, to define the MHD-SW IMF flow configuration; to clarify the role of impact ionization processes, to comment on the importance of anomalous ionization phenomena (via wave particle processes), to quantify the importance of wave turbulence in the cometary interaction, to establish the importance of photoionization via the presence of characteristic lines in a structured energy spectrum, to infer the presence and grain size of significant ambient dust column density, to search for the theoretically suggested 'impenetrable' contact surface, and to quantify the flow of heat (in the likelihood that no surface exists) that will penetrate very deep into the atmosphere supplying a good deal of heat via impact and charge exchange ionization. This final report provides an instrument description, instrument test plans, list of deliverables/schedule, flight and support equipment and software schedule, CREWE accommodation issues, resource requirements, status of major contracts, an explanation of the non-NASA funded efforts, status of EIP and IM plan, descope options, and Brinton questions.

  2. Investigation of Very Slowly Tumbling Spin Labels by Nonlinear Spin Response Techniques: Theory and Experiment for Stationary Electron Electron Double Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Smigel, Murray D.; Dalton, Larry R.; Hyde, James S.; Dalton, Lauraine A.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation of very slowly tumbling spin labels by nonlinear electron spin response techniques is discussed. Such techniques permit characterization of rotational processes with correlation times from 10-3 to 10-7 sec even though the linear spin response (ESR) technique is insensitive to motion in this region. Nonlinear techniques fall into two categories: (a) Techniques (referred to as passage techniques) in which the distribution of saturation throughout the spin system is determined both by the applied magnetic field modulation of the resonance condition and by the modulation of the resonance frequency induced by the molecular motion. The time dependence of this distribution produces phase and amplitude changes in the observed signals. (b) Techniques that measure the integral of the distribution function of the time required for saturated spin packets to move between pumped and observed portions of the spectrum [stationary and pulsed electron electron double resonance (ELDOR) techniques]. Quantitative analysis of passage ESR and stationary ELDOR techniques can be accomplished employing a density matrix treatment that explicitly includes the interaction of the spins with applied radiation and modulation fields. The effect of molecular motion inducing a random modulation of the anisotropic spin interactions can be calculated by describing the motion by the diffusion equation appropriate to the motional model assumed. For infinitesimal steps the eigen-functions of the diffusion operator are known analytically, while for random motion of arbitrary step size they are determined by diagonalizing the transition matrix appropriate for the step model used. The present communication reports investigation of the rotational diffusion of the spin label probes 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinol-1-oxyl and 17β-hydroxy-4′,4′-dimethylspiro-[5α-androstane-3,2′-oxazolidin]-3′-oxyl in sec-butylbenzene. Experimental spectra are compared with computer simulations of

  3. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Cryan, Scott; Zipay, John; Strube, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR&D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a threedimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe the current

  4. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Strube, Matthew; Zipay, John J.; Cryan, Scott

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR and D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR and D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR and D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a threedimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR and D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe

  5. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Strube, Matthew; Zipay, John J.; Cryan, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR&D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion spacecraft. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a three-dimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build-time instead of at design-time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal non-recurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe the current

  6. The impact of trauma on the psyche of the individual using the film Belleville Rendez-vous as an illustrative vehicle.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Sharn

    2008-09-01

    Using the film Belleville Rendez-vous as a vehicle for discussion, this paper argues that whilst a traumatic complex may bring about dissociation of the psyche, this is not the only possibility, nor is dissociation necessarily to be seen solely as a difficulty to be overcome. If trauma is experienced within the context of support and validation, the experience of trauma may generate integration not only of the trauma but also of the growth potential that the trauma has previously inhibited. PMID:18844736

  7. Spontaneous Rupture of Superficial Femoral Artery Repaired with Endovascular Stent-Grafting with use of Rendez-Vous Technique, Followed by Delayed Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio Cannavale, Alessandro; Gazzetti, Marianna; Fantozzi, Cristiano; Taurino, Maurizio; Speziale, Francesco

    2013-02-15

    This is the case of a 72-year-old man with lower limb ischemia due to spontaneous rupture of nonaneurysmal superficial femoral artery that developed into thigh hematoma. After failure of a Fogarty revascularization, an emergency endovascular procedure was performed to restore the arterial continuity. A rendezvous procedure was performed with a double femoral and popliteal approach and two covered stent-grafts were deployed. Patient's clinical conditions immediately improved, but 4 months later the stent-grafts were surgically removed for infection and exteriorization. A femoropopliteal bypass was performed. After 1 year follow-up, the patient is in good clinical condition.

  8. Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR): A New Frontiers Mission to Conduct the First Detailed Reconnaissance of the Jupiter Trojan Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James F.; Olkin, Cathy; Castillo-Rogez, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Among the most potentially diagnostic but least explored populations of small bodies are the Jupiter Trojan asteroids, which orbit at ~5 AU in the L4 and L5 Lagrange points of Jupiter. The Trojans provide a unique perspective on solar system history, because their locations and physical, compositional, and mineralogic properties preserve evidence for important gravitational interactions among the giant planets. The locations and orbital properties of more than 6200 Jupiter Trojans are now known, but that is likely only a small fraction of a population of up to ~1e6 Trojans >1 km in size. The Trojans are hypothesized to be either former KBOs scattered into the inner solar system by early giant planet migration and then trapped in L4 and L5, or bodies formed near 5 AU in a more quiescent early solar system.Important Planetary Decadal Survey questions that can be addressed by studying the Trojans include: (a) How did the giant planets and their satellite systems accrete, and is there evidence that they migrated to new orbital positions? (b) What is the relationship between large and small KBOs? Is the small population derived by impact disruption of the large one? (c) What kinds of surface evolution, radiation chemistry, and surface-atmosphere interactions occur on distant icy primitive bodies? And (d) What are the sources of asteroid groups (Trojans and Centaurs) that remain to be explored by spacecraft?Here we describe the Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR) New Frontiers mission concept, which is designed to answer these Decadal questions and to test hypotheses for early giant planet migration and solar system evolution. Via close flybys of many of these objects, and orbital characterization of at least one large Trojan, TTR will enable the initial up-close exploration of this population. Our primary mission goals are to characterize the overall surface geology, geochemistry and mineralogy of these worlds; to characterize their internal structure and dynamical

  9. Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR): A New Frontiers Mission to Explore the Origin and Evolution of the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J. F., III; Olkin, C.; Castillo, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The orbital properties, compositions, and physical properties of the diverse populations of small outer solar system bodies provide a forensic map of how our solar system formed and evolved. Perhaps the most potentially diagnostic, but least explored, of those populations are the Jupiter Trojan asteroids, which orbit at ~5 AU in the L4 and L5 Lagrange points of Jupiter. More than 6200 Jupiter Trojans are presently known, but these are predicted to be only a small fraction of the 500,000 to 1 million Trojans >1 km in size. The Trojans are hypothesized to be either former Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that were scattered into the inner solar system by early giant planet migration and then trapped in the 1:1 Jupiter mean motion resonance, or bodies formed near 5 AU in a much more quiescent early solar system, and then trapped at L4 and L5. The 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey identified important questions about the origin and evolution of the solar system that can be addressed by studying of the Trojan asteroids, including: (a) How did the giant planets and their satellite systems accrete, and is there evidence that they migrated to new orbital positions? (b) What is the relationship between large and small KBOs? Is the small population derived by impact disruption of the large one? (c) What kinds of surface evolution, radiation chemistry, and surface-atmosphere interactions occur on distant icy primitive bodies? And (d) What are the sources of asteroid groups (Trojans and Centaurs) that remain to be explored by spacecraft? The Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR) is a New Frontiers-class mission designed to answer these questions, and to test hypotheses for early giant planet migration and solar system evolution. Via close flybys of a large number of these objects,, and orbital characterization of at least one large Trojan, TTR will enable the first-time exploration of this population. Our primary mission goals are to characterize the overall surface geology

  10. Tumbling motions of NH2(CH3)2 ions in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 studied using 1H MAS NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Choi, Jae Hun; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-12-01

    The structure and the phase transition temperatures of [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 were determined using X-ray diffraction and DSC, respectively. The temperature dependence of chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1ρ in the rotating frame were measured for the 1H and 13C nuclei in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4. From these results, it was observed that the structural change by chemical shifts does not occur with temperature. However, T1ρ for 1H and 13C in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 showed a minimum, and it is apparent that both T1ρ values are governed by the same tumbling motions. The activation energies of tumbling motions for 1H and 13C are nearly the same owing to the connection between CH3 and NH2 ions in the [NH2(CH3)2]+ group.

