Sample records for tumble rates rendezvousing

  1. Optical Survey of the Tumble Rates of Retired GEO Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binz, C.; Davis, M.; Kelm, B.; Moore, C.

    2014-09-01

    The Naval Research Lab (NRL) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) have made significant progress toward robotic rendezvous and docking between spacecraft, however the long-term attitude motion evolution of uncontrolled resident space objects has never been well-characterized. This effort set out to identify the motion exhibited in retired satellites at or near geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Through analysis of the periodic structure of observed reflected light curves, estimated tumble rates were determined for several retired satellites, typically in a super-GEO disposal orbit. The NRL's 1-meter telescope at Midway Research Center was used to track and observe the objects while the sun-satellite-observer geometry was most favorable; typically over a one- to two-hour period, repeated multiple times over the course of weeks. By processing each image with calibration exposures, the relative apparent magnitude of the brightness of the object over time was determined. Several tools, including software developed internally, were used for frequency analysis of the brightness curves. Results show that observed satellites generally exhibit a tumble rate well below the notional bounding case of one degree per second. When harmonics are found to exist in the data, modeling and simulation of the optical characteristics of the satellite can help to resolve ambiguities. This process was validated on spacecraft for which an attitude history is known, and agreement was found.

  2. Automated rendezvous and docking: A parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, R.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for achieving autonomous rendezvous and docking of two orbiting space vehicles is described. Results of a digital computer simulation of the technique are presented and used to evaluate its performance under a wide variety of conditions, including docking with tumbling spacecraft. The interrelationships between initial range, tumbling rates, fuel consumption, and time requirements are explored. Factors which limit performance are identified and beneficial modifications proposed.

  3. Study of effects of uncertainties of comet and asteroid encounter and contact guidance requirements. Part 2: Tumbling problem studies. [development of navigation and guidance techniques for space rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of determining the rotational motion of a tumbling celestial body of the asteroid type using spacecraft-acquired data is addressed. The rotational motion of the body is modeled by free-Eulerian motion of a triaxial, rigid body and its translational motion with respect, to a nonrotating, observing spacecraft, which is not thrusting, is assumed to be uniform during the time observations are made. The mathematical details which form the basis for a digital simulation of the motion and observations are presented. Two algorithms for determining the motion from observations for the special case of uniform rotational motion are given.

  4. Tumbling of Small Axisymmetric Particles in Random and Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, K.; Einarsson, J.; Mehlig, B.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the tumbling of small nonspherical, axisymmetric particles in random and turbulent flows. We compute the orientational dynamics in terms of a perturbation expansion in the Kubo number, and obtain the tumbling rate in terms of Lagrangian correlation functions. These capture preferential sampling of the fluid gradients, which in turn can give rise to differences in the tumbling rates of disks and rods. We show that this is a weak effect in Gaussian random flows. But in turbulent flows persistent regions of high vorticity cause disks to tumble much faster than rods, as observed in direct numerical simulations [S. Parsa, E. Calzavarini, F. Toschi, and G. A. Voth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 134501 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.134501]. For larger particles (at finite Stokes numbers), rotational and translational inertia affects the tumbling rate and the angle at which particles collide, due to the formation of rotational caustics.

  5. Aerodynamic analysis of a tumbling American football

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Daniel Edmundson

    In this study, the aerodynamic effects on an American football are characterized, especially in a tumbling, or end-over-end, motion as seen in a typical kickoff or field goal attempt. The objective of this study is to establish aerodynamic coefficients for the dynamic motion of a tumbling American football. A subsonic wind tunnel was used to recreate a range of air velocities that, when coupled with rotation rates and differing laces orientations, would provide a test bed for aerodynamic drag, side, and lift coefficient analysis. Test results quantify effect of back-spin and top-spin on lift force. Results show that the presence of laces imposes a side force in the opposite direction of the laces orientation. A secondary system was installed to visualize air flow around the tumbling ball and record high-speed video of wake patterns, as a qualitative check of measured force directions.

  6. Optimal Rendezvous Path Planning to an Uncontrolled Tumbling Target

    E-print Network

    Dettweiler, Michael

    ). Another problem is that -- according to Orbital Space Debris Program (2011) -- the number of dangerous.chudej@uni-bayreuth.de). Abstract: As the number of uncontrollable objects in low earth orbit is rising, the thread of collisions objects from the important orbits are taken into account by the international space associations

  7. QUENCHING TUMBLING MILL TUMBLES CASTINGS OVER EACH OTHER TO REMOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    QUENCHING TUMBLING MILL TUMBLES CASTINGS OVER EACH OTHER TO REMOVE RUNNERS AND SPRUES WHILE QUICKLY COOLING THEM WITH WATER IN THE MALLEABLE ANNEALING BUILDING. THIS PROCESS ENSURES CASTINGS FORM WHITE IRON PRIOR TO BEING ASSEMBLED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Annealing Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. CTV rendezvous techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Jerry L.; Anderson, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) requires the capability to perform automated rendezvous with Space Station Freedom (SSF) using onboard sensors and algorithms. The current approach to CTV rendezvous applies techniques developed during the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) program which have been mechanized for automatic, onboard execution. The initial catch up sequence can be described as a passive rendezvous without explicit time of arrival control. The ultimate requirement for this rendezvous technique is to place the CTV on the SSF V-bar axis at some specified downrange distance. The launch vehicle will use yaw steering during orbit injection to achieve the proper phantom plane for nodal biasing. This presentation describes the primary components of the CTV rendezvous scheme.

  9. Rough and Tumble Play 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Many people fear that play-fighting or rough and tumble play is the same as real fighting. There is also a fear that this rough play will become real fighting if allowed to continue. Most of all, parents and teachers fear that during the course of rough and tumble play a child may be hurt. To provide for and allow children to play rough without…

  10. Dynamics and control of a tumbling satellite retrieval device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Jon Mark

    The problem of capturing and despinning a satellite in an uncontrolled three-axis tumble is addressed. The proposed solution is a device which resembles a hollow cage. Thin cylindrical elements are arranged in a regular octahedron, forming a three-dimensional space truss with masses mounted at each corner of the octahedron. The device, which is larger than the tumbling satellite, opens at one end and engulfs the satellite. The device maneuvers such that its center of mass is coincident with the satellite's center of mass. By adjusting the corner masses, the device can match the satellite's moment of inertia ratios. Torques are then applied to the device to cause it to match the tumble rates of the satellite. Once this occurs, the torques can be neutralized and the device will follow the satellite's motion in a torque-free tumble. The target (i.e., the satellite) is then motionless in the reference frame of the retrieval device and the satellite can be grappled without fear of damaging solar panels, antennas, or other equipment. Equations are derived which show how the device can vary the mass distribution to match any set of inertia moment ratios. The physical system is shown to be controllable. An optimal control algorithm for tumble matching is then derived and a computer simulation is developed. The results of the computer simulation show that the control algorithm is stable for four test cases involving different satellites in different tumbles.

  11. Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Rendezvous Docking Simulator. The simulation demonstrated linear and gimbal motions of the capsule and a Gemini-Agena docking. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030983. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  12. Apollo Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Originally the Rendezvous was used by the astronauts preparing for Gemini missions. The Rendezvous Docking Simulator was then modified and used to develop docking techniques for the Apollo program. The pilot is shown maneuvering the LEM into position for docking with a full-scale Apollo Command Module. From A.W. Vogeley, 'Piloted Space-Flight Simulation at Langley Research Center,' Paper presented at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1966 Winter Meeting, New York, NY, November 27 - December 1, 1966. 'The Rendezvous Docking Simulator and also the Lunar Landing Research Facility are both rather large moving-base simulators. It should be noted, however, that neither was built primarily because of its motion characteristics. The main reason they were built was to provide a realistic visual scene. A secondary reason was that they would provide correct angular motion cues (important in control of vehicle short-period motions) even though the linear acceleration cues would be incorrect.' Apollo Rendezvous Docking Simulator: Langley's Rendezvous Docking Simulator was developed by NASA scientists to study the complex task of docking the Lunar Excursion Module with the Command Module in Lunar orbit.

  13. Tumbling of a rigid rod in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, J. M. J.; Blöte, H. W. J.

    2014-09-01

    The tumbling of a rigid rod in a shear flow is analyzed in the high viscosity limit. Following Burgers, the Master Equation is derived for the probability distribution of the orientation of the rod. The equation contains one dimensionless number, the Weissenberg number, which is the ratio of the shear rate and the orientational diffusion constant. The equation is solved for the stationary state distribution for arbitrary Weissenberg numbers, in particular for the limit of high Weissenberg numbers. The stationary state gives an interesting flow pattern for the orientation of the rod, showing the interplay between flow due to the driving shear force and diffusion due to the random thermal forces of the fluid. The average tumbling time and tumbling frequency is calculated as a function of the Weissenberg number. A simple crossover function is proposed which covers the whole regime from small to large Weissenberg numbers.

  14. On the tumbling toast problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Riccardo

    2012-09-01

    A didactical revisitation of the so-called tumbling toast problem is presented here. The numerical solution of the related Newton's equations has been found in the space domain, without resorting to the complete time-based law of motion, with a considerable reduction of the mathematical complexity of the problem. This could allow the effect of the different physical mechanisms ruling the overall dynamics to be appreciated in a more transparent way, even by undergraduates. Moreover, the availability from the literature of experimental investigations carried out on tumbling toast allows us to propose different theoretical models of growing complexity in order to show the corresponding improvement of the agreement between theory and observation.

  15. Kazakhstan's Currency Tumbles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Waters, Megan.

    1999-01-01

    This week's In the News follows economic conditions in the former Soviet Republic of Kazakhstan. The seven resources discussed provide news, government links, and background information on Kazakhstan and its currency. Following a Kazahk National Bank announcement ending government limitations on currency exchange, the tenge fell in value from 88.30 tenge to the dollar on April 2, 1999 to 150.00 tenge to the dollar on April 6, 1999. The decision allows Kazakhstan's currency to float freely on international exchange markets and has resulted in some criticism from the International Monetary Fund (IMF). According to the IMF's representative Paul Ross, the decision should stimulate economic growth in this once-industrial economy, but it may come at some social cost. Currently, Kazahk citizens may exchange their bank deposits at pre-fall rates to the dollar providing they do not withdraw their savings for nine months, and as the BBC reports, many shop keepers in the commercial capital of Almaty have already doubled their prices.

  16. Tumble instability in the IC engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Fogleman; J. Lumley; D. Haworth; D. Rempfer

    2002-01-01

    Summary form only given. The objective of this project is to analyze the instability associated with the breakdown of tumble during compression of an internal combustion engine flow. It has been observed that the tumble vortex (a vortex whose axis is perpendicular to the cylinder axis which is produced during intake by an asymmetry of the valve(s)) becomes unstable during

  17. The tumbling spin state of (99942) Apophis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, P.; Scheirich, P.; ?urech, J.; Pollock, J.; Kušnirák, P.; Hornoch, K.; Galád, A.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Harris, A. W.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Opitom, C.; Gillon, M.; Colas, F.; Oey, J.; Vraštil, J.; Reichart, D.; Ivarsen, K.; Haislip, J.; LaCluyze, A.

    2014-05-01

    Our photometric observations of Asteroid (99942) Apophis from December 2012 to April 2013 revealed it to be in a state of non-principal axis rotation (tumbling). We constructed its spin and shape model and found that it is in a moderately excited Short Axis Mode (SAM) state with a ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to the basic spin state energy E/E0=1.024±0.013. (All quoted uncertainties correspond to 3?.) The greatest and intermediate principal moments of inertia are nearly the same with I2/I3=0.965-0.015+0.009, but the smallest principal moment of inertia is substantially lower with I1/I3=0.61-0.08+0.11; the asteroid’s dynamically equivalent ellipsoid is close to a prolate ellipsoid. The precession and rotation periods are P?=27.38±0.07 h and P?=263±6 h, respectively; the strongest observed lightcurve amplitude for the SAM case is in the 2nd harmonic of P1=P=30.56±0.01 h. The rotation is retrograde with the angular momentum vector’s ecliptic longitude and latitude of 250° and -75° (the uncertainty area is approximately an ellipse with the major and minor semiaxes of 27° and 14°, respectively). An implication of the retrograde rotation is a somewhat increased probability of the Apophis’ impact in 2068, but it is still very small with the risk level on the Palermo Scale remaining well below zero. Apophis is a member of the population of slowly tumbling asteroids. Applying the theory of asteroid nutational damping by Breiter et al. (Breiter, S., Ro?ek, A., Vokrouhlický, D. [2012]. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 427, 755-769), we found that slowly tumbling asteroids predominate in the spin rate-size range where their estimated damping times are greater than about 0.2 Gyr. The appearance that the PA/NPA rotators transition line seems to follow a line of constant damping time may be because there are two or more asteroid spin evolution mechanisms in play, or the factor of ?Q (the elastic modulus times the quality factor) is not constant but it may decrease with decreasing asteroid size, which would oppose the trend due to decreasing collisional age or excitation time.

  18. An extension of generalized Taylor dispersion in unbounded homogeneous shear flows to run-and-tumble chemotactic bacteria

    E-print Network

    Bearon, Rachel

    -and-tumble chemotactic bacteria R. N. Bearon School of Oceanography, Box 357940, University of Washington, Seattle of flow, the biased random walk of bacteria such as Escherichia coli is modeled by straight runs. In the well-studied situation of weak bias in tumble rate, bacteria disperse over a diffusive time scale

  19. Vesicle tumbling inhibited by inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laadhari, Aymen; Saramito, Pierre; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2012-03-01

    Vesicles under flow constitute a model system for the study of red blood cells (RBCs) dynamics and blood rheology. In the blood circulatory system the Reynolds number (at the scale of the RBC) is not always small enough for the Stokes limit to be valid. We develop a numerical method in two dimensions based on the level set approach and solve the fluid/membrane coupling by using an adaptive finite element technique. We find that a Reynolds number of order one can destroy completely the vesicle tumbling motion obtained in the Stokes regime. We analyze in details this phenomenon and discuss some of the far reaching consequences. We suggest experimental tests on vesicles.

  20. Rendezvous and docking with remote piloted vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheal, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The man-in-the-loop control system requirements for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are examined. Since many similarities exist between the Teleoperator Retrieval System (TRS) and the unfolding OMV concept, a review of the TRS control system baseline along with selected design trades which led to that baseline are discussed. TRS program issues relevant to the man-in-the-loop control system design include thruster size, communication delays and TV bandwidth compression, range/range rate radar, tumbling targets, shimmed docking interface, and control system definition. A TRS vs. OMV simulation comparative study is summarized, and the major issues currently facing the control system designer on OMV are discussed.

  1. Near Earth asteroid rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Spacecraft Design Course is the capstone design class for the M.S. in astronautics at the Naval Postgraduate School. The Fall 92 class designed a spacecraft for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Mission (NEAR). The NEAR mission uses a robotic spacecraft to conduct up-close reconnaissance of a near-earth asteroid. Such a mission will provide information on Solar System formation and possible space resources. The spacecraft is intended to complete a NEAR mission as a relatively low-budget program while striving to gather as much information about the target asteroid as possible. A complete mission analysis and detailed spacecraft design were completed. Mission analysis includes orbit comparison and selection, payload and telemetry requirements, spacecraft configuration, and launch vehicle selection. Spacecraft design includes all major subsystems: structure, electrical power, attitude control, propulsion, payload integration, and thermal control. The resulting spacecraft demonstrates the possibility to meet the NEAR mission requirements using existing technology, 'off-the-shelf' components, and a relatively low-cost launch vehicle.

  2. History of Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2011-01-01

    This technical history is intended to provide a technical audience with an introduction to the rendezvous and proximity operations history of the Space Shuttle Program. It details the programmatic constraints and technical challenges encountered during shuttle development in the 1970s and over thirty years of shuttle missions. An overview of rendezvous and proximity operations on many shuttle missions is provided, as well as how some shuttle rendezvous and proximity operations systems and flight techniques evolved to meet new programmatic objectives. This revised edition provides additional information on Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and Apollo/Soyuz. Some chapters on the Space Shuttle have been updated and expanded. Four special focus chapters have been added to provide more detailed information on shuttle rendezvous. A chapter on the STS-39 mission of April/May 1991 describes the most complex deploy/retrieve mission flown by the shuttle. Another chapter focuses on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. A third chapter gives the reader a detailed look at the February 2010 STS-130 mission to the International Space Station. The fourth chapter answers the question why rendezvous was not completely automated on the Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle vehicles.

  3. EUS-guided biliary rendezvous using a short hydrophilic guidewire

    PubMed Central

    Kwek, Boon Eu Andrew; Bhandari, Suryaprakash; Bapat, Mukta; Maydeo, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Background and study aims EUS-guided rendezvous technique for biliary access requires expert manipulation of the guidewire across the downstream stricture or papilla. Published literature reports usage of the long-wire system to prevent loss of wire during scope exchange. We studied the efficacy of using a short hydrophilic guidewire in EUS-guided rendezvous. Patients and methods This is a retrospective study conducted in a tertiary care referral centre. 15 patients underwent EUS-guided biliary rendezvous with short wire. EUS-guided transduodenal/transgastric puncture of the biliary system was performed, followed by anterograde placement of a hydrophilic short-wire (260 cm) across the downstream stricture and/or papilla. Retrograde access was then achieved by retrieving the trans-papillary wire, followed by standard ERCP intervention. Main outcome measurements were rates of procedural success and complications. Results EUS-guided biliary rendezvous was successful in 14 patients (93.3%). Failure was seen in one patient due to a tight malignant biliary stricture. One patient had peri-choledochal bile tracking which did not require any specific treatment. Conclusions Short-wire system in EUS-guided biliary rendezvous is highly effective and safe. It is a useful salvage procedure for biliary cannulation in patients with accessible papilla. PMID:22586528

  4. Extraction and Visualization of Swirl and Tumble Motion

    E-print Network

    Tricoche, Xavier

    flows. The simulation data associated with in-cylinder tumble mo- tion within a gas engine, givenExtraction and Visualization of Swirl and Tumble Motion from Engine Simulation Data Christoph Garth with this process are two im- portant patterns of flow: swirl and tumble motion, which optimize the mixing of fluid

  5. TRAC based sensing for autonomous rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Louis J.; Monford, Leo

    1991-01-01

    The Targeting Reflective Alignment Concept (TRAC) sensor is to be used in an effort to support an Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) flight experiment. The TRAC sensor uses a fixed-focus, fixed-iris CCD camera and a target that is a combination of active and passive components. The system experiment is anticipated to fly in 1994 using two Commercial Experiment Transporters (COMET's). The requirements for the sensor are: bearing error less than or equal to 0.075 deg; bearing error rate less than 0.3 deg/sec; attitude error less than 0.5 deg.; and attitude rate error less than 2.0 deg/sec. The range requirement depends on the range and the range rate of the vehicle. The active component of the target is several 'kilo-bright' LED's that can emit 2500 millicandela with 40 milliwatts of input power. Flashing the lights in a known pattern eliminates background illumination. The system should be able to rendezvous from 300 meters all the way to capture. A question that arose during the presentation: What is the life time of the LED's and their sensitivity to radiation? The LED's should be manufactured to Military Specifications, coated with silicon dioxide, and all other space qualified precautions should be taken. The LED's will not be on all the time so they should easily last the two-year mission.

  6. A Tumbling Test for Pressed Pellets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Stewart

    1948-01-01

    A tumbling test for compressed cylindrical pellets is described. The pellets are placed in a cylinder, of glass or mild steel, which is rotated about an axis perpendicular to its axis in a vertical plane. It is shown that for any length of tube there is a speed of rotation at which the loss in weight is a maximum, and

  7. Tumbling For Seed Cleaning and Conditioning1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Dreesen

    Small rock tumblers can be used to clean and condition seeds both in an aqueous and a dry mode. During the process, grit and gravel remove fruit pulp and abrade seed coats. Wet tumbling of seed aids imbibition, leaches water-soluble germination inhibitors, and may partially substitute for cold stratification for some shrub seed lots.

  8. Automated rendezvous and docking with video imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Mike; Kennedy, Larry Z.

    1991-01-01

    For rendezvous and docking, assessing and tracking relative orientation is necessary within a minimum approach distance. Special target light patterns have previously been considered for use with video sensors for ease of determining relative orientation. A generalization of those approaches is addressed. At certain ranges, the entire structure of the target vehicle constitutes an acceptable target; at closer ranges, substructures will suffice. Acting on the same principle as the human intelligence, these structures can be compared with a memory model to assess the relative orientation and range. Models for comparison are constructed from a CAD facet model and current imagery. This approach requires fast image handling, projection, and comparison techniques which rely on rapidly developing parallel processing technology. Relative orientation and range assessment consists of successful comparison of the perceived target aspect with a known aspect. Generating a known projection from a model within required times, say subsecond times, is only now approaching feasibility. With this capability, rates of comparison used by the human brain can be approached and arbitrary known structures can be compared in reasonable times. Future space programs will have access to powerful computation devices which far exceed even this capability. For example, the possibility will exist to assess unknown structures and then control rendezvous and docking, all at very fast rates. The first step which has the current utility, namely applying this to known structures, is taken.

  9. Orbiter Servicer Rendezvous Simulation (ORSIM)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amiel Amato; Mickie D. Hoffman

    1987-01-01

    Orbiter Servicer Rendezvous Simulation (ORSIM) is an automated tool that simulates sequential transfer maneuvers of an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) transporting orbital replaceable units from a space-based depot, or logistics platform, to higher altitude SDI sdatellites. ORSIM calculates OMV energy expenditures (velocity changes) and event histories for various combinations of user-selected orbital transfer maneuvers. Additionally, ORSIM determines the optimal configuration\\/quantities

  10. STS-134 Re-Rendezvous Design History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuit, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    In preparation to provide the capability for the Orion spacecraft to rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS), a new suite of relative navigation sensors are in development and will be tested on one of the final Space Shuttle missions to ISS. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) commissioned a flight test of prototypes of the instruments on STS-134, in order to test their performance in the space environment during the nominal rendezvous and docking, as well as a re-rendezvous dedicated to testing the prototype sensors following the undocking of the Space Shuttle Orbiter at the end of the mission. Unlike the initial rendezvous and docking, the re-rendezvous profile would replicate the newly designed Orion coelliptic approach trajectory, something never before attempted with the Shuttle Orbiter. Therefore, there were a number of new parameters that needed to be conceived of, designed, and tested for this re-rendezvous to make the flight test successful. And all of this work had to be integrated with the normal operations of the ISS and Shuttle and had to conform to the constraints of the mission and vehicles. The result of this work is a separation and re-rendezvous trajectory design that will prove not only the design of the relative navigation sensors for the Orion vehicle, but also will serve as a proof of concept for the Orion rendezvous trajectory itself. This document presents the analysis and decision making process involved in attaining the final STS-134 re-rendezvous design.

  11. NASA MSFC hardware in the loop simulations of automatic rendezvous and capture systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Naumann, Charles B.; Sutton, William; Bryan, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Two complementary hardware-in-the-loop simulation facilities for automatic rendezvous and capture systems at MSFC are described. One, the Flight Robotics Laboratory, uses an 8 DOF overhead manipulator with a work volume of 160 by 40 by 23 feet to evaluate automatic rendezvous algorithms and range/rate sensing systems. The other, the Space Station/Station Operations Mechanism Test Bed, uses a 6 DOF hydraulic table to perform docking and berthing dynamics simulations.

  12. NASA MSFC hardware in the loop simulations of automatic rendezvous and capture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Naumann, Charles B.; Sutton, William; Bryan, Thomas C.

    Two complementary hardware-in-the-loop simulation facilities for automatic rendezvous and capture systems at MSFC are described. One, the Flight Robotics Laboratory, uses an 8 DOF overhead manipulator with a work volume of 160 by 40 by 23 feet to evaluate automatic rendezvous algorithms and range/rate sensing systems. The other, the Space Station/Station Operations Mechanism Test Bed, uses a 6 DOF hydraulic table to perform docking and berthing dynamics simulations.

  13. Orbiter Servicer Rendezvous Simulation (ORSIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Amiel; Hoffman, Mickie D.

    Orbiter Servicer Rendezvous Simulation (ORSIM) is an automated tool that simulates sequential transfer maneuvers of an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) transporting orbital replaceable units from a space-based depot, or logistics platform, to higher altitude SDI sdatellites. ORSIM calculates OMV energy expenditures (velocity changes) and event histories for various combinations of user-selected orbital transfer maneuvers. Additionally, ORSIM determines the optimal configuration/quantities of logistics platforms and OMVs which conform to the dynamics of differential nodal precession, given user-prescribed values of the scheduled maintenance cycle and required servicing times. ORSIM is coded in FORTRAN-77 and is resident on an IBM PC/AT.

  14. Automated rendezvous and proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flecklin, Anton F., II

    1991-01-01

    IR&D efforts in recent years have focused on effective means of performing automated rendezvous and proximity operations. The primary focus for application has been to the Space Shuttle Orbiter and potential derivations, such as the Reusable Cargo Vehicle (RCV), studied in FY 1990. All candidate vehicle mission scenarios have included approach to docking or berthing with the Space Station Freedom (SSF). Results to date indicate that application of appropriate guidance algorithms can reduce docking contact or relative offset conditions, resulting in potential simplification of capture systems.

  15. Rendezvous of Distance-aware Mobile Agents in Unknown Graphs

    E-print Network

    Rendezvous of Distance-aware Mobile Agents in Unknown Graphs Shantanu Das1 , Dariusz Dereniowski2 study the problem of rendezvous of two mobile agents starting at distinct locations in an unknown graph bounds for the general rendezvous problem without distance awareness. Keywords: Mobile Agent, Rendezvous

  16. Terminal guidance and navigation for comet and asteroid rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, A. G.; Pitts, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    A terminal guidance and navigation scheme developed in earlier work was modified and evaluated for a solar electric propulsion rendezvous mission to comet Encke. The scheme is intended for autonomous, on-board use. The guidance algorithm is based on optimal control theory and minimizes the time integrated square of thrust acceleration. The navigation algorithm employs a modified Kalman filter set in measurement variables. Random sequences were generated to simulate measurement errors, and the evaluation was conducted with detailed numerical computations which include actual motions of spacecraft and comet. The evaluations showed that the scheme attains rendezvous and maintains station after rendezvous within less than 10 km for estimated best measurements and within less than 100 km for estimated worst measurements. The measurements required are angles, range, and range rate. Angles and range appear to be absolutely necessary; range rate is not as strong a measurement type, and further modifications of the filter will allow a scheme that does not require the rate measurements.

  17. Boom Rendezvous Alternative Docking Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    Space rendezvous and docking has always been attempted with primarily one philosophic methodology. The slow matching of one vehicle's orbit by a second vehicle and then a final closing sequence that ends in matching the orbits with perfect precision and with near zero relative velocities. The task is time consuming, propellant intensive, risk inherent (plume impingement, collisions, fuel depletion, etc.) and requires substantial hardware mass. The historical background and rationale as to why this approach is used is discussed in terms of the path-not-taken and in light of an alternate methodology. Rendezvous and docking by boom extension is suggested to have inherent advantages that today s technology can readily exploit. Extension from the primary spacecraft, beyond its inherent large inertia, allows low inertia connections to be made rapidly and safely. Plume contamination issues are eliminated as well as the extra propellant mass and risk required for the final thruster (docking) operations. Space vehicle connection hardware can be significantly lightened. Also, docking sensors and controls require less fidelity; allowing them to be more robust and less sensitive. It is the potential safety advantage and mission risk reduction that makes this approach attractive, besides the prospect of nominal time and mass savings.

  18. Comparison of the effects of intake-generated swirl and tumble on turbulence characteristics in a 4-valve engine

    SciTech Connect

    Floch, A.; Frank, J. Van; Ahmed, A.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental investigation is carried out on the effect of Swirl and Tumble on turbulence and combustion characteristics in four-valve spark ignition engines. This study is conducted on an optically accessed single cylinder research engine. The in-cylinder motion is varied by means of flow-control baffle located between the intake manifold and the cylinder head. Several baffle sizes and shapes have been designed to induce various in-cylinder flow fields. The equivalent angular speed of the tumble and swirl vortices, occurring inside the cylinder, are determined from Laser Doppler Velocimetry. Comparisons with measurements from a conventional steady flow rig which measures air motion speed with a paddle wheel anemometer are presented and show a good correlation between the two measurement techniques. The turbulence and local velocity in the combustion chamber at ignition are measured and correlated with combustion characteristics obtained from analysis of the combustion in the cylinder. The influence of tumble and swirl levels on the characteristics of turbulence and combustion is analyzed. As the tumble intensity increases, the breakdown of the tumbling motion into turbulence occurs earlier in the compression stroke. For swirl configurations, the location of the center of rotation has a significant impact on the characteristics of turbulence at the spark plug location.Turbulence intensity measured at the spark plug location correlates well with combustion characteristics such as stability, delay angle, burn angle obtained from heat release rate analysis.

  19. Tumbling, an Interactive Way to Move Forward

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hiroko Sano (New York University School of Medicine; Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Kimmel Center for Biology and Medicine of the Skirball Institute REV)

    2007-11-13

    The migration of Drosophila border cells has become a powerful model with which to genetically identify guidance cues that control the directed migration of a group of interconnected cells. During oogenesis, border cells delaminate from an epithelial layer and move collectively toward the oocyte. In vivo observation has been added to the impressive experimental toolkit available to study border cell migration. These studies reveal two previously unknown migratory behaviors: one in which cells within the border cell cluster constantly change their position, and another called "tumbling," by which the entire border cell cluster rotates forward. Unexpectedly, the same receptor tyrosine kinases control these different modes of migration through separate downstream pathways. An early mode is mediated by the actin regulatory proteins ELMO and Mbc and resembles cellular polarization during individual cell migration; whereas during a later phase, communication between cells, facilitated by mitogen-activated protein kinase and phospholipase C–?, organizes the polarity of the entire cluster.

  20. Soviet automated rendezvous and docking system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinman, Elaine M.; Bushman, David M.

    1991-01-01

    The Soviets have been performing automated rendezvous and docking for many years. This paper will present an overview and brief history of the Soviet AR&D system, based on the open literature and publicly available sources.

  1. LDV measurement and analysis of tumble formation and decay in a four-valve engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kern Y. Kang; Je H. Baek

    1995-01-01

    Tumbling motion is very effective for turbulence enhancement during the compression process inside the cylinder of a four-valve engine. The tumble formation and decay mechanisms in a transparent four-valve engine were investigated by laser-Doppler velocimetry and analyzed by means of the tumble angular momentum and two nondimensional parameters, the tumble eccentricity and the shape factor in the tumble velocity profile.

  2. A bead-spring model for running and tumbling of flagellated swimmers: detailed predictions compared to experimental data for E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Miqiu; Wu, Yan; Li, Guangxian; Larson, Ronald G

    2015-02-28

    To study the swimming of the multi-flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli, we deploy a bead-spring hydrodynamic model (Watari and Larson 2010), whose body and flagellar geometry, motor torques, and motor reversals are adjusted to match the experimental observations of the Berg group (Turner et al. 2000; Darnton et al. 2007) during both running and tumbling of the bacterium. In this model, hydrodynamic interactions, which drive swimming, flagellar bundling, and unbundling during swimming and tumbling, are imposed by treating the beads as Stokeslets, imposing torques and counter-torques on the body and flagellum at the flexible joint connecting them to represent the action of motor, and using the Rotne-Prager tensor to model their hydrodynamic interactions with other beads. We explore the behavior of coarse-grained (60-bead) and refined (120-bead) versions of the model, and show that predictions of running speed, helical and body rotation rates, body wobble rates and angles, average tumbling angles, range of tumbling angles, and flagellar re-bundling times are in good agreement with experimental observations by Berg and coworkers. We find that variation in tumbling angle arises from variation in flagellar number and location on the bacterial body, variations in polymorphic transitions of the filaments, and especially from variations in the duration of the tumbling time, which is roughly linearly correlated with tumbling time up to tumbling angles of around 40-50° and more weakly thereafter. The accuracy of the model suggests its usefulness for future studies of swimming of other flagellated swimmers, for predictions of collective phenomena, and for tuning parameters of coarser-grained swimmer models to achieve greater realism. PMID:25591165

  3. Failed Escape: Solid Surfaces Prevent Tumbling of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Barry, Michael; Stocker, Roman; Sheng, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Understanding how bacteria move close to surfaces is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial dispersion, and pathogenic infections. We used digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>103) of three-dimensional Escherichia coli trajectories near and far from a surface. We found that within 20 ?m from a surface tumbles are suppressed by 50% and reorientations are largely confined to surface-parallel directions, preventing escape of bacteria from the near-surface region. A hydrodynamic model indicates that the tumble suppression is likely due to a surface-induced reduction in the hydrodynamic force responsible for the flagellar unbundling that causes tumbling. These findings imply that tumbling does not provide an effective means to escape trapping near surfaces.

  4. Failed escape: solid surfaces prevent tumbling of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Molaei, Mehdi; Barry, Michael; Stocker, Roman; Sheng, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Understanding how bacteria move close to surfaces is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial dispersion, and pathogenic infections. We used digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>10(3)) of three-dimensional Escherichia coli trajectories near and far from a surface. We found that within 20???m from a surface tumbles are suppressed by 50% and reorientations are largely confined to surface-parallel directions, preventing escape of bacteria from the near-surface region. A hydrodynamic model indicates that the tumble suppression is likely due to a surface-induced reduction in the hydrodynamic force responsible for the flagellar unbundling that causes tumbling. These findings imply that tumbling does not provide an effective means to escape trapping near surfaces. PMID:25148353

  5. Optical Signature Analysis of Tumbling Rocket Bodies via Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Liou, J.-C.; Ojakangas, G.; Mulrooney, M.

    2012-09-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has acquired telescopic lightcurve data on massive intact objects, specifically spent rocket bodies (R/Bs), to ascertain tumble rates in support of the Active Debris Removal (ADR) studies to help remediate the LEO environment. Tumble rates are needed to plan and develop proximity and docking operations for potential future ADR operations. To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC emulates illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC employs a 75-W Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The OMC does not attempt to replicate the rotation rates, but focuses on ascertaining how an object is rotating as seen from multiple phase angles. The two targets studied are scaled (1:48) SL-8 Cosmos 3M second stages. The first target is painted in the standard Russian government "gray" scheme and the second target is white/orange as used for commercial missions. This paper summarizes results of the two scaled rocket bodies, each observed in three independent rotation states: (a) spin-stabilized rotation (about the long axis), (b) end-over-end rotation, and (c) a 10 degree wobble about the center of mass. The first two cases represent simple spin about either primary axis. The third - what we call "wobble" - represents maximum principal axis rotation, with an inertia tensor that is offset from the symmetry axes. By comparing the resultant phase and orientation-dependent laboratory signatures with actual lightcurves derived from telescopic observations of orbiting R/Bs, we intend to assess the intrinsic R/B rotation states. In the simplest case, simulated R/B behavior coincides with principal axis spin states, while more complex R/B motions can be constructed by combinations of OMC-derived optical signature that together form a rudimentary basis set. The signatures will be presented for specific phase angles for each rocket body and shown in conjunction with acquired optical data from multiple telescope sources. The results of the data show possible correlations between the laboratory data and telescopic data for the rotations states mentioned above (b) and (c), but with limited data the results were not definitive to differentiate between color schemes and rotations. The only rotation that did not correlate with the observed telescopic data was the spin-stabilized rotation.

  6. Credit PSR. This interior view shows the vacuum tumble dryer. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit PSR. This interior view shows the vacuum tumble dryer. The tumble dryer is lined with a water jacket to maintain temperature during the drying of ammonium perchlorate ("AP"); water enters and exits the dryer jacket through the pipe fittings along the horizontal center line of the dryer. The wall at the right is constructed to blow out in the event of an explosion - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Oxidizer Dryer Building, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. The Rendezvous Monitoring Display Capabilities of the Rendezvous and Proximity Operations Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack; Spehar, Pete; Clark, Fred; Foster, Chris; Eldridge, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The Rendezvous and Proximity Operations Program (RPOP) is a laptop computer- based relative navigation tool and piloting aid that was developed during the Space Shuttle program. RPOP displays a graphical representation of the relative motion between the target and chaser vehicles in a rendezvous, proximity operations and capture scenario. After being used in over 60 Shuttle rendezvous missions, some of the RPOP display concepts have become recognized as a minimum standard for cockpit displays for monitoring the rendezvous task. To support International Space Station (ISS) based crews in monitoring incoming visiting vehicles, RPOP has been modified to allow crews to compare the Cygnus visiting vehicle s onboard navigated state to processed range measurements from an ISS-based, crew-operated Hand Held Lidar sensor. This paper will discuss the display concepts of RPOP that have proven useful in performing and monitoring rendezvous and proximity operations.

  8. Study of a comet rendezvous mission. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Appendices to the comet Encke rendezvous mission consider relative positions of comet, earth and sun; viewing condition for Encke; detection of Taurid meteor streams; ephemeris of comet Encke; microwave and optical techniques in rendezvous mission; approach instruments; electrostatic equilibrium of ion engine spacecraft; comet flyby data for rendezvous spacecraft assembly; observations of P/Encke extracted from a compilation; and summary of technical innovations.

  9. Demonstration of autonomous rendezvous technology (DART) project summary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy E. Rumford

    2003-01-01

    Since the 1960s, NASA has performed numerous rendezvous and docking missions. The common element of all US rendezvous and docking is that the spacecraft has always been piloted by astronauts. Only the Russian Space Program has developed and demonstrated an autonomous capability. The Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) project currently funded under NASA's SPace Launch Initiative (SLI) Cycle I

  10. Multiple Radios for Fast Rendezvous in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-print Network

    Chu, Xiaowen

    1 Multiple Radios for Fast Rendezvous in Cognitive Radio Networks Lu Yu, Hai Liu, Yiu-Wing Leung, Xiaowen Chu, and Zhiyong Lin Abstract--Rendezvous is a fundamental operation in cognitive radio networks. The existing work on rendezvous implicitly assumes that each cognitive user is equipped with one radio (i

  11. A plan for spacecraft automated rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, A. W.; Lomas, J. J.; Mullins, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    An automated rendezvous approach has been developed that utilizes advances in technology to reduce real-time/near real-time flight operations support personnel to an acceptable level that is near the minimum without jeopardizing the success of the mission. The on-board flight targeting uses a rule-based system to select the pursuit vehicle phasing orbits and uses precise navigation updates from the pursuit/target spacecraft made possible by the global positioning system receivers/processors on both spacecraft to adjust the phasing orbits and achieve rendezvous. The ascent-to-orbit targeting for the pursuit vehicle has been successfully decoupled from the on-orbit orbit transfer phasing targeting. Typical launch window data have been developed for the heavy lift launch vehicle and cargo transfer vehicle for a Space Station Freedom rendezvous mission.

  12. Strategy for capturing of a tumbling space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Shin-Ichiro; Kawamoto, Satomi

    2011-01-01

    In general space debris objects do not possess much convenient features and are non-cooperative. In such cases, since the conditions for capture are not favorable, tracking errors will lead to loading, and momentum transfer will occur during the capture process. In most cases, detailed mass and inertial characteristics of the target are unknown, either because design details are unavailable or due to changes as a result of damage sustained when failure occurred or gradual degradation over the years, and this makes impedance matching of the capture arm force control system difficult. This led to us to devise a "joint virtual depth control" algorithm for robot arm control, which brakes the rotation of a target with unknown inertia. This paper deals with a removal work strategy and control method for capturing and braking a tumbling, non-cooperative target space debris. We propose a new brush type contactor as end-effecter of a robot arm for reducing the rotational rate of the target debris. As a means for relieving the loads generated during target tapping, in addition to joint compliance control we propose a new control method that controls the arm tip force according to a contact force profile.