  11. DARe: Dark Asteroid Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, K. S.; McFadden, L. A.; Rhoden, A. R.; Lim, L. F.; Boynton, W. V.; Carter, L. M.; Collins, G.; Englander, J. A.; Goossens, S. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Li, J.-Y.; Mottola, S.; Oberst, J.; Orosei, R.; Parsons, A. M.; Preusker, F.; Reuter, D. C.; Simon, A. A.; Thomas, C. A.; Walsh, K.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Small bodies record the chemical, physical, and dynamical processes that gave birth to and shaped the solar system. The great variety of small bodies reflects the diversity of both their genesis and their histories. The DARe mission conducts a critical test of how small body populations reflect a history of planetary migration and planetesimal scattering. This understanding is crucial for planning future NASA missions and placing current and past missions into context.

  12. In-Flight Operation of the Dawn Ion Propulsion System: Status at One Year from the Vesta Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E.; Rayman, Marc D.

    2010-01-01

    , 2007 and was successfully concluded as planned on October 31, 2008. During this time period the Dawn IPS was operated mostly at full power for approximately 6500 hours, consumed 71.7 kg of xenon and delivered approximately 1.8 km/s of delta V to the spacecraft. The thrusting to Mars was followed by a coasting period of approximately 3.5 months that included a Mars flyby in February of 2009. The Mars flyby provided a gravity assist (MGA) for a plane change and approximately 1 km/s of heliocentric energy increase and is the only part of the mission following launch in which a needed velocity change is not accomplished by the IPS. During the coast period IPS was operated for a trajectory correction maneuver and for engineering tests but was not operated for primary propulsion. Closest approach to Mars occurred as planned on February 17, 2009 and was followed by another coasting period of just under 4 months in duration. During this last coasting phase IPS was operated only for routine maintenance activities and for system engineering tests. Deterministic thrusting for heliocentric transfer to Vesta resumed on June 8, 2009. Since resumption of cruise to Vesta IPS has been operated at throttled power levels, most of the time at full power, and with a duty cycle of approximately 93%, leading to an arrival at Vesta in July of 2011 and arrival at Ceres in February 2015. This paper provides an overview of Dawn's mission objectives and the results of Dawn IPS mission operations through one year from the spacecraft's rendezvous with Vesta.

  13. Investigation of Spinning and Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 Airplane in the Free-Spinning Tunnel, TED No. NACA DE 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 airplane with a windmilling propeller simulated to determine the effects of control setting and movements upon the erect spin and recovery characteristics for a range of airplane-loading conditions. The effects on the model's spin-recovery characteristics of removing the lower vertical tail, removing the gun pods, and fixing the rudders at neutral were also investigated briefly. The investigation included determination of the size parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins. The tumbling tendencies of the model were also investigated. Brief static force tests were made to determine the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch at high angles of attack. The investigation indicated that the spin and recovery characteristics of the airplane with propeller windmilling will be satisfactory for all loading conditions if recovery is attempted by full rudder reversal accompanied by simultaneous movement of the stick laterally to full with the spin (stick right in a right spin) and longitudinally to neutral. Inverted spins should be satisfactorily terminated by fully reversing the rudder followed immediately by moving the stick laterally towards the forward rudder pedal and longitudinally to neutral. Removal of the gun pods or fixing the rudders at neutral will not adversely affect the airplane's spin-recovery characteristics, but removal of the lower vertical tail will result in unsatisfactory spin-recovery characteristics. The model-test results showed that a 13.3-foot wing-tip conventional parachute (drag coefficient approximately 0.7) should be effective as an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane. It was indicated that the airplane should not tumble and that no unusual longitudinal-trim characteristics should be obtained for the center-of-gravity positions investigated.

  14. Modification of Platelet Margination Rate via Reduction of Viscosity Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasor, Daniel; Mehrabadi, Marmar; Ku, David; Aidun, Cyrus

    2011-11-01

    Experimental investigations of platelet margination have primarily been limited to effects of hematocrit (Ht.) and shear rate. The suspending fluids used commonly have viscosities greater than plasma which can modify the transition in dynamical regimes from tumbling to tank-treading for isolated RBCs. This work focuses on the effects of λ, the ratio of internal to suspending fluid viscosity of RBCs, on the rate of platelet margination in a rigid 41.3 μm diameter vessel. Simulations are performed with a lattice-Boltzmann fluid solver using the standard bounce-back boundary condition coupled with a coarse-grained spectrin-link RBC membrane model and a Newtonian dynamics solver for rigid platelets. Our results are consistent with observations that an increase in Ht. increases the rate of platelet margination for Ht.=20-40%, but we focus on the modification of λ at Ht.=20%. Our results show that rigid RBCs inhibit margination, but modifying λ with deformable RBCs show significant increases in margination rate. Our observations demonstrate an increase in platelet wall-normal velocity fluctuations, enhanced margination rate, and an increase in the wall-normal diffusivity as λ is reduced from the physiological value of five. NSF TeraGrid Grant: TG-CTS100012.

  15. Tumbling: From Rally Cars to Toast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang

    2012-10-01

    The article by Rod Cross describing the translational and rotational motion of the "Launch of a Vehicle from a Ramp" motivated us to create two computer models showing this type of dynamical behavior.

  16. Are the Walls of Injustice Tumbling Down?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rochelle R.; Davila, Erica R.

    2011-01-01

    The discussion of multicultural education in teacher preparation dates back several decades. "The historical roots of multicultural education lie in the civil rights movements of various historically oppressed groups" (Gorski, 1999, p.1). As communities of color resisted institutional racism, schools became one of the sites of struggle. Thus, the…

  17. Tumbling: From Rally Cars to Toast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The article by Rod Cross describing the translational and rotational motion of the "Launch of a Vehicle from a Ramp" motivated us to create two computer models showing this type of dynamical behavior.

  18. A Proposed Strategy for the U.S. to Develop and Maintain a Mainstream Capability Suite ("Warehouse") for Automated/Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking in Low Earth Orbit and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, Kalmanje S.; Stillwater, Ryan A.; Babula, Maria; Moreau, Michael C.; Riedel, J. Ed; Mrozinski, Richard B.; Bradley, Arthur; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of space assets to rendezvous and dock/capture/berth is a fundamental enabler for numerous classes of NASA fs missions, and is therefore an essential capability for the future of NASA. Mission classes include: ISS crew rotation, crewed exploration beyond low-Earth-orbit (LEO), on-orbit assembly, ISS cargo supply, crewed satellite servicing, robotic satellite servicing / debris mitigation, robotic sample return, and robotic small body (e.g. near-Earth object, NEO) proximity operations. For a variety of reasons to be described, NASA programs requiring Automated/Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking/Capture/Berthing (AR&D) capabilities are currently spending an order-of-magnitude more than necessary and taking twice as long as necessary to achieve their AR&D capability, "reinventing the wheel" for each program, and have fallen behind all of our foreign counterparts in AR&D technology (especially autonomy) in the process. To ensure future missions' reliability and crew safety (when applicable), to achieve the noted cost and schedule savings by eliminate costs of continually "reinventing the wheel ", the NASA AR&D Community of Practice (CoP) recommends NASA develop an AR&D Warehouse, detailed herein, which does not exist today. The term "warehouse" is used herein to refer to a toolbox or capability suite that has pre-integrated selectable supply-chain hardware and reusable software components that are considered ready-to-fly, low-risk, reliable, versatile, scalable, cost-effective, architecture and destination independent, that can be confidently utilized operationally on human spaceflight and robotic vehicles over a variety of mission classes and design reference missions, especially beyond LEO. The CoP also believes that it is imperative that NASA coordinate and integrate all current and proposed technology development activities into a cohesive cross-Agency strategy to produce and utilize this AR&D warehouse. An initial estimate indicates that if NASA

  19. The First Joint Report of the General Thomas P. Stafford Task Force and the Academician Vladimir F. Utkin Advisory Expert Council on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In October 1992, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) formally agreed to conduct a fundamentally new program of human cooperation in space. The 'Shuttle-Mir Program' encompassed combined astronaut-cosmonaut activities on the Shuttle, Soyuz Test Module(TM), and Mir station spacecraft. At that time, NASA and RSA limited the project to: the STS-60 mission carrying the first Russian cosmonaut to fly on the U.S. Space Shuttle; the launch of the first U.S. astronaut on the Soyuz vehicle for a multi-month mission as a member of a Mir crew; and the change-out of the U.S.-Russian Mir crews with a Russian crew during a Shuttle rendezvous and docking mission with the Mir Station. The objectives of the Phase 1 Program are to provide the basis for the resolution of engineering and technical problems related to the implementation of the ISS and future U.S.-Russian cooperation in space. This, combined with test data generated during the course of the Shuttle flights to the Mir station and extended joint activities between U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts aboard Mir, is expected to reduce the technical risks associated with the construction and operation of the ISS. Phase 1 will further enhance the ISS by combining space operations and joint space technology demonstrations. Phase 1 also provides early opportunities for extended U.S. scientific and research activities, prior to utilization of the ISS.

  20. Red Blood Cell Hematocrit Influences Platelet Adhesion Rate in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, Andrew; Campbell, James; Fitzgibbon, Sean; Rodriguez, Armando; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The creation of a blood clot to stop bleeding involves platelets forming a plug at the site of injury. Red blood cells indirectly play a role in ensuring that the distribution of platelets across the height of the channel is not uniform - the contrast in deformability and size between platelets and red blood cells allows the platelets to preferentially marginate close to the walls. We perform 3D boundary integral simulations of a suspension of platelets and red blood cells in a periodic channel with a model that allows for platelet binding at the walls. The relative rate of platelet activity with varying hematocrit (volume fraction of red blood cells) is compared to experiments in which red blood cells and platelets flow through a channel coated with von Willebrand factor. In the simulations as well as the experiments, a decrease in hematocrit of red blood cells is found to reduce the rate at which platelets adhere to the channel wall in a manner that is both qualitatively and quantitatively similar. We conclude with a discussion of the tumbling and wobbling motions of platelets in 3D leading up to the time at which the platelets bind to the wall. Funded by Stanford Army High Performance Computing Research Center, experiments by US Army Institute of Surgical Research.

  1. Coding gains and error rates from the Big Viterbi Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onyszchuk, I. M.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype hardware Big Viterbi Decoder (BVD) was completed for an experiment with the Galileo Spacecraft. Searches for new convolutional codes, studies of Viterbi decoder hardware designs and architectures, mathematical formulations, and decompositions of the deBruijn graph into identical and hierarchical subgraphs, and very large scale integration (VLSI) chip design are just a few examples of tasks completed for this project. The BVD bit error rates (BER), measured from hardware and software simulations, are plotted as a function of bit signal to noise ratio E sub b/N sub 0 on the additive white Gaussian noise channel. Using the constraint length 15, rate 1/4, experimental convolutional code for the Galileo mission, the BVD gains 1.5 dB over the NASA standard (7,1/2) Maximum Likelihood Convolution Decoder (MCD) at a BER of 0.005. At this BER, the same gain results when the (255,233) NASA standard Reed-Solomon decoder is used, which yields a word error rate of 2.1 x 10(exp -8) and a BER of 1.4 x 10(exp -9). The (15, 1/6) code to be used by the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF)/Cassini Missions yields 1.7 dB of coding gain. These gains are measured with respect to symbols input to the BVD and increase with decreasing BER. Also, 8-bit input symbol quantization makes the BVD resistant to demodulated signal-level variations which may cause higher bandwidth than the NASA (7,1/2) code, these gains are offset by about 0.1 dB of expected additional receiver losses. Coding gains of several decibels are possible by compressing all spacecraft data.

  2. The Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Mission, the Mars Surveyor 2001 (MS01) Mission, and the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The NEAR Mission was launched on February 17, 1996 for a three year cruise to the asteroid 433 Eros. During October, November, and December 1998 cruise measurements with the gamma-ray spectrometer were made at three different escape-window-width settings. These were done in order to understand how the count rate and peak width change as the window width settings change. Analysis of these spectra was completed using the latest version of the spectral analysis program, RobWin. Results as a function of energy were combined with the results from the Schlumberger-Doll Research experiments (described below). Laboratory measurements were needed to confirm efficiency calculations above 6 MeV and to understand the relationship between the full energy peak areas and the areas of the first and second escape peaks as a function of the escape peak widths. A week of measurements was made at Schlumberger-Doll Research using their 14-MeV pulsed neutron generator and large soil samples. Data were collected after adding iron and nickel to the sample to increase the emission of high-energy lines. Approximately 24 hours of data were accumulated at each of three escape peak window widths. These data were analyzed with RobWin. Combining results from the cruise measurements and the laboratory measurements indicated that both data sets had similar energy dependence and that this energy dependence was different from that obtained using standard Monte Carlo calculations. Alternate methods of simulating the response of the detector to changes in the escape window widths are being investigated.

  3. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing, and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR, and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.

  4. Discovery: Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    The work carried out under this grant consisted of two parallel studies aimed at defining candidate missions for the initiation of the Discovery Program being considered by NASA's Solar System Exploration Division. The main study considered a Discover-class mission to a Near Earth Asteroid (NEA); the companion study considered a small telescope in Earth-orbit dedicated to ultra violet studies of solar system bodies. The results of these studies are summarized in two reports which are attached (Appendix 1 and Appendix 2).

  5. 14 CFR 1214.111 - Rendezvous services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Earth of the orbiting spacecraft (or part thereof), including a spacecraft deployed earlier on the same... orbiting spacecraft to Earth. (3) Revisit of an orbiting spacecraft for purposes such as resupply,...

  6. Telerobotic rendezvous and docking vision system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravely, Ben; Myers, Donald; Moody, David

    1992-01-01

    This research program has successfully demonstrated a new target label architecture that allows a microcomputer to determine the position, orientation, and identity of an object. It contains a CAD-like database with specific geometric information about the object for approach, grasping, and docking maneuvers. Successful demonstrations were performed selecting and docking an ORU box with either of two ORU receptacles. Small, but significant differences were seen in the two camera types used in the program, and camera sensitive program elements have been identified. The software has been formatted into a new co-autonomy system which provides various levels of operator interaction and promises to allow effective application of telerobotic systems while code improvements are continuing.