  13. Optical Signature Analysis of Tumbling Rocket Bodies via Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Liou, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has acquired telescopic lightcurve data on massive intact objects, specifically spent rocket bodies, in order to ascertain tumble rates in support of the Active Debris Removal (ADR) task to help remediate the LEO environment. Rotation rates are needed to plan and develop proximity operations for potential future ADR operations. To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC emulates illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC employs a 75-watt Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The light source is mounted on a rotary arm, allowing access any phase angle between 0 -- 360 degrees. The OMC does not attempt to replicate the rotation rates, but focuses on how an object is rotating as seen from multiple phase angles. The two targets studied are scaled (1:48), SL-8 Cosmos 3M second stages. The first target is painted in the standard government "gray" scheme and the second target is primary white, as used for commercial missions. This paper summarizes results of the two scaled rocket bodies, each rotated about two primary axes: (a) a spin-stabilized rotation and (b) an end-over-end rotation. The two rotation states are being investigated as a basis for possible spin states of rocket bodies, beginning with simple spin states about the two primary axes. The data will be used to create a database of potential spin states for future works to convolve with more complex spin states. The optical signatures will be presented for specific phase angles for each rocket body and shown in conjunction with acquired optical data from multiple telescope sources.

  14. Tumbling of polymers in semidilute solution under shear flow

    E-print Network

    C. -C. Huang; G. Sutmann; G. Gompper; R. G. Winkler

    2011-03-18

    The tumbling dynamics of individual polymers in semidilute solution is studied by large-scale non-equilibrium mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations. We find that the tumbling time is equal to the non-equilibrium relaxation time of the polymer end-to-end distance along the flow direction and strongly depends on concentration. In addition, the normalized tumbling frequency as well as the widths of the alignment distribution functions for a given concentration-dependent Weissenberg number exhibit a weak concentration dependence in the cross-over regime from a dilute to a semidilute solution. For semidilute solutions a universal behavior is obtained. This is a consequence of screening of hydrodynamic interactions at polymer concentrations exceeding the overlap concentration.

  15. Rendezvous lidar sensor system for terminal rendezvous, capture, and berthing to the International Space Station

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew C. M. Allen; Christopher Langley; Raja Mukherji; Allen B. Taylor; Manickam Umasuthan; Timothy D. Barfoot

    2008-01-01

    The Rendezvous Lidar System (RLS), a high-performance scanning time-of-flight lidar jointly developed by MDA and Optech, was employed successfully during the XSS-11 spacecraft's 23-month mission. Ongoing development of the RLS mission software has resulted in an integrated pose functionality suited to safety-critical applications, specifically the terminal rendezvous of a visiting vehicle with the International Space Station (ISS). This integrated pose

  16. Multiple NEO Rendezvous Using Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Fabisinski, Leo; Heaton, Andy; Miernik, Janie; Stough, Rob; Wright, Roosevelt; Young, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Mission concept is to assess the feasibility of using solar sail propulsion to enable a robotic precursor that would survey multiple Near Earth Objects (NEOs) for potential future human visits. Single spacecraft will rendezvous with and image 3 NEOs within 6 years of launch

  17. Red blood cells and other non-spherical capsules in shear flow: oscillatory dynamics and the tank-treading-to-tumbling transition

    E-print Network

    J. M. Skotheim; T. W. Secomb

    2006-05-26

    We consider the motion of red blood cells and other non-spherical microcapsules dilutely suspended in a simple shear flow. Our analysis indicates that depending on the viscosity, membrane elasticity, geometry and shear rate, the particle exhibits either tumbling, tank-treading of the membrane about the viscous interior with periodic oscillations of the orientation angle, or intermittent behavior in which the two modes occur alternately. For red blood cells, we compute the complete phase diagram and identify a novel tank-treading-to-tumbling transition at low shear rates. Observations of such motions coupled with our theoretical framework may provide a sensitive means of assessing capsule properties.

  18. Concept definition study for recovery of tumbling satellites. Volume 2: Supporting research and technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, D. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Cathcart, J. A.; Keeley, M. G.; Madayev, L.; Nguyen, T. K.; Preese, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    A number of areas of research and laboratory experiments were identified which could lead to development of a cost efficient remote, disable satellite recovery system. Estimates were planned of disabled satellite motion. A concept is defined as a Tumbling Satellite Recovery kit which includes a modular system, composed of a number of subsystem mechanisms that can be readily integrated into varying combinations. This would enable the user to quickly configure a tailored remote, disabled satellite recovery kit to meet a broad spectrum of potential scenarios. The capability was determined of U.S. Earth based satellite tracking facilities to adequately determine the orientation and motion rates of disabled satellites.

  19. Designing the STS-134 Re-Rendezvous: A Preparation for Future Crewed Rendezvous Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuit, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    In preparation to provide the capability for the Orion spacecraft, also known as the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), to rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS) and future spacecraft, a new suite of relative navigation sensors are in development and were tested on one of the final Space Shuttle missions to ISS. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) commissioned a flight test of prototypes of the Orion relative navigation sensors on STS-134, in order to test their performance in the space environment during the nominal rendezvous and docking, as well as a re-rendezvous dedicated to testing the prototype sensors following the undocking of the Space Shuttle orbiter at the end of the mission. Unlike the rendezvous and docking at the beginning of the mission, the re-rendezvous profile replicates the newly designed Orion coelliptic approach trajectory, something never before attempted with the shuttle orbiter. Therefore, there were a number of new parameters that needed to be conceived of, designed, and tested for this rerendezvous to make the flight test successful. Additionally, all of this work had to be integrated with the normal operations of the ISS and shuttle and had to conform to the constraints of the mission and vehicles. The result of this work is a separation and rerendezvous trajectory design that would not only prove the design of the relative navigation sensors for the Orion vehicle, but also would serve as a proof of concept for the Orion rendezvous trajectory itself. This document presents the analysis and decision making process involved in attaining the final STS-134 re-rendezvous design.

  20. The REAACT Multiple Asteroid Rendezvous Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, D. T.; Bell, J. F.

    1993-07-01

    The REAACT (Rendezvous with Earth Approaching Asteroids) mission was a proposal to last year's Discovery Program Workshop. This mission is designed to address the major question in asteroid science, the link between the spectral diversity of the asteroids and their geochemistry. Spectral diversity is perhaps the overriding feature of the asteroids. There are currently 17 different asteroid spectral types with at least 5 spectral types having no established meteoritical analogs and several more types having dubious or poorly defined analogs. The best way to link the large body of meteorite geochemical data with the groundbased remote sensing spectral data is asteroid rendezvous that yield imaging, IR-spectroscopy, and high-precision geochemical data. However, part of the scientific landscape are the severe programmatic and budgetary constraints that are imposed by limited NASA resources. The Discovery program was conceived as a way of maximizing those limited resources by emphasizing small, short missions with highly focused scientific objectives. Even with the lowcost Discovery-type missions, we cannot expect more than one or two asteroid rendezvous/sample return missions per decade. But missions that only target a single asteroids for rendezvous cannot provide a statistically meaningful sample of the wide diversity within the asteroids. It will take decades under the current budget constraints to build up an accurate picture of asteroidal geochemistry from single missions. The only way to address the diversity of the asteroids is with multiple rendezvous and REAACT proposes to do exactly that by buying at least four high-quality rendezvous spacecraft under a single Discovery cost cap. This is accomplished by adherence to four cost-saving principals: Maximum Use of Existing Commercial Equipment: REAACT uses the TRW Eagle-class lightsats for the spacecraft bus and a commercial space-qualified CCD camera for the imager. Scientific Instruments of Simple Design and Extensive Heritage: The primary geochemical instrument is an Alpha X-Ray spectrometer that first flew on the Surveyor missions in the 1960s. Target Near-Earth Asteroids: The program targets small asteroids with low- i, low- e and semi-major axis near 1.0 AU using single launches that place the spacecraft on a direct rendezvous trajectory. This keeps cruise times short and makes data return much easier. Built-in Redundancy: Risk is reduced by having multiple spacecraft rather than expensive redundant systems on each spacecraft. This greatly reduces spacecraft cost, complexity, and mass; and with multiple spacecraft the loss of one or even two spacecraft will not cause the failure of the program. In addition the mission plans for all the rendezvous are essentially identical to reduce mission planning and operations costs to a minimum. REAACT offers a cost-effective way to address the fundamental questions of asteroid science. Its advantage lies in its simplicity and redundancy. REAACT can deliver at least four identical commercial-grade spacecraft for quick rendezvous with four asteroids within the budget constraints of one Discovery mission.

  1. Radiation environment for rendezvous and docking with nuclear rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. R.; Warman, E. A.; Lindsey, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Radiation environment data for the NERVA engine are provided which may be utilized in estimating radiation exposures associated with various space maneuvers. Spatial distributions of neutron and gamma tissue kerma rates produced during full thrust operation of the engine are presented. Final rendezvous with an orbiting space station would be achieved subsequent to full thrust operation during a period of 10 or more hours duration in which impulse is delivered by the propellant used for removal of decay heat. Consequently, post operation radiation levels are of prime importance in estimating space station exposures. Maps of gamma kerma rates around the engine are provided for decay times of 4 and 24 hours after a representative firing. Typical decay curves illustrating the dependence of post operation kerma rates on decay time and operating history are included. Examples of the kerma distributions around the engine which result from integration over specific exposure periods are shown.

  2. Tumbling flow in loop-scavenged two-stroke engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yeng-Yung Tsui; Hong-Ping Cheng

    1995-01-01

    A multidimensional calculation procedure is used to investigate the flow in loop-scavenged two-stroke engine with curved cylinder heads. Five different cylinder heads are considered. The curvature of cylinder head increases from case 1 to case 4. In case 5 the head curvature is further increased, but it is shaped in the radially outer region. Calculations reveal that a tumbling vortex

  3. Orion Handling Qualities During ISS Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy J.; Stephens, J. P.; Spehar, P.; Bilimoria, K.; Foster, C.; Gonzalex, R.; Sullivan, K.; Jackson, B.; Brazzel, J.; Hart, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft was designed to rendezvous with multiple vehicles in low earth orbit (LEO) and beyond. To perform the required rendezvous and docking task, Orion must provide enough control authority to perform coarse translational maneuvers while maintaining precision to perform the delicate docking corrections. While Orion has autonomous docking capabilities, it is expected that final approach and docking operations with the International Space Station (ISS) will initially be performed in a manual mode. A series of evaluations was conducted by NASA and Lockheed Martin at the Johnson Space Center to determine the handling qualities (HQ) of the Orion spacecraft during different docking and rendezvous conditions using the Cooper-Harper scale. This paper will address the specifics of the handling qualities methodology, vehicle configuration, scenarios flown, data collection tools, and subject ratings and comments. The initial Orion HQ assessment examined Orion docking to the ISS. This scenario demonstrates the Translational Hand Controller (THC) handling qualities of Orion. During this initial assessment, two different scenarios were evaluated. The first was a nominal docking approach to a stable ISS, with Orion initializing with relative position dispersions and a closing rate of approximately 0.1 ft/sec. The second docking scenario was identical to the first, except the attitude motion of the ISS was modeled to simulate a stress case ( 1 degree deadband per axis and 0.01 deg/sec rate deadband per axis). For both scenarios, subjects started each run on final approach at a docking port-to-port range of 20 ft. Subjects used the THC in pulse mode with cues from the docking camera image, window views, and range and range rate data displayed on the Orion display units. As in the actual design, the attitude of the Orion vehicle was held by the automated flight control system at 0.5 degree deadband per axis. Several error sources were modeled including Reaction Control System (RCS) jet angular and position misalignment, RCS thrust magnitude uncertainty, RCS jet force direction uncertainty due to self plume impingement, and Orion center of mass uncertainty.

  4. Laser space rendezvous and docking tradeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S.; Levinson, S.; Raber, P.; Weindling, F.

    1974-01-01

    A spaceborne laser radar (LADAR) was configured to meet the requirements for rendezvous and docking with a cooperative object in synchronous orbit. The LADAR, configurated using existing pulsed CO2 laser technology and a 1980 system technology baseline, is well suited for the envisioned space tug missions. The performance of a family of candidate LADARS was analyzed. Tradeoff studies as a function of size, weight, and power consumption were carried out for maximum ranges of 50, 100, 200, and 300 nautical miles. The investigation supports the original contention that a rendezvous and docking LADAR can be constructed to offer a cost effective and reliable solution to the envisioned space missions. In fact, the CO2 ladar system offers distinct advantages over other candidate systems.

  5. Lunar Ascent and Rendezvous Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sostaric, Ronald R.; Merriam, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The Lunar Lander Ascent Module (LLAM) will leave the lunar surface and actively rendezvous in lunar orbit with the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). For initial LLAM vehicle sizing efforts, a nominal trajectory, along with required delta-V and a few key sensitivities, is very useful. A nominal lunar ascent and rendezvous trajectory is shown, along with rationale and discussion of the trajectory shaping. Also included are ascent delta-V sensitivities to changes in target orbit and design thrust-to-weight of the vehicle. A sample launch window for a particular launch site has been completed and is included. The launch window shows that budgeting enough delta-V for two missed launch opportunities may be reasonable. A comparison between yaw steering and on-orbit plane change maneuvers is included. The comparison shows that for large plane changes, which are potentially necessary for an anytime return from mid-latitude locations, an on-orbit maneuver is much more efficient than ascent yaw steering. For a planned return, small amounts of yaw steering may be necessary during ascent and must be accounted for in the ascent delta-V budget. The delta-V cost of ascent yaw steering is shown, along with sensitivity to launch site latitude. Some discussion of off-nominal scenarios is also included. In particular, in the case of a failed Powered Descent Initiation burn, the requirements for subsequent rendezvous with the Orion vehicle are outlined.

  6. Multiple exposure of Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Multiple exposure of Rendezvous Docking Simulator. Francis B. Smith, described the simulator as follows: 'The rendezvous and docking operation of the Gemini spacecraft with the Agena and of the Apollo Command Module with the Lunar Excursion Module have been the subject of simulator studies for several years. [This figure] illustrates the Gemini-Agena rendezvous docking simulator at Langley. The Gemini spacecraft was supported in a gimbal system by an overhead crane and gantry arrangement which provided 6 degrees of freedom - roll, pitch, yaw, and translation in any direction - all controllable by the astronaut in the spacecraft. Here again the controls fed into a computer which in turn provided an input to the servos driving the spacecraft so that it responded to control motions in a manner which accurately simulated the Gemini spacecraft.' Published in Barton C. Hacker and James M. Grimwood, On the Shoulders of Titans: A History of Project Gemini, NASA SP-4203; Francis B. Smith, 'Simulators for Manned Space Research,' Paper presented at the 1966 IEEE International convention, March 21-25, 1966.

  7. Radar Performance Improvement. Angle Tracking Modification to Fire Control Radar System for Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The AN/APQ-153 fire control radar modified to provide angle tracking was evaluated for improved performance. The frequency agile modifications are discussed along with the range-rate improvement modifications, and the radar to computer interface. A parametric design and comparison of noncoherent and coherent radar systems are presented. It is shown that the shuttle rendezvous range and range-rate requirements can be made by a Ku-Band noncoherent pulse radar.

  8. Development of Ku-band rendezvous radar tracking and acquisition simulation programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The fidelity of the Space Shuttle Radar tracking simulation model was improved. The data from the Shuttle Orbiter Radar Test and Evaluation (SORTE) program experiments performed at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) were reviewed and analyzed. The selected flight rendezvous radar data was evaluated. Problems with the Inertial Line-of-Sight (ILOS) angle rate tracker were evaluated using the improved fidelity angle rate tracker simulation model.

  9. Statistical Mechanics of Interacting Run-and-Tumble Bacteria

    E-print Network

    J. Tailleur; M. E. Cates

    2008-08-14

    We consider self-propelled particles undergoing run-and-tumble dynamics (as exhibited by E. coli) in one dimension. Building on previous analyses at drift-diffusion level for the one-particle density, we add both interactions and noise, enabling discussion of domain formation by "self-trapping", and other collective phenomena. Mapping onto detailed-balance systems is possible in certain cases.

  10. Aperiodic tumbling of microrods advected in a microchannel flow

    E-print Network

    J. Einarsson; A. Johansson; S. K. Mahato; Y. Mishra; J. R. Angilella; D. Hanstorp; B. Mehlig

    2013-05-30

    We report on an experimental investigation of the tumbling of microrods in the shear flow of a microchannel (40 x 2.5 x 0.4 mm). The rods are 20 to 30 microns long and their diameters are of the order of 1 micron. Images of the centre-of-mass motion and the orientational dynamics of the rods are recorded using a microscope equipped with a CCD camera. A motorised microscope stage is used to track individual rods as they move along the channel. Automated image analysis determines the position and orientation of a tracked rods in each video frame. We find different behaviours, depending on the particle shape, its initial position, and orientation. First, we observe periodic as well as aperiodic tumbling. Second, the data show that different tumbling trajectories exhibit different sensitivities to external perturbations. These observations can be explained by slight asymmetries of the rods. Third we observe that after some time, initially periodic trajectories lose their phase. We attribute this to drift of the centre of mass of the rod from one to another stream line of the channel flow.

  11. Rendezvous of Heterogeneous Mobile Agents in Edge-weighted Networks

    E-print Network

    Rendezvous of Heterogeneous Mobile Agents in Edge-weighted Networks Dariusz Dereniowski1 , Ralf. In the rendezvous problem, two identical mobile agents, initially located in two nodes of a network, move along, but is unable to traverse other types of terrain. By contrast, the other agent may be a specialized mobile unit

  12. GPS aided rendezvous and docking with a commercial space platform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Oberg; C. Cook; P. Gulman; T. Taylor

    1992-01-01

    The OUTPOST platform is a commercial space platform constructed on a salvaged Space Shuttle External Tank which will provide low cost access to Low Earth Orbit operations after its launch in 1996. The platform will rendezvous with several types of vehicles during its operational life. A GPS-based rendezvous and docking system which will support all projected mission operations with established

  13. Powered Safe Abort for Autonomous Rendezvous of Spacecraft

    E-print Network

    How, Jonathan P.

    Powered Safe Abort for Autonomous Rendezvous of Spacecraft Louis Breger and Jonathan P. How MIT-optimized rendezvous trajectories. These trajectories guarantee the existence of known powered abort trajectories the existence of known active safe abort trajectories for a large class of possible spacecraft anomalies

  14. Multiple Radios for Effective Rendezvous in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-print Network

    Chu, Xiaowen

    Multiple Radios for Effective Rendezvous in Cognitive Radio Networks Lu Yu1 , Hai Liu1 , Yiu in cognitive radio networks (CRNs) for establishing a communication link on a commonly-available channel, we investigate the rendezvous problem in CRNs where cognitive users are equipped with multiple radios

  15. Flight operations for Shuttle rendezvous navigation and targeting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Collins

    1984-01-01

    An important mission for the Space Shuttle is orbital rendezvous with free-flying satellites for repair and refurbishment. The recent successful rescue of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite by the Space Shuttle Challenger emphasizes this fact. The task of completing a rendezvous is one that requires the capability to track the target satellite and autonomously determine the maneuvers necessary to

  16. Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Conference, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (ARD) will be a requirement for future space programs. Clear examples include satellite servicing, repair, recovery, and reboost in the near term, and the longer range lunar and planetary exploration programs. ARD will permit more aggressive unmanned space activities, while providing a valuable operational capability for manned missions. The purpose of the conference is to identify the technologies required for an on-orbit demonstration of ARD, assess the maturity of those technologies, and provide the necessary insight for a quality assessment of programmatic management, technical, schedule, and cost risks.

  17. Automated rendezvous and capture demonstration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This study was instituted to assist NASA and MSFC in the development of ground and flight options to demonstrate the capability of Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C). Study goals placed emphasis on low cost approaches and the need to be responsive to newly developing programs and studies such as Space Station Freedom and the Cargo Transfer Vehicle. This study provides an assessment of vehicle options and AR&C requirements to assist in the meaningful development of an AR&C capability. This report documents study activities performed at Applied Research, Inc. (ARI) between 1 Apr. 1992 and May 1993.

  18. Elementary-School Children's Rough-and-Tumble Play and Social Competence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. Pellegrini

    1988-01-01

    The intent of this study was to describe relations between elementary-school children's rough-and-tumble play and their social competence. Elementary-school children (Grades K, 2, and 4) were observed on the school playground during their recess periods. Results suggested that rough-and-tumble play for popular children led to games-with-rules, whereas it led to aggression for rejected children. Furthermore, popular children's rough-and-tumble was positively

  19. Concept definition study for recovery of tumbling satellites. Volume 1: Executive summary, study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, D. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Cathcart, J. A.; Keeley, M. G.; Madayev, L.; Nguyen, T. K.; Preese, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The first assessment is made of the design requirements and conceptual definition of a front end kit to be transported on the currently defined Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) and the Space Transportation System Shuttle Orbiter, to conduct remote, teleoperated recovery of disabled and noncontrollable, tumbling satellites. Previous studies did not quantify the dynamic characteristics of a tumbling satellite, nor did they appear to address the full spectrum of Tumbling Satellite Recovery systems requirements. Both of these aspects are investigated with useful results.

  20. Demonstration of autonomous rendezvous technology (DART) project summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumford, Timothy E.

    2003-08-01

    Since the 1960s, NASA has performed numerous rendezvous and docking missions. The common element of all US rendezvous and docking is that the spacecraft has always been piloted by astronauts. Only the Russian Space Program has developed and demonstrated an autonomous capability. The Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) project currently funded under NASA's SPace Launch Initiative (SLI) Cycle I , provides a key step in establishing an autonomous rendezvous capaibility for the United States. The Objective of the DART mission is to demonstrate, in space, the hardware and software necessary for autonomous rendezvous. Orbital Sciences Corporation intends to integrate an Advanced Video Guidance Sensor and Autonomous Rendezvous and Proximity Operations algorithms into a Pegasus upper stage in order to demonstrate the capability to autonomously rendezvous with a target currently in orbit. The DART mission will occur in April 2004. The launch site will be Vandenberg AFB and the launch vehicle will be a Pegasus XL equipped with a Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System 4th Stage. All mission objectives will be completed within a 24 hour period. The paper provides a summary of mission objectives, mission overview and a discussion on the design features of the chase and target vehicles.

  1. Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) Project Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumford, TImothy E.

    2003-01-01

    Since the 1960's, NASA has performed numerous rendezvous and docking missions. The common element of all US rendezvous and docking is that the spacecraft has always been piloted by astronauts. Only the Russian Space Program has developed and demonstrated an autonomous capability. The Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) project currently funded under NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Cycle I, provides a key step in establishing an autonomous rendezvous capability for the United States. DART's objective is to demonstrate, in space, the hardware and software necessary for autonomous rendezvous. Orbital Sciences Corporation intends to integrate an Advanced Video Guidance Sensor and Autonomous Rendezvous and Proximity Operations algorithms into a Pegasus upper stage in order to demonstrate the capability to autonomously rendezvous with a target currently in orbit. The DART mission will occur in April 2004. The launch site will be Vandenburg AFB and the launch vehicle will be a Pegasus XL equipped with a Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System 4th stage. All mission objectives will be completed within a 24 hour period. The paper provides a summary of mission objectives, mission overview and a discussion on the design features of the chase and target vehicles.

  2. Orbital rendezvous mission planning using mixed integer nonlinear programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Tang, Guo-jin; Luo, Ya-Zhong; Li, Hai-yang

    2011-04-01

    The rendezvous and docking mission is usually divided into several phases, and the mission planning is performed phase by phase. A new planning method using mixed integer nonlinear programming, which investigates single phase parameters and phase connecting parameters simultaneously, is proposed to improve the rendezvous mission's overall performance. The design variables are composed of integers and continuous-valued numbers. The integer part consists of the parameters for station-keeping and sensor-switching, the number of maneuvers in each rendezvous phase and the number of repeating periods to start the rendezvous mission. The continuous part consists of the orbital transfer time and the station-keeping duration. The objective function is a combination of the propellant consumed, the sun angle which represents the power available, and the terminal precision of each rendezvous phase. The operational requirements for the spacecraft-ground communication, sun illumination and the sensor transition are considered. The simple genetic algorithm, which is a combination of the integer-coded and real-coded genetic algorithm, is chosen to obtain the optimal solution. A practical rendezvous mission planning problem is solved by the proposed method. The results show that the method proposed can solve the integral rendezvous mission planning problem effectively, and the solution obtained can satisfy the operational constraints and has a good overall performance.

  3. Rendezvous missions with minimoons from L1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Patterson, G.

    2014-07-01

    We propose to present asteroid capture missions with the so-called minimoons. Minimoons are small asteroids that are temporarily captured objects on orbits in the Earth-Moon system. It has been suggested that, despite their small capture probability, at any time there are one or two meter diameter minimoons, and progressively greater numbers at smaller diameters. The minimoons orbits differ significantly from elliptical orbits which renders a rendezvous mission more challenging, however they offer many advantages for such missions that overcome this fact. First, they are already on geocentric orbits which results in short duration missions with low Delta-v, this translates in cost efficiency and low-risk targets. Second, beside their close proximity to Earth, an advantage is their small size since it provides us with the luxury to retrieve the entire asteroid and not only a sample of material. Accessing the interior structure of a near-Earth satellite in its morphological context is crucial to an in-depth analysis of the structure of the asteroid. Historically, 2006 RH120 is the only minimoon that has been detected but work is ongoing to determine which modifications to current observation facilities is necessary to provide detection algorithm capabilities. In the event that detection is successful, an efficient algorithm to produce a space mission to rendezvous with the detected minimoon is highly desirable to take advantage of this opportunity. This is the main focus of our work. For the design of the mission we propose the following. The spacecraft is first placed in hibernation on a Lissajoux orbit around the liberation point L1 of the Earth-Moon system. We focus on eight-shaped Lissajoux orbits to take advantage of the stability properties of their invariant manifolds for our transfers since the cost to minimize is the spacecraft fuel consumption. Once a minimoon has been detected we must choose a point on its orbit to rendezvous (in position and velocities) with the spacecraft. This is determined using a combination of distance between the minimoon's orbit to L1 and its energy level with respect to the Lissajoux orbit on which the spacecraft is hibernating. Once the spacecraft rendezvous with the minimoon, it will escort the temporarily captured object to analyze it until the withdrawal time when the spacecraft exits the orbit to return to its hibernating location awaiting for another minimoon to be detected. The entire mission including the return portion can be stated as an optimal control problem, however we choose to break it into smaller sub-problems as a first step to be refined later. To model our control system, we use the circular three-body problem since it provides a good approximation in the vicinity of the Earth-Moon dynamics. Expansion to more refined models will be considered once the problem has been solved for this first approximation. The problem is solved in several steps. First, we consider the time minimal problem since we will use a multiple of it for the minimal fuel consumption problem with fixed time. The techniques used to produce the transfers involve an indirect method based on the necessary optimality condition of the Pontriagyn maximum principle coupled with a continuation method to address the sensitivity of the numerical algorithm to initial values. Time local optimality is verified by computing the Jacobi fields of the Hamiltonian system associated to our optimal control problem to check the second-order conditions of optimality and determine the non-existence of conjugate points.

  4. Pathfinder autonomous rendezvous and docking project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Stephen (editor); Mccandless, Wayne (editor)

    1990-01-01

    Capabilities are being developed and demonstrated to support manned and unmanned vehicle operations in lunar and planetary orbits. In this initial phase, primary emphasis is placed on definition of the system requirements for candidate Pathfinder mission applications and correlation of these system-level requirements with specific requirements. The FY-89 activities detailed are best characterized as foundation building. The majority of the efforts were dedicated to assessing the current state of the art, identifying desired elaborations and expansions to this level of development and charting a course that will realize the desired objectives in the future. Efforts are detailed across all work packages in developing those requirements and tools needed to test, refine, and validate basic autonomous rendezvous and docking elements.

  5. Tumbling flow in loop-scavenged two-stroke engines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Y.Y.; Cheng, H.P. [National Chiao Tung Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-12-01

    A multidimensional calculation procedure is used to investigate the flow in loop-scavenged two-stroke engine with curved cylinder heads. Five different cylinder heads are considered. The curvature of cylinder head increases from case 1 to case 4. In case 5 the head curvature is further increased, but it is shaped in the radially outer region. Calculations reveal that a tumbling vortex forms after the exhaust port is closed and the vortex constantly dominates the flow structure in the cylinder throughout the compression period. With high head curvatures the vortex is well organized and occupies the entire cylinder volume in the late compression stage. Due to compression of the better organized tumbling vortex by the moving piston more energy cascades from mean flow to turbulence in the high curvature cases 3 and 4. As for case 5, the larger clearance in the bowl center region leads to lower shear stresses and, thus, the turbulence augmentation phenomenon is less prominent than that for cases 3 and 4.

  6. Study of the intake tumble motion by flow visualization and particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalighi, B.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the in-cylinder tumbling flow generated by an engine head during the induction process using flow visualization and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). The study was carried out for a 4-valve engine head with shrouded intake valves in a special single cylinder transient water analog. This shrouded intake valve configuration was used to obtain a prototypical “pure tumble” flow suitable for fundamental combustion studies. The results revealed that the shrouded intake valves generate a strong, well-behaved tumble vortex on the axial plane between the cylinder head and the piston face. This vortex dominates the entire flow field and seems to be highly repeatable from cycle to cycle. The effect of engine speed on this tumbling flow was studied. An equivalent “tumble ratio” was defined and evaluated using the measured velocity fields at BDC (bottom dead center).

  7. Robust optimization of nonlinear impulsive rendezvous with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, YaZhong; Yang, Zhen; Li, HengNian

    2014-04-01

    The optimal rendezvous trajectory designs in many current research efforts do not incorporate the practical uncertainties into the closed loop of the design. A robust optimization design method for a nonlinear rendezvous trajectory with uncertainty is proposed in this paper. One performance index related to the variances of the terminal state error is termed the robustness performance index, and a two-objective optimization model (including the minimum characteristic velocity and the minimum robustness performance index) is formulated on the basis of the Lambert algorithm. A multi-objective, non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm is employed to obtain the Pareto optimal solution set. It is shown that the proposed approach can be used to quickly obtain several inherent principles of the rendezvous trajectory by taking practical errors into account. Furthermore, this approach can identify the most preferable design space in which a specific solution for the actual application of the rendezvous control should be chosen.

  8. STS-134: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver - Duration: 4:00.

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 18, 2011, space shuttle Endeavour performed the Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or "backflip." With Commander Mark Kelly at the helm, Endeavour rotated 360 degrees backward to enable Internationa...

  9. Supervised autonomous rendezvous and docking systems technology evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, employing the technology assessment that resulted from the Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Conference held at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center on 15-16 Aug. 1990 as the basis undertook a literature search and contacts with major national and international aerospace companies to perform an assessment of the existing technologies and those that are needed to accomplish supervised autonomous rendezvous and docking in space. The following five issues are covered: (1) lessons learned; (2) technology assessment for navigation and guidance sensors for Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D); (3) technology assessment of Guidance, Navigation and Controls (GN&C), techniques for rendezvous and docking; (4) docking mechanisms; and (5) space and ground operations.

  10. The ultimate rendezvous: microbial ecology meets industrial biotechnology

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    The ultimate rendezvous: microbial ecology meets industrial biotechnology Editorial overview and likely, as well as actual, applications for environmental, industrial and health-related biotechnology about by the plethora of emissions associated with industrial growth. At the same time, economic

  11. STS-133: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver - Duration: 4:08.

    NASA Video Gallery

    At 1:15 p.m. EST Saturday, space shuttle Discovery began the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or "backflip." With Commander Steve Lindsey at the helm, Discovery rotated 360 degrees backward t...

  12. STS-135: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver - Duration: 3:15.

    NASA Video Gallery

    On July 10, 2011, space shuttle Atlantis performed the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or â??backflip.â? With Commander Chris Ferguson at the helm, Atlantis rotated 360 degrees backward to ...

  13. Automatic rendezvous and docking systems functional and performance requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A generalized mission design scheme which utilizes a standard mission profile for all OMV rendezvous operations, recognizes typical operational constraints, and minimizes propellant penalties due to nodal regression effects was developed. This scheme has been used to demonstrate a unified guidance and navigation maneuver processor (the UMP), which supports all mission phases through station-keeping. The initial demonstration version of the Orbital Rendezvous Mission Planner (ORMP) was provided for evaluation purposes, and program operation was discussed.

  14. Automated Rendezvous and Capture System Development and Simulation for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.; Murphy, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The United States does not have an Automated Rendezvous and Capture Docking (AR&C) capability and is reliant on manned control for rendezvous and docking of orbiting spacecraft. T h i s reliance on the labor intensive manned interface for control of rendezvous and docking vehicles has a significant impact on the cost of the operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and precludes the use of any U.S. expendable launch capabilities for Space Station resupply. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture (or docking) (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. This A M C system was tested extensively using hardware-in-the-loop simulations in the Flight Robotics Laboratory, and a rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor was developed and successfully flown on the Space Shuttle on flights STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. Further developments in sensor technology and vehicle and target configuration have lead to continued improvements and changes in AR&C system development and simulation. A new Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) with target will be utilized as the primary navigation sensor on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies (DART) flight experiment in 2004. Realtime closed-loop simulations will be performed to validate the improved AR&C systems prior to flight.

  15. Automated rendezvous and capture system development and simulation for NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.; Murphy, Leslie

    2004-09-01

    The United States does not have an Automated Rendezvous and Capture/Docking (AR&C) capability and is reliant on manned control for rendezvous and docking of orbiting spacecraft. This reliance on the labor intensive manned interface for control of rendezvous and docking vehicles has a significant impact on the cost of the operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and precludes the use of any U.S. expendable launch capabilities for Space Station resupply. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture (or docking) (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. This AR&C system was tested extensively using hardware-in-the-loop simulations in the Flight Robotics Laboratory, and a rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor was developed and successfully flown on the Space Shuttle on flights STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. Further developments in sensor technology and vehicle and target configuration have lead to continued improvements and changes in AR&C system development and simulation. A new Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) with target will be utilized as the primary navigation sensor on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies (DART) flight experiment in 2004. Realtime closed-loop simulations will be performed to validate the improved AR&C systems prior to flight.

  16. Tank-treading and tumbling frequencies of capsules and red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza Z. K.; Kalluri, R. Murthy; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2011-04-01

    This study is motivated in part by the discrepancy that exists in the literature with regard to the dependence of the tank-treading frequency of red blood cells on the shear rate and suspending medium viscosity. Here we consider three-dimensional numerical simulations of deformable capsules of initially spherical and oblate spheroidal shapes and biconcave discoid representing the red blood cell resting shape. By considering a much broader range of the viscosity ratio (ratio of capsule or cell interior to suspending fluid viscosity), shear rate, and aspect ratio (ratio of minor to major axes) than that considered in the previous experiments, we find several new characteristics of the tank-treading and tumbling frequencies that have not been reported earlier. These new characteristics are the result of the large shape deformation and the coupling between shape and angular oscillations of the capsules or cells. For the spherical and oblate spheroidal capsules, the tank-treading frequency shows a nonmonotonic trend that is characterized by an initial decrease leading to a minimum followed by an increase with increasing viscosity ratio. For red blood cells, we find two regimes of the viscosity dependence of the tank-treading frequency: an exponential regime in which the tank-treading frequency decreases at a slower rate with increasing viscosity ratio, and a logarithmic range in which it decreases at a much faster rate. While this trend agrees well with different theoretical models of shape-preserving capsules, it was not evident in previous experimental results. When the shear rate dependence is considered, the tank-treading frequency of red blood cells and capsules of highly elongated initial shapes exhibits a nonmonotonic trend that is characterized by an initial increase leading to a maximum followed by a sharp decrease with decreasing shear rate. This anomalous behavior of the tank-treading frequency is shown to be due to a breathing-like dynamics of the capsule or cell that is characterized by a repeated emergence and absence of deep, crater-like dimples, and a large swinging motion. We further observe that the tumbling frequency exhibits a decreasing trend with increasing viscosity ratio that is in contrast to the theoretical result for the shape-preserving capsules and is due to the periodic deformation and preferential alignment of the capsules in the extensional quadrant of the flow.

  17. Automated Rendezvous and Capture System Development and Simulation for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.; Murphy, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The United States does not have an Automated Rendezvous and Capture/Docking (AR and C) capability and is reliant on manned control for rendezvous and docking of orbiting spacecraft. This reliance on the labor intensive manned interface for control of rendezvous and docking vehicles has a significant impact on the cost of the operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and precludes the use of any U.S. expendable launch capabilities for Space Station resupply. The Soviets have the capability to autonomously dock in space, but their system produces a hard docking with excessive force and contact velocity. Automated Rendezvous and Capture/Docking has been identified as a key enabling technology for the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Program, DARPA Orbital Express and other DOD Programs. The development and implementation of an AR&C capability can significantly enhance system flexibility, improve safety, and lower the cost of maintaining, supplying, and operating the International Space Station. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture (or docking) (AR and C) system for U.S. space vehicles. This AR&C system was tested extensively using hardware-in-the-loop simulations in the Flight Robotics Laboratory, and a rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor was developed and successfully flown on the Space Shuttle on flights STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. Further developments in sensor technology and vehicle and target configuration have lead to continued improvements and changes in AR&C system development and simulation. A new Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) with target will be utilized on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies (DART) flight experiment in 2004.

  18. Run-and-tumble dynamics of self-propelled particles in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgeti, Jens; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    Run-and-tumble dynamics is a wide-spread mechanism of swimming bacteria. The accumulation of run-and-tumble microswimmers near impermeable surfaces is studied theoretically and numerically in the low-density limit in two and three spatial dimensions. Both uni-modal and exponential distributions of the run lengths are considered. Constant run lengths lead to peaks and depletions regions in the density distribution of particles near the surface, in contrast to exponentially distributed run lengths. Finally, we present a universal accumulation law for large channel widths, which applies not only to run-and-tumble swimmers, but also to many other kinds of self-propelled particles.

  19. DABCO as a dynamic hinge between cofacial porphyrin panels and its tumbling inside a supramolecular cavity.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Soumen K; Samanta, Debabrata; Bats, Jan W; Schmittel, Michael

    2011-09-16

    The heteroleptic supramolecular double-decker porphyrin 1 was synthesized with DABCO as a guest between two cofacial porphyrin units as characterized by (1)H NMR and ESI-MS. While DABCO is not seen to tumble inside the cavity, even at higher temperatures (80 °C), such motion was triggered upon addition of various coordinating ligands (quinuclidine, 4-bromopyridine, or excess of DABCO). Different stoichiometric amounts were needed depending on the n donor quality of the added ligands to initiate tumbling of the "inside" DABCO. As demonstrated in an example with excess DABCO, the tumbling was stopped by lowering the temperature to -50 °C. PMID:21863790

  20. WISE Observations of Rendezvous Mission Candidate Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Bauer, J. M.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Walker, R. G.; Meech, K. J.; Grav, T.; Weissman, P. R.; Kramer, E.; Stevenson, R.

    2012-10-01

    In 1992, Osip et al. wrote: "Several comet flyby and/or rendezvous missions are currently being planned, for which supporting groundbased data from previous apparitions should prove useful. Here, we discuss groundbased narrowband photometry obtained over the last 15 years for nine candidate comets, five of which have been observed on multiple apparitions -- we derive limits on the size of each cometary nucleus. In order to facilitate spacecraft mission planning, we also present molecular abundance ratios, note variations in cometary activity as a function of orbital position and between apparitions, and note the overall degree of dustiness. A detailed analysis of the characteristics of these nine viable mission candidates will provide necessary information for prioritizing targets for any future missions." In this work, we update Osip et al.'s 1992 work using recent photometric infrared observations of the best candidate comet spacecraft targets observed by WISE and other (IRAS, MSX, ISO, Spitzer) infrared space telescopes. The comets studied include 2P/Encke, 9P/Tempel 1, 10P Tempe1 2, 19P/Borrelly, 22P/Kopff, 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 81P/Wild, 103P/Hartley 2, 107P/Wilson-Harrington. We present imagery, photometry, and temporal trend data, and derived estimates of the dust mass, spatial distribution, albedo/emissivity, and PSD for each comet.

  1. Advanced Multipurpose Rendezvous Tracking System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, R. J.; Sterzer, F.