  7. Alan Shepard in the Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut Alan Shepard (right) was one of 14 astronauts, 8 NASA test pilots, and 2 McDonnell test pilots who took part in simulator studies. Shepard flew the simulator on November 14, 1963. A.W. Vogeley wrote: 'Many of the astronauts have flown this simulator in support of the Gemini studies and they, without exception, appreciated the realism of the visual scene. The simulator has also been used in the development of pilot techniques to handle certain jet malfunctions in order that aborts could be avoided. In these situations large attitude changes are sometimes necessary and the false motion cues that were generated due to earth gravity were somewhat objectionable; however, the pilots were readily able to overlook these false motion cues in favor of the visual realism.' Roy F. Brissenden noted that: 'The basic Gemini control studies developed the necessary techniques and demonstrated the ability of human pilots to perform final space docking with the specified Gemini-Agena systems using only visual references. ... Results... showed that trained astronauts can effect the docking with direct acceleration control and even with jet malfunctions as long as good visual conditions exist.... Probably more important than data results was the early confidence that the astronauts themselves gained in their ability to perform the maneuver in the ultimate flight mission.' Shepard commented: 'I had the feeling tonight - a couple of times - that I was actually doing the space mission instead of the simulation. As I said before, I think it is a very good simulation.' Shepard also commented on piloting techniques. Most astronauts arrived at this same preferred technique: Shepard: 'I believe I have developed the preferred technique for these conditions and the technique appeared to me to be best was to come in slightly above the target so that I was able to use the longitudinal marks on the body of the target as a reference, particularly for a lateral translation and, of course, I used the foreshortening effect for a vertical translation, and this appeared to give me the best results. By that I mean the least number of control motions and the lowest fuel usage and the best end techniques, or the best end conditions, I should say.' Engineer: 'When you started to run you didn't start thrusting immediately I don't believe. It looked like you started working on your attitudes, then started closing in.' Shepard: 'That is correct. I did that because I felt that I wanted to get the X-axis translation in the most effective vector and for minimum fuel usage that wouldn't introduce any other lateral or vertical offsets that did not already exist.'

  8. MMU applications for automated rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitsett, Edward

    1991-01-01

    The Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) is a proven free flying platform that can operate in a piloted or unpiloted mode. The MMU is a possible candidate for an on orbit AR&C demonstration. A pilot can transition the system between manual and automated modes, then monitor the automated system for safety.

  9. STORRM To Test Future Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Video Gallery

    A state-of-the-art relative navigation system will be demonstrated on the STS-134 mission to the International Space Station called the Sensor Test for Orion Relative Navigation Risk Mitigation or ...

  10. 14 CFR 1214.111 - Rendezvous services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Earth of the orbiting spacecraft (or part thereof), including a spacecraft deployed earlier on the same... orbiting spacecraft to Earth. (3) Revisit of an orbiting spacecraft for purposes such as resupply,...

  11. Mars Researchers Rendezvous on Remote Arctic Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Devon Island is situated in an isolated part of Canada's Nunavut Territory, and is usually considered to be the largest uninhabited island in the world. However, each summer since 1999, researchers from NASA's Haughton-Mars Project and the Mars Society reside at this 'polar desert' location to study the geologic and environmental characteristics of a site which is considered to be an excellent 'Mars analog': a terrestrial location wherein specific conditions approximate environmental features reported on Mars. Base camps established amidst the rocks and rubble surrounding the Haughton impact crater enable researchers to conduct surveys designed to test the habitat, equipment and technology that may be deployed during a human mission to Mars. One of the many objectives of the project scientists is to understand the ice formations around the Haughton area, in the hopes that this might ultimately assist with the recognition of areas where ice can be found at shallow depth on Mars.

    These images of Devon Island from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument provide contrasting views of the spectral and angular reflectance 'signatures' of different surfaces within the region. The top panel is a natural color view created with data from the red, green and blue-bands of MISR's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera. The bottom panel is a false-color multiangular composite of the same area, utilizing red band data from MISR's 60-degree backward, nadir, and 60-degree forward-viewing cameras, displayed as red, green and blue, respectively. In this representation, colors highlight textural properties of elements within the scene, with blue tones indicating smooth surfaces (which preferentially forward scatter sunlight) and red hues indicating rougher surfaces (which preferentially backscatter). The angular reflectance 'signature' of low clouds causes them to appear purple, and this visualization provides a unique way of distinguishing clouds from snow and ice.

    The data were captured on June 28, 2001, during the early part of the arctic summer, when sea ice becomes thinner and begins to move depending upon localized currents and winds. In winter the entire region is locked with several meters of nearly motionless sea ice, which acts as a thermodynamic barrier to the loss of heat from the comparatively warm ocean to the colder atmosphere. Summer melting of sea ice can be observed at the two large, dark regions of open water; one is present in the Jones Sound (near the top to the left of center), and another appears in the Wellington Channel (left-hand edge). A large crack caused by tidal heaving has broken the ice cover over the Parry Channel (lower right-hand corner). A substantial ice cap permanently occupies the easternmost third of the island (upper right). Surface features such as dendritic meltwater channels incised into the island's surface are apparent. The Haughton-Mars project site is located slightly to the left and above image center, in an area which appears with relatively little surface ice, near the island's inner 'elbow.'

    The images were acquired during Terra orbit 8132 and cover an area of about 334 kilometers x 229 kilometers. They utilize data from blocks 27 to 31 within World Reference System-2 path 42.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  12. Long range targeting for space based rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Louis J.; Redfield, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    The work performed under this grant supported the Dexterous Flight Experiment one STS-62 The project required developing hardware and software for automating a TRAC sensor on orbit. The hardware developed by for the flight has been documented through standard NASA channels since it has to pass safety, environmental, and other issues. The software has not been documented previously, therefore, this report provides a software manual for the TRAC code developed for the grant.

  13. Automated Rendezvous and Docking: 1994-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This custom bibliography from the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program lists a sampling of records found in the NASA Aeronautics and Space Database. The scope of this topic includes technologies for human exploration and robotic sample return missions. This area of focus is one of the enabling technologies as defined by NASA s Report of the President s Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy, published in June 2004.

  14. Full relaxation matrix analysis of apparent cross-correlated relaxation rates in four-spin systems.

    PubMed

    Vögeli, Beat

    2013-01-01

    Cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) rates are an established tool for the extraction of relative bond orientations in biomolecules in solution. CCR between dipolar interactions in four-spin systems is a particularly well-suited mechanism. In this paper, a simple approach to analyze systematic experimental errors is formulated in a subspace of the complete four-spin Hilbert space. It is shown that, contrary to the common assumption, the secular approximation of the relaxation matrix is marginal for the most prominent spin systems. With the main focus on the model protein GB3 at room temperature, it is shown that the apparent experimental CCR rates have errors between -12% and +4% for molecules with a molecular tumbling time of 3.5 ns. Although depending on the specific pulse sequence used, the following rule-of-thumb can be established: Judged by absolute values, the errors for H(α)-C(α)/H(α)-C(α), H(N)-N/C(α)-C', H(N)-N/C(γ)-C(β) and H(N)-N/H(β)-C(β) CCR rates can safely be neglected. However, errors for H(N)-N/H(N)-N and H(N)-N/H(α)-C(α) CCR rates are on the order of 0.1-0.3s(-1) and must be considered. Tabulated correction factors may be used for their extraction. If larger systems are studied, in most cases the errors cannot be neglected anymore. On the other hand, well-calibrated pulses can safely be assumed to be perfect. PMID:23207177

  15. The gas production rate of periodic comet d'Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Festou, Michel C.; Feldman, Paul D.; Ahearn, Michael F.

    1992-01-01

    Comet P/d'Arrest is a potential target for a rendezvous mission to a short period comet. Its light curve is rather peculiar, the comet being active only after perihelion passage. One apparition out of two is easy to observe from the ground. The 1995 apparition of the comet will offer a unique opportunity to characterize the outgassing properties of its nucleus.

  16. Reentry survival analysis of tumbling metallic hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Hyung-seok; Kim, Kyu-hong

    2011-09-01

    The survival of orbital debris reentering the Earth's atmosphere is considered. The numerical approach of NASA's Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) is reviewed, and a new equation accounting for reradiation heat loss of hollow cylindrical objects is presented. Based on these, a code called Survivability Analysis Program for Atmospheric Reentry (SAPAR) has been developed, and the new equation for reradiation heat loss is validated. Using this equation in conjunction with the formulation used in ORSAT, a comparative case study on the Delta-II second stage cylindrical tank is given, demonstrating that the analysis using the proposed equation is in good agreement with the actual recovered object when a practical value for thermal emissivity is used. A detailed explanation of the revised formulation is given, and additional simulation results are presented. Finally, discussions are made to address the applicability of the proposed equation to be incorporated in future survival analyses of orbital debris.

  17. Run-and-tumble particles in speckle fields.

    PubMed

    Paoluzzi, M; Di Leonardo, R; Angelani, L

    2014-09-17

    The random energy landscapes developed by speckle fields can be used to confine and manipulate a large number of micro-particles with a single laser beam. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of an active suspension of swimming bacteria embedded into speckle patterns. Looking at the correlation of the density fluctuations and the equilibrium density profiles, we observe a crossover phenomenon when the forces exerted by the speckles are equal to the bacteria's propulsion. PMID:25105250

  18. Examination of Granular Tumbling by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Lachlan; Metcalfe, Guy

    1998-11-01

    The focus for the present work has been to investigate the granular flow in a rotating tumbler. Tumblers are used industrially in areas such as calcining kilns and have issues such as product throughput and recycling. A model tumbler was made from acrylic tube supported at each end to allow the working section to coincide with the MRI magnet imaging region. A removable hatch allowed the tumbler to be filled with particles. The particles used were polystyrene beads and yellow mustard seeds. The aspect ratio of the tumbler could be varied by moving the end plates and the surface roughness was also varied by gluing various grades of abrasive paper to the internal surfaces. The abrasive paper had discernable effect on the quality of the MRI signals. The tumbler was rotated slowly to simulate operation in the avalanche regime. Images were taken up to 128 revolutions. Results showed that the mustard seeds and polystyrene beads segregated with the seeds moving to the wall of the tumbler except for an unmixed core region. This core region formed in the first few revolutions and persisted for the full 128 revolutions investigated. The size of the unmixed core appeared to asymptote by 128 revolutions. Measurements of the final core size relative to the initial size showed that the final core size decreased with increasing aspect ratio.

  19. Take a Tumble: Weathering and Erosion Using a Rock Tumbler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Patrick; Mattox, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Weathering--the physical and chemical breakdown of geologic materials--and erosion--the transport of materials by wind, water, or ice--can be subtle, yet powerful forces. For example, shale, a rock made of mud-sized particles, is by far the most common sedimentary rock, a testament to the ability of weathering and erosion to take a rock and reduce…

  20. On the relationship between visual magnitudes and gas and dust production rates in target comets to space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, A. A.; Sanzovo, G. C.; Singh, P. D.; Misra, A.; Miguel Torres, R.; Boice, D. C.; Huebner, W. F.

    In this paper, we report the results of a cometary research, developed during the last 10 years by us, involving a criterious analysis of gas and dust production rates in comets directly associated to recent space missions. For the determination of the water release rates we use the framework of the semi-empirical model of observed visual magnitudes [Newburn Jr., R.L. A semi-empirical photometric theory of cometary gas and dust production. Application to P/Halley's production rates, ESA-SP 174, 3, 1981; de Almeida, A.A., Singh, P.D., Huebner, W.F. Water release rates, active areas, and minimum nuclear radius derived from visual magnitudes of comets - an application to Comet 46P/Wirtanen, Planet. Space Sci. 45, 681-692, 1997; Sanzovo, G.C., de Almeida, A.A., Misra, A. et al. Mass-loss rates, dust particle sizes, nuclear active areas and minimum nuclear radii of target comets for missions STARDUST and CONTOUR, MNRAS 326, 852-868, 2001.], which once obtained, were directly converted into gas production rates. In turn, the dust release rates were obtained using the photometric model for dust particles [Newburn Jr., R.L., Spinrad, H. Spectrophotometry of seventeen comets. II - the continuum, AJ 90, 2591-2608, 1985; de Freitas Pacheco, J.A., Landaberry, S.J.C., Singh, P.D. Spectrophotometric observations of the Comet Halley during the 1985-86 apparition, MNRAS 235, 457-464, 1988; Sanzovo, G.C., Singh, P.D., Huebner, W.F. Dust colors, dust release rates, and dust-to-gas ratios in the comae of six comets, A&AS 120, 301-311, 1996.]. We applied these models to seven target comets, chosen for space missions of "fly-by"/impact and rendezvous/landing.

  1. Rating Movies and Rating the Raters Who Rate Them.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    The movie distribution company Netflix has generated considerable buzz in the statistics community by offering a million dollar prize for improvements to its movie rating system. Among the statisticians and computer scientists who have disclosed their techniques, the emphasis has been on machine learning approaches. This article has the modest goal of discussing a simple model for movie rating and other forms of democratic rating. Because the model involves a large number of parameters, it is nontrivial to carry out maximum likelihood estimation. Here we derive a straightforward EM algorithm from the perspective of the more general MM algorithm. The algorithm is capable of finding the global maximum on a likelihood landscape littered with inferior modes. We apply two variants of the model to a dataset from the MovieLens archive and compare their results. Our model identifies quirky raters, redefines the raw rankings, and permits imputation of missing ratings. The model is intended to stimulate discussion and development of better theory rather than to win the prize. It has the added benefit of introducing readers to some of the issues connected with analyzing high-dimensional data. PMID:20802818

  2. Rating Movies and Rating the Raters Who Rate Them

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The movie distribution company Netflix has generated considerable buzz in the statistics community by offering a million dollar prize for improvements to its movie rating system. Among the statisticians and computer scientists who have disclosed their techniques, the emphasis has been on machine learning approaches. This article has the modest goal of discussing a simple model for movie rating and other forms of democratic rating. Because the model involves a large number of parameters, it is nontrivial to carry out maximum likelihood estimation. Here we derive a straightforward EM algorithm from the perspective of the more general MM algorithm. The algorithm is capable of finding the global maximum on a likelihood landscape littered with inferior modes. We apply two variants of the model to a dataset from the MovieLens archive and compare their results. Our model identifies quirky raters, redefines the raw rankings, and permits imputation of missing ratings. The model is intended to stimulate discussion and development of better theory rather than to win the prize. It has the added benefit of introducing readers to some of the issues connected with analyzing high-dimensional data. PMID:20802818

  3. Lithologic Influence and Experimental Variability in Gravel Abrasion: Implications for Predicting Rates of Downstream Fining of River Bed Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, J. W.; Sklar, L. S.