    1982-01-01

    Rendezvous and docking (R&D) sensors needed to support Earth orbital operations of vehicles were investigated to determine the form they should take. An R&D sensor must enable an interceptor vehicle to determine both the relative position and the relative attitude of a target vehicle. Relative position determination is fairly straightforward and places few constraints on the sensor. Relative attitude determination, however, is more difficult. The attitude is calculated based on relative position measurements of several reflectors placed in a known arrangement on the target vehicle. The constraints imposed on the sensor by the attitude determination method are severe. Narrow beamwidth, wide field of view (fov), high range accuracy, and fast random scan capability are all required to determine attitude by this method. A consideration of these constraints as well as others imposed by expected operating conditions and the available technology led to the conclusion that the sensor should be a cw optical radar employing a semiconductor laser transmitter and an image dissector receiver.

  2. Soviet automated rendezvous and docking system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinman, Elaine M.; Bushman, David M.

    1991-01-01

    The Soviets have been performing automated rendezvous and docking for many years. It has been a reliable mode of resupply and reboost. During the course of the Soviet space program, the autodocking system has evolved. The earlier IGLA system was replaced with the current KURS system. Both systems are radar-based. The variation in strength between antennas is used for computing relative positions and attitudes. The active spacecraft has a transponder. From discussions with Soviet engineers, it seems the docking process can be controlled either from the ground or from the active (docking) spacecraft's onboard computer. The unmanned Progress resupply ships regularly dock with the current MIR Space Station. The Soyuz T spacecraft incorporated the IGLA system, and the later Soyuz TM and Progress M Series spacecraft incorporated the KURS. The MIR Complex has both systems installed. The rear port and the KVANT docking port have the IGLA system installed to support earlier Progress ships that use the IGLA. The first Soyuz TM docking occurred in May of 1986, while the first Progress M docked in September of 1989.

  3. A Monte-Carlo performance analysis of Kalman filter and targeting algorithms for autonomous orbital rendezvous

    E-print Network

    Vaughan, Andrew Thomas, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Autonomous orbital rendezvous with an orbiting sample (OS) is seen as an enabling technology for a Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission, so several demonstrations have been planned. With CNES cooperation a proposed rendezvous ...

  4. Rendezvous and Proximity Operations of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Space Shuttle rendezvous missions present unique challenges that were not fully recognized when the Shuttle was designed. Rendezvous targets could be passive (i.e., no lights or transponders), and not designed to facilitate Shuttle rendezvous, proximity operations, and retrieval. Shuttle reaction control system jet plume impingement on target spacecraft presented induced dynamics, structural loading, and contamination concerns. These issues, along with limited reaction control system propellant in the Shuttle nose, drove a change from the legacy Gemini/Apollo coelliptic profile to a stable orbit profile, and the development of new proximity operations techniques. Multiple scientific and on-orbit servicing missions, and crew exchange, assembly and replenishment flights to Mir and to the International Space Station drove further profile and piloting technique changes. These changes included new proximity operations, relative navigation sensors, and new computer generated piloting cues. However, the Shuttle's baseline rendezvous navigation system has not required modification to place the Shuttle at the proximity operations initiation point for all rendezvous missions flown.

  5. Maneuver strategy for NEAR's rendezvous with 433 Eros^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, David W.; McAdams, James V.; Mosher, Larry E.; Helfrich, Clifford E.

    2000-04-01

    On 17 February, 1996, a Delta-2 rocket placed NASA's Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft into a 2-year ?VEGA trajectory that will rendezvous with the large near-Earth asteroid, 433 Eros in early January 1999. This paper discusses the strategy for performing NEAR's two large deterministic ?Vs, the Deep Space Maneuver (DSM; 269 m/s) 4 months after aphelion of the initial 2-year orbit and the rendezvous (RND; total 971 m/s) with Eros. The DSM was performed flawlessly on 3 July, 1997, 6 days after NEAR's flyby of the main-belt asteroid 253 Mathilde. But NEAR could have still gone into orbit about Eros even if there had been a delay of 8 weeks in performing the DSM. The RND maneuver will be much more time-critical than the DSM. The rendezvous will be split into four burns of decreasing size, the error for each of which will be successively decreased. The design can accommodate one-day and two-day delays. After that, NEAR will fly past Eros, necessitating longer delays and higher ?V costs to orbit the asteroid. A strategy is shown that will allow the full Eros orbital phase to be performed with delays as long as 40 days in performing the first large rendezvous burn. If in the unlikely event the delay is even longer, NEAR could be aimed to swing by the Earth in January 2003, and from there it could encounter 4 Vesta and other interesting objects.

  6. The Rendezvous and Proximity Operations Program displays and controls capabilities as tools for situational awareness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zoran Milenkovic

    2012-01-01

    The idea for the Rendezvous and Proximity Operations Program (RPOP) was conceived by a small group of engineers at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). RPOP was part of the tools and technologies implemented for the first Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking. Since that time RPOP was used on over 60 missions and became an essential tool for Shuttle rendezvous operations. RPOP

  7. Mobile Agent Rendezvous in a Ring Evangelos Kranakis Danny Krizanc y Nicola Santoro Cindy Sawchuk

    E-print Network

    Devoto, Stephen H.

    Mobile Agent Rendezvous in a Ring Evangelos Kranakis #3; Danny Krizanc y Nicola Santoro #3; Cindy Sawchuk #3; Abstract In the rendezvous search problem, two mobile agents must move along the n nodes of a network so as to minimize the time required to meet or rendezvous. When the mobile agents are identical

  8. Tumbling dynamics of isolated polymer chains in strong shear flows and the effects of chain resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald; Saha Dalal, Indranil; Albaugh, Alex; Hoda, Nazish

    2012-02-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulations, without hydrodynamic and excluded volume interactions, on polymer chain models encompassing a wide range of resolutions, we present a detailed investigation on the behavior of isolated chains in shear flow. We find a highly non-monotonic behavior for all models, with chain compression occurring at ultra-high shear rates that is consistent with the recent simulation studies. However, results obtained using highly refined models, with resolutions lower than a Kuhn step, reveal that this transition is an artifact of the level of chain discretization. Also, our results clearly indicate that, at high shear rates, the chain thickness in the shear-gradient direction is independent of the chain length, which differ from previously reported scaling law. We show that the chain thickness is fixed by the distance a sub-section of the chain can diffuse in the shear-gradient direction before convection stretches it out and suppresses further diffusion. Simple physical arguments are then used to derive the correct scaling laws for the coil width and the tumbling time at high shear rates. We believe that our findings presented here will provide the foundation for a better understanding of this basic problem in polymer dynamics.

  9. Unsteady aerodynamic forces and torques on falling parallelograms in coupled tumbling-helical motions.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Kapil; Chang, Song; Wang, Z Jane

    2013-05-01

    Falling parallelograms exhibit coupled motion of autogyration and tumbling, similar to the motion of falling tulip seeds, unlike maple seeds which autogyrate but do not tumble, or rectangular cards which tumble but do not gyrate. This coupled tumbling and autogyrating motion are robust, when card parameters, such as aspect ratio, internal angle, and mass density, are varied. We measure the three-dimensional (3D) falling kinematics of the parallelograms and quantify their descending speed, azimuthal rotation, tumbling rotation, and cone angle in each falling. The cone angle is insensitive to the variation of the card parameters, and the card tumbling axis does not overlap with but is close to the diagonal axis. In addition to this connection to the dynamics of falling seeds, these trajectories provide an ideal set of data to analyze 3D aerodynamic force and torque at an intermediate range of Reynolds numbers, and the results will be useful for constructing 3D aerodynamic force and torque models. Tracking these free falling trajectories gives us a nonintrusive method for deducing instantaneous aerodynamic forces. We determine the 3D aerodynamic forces and torques based on Newton-Euler equations. The dynamical analysis reveals that, although the angle of attack changes dramatically during tumbling, the aerodynamic forces have a weak dependence on the angle of attack. The aerodynamic lift is dominated by the coupling of translational and rotational velocities. The aerodynamic torque has an unexpectedly large component perpendicular to the card. The analysis of the Euler equation suggests that this large torque is related to the deviation of the tumbling axis from the principle axis of the card. PMID:23767634

  10. Rendezvous missions: From ISS to lunar space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazin, Rafail

    2014-08-01

    There was a lot of experience gained in the rendezvous of different vehicles in the LEO during the years of human space exploration. In the framework of the Apollo program when the astronauts landed on the surface of the Moon, the docking of the Lunar Module launched from the Moon's surface to the Apollo Command Module was successfully implemented in the near-Moon orbit. Presently many space agencies are considering a return to the Moon. It is necessary to solve the new task of docking the vehicle launched from the Earth to the long-term near-Moon orbital station taking into account specific constraints. Based on the ISS experience the author proposes a number of ballistic rendezvous strategies that provide for docking to the near-Moon orbital station with minimum propellant consumption. The trade-off analysis of the given rendezvous strategies is presented.

  11. Apollo-Lunar Orbital Rendezvous Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Apollo-Lunar Orbital Rendezvous Technique. The film shows artists rendition of the spacecrafts, boosters, and flight of the Apollo lunar missions. The Apollo spacecraft will consist of three modules: the manned Command Module; the Service Module, which contains propulsion systems; and the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) to carry astronauts to the moon and back to the Command and Service Modules. The spacecraft will be launched via a three-stage Saturn booster. The first stage will provide 7.5 million pounds of thrust from five F-1 engines for liftoff and initial powered flight. The second stage will develop 1 million pounds of thrust from five J-2 engines to boost the spacecraft almost into Earth orbit. Immediately after ignition of the second stage, the Launch Escape System will be jettisoned. A single J-2 engine in the S4B stage will provide 200,000 pounds of thrust to place the spacecraft in an earth parking orbit. It also will be used to propel the spacecraft into a translunar trajectory, then it will separate from the Apollo Modules. Onboard propulsion systems will be used to insert the spacecraft into lunar orbit. Two astronauts will enter the LEM, which will separate from the command and service modules. The LEM will go into elliptical orbit and prepare for landing. The LEM will lift off of the Moon's surface to return to the Command and Service Modules, and most likely be left in lunar orbit. After leaving the Moon's orbit, and shortly before entering Earth's orbit, the Service Module will be ejected. The Command Module will be oriented for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. A drogue parachute will deploy at approximately 50,000 feet, followed by the main parachute system for touchdown. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030988. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  12. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with rendezvous cannulation reduces pancreatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Swahn, Fredrik; Regnér, Sara; Enochsson, Lars; Lundell, Lars; Permert, Johan; Nilsson, Magnus; Thorlacius, Henrik; Arnelo, Urban

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether rendezvous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is associated with less pancreatic damage, measured as leakage of proenzymes, than conventional ERCP. METHODS: Patients (n = 122) with symptomatic gallstone disease, intact papilla and no ongoing inflammation, were prospectively enrolled in this case-control designed study. Eighty-one patients were subjected to laparoscopic cholecystectomy and if intraoperative cholangiography suggested common bile duct stones (CBDS), rendezvous ERCP was performed intraoperatively (n = 40). Patients with a negative cholangiogram constituted the control group (n = 41). Another 41 patients with CBDS, not subjected to surgery, underwent conventional ERCP. Pancreatic proenzymes, procarboxypeptidase B and trypsinogen-2 levels in plasma, were analysed at 0, 4, 8 and 24 h. The proenzymes were determined in-house with a double-antibody enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Pancreatic amylase was measured by an enzymatic colourimetric modular analyser with the manufacturer’s reagents. All samples were blinded at analysis. RESULTS: Post ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) occurred in 3/41 (7%) of the patients cannulated with conventional ERCP and none in the rendezvous group. Increased serum levels indicating pancreatic leakage were significantly higher in the conventional ERCP group compared with the rendezvous ERCP group regarding pancreatic amylase levels in the 4- and 8-h samples (P = 0.0015; P = 0.03), procarboxypeptidase B in the 4- and 8-h samples (P < 0.0001; P < 0.0001) and trypsinogen-2 in the 24-hour samples (P = 0.03). No differences in these markers were observed in patients treated with rendezvous cannulation technique compared with patients that underwent cholecystectomy alone (control group). Post procedural concentrations of pancreatic amylase and procarboxypeptidase B were significantly correlated with pancreatic duct cannulation and opacification. CONCLUSION: Rendezvous ERCP reduces pancreatic enzyme leakage compared with conventional ERCP cannulation technique. Thus, laparo-endoscopic technique can be recommended with the ambition to minimise the risk for post ERCP pancreatitis. PMID:24106403

  13. Robust H? Control for Spacecraft Rendezvous with a Noncooperative Target

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu-Nan; Zhou, Wen-Ya; Tan, Shu-Jun; Wu, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The robust H? control for spacecraft rendezvous with a noncooperative target is addressed in this paper. The relative motion of chaser and noncooperative target is firstly modeled as the uncertain system, which contains uncertain orbit parameter and mass. Then the H? performance and finite time performance are proposed, and a robust H? controller is developed to drive the chaser to rendezvous with the non-cooperative target in the presence of control input saturation, measurement error, and thrust error. The linear matrix inequality technology is used to derive the sufficient condition of the proposed controller. An illustrative example is finally provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controller. PMID:24027446

  14. Laser space rendezvous and docking system study continuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S.; Heynau, H.; Levinson, S.; Weindling, F.

    1977-01-01

    Investigations were made of a configuration for a spaceborne laser radar (ladar) to meet the requirements for rendezvous and docking with a cooperative object in synchronous orbit. An analysis was completed of laser phase locking techniques, while experimental verification was made of pulse repetition frequency and resonant scanning control loops. Data measurements on a satellite mock-up were also made. The investigation supports the original contention that a rendezvous and docking ladar can be configured to offer a cost effective and reliable solution to envisioned space missions.

  15. The effects of tumble and swirl flows on flame propagation in a four-valve S.I. engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kihyung Lee; Choongsik Bae; Kernyong Kang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of in-cylinder flow patterns, such as tumble and swirl flows, on combustion were experimentally investigated in a 4-valve S.I. engine. Tumble flows were generated by intake ports with entry angles of 25°, 20° and 15°. Inclined tumble (swirl) flows were induced by two different swirl control valves. The initial flame propagation was visualized by an ICCD camera, the

  16. Management and Conservation Article Surveying Predicted Rendezvous Sites to

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, Mike

    83638, USA ABSTRACT We used rendezvous site locations of wolf (Canis lupus) packs recorded during 1996 for targeted sampling and future wolf population monitoring surveys. KEY WORDS Canis lupus, gray wolf of gray wolves (Canis lupus) in Idaho, USA (Bangs and Fritts 1996). The United States Fish and Wildlife

  17. Decentralized algorithm for minimum-time rendezvous of Dubins vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amit Bhatia; Emilio Frazzoli

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of minimum-time rendezvous of a team of Dubins vehicle at a pre-assigned destination point starting from arbitrary initial configurations. We impose an additional constraint that the separation between arrival angles of successive team members at the destination be equal. We propose a decentralized algorithm that solves the problem up to a desired level

  18. Optimal analytic rendezvous using Clohessy-Wiltshire equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.; Donaldson, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The optimal solution time that minimizes the sum of the two applied impulses necessary to rendezvous is obtained analytically for the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations with a linear gravity model assumption. A plume impingement inequality constraint on the solution is examined, and an optimal policy is developed. Numerical tests are conducted to verify the analysis and to illustrate the optimal solution algorithm.

  19. Rendezvous Layer Protocols for Bluetooth-Enabled Smart Devices

    E-print Network

    Rendezvous Layer Protocols for Bluetooth-Enabled Smart Devices Frank Siegemund and Michael Rohs- tigate device discovery in Bluetooth, a candidate wireless technology for ubiquitous computing. Detecting new devices accounts for a significant portion of the total energy consumption in Bluetooth

  20. Autonomous rendezvous and docking for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, James L., Jr.; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D) for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: requirements for AR&D experience; Comet spacecraft performance; AR&D mission profile; analytical models for approach trajectory, loosely coupled configuration, and contact dynamics; and application to space infrastructure.

  1. Cognitive Vision for Autonomous Satellite Rendezvous and Docking

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    with the challenge of effec- tively combining low-level vision with artificial intelli- gence. Some of the earliestCognitive Vision for Autonomous Satellite Rendezvous and Docking Faisal Z. Qureshi and Demetri MDRobotics Limited, Brampton, ON L6S 4J3, Canada Abstract We present a cognitively-controlled vision system

  2. Test Results for the Automated Rendezvous and Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruzen, Craig; Dabney, Richard; Lomas, James

    1999-01-01

    The Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) system was designed and tested at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to demonstrate technologies and mission strategies for automated rendezvous and docking of spacecraft in Earth orbit, The system incorporates some of the latest innovations in Global Positioning, System space navigation, laser sensor technologies and automated mission sequencing algorithms. The system's initial design and integration was completed in 1998 and has undergone testing at MSFC. This paper describes the major components of the AR&C system and presents results from the official system tests performed in MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory with digital simulations and hardware in the loop tests. The results show that the AR&C system can safely and reliably perform automated rendezvous and docking missions in the absence of system failures with 100 percent success. When system failures are included, the system uses its automated collision avoidance maneuver logic to recover in a safe manner. The primary objective of the AR&C project is to prove that by designing a safe and robust automated system, mission operations cost can be reduced by decreasing the personnel required for mission design, preflight planning and training required for crewed rendezvous and docking missions.

  3. Rendezvous Planning in Wireless Sensor Networks with Mobile Elements

    E-print Network

    -CP and RP-UG. RP-CP finds the optimal RPs when MEs move along the data routing tree, while RP-UG greedily Collection protocol that facilitates reliable data transfers from RPs to MEs in presence of significant a WSN that utilizes such a mechanism. By configuring the number and locations of RPs, the rendezvous

  4. Dynamical properties of nematic liquid crystals subjected to shear flow and magnetic fields: tumbling instability and nonequilibrium fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Fatriansyah, Jaka Fajar; Orihara, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the dynamical properties of monodomain nematic liquid crystals under shear flow and magnetic fields on the basis of the Ericksen-Leslie theory. Stable and unstable states appear depending on the magnetic field and the shear rate. The trajectory of the unstable state shows tumbling motion. The phase diagram of these states is plotted as a function of the three components of the magnetic field at a constant shear rate. The phase diagram changes depending on the viscous properties of different types of nematic liquid crystals. In this nonequilibrium steady state, we calculate the correlation function of director fluctuations and the response function, and discuss the nonequilibrium fluctuations and the modified fluctuation-dissipation relation in connection with nonconservative forces due to shear flow. PMID:23944477

  5. Design and fabrication of an autonomous rendezvous and docking sensor using off-the-shelf hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, Gary E.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Howard, Richard T.; Book, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed and tested an engineering model of an automated rendezvous and docking sensor system composed of a video camera ringed with laser diodes at two wavelengths and a standard remote manipulator system target that has been modified with retro-reflective tape and 830 and 780 mm optical filters. TRW has provided additional engineering analysis, design, and manufacturing support, resulting in a robust, low cost, automated rendezvous and docking sensor design. We have addressed the issue of space qualification using off-the-shelf hardware components. We have also addressed the performance problems of increased signal to noise ratio, increased range, increased frame rate, graceful degradation through component redundancy, and improved range calibration. Next year, we will build a breadboard of this sensor. The phenomenology of the background scene of a target vehicle as viewed against earth and space backgrounds under various lighting conditions will be simulated using the TRW Dynamic Scene Generator Facility (DSGF). Solar illumination angles of the target vehicle and candidate docking target ranging from eclipse to full sun will be explored. The sensor will be transportable for testing at the MSFC Flight Robotics Laboratory (EB24) using the Dynamic Overhead Telerobotic Simulator (DOTS).

  6. Effect of different tumbling marination treatments on the quality characteristics of prepared pork chops.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tian; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Jiang, Yun; Ma, Ruixue; Song, Lei; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-02-01

    The effect of different tumbling marination treatments (control group, CG; conventional static marination, SM; vacuum continuous tumbling marination, CT; vacuum intermittent tumbling marination, IT) on the quality characteristics of prepared pork chops was investigated under simulated commercial conditions. The CT treatment increased (p<0.05) the pH value, b* value, product yield, tenderness, overall flavor, sensory juiciness and overall acceptability in comparison to other treatments for prepared boneless pork chops. The CT treatment decreased (p<0.05) cooking loss, shear force value, hardness, gumminess and chewiness compared with other treatments. In addition, CT treatment effectively improved springiness and sensory color more than other treatments. However, IT treatment achieved the numerically highest (p<0.05) L* and a* values. These results suggested that CT treatment obtained the best quality characteristics of prepared pork chops and should be adopted as the optimal commercial processing method for this prepared boneless pork chops. PMID:25557823

  7. Effect of Different Tumbling Marination Treatments on the Quality Characteristics of Prepared Pork Chops

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tian; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Jiang, Yun; Ma, Ruixue; Song, Lei; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different tumbling marination treatments (control group, CG; conventional static marination, SM; vacuum continuous tumbling marination, CT; vacuum intermittent tumbling marination, IT) on the quality characteristics of prepared pork chops was investigated under simulated commercial conditions. The CT treatment increased (p<0.05) the pH value, b* value, product yield, tenderness, overall flavor, sensory juiciness and overall acceptability in comparison to other treatments for prepared boneless pork chops. The CT treatment decreased (p<0.05) cooking loss, shear force value, hardness, gumminess and chewiness compared with other treatments. In addition, CT treatment effectively improved springiness and sensory color more than other treatments. However, IT treatment achieved the numerically highest (p<0.05) L* and a* values. These results suggested that CT treatment obtained the best quality characteristics of prepared pork chops and should be adopted as the optimal commercial processing method for this prepared boneless pork chops. PMID:25557823

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, G. V.; Harrington, J. K.; Eastman, M. P.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of EPR line shapes by the method of Polnaszek, Bruno, and Freed is made for slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in viscous nematic liquid crystals. The use of typical vanadyl complexes as spin probes for nematic liquid crystals is shown to simplify the theoretical analysis and the subsequent interpretation. Rotational correlation times tau and orientational ordering parameters S sub Z where slow tumbling effects are expected to be observed in vanadyl EPR spectra are indicated in a plot. Analysis of the inertial effects on the probe reorientation, which are induced by slowly fluctuating torque components of the local solvent structure, yield quantitative values for tau and S sub Z. The weakly ordered probe VOAA is in the slow tumbling region and displays these inertial effects throughout the nematic range of BEPC and Phase V. VOAA exhibits different reorientation behavior near the isotropic-nematic transition temperature than that displayed far below this transition temperature.

  9. Enchanted rendezvous: John C. Houbolt and the genesis of the lunar-orbit rendezvous concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This is the fourth publication of the 'Monographs in Aerospace History' series, prepared by the NASA History Office. These publications are intended to be tightly focused in terms of subject, relatively short in length, and reproduced to allow timely and broad dissemination to researchers in aerospace history. This publication details the arguments of John C. Houbolt, an engineer at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, in his 1961-1962 campaign to support the lunar-orbit rendezvous (LOR). The LOR was eventually selected during Project Apollo as the method of flying to the Moon, landing on the surface, and returning to Earth. The LOR opted to send the entire lunar spacecraft up in one launch, enter into the lunar orbit, and dispatch a small lander to the lunar surface. It was the simplest of the various methods, both in terms of development and operational costs, but it was risky. There was no room for error or the crew could not get home; and the more difficult maneuvers had to be done when the spacecraft was committed to a circumlunar flight. Houbolt was one of the most vocal people supporting the LOR.

  10. Abrasion in pyroclastic density currents: Insights from tumbling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Putz, Constanze; Spieler, Oliver; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2012-01-01

    During granular mass movements of any kind, particles may interact with one another. The degree of interaction is a function of several variables including; grain-size distribution, particle concentration, density stratification and degree of fluidisation. The impact of particle interaction is additionally influenced by the relative speed, impact angle and clast temperature. Thus, both source conditions and transport-related processes are expected to influence the flow dynamics of pyroclastic density currents and their subsequent deposition. Here, we use tumbling experiments to shed light on the susceptibility of porous clasts to abrasion. We investigated the abrasion of unaltered volcanic rocks (5.7-80 vol.% porosity) from Unzen (Japan), Bezymianny (Russia) and Santorini (Greece) volcanoes as well as one synthetic analogue material, an insulating material with the trade name Foamglas® (95 vol.% porosity). Each experiment started with angular fragments generated in a jaw crusher from larger clasts. Two experimental series were performed; on samples with narrow and broader grain-size distributions, respectively. The dry samples were subject to rotational movement at constant speed and ambient temperature in a gum rotational tumbler for durations of 15, 30, 45, 60 and 120 min. The amount of volcanic ash (particles <2 mm) generated was evaluated as a function of experimental duration and sample porosity. We term “abrasion” as the ash fraction generated during the experiments. The observed increase of “abrasion” with increasing sample porosity and experimental duration is initially non-linear but becomes linear for experiments of 30 min duration or longer. For any given sample, abrasion appears to be more effective for coarser samples and larger initial mass. The observed range of ash generated in our experiments is between 1 and 35 wt.%. We find that this amount generally increases with increasing initial clast size or increasing breadth of the initial grain-size distribution. Despite the limits in the complexity that is experimentally attainable in this simulation of ash generation, our results clearly testify the rapid and efficient generation of ash by abrasion, strongly influenced by the material properties (e.g., crystallinity, pore textures).

  11. Effects of swirl and tumble motion on fuel vapor behavior and mixture stratification in lean burn engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomonori Urushihara; Tsutomu Nakata; Akihiko Kakuhou; Yasuo Takagi

    1996-01-01

    Flow measurements using LDV and in-cylinder fuel vapor visualization using LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) were performed for various types of intake systems that generated several different combinations of swirl ratio and tumble ratio in the cylinder. The measured results indicate that there is a necessary condition for swirl ratio and tumble ratio to realize the charge stratification in the cylinder.

  12. Improvement on the electrochemical characteristics of graphite anodes by coating of the pyrolytic carbon using tumbling chemical vapor deposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Young-Soo Han; Jai-Young Lee

    2003-01-01

    The electrochemical characteristics of graphite coated with pyrolytic carbon materials using tumbling chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process have been studied for the active material of anodes in lithium ion secondary batteries. Coating of pyrolytic carbons on the surface of graphite particles, which tumble in a rotating reactor tube, was performed through the pyrolysis of liquid propane gas (LPG). The surface

  13. Use of automated rendezvous trajectory planning to improve spacecraft operations efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Tom A.

    1991-01-01

    The current planning process for space shuttle rendezvous with a second Earth-orbiting vehicle is time consuming and costly. It is a labor-intensive, manual process performed pre-mission with the aid of specialized maneuver processing tools. Real-time execution of a rendezvous plan must closely follow a predicted trajectory, and targeted solutions leading up to the terminal phase are computed on the ground. Despite over 25 years of Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and shuttle vehicle-to-vehicle rendezvous missions flown to date, rendezvous in Earth orbit still requires careful monitoring and cannot be taken for granted. For example, a significant trajectory offset was experienced during terminal phase rendezvous of the STS-32 Long Duration Exposure Facility retrieval mission. Several improvements can be introduced to the present rendezvous planning process to reduce costs, produce more fuel-efficient profiles, and increase the probability of mission success.

  14. Statistics of tumbling of a single polymer molecule in shear flow

    E-print Network

    Sergiy Gerashchenko; Victor Steinberg

    2005-03-11

    We present experimental results on statistics of polymer orientation angles relatively to shear plane and tumbling times in shear flow with thermal noise. Strong deviation of probability distribution functions (PDF) of these parameters from Gaussian was observed and a good accord with theory was found. The scaling relations of PDF widths for both angles as a function of the control parameter $Wi$ are verified and compared with numerics. An universal exponential PDF tail for the tumbling times and its predicted scaling with $Wi$ are also tested experimentally against numerics.

  15. Emergent Run-and-Tumble Behavior in a Simple Model of Chlamydomonas with Intrinsic Noise

    E-print Network

    Rachel R. Bennett; Ramin Golestanian

    2012-11-14

    Recent experiments on the green alga Chlamydomonas that swims using synchronized beating of a pair of flagella have revealed that it exhibits a run-and-tumble behavior similar to that of bacteria such as E. Coli. Using a simple purely hydrodynamic model that incorporates a stroke cycle and an intrinsic Gaussian white noise, we show that a stochastic run-and-tumble behavior could emerge, due to the nonlinearity of the combined synchronization-rotation-translation dynamics. This suggests the intriguing possibility that the alga might exploit nonlinear mechanics---as opposed to sophisticated biochemical circuitry as used by bacteria---to control its behavior.

  16. Genetic algorithm based fuzzy control of spacecraft autonomous rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, C. L.; Freeman, L. M.; Meredith, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines is currently investigating ways to combine the control capabilities of fuzzy logic with the learning capabilities of genetic algorithms. Fuzzy logic allows for the uncertainty inherent in most control problems to be incorporated into conventional expert systems. Although fuzzy logic based expert systems have been used successfully for controlling a number of physical systems, the selection of acceptable fuzzy membership functions has generally been a subjective decision. High performance fuzzy membership functions for a fuzzy logic controller that manipulates a mathematical model simulating the autonomous rendezvous of spacecraft are learned using a genetic algorithm, a search technique based on the mechanics of natural genetics. The membership functions learned by the genetic algorithm provide for a more efficient fuzzy logic controller than membership functions selected by the authors for the rendezvous problem. Thus, genetic algorithms are potentially an effective and structured approach for learning fuzzy membership functions.

  17. Rendezvous and Proximity Operations of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Space Shuttle rendezous missions presented unique challenges that were not fully recognized when the Shuttle was designed. Rendezvous targets could be passive (i.e., no lights or transponders), and not designed to facilitate Shuttle rendezvous, proximity operations and retrieval. Shuttle reaction control system jet plume impingement on target spacecraft presented induced dynamics, structural loading and contamination concerns. These issues, along with limited forward reaction control system propellant, drove a change from the Gemimi/Apollo coelliptic profile heritage to a stable orbit profile, and the development of new proximity operations techniques. Multiple scientific and on-orbit servicing missions and crew exchange, assembly and replinishment flights to Mir and to the International Space Station drove further profile and piloting technique changes, including new relative navigation sensors and new computer generated piloting cues.

  18. Fuzzy genetic controllers for the autonomous rendezvous and docking problem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vijayarangan Gopalan; Abdollalh Homaifar; M. Reza Salami; R. W. Dabney; Bijan Sayyarrodsari

    1995-01-01

    Autonomous rendezvous and docking has been dlefined as one of the primary goals in today’s space technology. Autonomous operation of an unmanned space vehicle in a real world environment poses a series of problems. The kno,wledge about the environment is in general incomplete, uncertain and approximate. Perceptually acquired information is not precise, sensor’s noise introduces uncertainty and imprecision, sensor’s limited

  19. Using advanced industrial robotics for spacecraft Rendezvous and Docking simulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toralf Boge; Ou Ma

    2011-01-01

    One of the most challenging and risky missions for spacecraft is to perform Rendezvous and Docking (RvD) autonomously in space. To ensure a safe and reliable operation, such a mission must be carefully designed and thoroughly verified before a real space mission can be launched. This paper describes a new, robotics-based, hardware-in-the-loop RvD simulation facility which uses two industrial robots

  20. Supervised autonomous rendezvous and docking system technology evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.

    1991-01-01

    Technology for manned space flight is mature and has an extensive history of the use of man-in-the-loop rendezvous and docking, but there is no history of automated rendezvous and docking. Sensors exist that can operate in the space environment. The Shuttle radar can be used for ranges down to 30 meters, Japan and France are developing laser rangers, and considerable work is going on in the U.S. However, there is a need to validate a flight qualified sensor for the range of 30 meters to contact. The number of targets and illumination patterns should be minimized to reduce operation constraints with one or more sensors integrated into a robust system for autonomous operation. To achieve system redundancy, it is worthwhile to follow a parallel development of qualifying and extending the range of the 0-12 meter MSFC sensor and to simultaneously qualify the 0-30(+) meter JPL laser ranging system as an additional sensor with overlapping capabilities. Such an approach offers a redundant sensor suite for autonomous rendezvous and docking. The development should include the optimization of integrated sensory systems, packaging, mission envelopes, and computer image processing to mimic brain perception and real-time response. The benefits of the Global Positioning System in providing real-time positioning data of high accuracy must be incorporated into the design. The use of GPS-derived attitude data should be investigated further and validated.

  1. Trajectory Control of Rendezvous with Maneuver Target Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Zhinqiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear trajectory control algorithm of rendezvous with maneuvering target spacecraft is presented. The disturbance forces on the chaser and target spacecraft and the thrust forces on the chaser spacecraft are considered in the analysis. The control algorithm developed in this paper uses the relative distance and relative velocity between the target and chaser spacecraft as the inputs. A general formula of reference relative trajectory of the chaser spacecraft to the target spacecraft is developed and applied to four different proximity maneuvers, which are in-track circling, cross-track circling, in-track spiral rendezvous and cross-track spiral rendezvous. The closed-loop differential equations of the proximity relative motion with the control algorithm are derived. It is proven in the paper that the tracking errors between the commanded relative trajectory and the actual relative trajectory are bounded within a constant region determined by the control gains. The prediction of the tracking errors is obtained. Design examples are provided to show the implementation of the control algorithm. The simulation results show that the actual relative trajectory tracks the commanded relative trajectory tightly. The predicted tracking errors match those calculated in the simulation results. The control algorithm developed in this paper can also be applied to interception of maneuver target spacecraft and relative trajectory control of spacecraft formation flying.

  2. Fast solar sail rendezvous mission to near Earth asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiangyuan; Gong, Shengping; Li, Junfeng

    2014-12-01

    The concept of fast solar sail rendezvous missions to near Earth asteroids is presented by considering the hyperbolic launch excess velocity as a design parameter. After introducing an initial constraint on the hyperbolic excess velocity, a time optimal control framework is derived and solved by using an indirect method. The coplanar circular orbit rendezvous scenario is investigated first to evaluate the variational trend of the transfer time with respect to different hyperbolic excess velocities and solar sail characteristic accelerations. The influence of the asteroid orbital inclination and eccentricity on the transfer time is studied in a parametric way. The optimal direction and magnitude of the hyperbolic excess velocity are identified via numerical simulations. The found results for coplanar circular scenarios are compared in terms of fuel consumption to the corresponding bi-impulsive transfer of the same flight time, but without using a solar sail. The fuel consumption tradeoff between the required hyperbolic excess velocity and the achievable flight time is discussed. The required total launch mass for a particular solar sail is derived in analytical form. A practical mission application is proposed to rendezvous with the asteroid 99942 Apophis by using a solar sail in combination with the provided hyperbolic excess velocity.

  3. Is Father-Child Rough-and-Tumble Play Associated with Attachment or Activation Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Daniel; Dumont, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The activation relationship theory, primarily focused on parental stimulation of risk-taking along with parental control during exploration, predicts that boys will be activated more than girls by their fathers. This theory may explain why fathers engage in rough-and-tumble play (RTP) with children more frequently than mothers, especially with…

  4. Study of the intake tumble motion by flow visualization and particle tracking velocimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Khalighi

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the in-cylinder tumbling flow generated by an engine head during the induction process using flow visualization and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). The study was carried out for a 4-valve engine head with shrouded intake valves in a special single cylinder transient water analog. This shrouded intake valve configuration was used to obtain

  5. TUMBLING MOTION OF ELLIPTICAL PARTICLES IN VISCOUS TWO-DIMENSIONAL FLUIDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GERALD H. RISTOW

    2000-01-01

    The settling dynamics of spherical and elliptical particles in a viscous Newtonian fluid are investigated numerically using a finite difference technique. The terminal velocity for spherical particles is calculated for different system sizes and the extrapolated value for an infinite system size is compared to the Oseen approximation. Special attention is given to the settling and tumbling motion of elliptical

  6. Rough and Tumble Play Quality: Theoretical Foundations for a New Measure of Father-Child Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Richard; StGeorge, Jennifer; Freeman, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relationships. Animal studies have demonstrated positive developmental effects of peer-peer play-wrestling, influencing cognitive and social outcomes. The purpose of this paper is…

  7. Stereoscopic multi-planar PIV measurements of in-cylinder tumbling flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bücker, I.; Karhoff, D.-C.; Klaas, M.; Schröder, W.

    2012-12-01

    The non-reacting flow field within the combustion chamber of a motored direct-injection spark-ignition engine with tumble intake port is measured. The three-dimensionality of the flow necessitates the measurement of all three velocity components via stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry in multiple planes. Phase-locked stereoscopic PIV is applied at 15 crank angles during the intake and compression strokes, showing the temporal evolution of the flow field. The flow fields are obtained within a set of 14 axial planes, covering nearly the complete cylinder volume. The stereoscopic PIV setup applied to engine in-cylinder flow and the arising problems and solutions are discussed in detail. The three-dimensional flow field is reconstructed and analyzed using vortex criteria. The tumble vortex is the dominant flow structure, and this vortex varies significantly regarding shape, strength, and position throughout the two strokes. The tumble vortex center moves clockwise through the combustion chamber. At first, the tumble has a c-shape which turns into an almost straight tube at the end of the compression. Small-scale structures are analyzed by the distribution of the turbulent kinetic energy. It is evident that the symmetry plane only represents the 3D flow field after 100 CAD. For earlier crank angles, both kinetic energy (KE) and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the combustion chamber are well below the KE and TKE in the symmetry plane. This should be taken into account when the injection and breakup of the three-dimensional fuel jet are studied. The mean kinetic energy is conserved until late compression by the tumble motion. This conservation ensures through the excited air motion an enhancement of the initial air-fuel mixture which is of interest for direct-injection gasoline engines.

  8. Low-thrust mission risk analysis, with application to a 1980 rendezvous with the comet Encke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, C. L.; Smith, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized failure process simulation procedure is used to evaluate the risk in a solar electric space mission. The procedure uses currently available thrust-subsystem reliability data and performs approximate simulations of the thrust sybsystem burn operation, the system failure processes, and the retargeting operations. The method is applied to assess the risks in carrying out a 1980 rendezvous mission to the comet Encke. Analysis of the results and evaluation of the effects of various risk factors on the mission show that system component failure rates are the limiting factors in attaining a high mission relability. It is also shown that a well-designed trajectory and system operation mode can be used effectively to partially compensate for unreliable thruster performance.

  9. Social Gravity: A Virtual Elastic Tether for Casual, Privacy-Preserving Pedestrian Rendezvous

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    of rendezvous without revealing users' positions. Using accelerometers and magnetometers, combined with GPS Mobile, navigation, vibrotactile, GPS, geosocial interaction. ACM Classification Keywords H.5.2 User them. The locations of users en- gaged in rendezvous activity should not be shared directly between

  10. Social Gravity: A Virtual Elastic Tether for Casual, Privacy-Preserving Pedestrian Rendezvous

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    of rendezvous without revealing user's positions. Using accelerometers and magnetometers, combined with GPS Mobile, navigation, vibrotactile, GPS, geosocial interaction. ACM Classification Keywords H.5.2 User them. The locations of users en- gaged in rendezvous activity should not be shared directly between

  11. On-board knowledge-based assistant for orbital Rendez-Vous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Saint-Vincent, Arnaud; Lecouat, Francois; Caloud, Philippe; Marchal, Philippe

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system that supports astronauts in their decision-making in orbit and especially during HERMES Rendez-Vous operations. A model-based failure diagnostic module and a mission replanning module have been implemented. They are being extended and integrated with a supervision module to form a real-time Rendez-Vous testbed.

  12. RELAVIS: the development of a 4D laser vision system for spacecraft rendezvous and docking operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Martin; Daven Maharaj; Robert Richards; Jeffrey W. Tripp; James Bolger; Dan King

    2004-01-01

    Many on-orbit rendezvous missions would benefit from the ability to locate and track a spacecraft at a distance, compute its pose and attitude with high accuracy during close-in maneuvers, and to provide a visual record of the final mission event. The Rendezvous Laser Vision System (RELAVIS), designed by Optech and MD Robotics, meets such needs. Installed on a seeker vehicle,

  13. Mars Orbit Rendezvous Strategy for the Mars 2003\\/2005 Sample Return Mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis A. DAmario; Willard E. Bollman; Wayne J. Lee; Ralph B. Roncoli; John C. Smith

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of the Mars 2003\\/2005 Sample Return Project is to return Martian surface materials to Earth from two different sites by the year 2008. The baseline mission plan relies heavily on the use of a Mars orbit rendezvous strategy similar to the lunar orbit rendezvous scheme used for the Apollo missions. The 2003 mission consists of a single

  14. Constant propellant use rendezvous scenario across a launch window for refueling missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hametz, M. E.; Whittier, R.