    2004-12-01

    The question of what controls the occurrence and rate of downstream fining of bed-material sediments remains a fundamental unsolved problem despite over a century of field, experimental and theoretical investigations. Downstream fining rates are commonly modeled as exponential or power-law functions of travel distance. Much recent work has focused on the relative influence of particle abrasion and differential transport, however, no general method has been developed for explicitly accounting for the influence of rock strength in parameterizing fining models. Here we report preliminary results of laboratory tumbling experiments in which we are investigating the influence of variable rock durability, both between and within distinct lithologic units, on rates of particle abrasion. We consider three separate questions: 1) can rock tensile strength be used to predict differences in bulk fining rates across a wide spectrum of rock types; 2) does variability in rock durability among individual gravel clasts of the same lithologic composition and initial grain size lead to patterns of downstream evolution of grain size distributions that differ significantly from the predictions of simple fining models; and 3) how large is the uncertainty in abrasion coefficients determined by laboratory tumbling, as determined by replicate experiments with identical initial conditions? We use a horizontal axis, 25-cm diameter, steel barrel tumbler, driven by a mechanical transmission with excellent control of rotational velocity. Rock samples were collected from units of the Franciscan Formation in the Redwood Creek Watershed of Marin County, California, and from sedimentary and intrusive volcanic rocks of the Henry Mountains, in southeastern Utah. We collected clasts predominantly from hillslope source areas, to focus our attention on the durability of gravel as it enters the river network. We use the `Brazilian' tensile splitting test to measure the strength of 50-mm diameter core

  4. Fertility Clinic Success Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir 2013 ART Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report [PDF - 1MB] Bookmarks and thumbnails are available within ...

  5. Glomerular filtration rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007305.htm Glomerular filtration rate To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check ...

  6. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » + - Text Size Target Heart Rate Calculator Compute your best workout Enter your age ... is your age? years. How to Check Your Heart Rate Right after you stop exercising, take your pulse: ...

  7. Handbook of noise ratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Bennett, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The handbook was compiled to provide information in a concise form, describing the multitude of noise rating schemes. It is hoped that by describing the noise rating methods in a single volume the user will have better access to the definitions, application and calculation procedures of the current noise rating methods.

  8. Rate theories for biologists

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Some of the rate theories that are most useful for modeling biological processes are reviewed. By delving into some of the details and subtleties in the development of the theories, the review will hopefully help the reader gain a more than superficial perspective. Examples are presented to illustrate how rate theories can be used to generate insight at the microscopic level into biomolecular behaviors. Attempt is made to clear up a number of misconceptions in the literature regarding popular rate theories, including the appearance of Planck’s constant in the transition-state theory and the Smoluchowski result as an upper limit for protein-protein and protein-DNA association rate constants. Future work in combining the implementation of rate theories through computer simulations with experimental probes of rate processes, and in modeling effects of intracellular environments so theories can be used for generating rate constants for systems biology studies is particularly exciting. PMID:20691138

  9. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  10. The Effect of Erosion Rate on Hillslope Rock Fragment Production: Implications for Supply of Bedload Material to Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Attal, M.; Sklar, L. S.; Riebe, C. S.; Hurst, M. D.; Mudd, S. M.; Yoo, K.

    2009-12-01

    The size distribution, abundance and durability of coarse sediment supplied by hillslopes to channels fundamentally influences channel morphodynamics, including the rate of river incision into bedrock. However, little is known about how hillslope boundary conditions such as erosion rate, climate and lithology, affect the production of bedload-sized rock fragments (> 2mm) on soil-mantled hillslopes. We hypothesize that more rapidly eroding hillslopes should produce larger, more abundant and more durable rock fragments, all else equal, because soils should be thinner, residence times shorter, and soil-producing disturbances such as tree throw more likely to transport unweathered bedrock to the surface. Here we present measurements of soil grain size distributions from three climatically distinct sites in northern California, where erosion rates vary widely within each site. Two of our sites are in granitic terrain in the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Fort Sage and Feather River), where rates of erosion and chemical weathering are constrained from previous measurements of cosmogenic radionuclides exposure ages and insoluble element enrichment. At the third site (Butano Ridge), an asymmetrical ridge underlain by massive sandstone in the Santa Cruz Mountains, we infer variable erosion rates from analysis of topographic curvature and hillslope gradient using a high-resolution LiDAR-derived DEM. We focus on the creep-dominated portion of the landscape to avoid sampling in landscape scars where the size distribution may not reflect long-term average production patterns. Bulk soil samples are taken from pits excavated to below the soil saprolite-bedrock boundary. We then sieve to obtain the full grain-size distribution in the soil column above the saprolite. We are also using laboratory tumbling mills to characterize rock fragment durability and assess the potential for fragment survival as bedload, once delivered to the channel. We find that rock fragment abundance generally

  11. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  12. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  13. Controlled Rate Cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled-rate cooling is one of several techniques available for the long-term storage of plants in liquid nitrogen. In this technique samples are slowly cooled to an intermediate temperature and then plunged in liquid nitrogen. Controlled rate cooling is based on osmotic regulation of cell conte...

  14. Scaling metabolic rate fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Labra, Fabio A; Marquet, Pablo A; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2007-06-26

    Complex ecological and economic systems show fluctuations in macroscopic quantities such as exchange rates, size of companies or populations that follow non-Gaussian tent-shaped probability distributions of growth rates with power-law decay, which suggests that fluctuations in complex systems may be governed by universal mechanisms, independent of particular details and idiosyncrasies. We propose here that metabolic rate within individual organisms may be considered as an example of an emergent property of a complex system and test the hypothesis that the probability distribution of fluctuations in the metabolic rate of individuals has a "universal" form regardless of body size or taxonomic affiliation. We examined data from 71 individuals belonging to 25 vertebrate species (birds, mammals, and lizards). We report three main results. First, for all these individuals and species, the distribution of metabolic rate fluctuations follows a tent-shaped distribution with power-law decay. Second, the standard deviation of metabolic rate fluctuations decays as a power-law function of both average metabolic rate and body mass, with exponents -0.352 and -1/4 respectively. Finally, we find that the distributions of metabolic rate fluctuations for different organisms can all be rescaled to a single parent distribution, supporting the existence of general principles underlying the structure and functioning of individual organisms. PMID:17578913

  15. Extended rate equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.

    1981-01-30

    The equations of motion are discussed which describe time dependent population flows in an N-level system, reviewing the relationship between incoherent (rate) equations, coherent (Schrodinger) equations, and more general partially coherent (Bloch) equations. Approximations are discussed which replace the elaborate Bloch equations by simpler rate equations whose coefficients incorporate long-time consequences of coherence.

  16. Interest rates mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevski, M.; Maignan, M.; Pozdnoukhov, A.; Timonin, V.

    2008-06-01

    The present study deals with the analysis and mapping of Swiss franc interest rates. Interest rates depend on time and maturity, defining term structure of the interest rate curves (IRC). In the present study IRC are considered in a two-dimensional feature space-time and maturity. Exploratory data analysis includes a variety of tools widely used in econophysics and geostatistics. Geostatistical models and machine learning algorithms (multilayer perceptron and Support Vector Machines) were applied to produce interest rate maps. IR maps can be used for the visualisation and pattern perception purposes, to develop and to explore economical hypotheses, to produce dynamic asset-liability simulations and for financial risk assessments. The feasibility of an application of interest rates mapping approach for the IRC forecasting is considered as well.

  17. Optimal firing rate estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulin, M. G.; Hoffman, L. F.

    2001-01-01

    We define a measure for evaluating the quality of a predictive model of the behavior of a spiking neuron. This measure, information gain per spike (Is), indicates how much more information is provided by the model than if the prediction were made by specifying the neuron's average firing rate over the same time period. We apply a maximum Is criterion to optimize the performance of Gaussian smoothing filters for estimating neural firing rates. With data from bullfrog vestibular semicircular canal neurons and data from simulated integrate-and-fire neurons, the optimal bandwidth for firing rate estimation is typically similar to the average firing rate. Precise timing and average rate models are limiting cases that perform poorly. We estimate that bullfrog semicircular canal sensory neurons transmit in the order of 1 bit of stimulus-related information per spike.

  18. Mutation rates as adaptations.

    PubMed

    Maley, C

    1997-06-01

    In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes. PMID:9219670

  19. Growth rates made easy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Barry G; Acar, Hande; Nandipati, Anna; Barlow, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    In the 1960s-1980s, determination of bacterial growth rates was an important tool in microbial genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and microbial physiology. The exciting technical developments of the 1990s and the 2000s eclipsed that tool; as a result, many investigators today lack experience with growth rate measurements. Recently, investigators in a number of areas have started to use measurements of bacterial growth rates for a variety of purposes. Those measurements have been greatly facilitated by the availability of microwell plate readers that permit the simultaneous measurements on up to 384 different cultures. Only the exponential (logarithmic) portions of the resulting growth curves are useful for determining growth rates, and manual determination of that portion and calculation of growth rates can be tedious for high-throughput purposes. Here, we introduce the program GrowthRates that uses plate reader output files to automatically determine the exponential portion of the curve and to automatically calculate the growth rate, the maximum culture density, and the duration of the growth lag phase. GrowthRates is freely available for Macintosh, Windows, and Linux. We discuss the effects of culture volume, the classical bacterial growth curve, and the differences between determinations in rich media and minimal (mineral salts) media. This protocol covers calibration of the plate reader, growth of culture inocula for both rich and minimal media, and experimental setup. As a guide to reliability, we report typical day-to-day variation in growth rates and variation within experiments with respect to position of wells within the plates. PMID:24170494

  20. Burning Rate Emulator

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Burning Rate Emulator is a gas fuel investigation attempting to emulate the burning of solids to improve our understanding of materials''flammability over a wide range of conditions. The approa...

  1. The ratings game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braben, Donald W.

    2009-04-01

    How sad to read a supposedly serious debate among distinguished physicists (February p19) about which combinations of the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) ratings represent a university physics department's true strengths.

  2. National ART Success Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... ART and Birth Defects ART and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology National Summary Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... live-birth rate? [PDF - 1.37MB] Section 2: ART Cycles using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos What ...

  3. Rating the Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slovic, Paul; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explains how people arrive at personal hazard assessments. Explores why people overestimate some hazards and underestimate others. Examines risk ratings for activities and technologies such as nuclear power, motor vehicles, pesticides, and vaccinations. (MA)

  4. Heart Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 70's, NASA saw a need for a long term electrocardiographic electrode suitable for use on astronauts. Heart Rate Inc.'s insulated capacitive electrode is constructed of thin dielectric film applied to stainless steel surface, originally developed under a grant by Texas Technical University. HRI, Inc. was awarded NASA license and continued development of heart rate monitor for use on exercise machines for physical fitness and medical markets.

  5. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years. PMID:17782901

  6. Heart Rate Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  7. Modelling Heart Rate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual’s cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  8. Modelling heart rate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual's cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  9. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. PMID:24215748

  10. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-01-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  11. Time rate collision matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Smith, T.M.

    1980-02-01

    The collision integral terms in Boltzmann equation are reformulated numerically leading to the substitution of the multiple integrals with a multiplicative matrix of the two colliding species velocity distribution functions which varies with the differential collision cross section. A matrix of lower rank may be constructed when one of the distribution functions is specified, in which case the matrix elements represent kinetic transition probabilities in the velocity space and the multiplication of the time rate collision matrix with the unknown velocity distribution function expresses the time rate of change of the distribution. The collision matrix may be used to describe the time evolution of systems in nonequilibrium conditions, to evaluate the rate of momentum and energy transfer between given species, or to generate validity criteria for linearized kinetic equations.

  12. Weather Balloon Ascent Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The physics of a weather balloon is analyzed. The surprising aspect of the motion of these balloons is that they ascend to great altitudes (typically 35 km) at a more or less constant rate. Such behavior is not surprising near the ground—say for a helium-filled party balloon rising from street level to the top of the Empire State building—but it is unexpected for a balloon that rises to altitudes where the air is rarefied. We show from elementary physical laws why the ascent rate is approximately constant.

  13. Controlling Your Utility Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucht, Ray; Dembowski, Frederick L.

    1985-01-01

    A cost-effective alternative to high utility bills for middle-sized and smaller utility users is the service of utility rate consultants. The consultants analyze utility invoices for the previous 12 months to locate available refunds or credits. (MLF)

  14. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual consumers…

  15. Paradoxes in Film Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    The author selected a simple random sample of 100 movies from the "Movie and Video Guide" (1996), by Leonard Maltin. The author's intent was to obtain some basic information on the population of roughly 19,000 movies through a small sample. The "Movie and Video Guide" by Leonard Maltin is an annual ratings guide to movies. While not all films ever…

  16. DATA ATTRIBUTE RATING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a data attribute rating system (DARS), developed by EPA to assist in evaluating data associated with emission inventories. he paper presents DARS for evaluation by the potential user community. ARS was originally conceived as a method for evaluating country-sp...

  17. Variable rate irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems are available to producers to make variable-rate applications of defoliants, fertilizer, lime, pesticides, plant growth regulators, and seed. These systems could potentially offer cost savings to a producer; however, the full potential of the benefits and savings cannot be realized if water ...

  18. Variable Rate Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems are available to producers with the ability to make variable-rate applications of defoliants, fertilizer, lime, pesticides, plant growth regulators, and seed. These systems could potentially offer a producer great cost savings; however, the full potential of these benefits and savings cannot...

  19. Toy Stories: Modeling Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    Elementary school mathematics is increasingly recognized for its crucial role in developing the foundational skills and understandings for algebra. In this article, the author uses a lesson to introduce the concept of "rates"--comparing two different types and units of measure--and how to graph them. Described is the lesson and shared…

  20. Understanding Rates of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Aurelia; Russell, Larry

    This paper presents three activities on how to analyze rates of change in real-life situations using TI-83 calculators and computer-based laboratories. Activities include 24 hour temperature data, the temperature of a light bulb, and an M&M toss. Each section contains descriptions of equipment/materials, data collection, and data analysis. The…

  1. 78 FR 18664 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to the average SBA direct loan. This rate may be used as a base rate...

  2. Radiation dose rate meter

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; Siebentritt, C.R.

    1981-07-28

    A combined dose rate meter and charger unit therefor which does not require the use of batteries but on the other hand produces a charging potential by means of a piezoelectric cylinder which is struck by a manually triggered hammer mechanism. A tubular type electrometer is mounted in a portable housing which additionally includes a geiger-muller (Gm) counter tube and electronic circuitry coupled to the electrometer for providing multi-mode operation. In one mode of operation, an rc circuit of predetermined time constant is connected to a storage capacitor which serves as a timed power source for the gm tube, providing a measurement in terms of dose rate which is indicated by the electrometer. In another mode, the electrometer indicates individual counts.

  3. Sequoia Messaging Rate Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Friedley, Andrew

    2008-01-22

    The purpose of this benchmark is to measure the maximal message rate of a single compute node. The first num_cores ranks are expected to reside on the 'core' compute node for which message rate is being tested. After that, the next num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the first core rank, the next set of num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the second core rank, and so on. For example, testing an 8-core node (num_cores = 8) with 4 neighbors (num_nbors = 4) requires 8 + 8 * 4 - 40 ranks. The first 8 of those 40 ranks are expected to be on the 'core' node being benchmarked, while the rest of the ranks are on separate nodes.

  4. Sequoia Messaging Rate Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-22

    The purpose of this benchmark is to measure the maximal message rate of a single compute node. The first num_cores ranks are expected to reside on the 'core' compute node for which message rate is being tested. After that, the next num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the first core rank, the next set of num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the second core rank, and so on. For example, testing an 8-core node (num_cores = 8)more » with 4 neighbors (num_nbors = 4) requires 8 + 8 * 4 - 40 ranks. The first 8 of those 40 ranks are expected to be on the 'core' node being benchmarked, while the rest of the ranks are on separate nodes.« less

  5. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  6. PULSE RATE DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, H.C. Jr.