    1990-01-01

    Active rendezvous of an unmanned spacecraft with the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle for refueling missions is investigated. The operational constraints facing both the maneuvering spacecraft and the Shuttle during a rendezvous sequence are presented. For example, the user spacecraft must arrive in the generic Shuttle control box at a specified time after Shuttle launch. In addition, the spacecraft must be able to initiate the transfer sequence from any point in its orbit. The standard four-burn rendezvous sequence, consisting of two Hohmann transfers and an intermediate phasing orbit, is presented as a low-energy solution for rendezvous and retrieval missions. However, for refueling missions, the Shuttle must completely refuel the spacecraft and return to Earth with no excess fuel. This additional constraint is not satisfied by the standard four-burn sequence. Therefore, a variation of the four-burn rendezvous, the constant delta-V scenario, was developed to satisfy the added requirement.

  15. Tug rendezvous and docking with a spacecraft - A remote manned approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    The development and use of a visual simulator for remote-manned rendezvous and docking utilizing frame-by-frame, slow-scan, low-light-level TV (LLLTV) was conceived and initiated in mid-1974. The effort was limited to modification, checkout, and validation of simulator hardware specific to this task, to the development of simulation (digital computer) software, and technical support to several rendezvous and docking simulation studies. Analysis and simulation has shown that LLLTV, such as would be required for satellite inspection, could provide a suitable acquisition sensor for a remote manned rendezvous/docking subsystem. A manned, remote simulation has demonstrated its feasibility during the terminal rendezvous and docking phases. Should this approach prove fully adequate in subsequent detailed simulation studies and tests, an order-of-magnitude cost savings can be obtained for early rendezvous and docking operations.

  16. Virtual reality applications to automated rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph; Oneil, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a rapidly developing Human/Computer Interface (HCI) technology. The evolution of high-speed graphics processors and development of specialized anthropomorphic user interface devices, that more fully involve the human senses, have enabled VR technology. Recently, the maturity of this technology has reached a level where it can be used as a tool in a variety of applications. This paper provides an overview of: VR technology, VR activities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), applications of VR to Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C), and identifies areas of VR technology that requires further development.

  17. Reference equations of motion for automatic rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis presented in this paper defines the reference coordinate frames, equations of motion, and control parameters necessary to model the relative motion and attitude of spacecraft in close proximity with another space system during the Automatic Rendezvous and Capture phase of an on-orbit operation. The relative docking port target position vector and the attitude control matrix are defined based upon an arbitrary spacecraft design. These translation and rotation control parameters could be used to drive the error signal input to the vehicle flight control system. Measurements for these control parameters would become the bases for an autopilot or feedback control system (FCS) design for a specific spacecraft.

  18. A study of autonomous rendezvous and docking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of activities in the automatic rendezvous and docking area is presented. A representative mission scenario is covered. A statement of the problem is made and the requirements for the extraction of relative attitude and position data are delineated. A systems block diagram is included and the integral functions which go to make up an autonomous docking system is described. A system was simulated, and the digital simulation is described along with some representative results of a system based a laser ranging device as the sensor. A television camera as the ranging sensor was also considered, one video based automatic docking scheme is discussed along with some representative results.

  19. General heating distributions on the tumbling infinite cylinder. [aerothermodynamics of space shuttle external tank reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    The Shuttle program plans to recover all flight hardware except the External Tank (ET). The ET reentry task requires the quaranteed safe disposal in a remote section and specific footprint of the Indian Ocean or the Antarctic Pacific. The ET is separated from the Orbiter at near orbital speeds and must reenter tumbling, to neutralize lift in an essentially ballistic trajectory. The aerothermodynamic heating becomes an intriguing, complex, and sophisticated series of flow field, boundary layer, and gas dynamic problems that is an important new technology in the reentering disposal task. The singular aspect given in this paper is the general heating distributions for all tumbling attitudes. The objective is to maintain simplicity in form but with variable coefficients to be analytically scaled to account for free molecule, convective laminar and turbulent flow, real gas dissociation or any Reynolds number or Mach number effects.

  20. Membrane compression in tumbling and vacillating-breathing regimes for quasispherical vesicles.

    PubMed

    Guedda, M

    2014-01-01

    We derive some analytical results of a well-known model for quasispherical vesicles in a linear shear flow at low deformability. Attention is focussed on the oscillatory regimes: the tumbling (TB) mode, vacillating-breathing (VB) mode, and the transition from vacillating-breathing to tumbling, depending on a control parameter ?. It is shown that, during the VB-to-TB transition (?=1), the vesicle momentarily attains its maximal extension in the vorticity direction and transits through a circular profile in the shear plane for which the radius is exactly determined. In addition, we provide an explicit analytical expression for the effective membrane tension for different types of motions. We find a critical bending number below which the membrane undergoes compression at each instant and show that, during the VB-to-TB transition, a fourth-order membrane deformation is possible. PMID:24580253

  1. Autonomous control procedures for shuttle rendezvous proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Mitchell, Eric V.; Goodwin, Mary Ann

    1987-01-01

    The results are presented of a study which uses fuzzy sets to model a Space Shuttle pilot's reasoning and actions while performing rendezvous proximity operation maneuvers. In this model fuzzy sets are used to simulate smooth and continuous actions as would be expected from an experienced pilot and to simulate common sense reasoning in the decision process. The present model assumes visual information available to the Shuttle pilot from the Shuttle Crew Optical Alignment Sighting (COAS) device and the overhead window and rendezvous radar sensor information available to him from an onboard display. This model will be used in a flight analysis simulator to perform studies requiring a large number of runs, each of which currently needs an engineer in the loop to supply the piloting decisions. This work has much broader implications in control of robots such as the Flight Telerobotic Servicer, in automated pilot control and attitude control, and in advisory and evaluation functions that could be used for flight data monitoring or for testing of various rule sets in flight preparation.

  2. Assessment of a zero-dimensional model of tumble in four-valve high performance engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Damian Ramajo; Angel Zanotti; Norberto Nigro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess a phenomenological zero-dimensional model (0-D model) in order to evaluate both the in-cylinder tumble motion and turbulence in high-performance engine, focusing on the capability and sensitivity of the model. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The study was performed using a four-valve pentroof engine, testing two different intake ports. The first one was a

  3. Spatio-temporal structure and cycle to cycle variations of an in-cylinder tumbling flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Voisine; L. Thomas; J. Borée; P. Rey

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to make use of PIV and high-speed PIV in a research engine of moderate tumbling ratio in order to\\u000a analyze both the spatial structure of the flow and its temporal evolution during series of consecutive cycles. Appropriate\\u000a analyzing tools are introduced, and four different points are addressed: (1) the chain of events driving the

  4. Tumbling\\/squish Interaction in Loop-Scavenged Two-Stroke Engines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yeng-Yung Tsui; Hong-Ping Cheng

    1997-01-01

    This article describes a numerical investigation of the flow in a loop-scavenged two-stroke engine equipped with a head-bowl combustion chamber. The bowl is either placed in the center of the cylinder head or displaced away from the center. Attention is focused on the period of compression and early expansion. Results show that the effects of compression of the tumbling vortex

  5. Tumbling flow analysis in a four-valve spark ignition engine using particle image velocimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y Li; H Zhao; Z Peng; N Ladommatos

    2002-01-01

    Tumble motion in the cylinder of a four-valve spark ignition (SI) engine with a production-type cylinder head was studied using cross-correlation digital particle image velocimetry (PIV). The in-cylinder flow field was measured on three planes: the vertical symmetric plane of the combustion chamber, the vertical plane through centres of the intake and exhaust valves, and a horizontal plane 12 mm

  6. Characterization of an in-cylinder flow structure in a high-tumble spark ignition engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y Li; H Zhao; B Leach; T Ma; N Ladommatos

    2004-01-01

    A strong in-cylinder tumbling flow, which was produced by partially shrouding the lower periphery of the inlet valves, was measured in a three-valve twin-spark spark ignition (SI) engine using digital particle image velocimetry (PIV). Characteristics of the bulk flow, cyclic variation, frequency spectrum of velocity fluctuation, large- and small-scale fluctuation kinetic energy and integral length scale are analysed in detail.

  7. Tumbling Motion of Elliptical Particles in Viscous Two-Dimensional Flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald H. Ristow

    2000-01-01

    The settling dynamics of spherical and elliptical particles in a viscous\\u000aNewtonian fluid are investigated numerically using a finite difference\\u000atechnique. The terminal velocity for spherical particles is calculated for\\u000adifferent system sizes and the extrapolated value for an infinite system size\\u000ais compared to the Oseen approximation. Special attention is given to the\\u000asettling and tumbling motion of elliptical

  8. Spatio-temporal structure and cycle to cycle variations of an in-cylinder tumbling flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisine, M.; Thomas, L.; Borée, J.; Rey, P.

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to make use of PIV and high-speed PIV in a research engine of moderate tumbling ratio in order to analyze both the spatial structure of the flow and its temporal evolution during series of consecutive cycles. Appropriate analyzing tools are introduced, and four different points are addressed: (1) the chain of events driving the generation of the three-dimensional mean tumbling motion is investigated; (2) a Lagrangian analysis of the roll-up of the tumbling jet in individual cycles demonstrates a strong cycle to cycle variation during the compression phase (the rms of the position of the jet front being approximately 10% of the piston stroke); (3) focussing on the "breakdown" phase, phase invariant proper orthogonal decomposition enables us to distinguish cycles according to their structure near top dead center (TDC). We show that when the coherent energy of the flow is conserved, there is no increase in the fluctuating kinetic energy; (4) finally, the phase-averaged Reynolds stresses is decomposed into a contribution of the in-cycle coherence and the turbulence carried by the flow states. Approximately 30% of the fluctuating kinetic energy is due to cycle to cycle fluctuations in this chamber near TDC.

  9. Analysis of transitions between fluttering, tumbling and steady descent of falling cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, A.; Pesavento, U.; Wang, Z. Jane

    2005-10-01

    We study the dynamics of a rigid card falling in air using direct numerical simulations of the two-dimensional Navier Stokes equation and a fluid force model based on ordinary differential equations derived from recent experiments and simulations. The system depends on three non-dimensional parameters, i.e. the thickness-to-width ratio, the dimensionless moment of inertia, and the Reynolds number. By increasing the thickness-to-width ratio in the direct numerical simulations and thereby the non-dimensional moment of inertia we observe a transition from periodic fluttering to periodic tumbling with a wide transition region in which the cards flutter periodically but tumble once between consecutive turning points. In the transition region the period of oscillation diverges and the cards fall vertically for distances of up to 50 times the card width. We analyse the transition between fluttering and tumbling in the ODE model and find a heteroclinic bifurcation which leads to a logarithmic divergence of the period of oscillation at the bifurcation point. We further discuss the bifurcation scenario of the ODE model in relation to our direct numerical simulations and the phase diagrams measured by willmarth, Hawk & Harvey (1964) and belmonte, Eisenberg & Moses (1998).

  10. Gossip-Based Solutions for Discrete Rendezvous in Populations of Communicating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Christopher D.; Wu, Annie S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the rendezvous problem is to construct a method that enables a population of agents to agree on a spatial (and possibly temporal) meeting location. We introduce the buffered gossip algorithm as a general solution to the rendezvous problem in a discrete domain with direct communication between decentralized agents. We compare the performance of the buffered gossip algorithm against the well known uniform gossip algorithm. We believe that a buffered solution is preferable to an unbuffered solution, such as the uniform gossip algorithm, because the use of a buffer allows an agent to use multiple information sources when determining its desired rendezvous point, and that access to multiple information sources may improve agent decision making by reinforcing or contradicting an initial choice. To show that the buffered gossip algorithm is an actual solution for the rendezvous problem, we construct a theoretical proof of convergence and derive the conditions under which the buffered gossip algorithm is guaranteed to produce a consensus on rendezvous location. We use these results to verify that the uniform gossip algorithm also solves the rendezvous problem. We then use a multi-agent simulation to conduct a series of simulation experiments to compare the performance between the buffered and uniform gossip algorithms. Our results suggest that the buffered gossip algorithm can solve the rendezvous problem faster than the uniform gossip algorithm; however, the relative performance between these two solutions depends on the specific constraints of the problem and the parameters of the buffered gossip algorithm. PMID:25397882

  11. Longitudinal Trim and Tumble Characteristics of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane, TED NO. NACA DE311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert L.

    1948-01-01

    Based on results of longitudinal trim and tumble tests of a 0.057-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane, the following conclusions regarding the trim and tumble characteristics of the airplane have been drawn: 1. The airplane will not trim at any unusual or uncontrolled angles of attack. 2. The airplane will not tumble with the center of gravity located forward of 24 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord. When the center of gravity is located at 24 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord and slats are extended and elevators are deflected full up, the airplane may tumble if given an external positive pitching moment. 3. The tumbling motion obtained will be readily terminated by deflecting the elevators full down so as to oppose the rotation. 4. The accelerations encountered during an established tumble may be dangerous to the pilot and, therefore, action should be taken to terminate a tumble immediately upon its inception. 5. Simultaneous opening of two wing-tip parachutes having diameters of 4 feet or larger and having drag coefficients of approximately 0.7 will effectively terminate the tumble. 6. Model results indicate that the pilot will not be struck by the airplane if it becomes necessary to leave the airplane during a tumble. The pilot may require aid from an ejection-seat arrangement.

  12. New developments in astrodynamics algorithms for autonomous rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, Allan R.

    1991-01-01

    A the core of any autonomous rendezvous guidance system must be two algorithms for solving Lambert's and Kepler's problems, the two fundamental problems in classical astrodynamics. Lambert's problem is to determine the trajectory connecting specified initial and terminal position vectors in a specified transfer time. The solution is the initial and terminal velocity vectors. Kepler's problem is to determine the trajectory that stems from a given initial state (position and velocity). The solution is the state of an earlier or later specified time. To be suitable for flight software, astrodynamics algorithms must be totally reliable, compact, and fast. Although solving Lambert's and Kepler's problems has challenged some of the world's finest minds for over two centuries, only in the last year have algorithms appeared that satisfy all three requirements just stated. This paper presents an evaluation of the most highly regarded Lambert and Kepler algorithms.

  13. Real-time simulations for automated rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuseo, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Although the individual technologies for automated rendezvous and capture (AR&C) exist, they have not yet been integrated to produce a working system in the United States. Thus, real-time integrated systems simulations are critical to the development and pre-flight demonstration of an AR&C capability. Real-time simulations require a level of development more typical of a flight system compared to purely analytical methods, thus providing confidence in derived design concepts. This presentation will describe Martin Marietta's Space Operations Simulation (SOS) Laboratory, a state-of-the-art real-time simulation facility for AR&C, along with an implementation for the Satellite Servicer System (SSS) Program.

  14. Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Spacecraft/Delta II launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft undergoing preflight preparation in the Spacecraft Assembly Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). NEAR will perform two critical mission events - Mathilde flyby and the Deep-Space maneuver. NEAR will fly-by Mathilde, a 38-mile (61-km) diameter C-type asteroid, making use of its imaging system to obtain useful optical navigation images. The primary science instrument will be the camera, but measurements of magnetic fields and mass also will be made. The Deep-Space Maneuver (DSM) will be executed about a week after the Mathilde fly-by. The DSM represents the first of two major burns during the NEAR mission of the 100-pound bi-propellant (Hydrazine/nitrogen tetroxide) thruster. This maneuver is necessary to lower the perihelion distance of NEAR's trajectory. The DSM will be conducted in two segments to minimize the possibility of an overburn situation.

  15. Orion Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, and Docking Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Hanak, F. Chad; Spehar, Pete; Clark, Fred D.; Jackson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The Orion vehicle will be required to perform rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and the Earth Departure Stage (EDS)/Lunar Landing Vehicle (LLV) stack in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) as well as with the Lunar Landing Vehicle in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). The RPOD system, which consists of sensors, actuators, and software is being designed to be flexible and robust enough to perform RPOD with different vehicles in different environments. This paper will describe the design and the analysis which has been performed to date to allow the vehicle to perform its mission. Since the RPOD design touches on many areas such as sensors selection and placement, trajectory design, navigation performance, and effector performance, it is inherently a systems design problem. This paper will address each of these issues in order to demonstrate how the Orion RPOD has been designed to accommodate and meet all the requirements levied on the system.

  16. Rendezvous, proximity operations and capture quality function deployment report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Stephen L. (editor)

    1991-01-01

    Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, and Capture (RPOC) is a missions operations area which is extremely important to present and future space initiatives and must be well planned and coordinated. To support this, a study team was formed to identify a specific plan of action using the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) process. This team was composed of members from a wide spectrum of engineering and operations organizations which are involved in the RPOC technology area. The key to this study's success is an understanding of the needs of potential programmatic customers and the technology base available for system implementation. To this end, the study team conducted interviews with a variety of near term and future programmatic customers and technology development sponsors. The QFD activity led to a thorough understanding of the needs of these customers in the RPOC area, as well as the relative importance of these needs.

  17. Single photon lidar demonstrator for asteroid rendezvous missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, Michael; Michalek, Vojtech; Peca, Marek; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Djurovic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    We present compact single photon lidar demonstrator dedicated for asteroid rendezvous missions. The instrument provides crucial data on altitude and terrain profile for altitudes exceeding 5km with a precision of less than 10 cm fulfilling the Rayleigh criterion. Transmitter and receiver optics designs are discussed, control and processing electronics based on a single rad-hard compatible FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) is analyzed. The FPGA electronics subsystems are TDC (Time-to-Digit Converter), laser trigger pulse generator and gate generator. Indoor calibration procedures of the whole demonstrator chain are proposed and evaluated. The calibration covers positioning of receiver and transmitter optics related to detector and laser, aligning of transmitter and receiver optical common paths. The retrieving strategy of terrain elevation profile is proposed and via indoor tests validated. Theory for surface slope and scanning is established, simulation and measurement results are compared and discussed.

  18. NASA Automated Rendezvous and Capture Review. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In support of the Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) Definition Studies in FY-92, the Advanced Program Development division of the Office of Space Flight at NASA Headquarters conducted an evaluation and review of the United States capabilities and state-of-the-art in Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C). This review was held in Williamsburg, Virginia on 19-21 Nov. 1991 and included over 120 attendees from U.S. government organizations, industries, and universities. One hundred abstracts were submitted to the organizing committee for consideration. Forty-two were selected for presentation. The review was structured to include five technical sessions. Forty-two papers addressed topics in the five categories below: (1) hardware systems and components; (2) software systems; (3) integrated systems; (4) operations; and (5) supporting infrastructure.

  19. Study of a comet rendezvous mission, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility, scientific objectives, modes of exploration and implementation alternatives of a rendezvous mission to Encke's comet in 1984 are considered. Principal emphasis is placed on developing the scientific rationale for such a mission, based on available knowledge and best estimates of this comet's physical characteristics, including current theories of its origin, evolution and composition. Studied are mission profile alternatives, performance tradeoffs, preferred exploration strategy, and a spacecraft design concept capable of performing this mission. The study showed that the major scientific objectives can be met by a Titan IIID/Centaur-launched 17.5 kw solar electric propulsion spacecraft which carries 60 kg of scientific instruments and is capable of extensive maneuvering within the comet envelope to explore the coma, tail and nucleus.

  20. The comet rendezvous asteroid flyby mission: A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Neugebauer, Marcia

    1991-01-01

    The Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission received a new start in fiscal year 1990. CRAF will match orbits with an active short-period comet and follow it around the Sun, making scientific measurements of the nucleus, coma, and tail. The Imaging system will map the nucleus surface at a resolution of 1 meter/line-pair or better, while Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and Thermal Infrared Radiometer Experiment (TIREX) will produce spectral and thermal maps of the surface. Onboard instruments will collect cometary dust, ice, and gases and perform elemental and molecular analysis. A suite of fields and particles instruments will observe the solar wind interaction with the cometary atmosphere and tail. Radio tracking of the spacecraft will provide an accurate measure of the nucleus mass and higher harmonics in the comet's gravity field. En route to the comet, the spacecraft will make a close flyby of a large asteroid, preferably a primitive type from the outer main belt. Observations at the asteroid include remote sensing mapping of the surface, detection of any solar wind interaction observable at the flyby distance, and measurement of the asteroid mass to better than 10 percent accuracy. Detailed design of the CRAF spacecraft is currently underway at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Recent mass growth has necessitated a switch to Venus-Earth gravity assist type trajectories, similar to that used by the Galileo spacecraft. These trajectories require longer flight times from launch to rendezvous with the target comet. The details of the current baseline mission, spacecraft design, and instrument payload will be reviewed.

  1. A vision based control system for autonomous rendezvous and capture of a Mars Orbital Sample

    E-print Network

    Jyothindran, Vishnu

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission involves many challenging operations. The current mission scenario utilizes a small Orbiting Sample (OS) satellite, launched from the surface of Mars, which will rendezvous with an ...

  2. Avionics and control system development for mid-air rendezvous of two unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-print Network

    Park, Sanghyuk, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    A flight control system was developed to achieve mid-air rendezvous of two unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a part of the Parent Child Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (PCUAV) project at MIT and the Draper Laboratory. A lateral ...

  3. A feasibility study of unmanned rendezvous and docking in Mars orbit: Midterm review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The ascent, rendezvous, docking and sample transfer operations in a potential MSSR mission that uses the Mars orbital rendezvous mode are considered. In order that the design choices made for these operations remain compatible with the rest of the mission, the impact on the Earth launch, Mars landing and orbiting and Earth return phase are also being assessed. The selection and description of a preliminary baseline concept are presented.

  4. Fault tolerant cooperative control for UAV rendezvous problem subject to actuator faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, T.; Meskin, N.; Sobhani-Tehrani, E.; Khorasani, K.; Rabbath, C. A.

    2007-04-01

    This paper investigates the problem of fault tolerant cooperative control for UAV rendezvous problem in which multiple UAVs are required to arrive at their designated target despite presence of a fault in the thruster of any UAV. An integrated hierarchical scheme is proposed and developed that consists of a cooperative rendezvous planning algorithm at the team level and a nonlinear fault detection and isolation (FDI) subsystem at individual UAV's actuator/sensor level. Furthermore, a rendezvous re-planning strategy is developed that interfaces the rendezvous planning algorithm with the low-level FDI. A nonlinear geometric approach is used for the FDI subsystem that can detect and isolate faults in various UAV actuators including thrusters and control surfaces. The developed scheme is implemented for a rendezvous scenario with three Aerosonde UAVs, a single target, and presence of a priori known threats. Simulation results reveal the effectiveness of our proposed scheme in fulfilling the rendezvous mission objective that is specified as a successful intercept of Aerosondes at their designated target, despite the presence of severe loss of effectiveness in Aerosondes engine thrusters.

  5. Observer-based body-frame hovering control over a tumbling asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Morad; Wauson, Robert; Critz, Thomas; Butcher, Eric A.; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    Observer-based hovering control over a tumbling asteroid in the body-fixed frame is studied. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is used to process range measurements from a small collection of ground stations, yielding estimates of the spacecraft state vector and the gravitational parameters of the asteroid assuming a second degree and order gravity field model. The estimated states are used in the optimal feedback control algorithm which consists of two alternatives: time-varying LQR or the Lyapunov-Floquet transformation (LFT) and time-invariant LQR. The closed-loop response of the system and the control effort required are investigated and compared for both control strategies.

  6. The Successful Development of an Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) System for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fred D. Roe; Richard T. Howard

    2003-01-01

    During the 1990's, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture\\/docking (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous sensor was identified early in the AR&C Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proximity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous sensor, the Video

  7. The Successful Development of an Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) System for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fred D. Roe; Richard T. Howard

    2003-01-01

    During the 1990’s, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture\\/docking (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous sensor was identified early in the AR&C Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proximity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous sensor, the Video

  8. Multiple NEO Rendezvous, Reconnaissance and In Situ Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, K.; Elsperman, M. S.; Cook, T.; Smith, D.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a two spacecraft mission (Mother Ship and Small Body Lander) rendezvous with multiple Near Earth Objects (NEO). This two spacecraft mission mimics the likely architecture approach that human explorers will use: a “mother ship”(MS) designed to get from Earth to the NEO and a “Small Body Lander”(SBL) that performs in situ investigation on or close to the NEO’s surface. The MS carries the SBL to the target NEO. Once at the target NEO, the MS conducts an initial reconnaissance in order to produce a high resolution map of the surface. This map is used to identify coordinates of interest which are sent to the SBL. The SBL un-docks from the MS to rendezvous with the NEO and collect data. Landings are possible, though the challenges of anchoring to the NEO surface are significant. The SBL design is flexible and adaptable, enabling science data collection on or near the surface. After surface investigations are completed on the first NEO, the SBL will return and autonomously rendezvous and dock with the MS. The MS then goes to the next NEO target. During transit to the next NEO, the SBL could be refueled by the MS, a TRL8 capability demonstrated on the DARPA/NASA Orbital Express mission in 2007, or alternately sized to operate without requiring refueling depending on the mission profile. The mission goals are to identify surface hazards; quantify engineering boundary conditions for future human visits, and identify resources for future exploitation. The mission goals will be accomplished through the execution of key mission objectives: (1) high-resolution surface topography; (2) surface composition and mineralogy; (3) radiation environment near NEO; and (4) mechanical properties of the surface. Essential SBL instruments include: a) LIDAR (Obj. 1); b) 3D, high- resolution hyperspectral imaging cameras (Obj. 2); c) radiation sensor package (Obj. 3); and d) strain gauges (Obj. 4). Additional or alternative instruments could include: e) x-ray fluorescence or laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) sensor package (Obj. 2); f) gamma ray/neutron spectrometry package (Obj. 2); and g) radiometer package (to address variations in thermal environment). The ability to reach, survey, sample, and analyze multiple NEOs at close proximity is an enormous capability that can enable NASA to rapidly achieve the primary Exploration Precursor Robotic Mission (xPRM) Program goal of characterizing NEOs for future human exploration. Instead of launching multiple dedicated missions to each NEO of interest, a multi-NEO sortie mission can be planned and executed to achieve the same mission objectives with one launch, dramatically reducing the cost of NEO exploration. Collectively, our NEO Exploration System Architecture provides solutions for a wide variety of exploration activities using a common spacecraft bus and common core instrumentation for the spacecraft. This engineering consistency will substantially improve the probability of mission success, increase the likelihood of maintaining an aggressive launch schedule, and decrease the total cost of multiple missions. NASA successfully used this approach with the robotic precursors leading up to the Apollo missions, and we see significant benefits from this same programmatic approach for the xPRM program.

  9. Design and Implementation of the Automated Rendezvous Targeting Algorithms for Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DSouza, Christopher; Weeks, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Orion vehicle will be designed to perform several rendezvous missions: rendezvous with the ISS in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), rendezvous with the EDS/Altair in LEO, a contingency rendezvous with the ascent stage of the Altair in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) and a contingency rendezvous in LLO with the ascent and descent stage in the case of an aborted lunar landing. Therefore, it is not difficult to realize that each of these scenarios imposes different operational, timing, and performance constraints on the GNC system. To this end, a suite of on-board guidance and targeting algorithms have been designed to meet the requirement to perform the rendezvous independent of communications with the ground. This capability is particularly relevant for the lunar missions, some of which may occur on the far side of the moon. This paper will describe these algorithms which are designed to be structured and arranged in such a way so as to be flexible and able to safely perform a wide variety of rendezvous trajectories. The goal of the algorithms is not to merely fly one specific type of canned rendezvous profile. Conversely, it was designed from the start to be general enough such that any type of trajectory profile can be flown.(i.e. a coelliptic profile, a stable orbit rendezvous profile, and a expedited LLO rendezvous profile, etc) all using the same rendezvous suite of algorithms. Each of these profiles makes use of maneuver types which have been designed with dual goals of robustness and performance. They are designed to converge quickly under dispersed conditions and they are designed to perform many of the functions performed on the ground today. The targeting algorithms consist of a phasing maneuver (NC), an altitude adjust maneuver (NH), and plane change maneuver (NPC), a coelliptic maneuver (NSR), a Lambert targeted maneuver, and several multiple-burn targeted maneuvers which combine one of more of these algorithms. The derivation and implementation of each of these algorithms will be discussed in detail, as well and the Rendezvous Targeting "wrapper" which will sequentially tie them all together into a single onboard targeting tool which can produce a final integrated rendezvous trajectory. In a similar fashion, the various guidance modes available for flying out each of these maneuvers will be discussed as well. This paradigm of having the onboard guidance & targeting capability described above is different than the way the Space Shuttle has operated thus far. As a result, a discussion of these differences in terms of operations and ground and crew intervention will also be discussed. However, the general framework of how the mission designers on the ground first perform all mission design and planning functions, and then uplink that burn plan to the vehicle ensures that the ground will be involved to ensure safety and reliability. The only real difference is which of these functions will be done onboard vs. on the ground as done currently. Finally, this paper will describe the performance of each of these algorithms individually as well as the entire suite of algorithms as applied to the Orion ISS and EDS/Altair rendezvous missions in LEO. These algorithms have been incorporated in both a Linear Covariance environment and a Monte Carlo environment and the results of these dispersion analyses will be presented in the paper as well.

  10. NEP for a Kuiper Belt Object Rendezvous Mission

    SciTech Connect

    HOUTS,MICHAEL G.; LENARD,ROGER X.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; PATTON,BRUCE; POSTON,DAVID I.; WRIGHT,STEVEN A.

    1999-11-03

    Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are a recently-discovered set of solar system bodies which lie at about the orbit of Pluto (40 AU) out to about 100 astronomical units (AU). There are estimated to be about 100,000 KBOS with a diameter greater than 100 km. KBOS are postulated to be composed of the pristine material which formed our solar system and may even have organic materials in them. A detailed study of KBO size, orbit distribution, structure, and surface composition could shed light on the origins of the solar system and perhaps even on the origin of life in our solar system. A rendezvous mission including a lander would be needed to perform chemical analysis of the surface and sub-surface composition of KBOS. These requirements set the size of the science probe at around a ton. Mission analyses show that a fission-powered system with an electric thruster could rendezvous at 40 AU in about 13.0 years with a total {Delta}V of 46 krnk. It would deliver a 1000-kg science payload while providing ample onboard power for relaying data back to earth. The launch mass of the entire system (power, thrusters, propellant, navigation, communication, structure, science payload, etc.) would be 7984 kg if it were placed into an earth-escape trajectory (C=O). Alternatively, the system could be placed into a 700-km earth orbit with more propellant,yielding a total mass in LEO of 8618 kg, and then spiral out of earth orbit to arrive at the KBO in 14.3 years. To achieve this performance, a fission power system with 100 kW of electrical power and a total mass (reactor, shield, conversion, and radiator) of about 2350 kg. Three possible configurations are proposed: (1) a UZrH-fueled, NaK-cooled reactor with a steam Rankine conversion system, (2) a UN-fueled gas-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system, and (3) a UN-fueled heatpipe-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system. (Boiling and condensation in the Rankine system is a technical risk at present.) All three of these systems have the potential to meet the weight requirement for the trip and to be built in the near term.

  11. NEP for a Kuiper Belt Object rendezvous mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Lenard, Roger X.; Wright, Steven A.; Houts, Michael G.; Patton, Bruce; Poston, David I.

    2000-01-01

    Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are a recently-discovered set of solar system bodies which lie at about the orbit of Pluto (40 AU) out to about 100 astronomical units (AU). There are estimated to be about 100,000 KBOs with a diameter greater than 100 km. KBOs are postulated to be composed of the pristine material which formed our solar system and may even have organic materials in them. A detailed study of KBO size, orbit distribution, structure, and surface composition could shed light on the origins of the solar system and perhaps even on the origin of life in our solar system. A rendezvous mission including a lander would be needed to perform chemical analysis of the surface and sub-surface composition of KBOs. These requirements set the size of the science probe at around a ton. Mission analyses show that a fission-powered system with an electric thruster could rendezvous at 40 AU in about 13.0 years with a total DV of 46 km/s. It would deliver a 1000-kg science payload while providing ample onboard power for relaying data back to earth. The launch mass of the entire system (power, thrusters, propellant, navigation, communication, structure, science payload, etc.) would be 7984 kg if it were placed into an earth-escape trajectory (C=0). Alternatively, the system could be placed into a 700-km earth orbit with more propellant, yielding a total mass in LEO of 8618 kg, and then spiral out of earth orbit to arrive at the KBO in 14.3 years. To achieve this performance, a fission power system with 100 kW of electrical power and a total mass (reactor, shield, conversion, and radiator) of about 2350 kg. Three possible configurations are proposed: (1) a UZrH-fueled, NaK-cooled reactor with a steam Rankine conversion system, (2) a UN-fueled gas-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system, and (3) a UN-fueled heatpipe-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system. (Boiling and condensation in the Rankine system is a technical risk at present.) All three of these systems have the potential to meet the weight requirement for the trip and to be built in the near term. .

  12. Autonomous Mission Manager for Rendezvous, Inspection and Mating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimpfer, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    To meet cost and safety objectives, space missions that involve proximity operations between two vehicles require a high level of autonomy to successfully complete their missions. The need for autonomy is primarily driven by the need to conduct complex operations outside of communication windows, and the communication time delays inherent in space missions. Autonomy also supports the goals of both NASA and the DOD to make space operations more routine, and lower operational costs by reducing the requirement for ground personnel. NASA and the DoD have several programs underway that require a much higher level of autonomy for space vehicles. NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program has ambitious goals of reducing costs by a factor or 10 and improving safety by a factor of 100. DARPA has recently begun its Orbital Express to demonstrate key technologies to make satellite servicing routine. The Air Force's XSS-ll program is developing a protoflight demonstration of an autonomous satellite inspector. A common element in space operations for many NASA and DOD missions is the ability to rendezvous, inspect anclJor dock with another spacecraft. For DARPA, this is required to service or refuel military satellites. For the Air Force, this is required to inspect un-cooperative resident space objects. For NASA, this is needed to meet the primary SLI design reference mission of International Space Station re-supply. A common aspect for each of these programs is an Autonomous Mission Manager that provides highly autonomous planning, execution and monitoring of the rendezvous, inspection and docking operations. This paper provides an overview of the Autonomous Mission Manager (AMM) design being incorporated into many of these technology programs. This AMM provides a highly scalable level of autonomous operations, ranging from automatic execution of ground-derived plans to highly autonomous onboard planning to meet ground developed mission goals. The AMM provides the capability to automatically execute the plans and monitor the system performance. In the event of system dispersions or failures the AMM can modify plans or abort to assure overall system safety. This paper describes the design and functionality of Draper's AMM framework, presents concept of operations associated with the use of the AMM, and outlines the relevant features of the flight demonstrations.

  13. The acceleration and the deceleration of the tumbling period of Rocket Intercosmos 11 during the first two years after launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnhardt, H.; Koehnhke, H.; Seidel, A.

    1989-12-01

    The development of the tumbling period of Rocket Intercosmos 11 (1974-34-B) during the first two years after launch is analyzed. It is shown that the period increase observed from August 1974 to June 1976 can be interpreted to be due to torque moments caused by eddy currents induced in the hollow cylinder by the magnetic field of the earth. The tumbling acceleration that was observed in June 1974 is interpreted as an outgassing effect of the rest propellant which remained inside the rocket after burn-off. A model of the outgassing acceleration is developed, showing reasonably good agreement of calculated periods with observed ones.

  14. Space shuttle Ku-band integrated rendezvous radar/communications system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of work performed on the Space Shuttle Ku-Band Integrated Rendezvous Radar/Communications System Study. The recommendations and conclusions are included as well as the details explaining the results. The requirements upon which the study was based are presented along with the predicted performance of the recommended system configuration. In addition, shuttle orbiter vehicle constraints (e.g., size, weight, power, stowage space) are discussed. The tradeoffs considered and the operation of the recommended configuration are described for an optimized, integrated Ku-band radar/communications system. Basic system tradeoffs, communication design, radar design, antenna tradeoffs, antenna gimbal and drive design, antenna servo design, and deployed assembly packaging design are discussed. The communications and radar performance analyses necessary to support the system design effort are presented. Detailed derivations of the communications thermal noise error, the radar range, range rate, and angle tracking errors, and the communications transmitter distortion parameter effect on crosstalk between the unbalanced quadriphase signals are included.

  15. Multi-sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Carrington, Connie K.

    2008-01-01

    During the past two years, many sensors have been tested in an open-loop fashion in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL) to both determine their suitability for use in Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) systems and to ensure the test facility is prepared for future multi-sensor testing. The primary focus of this work was in support of the CEV AR&D system, because the AR&D sensor technology area was identified as one of the top risks in the program. In 2006, four different sensors were tested individually or in a pair in the MSFC FRL. In 2007, four sensors, two each of two different types, were tested simultaneously. In each set of tests, the target was moved through a series of pre-planned trajectories while the sensor tracked it. In addition, a laser tracker "truth" sensor also measured the target motion. The tests demonstrated the functionality of testing four sensors simultaneously as well as the capabilities (both good and bad) of all of the different sensors tested. This paper outlines the test setup and conditions, briefly describes the facility, summarizes the earlier results of the individual sensor tests, and describes in some detail the results of the four-sensor testing. Post-test analysis includes data fusion by minimum variance estimation and sequential Kalman filtering. This Sensor Technology Project work was funded by NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program.

  16. Ku-Band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, H. G.; Goff, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    All work performed on the Ku-band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model program since the release of the preliminary final report is summarized. Developments on the program fall into three distinct categories: (1) modifications to the existing Ku-band radar tracking performance computer model; (2) the addition of a highly accurate, nonrealtime search and acquisition performance computer model to the total software package developed on this program; and (3) development of radar cross section (RCS) computation models for three additional satellites. All changes in the tracking model involved improvements in the automatic gain control (AGC) and the radar signal strength (RSS) computer models. Although the search and acquisition computer models were developed under the auspices of the Hughes Aircraft Company Ku-Band Integrated Radar and Communications Subsystem program office, they have been supplied to NASA as part of the Ku-band radar performance comuter model package. Their purpose is to predict Ku-band acquisition performance for specific satellite targets on specific missions. The RCS models were developed for three satellites: the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft, the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft, and the Space Telescopes.

  17. Video-Guidance Design for the DART Rendezvous Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, Michael; Tracy, Chisholm

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) mission will validate a number of different guidance technologies, including state-differenced GPS transfers and close-approach video guidance. The video guidance for DART will employ NASA/Marshall s Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS). This paper focuses on the terminal phase of the DART mission that includes close-approach maneuvers under AVGS guidance. The closed-loop video guidance design for DART is driven by a number of competing requirements, including a need for maximizing tracking bandwidths while coping with measurement noise and the need to minimize RCS firings. A range of different strategies for attitude control and docking guidance have been considered for the DART mission, and design decisions are driven by a goal of minimizing both the design complexity and the effects of video guidance lags. The DART design employs an indirect docking approach, in which the guidance position targets are defined using relative attitude information. Flight simulation results have proven the effectiveness of the video guidance design.

  18. Hubble Servicing Challenges Drive Innovation of Shuttle Rendezvous Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Walker, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing, performed by Space Shuttle crews, has contributed to what is arguably one of the most successful astronomy missions ever flown. Both nominal and contingency proximity operations techniques were developed to enable successful servicing, while lowering the risk of damage to HST systems, and improve crew safety. Influencing the development of these techniques were the challenges presented by plume impingement and HST performance anomalies. The design of both the HST and the Space Shuttle was completed before the potential of HST contamination and structural damage by shuttle RCS jet plume impingement was fully understood. Relative navigation during proximity operations has been challenging, as HST was not equipped with relative navigation aids. Since HST reached orbit in 1990, proximity operations design for servicing missions has evolved as insight into plume contamination and dynamic pressure has improved and new relative navigation tools have become available. Servicing missions have provided NASA with opportunities to gain insight into servicing mission design and development of nominal and contingency procedures. The HST servicing experiences and lessons learned are applicable to other programs that perform on-orbit servicing and rendezvous, both human and robotic.

  19. Integrated GPS/INS navigation system design for autonomous spacecraft rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaylor, David Edward

    2003-10-01

    The goal of the NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program is to advance the technologies for the next generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The SLI program has identified automated rendezvous and docking as an area requiring further research and development. Currently, the Space Shuttle uses a partially manual system for rendezvous, but a fully automated system could be safer and more reliable. Previous studies have shown that it is feasible to use the Global Positioning System (GPS) for spacecraft navigation during rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS). However, these studies have not accounted for the effects of GPS signal blockage and multipath in the vicinity of the ISS, which make a GPS-only navigation system less accurate and reliable. One possible solution is to combine GPS with an inertial navigation system (INS). The integration of GPS and INS can be achieved using a Kalman filter. GPS/INS systems have been used in aircraft for many years and have also been used in launch vehicles. However, the performance of GPS/INS systems in orbit and during spacecraft rendezvous has not been characterized. The primary objective of this research is to evaluate the ability of an integrated GPS/INS to provide accurate navigation solutions during a rendezvous scenario where the effects of ISS signal blockage, multipath and delta-v maneuvers degrade GPS-only navigation. In order to accomplish this, GPS-only and GPS/INS Kalman filters have been developed for both absolute and relative navigation, as well as a new statistical multipath model for spacecraft operating near the ISS. Several factors that affect relative navigation performance were studied, including: filter tuning, GPS constellation geometry, rendezvous approach direction, and inertial sensor performance. The results showed that each of these factors has a large impact on relative navigation performance. Finally, it has been demonstrated that a GPS/INS system based on medium accuracy aircraft avionics-grade inertial sensors does not provide adequate relative navigation performance for rendezvous with the ISS unless accelerometer thresholding is used. However, the use of state-of-the-art inertial navigation sensors provides relative position accuracy which is adequate for rendezvous with ISS if an additional rendezvous sensor is included.

  20. Monsters, Magic and Mr Psycho: A Biocultural Approach to Rough and Tumble Play in the Early Years of Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Pam

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the developmental role of rough and tumble (R&T) play with particular attention to the narratives that children use to underpin such activities. A review of the literature suggests that current early years research and practice pays scant attention to children's outdoor free play activities. A piece of original research is…

  1. Physical Activity Play and Preschool Children's Peer Acceptance: Distinctions between Rough-and-Tumble and Exercise Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Two forms of exercise play (toy mediated and non-mediated) and 2 forms of rough-and-tumble (R&T) play (chase and fighting) were examined in relation to preschoolers' peer competence. A total of 148 preschoolers (78 boys, 89 Euro-Americans) were observed during free play at their university-sponsored child care center.…

  2. Robust rendezvous maneuver point conditions. M.S. Thesis - Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogle, Debra Ann

    1992-01-01

    This study develops rendezvous maneuver point conditions that are robust to one dimensional errors in state estimation and burn execution. Allowing small deviations in the time of intercept provides a degree of freedom that can be used to compensate for these errors. The direction of allowable burn deviation is developed for errors in state estimation and burn execution. The maneuver points for which the error is aligned with the insensitive direction provide excellent rendezvous initiation points. The method is applied to sample rendezvous for vehicles in circular and elliptic orbits. Robust maneuver points are selected and the vehicles' relative motion plotted, demonstrating the validity of the maneuver points. Finally, a graphical illustration of the error focusing effect is demonstrated by means of a Monte Carlo simulation.

  3. Trajectory design for the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby 1995-1996 opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Mark R.; Stetson, Douglas S.; Byrnes, Dennis V.

    1988-01-01

    Recent reprogramming of NASA's Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission has motivated an examination of the comet rendezvous opportunities available with launch dates in 1995 and 1996. Various interplanetary transfer modes have been investigated including direct, Delta V-earth-gravity- assist and Venus/earth gravity assist trajectories. Optimal trajectories have been generated and their performance assessed for a spacecraft using a chemical propulsion system and the upgraded Titan/Centaur launch vehicle. Of the viable options available, a new CRAF baseline mission has been selected. One important result of the present study is that while there are comet rendezvous trajectories with launch dates throughout the next decade, 1997 marks the beginning of a hiatus of opportunities with short flight times to the comet targets which promise the greatest potential science return.

  4. An Assessment of the Technology of Automated Rendezvous and Capture in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study to assess the technology of automated rendezvous and capture (AR&C) in space. The outline of the paper is as follows. First, the history of manual and automated rendezvous and capture and rendezvous and dock is presented. Next, the need for AR&C in space is established. Then, today's technology and ongoing technology efforts related to AR&C in space are reviewed. In light of these, AR&C systems are proposed that meet NASA's future needs, but can be developed in a reasonable amount of time with a reasonable amount of money. Technology plans for developing these systems are presented; cost and schedule are included.

  5. Time-fixed rendezvous by impulse factoring with an intermediate timing constraint. [for transfer orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.; Kibler, J. F.; Young, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is presented for factoring a two-impulse orbital transfer into a three- or four-impulse transfer which solves the rendezvous problem and satisfies an intermediate timing constraint. Both the time of rendezvous and the intermediate time of a alinement are formulated as any element of a finite sequence of times. These times are integer multiples of a constant plus an additive constant. The rendezvous condition is an equality constraint, whereas the intermediate alinement is an inequality constraint. The two timing constraints are satisfied by factoring the impulses into collinear parts that vectorially sum to the original impulse and by varying the resultant period differences and the number of revolutions in each orbit. Five different types of solutions arise by considering factoring either or both of the two impulses into two or three parts with a limit for four total impulses. The impulse-factoring technique may be applied to any two-impulse transfer which has distinct orbital periods.

  6. Comparative study of in-cylinder tumble flows in an internal combustion engine using different piston shapes—an insight using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali Krishna, B.; Mallikarjuna, J. M.

    2010-05-01

    This paper deals with the experimental investigations of the in-cylinder tumble flows in a single-cylinder engine with five different piston crown shapes at an engine speed of 1,000 rev/min., during suction and compression strokes under motoring conditions using particle image velocimetry. Two-dimensional in-cylinder tumble flow measurements and analysis are carried out in combustion space on a vertical plane passing through cylinder axis. Ensemble average velocity vectors are used to analyze the tumble flow structure. Tumble ratio and average turbulent kinetic energy are evaluated and used to characterize the tumble flows. From results, it is found that at end of compression, pentroof-offset-bowl piston shows about 41 and 103% improvement in tumble ratio and average turbulent kinetic energy respectively, compared to that of flat piston. The present study will be useful in understanding effect of piston crown shapes on nature of the in-cylinder fluid tumble flows under real engine conditions.

  7. Methodology for Developing a Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model of Spacecraft Rendezvous and Dockings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farnham, Steven J., II; Garza, Joel, Jr.; Castillo, Theresa M.; Lutomski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 NASA was preparing to send two new visiting vehicles carrying logistics and propellant to the International Space Station (ISS). These new vehicles were the European Space Agency s (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), the Jules Verne, and the Japanese Aerospace and Explorations Agency s (JAXA) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The ISS Program wanted to quantify the increased risk to the ISS from these visiting vehicles. At the time, only the Shuttle, the Soyuz, and the Progress vehicles rendezvoused and docked to the ISS. The increased risk to the ISS was from an increase in vehicle traffic, thereby, increasing the potential catastrophic collision during the rendezvous and the docking or berthing of the spacecraft to the ISS. A universal method of evaluating the risk of rendezvous and docking or berthing was created by the ISS s Risk Team to accommodate the increasing number of rendezvous and docking or berthing operations due to the increasing number of different spacecraft, as well as the future arrival of commercial spacecraft. Before the first docking attempt of ESA's ATV and JAXA's HTV to the ISS, a probabilistic risk model was developed to quantitatively calculate the risk of collision of each spacecraft with the ISS. The 5 rendezvous and docking risk models (Soyuz, Progress, Shuttle, ATV, and HTV) have been used to build and refine the modeling methodology for rendezvous and docking of spacecrafts. This risk modeling methodology will be NASA s basis for evaluating the addition of future ISS visiting spacecrafts hazards, including SpaceX s Dragon, Orbital Science s Cygnus, and NASA s own Orion spacecraft. This paper will describe the methodology used for developing a visiting vehicle risk model.

  8. Recent developments in electropolishing and tumbling R&D at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.; Brandt, J.; Cooley, L.; Ge, M.; Harms, E.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab; Boffo, C.; /Babcock Noell, Wuerzburg

    2009-10-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Lab (Fermilab) is continuing to improve its infrastructure for research and development on the processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities. A single cell 3.9 GHz electropolishing tool built at Fermilab and operated at an industrial partner was recently commissioned. The EP tool was used to produce a single cell 3.9 GHz cavity that reached an accelerating gradient of 30 MV/m with a quality factor of 5 x 10{sup 9}. A single cell 1.3 GHz cavity was also electropolished at the same industrial vendor using the vendor's vertical full-immersion technique. On their first and only attempt the vendor produced a single cell 1.3 GHz cavity that reached 30 MV/m with a quality factor of 1 x 10{sup 10}. These results will be detailed along with preliminary tumbling results.

  9. Tumbling/squish interaction in loop-scavenged two-stroke engines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Y.Y.; Cheng, H.P. [National Chiao Tung Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-12-01

    This article describes a numerical investigation of the flow in a loop-scavenged two-stroke engine equipped with a head-bowl combustion chamber. The bowl is either placed in the center of the cylinder head or displaced away from the center. Attention is focused on the period of compression and early expansion. Results show that the effects of compression of the tumbling vortex by the piston become prominent after the midcompression stage, resulting in significant cascading of energy from mean flow to turbulence, followed by a fast decay of turbulence. The subsequent emergence of squish and reverse squish helps retard the decay. As a consequence, the cases with head bowls possess higher levels of mean flow and turbulence than those without bowls at top dead center and the later stage. It is also shown in the results that the offset of the head bowl had significant effects on the mean flow and turbulence characteristics, highly dependent on the offset direction.

  10. Electron Spin-Lattice Relaxation Mechanisms of Rapidly-Tumbling Nitroxide Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Joshua R.; Elajaili, Hanan; Meyer, Virginia; Rosen, Gerald M.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2013-01-01

    Electron spin relaxation times at 295 K were measured at frequencies between 250 MHz and 34 GHz for perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-1-oxyl (PDT) in five solvents with viscosities that result in tumbling correlation times, ?R, between 4 and 50 ps and for three 14N/15N pairs of nitroxides in water with ?R between 9 and 19 ps. To test the impact of structure on relaxation three additional nitroxides with ?R between 10 and 26 ps were studied. In this fast tumbling regime T2?1 ? T1?1 at frequencies up to about 9 GHz. At 34 GHz T2?1 > T1?1 due to increased contributions to T2?1 from incomplete motional averaging of g-anisotropy, and T2?1 ? T1?1 is proportional to ?R. The contribution to T1?1 from spin rotation is independent of frequency and decreases as ?R increases. Spin rotation dominates T1?1 at 34 GHz for all ?R studied, and at all frequencies studied for ?R = 4 ps. The contribution to T1?1 from modulation of nitrogen hyperfine anisotropy increases as frequency decreases and as ?R increases; it dominates at low frequencies for ?R > ? 15 ps. The contribution from modulation of g anisotropy is significant only at 34 GHz. Inclusion of a thermally-activated process was required to account for the observation that for most of the radicals, T1?1 was smaller at 250 MHz than at 1 to 2 GHz. The significant 15N/14N isotope effect, the small H/D isotope effect, and the viscosity dependence of the magnitude of the contribution from the thermally-activated process suggest that it arises from intramolecular motions of the nitroxide ring that modulate the isotropic A values. PMID:24056272

  11. NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking convened on May 24 and 25, 1994. Based on the meetings, the Task Force made the following recommendations: at a minimum, the mission commander and payload commander for all subsequent Shuttle-Mir missions should be named at least 18 months in advance of the scheduled launch date; in order to derive early operational experience in advance of the first Mir docking mission, the primary objective of STS-63 should be Mir rendezvous and proximity operations; and if at all possible, the launch date for STS-63 should be moved forward.

  12. Rendezvous terminal phase automatic braking sequencing and targeting. [for space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachmar, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the rendezvous terminal phase braking program is to provide the means of automatically bringing the primary orbiter within desired station keeping boundaries relative to the target satellite. A detailed discussion is presented on the braking program and its navigation, targeting, and guidance functions.

  13. Multi-robot SLAM with Unknown Initial Correspondence: The Robot Rendezvous Case

    E-print Network

    Roumeliotis, Stergios I.

    to participate in this task. This process is known as Multi-robot SLAM or Cooperative SLAM (C- SLAM). While enhancing efficiency, the complexity of SLAM increases when robots cooperate to construct a single, jointMulti-robot SLAM with Unknown Initial Correspondence: The Robot Rendezvous Case Xun S. Zhou

  14. Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation for Spacecraft Rendezvous Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy J.; Valasek, John

    2007-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle necessitates higher levels of automation than previous NASA vehicles, due to program requirements for automation, including Automated Rendezvous and Docking. Studies of spacecraft development often point to the locus of decision-making authority between humans and computers (i.e. automation) as a prime driver for cost, safety, and mission success. Therefore, a critical component in the Crew Exploration Vehicle development is the determination of the correct level of automation. To identify the appropriate levels of automation and autonomy to design into a human space flight vehicle, NASA has created the Function-specific Level of Autonomy and Automation Tool. This paper develops a methodology for prototyping increased levels of automation for spacecraft rendezvous functions. This methodology is used to evaluate the accuracy of the Function-specific Level of Autonomy and Automation Tool specified levels of automation, via prototyping. Spacecraft rendezvous planning tasks are selected and then prototyped in Matlab using Fuzzy Logic techniques and existing Space Shuttle rendezvous trajectory algorithms.

  15. Convergence results for multi-agent rendezvous algorithm with rectilinear decision domain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaushik Das; Debasish Ghose

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a proof of convergence of a computationally efficient decentralized rendezvous algorithm for a group of autonomous agents. The algorithm uses a recti- linear decision domain (RDD) as against the circular decision domain assumed in earlier work reducing its computational complexity considerably. Simulation results in earlier work has shown that, compared to the standard Ando's algorithm, the RDD

  16. Predictive Control for Spacecraft Rendezvous in an Elliptical Orbit using an FPGA

    E-print Network

    Hartley, Edward N.; Maciejowski, Jan M.

    2013-07-17

    Systems, Frascati, Rome, Oct. 22–25 2003, pp. 209–216. [2] R. Larsson, S. Berge, P. Bodin, and U. Jönsson, “Fuel efficient relative orbit control strategies for formation flying and rendezvous within PRISMA,” in Proc. 29th Annual AAS Guidance and Control...

  17. Feature-tracking based pose estimation for autonomous rendezvous and docking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daihou Wang; Hanghang Ren; Yiran Wu; Changhong Wang

    2010-01-01

    Schemes for feature tracking and relative pose estimation for the final approach of rendezvous and docking procedure is proposed in this paper. Positions of the feature points were predicted by Kalman filter proposed to reduce the searching area, which effectively increased both the calculation speed and the anti-disturbance ability. Relative pose information was retrieved from solving the 3 points problem,

  18. Project JXTA: A Loosely-Consistent DHT Rendezvous Walker Bernard Traversat, Mohamed Abdelaziz, Eric Pouyoul

    E-print Network

    Ricci, Laura

    1 Project JXTA: A Loosely-Consistent DHT Rendezvous Walker Bernard Traversat, Mohamed Abdelaziz variety of decentralized network applications. The following paper describes a loosely- consistent DHT. The loosely-consistent DHT walker uses an hybrid approach that combines the use of a DHT to index and locate

  19. Robust rendezvous for mobile autonomous agents via proximity graphs in arbitrary dimensions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Cortes; Sonia Martínez; Francesco Bullo

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents coordination algorithms for networks of mobile autonomous agents. The objective of the proposed algorithms is to achieve rendezvous, that is, agreement over the location of the agents in the network. We provide analysis and design results for multiagent networks in arbitrary dimensions under weak requirements on the switching and failing communication topology. The novel correctness proof relies

  20. Optimum rendezvous transfer between coplanar heliocentric elliptic orbits using solar sail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. V. S. Rao; R. V. Ramanan

    1992-01-01

    A convenient formulation is presented for determining the effect of terminal orbit eccentricities on the steering profile of a sail spacecraft for time-optimal rendezvous transfer between coplanar heliocentric orbits. The problem is reduced to that of solving a two-point boundary value problem for a system of seven ordinary differential equations. The system is solved using the controlled random search optimization

  1. Optimal three-dimensional heliocentric solar-sail rendezvous transfer trajectories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. V. Subba Rao; R. V. Ramanan

    1993-01-01

    This study is concerned with the problem of optimization of the control, in the sense of high speed of response, for minimum time rendezvous transfer of sail-spacecraft between heliocentric, inclined, elliptic orbits. The angles defining the orientation of the sail (assumed to be perfectly reflecting and flat) with respect to sunlight are the control variables. The analysis employs a two-body

  2. Space shuttle earth orbital rendezvous targeting techniques for near circular target satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    The targeting techniques are developed which are required to determine the guidance reference release time of the space shuttle navigation system, the orbital insertion targeting values, and a time line of orbital maneuvers. An extension is made for rendezvous with a target satellite in an elliptical orbit.

  3. An analytic approach to optimal rendezvous using Clohessy-Wiltshire equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.; Donaldson, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    An analytic approach is used to obtain the optimal solution time that minimizes the sum of the two applied impulses necessary to rendezvous for the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations. A plume impingement inequality constraint on the solution is examined, and an optimal policy is developed. Numerical tests are conducted to verify the analysis and to illustrate the optimal solution algorithm.

  4. Rendezvous and Docking Strategy for Crewed Segment of the Asteroid Redirect Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather D.; Cryan, Scott P.; D'Souza, Christopher; Dannemiller, David P.; Brazzel, Jack P.; Condon, Gerald L.; Othon, William L.; Williams, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This paper will describe the overall rendezvous, proximity operations and docking (RPOD) strategy in support of the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM), as part of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). The focus of the paper is on the crewed mission phase of ARM, starting with the establishment of Orion in the Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO) and ending with docking to the Asteroid Redirect Vechicle (ARV). The paper will detail the sequence of maneuvers required to execute the rendezvous and proximity operations mission phases along with the on-board navigation strategies, including the final approach phase. The trajectories to be considered will include target vehicles in a DRO. The paper will also discuss the sensor requirements for rendezvous and docking and the various trade studies associated with the final sensor selection. Building on the sensor requirements and trade studies, the paper will include a candidate sensor concept of operations, which will drive the selection of the sensor suite; concurrently, it will be driven by higher level requirements on the system, such as crew timeline constraints and vehicle consummables. This paper will address how many of the seemingly competing requirements will have to be addressed to create a complete system and system design. The objective is to determine a sensor suite and trajectories that enable Orion to successfully rendezvous and dock with a target vehicle in trans lunar space. Finally, the paper will report on the status of a NASA action to look for synergy within RPOD, across the crewed and robotic asteroid missions.

  5. Proximity Operations for Space Situational Awareness Spacecraft Rendezvous and Maneuvering using Numerical Simulations and Fuzzy Logic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Carrico; T. Langster; J. Carrico; S. Alfano; M. Loucks; D. Vallado

    2006-01-01

    The authors present several spacecraft rendezvous and close proximity maneuvering techniques modeled with a high-precision numerical integrator using full force models and closed loop control with a Fuzzy Logic intelligent controller to command the engines. The authors document and compare the maneuvers, fuel use, and other parameters. This paper presents an innovative application of an existing capability to design, simulate

  6. Utilization of flash ladar for cooperative and uncooperative rendezvous and capture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert D. Habbit Jr.; Robert O. Nellums; Aaron D. Niese; Jose L. Rodriguez

    2003-01-01

    An ideal Rendezvous and Capture (R&C) sensor on a seeker Space Vehicle (SV) would provide accurate relative 6 degree of freedom data for the Guidance Navigation and Control System (GNCS) from far and near, operate autonomously, and provide multifunctional capability. Flash LADAR has the potential to fulfill these requirements. Sandia has developed Scannerless Range Imaging (SRI) LADAR sensors for a

  7. Peer-to-Peer Refuelling within a Satellite Constellation Part I: Zero-Cost Rendezvous Case

    E-print Network

    Tsiotras, Panagiotis

    Peer-to-Peer Refuelling within a Satellite Constellation Part I: Zero-Cost Rendezvous Case Haijun in a constellation. The satellites in the constellation are assumed to be capable of refu- elling each other in the constellation after a given period. It is shown that the problem of equalizing the fuel among the satellites can

  8. Peer-to-Peer Refuelling within a Satellite Constellation Part II: Nonzero-Cost Rendezvous Case

    E-print Network

    Tsiotras, Panagiotis

    Peer-to-Peer Refuelling within a Satellite Constellation Part II: Nonzero-Cost Rendezvous Case in a constellation. It is assumed that there is no fuel delivered to the constellation externally. Instead, the satellites in the constellation are assumed to be capable of refuelling each other. The cost

  9. The Direction of Synthetic Actors in the Film RendezVous a Montreal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Magnenat-Thalmann; Daniel Thalmann

    1987-01-01

    This article describes how the synthetic actors Marilyn Monroe and Humphrey Bogart were directed in the film Rendez-vous a Montreal, using the Human Factory software. Innovative points are emphasized. The recreation of famous persons and reconstitution of their personalities, as well as the corresponding animation, are considered from an artistic point of view. Technical points discussed are personalized expressions, abstract

  10. Effect of Location-Awareness on Rendezvous Behaviour David Dearman, Kirstie Hawkey and Kori M. Inkpen

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    -awareness of all collaborators and an active communication channel (e.g. text messaging, voice). WatchMe [5] builds}@cs.dal.ca ABSTRACT This paper presents an exploratory field study investigating the behavioral effects of mobile provides an obvious benefit for rendezvousing; however, it is unclear how this information will affect

  11. Mechanisms and Rates of Bacterial Colonization of Sinking Aggregates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kiorboe; Hans-Peter Grossart; Helle Ploug; Kam Tang

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying the rate at which bacteria colonize aggregates is a key to understanding microbial turnover of aggregates. We used encounter models based on random walk and advection-diffusion considerations to predict colonization rates from the bacteria's motility patterns (swimming speed, tumbling frequency, and turn angles) and the hydrodynamic environment (stationary versus sinking aggregates). We then experimentally tested the models with 10

  12. Comparative study of in-cylinder tumble flows in an internal combustion engine using different piston shapes---an insight using particle image velocimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Murali Krishna; J. M. Mallikarjuna

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental investigations of the in-cylinder tumble flows in a single-cylinder engine with five different piston crown shapes at an engine speed of 1,000 rev\\/min., during suction and compression strokes under motoring conditions using particle image velocimetry. Two-dimensional in-cylinder tumble flow measurements and analysis are carried out in combustion space on a vertical plane passing through

  13. The acceleration and the deceleration of the tumbling period of Rocket Intercosmos 11 during the first two years after launch

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Boehnhardt; H. Koehnhke; A. Seidel

    1989-01-01

    We have analysed the development of the tumbling period of Rocket Intercosmos 11 (1974-34-B) during the first 2 years after launch. We interpret the period increase, observed from August 1974 to June 1976, as being caused by torque moments due to eddy currents induced in the hollow cylinder by the magnetic field of the Earth. The spin-decay time of 1974-34-B

  14. In-cylinder tumble flows and performance of a motorcycle engine with circular and elliptic intake ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R. F.; Lin, K. H.; Yeh, C.-N.; Lan, J.

    2009-01-01

    The temporal and spatial evolution processes of the flows in the cylinder of a four-valve, four-stroke, single cylinder, reciprocating motorcycle engine installed with the elliptic and circular intake ports were experimentally studied by using the particle image velocimetry (PIV). The engine was modified to fit the requirements of PIV measurement. The velocity fields measured by the PIV were analyzed and quantitatively presented as the tumble ratio and turbulence intensity. In the symmetry plane, both the circular and elliptic intake ports could initiate a vortex around the central region during the intake stroke. During the compression stroke, the central vortex created in the cylinder of the engine with the circular intake port disappeared, while that in the engine cylinder with the elliptic intake port further developed into the tumble motion. In the offset plane, weak vortical structures were initiated by the bluff-body effect of the intake valves during the intake stroke. The vortical structures induced by the elliptic intake port were more coherent than those generated by the circular intake port; besides, this feature extends to the compression stroke. The cycle-averaged tumble ratio and the turbulence intensity of the engine with the elliptic intake port were dramatically larger than those of the engine with the circular intake port. The measured engine performance was improved a lot by installing the elliptic intake port. The correlation between the flow features and the enhancement of the engine performance were argued and discussed.

  15. Drill Holes and Predation Traces versus Abrasion-Induced Artifacts Revealed by Tumbling Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gorzelak, Przemys?aw; Salamon, Mariusz A.; Trz?siok, Dawid; Nied?wiedzki, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Drill holes made by predators in prey shells are widely considered to be the most unambiguous bodies of evidence of predator-prey interactions in the fossil record. However, recognition of traces of predatory origin from those formed by abiotic factors still waits for a rigorous evaluation as a prerequisite to ascertain predation intensity through geologic time and to test macroevolutionary patterns. New experimental data from tumbling various extant shells demonstrate that abrasion may leave holes strongly resembling the traces produced by drilling predators. They typically represent singular, circular to oval penetrations perpendicular to the shell surface. These data provide an alternative explanation to the drilling predation hypothesis for the origin of holes recorded in fossil shells. Although various non-morphological criteria (evaluation of holes for non-random distribution) and morphometric studies (quantification of the drill hole shape) have been employed to separate biological from abiotic traces, these are probably insufficient to exclude abrasion artifacts, consequently leading to overestimate predation intensity. As a result, from now on, we must adopt more rigorous criteria to appropriately distinguish abrasion artifacts from drill holes, such as microstructural identification of micro-rasping traces. PMID:23505530

  16. Guidance and Navigation for Rendezvous and Proximity Operations with a Non-Cooperative Spacecraft at Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent William; Carpenter, J. Russell; Heatwole, Scott; Markley, F. Landis; Moreau, Michael; Naasz, Bo J.; VanEepoel, John

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility and benefits of various spacecraft servicing concepts are currently being assessed, and all require that the servicer spacecraft perform rendezvous, proximity, and capture operations with the target spacecraft to be serviced. Many high-value spacecraft, which would be logical targets for servicing from an economic point of view, are located in geosynchronous orbit, a regime in which autonomous rendezvous and capture operations are not commonplace. Furthermore, existing GEO spacecraft were not designed to be serviced. Most do not have cooperative relative navigation sensors or docking features, and some servicing applications, such as de-orbiting of a non-functional spacecraft, entail rendezvous and capture with a spacecraft that may be non-functional or un-controlled. Several of these challenges have been explored via the design of a notional mission in which a nonfunctional satellite in geosynchronous orbit is captured by a servicer spacecraft and boosted into super-synchronous orbit for safe disposal. A strategy for autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture is developed, and the Orbit Determination Toolbox (ODTBX) is used to perform a relative navigation simulation to assess the feasibility of performing the rendezvous using a combination of angles-only and range measurements. Additionally, a method for designing efficient orbital rendezvous sequences for multiple target spacecraft is utilized to examine the capabilities of a servicer spacecraft to service multiple targets during the course of a single mission.

  17. Low-Cost Innovation in Spaceflight: The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Shoemaker Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCurdy, Howard E.

    2005-01-01

    On a spring day in 1996, at their research center in the Maryland countryside, representatives from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) presented Administrator Daniel S. Goldin of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with a check for $3.6 million. 1 Two and a half years earlier, APL officials had agreed to develop a spacecraft capable of conducting an asteroid rendezvous and to do so for slightly more than $122 million. This was a remarkably low sum for a spacecraft due to conduct a planetaryclass mission. By contrast, the Mars Observer spacecraft launched in 1992 for an orbital rendezvous with the red planet had cost $479 million to develop, while the upcoming Cassini mission to Saturn required a spacecraft whose total cost was approaching $1.4 billion. In an Agency accustomed to cost overruns on major missions, the promise to build a planetary-class spacecraft for about $100 million seemed excessively optimistic.

  18. Model predictive control application to spacecraft rendezvous in mars sample return scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponara, M.; Barrena, V.; Bemporad, A.; Hartley, E. N.; Maciejowski, J.; Richards, A.; Tramutola, A.; Trodden, P.

    2013-12-01

    Model Predictive Control (MPC) is an optimization-based control strategy that is considered extremely attractive in the autonomous space rendezvous scenarios. The Online Recon¦guration Control System and Avionics Architecture (ORCSAT) study addresses its applicability in Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission, including the implementation of the developed solution in a space representative avionic architecture system. With respect to a classical control solution High-integrity Autonomous RendezVous and Docking control system (HARVD), MPC allows a signi¦cant performance improvement both in trajectory and in propellant save. Furthermore, thanks to the online optimization, it allows to identify improvements in other areas (i. e., at mission de¦nition level) that could not be known a priori.

  19. The asteroid rendezvous spacecraft. An adaptation study of TIROS/DMSP technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using the TIROS/DMSP Earth orbiting meteorological satellite in application to a near Earth asteroid rendezvous mission. System and subsystems analysis was carried out to develop a configuration of the spacecraft suitable for this mission. Mission analysis studies were also done and maneuver/rendezvous scenarios developed for baseline missions to both Anteros and Eros. The fact that the Asteroid mission is the most complex of the Pioneer class missions currently under consideration notwithstanding, the basic conclusion very strongly supports the suitability of the basic TIROS bus for this mission in all systems and subsystems areas, including science accommodation. Further, the modifications which are required due to the unique mission are very low risk and can be accomplished readily. The key issue is that in virtually every key subsystem, the demands of the Asteroid mission are a subset of the basic meteorological satellite mission. This allows a relatively simple reconfiguration to be accomplished without a major system redesign.

  20. Six degree of freedom simulation system for evaluating automated rendezvous and docking spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rourke, Kenneth H.; Tsugawa, Roy K.

    1991-01-01

    Future logistics supply and servicing vehicles such as cargo transfer vehicles (CTV) must have full 6 degree of freedom (6DOF) capability in order to perform requisite rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture operations. The design and performance issues encountered when developing a 6DOF maneuvering spacecraft are very complex with subtle interactions which are not immediately obvious or easily anticipated. In order to deal with these complexities and develop robust maneuvering spacecraft designs, a simulation system and associated family of tools are used at TRW for generating and validating spacecraft performance requirements and guidance algorithms. An overview of the simulator and tools is provided. These are used by TRW for autonomous rendezvous and docking research projects including CTV studies.

  1. Constant thrust glideslope guidance algorithm for rendezvous in multi-body realm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yijun Lian; Luhua Liu; Yunhe Meng; Guojian Tang; Kejun Chen

    2011-01-01

    A guidance algorithm for spacecraft approaching a target vehicle in a quasi-halo orbit in the real earth-moon system is presented. The algorithm is based on the numerical solution of the time-variant linearized relative dynamics of RTBP in inertial coordinates. The whole trajectory is divided into several segments. The multi-impulse glideslope idea, traditionally used in the near-earth rendezvous, is employed to

  2. Multiple rendezvous and sample return missions to near-Earth objects using solar sailcraft

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Dachwald; W. Seboldt; L. Richter

    2006-01-01

    Solar sailcraft are due to their high ?V-capability especially capable to perform multiple rendezvous and sample return missions to near-Earth objects. Even with moderate-performance solar sails of the first generation, challenging scientific missions are feasible at relatively low cost. Within this paper, it will be shown that a 300kg-spacecraft (including a lander and a sample return capsule), propelled by a

  3. Multiple rendezvous and sample return missions to near-Earth objects using solar sailcraft

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Dachwald; W. Seboldt; L. Richter

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailcraft are due to their high DeltaV-capability especially capable to perform multiple rendezvous and sample return missions to near-Earth objects. Even with moderate-performance solar sails of the first generation, challenging scientific missions are feasible at relatively low cost. Within this paper, it will be shown that a 300 kg-spacecraft (including a lander and a sample return capsule), propelled by

  4. Modeling, simulation, testing, and verification of the Orbital Express Autonomous Rendezvous and Capture Sensor System (ARCSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinz, Manny R.; Chen, Chih-Tsai; Scott, Peter; Gaumer, William; Sabasteanski, Peter; Beaven, Michael

    2008-04-01

    The Orbital Express Autonomous Rendezvous and Capture Sensor System (ARCSS) ALONG WITH ITS Vision-based Software for Track, Attitude and Ranging (Vis-STAR) provided relative target position and attitude measurements for guidance and relative navigation during autonomous vehicle proximity operations. The use of computer and physical models during simulation, ground testing and verification of ARCSS imaging camera and software performance prior to and during on-orbit operations is discussed.

  5. Diffusion, sedimentation equilibrium, and harmonic trapping of run-and-tumble nanoswimmers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjia; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-05-14

    The diffusion of self-propelling nanoswimmers is explored by dissipative particle dynamics in which a nanoswimmer swims by forming an instantaneous force dipole with one of its nearest neighboring solvent beads. Our simulations mimic run-and-tumble behavior by letting the swimmer run for a time ?, then it randomly changes its direction for the next run period. Our simulations show that the swimming speed (?(a)) of a nanoswimmer is proportional to the propulsion force and the mobility of a pusher is the same as that of a puller. The effective diffusivity is determined by three methods: mean squared displacement, velocity autocorrelation function, and sedimentation equilibrium. The active colloid undergoes directed propulsion at short time scales but changes to random motion at long time scales. The velocity autocorrelation function decreases with time and becomes zero beyond the run time. Under gravity, the concentration profile of active colloids follows Boltzmann distribution with a sedimentation length consistent with that acquired from the drift-diffusion equation. In our simulation, all three methods yield the same result, the effective diffusivity of an active colloid is the sum of the diffusivity of a passive colloid and ?(a)²?/6. When the active colloids are confined by a harmonic well, they are trapped within a confinement length defined by the balance between the swimmer active force and restoring force of the well. When the confinement length is large compared to the run length, the stationary density profile follows the Boltzmann distribution. However, when the run length exceeds the confinement length, the density distribution is no longer described by Boltzmann distribution, instead we found a bimodal distribution. PMID:24718999

  6. A feasibility study of unmanned rendezvous and docking in Mars orbit. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technical feasibility of achieving automatic rendezvous and docking in Mars orbit as a part of a surface sample return mission was investigated based on using as much existing Viking '75 Orbiter and Lander hardware as possible. Both 1981 and 1983/84 mission opportunities were considered. The principle result of the study was the definition of a three stage 289 kg Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) capable of accepting a 1 kg sample, injecting itself into a 2200 km circular orbit, and rendezvousing with an orbiting spacecraft carrying an earth return vehicle. Conclusions are that with state of the art systems plus limited application of new developments in areas where feasibility has already been demonstrated, e.g., solid rocket motor sterilization, it is possible to land a small ascent vehicle capable of automatically ascending and rendezvousing with a modified Viking '75 orbiter spacecraft. The mission can be flown in 1981 or 1983/84, but a dual launch or a larger launch vehicle than the Viking Titan 3 Centaur, or the use of space storable propellants for Mars orbit injection, would be required in the 1983/84 opportunity.

  7. Rapid design and optimization of low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectory for asteroid deflection missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Zhu, Yongsheng; Wang, Yukai

    2014-02-01

    Asteroid deflection techniques are essential in order to protect the Earth from catastrophic impacts by hazardous asteroids. Rapid design and optimization of low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectories is considered as one of the key technologies to successfully deflect potentially hazardous asteroids. In this paper, we address a general framework for the rapid design and optimization of low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectories for future asteroid deflection missions. The design and optimization process includes three closely associated steps. Firstly, shape-based approaches and genetic algorithm (GA) are adopted to perform preliminary design, which provides a reasonable initial guess for subsequent accurate optimization. Secondly, Radau pseudospectral method is utilized to transcribe the low-thrust trajectory optimization problem into a discrete nonlinear programming (NLP) problem. Finally, sequential quadratic programming (SQP) is used to efficiently solve the nonlinear programming problem and obtain the optimal low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectories. The rapid design and optimization algorithms developed in this paper are validated by three simulation cases with different performance indexes and boundary constraints.

  8. Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J.; Johnston, A.; Howard, R.; Williamson, M.; Brewster, L.; Strack, D.; Cryan, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as Automated Rendezvous and Docking, AR&D). The crewed versions may also perform AR&D, possibly with a different level of automation and/or autonomy, and must also provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the CEV requirements. The relatively low technology readiness of relative navigation sensors for AR&D has been carried as one of the CEV Projects top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce this risk by increasing technology maturation of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through testing and simulation, and to allow the CEV Project to assess the relative navigation sensors.

  9. Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Williamson, Marlin L.; Johnston, Albert S.; Brewster, Linda L.; Mitchell, Jennifer D.; Cryan, Scott P.; Strack, David; Key, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as Automated Rendezvous and Docking, (AR&D).) The crewed versions of the spacecraft may also perform AR&D, possibly with a different level of automation and/or autonomy, and must also provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the CEV requirements. The relatively low technology readiness of relative navigation sensors for AR&D has been carried as one of the CEV Projects top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce this risk by increasing technology maturation of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through testing and simulation, and to allow the CEV Project to assess the relative navigation sensors.

  10. The Data Transfer Kit: A geometric rendezvous-based tool for multiphysics data transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, S. R.; Wilson, P. P. H. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Pawlowski, R. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Data Transfer Kit (DTK) is a software library designed to provide parallel data transfer services for arbitrary physics components based on the concept of geometric rendezvous. The rendezvous algorithm provides a means to geometrically correlate two geometric domains that may be arbitrarily decomposed in a parallel simulation. By repartitioning both domains such that they have the same geometric domain on each parallel process, efficient and load balanced search operations and data transfer can be performed at a desirable algorithmic time complexity with low communication overhead relative to other types of mapping algorithms. With the increased development efforts in multiphysics simulation and other multiple mesh and geometry problems, generating parallel topology maps for transferring fields and other data between geometric domains is a common operation. The algorithms used to generate parallel topology maps based on the concept of geometric rendezvous as implemented in DTK are described with an example using a conjugate heat transfer calculation and thermal coupling with a neutronics code. In addition, we provide the results of initial scaling studies performed on the Jaguar Cray XK6 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for a worse-case-scenario problem in terms of algorithmic complexity that shows good scaling on 0(1 x 104) cores for topology map generation and excellent scaling on 0(1 x 105) cores for the data transfer operation with meshes of O(1 x 109) elements. (authors)

  11. A Ground Testbed to Advance US Capability in Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This project will advance the Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) GNC system by testing it on hardware, particularly in a flight processor, with a goal of testing it in IPAS with the Waypoint L2 AR&D scenario. The entire Agency supports development of a Commodity for Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (CARD) as outlined in the Agency-wide Community of Practice whitepaper entitled: "A Strategy for the U.S. to Develop and Maintain a Mainstream Capability for Automated/Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking in Low Earth Orbit and Beyond". The whitepaper establishes that 1) the US is in a continual state of AR&D point-designs and therefore there is no US "off-the-shelf" AR&D capability in existence today, 2) the US has fallen behind our foreign counterparts particularly in the autonomy of AR&D systems, 3) development of an AR&D commodity is a national need that would benefit NASA, our commercial partners, and DoD, and 4) an initial estimate indicates that the development of a standardized AR&D capability could save the US approximately $60M for each AR&D project and cut each project's AR&D flight system implementation time in half.

  12. Poisson equations of rotational motion for a rigid triaxial body with application to a tumbling artificial satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. J. F.; Fitzpatrick, P. M.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for studying the effects of gravity gradient torque on the attitude stability of a tumbling triaxial rigid satellite. Poisson equations are used to investigate the rotation of the satellite (which is in elliptical orbit about an attracting point mass) about its center of mass. An averaging method is employed to obtain an intermediate set of differential equations for the nonresonant, secular behavior of the osculating elements which describe the rotational motions of the satellite, and the averaged equations are then integrated to obtain long-term secular solutions for the osculating elements.