    1962-12-18

    A compact pulse-rate divider circuit affording low impedance output and high input pulse repetition rates is described. The circuit features a single secondary emission tube having a capacitor interposed between its dynode and its control grid. An output pulse is produced at the anode of the tube each time an incoming pulse at the control grid drives the tube above cutoff and the duration of each output pulse corresponds to the charging time of the capacitor. Pulses incoming during the time the grid bias established by the discharging capacitor is sufficiently negative that the pulses are unable to drive the tube above cutoff do not produce output pulses at the anode; these pulses are lost and a dividing action is thus produced by the circuit. The time constant of the discharge path may be vanied to vary in turn the division ratio of the circuit; the time constant of the charging circuit may be varied to vary the width of the output pulses. (AEC)

  7. Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... staged? Next Topic How is thymus cancer treated? Survival rates for thymus cancer Survival rates are often ... into account. Stage of thymoma 5-year observed survival rate I 74% II 73% III 64% IV ...

  8. Heart-Rate and Breath-Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Circuit requiring only four integrated circuits (IC's) measures both heart rate and breath rate. Phase-locked loops lock on heart-rate and respiration-rate input signals. Each loop IC contains two phase comparators. Positive-edge-triggered circuit used in making monitors insensitive to dutycycle variations.

  9. 29 CFR 778.112 - Day rates and job rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Day rates and job rates. 778.112 Section 778.112 Labor... Requirements Principles for Computing Overtime Pay Based on the âregular Rateâ § 778.112 Day rates and job rates. If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day's work or for doing a particular job, without...

  10. 29 CFR 778.112 - Day rates and job rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Day rates and job rates. 778.112 Section 778.112 Labor... Requirements Principles for Computing Overtime Pay Based on the âregular Rateâ § 778.112 Day rates and job rates. If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day's work or for doing a particular job, without...

  11. 29 CFR 778.112 - Day rates and job rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Day rates and job rates. 778.112 Section 778.112 Labor... Requirements Principles for Computing Overtime Pay Based on the âregular Rateâ § 778.112 Day rates and job rates. If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day's work or for doing a particular job, without...

  12. 29 CFR 778.112 - Day rates and job rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Day rates and job rates. 778.112 Section 778.112 Labor... Requirements Principles for Computing Overtime Pay Based on the âregular Rateâ § 778.112 Day rates and job rates. If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day's work or for doing a particular job, without...

  13. 29 CFR 778.112 - Day rates and job rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Day rates and job rates. 778.112 Section 778.112 Labor... Requirements Principles for Computing Overtime Pay Based on the âregular Rateâ § 778.112 Day rates and job rates. If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day's work or for doing a particular job, without...

  14. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  15. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing, and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  16. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing, and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  17. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  18. Rates of Earth degassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onions, R. K.

    1994-01-01

    The degassing of the Earth during accretion is constrained by Pu-U-I-Xe systematics. Degassing was much more efficient during the first 100-200 Ma than subsequently, and it was more complete for Xe than for the lighter gases. More than 90 percent of the degassed Xe escaped from the atmosphere during this period. The combination of fractional degassing of melts and rare gas escape from the atmosphere is able to explain the deficit of terrestrial Xe as a simple consequence of this early degassing history. By the time Xe was quantitatively retained in the atmosphere, the abundances of Kr and the lighter gases in the Earth's interior were similar to or higher than the present-day atmospheric abundances. Subsequent transfer of these lighter rare gases into the atmosphere requires a high rate of post-accretion degassing and melt production. Considerations of Pu-U-Xe systematics suggest that relatively rapid post-accretion degassing was continued to ca. 4.1-4.2 Ga. The present-day degassing history of the Earth is investigated through consideration of rare gas isotope abundances. Although the Earth is a highly degassed body, depleted in rare gases by many orders of magnitude relative to their solar abundances, it is at the present-day losing primordial rare gases which were trapped at the time of accretion.

  19. Rate of Lysozyme Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, J. K.; Clunie, J. C.

    1997-03-01

    We have observed the following: Free solution measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals grown in aqueous NaCl at 10 deg C at pH values between 3.6 and 5.7 demonstrate that the crystals are positively charged.(J.K. Baird, A.M. Holmes, and J.C. Clunie, Bull.Am.Phys.Soc. 41, 620 (1996)) (2) When the decaying concentration of uncrystallized lysozyme in the growth solution is monitored as a function of time, the log of the half-life decreases linearly with the square-root of the ionic strength. (3) Acid-base titration shows that lysozyme molecules in solution exist as highly charged cations.(R. Roxby and C. Tanford, Biochemistry 10, 3348 (1971)) These three observations combine to suggest that lysozyme crystallizes by addition of lysozyme cations to positively charged crystal nuclei and that the rate is accelerated by the presence of strong electrolytes.

  20. 77 FR 20476 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  1. 77 FR 59447 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to...

  2. 75 FR 60152 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to...

  3. 78 FR 62932 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  4. 78 FR 39434 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  5. 77 FR 39560 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  6. 77 FR 76586 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to...

  7. 75 FR 81326 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  8. 76 FR 38717 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to...

  9. 76 FR 77581 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  10. 75 FR 37872 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to...

  11. 76 FR 18821 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to...

  12. 75 FR 5342 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... COMMISSION Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... preliminary annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.060% (.00060) for tier 2 for calendar year 2010. These... fee rate on class II revenues for calendar year 2010 shall be one-half of the annual fee rate,...

  13. 77 FR 41202 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... COMMISSION Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.074% (.00074) for tier 2 for calendar year 2012. These rates... Commission. If a Tribe has a certificate of self-regulation under 25 CFR part 518, the final fee rate...

  14. 78 FR 14821 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission, Interior. ACTION... Commission has adopted its 2013 preliminary annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.074% (.00074) for tier... preliminary fee rate on Class II revenues shall be one-half of the annual fee rate, which is 0.037%...

  15. 76 FR 38207 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... COMMISSION Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.074% (.00074) for tier 2 for calendar year 2011. These rates... Commission. If a tribe has a certificate of self-regulation under 25 CFR part 518, the final fee rate...

  16. 76 FR 7879 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... COMMISSION Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... preliminary annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.074% (.00074) for tier 2 for calendar year 2011. These... fee rate on class II revenues for calendar year 2011 shall be one-half of the annual fee rate,...

  17. 77 FR 5267 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... COMMISSION Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... preliminary annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.074% (.00074) for tier 2 for calendar year 2012. These... fee rate on class II revenues for calendar year 2012 shall be one-half of the annual fee rate,...

  18. 76 FR 8946 - Security Ratings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 200, 229, 230, 232, 239, 240, and 249 RIN 3235-AK18 Security Ratings AGENCY... will be considering relating to the use of security ratings by credit rating agencies in our rules and... that rely on, or make special accommodations for, security ratings (for example, Forms S-3 and...

  19. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to previous research on sequential ratings of student performance, this study found that professional essay raters of a large-scale standardized testing program produced ratings that were drawn toward previous ratings, creating an assimilation effect. Longer intervals between the two adjacent ratings and higher degree of agreement with…

  20. Primate disease and breeding rates.

    PubMed

    Chamove, A; Cameron, G; Nash, V

    1979-10-01

    33 species were compared for 12 disease categories over 3 years of laboratory housing. There were low correlations between popularity, birth, death, and illness rates. Highest rates were: birth, Macaca nemestrina; illness, Pongo pygmaeus; death, Cercopithecus aethiops. Lowest rates were: birth, Lemur catta; illness, Sanguinus mystax; death, Galago crassicaudatus. Galago crassicaudatus and Macaca fasicularus had low disease and high birth rates. PMID:119108