  13. The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) and Closed-loop Hardware Testing for Orion Rendezvous System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Milenkovich, Zoran; Wilson, Zachary; Huich, David; Bendle, John; Kibler, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) at the Lockheed Martin (LM) Waterton Campus in Littleton, Colorado is a dynamic test environment focused on Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) development testing and risk reduction activities. The SOSC supports multiple program pursuits and accommodates testing Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) algorithms for relative navigation, hardware testing and characterization, as well as software and test process development. The SOSC consists of a high bay (60 meters long by 15.2 meters wide by 15.2 meters tall) with dual six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) motion simulators and a single fixed base 6DOF robot. The large testing area (maximum sensor-to-target effective range of 60 meters) allows for large-scale, flight-like simulations of proximity maneuvers and docking events. The facility also has two apertures for access to external extended-range outdoor target test operations. In addition, the facility contains four Mission Operations Centers (MOCs) with connectivity to dual high bay control rooms and a data/video interface room. The high bay is rated at Class 300,000 (. 0.5 m maximum particles/m3) cleanliness and includes orbital lighting simulation capabilities.

  14. Effect of field size, head motion, and rotational velocity on roll vection and illusory self-tilt in a tumbling room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, R. S.; Howard, I. P.; Zacher, J. E.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of field size, velocity, and visual fixation upon the perception of self-body rotation and tilt was examined in a rotating furnished room. Subjects sat in a stationary chair in the furnished room which could be rotated about the body roll axis. For full-field conditions, complete 360 degrees body rotation (tumbling) was the most common sensation (felt by 80% of subjects). Constant tilt or partial tumbling (less than 360 degrees rotation) occurred more frequently with a small field of view (20 deg). The number of subjects who experienced complete tumbling increased with increases in field of view and room velocity (for velocities between 15 and 30 degrees s-1). The speed of perceived self-rotation relative to room rotation also increased with increasing field of view.

  15. Comparative study of in-cylinder tumble flows in an internal combustion engine using different piston shapes—an insight using particle image velocimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Murali Krishna; J. M. Mallikarjuna

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental investigations of the in-cylinder tumble flows in a single-cylinder engine with five\\u000a different piston crown shapes at an engine speed of 1,000 rev\\/min., during suction and compression strokes under motoring\\u000a conditions using particle image velocimetry. Two-dimensional in-cylinder tumble flow measurements and analysis are carried\\u000a out in combustion space on a vertical plane passing through cylinder

  16. SPARTAN: A High-Fidelity Simulation for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turbe, Michael A.; McDuffie, James H.; DeKock, Brandon K.; Betts, Kevin M.; Carrington, Connie K.

    2007-01-01

    bd Systems (a subsidiary of SAIC) has developed the Simulation Package for Autonomous Rendezvous Test and ANalysis (SPARTAN), a high-fidelity on-orbit simulation featuring multiple six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) vehicles. SPARTAN has been developed in a modular fashion in Matlab/Simulink to test next-generation automated rendezvous and docking guidance, navigation,and control algorithms for NASA's new Vision for Space Exploration. SPARTAN includes autonomous state-based mission manager algorithms responsible for sequencing the vehicle through various flight phases based on on-board sensor inputs and closed-loop guidance algorithms, including Lambert transfers, Clohessy-Wiltshire maneuvers, and glideslope approaches The guidance commands are implemented using an integrated translation and attitude control system to provide 6DOF control of each vehicle in the simulation. SPARTAN also includes high-fidelity representations of a variety of absolute and relative navigation sensors that maybe used for NASA missions, including radio frequency, lidar, and video-based rendezvous sensors. Proprietary navigation sensor fusion algorithms have been developed that allow the integration of these sensor measurements through an extended Kalman filter framework to create a single optimal estimate of the relative state of the vehicles. SPARTAN provides capability for Monte Carlo dispersion analysis, allowing for rigorous evaluation of the performance of the complete proposed AR&D system, including software, sensors, and mechanisms. SPARTAN also supports hardware-in-the-loop testing through conversion of the algorithms to C code using Real-Time Workshop in order to be hosted in a mission computer engineering development unit running an embedded real-time operating system. SPARTAN also contains both runtime TCP/IP socket interface and post-processing compatibility with bdStudio, a visualization tool developed by bd Systems, allowing for intuitive evaluation of simulation results. A description of the SPARTAN architecture and capabilities is provided, along with details on the models and algorithms utilized and results from representative missions.

  17. Third Report of the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In May 1994, the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions was established by the NASA Advisory Council. Its purpose is to review Phase 1 (Shuttle-Mir) planning, training, operations, rendezvous and docking, and management and to provide interim reports containing specific recommendations to the Advisory Council. Phase 1 represents the building block to create the experience and technical expertise for an International Space Station. The Phase 1 program brings together the United States and Russia in a major cooperative and contractual program that takes advantage of both countries' capabilities. The content of the Phase 1 program consists of the following elements as defined by the Phase 1 Program Management Plan, dated October 6, 1994: Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking missions; astronaut long duration presence on Mir Requirements for Mir support of Phase 1 when astronauts are not on board; outfitting Spektr and Priroda modules with NASA science, research, and risk mitigation equipment Related ground support requirements of NASA and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) to support Phase 1 Integrated NASA and RSA launch schedules and manifests The first meeting of the Task Force was held at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) on May 24 and 25, 1994 with a preliminary report submitted to the NASA Advisory Council on June 6, 1994. The second meeting of the Task Force was held at JSC on July 12 and 13, 1994 and a detailed report containing a series of specific recommendations was submitted on July 29, 1994. This report reflects the results of the third Task Force meeting which was held at JSC on 11 and 12 October, 1994. The briefings presented at that meeting reviewed NASA's response to the Task Force recommendations made to date and provided background data and current status on several critical areas which the Task Force had not addressed in its previous reports.

  18. Embedded Relative Navigation Sensor Fusion Algorithms for Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKock, Brandon K.; Betts, Kevin M.; McDuffie, James H.; Dreas, Christine B.

    2008-01-01

    bd Systems (a subsidiary of SAIC) has developed a suite of embedded relative navigation sensor fusion algorithms to enable NASA autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D) missions. Translational and rotational Extended Kalman Filters (EKFs) were developed for integrating measurements based on the vehicles' orbital mechanics and high-fidelity sensor error models and provide a solution with increased accuracy and robustness relative to any single relative navigation sensor. The filters were tested tinough stand-alone covariance analysis, closed-loop testing with a high-fidelity multi-body orbital simulation, and hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL).

  19. Elements of solar sail navigation with application to a Halley's comet rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.; Thornton, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of interplanetary navigation of a solar sail spacecraft is examined and found to be analogous to that of solar electric spacecraft. The dominant navigation error sources are shown to be accelerations that are unaccounted for in the description of the vehicle's motion, due to the inability to precisely model the solar radiation pressure. A strategy for navigation in the presence of these accelerations is devised, based on techniques previously developed for solar electric vehicles. An evaluation of the strategy is made for a Halley's comet rendezvous mission, and the results of that evaluation indicate that the strategy gives acceptable performance.

  20. Ion drive technology readiness for the 1985 Halley Comet rendezvous mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study undertaken in FY 77 to assess readiness by 1985 for a Halley's Comet rendezvous mission (HCR) are presented with reference to already identified risks, e.g., a marginal mass margin of 6.7%, driven by uncertainties in ion drive vehicle masses, and an unconfirmed solar array power degradation model of 12%. Technology for two of the six subsystems, thrust and solar array, is also largely undemonstrated. High-, medium-, and low-risk subsystems are evaluated and compared with one another. Among the low-risk subsystems are those relating to structure, data handling, temperature control, and power supply.

  1. NASA Automated Rendezvous and Capture Review. A compilation of the abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document presents a compilation of abstracts of papers solicited for presentation at the NASA Automated Rendezvous and Capture Review held in Williamsburg, VA on November 19-21, 1991. Due to limitations on time and other considerations, not all abstracts could be presented during the review. The organizing committee determined however, that all abstracts merited availability to all participants and represented data and information reflecting state-of-the-art of this technology which should be captured in one document for future use and reference. The organizing committee appreciates the interest shown in the review and the response by the authors in submitting these abstracts.

  2. Orbit Modification of Earth-Crossing Asteroids/Comets Using Rendezvous Spacecraft and Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sang-Young; Mazanek, Daniel D.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the approach and results of an end-to-end simulation to deflect a long-period comet (LPC) by using a rapid rendezvous spacecraft and laser ablation system. The laser energy required for providing sufficient deflection DELTA V and an analysis of possible intercept/rendezvous spacecraft trajectories are studied in this analysis. These problems minimize a weighted sum of the flight time and required propellant by using an advanced propulsion system. The optimal thrust-vector history and propellant mass to use are found in order to transfer a spacecraft from the Earth to a targeted celestial object. One goal of this analysis is to formulate an optimization problem for intercept/rendezvous spacecraft trajectories. One approach to alter the trajectory of the object in a highly controlled manner is to use pulsed laser ablative propulsion. A sufficiently intense laser pulse ablates the surface of a near-Earth object (NEO) by causing plasma blowoff. The momentum change from a single laser pulse is very small. However, the cumulative effect is very effective because the laser can interact with the object over long periods of time. The laser ablation technique can overcome the mass penalties associated with other nondisruptive approaches because no propellant is required to generate the DELTA V (the material of the celestial object is the propellant source). Additionally, laser ablation is effective against a wide range of surface materials and does not require any landing or physical attachment to the object. For diverting distant asteroids and comets, the power and optical requirements of a laser ablation system on or near the Earth may be too extreme to contemplate in the next few decades. A hybrid solution would be for a spacecraft to carry a laser as a payload to a particular celestial body. The spacecraft would require an advanced propulsion system capable of rapid rendezvous with the object and an extremely powerful electrical generator, which is likely needed for the propulsion system as well. The spacecraft would station-keep with the object at a small standoff distance while the laser ablation is performed.

  3. A novel approach to heat transfer enhancement using trapezoid shaped spiral strips to promote tumble and swirl in a slot shaped channel used in heat exchangers

    E-print Network

    Segura, D.; Acharya, S.

    2012-01-01

    Heat transfer results for a given slot shaped channel with a 3:1 aspect ratio are presented using various configurations of a trapezoid shaped spiral wound strips to enhance swirl and tumble motion in the channel. The Reynolds numbers investigated...

  4. Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) Rendezvous Proximity Operations Design and Trade Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbach, J.; Westphal, J. J.; Roscoe, C.; Hawes, D. R.; Carrico, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) program is to demonstrate rendezvous proximity operations (RPO), formation flying, and docking with a pair of 3U CubeSats. The program is sponsored by NASA Ames via the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) in support of its Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP). The goal of the mission is to demonstrate complex RPO and docking operations with a pair of low-cost 3U CubeSat satellites using passive navigation sensors. The program encompasses the entire system evolution including system design, acquisition, satellite construction, launch, mission operations, and final disposal. The satellite is scheduled for launch in Fall 2015 with a 1-year mission lifetime. This paper provides a brief mission overview but will then focus on the current design and driving trade study results for the RPO mission specific processor and relevant ground software. The current design involves multiple on-board processors, each specifically tasked with providing mission critical capabilities. These capabilities range from attitude determination and control to image processing. The RPO system processor is responsible for absolute and relative navigation, maneuver planning, attitude commanding, and abort monitoring for mission safety. A low power processor running a Linux operating system has been selected for implementation. Navigation is one of the RPO processor's key tasks. This entails processing data obtained from the on-board GPS unit as well as the on-board imaging sensors. To do this, Kalman filters will be hosted on the processor to ingest and process measurements for maintenance of position and velocity estimates with associated uncertainties. While each satellite carries a GPS unit, it will be used sparsely to conserve power. As such, absolute navigation will mainly consist of propagating past known states, and relative navigation will be considered to be of greater importance. For relative observations, each spacecraft hosts 3 electro-optical sensors dedicated to imaging the companion satellite. The image processor will analyze the images to obtain estimates for range, bearing, and pose, with associated rates and uncertainties. These observations will be fed to the RPO processor's relative Kalman filter to perform relative navigation updates. This paper includes estimates for expected navigation accuracies for both absolute and relative position and velocity. Another key task for the RPO processor is maneuver planning. This includes automation to plan maneuvers to achieve a desired formation configuration or trajectory (including docking), as well as automation to safely react to potentially dangerous situations. This will allow each spacecraft to autonomously plan fuel-efficient maneuvers to achieve a desired trajectory as well as compute adjustment maneuvers to correct for thrusting errors. This paper discusses results from a trade study that has been conducted to examine maneuver targeting algorithms required on-board the spacecraft. Ground software will also work in conjunction with the on-board software to validate and approve maneuvers as necessary.

  5. Design and development of guidance navigation and control algorithms for spacecraft rendezvous and docking experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglieri, Giorgio; Maroglio, Franco; Pellegrino, Pasquale; Torre, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design of the GNC system of a ground test-bed for spacecraft rendezvous and docking experiments. The test-bed is developed within the STEPS project (Systems and Technologies for Space Exploration). The facility consists of a flat floor and two scaled vehicles, one active chaser and one “semi-active” target. Rendezvous and docking maneuvers are performed floating on the plane with pierced plates as lifting systems. The system is designed to work both with inertial and non-inertial reference frame, receiving signals from navigation sensors as: accelerometers, gyroscopes, laser meter, radio finder and video camera, and combining them with a digital filter. A Proportional-Integrative-Derivative control law and Pulse Width Modulators are used to command the cold gas thrusters of the chaser, and to follow an assigned trajectory with its specified velocity profile. The design and development of the guidance, navigation and control system and its architecture-including the software algorithms-are detailed in the paper, presenting a performance analysis based on a simulated environment. A complete description of the integrated subsystems is also presented.

  6. Endoscopic Sphincterotomy Using the Rendezvous Technique for Choledocholithiasis during Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Haraguchi, Masashi; Tokai, Hirotaka; Ito, Shinichiro; Kitajima, Masachika; Ohno, Tsuyoshi; Onizuka, Shinya; Inoue, Keiji; Motoyoshi, Yasuhide; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Kanemastu, Takashi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2014-05-01

    A 50-year-old male was examined at another hospital for fever, general fatigue and slight abdominal pain. He was treated with antibiotics and observed. However, his symptoms did not lessen, and laboratory tests revealed liver dysfunction, jaundice and an increased inflammatory response. He was then admitted to our hospital and underwent an abdominal computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), which revealed common bile duct (CBD) stones. He was diagnosed with mild acute cholangitis. As the same time, he was admitted to our hospital and an emergency endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed. Vater papilla opening in the third portion of the duodenum and presence of a peripapillary duodenal diverticulum made it difficult to perform cannulation of the CBD. In addition, MRCP revealed that the CBD was extremely narrow (diameter 5 mm). We therefore performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy and endoscopic sphincterotomy using the rendezvous technique for choledocholithiasis simultaneously rather than laparoscopic CBD exploration. After the operation, the patient was discharged with no complications. Although the rendezvous technique has not been very commonly used because several experts in the technique and a large operating room are required, this technique is a very attractive and effective approach for treating choledocholithiasis, for which endoscopic treatment is difficult. PMID:25298761

  7. Endoscopic Sphincterotomy Using the Rendezvous Technique for Choledocholithiasis during Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Haraguchi, Masashi; Tokai, Hirotaka; Ito, Shinichiro; Kitajima, Masachika; Ohno, Tsuyoshi; Onizuka, Shinya; Inoue, Keiji; Motoyoshi, Yasuhide; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Kanemastu, Takashi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old male was examined at another hospital for fever, general fatigue and slight abdominal pain. He was treated with antibiotics and observed. However, his symptoms did not lessen, and laboratory tests revealed liver dysfunction, jaundice and an increased inflammatory response. He was then admitted to our hospital and underwent an abdominal computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), which revealed common bile duct (CBD) stones. He was diagnosed with mild acute cholangitis. As the same time, he was admitted to our hospital and an emergency endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed. Vater papilla opening in the third portion of the duodenum and presence of a peripapillary duodenal diverticulum made it difficult to perform cannulation of the CBD. In addition, MRCP revealed that the CBD was extremely narrow (diameter 5 mm). We therefore performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy and endoscopic sphincterotomy using the rendezvous technique for choledocholithiasis simultaneously rather than laparoscopic CBD exploration. After the operation, the patient was discharged with no complications. Although the rendezvous technique has not been very commonly used because several experts in the technique and a large operating room are required, this technique is a very attractive and effective approach for treating choledocholithiasis, for which endoscopic treatment is difficult. PMID:25298761

  8. Orbital Express Autonomous Rendezvous and Capture Sensor System (ARCSS) flight test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinz, Manny R.; Chen, Chih-Tsai; Beaven, Michael W.; Weismuller, Thomas P.; Caballero, David L.; Gaumer, William B.; Sabasteanski, Peter W.; Scott, Peter A.; Lundgren, Mark A.

    2008-04-01

    The Orbital Express flight demonstration was established by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop and validate key technologies required for cost-effective servicing of next-generation satellites. A contractor team led by Boeing Advanced Network and Space Systems built two mated spacecraft launched atop an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on March 8, 2007. The low earth orbit test flight demonstrated on orbit transfer of hydrazine propellant, transfer of a spare battery between spacecraft and the ability to replace a spacecraft computer on orbit. It also demonstrated autonomous rendezvous and capture (AR&C) using advanced sensor, guidance, and relative navigation hardware and software. This paper summarizes the results of the on-orbit performance testing of the ARCSS (Autonomous Rendezvous and Capture Sensor System). ARCSS uses onboard visible, infrared and laser rangefinder sensors to provide real time data and imagery to the onboard sensor computer. The Boeing-developed Vis-STAR software executing on the sensor computer uses the ARCSS data to provide precision real-time client bearing, range and attitude as needed, from long range to soft capture. The paper summarizes the ARCSS and Vis-STAR on orbit performance.

  9. Space Shuttle Guidance, Navigation, and Rendezvous Knowledge Capture Reports. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2011-01-01

    This document is a catalog and readers guide to lessons learned, experience, and technical history reports, as well as compilation volumes prepared by United Space Alliance personnel for the NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) Flight Dynamics Division.1 It is intended to make it easier for future generations of engineers to locate knowledge capture documentation from the Shuttle Program. The first chapter covers observations on documentation quality and research challenges encountered during the Space Shuttle and Orion programs. The second chapter covers the knowledge capture approach used to create many of the reports covered in this document. These chapters are intended to provide future flight programs with insight that could be used to formulate knowledge capture and management strategies. The following chapters contain descriptions of each knowledge capture report. The majority of the reports concern the Space Shuttle. Three are included that were written in support of the Orion Program. Most of the reports were written from the years 2001 to 2011. Lessons learned reports concern primarily the shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) upgrade and the knowledge capture process. Experience reports on navigation and rendezvous provide examples of how challenges were overcome and how best practices were identified and applied. Some reports are of a more technical history nature covering navigation and rendezvous. They provide an overview of mission activities and the evolution of operations concepts and trajectory design. The lessons learned, experience, and history reports would be considered secondary sources by historians and archivists.

  10. A Comparison of Trajectory Optimization Methods for the Impulsive Minimum Fuel Rendezvous Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P.; Mailhe, Laurie M.; Guzman, Jose J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present, a comparison of trajectory optimization approaches for the minimum fuel rendezvous problem. Both indirect and direct methods are compared for a variety of test cases. The indirect approach is based on primer vector theory. The direct approaches are implemented numerically and include Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP). Quasi- Newton and Nelder-Meade Simplex. Several cost function parameterizations are considered for the direct approach. We choose one direct approach that appears to be the most flexible. Both the direct and indirect methods are applied to a variety of test cases which are chosen to demonstrate the performance of each method in different flight regimes. The first test case is a simple circular-to-circular coplanar rendezvous. The second test case is an elliptic-to-elliptic line of apsides rotation. The final test case is an orbit phasing maneuver sequence in a highly elliptic orbit. For each test case we present a comparison of the performance of all methods we consider in this paper.

  11. Space Shuttle Program: Automatic rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture (category 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William L.; Lee, Roscoe; Eick, Richard E.; Hallstrom, J. V.; Hiers, Harry K.; Mcmanamen, John P.; Olszewski, Oscar W.; Prather, Joseph L.; Rue, D. L.; Zimmer, Karl J.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center is actively pursuing the development and demonstration of capabilities for automatic rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture (AR&C) using the Space Shuttle as the active vehicle. This activity combines the technologies, expertise, tools, and facilities of the JSC Tracking and Communications Division (EE), Navigation, Control and Aeronautics Division (EG), Automation and Robotics Division (ER), and Structures and Mechanics Division (ES) of the Engineering Directorate and the Flight Design and Dynamics Division (DM) of the Mission Operations Directorate. Potential benefits of AR&C include more efficient and repeatable rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture operations; reduced impacts on the target vehicles (e.g., Orbiter RCS plume loads); reduced flight crew work loads; reduced ground support requirements; and reduced operational constraints. This paper documents the current JSC capabilities/tools/facilities for AR&C and describes a proposed plan for a progression of ground demonstrations and flight tests and demonstrations of AR&C capabilities. This plan involves the maturing of existing technologies in tracking and communications; guidance, navigation and control; mechanisms; manipulators; and systems management and integrating them into several evolutionary demonstration stages.

  12. Use of industrial robots for hardware-in-the-loop simulation of satellite rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ou; Flores-Abad, Angel; Boge, Toralf

    2012-12-01

    One of the most challenging and risky operations for spacecraft is to perform rendezvous and docking autonomously in space. To ensure a safe and reliable operation, such a mission must be carefully designed and thoroughly verified before a real space mission can be launched. This paper describes the control strategy for achieving high fidelity contact dynamics simulation of a new, robotics-based, hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) rendezvous and docking simulation facility that uses two industrial robots to physically simulate the 6-DOF dynamic maneuvering of two docking satellites. The facility is capable of physically simulating the final approaching within a 25-meter range and the entire docking/capturing process for a satellite on-orbit servicing mission. The key difficulties of using industrial robots for high-fidelity HIL contact dynamics simulation were found and different solution techniques were investigated in the presented project. An admittance control method was proposed to achieve the goal of making the robots in the HIL simulation process match the impedance of the two docking satellites. Simulation study showed the effectiveness and performance of the proposed solution method.

  13. Utilization of flash ladar for cooperative and uncooperative rendezvous and capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbit, Robert D., Jr.; Nellums, Robert O.; Niese, Aaron D.; Rodriguez, Jose L.

    2003-08-01

    An ideal Rendezvous and Capture (R&C) sensor on a seeker Space Vehicle (SV) would provide accurate relative 6 degree of freedom data for the Guidance Navigation and Control System (GNCS) from far and near, operate autonomously, and provide multifunctional capability. Flash LADAR has the potential to fulfill these requirements. Sandia has developed Scannerless Range Imaging (SRI) LADAR sensors for a multitude of applications. One of the sensors, LDRI, flew onboard the STS97 mission to install the P6 truss and solar panels on the International Space Station. When compared to scanning LADAR, Scannerless LADAR is smaller, lighter, not mechanically complex, and has a much faster image acquisition time. Recently Sandia has demonstrated Flash Scannerless Range Imaging. Flash LADAR enables the capture of a full scene 3-D range image in one acquisition, thus, enabling freeze motion. The technology"s proven ability to accurately image an object as well as capture the image on the move has the potential to provide very accurate static and dynamic position data for the target vehicle relative to the seeker SV. Since no specific requirements are imposed on the target vehicle, the sensor will work equally well on cooperative and uncooperative target vehicles. This sensor technology can also provide docking feature inspection data and perform a detailed inspection of the target vehicle. This paper will describe the applicability of a Flash LADAR sensor for on-orbit cooperative and uncooperative rendezvous and capture.

  14. Progress in navigation filter estimate fusion and its application to spacecraft rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    1994-01-01

    A new derivation of an algorithm which fuses the outputs of two Kalman filters is presented within the context of previous research in this field. Unlike other works, this derivation clearly shows the combination of estimates to be optimal, minimizing the trace of the fused covariance matrix. The algorithm assumes that the filters use identical models, and are stable and operating optimally with respect to their own local measurements. Evidence is presented which indicates that the error ellipsoid derived from the covariance of the optimally fused estimate is contained within the intersections of the error ellipsoids of the two filters being fused. Modifications which reduce the algorithm's data transmission requirements are also presented, including a scalar gain approximation, a cross-covariance update formula which employs only the two contributing filters' autocovariances, and a form of the algorithm which can be used to reinitialize the two Kalman filters. A sufficient condition for using the optimally fused estimates to periodically reinitialize the Kalman filters in this fashion is presented and proved as a theorem. When these results are applied to an optimal spacecraft rendezvous problem, simulated performance results indicate that the use of optimally fused data leads to significantly improved robustness to initial target vehicle state errors. The following applications of estimate fusion methods to spacecraft rendezvous are also described: state vector differencing, and redundancy management.

  15. COMPASS Final Report: Near Earth Asteroids Rendezvous and Sample Earth Returns (NEARER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the Collaborative Modeling for Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team completed a design for a multi-asteroid (Nereus and 1996 FG3) sample return capable spacecraft for the NASA In-Space Propulsion Office. The objective of the study was to support technology development and assess the relative benefits of different electric propulsion systems on asteroid sample return design. The design uses a single, heritage Orion solar array (SA) (approx.6.5 kW at 1 AU) to power a single NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster ((NEXT) a spare NEXT is carried) to propel a lander to two near Earth asteroids. After landing and gathering science samples, the Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) vehicle spirals back to Earth where it drops off the first sample s return capsule and performs an Earth flyby to assist the craft in rendezvousing with a second asteroid, which is then sampled. The second sample is returned in a similar fashion. The vehicle, dubbed Near Earth Asteroids Rendezvous and Sample Earth Returns (NEARER), easily fits in an Atlas 401 launcher and its cost estimates put the mission in the New Frontier s (NF's) class mission.

  16. Measurement of radial expansion and tumbling motion of a high-speed rotor using an optical sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, P.; Dreier, F.; Pfister, T.; Czarske, J.; Haupt, T.; Hufenbach, W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the load capacity and the strength properties of high-speed rotors, dynamic deformation and vibration measurements are of importance, in particular at lightweight composite devices which cannot be simulated reliably. This is a challenging task in metrology since non-contact inspection techniques are required which offer micron uncertainties and high temporal resolution simultaneously, also under vacuum conditions. In order to meet these requirements, a non-incremental laser Doppler distance sensor system was developed using fiber and diffractive optics. In this paper we present for the first time high-speed deformation measurements of a cylindrical steel rotor using this novel sensor system. The radial rotor expansion of only some microns was determined despite the presence of an unsteady tumbling motion of the rotor, which was measured simultaneously. Future prospects are discussed including the possibility to measure non-metallic devices such as fiber-reinforced composites.

  17. Q-Learning and p-persistent CSMA based rendezvous protocol for cognitive radio networks operating with shared spectrum activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Clifton L.; Biswas, Subir

    2014-06-01

    With an increasing demand for spectrum, dynamic spectrum access (DSA) has been proposed as viable means for providing the flexibility and greater access to spectrum necessary to meet this demand. Within the DSA concept, unlicensed secondary users temporarily "borrow" or access licensed spectrum, while respecting the licensed primary user's rights to that spectrum. As key enablers for DSA, cognitive radios (CRs) are based on software-defined radios which allow them to sense, learn, and adapt to the spectrum environment. These radios can operate independently and rapidly switch channels. Thus, the initial setup and maintenance of cognitive radio networks are dependent upon the ability of CR nodes to find each other, in a process known as rendezvous, and create a link on a common channel for the exchange of data and control information. In this paper, we propose a novel rendezvous protocol, known as QLP, which is based on Q-learning and the p-persistent CSMA protocol. With the QLP protocol, CR nodes learn which channels are best for rendezvous and thus adapt their behavior to visit those channels more frequently. We demonstrate through simulation that the QLP protocol provides a rendevous capability for DSA environments with different dynamics of PU activity, while attempting to achieve the following performance goals: (1) minimize the average time-to-rendezvous, (2) maximize system throughput, (3) minimize primary user interference, and (4) minimize collisions among CR nodes.

  18. Coordinated Radio, Electron, and Waves Experiment (CREWE) for the NASA Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack D. Scudder

    1992-01-01

    The Coordinated Radio, Electron, and Waves Experiment (CREWE) was designed to determine density, bulk velocity and temperature of the electrons for the NASA Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby Spacecraft, to define the MHD-SW IMF flow configuration; to clarify the role of impact ionization processes, to comment on the importance of anomalous ionization phenomena (via wave particle processes), to quantify the

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided bile duct access for rendezvous ERCP drainage in the setting of intradiverticular papilla.

    PubMed

    Lai, R; Freeman, M L

    2005-05-01

    Cannulation of an intradiverticular papilla during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) can be challenging. We present here a technique for endoscopic ultrasound-guided puncture of the common bile duct followed by rendezvous ERCP for biliary drainage through the native intradiverticular papilla. PMID:15844030

  20. The Successful Development of an Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) System for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.

    2003-01-01

    During the 1990's, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture/docking (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous sensor was identified early in the AR&C Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proximity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. A ground demonstration of the entire system and software was successfully tested. Advances in both video and signal processing technologies and the lessons learned from the two successful flight experiments provided a baseline for the development, by the MSFC, of a new generation of video based rendezvous sensor. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AGS) has greatly increased performance and additional capability for longer-range operation with a new target designed as a direct replacement for existing ISS hemispherical reflectors.

  1. Autonomous rendezvous and docking operations of unmanned expendable cargo transfer vehicles (e.g. Centaur) with Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmet, Brian R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the feasibility study using Centaur or other CTV's to deliver payloads to the Space Station Freedom (SSF). During this study was examined the requirements upon unmanned cargo transfer stages (including Centaur) for phasing, rendezvous, proximity operations and docking/berthing (capture).

  2. Transluminal Recanalization of Chronic Total Occlusion of Radial Artery Using Rendezvous Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Mohammad; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Qattan, Nabeel

    2014-01-01

    Although endovascular management of lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is well studied, little information exists regarding endovascular treatment of critical upper limb ischemia. We report a case of transluminal recanalization of right radial artery chronic total occlusion (CTO) using rendezvous technique in a patient with critical hand ischemia and dry gangrene of the right index finger. PMID:25161805

  3. Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, Linda L.; Howard, Richard T.; Johnston, A. S.; Carrington, Connie; Mitchell, Jennifer D.; Cryan, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success ofthe Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-Ioop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of "pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL) using the FRL's 6-DOF gantry system, called the Dynamic Overhead Target System (DOTS). The target vehicle for "docking" in the laboratory was a mockup that was representative of the proposed CEV docking system, with added retroreflectors for the AVGS.' The multi-sensor test configuration used 35 open-loop test trajectories covering three major objectives: (l) sensor characterization trajectories designed to test a wide range of performance parameters; (2) CEV-specific trajectories designed to test performance during CEV-like approach and departure profiles; and (3) sensor characterization tests designed for evaluating sensor performance under more extreme conditions as might be induced during a spacecraft failure or during contingency situations. This paper describes the test development, test facility, test preparations, test execution, and test results of the multisensor series oftrajectories

  4. Mars Orbit Rendezvous Strategy for the Mars 2003/2005 Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAmario, Louis A.; Bollman, Willard E.; Lee, Wayne J.; Roncoli, Ralph B.; Smith, John C.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of the Mars 2003/2005 Sample Return Project is to return Martian surface materials to Earth from two different sites by the year 2008. The baseline mission plan relies heavily on the use of a Mars orbit rendezvous strategy similar to the lunar orbit rendezvous scheme used for the Apollo missions. The 2003 mission consists of a single spacecraft comprised of a Lander, Rover, and Mars ascent vehicle (MAV). The 2003 mission will be launched on a Delta-III-class launch vehicle in May/June 2003 and arrive at Mars in December 2003/January 2004. The Lander deploys the Rover to collect surface samples from several sites and return them to the Lander where they are transferred to a sample canister onboard the MAV. The MAV is launched into a low Mars orbit (targeted for 600 km circular, 45 deg inclination) and releases the sample canister to await retrieval by an Orbiter launched in 2005. (The sample canister is a passive vehicle with no maneuvering capability.) The duration of Mars surface operations is at most about 90 days. The 2005 mission consists of two separate spacecraft: a Lander/Rover/MAV spacecraft identical to that used for the 2003 mission and an Orbiter carrying an Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV). Both spacecraft will be launched on a single Ariane-5 in August 2005 and arrive at Mars in July/August 2006. A second sample canister is delivered to Mars orbit using the same scenario as was used for the 2003 mission. The Orbiter uses aerocapture for insertion into Mars orbit (targeted for 250 x 1400 km, 45 deg inclination). During its approximately one-year stay at Mars, the Orbiter will search for and attempt to rendezvous first with the 2003 sample canister and then with the 2005 sample canister. After retrieval, each sample canister is transferred to the EEV. The Orbiter departs Mars in July 2007 and returns to Earth in October 2008 on a trajectory targeted for landing at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR). After deploying the EEV, the Orbiter performs a deflection maneuver to avoid reentry into Earth's atmosphere.

  5. Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, L.; Johnston, A.; Howard, R.; Mitchell, J.; Cryan, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-loop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of"pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL) using the FRL's 6-DOF gantry system, called the Dynamic Overhead Target System (DOTS). The target vehicle for "docking" in the laboratory was a mockup that was representative of the proposed CEV docking system, with added retroreflectors for the AVGS. The multi-sensor test configuration used 35 open-loop test trajectories covering three major objectives: (1) sensor characterization trajectories designed to test a wide range of performance parameters; (2) CEV-specific trajectories designed to test performance during CEV-like approach and departure profiles; and (3) sensor characterization tests designed for evaluating sensor performance under more extreme conditions as might be induced during a spacecraft failure or during contingency situations. This paper describes the test development, test facility, test preparations, test execution, and test results of the multi-sensor series of trajectories.

  6. Wookie Rendezvous

    E-print Network

    Multiple Contributors

    1999-01-01

    doing here? Get out!" "What do I want? I came to see if you'd been knifed in your sleep. I ain't going anywhere 'til I find out what's wrong." Han set his jaw defiantly, and stood there with his hands on hips. Leia burst into tears. "Princess...

  7. Solar electric propulsion for the Halley's Comet rendezvous mission - Foundation for future missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, R. E.; Dod, R. E.; Grim, D.

    1978-01-01

    Long range and long duration space missions require an inexpensive and powerful means of propulsion. Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) is considered in terms of cost effectiveness and its present state of the art. An ion propulsion system is described, which will employ solar collectors (preferably bi-flat) to generate an electric current to operate an ion thruster. The expulsion of mercury, and later, argon, ions will provide the impulse to move the spacecraft. SEP in the range of 18-60 kW, and spacecraft velocities of up to 30 km/s are discussed with reference to future exploratory missions, including: asteroid and comet rendezvous, Mars sample return, planetary orbiters, and out-of-the-ecliptic space flight. SEP applicability to earth-orbital missions is also discussed, with attention to its effectiveness in moving large objects, e.g., satellite power stations, from LEO to GEO.

  8. Report of the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In October 1992, Russia and the U.S. agreed to conduct a fundamentally new program of human cooperation in space. This original 'Shuttle-Mir' project encompassed combined astronaut-cosmonaut activities on the Shuttle, Soyuz, and Mir spacecraft. At that time, the project was limited to: the STS-60 Shuttle mission, which was completed in February 1994 and carried the first Russian cosmonaut; the planned March 1995 Soyuz 18 launch which will carry a U.S. astronaut to the Mir space station for a three month mission; and the STS-71 Shuttle mission which is scheduled to rendezvous and dock with the Mir space station in June 1995. The Task Force's specific recommendations are given.

  9. Laparoscopic-endoscopic rendez-vous resection of iuxta-cardial gastric GIST

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; MARCHESE, S.; AMORE, F.F.; LA CORTE, F.; FERLA, F.; SPATARO, L.; INTAGLIATA, E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and they often require a surgical removal. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors can originate from any part of the gastrointestinal tract but gastric location is the most common. In the past the risk of rupture of pseudocapsula and peritoneal dissemination have discouraged surgeons from making a minimally invasive surgical treatment. Recently laparoscopic wedge resection has been proposed. Performance of this mini-invasive technique is however difficult in some gastric location of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, such as iuxta-cardial region. The Authors report and discuss a new technique they used to remove a gastrointestinal stromal tumor located just below the cardia, using a rendez-vous endoscopic and laparoscopic technique. PMID:23837950

  10. Laparoscopic-endoscopic rendez-vous resection of iuxta-cardial gastric GIST.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, R; Marchese, S; Amore, F F; La Corte, F; Ferla, F; Spataro, L; Intagliata, E

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and they often require a surgical removal. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors can originate from any part of the gastrointestinal tract but gastric location is the most common. In the past the risk of rupture of pseudocapsula and peritoneal dissemination have discouraged surgeons from making a minimally invasive surgical treatment. Recently laparoscopic wedge resection has been proposed. Performance of this mini-invasive technique is however difficult in some gastric location of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, such as iuxta-cardial region. The Authors report and discuss a new technique they used to remove a gastrointestinal stromal tumor located just below the cardia, using a rendez-vous endoscopic and laparoscopic technique. PMID:23837950

  11. Orbit determination for the Mariner Mark II Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby mission - The orbiting phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission is the first of the Mariner Mark II mission set, designed to explore the outer solar system. Major objectives of orbit determination will be determine the positions and masses of the comet and asteroid and the relative position of the spacecraft, which is important to accurate pointing of the scan platform on which the narrow angle camera and scientific instruments are positioned. Position prediction is also important, since continuous commuication with the spacecraft will not be possible. The small gravitational attractions and poorly known ephemerides of the comet and asteroid, and the small, slow spacecraft orbit about the comet, pose significant new problems for orbit determination. Results of simulations studying the effectiveness of key data types, the accuracies of estimates, and prediction capabilities, are presented.

  12. Mission Design for a Multiple-Rendezvous Mission to Jupiter's Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiwald, Volker; Dachwald, Bernd

    In this paper, we will provide a feasible mission design for a multiple-rendezvous mission to Jupiter's Trojans. It is based on solar electric propulsion, as being currently used on the DAWN spacecraft, and other flight-proven technology. First, we have selected a set of mission objectives, the prime objective being the detection of water -especially subsurface water -to provide evidence for the Trojans' formation at large solar distances. Based on DAWN and other comparable missions, we have determined suitable payload instruments to achieve these objectives. Afterwards, we have designed a spacecraft that is able to carry the selected payload to the Trojan region and rendezvous successively with three target bodies within a maximum mission duration of 15 years. Accurate low-thrust trajectories have been obtained with a global low-thrust trajectory optimization program (InTrance). During the transfer from Earth to the first target, the spacecraft is propelled by two RIT-22 ion engines from EADS Astrium, whereas a single RIT-15 is used for transfers within the Trojan region to reduce the required power. For power generation, the spacecraft uses a multi-junction solar array that is supported by concentrators. To achieve moderate mission costs, we have restricted the launch mass to a maximum of 1600 kg, the maximum interplanetary injection capability of a Soyuz/Fregat launcher. Our final layout has a mass of 1400 kg, yielding a margin of about 14%. Nestor (a member of the L4-population) was determined as the first mission target. It can be reached within 4.6 years from launch. The fuel mass ratio for this transfer is about 35%. The stay time at Nestor is 1.2 years. Eurymedon was selected as the second target (transfer time 3.5 years, stay time 3.0 years) and Irus as the third target (transfer time 2.2 years). The transfers within the Trojan L4-population can be accomplished with fuel mass ratios of about 3% for each trajectory leg. Including the stay times in orbit around the targets, the mission can be accomplished within a total duration of about 14.5 years. According to our mission analysis, it is also feasible to fly to the L5-population with similar flight times. It has to be noted that -for a first analysis -we have taken only the named targets into account. Allowing also rendezvous with unnamed objects will very likely decrease the mission duration. Based on a scaling of DAWN's mission costs (due to comparable scientific instruments and mission objectives), and taking into account the longer mission duration and the potential re-use of already developed technology, we have estimated that these three rendezvous can be accomplished with a budget of about 250 Million Euros, i.e. about 25% of ROSETTA's budget.

  13. Development of an autonomous video rendezvous and docking system, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Richardson, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    The critical elements of an autonomous video rendezvous and docking system were built and used successfully in a physical laboratory simulation. The laboratory system demonstrated that a small, inexpensive electronic package and a flight computer of modest size can analyze television images to derive guidance information for spacecraft. In the ultimate application, the system would use a docking aid consisting of three flashing lights mounted on a passive target spacecraft. Television imagery of the docking aid would be processed aboard an active chase vehicle to derive relative positions and attitudes of the two spacecraft. The demonstration system used scale models of the target spacecraft with working docking aids. A television camera mounted on a 6 degree of freedom (DOF) simulator provided imagery of the target to simulate observations from the chase vehicle. A hardware video processor extracted statistics from the imagery, from which a computer quickly computed position and attitude. Computer software known as a Kalman filter derived velocity information from position measurements.

  14. Solar array study for solar electric propulsion spacecraft for the Encke rendezvous mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sequeira, E. A.; Patterson, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The work is described which was performed on the design, analysis and performance of a 20 kW rollup solar array capable of meeting the design requirements of a solar electric spacecraft for the 1980 Encke rendezvous mission. To meet the high power requirements of the proposed electric propulsion mission, solar arrays on the order of 186.6 sq m were defined. Because of the large weights involved with arrays of this size, consideration of array configurations is limited to lightweight, large area concepts with maximum power-to-weight ratios. Items covered include solar array requirements and constraints, array concept selection and rationale, structural and electrical design considerations, and reliability considerations.

  15. Effects of beef enhancement with non-meat ingredients, blade tenderization, and vacuum tumbling on quality attributes of four beef cuts stored in a high oxygen environment

    E-print Network

    Williams, Tracey Ann

    2005-02-17

    (injected or non-injected), blade tenderization (0, 1, or 2 passes) and vacuum-tumbling (0, 5, 10 or 20 minutes). Injected muscles contained up to 10% of a brine containing 1.55% potassium lactate, 0.1% sodium diacetate, 0.3% sodium tripolyphosphate...-1. ANOVA table for full model...................................................................... 134 A-2. ANOVA table for package purge (%) for Biceps femoris.......................... 135 A-3. ANOVA table for Warner Bratzler shear force...

  16. Evaluation of GPS position and attitude determination for automated rendezvous and docking missions. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diprinzio, Marc D.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    The use of the Global Positioning System for position and attitude determination is evaluated for an automated rendezvous and docking mission. The typical mission scenario involves the chaser docking with the target for resupply or repair purposes, and is divided into three sections. During the homing phase, the chaser utilizes coarse acquisition pseudorange data to approach the target; guidance laws for this stage are investigated. In the second phase, differential carrier phase positioning is utilized. The chaser must maintain a quasiconstant distance from the target, in order to resolve the initial integer ambiguities. Once the ambiguities are determined, the terminal phase is entered, and the rendezvous is completed with continuous carrier phase tracking. Attitude knowledge is maintained in all phases through the use of the carrier phase observable. A Kalman filter is utilized to estimate all states from the noisy measurement data. The effects of selective availability and cycle slips are also investigated.

  17. Vacuum to Antimatter-Rocket Interstellar Explorer System (VARIES): A Proposed Program for an Interstellar Rendezvous and Return Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obousy, R.

    While interstellar missions have been explored in the literature, one mission architecture has not received much attention, namely the interstellar rendezvous and return mission that could be accomplished on timescales comparable with a working scientist's career. Such a mission would involve an initial boost phase followed by a coasting phase to the target system. Next would be the deceleration and rendezvous phase, which would be followed by a period of scientific data gathering. Finally, there would be a second boost phase, aimed at returning the spacecraft back to the solar system, and subsequent coasting and deceleration phases upon return to our solar system. Such a mission would represent a precursor to a future manned interstellar mission; which in principle could safely return any astronauts back to Earth. In this paper a novel architecture is proposed that would allow for an unmanned interstellar rendezvous and return mission. The approach utilized for the Vacuum to Antimatter-Rocket Interstellar Explorer System (VARIES) would lead to system components and mission approaches that could be utilized for autonomous operation of other deep-space probes. Engineering solutions for such a mission will have a significant impact on future exploration and sample return missions for the outer planets. This paper introduces the general concept, with a mostly qualitative analysis. However, a full research program is introduced, and as this program progresses, more quantitative papers will be released.

  18. Long-Range Motional Restrictions in a Multidomain Zinc-Finger Protein from Anisotropic Tumbling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rafael Bruschweiler; Xiubei Liao; Peter E. Wright

    1995-01-01

    Structural characterization of biomolecules in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is based primarily on the use of interproton distances derived from homonuclear cross-relaxation experiments. Information about short time-scale dynamics, on the other hand, is obtained from relaxation rates of heteronuclear spin pairs such as 15N-^1H. By combining the two types of data and utilizing the dependence of heteronuclear

  19. String method for calculation of minimum free-energy paths in Cartesian space in freely-tumbling systems.

    PubMed

    Branduardi, Davide; Faraldo-Gómez, José D

    2013-09-10

    The string method is a molecular-simulation technique that aims to calculate the minimum free-energy path of a chemical reaction or conformational transition, in the space of a pre-defined set of reaction coordinates that is typically highly dimensional. Any descriptor may be used as a reaction coordinate, but arguably the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms involved are the most unprejudiced and intuitive choice. Cartesian coordinates, however, present a non-trivial problem, in that they are not invariant to rigid-body molecular rotations and translations, which ideally ought to be unrestricted in the simulations. To overcome this difficulty, we reformulate the framework of the string method to integrate an on-the-fly structural-alignment algorithm. This approach, referred to as SOMA (String method with Optimal Molecular Alignment), enables the use of Cartesian reaction coordinates in freely tumbling molecular systems. In addition, this scheme permits the dissection of the free-energy change along the most probable path into individual atomic contributions, thus revealing the dominant mechanism of the simulated process. This detailed analysis also provides a physically-meaningful criterion to coarse-grain the representation of the path. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method we analyze the isomerization of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum and the chair-to-inverted-chair transition of ?-D mannose in explicit water. Notwithstanding the simplicity of these systems, the SOMA approach reveals novel insights into the atomic mechanism of these isomerizations. In both cases, we find that the dynamics and the energetics of these processes are controlled by interactions involving only a handful of atoms in each molecule. Consistent with this result, we show that a coarse-grained SOMA calculation defined in terms of these subsets of atoms yields nearidentical minimum free-energy paths and committor distributions to those obtained via a highly-dimensional string. PMID:24729762

  20. An overview of autonomous rendezvous and docking system technology development at General Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuenzel, Fred

    1991-01-01

    The Centaur avionics suite is undergoing a dramatic modernization for the commercial, DoD Atlas and Titan programs. The system has been upgraded to the current state-of-the-art in ring laser gyro inertial sensors and Mil-Std-1750A processor technology. The Cruise Missile avionic system has similarly been evolving for many years. Integration of GPS into both systems has been underway for over five years with a follow-on cruise missile system currently in flight test. Rendezvous and Docking related studies have been conducted for over five years in support of OMV, CTV, and Advanced Upper Stages, as well as several other internal IR&D's. The avionics system and AR&D simulator demonstrated to the SATWG in November 1990 has been upgraded considerably under two IR&D programs in 1991. The Centaur modern avionics system is being flown in block upgrades which started in July of 1990. The Inertial Navigation Unit will fly in November of 1991. The Cruise Missile avionics systems have been fully tested and operationally validated in combat. The integrated AR&D system for space vehicle applications has been under development and testing since 1990. A Joint NASA / GD ARD&L System Test Program is currently being planned to validate several aspects of system performance in three different NASA test facilities in 1992.

  1. Coherent Doppler lidar for automated space vehicle rendezvous, stationkeeping and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The inherent spatial resolution of laser radar makes ladar or lidar an attractive candidate for Automated Rendezvous and Capture application. Previous applications were based on incoherent lidar techniques, requiring retro-reflectors on the target vehicle. Technology improvements (reduced size, no cryogenic cooling requirement) have greatly enhanced the construction of coherent lidar systems. Coherent lidar permits the acquisition of non-cooperative targets at ranges that are limited by the detection capability rather than by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requirements. The sensor can provide translational state information (range, velocity, and angle) by direct measurement and, when used with any array detector, also can provide attitude information by Doppler imaging techniques. Identification of the target is accomplished by scanning with a high pulse repetition frequency (dependent on the SNR). The system performance is independent of range and should not be constrained by sun angle. An initial effort to characterize a multi-element detection system has resulted in a system that is expected to work to a minimum range of 1 meter. The system size, weight and power requirements are dependent on the operating range; 10 km range requires a diameter of 3 centimeters with overall size at 3 x 3 x 15 to 30 cm, while 100 km range requires a 30 cm diameter.

  2. The applications of laser tracking and ranging technology in space rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Wenji; Gao, Limin; Zhou, Liang; Li, Dawei; Wang, Rong

    2013-09-01

    With the development of space technology, more and more Rendezvous and Docking (RVD) mission require more precise measurement of relative position and attitude between tracking spacecraft and target spacecraft. In the procedure of docking between near spacecraft , the optical retroreflector on the target Spacecraft were tracked by the laser tracking and ranging device on the tracking spacecraft , the distance data were provided by laser ranging system, and the azimuth data were provided by tracking gimbal, Synthesized the distance data and azimuth data, the relative position information between two spacecraft were provided to the target spacecraft. Furthermore, through tracking more than three point on the target spacecraft ,the complete information of relative position and attitude between two spacecraft were calculated rapidly by the measurement system?which were presented to the control system during the whole RVD operating stage. The laser tracking technology guaranteed continuous measurement and supplied accurate azimuth information, and the laser ranging technology ensured high accuracy of distance information. In addition, the untouched measure mode give no disturbance to the docking operation, moreover, the monochromaticity of laser make the tracking and ranging procedure avoiding to be disturbed by parasitic light of space, thus there will be a effective measurement accompanying the whole docking operating procedure and affording valid data to the control system of docking.

  3. The Ion Propulsion System on NASA's Space Technology 4/Champollion Comet Rendezvous Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles E.; Weiss, Jeffery M.

    1999-01-01

    The ST4/Champollion mission is designed to rendezvous with and land on the comet Tempel 1 and return data from the first-ever sampling of a comet surface. Ion propulsion is an enabling technology for this mission. The ion propulsion system on ST4 consists of three ion engines each essentially identical to the single engine that flew on the DS1 spacecraft. The ST4 propulsion system will operate at a maximum input power of 7.5 kW (3.4 times greater than that demonstrated on DS1), will produce a maximum thrust of 276 mN, and will provide a total (Delta)V of 11.4 km/s. To accomplish this the propulsion system will carry 385 kg of xenon. All three engines will be operated simultaneously for the first 168 days of the mission. The nominal mission requires that each engine be capable of processing 118 kg. If one engine fails after 168 days, the remaining two engines can perform the mission, but must be capable of processing 160 kg of xenon, or twice the original thruster design requirement. Detailed analyses of the thruster wear-out failure modes coupled with experience from long-duration engine tests indicate that the thrusters have a high probability of meeting the 160-kg throughput requirement.

  4. Fourth Report of the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On December 6, 1994, the NASA Administrator, Mr. Daniel Goldin, requested that Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, in his role as the Chairman of the NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions, lead a team composed of several Task Force members and technical advisors' to Russia with the goal of reviewing preparations and readiness for the upcoming international Space Station Phase 1 missions. In his directions to Gen. Stafford, Mr. Goldin requested that the review team focus its initial efforts on safety of flight issues for the following Phase 1A missions: the Soyuz TM-21 mission which will carry U.S. astronaut Dr. Norman Thagard and cosmonauts Lt. Col. Vladimir Dezhurov and Mr. Gennady Strekalov aboard a Soyuz spacecraft to the Mir Station; the Mir 18 Main Expedition during which Thagard and his fellow cosmonauts, Dezhurov and Strokalov, will spend approximately three months aboard the Mir Station; the STS-71 Space Shuttle mission which will perform the first Shuttle-Mir docking, carry cosmonauts Col. Anatoly SoloViev and Mr. Nikolai Budarin to the Mir Station, and return Thagard, Dezhurov, and Strekalov to Earth.

  5. Incineration of wastes in novel high-efficiency tumbling and rotating fluidized bed incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Swithenbank, J.; Nasserzadeh, V.; Taib, R.; Stagg, D.; Moore, D.; Ward, M. [Sheffield Univ. Waste Incineration Center (United Kingdom); Bone, J. [Sheffield Sewage Sludge Plant (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    At the present time, the sewage treatment plants in the United Kingdom produce about 25,000,000 t of sewage sludge each year at a concentration of 4% solids. New regulations in the United Kingdom forbid sea dumping, and in the near future new incinerators will be required to dispose of about 5,000,000 t per year. The research program at the Sheffield University consisted of design and construction of a small-scale cylindrical rotating fluidized bed incinerator with an inside diameter of 200 mm and an axial length of up to 200 mm. The fluidizing medium was silica sand and the bed depth 30--50 mm. The rotational speed of the bed varied between 100 and 1,000 rpm. Coal, oil, sewage sludge, and chicken manure were burnt in the bed at temperatures between 700 and 900 C. Measurements of heat transfer rate, bed temperature, and exhaust gas composition were carried out over a range of operating conditions. The influence of rotational forces on basic fluidization characteristics were also investigated on a perspex model. The results obtained from the research work demonstrated that the rotating fluidized bed incinerator can produce considerably higher combustion intensities, has a wide turn-down range, has low toxic emissions, and has a more easy and rapid start-up than conventional stationary fluidized bed incinerators. Other advantages of the system include: good mixing, simpler fuel injection, low thermal inertia, and good heat transfer rates. Other potential applications for this system include boilers, open cycle gas turbines, and combined gas/steam cycles.

  6. Rendezvous, Landing and Sample Return Mission to Jupiter Trojans by the Solar Power Sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Hajime; Matsuura, Shuji; Mori, Osamu; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Sekine, Yasuhito; Abe, Shinsuke

    JAXA/ISAS has been preparing for the Solar Power Sail mission, Japan’s first outer planet region exploration. Its precursor was successfully realized by IKAROS, the world's first deep space solar sail spacecraft, in 2010 between the Earth and Venus orbits. The Solar Power Sail is defined primarily as a technology demonstration mission; yet it will also present game-changing opportunities for both space astronomy and solar system exploration. The former will benefit the cruising operation, which will enable ”dust free” infrared astronomy beyond the cocoon of the zodiacal light to search for the first generation light of the Universe. Interplanetary-long baseline will allow gamma-ray burst observation to identify their source locations much more precise than ever. As for solar system exploration, the Solar Power Sail, which is not depended upon RTG technology, will offer the world's first possibility of rendezvous, landing and sample return from the outer planet region, i.e., in the Jupiter region and beyond. With this technology, we are aiming to visit Jupiter Trojan asteroids, one of the last uncharted frontiers of the Solar System. Jupiter Trojans may hold fundamental clues of the Solar System formation and revolution discussed by two competing hypotheses between the classic model and the planetary migration model. The former suggests that Trojan asteroids are mainly survivors of building blocks of the Jupiter system, while the latter claims that they must be intruders from outer regions after the planetary migration of gas planets settled. This paper outlines scientific objectives of Jupiter Trojan exploration, its mission design and major aspects of the spacecraft system, nature of candidate target asteroids, in-situ observation and lander instruments including optical camera, imaging spectrometer, high-resolution TOF mass spectrometer, and large-area dust counter, together with a strategy of the sample return option from the surface of a Trojan asteroid.

  7. Rendezvous with Toutatis from the Moon: The Chang'e-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Tang, X.; Meng, L.

    2014-07-01

    Chang'e-2 probe was the second lunar probe of China, with the main objectives to demonstrate some key features of the new lunar soft landing technology, and its applications to future exploration missions. After completing the planned mission successfully, Chang'e-2 flew away from the Moon and entered into the interplanetary space. Later, at a distance of 7 million km from the Earth, Chang'e-2 encountered asteroid (4179) Toutatis with a very close fly-by distance and obtained colorful images with a 3-m resolution. Given some surplus velocity increment as well as the promotion of autonomous flight ability and improvement of control, propulsion, and thermal systems in the initial design, Chang'e-2 had the capabilities necessary for escaping from the Moon. By taking advantage of the unique features of the Lagrangian point, the first close fly-by of asteroid Toutatis was realized despite the tight constraints of propellant allocation, spacecraft-Earth communication, and coordination of execution sequences. Chang'e-2 realized the Toutatis flyby with a km-level distance at closest approach. In the absence of direct measurement method, based on the principle of relative navigation and through the use of the sequence of target images, we calculated the rendezvous parameters such as relative distance and image resolution. With the help of these parameters, some fine and new scientific discoveries about the asteroid were obtained by techniques of optical measurements and image processing. Starting with an innovative design, followed by high-fidelity testing and demonstration, elaborative implementation, and optimal usage of residual propellant, Chang'e-2 has for the first time successfully explored the Moon, L2 point and an asteroid, while achieving the purpose of 'faster, better, cheaper'. What Chang'e-2 has accomplished was far beyond our expectations. *J. Huang is the chief designer (PI) of Chang'e-2 probe, planned Chang'e-2's multi-objective and multitasking exploration mission.

  8. A new way in intelligent recognition improves control accuracy and efficiency for spacecrafts' rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, JiaQing; Lu, Yaodong; Wang, JiaFa

    2013-08-01

    Spacecrafts rendezvous and docking (RVD) by human or autonomous control is a complicated and difficult problem especially in the final approach stage. Present control methods have their key technology weakness. It is a necessary, important and difficult step for RVD through human's aiming chaser spacecraft at target spacecraft in a coaxial line by a three-dimension bulge cross target. At present, there is no technology to quantify the alignment in image recognition direction. We present a new practical autonomous method to improve the accuracy and efficiency of RVD control by adding image recognition algorithm instead of human aiming and control. Target spacecraft has a bulge cross target which is designed for chaser spacecraft's aiming accurately and have two center points, one is a plate surface center point(PSCP), another is a bulge cross center point(BCCP), while chaser spacecraft has a monitoring ruler cross center point(RCCP) of the video telescope optical system for aiming . If the three center points are coincident at the monitoring image, the two spacecrafts keep aligning which is suitable for closing to docking. Using the trace spacecraft's video telescope optical system to acquire the real-time monitoring image of the target spacecraft's bulge cross target. Appling image processing and intelligent recognition algorithm to get rid of interference source to compute the three center points' coordinate and exact digital offset of two spacecrafts' relative position and attitude real-timely, which is used to control the chaser spacecraft pneumatic driving system to change the spacecraft attitude in six direction: up, down, front, back, left, right, pitch, drift and roll precisely. This way is also practical and economical because it needs not adding any hardware, only adding the real-time image recognition software into spacecrafts' present video system. It is suitable for autonomous control and human control.

  9. A Prediction Method of TV Camera Image for Space Manual-control Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Huang; Qing, Yang; Wenrui, Wu

    Space manual-control rendezvous and docking (RVD) is a key technology for accomplishing the RVD mission in manned space engineering, especially when automatic control system is out of work. The pilot on chase spacecraft manipulates the hand-stick by the image of target spacecraft captured by TV camera. From the TV image, the relative position and attitude of chase and target spacecrafts can be shown. Therefore, the size, the position, the brightness and the shadow of the target on TV camera are key to guarantee the success of manual-control RVD. A method of predicting the on-orbit TV camera image at different relative positions and light conditions during the process of RVD is discussed. Firstly, the basic principle of capturing the image of cross drone on target spacecraft by TV camera is analyzed theoretically, based which the strategy of manual-control RVD is discussed in detail. Secondly, the relationship between the displayed size or position and the real relative distance of chase and target spacecrafts is presented, the brightness and reflection by the target spacecraft at different light conditions are decribed, the shadow on cross drone caused by the chase or target spacecraft is analyzed. Thirdly, a prediction method of on-orbit TV camera images at certain orbit and light condition is provided, and the characteristics of TV camera image during the RVD is analyzed. Finally, the size, the position, the brightness and the shadow of target spacecraft on TV camera image at typical orbit is simulated. The result, by comparing the simulated images with the real images captured by the TV camera on Shenzhou manned spaceship , shows that the prediction method is reasonable

  10. Application of solar electric propulsion to comet and asteroid rendezvous and docking /CARD/ missions with sample return.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odom, P. R.; Cikanek, H. A.; Allen, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    Summary of a feasibility study of CARD mission/system concepts for comet Encke and asteroid Eros missions in the late 1970s. A common planetary vehicle employing a modular SEP (solar electric propulsion) system and a direct rendezvous/docking mode with a staged science/sampling module appears feasible based on 1973 technology. The SEP system utilizes 3.5-kW, 3500-sec Isp mercury ion thrusters and rollout solar arrays sized at 36 (Encke) and 13 (Eros) kW based on the Titan III family launch vehicles. Science payloads, sampling concepts, and supporting spacecraft subsystems are defined. Problem areas are identified, and programmatic considerations are discussed.

  11. Mission analysis and guidance, navigation, and control design for rendezvous and docking phase of advanced reentry vehicle mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strippoli, L.; Colmenarejo, P.; Strauch, H.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced Reentry Vehicle (ARV) belongs to the family of vehicles designed to perform rendezvous and docking (RvD) with the International space station (ISS) [1]. Differently from its predecessor ATV (Automated Transfer Vehicle), the ARV will transport a reentry capsule, equipped with a heatshield and able to bring back cargo, experiments, or, as a possible future development, even crew, being this latter scenario very attracting in view of the Space Shuttle retirement. GMV, as subcontractor of EADS-Astrium Germany, is in charge of the RvD and departure mission analysis and GNC (Guidance, Navigation, and Control) design of ARV mission. This paper will present the main outcomes of the study.

  12. Infrared focal plane design for the Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby and Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staller, Craig; Niblack, Curtiss; Evans, Thomas; Blessinger, Michael; Westrick, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    A focal plane assembly combining hybrid electronic components with passive optical components within a single hermetically sealed package has been designed by Cincinnati Electronics to meet the performance requirements imposed by the Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) and Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometers (VIMSs). A single line array of 256 InSb photodiodes, accessed by two 1 x 128 multiplexers, provides continuous spectral coverage from 0.85 to 5.1 microns. Intrinsic field-of-view apertures and a unique order sorting filter require critical optical alignment within the hybrid. FPA performance requirements, design approach, and critical issues are discussed.

  13. Fifth Report of the NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking missions examine a number of specific issues related to the Shuttle-Mir program. Three teams composed of Task Force members and technical advisors were formed to address the follow issues: preliminary results from STS-71 and the status of preparations for STS-74; NASA's presence in Russia; and NASA's automated data processing and telecommunications (ADP/T) infrastructure in Russia. The three review team reports have been included in the fifth report of the Task Force.

  14. Tumbling in Space

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Wisconsin Fast Plants Program

    The first activity in this newsletter was written to engage students in an investigation related to the Fast Plants that traveled into space in May of 1995. Students explore how plants use guidance systems which sense and respond to gravity (gravitropism) ensuring that roots anchor plants and access water and that shoots emerge into the light.This activity includes substantial background discussion about gravitropism in plants.

  15. Tumble Wing Walkalong Glider

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COSI

    2009-01-01

    In this physics activity (page 2 of the PDF), learners will construct their own walkalong glider. They will explore how air, though invisible, surrounds and affects other objects. Learners will discover that air is made up of molecules that exert pressure on objects. Though this activity was created as a pre-visit for a traveling science show, it makes a great stand-alone activity as well.

  16. Electron Spin Relaxation Rates for Semiquinones between 25 and 295 K in Glass-Forming Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Kathirvelu, Velavan; Sato, Hideo; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2009-01-01

    Electron spin lattice relaxation rates for five semiquinones (2,5-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,5-di-t-amyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,5-di-phenyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,6-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, tetrahydroxy-1,4-benzosemiquione) were studied by long-pulse saturation recovery EPR in 1:4 glycerol:ethanol, 1:1 glycerol:ethanol, and triethanolamine between 25 and 295 K. Although the dominant process changes with temperature, relaxation rates vary smoothly with temperature, even near the glass transition temperatures, and could be modeled as the sum of contributions that have the temperature dependence that is predicted for the direct, Raman, local mode and tumbling dependent processes. At 85 K, which is in a temperature range where the Raman process dominates, relaxation rates along the gxx (g~2.006) and gyy (g~2.005) axes are about 2.7 to 1.5 times faster than along the gzz axis (g = 2.0023). In highly viscous triethanolamine, contributions from tumbling-dependent processes are negligible. At temperatures above 100 K relaxation rates in triethanolamine are unchanged between X-band (9.5 GHz) and Q-band (34 GHz), so the process that dominates in this temperature interval was assigned as a local mode rather than a thermally-activated process. Because the largest proton hyperfine couplings are only 2.2 G, spin rotation makes a larger contribution than tumbling-dependent modulation of hyperfine anisotropy. Since g anisotropy is small, tumbling dependent modulation of g anisotropy make a smaller contribution than spin rotation at X-band. Although there was negligible impact of methyl rotation on T1, rotation of t-butyl or t-amyl methyl groups enhances spin echo dephasing between 85 and 150 K. PMID:19223213

  17. NASA's Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensor Development and Its Applicability to the GER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Cryan, Scott; DSouza, Christopher; Strube, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper will address how a common Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensor suite can support Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) missions, and discuss how the model of common capability development to support multiple missions can enable system capability level partnerships and further GER objectives. NASA has initiated efforts to develop AR&D/C sensors, that are directly applicable to GER. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a three-dimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. NASA's AR&D/C sensor development path could benefit the International Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) and support the GER mission scenario by providing a common sensor suite upon which GER objectives could be achieved while minimizing development costs. The paper will describe the concepts of operations of these missions and how the common sensors are utilized by each mission. It will also detail the potential partnerships and contribution of the International community in the development of this common AR&D/C sensor suite.

  18. Neuroscience, Technology and Learning The 2nd STELLARnet Alpine RendezVous in the French Alps, 27th to 31st March 2011

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Neuroscience, Technology and Learning The 2nd STELLARnet Alpine RendezVous in the French Alps, 27th to 31st March 2011 White Paper arising from the workshop on: Neuroscience-6Aug2012 #12;Neuroscience, Technology and Learning 1.Introduction and motivation This workshop

  19. An Investigation of Multipath Effects on the GPS System During Auto-Rendezvous and Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richie, James E.; Forest, Francis W.

    1995-01-01

    The proposed use of a Cargo Transport Vehicle (CTV) to carry hardware to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) during the construction phase of the SSF project requires remote maneuvering of the CTV. The CTV is not a manned vehicle. Obtaining the relative positions of the CTV and SSF for remote auto-rendezvous and capture (AR&C) scenarios will rely heavily on the Global Positioning System (GPS). The GPS system is expected to guide the CTV up to a distance of 100 to 300 meters from the SSF. At some point within this range, an optical docking system will take over the remote guidance for capture. During any remote guidance by GPS it is possible that significant multipath signals may be caused by large objects in the vicinity of the module being remotely guided. This could alter the position obtained by the GPS system from the actual position. Due to the nature of the GPS signals, it has been estimated that if the difference in distance between the Line of Sight (LOS) path and the multipath is greater than 300 meters, the GPS system is capable of discriminating between the direct signal and the reflected (or multipath) signal. However, if the path difference is less than 300 meters, one must be concerned. This report details the work accomplished by the Electromagnetic Simulations Laboratory at Marquette University over the period December 1993 to May 1995. This work is an investigation of the strength and phase of a multipath signal arriving at the CTV relative to the direct or line of sight (LOS) signal. The signal originates at a GPS satellite in half geo-stationary orbit and takes two paths to the CTV: (1) the direct or LOS path from the GPS satellite to the CTV; and (2) a scattered path from the GPS satellite to the SSF module and then to the CTV. The scattering from a cylinder has been computed using the physical optics approximation for the current. No other approximations or assumptions have been made including no assumptions regarding the far field or Fresnel field approximations. The integrations required to obtain the scattered field have been computed numerically using an N dimensional Romberg integration. The total scattered electric field is then projected onto the RCP component in the direction of propagation only. The direct or line of sight signal is then used to compute the relative strength and phase of the scattered field. The trajectory of the CTV has been parameterized into 4,214 points that are calculated for each of the geometries investigated. The motion of the CTV between points is small enough for the magnitude data (dB down from direct signal) to appear very smooth; however, because of the distances and wavelengths involved, the phase of the scattered field relative to the direct signal varies very rapidly.

  20. Rosetta rendezvous and CONSERT operations in 2014: A chimeric surface model of 67P/Churyumov Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herique, Alain; Lasue, Jéremie; Rogez, Yves; Zine, Sonia; Kofman, Wlodek

    2012-07-01

    In 2014 the European Space Agency's Rosetta probe will rendezvous with the comet 67P/Churyumov Gerasimenko (67P) and the Philae Lander will land on the surface of the nucleus. Following the landing, the COmet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radiowave Transmission (CONSERT) radar will perform the tomography of the nucleus by measuring radiowave propagation through the comet between the Lander and the orbiter. Preparation for these operations, in particular the development and validation of simulation software, requires a shape model of the surface of 67P. The complexity of this model should reflect the environmental conditions that will be found in 2014. In this paper, we show that existing models of 67P are not of a sufficiently high resolution to constitute interesting test cases. Following a review of current shape models for other comets, we propose a composite which is a hybrid of the 67P and 81P/Wild 2 models.

  1. Design and Performance Analysis of GPS Based Precise Relative Navigation for Rendezvous and Formation Flying Missions in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Toru

    Precise relative GPS navigation is essential technology for rendezvous and formation flying of spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit. Key design issues of precise relative GPS navigation software are studied and a novel formulation is proposed for the mission which requires high accuracy when the separation distance is up to several km. The navigation filter estimates float navigation solutions by extended Kalman filter with elaborate dynamics models, and resolves ambiguities of integer carrier phase biases to achieve high accuracy fix navigation solutions. A relative navigation software with the proposed formulation is implemented and evaluated in two different ways. One is a test using spacebourne GPS receivers and a GPS signal simulator to evaluate the performance and sensitivity of the software against variation of parameters. The other is a test using actual telemetry data from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to demonstrate the software performance. The design, implementation, and results of the evaluation are presented and discussed on this paper.

  2. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  3. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-ray and Gamma-ray Spectrometer (XGRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  4. Study of effects of uncertainties on comet and asteroid encounter and contact guidance requirements. Part 1: Guidance and navigation studies. [development of navigation and guidance techniques for space rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A guidance algorithm that provides precise rendezvous in the deterministic case while requiring only relative state information is developed. A navigation scheme employing only onboard relative measurements is built around a Kalman filter set in measurement coordinates. The overall guidance and navigation procedure is evaluated in the face of measurement errors by a detailed numerical simulation. Results indicate that onboard guidance and navigation for the terminal phase of rendezvous is possible with reasonable limits on measurement errors.

  5. Tumbling motions of [NH2(CH3)2]+ ions in [NH2(CH3)2]2CoCl4 determined by 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy in the rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ma Byong; Bong, Pill Hoon; Lim, Ae Ran

    2015-03-01

    The structure and phase transition temperatures of [NH2(CH3)2]2CoCl4 were determined using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The temperature dependence of chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1? in the rotating frame were measured for the 1H nucleus in [NH2(CH3)2]2CoCl4. T1? for 1H in [NH2(CH3)2]2CoCl4 showed a minimum, and it is apparent that T1? values are governed by a tumbling motion. The activation energy of tumbling motion for 1H is owing to the interaction between CH3 and NH2 ions in the [NH2(CH3)2]+ group.

  6. The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) and Closed-Loop Hardware Testing for Orion Rendezvous System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milenkovic, Zoran; DSouza, Christopher; Huish, David; Bendle, John; Kibler, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The exploration goals of Orion / MPCV Project will require a mature Rendezvous, Proximity Operations and Docking (RPOD) capability. Ground testing autonomous docking with a next-generation sensor such as the Vision Navigation Sensor (VNS) is a critical step along the path of ensuring successful execution of autonomous RPOD for Orion. This paper will discuss the testing rationale, the test configuration, the test limitations and the results obtained from tests that have been performed at the Lockheed Martin Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) to evaluate and mature the Orion RPOD system. We will show that these tests have greatly increased the confidence in the maturity of the Orion RPOD design, reduced some of the latent risks and in doing so validated the design philosophy of the Orion RPOD system. This paper is organized as follows: first, the objectives of the test are given. Descriptions of the SOSC facility, and the Orion RPOD system and associated components follow. The details of the test configuration of the components in question are presented prior to discussing preliminary results of the tests. The paper concludes with closing comments.

  7. Coordinated Radio, Electron, and Waves Experiment (CREWE) for the NASA Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, Jack D.

    1992-01-01

    The Coordinated Radio, Electron, and Waves Experiment (CREWE) was designed to determine density, bulk velocity and temperature of the electrons for the NASA Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby Spacecraft, to define the MHD-SW IMF flow configuration; to clarify the role of impact ionization processes, to comment on the importance of anomalous ionization phenomena (via wave particle processes), to quantify the importance of wave turbulence in the cometary interaction, to establish the importance of photoionization via the presence of characteristic lines in a structured energy spectrum, to infer the presence and grain size of significant ambient dust column density, to search for the theoretically suggested 'impenetrable' contact surface, and to quantify the flow of heat (in the likelihood that no surface exists) that will penetrate very deep into the atmosphere supplying a good deal of heat via impact and charge exchange ionization. This final report provides an instrument description, instrument test plans, list of deliverables/schedule, flight and support equipment and software schedule, CREWE accommodation issues, resource requirements, status of major contracts, an explanation of the non-NASA funded efforts, status of EIP and IM plan, descope options, and Brinton questions.

  8. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Cryan, Scott; Zipay, John; Strube, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR&D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a threedimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe the current design status and the considerations and technologies involved in developing this docking mechanism.

  9. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Strube, Matthew; Zipay, John J.; Cryan, Scott

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR and D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR and D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR and D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a threedimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR and D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe the current design status and the considerations and technologies involved in developing this docking mechanism.

  10. Thermo-physical properties of 162173 (1999 JU3), a potential flyby and rendezvous target for interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T. G.; ?urech, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Abe, M.; Kawakami, K.; Kasuga, T.; Kinoshita, D.; Kuroda, D.; Urakawa, S.; Okumura, S.; Sarugaku, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Takagi, Y.; Weissman, P. R.; Choi, Y.-J.; Larson, S.; Yanagisawa, K.; Nagayama, S.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Near-Earth asteroid 162173 (1999 JU3) is a potential flyby and rendezvous target for interplanetary missions because of its easy-to-reach orbit. The physical and thermal properties of the asteroid are relevant for establishing the scientific mission goals and also important in the context of near-Earth object studies in general. Aims: Our goal was to derive key physical parameters such as shape, spin-vector, size, geometric albedo, and surface properties of 162173 (1999 JU3). Methods: With three sets of published thermal observations (ground-based N-band, Akari IRC, Spitzer IRS), we applied a thermophysical model to derive the radiometric properties of the asteroid. The calculations were performed for the full range of possible shape and spin-vector solutions derived from the available sample of visual lightcurve observations. Results: The near-Earth asteroid 162173 (1999 JU3) has an effective diameter of 0.87 ± 0.03 km and a geometric albedo of 0.070 ± 0.006. The ?2-test reveals a strong preference for a retrograde sense of rotation with a spin-axis orientation of ?ecl = 73°, ?ecl = -62° and Psid = 7.63 ± 0.01 h. The most likely thermal inertia ranges between 200 and 600 J m-2 s-0.5 K-1, about a factor of 2 lower than the value for 25143 Itokawa. This indicates that the surface lies somewhere between a thick-dust regolith and a rock/boulder/cm-sized, gravel-dominated surface like that of 25143 Itokawa. Our analysis represents the first time that shape and spin-vector information has been derived from a combined data set of visual lightcurves (reflected light) and mid-infrared photometry and spectroscopy (thermal emission).

  11. Cosmic Ray Induced Degradation in X-Ray Detectors On Board the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, S. R.; Trombka, J. I.; Goldsten, J. O.; Fiore, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission is the first in NASA's new Discovery Program to explore the solar system. Launched in February 1996, the NEAR spacecraft will take a long cruise flight arriving at the asteroid 433 Eros in January 1999 for a one year orbiting survey operation. This long exposure to the space environment has already proven to be an additional complication for the x-ray spectrometer. The asteroid pointing detectors for the x-ray spectrometer are three gas-filled proportional counters with resolving power in the range of 1 keV. Therefore, to resolve the important but closely spaced magnesium, aluminum and silicon k alpha lines( 1.255, 1.487, 1.739 keV respectively), magnesium and aluminum balanced filters are used on two of the detectors. The x-ray florescence from the surface of Eros is stimulated by solar x-rays. A proportional counter and a silicon PIN detector are used to monitor the solar incident x-ray flux. The proportional counters are single wire gas filled beryllium lined steel tubes operating at about 1100 volt. The 25 cm(exp 2) optical window is one mil. thick beryllium. To define the detector's active region, two boron nitride disks were incorporated in the tube just outside window area. It appears from the space flight data that the space environment is creating a charge on these boron nitride disks which ultimately distorts the tube gain and resolution. This broadening of the photo peak makes it more difficult to identify weak peaks and so degrades the statistical accuracy for some very important elements such as sulfur, calcium and iron (2.307, 3.690, 6.403 keV respectively). If the broadening is severe enough in the low energy region, counts will be lost as the photo peak spreads below the lower level discriminator (0.7 keV).

  12. Spontaneous Rupture of Superficial Femoral Artery Repaired with Endovascular Stent-Grafting with use of Rendez-Vous Technique, Followed by Delayed Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.fanelli@uniroma1.it; Cannavale, Alessandro [University of Rome 'Sapienza,', Department of Radiological Sciences, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy)] [University of Rome 'Sapienza,', Department of Radiological Sciences, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Gazzetti, Marianna [Sapienza University of Rome 'Sapienza,', Department of Surgery Paride Stefanini, Vascular Surgery Division, Policlinico Umberto I (Italy)] [Sapienza University of Rome 'Sapienza,', Department of Surgery Paride Stefanini, Vascular Surgery Division, Policlinico Umberto I (Italy); Fantozzi, Cristiano; Taurino, Maurizio [University of Rome 'Sapienza,', Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy)] [University of Rome 'Sapienza,', Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy); Speziale, Francesco [Sapienza University of Rome 'Sapienza,', Department of Surgery Paride Stefanini, Vascular Surgery Division, Policlinico Umberto I (Italy)] [Sapienza University of Rome 'Sapienza,', Department of Surgery Paride Stefanini, Vascular Surgery Division, Policlinico Umberto I (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    This is the case of a 72-year-old man with lower limb ischemia due to spontaneous rupture of nonaneurysmal superficial femoral artery that developed into thigh hematoma. After failure of a Fogarty revascularization, an emergency endovascular procedure was performed to restore the arterial continuity. A rendezvous procedure was performed with a double femoral and popliteal approach and two covered stent-grafts were deployed. Patient's clinical conditions immediately improved, but 4 months later the stent-grafts were surgically removed for infection and exteriorization. A femoropopliteal bypass was performed. After 1 year follow-up, the patient is in good clinical condition.

  13. A Modified Technique Reduced Operative Time of Laparoendoscopic Rendezvous Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Combined with Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Concomitant Gallstone and Common Bile Ductal Stone

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Qunwei; Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Liying; Huang, Jiangsheng; Tan, Zhaohui; Li, Pengfei

    2014-01-01

    Laparoendoscopic rendezvous (LERV) endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC+ERCP/LERV) are considered an optimal approach for concomitant gallstones and common bile duct stones. The rendezvous technique is essential for the success of procedure. We applied two different LERV techniques, traditional technique and modified technique, in 60 consecutive cases from January 2011 to November 2012. 32 cases who underwent modified technique (group 1) from February 2012 to November 2012 were retrospectively compared to 28 cases (group 2) who underwent traditional technique from January 2011 to January 2012. There was no significant difference between two groups with respect to preoperative demographic features. Although the difference was not statistically significant, the procedure was successfully performed in 31 cases (96.9%) in group 1 and 24 cases (86.2%) in group 2. The mean operative time and time of endoscopic part were 82.6?±?19.6?min and 26.5?±?5.99?min in group 1 which were significantly shorter than those in group 2 (118.0?±?23.1?min and 58.7?±?13.3?min, resp.). There was no postoperative pancreatitis and mortality in both groups. The mean hospital stay, blood loss, incidence of complications, and residual stone were of no difference in both groups. This study proved that this modified technique can effectively reduce the operative time and time of endoscopic part of LC+ERCP/LERV compared with traditional technique. PMID:25024701

  14. Tumbling motions of NH2(CH3)2 ions in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 studied using 1H MAS NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Choi, Jae Hun; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-12-01

    The structure and the phase transition temperatures of [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 were determined using X-ray diffraction and DSC, respectively. The temperature dependence of chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1? in the rotating frame were measured for the 1H and 13C nuclei in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4. From these results, it was observed that the structural change by chemical shifts does not occur with temperature. However, T1? for 1H and 13C in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 showed a minimum, and it is apparent that both T1? values are governed by the same tumbling motions. The activation energies of tumbling motions for 1H and 13C are nearly the same owing to the connection between CH3 and NH2 ions in the [NH2(CH3)2]+ group.

  15. Rotation Rates of Inactive Satellites Near Geosynchronous Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cognion, R.

    2014-09-01

    Stabilized satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) become drifters after they are decommissioned. In addition, each satellite begins to tumble or process in its inactive state. As they drift around the earth, the inactive satellites provide sequential viewing opportunities---with synodic periods of months or weeks---for observation with an earth-based sensor. In order to measure their rotation rates as a function of time, we track a set of inactive satellites over several months as each comes into view over Hawaii. Images of each satellite are acquired through a small (0.4-m) optical telescope system with sampling periods of a few seconds. With temporal light curves obtained through relative, in-frame photometry on each image, we analyze both the time and frequency domains in order to determine the satellites rotation rates.

  16. Deburring by centrifugal barrel tumbling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gillespie

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of small precision mechanisms greatly depends upon the production of burr-free, sharp-edged parts. Centrifugal barrel finishing (Harperizing) is one of the few processes capable of producing these conditions. Burrs less than 0.001-in. thick by 0.001-in. high (25.4 x 25.4 ..mu..m) can be removed from 303 Se stainless steel, 1018 steel, and 6061-T6 aluminum with dimensional changes in the

  17. Noncooperative rendezvous radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fire control radar system was developed, assembled, and modified. The baseline system and modified angle tracking system are described along with the performance characteristics of the baseline and modified systems. Proposed changes to provide additional techniques for radar evaluation are presented along with flight test data.

  18. DARe: Dark Asteroid Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, K. S.; McFadden, L. A.; Rhoden, A. R.; Lim, L. F.; Boynton, W. V.; Carter, L. M.; Collins, G.; Englander, J. A.; Goossens, S. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Li, J.-Y.; Mottola, S.; Oberst, J.; Orosei, R.; Parsons, A. M.; Preusker, F.; Reuter, D. C.; Simon, A. A.; Thomas, C. A.; Walsh, K.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Small bodies record the chemical, physical, and dynamical processes that gave birth to and shaped the solar system. The great variety of small bodies reflects the diversity of both their genesis and their histories. The DARe mission conducts a critical test of how small body populations reflect a history of planetary migration and planetesimal scattering. This understanding is crucial for planning future NASA missions and placing current and past missions into context.

  19. Mountain Man Measurement Rendezvous

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Utah LessonPlans

    2012-10-22

    In this math lesson, learners participate in several activities where they apply measurement skills. Learners explore how the Mountain Men played an important part in the history of the American frontier and more importantly, how the Mountain Men used different techniques for making measurements in their daily activities. At the various stations, learners measure their jump distances, handfuls of "gold," water-soaked sponges, "buffalo chip" throws, arm spans, "stone" throws, "arrow" tosses, foot sizes, pots of beans, and "shooting" distances. This activity works well outside.

  20. Star Library: Random Rendezvous

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chance, Beth

    This activity leads students to appreciate the usefulness of simulations for approximating probabilities. It also provides them with experience calculating probabilities based on geometric arguments and using the bivariate normal distribution. We have used it in courses in probability and mathematical statistics, as well as in an introductory statistics course at the post-calculus level. Students are expected to approximate the solution through simulation before solving it exactly. They are also expected to employ graphical as well as algebraic problem-solving strategies, in addition to their simulation analyzes. Finally, students are asked to explain intuitively why it makes sense for the probabilities to change as they do.

  1. Modification of Platelet Margination Rate via Reduction of Viscosity Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasor, Daniel; Mehrabadi, Marmar; Ku, David; Aidun, Cyrus

    2011-11-01

    Experimental investigations of platelet margination have primarily been limited to effects of hematocrit (Ht.) and shear rate. The suspending fluids used commonly have viscosities greater than plasma which can modify the transition in dynamical regimes from tumbling to tank-treading for isolated RBCs. This work focuses on the effects of ?, the ratio of internal to suspending fluid viscosity of RBCs, on the rate of platelet margination in a rigid 41.3 ?m diameter vessel. Simulations are performed with a lattice-Boltzmann fluid solver using the standard bounce-back boundary condition coupled with a coarse-grained spectrin-link RBC membrane model and a Newtonian dynamics solver for rigid platelets. Our results are consistent with observations that an increase in Ht. increases the rate of platelet margination for Ht.=20-40%, but we focus on the modification of ? at Ht.=20%. Our results show that rigid RBCs inhibit margination, but modifying ? with deformable RBCs show significant increases in margination rate. Our observations demonstrate an increase in platelet wall-normal velocity fluctuations, enhanced margination rate, and an increase in the wall-normal diffusivity as ? is reduced from the physiological value of five.

  2. First rendezvous Our rendezvous, their each and every moment,

    E-print Network

    Givental, Alexander

    affection, and birds above flew in the same direction, and fish ascended from the river's midsts, and the two of us. As daring as a wing, more light than dust, you, down the stairway, like a dizzy torrent ran your lids with all the blossom's essence, a lilac branch was stretching from the tree, and lightly

  3. Growth Rate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-14

    This lesson from Illuminations uses growth charts for girls and boys to examine rates of change. The material uses slope to approximate the rate of change in height. Students will learn how to translate this data into a graph. The lesson is appropriate for grades 9-12 and should require 1 class period to complete.

  4. Rough and Tumble at Reform Party Convention

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    de Nie, Michael Willem.

    To be sure, this convention has not been scripted. Simmering tensions within the Reform Party boiled over this week at the party's convention in Long Beach, California. Followers of party-founder Ross Perot, who initially invited Patrick Buchanan to join the party because of Buchanan's national name recognition, had grown increasingly frustrated with what many see as the hijacking of the party's state organizations by Buchanan and his allies. The party has traditionally avoided divisive social or moral issues such as abortion and gay rights, issues central to Buchanan's hard-right agenda. After months of maneuvering and party infighting, Buchanan arrived in Long Beach with the most delegates. Two days of confusion and conflict followed, after which the party split in two, with Perot followers setting up their own convention next door and nominating John Hagelin, a physicist and Transcendental Mediation advocate who previously ran twice for president on the Natural Law Party ticket. At stake is $12.6 million in federal matching funds. While both candidates will no doubt declare that they have the nomination, the disposal of the money will most likely be decided by federal election officials. The Perot-Hagelin wing has already filed a complaint with the Federal Elections Commission contending that Buchanan's forces rigged the nomination process. Whichever candidate is awarded the funds, his strategy will almost certainly be to spend the bulk of the money in September, hoping to secure a spot in upcoming the presidential debates.

  5. Are the Walls of Injustice Tumbling Down?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rochelle R.; Davila, Erica R.

    2011-01-01

    The discussion of multicultural education in teacher preparation dates back several decades. "The historical roots of multicultural education lie in the civil rights movements of various historically oppressed groups" (Gorski, 1999, p.1). As communities of color resisted institutional racism, schools became one of the sites of struggle. Thus, the…

  6. Efficient and tumble similar set retrieval

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aristides Gionis; Dimitrios Gunopulos; Nick Koudas

    2001-01-01

    Set value attributes are a concise and natural way to model complex data sets. Modern Object Relational systems support set value attributes and allow various query capabilities on them. In this paper we initiate a formal study of indexing techniques for set value attributes based on similarity, for suitably defined notions of similarity between sets. Such techniques are necessary in

  7. Rotation Rates of Very Small Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Eileen V.; Ryan, W. H.

    2010-10-01

    Currently there exists only limited data on physical properties such as rotation rate for the very smallest Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) being discovered. The spin period of an asteroid can imply important information about its internal composition (via deduction of strength boundary limits) and degree of fracture, and thereby its collisional history. Our objective is to gather the data needed to test current theories of the relationship between spin limits and overall strength. We report on a dataset of 38 lightcurves of NEAs collected at the Magdalena Ridge Observatory's (MRO) 2.4-meter telescope, analyzed to obtain rotation rates. The majority of the objects targeted were less than about 200 meters in diameter, where existing data are sparse. These small bodies have exhibited a range of spin rates, from slow ( 8 hours) to very fast (less than a minute). A lightcurve taken of NEA 2010 JL88 (estimated to be 18 meters in diameter) on May 17, 2010, revealed a rotation period of 24.5 seconds, making this object the fastest natural rotator discovered to date. Further, we obtained a lightcurve of asteroid 2009 BF2 ( 27 meters in diameter) on January 17, 2009, and its rotation period was derived to be 58 seconds (the third fastest rotator discovered). We also found 2 NEAs that appear to be tumbling, indicating a recent collisional event. Although a more robust statistical sample of spin rates in this small size regime is still desired, we are making progress toward a better understanding of the physical processes at work as our observational survey of the Near-Earth zone continues. This research is funded through NASA's NEOO program and NSF's Planetary Astronomy program.

  8. Full relaxation matrix analysis of apparent cross-correlated relaxation rates in four-spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vögeli, Beat

    2013-01-01

    Cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) rates are an established tool for the extraction of relative bond orientations in biomolecules in solution. CCR between dipolar interactions in four-spin systems is a particularly well-suited mechanism. In this paper, a simple approach to analyze systematic experimental errors is formulated in a subspace of the complete four-spin Hilbert space. It is shown that, contrary to the common assumption, the secular approximation of the relaxation matrix is marginal for the most prominent spin systems. With the main focus on the model protein GB3 at room temperature, it is shown that the apparent experimental CCR rates have errors between -12% and +4% for molecules with a molecular tumbling time of 3.5 ns. Although depending on the specific pulse sequence used, the following rule-of-thumb can be established: Judged by absolute values, the errors for H?-C?/H?-C?, HN-N/C?-C', HN-N/C?-C? and HN-N/H?-C? CCR rates can safely be neglected. However, errors for HN-N/HN-N and HN-N/H?-C? CCR rates are on the order of 0.1-0.3 s-1 and must be considered. Tabulated correction factors may be used for their extraction. If larger systems are studied, in most cases the errors cannot be neglected anymore. On the other hand, well-calibrated pulses can safely be assumed to be perfect.

  9. A Proposed Strategy for the U.S. to Develop and Maintain a Mainstream Capability Suite ("Warehouse") for Automated/Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking in Low Earth Orbit and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, Kalmanje S.; Stillwater, Ryan A.; Babula, Maria; Moreau, Michael C.; Riedel, J. Ed; Mrozinski, Richard B.; Bradley, Arthur; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of space assets to rendezvous and dock/capture/berth is a fundamental enabler for numerous classes of NASA fs missions, and is therefore an essential capability for the future of NASA. Mission classes include: ISS crew rotation, crewed exploration beyond low-Earth-orbit (LEO), on-orbit assembly, ISS cargo supply, crewed satellite servicing, robotic satellite servicing / debris mitigation, robotic sample return, and robotic small body (e.g. near-Earth object, NEO) proximity operations. For a variety of reasons to be described, NASA programs requiring Automated/Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking/Capture/Berthing (AR&D) capabilities are currently spending an order-of-magnitude more than necessary and taking twice as long as necessary to achieve their AR&D capability, "reinventing the wheel" for each program, and have fallen behind all of our foreign counterparts in AR&D technology (especially autonomy) in the process. To ensure future missions' reliability and crew safety (when applicable), to achieve the noted cost and schedule savings by eliminate costs of continually "reinventing the wheel ", the NASA AR&D Community of Practice (CoP) recommends NASA develop an AR&D Warehouse, detailed herein, which does not exist today. The term "warehouse" is used herein to refer to a toolbox or capability suite that has pre-integrated selectable supply-chain hardware and reusable software components that are considered ready-to-fly, low-risk, reliable, versatile, scalable, cost-effective, architecture and destination independent, that can be confidently utilized operationally on human spaceflight and robotic vehicles over a variety of mission classes and design reference missions, especially beyond LEO. The CoP also believes that it is imperative that NASA coordinate and integrate all current and proposed technology development activities into a cohesive cross-Agency strategy to produce and utilize this AR&D warehouse. An initial estimate indicates that if NASA strategically coordinates the development of a robust AR&D capability across the Agency, the cost of implementing AR&D on a spacecraft could be reduced from roughly $70M per mission to as low as $7M per mission, and the associated development time could be reduced from 4 years to 2 years, after the warehouse is completely developed. Table 1 shows the clear long-term benefits to the Agency in term of costs and schedules for various missions. (The methods used to arrive at the Table 1 numbers is presented in Appendices A and B.)

  10. Combined effect of YORP and collisions on the rotation rate of small Main Belt asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, F.; Rossi, A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2011-08-01

    The rotation rate distribution of small Main Belt asteroids is dominated by YORP and collisions. These mechanism act differently depending on the size of the bodies and give rise to non-linear effects when they both operate. Using a Monte Carlo method we model the formation of a steady state population of small asteroids under the influence of both mechanisms and the rotation rate distribution is compared to the observed one as derived from Pravec et al. (Pravec, P. et al. [2008]. Icarus 197, 497-504). A better match to observations is obtained with respect to the case in which only YORP is considered. In particular, an excess of slow rotators is produced in the model with both collisions and YORP because bodies driven to slow rotation by YORP have a random walk-like evolution of the spin induced by repeated collisions with small projectiles. This is a dynamical evolution different from tumbling and it lasts until a large impact takes the body to a faster rotation rate. According to our model, the rotational fission of small asteroids is a very frequent event and might explain objects like P/2010 A2 and its associated tail of millimeter-sized dust particles. The mass loss during fission of small asteroids might significantly influence the overall collisional evolution of the belt. Fission can in fact be considered as an additional erosion mechanism, besides cratering and fragmentation, acting only at small diameters.

  11. Coding gains and error rates from the Big Viterbi Decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onyszchuk, I. M.

    1991-08-01

    A prototype hardware Big Viterbi Decoder (BVD) was completed for an experiment with the Galileo Spacecraft. Searches for new convolutional codes, studies of Viterbi decoder hardware designs and architectures, mathematical formulations, and decompositions of the deBruijn graph into identical and hierarchical subgraphs, and very large scale integration (VLSI) chip design are just a few examples of tasks completed for this project. The BVD bit error rates (BER), measured from hardware and software simulations, are plotted as a function of bit signal to noise ratio E sub b/N sub 0 on the additive white Gaussian noise channel. Using the constraint length 15, rate 1/4, experimental convolutional code for the Galileo mission, the BVD gains 1.5 dB over the NASA standard (7,1/2) Maximum Likelihood Convolution Decoder (MCD) at a BER of 0.005. At this BER, the same gain results when the (255,233) NASA standard Reed-Solomon decoder is used, which yields a word error rate of 2.1 x 10(exp -8) and a BER of 1.4 x 10(exp -9). The (15, 1/6) code to be used by the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF)/Cassini Missions yields 1.7 dB of coding gain. These gains are measured with respect to symbols input to the BVD and increase with decreasing BER. Also, 8-bit input symbol quantization makes the BVD resistant to demodulated signal-level variations which may cause higher bandwidth than the NASA (7,1/2) code, these gains are offset by about 0.1 dB of expected additional receiver losses. Coding gains of several decibels are possible by compressing all spacecraft data.

  12. Coding gains and error rates from the Big Viterbi Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onyszchuk, I. M.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype hardware Big Viterbi Decoder (BVD) was completed for an experiment with the Galileo Spacecraft. Searches for new convolutional codes, studies of Viterbi decoder hardware designs and architectures, mathematical formulations, and decompositions of the deBruijn graph into identical and hierarchical subgraphs, and very large scale integration (VLSI) chip design are just a few examples of tasks completed for this project. The BVD bit error rates (BER), measured from hardware and software simulations, are plotted as a function of bit signal to noise ratio E sub b/N sub 0 on the additive white Gaussian noise channel. Using the constraint length 15, rate 1/4, experimental convolutional code for the Galileo mission, the BVD gains 1.5 dB over the NASA standard (7,1/2) Maximum Likelihood Convolution Decoder (MCD) at a BER of 0.005. At this BER, the same gain results when the (255,233) NASA standard Reed-Solomon decoder is used, which yields a word error rate of 2.1 x 10(exp -8) and a BER of 1.4 x 10(exp -9). The (15, 1/6) code to be used by the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF)/Cassini Missions yields 1.7 dB of coding gain. These gains are measured with respect to symbols input to the BVD and increase with decreasing BER. Also, 8-bit input symbol quantization makes the BVD resistant to demodulated signal-level variations which may cause higher bandwidth than the NASA (7,1/2) code, these gains are offset by about 0.1 dB of expected additional receiver losses. Coding gains of several decibels are possible by compressing all spacecraft data.

  13. Quantitative determination of NOE rates in perdeuterated and protonated proteins: Practical and theoretical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vögeli, Beat; Friedmann, Michael; Leitz, Dominik; Sobol, Alexander; Riek, Roland

    2010-06-01

    Precision and accuracy are the limiting factors in extracting structural and dynamic information from experimental NOEs. In this study, error sources at all stages of such an analysis are identified and errors are estimated. The data set of H N-H N cross-relaxation rates obtained from triple-labeled ubiquitin presented in [B. Vögeli, T.F. Segawa, D. Leitz, A. Sobol, A. Choutko, D. Trzesniak, W. van Gunsteren, R. Riek, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131 (47) (2009) 17215-17225] is extended to rates obtained from a double-labeled sample. Analog data sets are presented for GB3. It is shown that quantitative NOE rates can be determined with high accuracy from both triple-labeled as well as double-labeled samples. The quality of experimental cross-relaxation rates obtained from 3D HXQC-NOESY and NOESY-HXQC experiments is discussed. It is shown that NOESY-HXQC experiments provide rates of the same quality as HXQC-NOESY if both diagonal and cross peaks for a spin pair can be resolved. Expressions for cross-relaxation rates for anisotropically tumbling molecules exhibiting fast and slow motion are derived. The impact of anisotropy on the prediction of cross-relaxation rates and on the conversion of experimental rates into effective distances is discussed. For molecules with anisotropy D/D? up to five the distance error is smaller than 2%. Finally, "averaged order parameters" are calculated for specific secondary-structural elements showing similar trends for ubiquitin and GB3.

  14. The First Joint Report of the General Thomas P. Stafford Task Force and the Academician Vladimir F. Utkin Advisory Expert Council on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In October 1992, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) formally agreed to conduct a fundamentally new program of human cooperation in space. The 'Shuttle-Mir Program' encompassed combined astronaut-cosmonaut activities on the Shuttle, Soyuz Test Module(TM), and Mir station spacecraft. At that time, NASA and RSA limited the project to: the STS-60 mission carrying the first Russian cosmonaut to fly on the U.S. Space Shuttle; the launch of the first U.S. astronaut on the Soyuz vehicle for a multi-month mission as a member of a Mir crew; and the change-out of the U.S.-Russian Mir crews with a Russian crew during a Shuttle rendezvous and docking mission with the Mir Station. The objectives of the Phase 1 Program are to provide the basis for the resolution of engineering and technical problems related to the implementation of the ISS and future U.S.-Russian cooperation in space. This, combined with test data generated during the course of the Shuttle flights to the Mir station and extended joint activities between U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts aboard Mir, is expected to reduce the technical risks associated with the construction and operation of the ISS. Phase 1 will further enhance the ISS by combining space operations and joint space technology demonstrations. Phase 1 also provides early opportunities for extended U.S. scientific and research activities, prior to utilization of the ISS.

  15. The gas production rate of periodic comet d'Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Festou, Michel C.; Feldman, Paul D.; Ahearn, Michael F.

    1992-01-01

    Comet P/d'Arrest is a potential target for a rendezvous mission to a short period comet. Its light curve is rather peculiar, the comet being active only after perihelion passage. One apparition out of two is easy to observe from the ground. The 1995 apparition of the comet will offer a unique opportunity to characterize the outgassing properties of its nucleus.

  16. National ART Success Rates

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patient Resources ART Success Rates National Summary Fertility Clinic Success Rates ART Reports and Resources Publications National ... Yahoo MyWeb National ART Success Rates To Fertility Clinic Success Rates Select Year: 2012 NATIONAL SUMMARY A ...

  17. Effects of chemical exchange and dipole-dipole interactions on the proton relaxation rates of surface histidyl residues in human hemoglobins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Marcela; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Ho, Nancy T.; Ho, Chien

    Proton spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation rates of several C2 protons of the histidyl residues located on the surfaces of human normal adult and sickle cell hemoglobins have been measured as a function of the hemoglobin concentration (10 to 16% (wt/ vol)), temperature ( 17 to 37°C), pH (5.7 to 9.0), and resonance frequency (300 to 600 MHz). The relaxation rates are compared to those calculated from the crystal coordinates of the hemoglobin molecule, assuming dipole-dipole interactions modulated by Brownian tumbling. We have found that the initial recoveries of the longitudinal magnetization of several of the C2 proton resonances of the surface histidyl residues investigated are in good agreement with the spin-lattice relaxation rates predicted by this model. On the other hand, the spin-spin relaxation rates are found to increase with the square of the resonance frequency and appear to be affected by the chemical exchange process between the ionized and unionized forms of the imidazole ring of the histidyl residue. From the experimental results, the lifetime of the exchange process is estimated to be 8 ± 3 ?s for all the resonance lines studied in 10% deoxyhemoglobin at pH 7.0 and at 25°C.

  18. Injury patterns and rates amongst students at the national institute of circus arts: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Munro, David

    2014-12-01

    Despite the ever-growing global participation in circus arts, very little research has been conducted into injuries associated with this physical discipline. To date, no studies have examined the incidence of injuries in circus training institutions and schools. In this study, data were collected over an academic year from all student injury presentations to the physiotherapy staff at one Australian circus school. A total of 351 injuries resulting in 1,948 treatments occurred in 33 female and 30 male circus students. The most common mechanisms of injury were acrobatics/tumbling (23%), handstands (12%), adagio (11%), and Chinese pole (10%). The most commonly injured body parts were the ankle (25%), lumbar spine (14%), and shoulder (12%). Interestingly, combined spinal injuries (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar) contributed to 35% of all initial injuries. Females sustained 71% of all hip injuries, but only 33% of all forearm injuries. Males accounted for 59% of all ankle injuries. There were no significant gender-based differences in other body areas. Results indicated that there is no gender-based difference in the overall rate of injury. However, females sustained significantly higher rates of hip injuries and males presented with more forearm and ankle injuries, perhaps reflecting the specific form and style of circus training and contortion undertaken. Spinal injuries had the highest overall rate of initial and follow-up presentations, indicating that both preventative and rehabilitative strategies could be addressed. It is suggested that the most common mechanisms of injury reflect both the amount of time spent training specific disciplines and the extreme physical difficulties and demands placed on the body. PMID:25433261

  19. A Miniature, High-Resolution Laser Radar Operating at Video Rates

    SciTech Connect

    SMITHPETER,COLIN L.; NELLUMS,ROBERT O.; LEBIEN,STEVEN M.; STUDOR,GEORGE

    2000-06-26

    The authors are developing a laser radar to meet the needs of NASA for a 5-lb, 150 in{sup 3} image sensor with a pixel range accuracy of 0.1-inch. NASA applications include structural dynamics measurements, navigation guidance in rendezvous and proximity operations, and space vehicle inspection. The sensor is based on the scannerless range imager architecture developed at Sandia. This architecture modulates laser floodlight illumination and a focal plane receiver to phase encode the laser time of flight (TOF) for each pixel. They believe this approach has significant advantages over architectures directly measuring TOF including high data rate, reduced detector bandwidth, and conventional FPA detection. A limitation of the phase detection technique is its periodic nature, which provides relative range information over a finite ambiguity interval. To extend the operating interval while maintaining a given range resolution, a LADAR sensor using dual modulation frequencies has been developed. This sensor also extends the relative range information to absolute range by calibrating a gating function on the receiver to the TOF. The modulation frequency values can be scaled to meet the resolution and range interval requirements of different applications. Results from the miniature NASA sensor illustrate the advantages of the dual-frequency operation and the ability to provide the range images of 640 by 480 pixels at 30 frames per second.

  20. On the relationship between visual magnitudes and gas and dust production rates in target comets to space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, A. A.; Sanzovo, G. C.; Singh, P. D.; Misra, A.; Miguel Torres, R.; Boice, D. C.; Huebner, W. F.

    In this paper, we report the results of a cometary research, developed during the last 10 years by us, involving a criterious analysis of gas and dust production rates in comets directly associated to recent space missions. For the determination of the water release rates we use the framework of the semi-empirical model of observed visual magnitudes [Newburn Jr., R.L. A semi-empirical photometric theory of cometary gas and dust production. Application to P/Halley's production rates, ESA-SP 174, 3, 1981; de Almeida, A.A., Singh, P.D., Huebner, W.F. Water release rates, active areas, and minimum nuclear radius derived from visual magnitudes of comets - an application to Comet 46P/Wirtanen, Planet. Space Sci. 45, 681-692, 1997; Sanzovo, G.C., de Almeida, A.A., Misra, A. et al. Mass-loss rates, dust particle sizes, nuclear active areas and minimum nuclear radii of target comets for missions STARDUST and CONTOUR, MNRAS 326, 852-868, 2001.], which once obtained, were directly converted into gas production rates. In turn, the dust release rates were obtained using the photometric model for dust particles [Newburn Jr., R.L., Spinrad, H. Spectrophotometry of seventeen comets. II - the continuum, AJ 90, 2591-2608, 1985; de Freitas Pacheco, J.A., Landaberry, S.J.C., Singh, P.D. Spectrophotometric observations of the Comet Halley during the 1985-86 apparition, MNRAS 235, 457-464, 1988; Sanzovo, G.C., Singh, P.D., Huebner, W.F. Dust colors, dust release rates, and dust-to-gas ratios in the comae of six comets, A&AS 120, 301-311, 1996.]. We applied these models to seven target comets, chosen for space missions of "fly-by"/impact and rendezvous/landing.

  1. Evaporation Rate on Tungsten

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    Cesium Evaporation Rate on Tungsten Photocathodes Ameerah Jabr-Hamdan Introduction Motivation Research Objective Experiments Results Conclusions Cesium Evaporation Rate on Tungsten Photocathodes supported by IREAP, with funding from NSF and ONR #12;Cesium Evaporation Rate on Tungsten Photocathodes

  2. Long range targeting for space based rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Louis J.; Redfield, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    The work performed under this grant supported the Dexterous Flight Experiment one STS-62 The project required developing hardware and software for automating a TRAC sensor on orbit. The hardware developed by for the flight has been documented through standard NASA channels since it has to pass safety, environmental, and other issues. The software has not been documented previously, therefore, this report provides a software manual for the TRAC code developed for the grant.

  3. Operator learning effects in teleoperated rendezvous & docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, M.; Harder, J.; Purschke, R.

    Teleoperation of spacecraft proximity operations and docking requires delicate timing and coordination of spacecraft maneuvers. Experience has shown that human operators show large performance fluctuations in these areas, which are a major factor to be addressed in operator training. In order to allow the quantification of the impact of these human fluctuations on control system performance and the human perception of this performance, a learning curve study was conducted with teleoperated final approach and docking scenarios. Over a period of ten experiment days, three test participants were tasked with repeatedly completing a set of three training scenarios. The scenarios were designed to contain different combinations of the major elements of any final approach and docking situation, and to feature an increasing difficulty level. The individual difficulty levels for the three operators furthermore differed in the level of operator support functions available in their human-machine interfaces. Operator performance in the test scenarios were evaluated in the fields approach success and precision, docking safety, and approach efficiency by a combination of recorded maneuver data and questionnaires. The results show that operator experience and the associated learning curves increase operator performance substantially, regardless of the support system used. The paper also shows that the fluctuations in operator performance and self-perception are substantial between as well as within experiment days, and must be reckoned with in teleoperation system design and mission planning.

  4. Telerobotic rendezvous and docking vision system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravely, Ben; Myers, Donald; Moody, David

    1992-01-01

    This research program has successfully demonstrated a new target label architecture that allows a microcomputer to determine the position, orientation, and identity of an object. It contains a CAD-like database with specific geometric information about the object for approach, grasping, and docking maneuvers. Successful demonstrations were performed selecting and docking an ORU box with either of two ORU receptacles. Small, but significant differences were seen in the two camera types used in the program, and camera sensitive program elements have been identified. The software has been formatted into a new co-autonomy system which provides various levels of operator interaction and promises to allow effective application of telerobotic systems while code improvements are continuing.

  5. Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous - A Pictorial Voyage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site offers students an opportunity to participate in a pictorial voyage that follows the NEAR spacecraft from its inception through the cruise phase to asteroid 433 Eros. They will learn about the rationale for visiting an asteroid, the instruments and construction of the spacecraft, and follow its flyby of the asteroid Mathilde, swingby of Earth, and encounter with Eros.

  6. 75 FR 44794 - Rendezvous International v.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ...Kaiser Apparel, Inc., Edco Logistics, Inc., Oriental Logistics, Inc., and Razor Enterprise; Notice of Filing of Complaint...Logistics, Inc., Oriental Logistics, Inc., and Razor Enterprise, hereinafter...

  7. Automated Rendezvous and Docking: 1994-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This custom bibliography from the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program lists a sampling of records found in the NASA Aeronautics and Space Database. The scope of this topic includes technologies for human exploration and robotic sample return missions. This area of focus is one of the enabling technologies as defined by NASA s Report of the President s Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy, published in June 2004.

  8. Safe Trajectories for Autonomous Rendezvous of Spacecraft

    E-print Network

    How, Jonathan P.

    class of anomalous system behaviors. We examine the cost of imposing safety as a problem constraint tend to drift away from the target spacecraft in the absence of thrusting. This method can guarantee

  9. Alan Shepard in the Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut Alan Shepard (right) was one of 14 astronauts, 8 NASA test pilots, and 2 McDonnell test pilots who took part in simulator studies. Shepard flew the simulator on November 14, 1963. A.W. Vogeley wrote: 'Many of the astronauts have flown this simulator in support of the Gemini studies and they, without exception, appreciated the realism of the visual scene. The simulator has also been used in the development of pilot techniques to handle certain jet malfunctions in order that aborts could be avoided. In these situations large attitude changes are sometimes necessary and the false motion cues that were generated due to earth gravity were somewhat objectionable; however, the pilots were readily able to overlook these false motion cues in favor of the visual realism.' Roy F. Brissenden noted that: 'The basic Gemini control studies developed the necessary techniques and demonstrated the ability of human pilots to perform final space docking with the specified Gemini-Agena systems using only visual references. ... Results... showed that trained astronauts can effect the docking with direct acceleration control and even with jet malfunctions as long as good visual conditions exist.... Probably more important than data results was the early confidence that the astronauts themselves gained in their ability to perform the maneuver in the ultimate flight mission.' Shepard commented: 'I had the feeling tonight - a couple of times - that I was actually doing the space mission instead of the simulation. As I said before, I think it is a very good simulation.' Shepard also commented on piloting techniques. Most astronauts arrived at this same preferred technique: Shepard: 'I believe I have developed the preferred technique for these conditions and the technique appeared to me to be best was to come in slightly above the target so that I was able to use the longitudinal marks on the body of the target as a reference, particularly for a lateral translation and, of course, I used the foreshortening effect for a vertical translation, and this appeared to give me the best results. By that I mean the least number of control motions and the lowest fuel usage and the best end techniques, or the best end conditions, I should say.' Engineer: 'When you started to run you didn't start thrusting immediately I don't believe. It looked like you started working on your attitudes, then started closing in.' Shepard: 'That is correct. I did that because I felt that I wanted to get the X-axis translation in the most effective vector and for minimum fuel usage that wouldn't introduce any other lateral or vertical offsets that did not already exist.'

  10. Mathilde Encounter: Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    In one of the most successful flybys of all time, the NEAR spacecraft passed within 1200 km of asteroid 253 Mathilde on June 27. Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory has created a website to document this event. The site contains information on the NEAR mission objectives, science goals, and Mathilde itself. It also features images of the asteroid, a flyby simulation, and an MPEG movie (player download provided).

  11. Mars Researchers Rendezvous on Remote Arctic Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Devon Island is situated in an isolated part of Canada's Nunavut Territory, and is usually considered to be the largest uninhabited island in the world. However, each summer since 1999, researchers from NASA's Haughton-Mars Project and the Mars Society reside at this 'polar desert' location to study the geologic and environmental characteristics of a site which is considered to be an excellent 'Mars analog': a terrestrial location wherein specific conditions approximate environmental features reported on Mars. Base camps established amidst the rocks and rubble surrounding the Haughton impact crater enable researchers to conduct surveys designed to test the habitat, equipment and technology that may be deployed during a human mission to Mars. One of the many objectives of the project scientists is to understand the ice formations around the Haughton area, in the hopes that this might ultimately assist with the recognition of areas where ice can be found at shallow depth on Mars.

    These images of Devon Island from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument provide contrasting views of the spectral and angular reflectance 'signatures' of different surfaces within the region. The top panel is a natural color view created with data from the red, green and blue-bands of MISR's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera. The bottom panel is a false-color multiangular composite of the same area, utilizing red band data from MISR's 60-degree backward, nadir, and 60-degree forward-viewing cameras, displayed as red, green and blue, respectively. In this representation, colors highlight textural properties of elements within the scene, with blue tones indicating smooth surfaces (which preferentially forward scatter sunlight) and red hues indicating rougher surfaces (which preferentially backscatter). The angular reflectance 'signature' of low clouds causes them to appear purple, and this visualization provides a unique way of distinguishing clouds from snow and ice.

    The data were captured on June 28, 2001, during the early part of the arctic summer, when sea ice becomes thinner and begins to move depending upon localized currents and winds. In winter the entire region is locked with several meters of nearly motionless sea ice, which acts as a thermodynamic barrier to the loss of heat from the comparatively warm ocean to the colder atmosphere. Summer melting of sea ice can be observed at the two large, dark regions of open water; one is present in the Jones Sound (near the top to the left of center), and another appears in the Wellington Channel (left-hand edge). A large crack caused by tidal heaving has broken the ice cover over the Parry Channel (lower right-hand corner). A substantial ice cap permanently occupies the easternmost third of the island (upper right). Surface features such as dendritic meltwater channels incised into the island's surface are apparent. The Haughton-Mars project site is located slightly to the left and above image center, in an area which appears with relatively little surface ice, near the island's inner 'elbow.'

    The images were acquired during Terra orbit 8132 and cover an area of about 334 kilometers x 229 kilometers. They utilize data from blocks 27 to 31 within World Reference System-2 path 42.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  12. Discovery: Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    The work carried out under this grant consisted of two parallel studies aimed at defining candidate missions for the initiation of the Discovery Program being considered by NASA's Solar System Exploration Division. The main study considered a Discover-class mission to a Near Earth Asteroid (NEA); the companion study considered a small telescope in Earth-orbit dedicated to ultra violet studies of solar system bodies. The results of these studies are summarized in two reports which are attached (Appendix 1 and Appendix 2).

  13. Rendezvous experiments on SmartSat-1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shinichi Kimura; Yasufumi Nagai; Hiroshi Yanainoto; Hiroshi Kozawa; Sachiko Sugimoto; Shinobu Nakamura; Kazumi Masuda; Naohiko Abe

    2006-01-01

    With the maturation of space technology, there is an increasing focus on the maintenance of spacecraft and the space environment. NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) has proposed an Orbital Maintenance System (OMS), which is a rescue-and-removal satellite-servicing system for telecommunications satellites, and has conducted research on related technologies. One of the biggest challenges in on-orbit maintenance is

  14. Total Fertility Rate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chart of fertility rates by country showing the very high fertility rates in the least developed countries and the very low fertility rates in the most developed countries as of 2008 according to the CIA world factbook. To maintain stable population, fertility rates must be slightly above 2.

  15. GENERAL TUITION RATES UNDERGRADUATES

    E-print Network

    Amin, S. Massoud

    GENERAL TUITION RATES UNDERGRADUATES The following per-credit semester tuition rates do not vary a flat tuition rate based on a minimum 13-credit load (including audited classes) and pay the student services fee, as well as a full technology/collegiate fee. Credits 1­12 are assessed at the per-credit rate

  16. Rating Movies and Rating the Raters Who Rate Them

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The movie distribution company Netflix has generated considerable buzz in the statistics community by offering a million dollar prize for improvements to its movie rating system. Among the statisticians and computer scientists who have disclosed their techniques, the emphasis has been on machine learning approaches. This article has the modest goal of discussing a simple model for movie rating and other forms of democratic rating. Because the model involves a large number of parameters, it is nontrivial to carry out maximum likelihood estimation. Here we derive a straightforward EM algorithm from the perspective of the more general MM algorithm. The algorithm is capable of finding the global maximum on a likelihood landscape littered with inferior modes. We apply two variants of the model to a dataset from the MovieLens archive and compare their results. Our model identifies quirky raters, redefines the raw rankings, and permits imputation of missing ratings. The model is intended to stimulate discussion and development of better theory rather than to win the prize. It has the added benefit of introducing readers to some of the issues connected with analyzing high-dimensional data. PMID:20802818

  17. Lithologic Influence and Experimental Variability in Gravel Abrasion: Implications for Predicting Rates of Downstream Fining of River Bed Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, J. W.; Sklar, L. S.

    2004-12-01

    The question of what controls the occurrence and rate of downstream fining of bed-material sediments remains a fundamental unsolved problem despite over a century of field, experimental and theoretical investigations. Downstream fining rates are commonly modeled as exponential or power-law functions of travel distance. Much recent work has focused on the relative influence of particle abrasion and differential transport, however, no general method has been developed for explicitly accounting for the influence of rock strength in parameterizing fining models. Here we report preliminary results of laboratory tumbling experiments in which we are investigating the influence of variable rock durability, both between and within distinct lithologic units, on rates of particle abrasion. We consider three separate questions: 1) can rock tensile strength be used to predict differences in bulk fining rates across a wide spectrum of rock types; 2) does variability in rock durability among individual gravel clasts of the same lithologic composition and initial grain size lead to patterns of downstream evolution of grain size distributions that differ significantly from the predictions of simple fining models; and 3) how large is the uncertainty in abrasion coefficients determined by laboratory tumbling, as determined by replicate experiments with identical initial conditions? We use a horizontal axis, 25-cm diameter, steel barrel tumbler, driven by a mechanical transmission with excellent control of rotational velocity. Rock samples were collected from units of the Franciscan Formation in the Redwood Creek Watershed of Marin County, California, and from sedimentary and intrusive volcanic rocks of the Henry Mountains, in southeastern Utah. We collected clasts predominantly from hillslope source areas, to focus our attention on the durability of gravel as it enters the river network. We use the `Brazilian' tensile splitting test to measure the strength of 50-mm diameter core samples obtained from the same localities as gravel source areas. We determine mass loss by weighing individual gravel clasts, and calculate abrasion coefficients after at least five or six runs, with a typical total `travel' distance of 4-6 km. We find a systematic variation in gravel abrasion rate with rock tensile strength, as well as an evolution of the grain size distribution that is quite sensitive to lithology. For initial conditions of both uniform-sized and log-normally distributed size mixtures, we observe development of skewed and bimodal distributions. We interpret consistent development of positively skewed distributions as reflecting differential pre-existing fracture density among otherwise identical clasts. Abrasion of sedimentary rocks tended to produce a large proportion of sand and silt, presumably due to failure between sediment grains. In contrast, microcrystalline rock, including chert and serpentinite, produced more fine gravel by clast splitting and trended toward a bimodal grain size distribution. Finally, we quantify significant uncertainty in experimental abrasion coefficients for replicate runs with the same initial weight distribution and lithology. Although the data are well fit with a power law relationship, the 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the abrasion exponent ranges from plus or minus 20% to 75% of the mean of three replicates. We conclude that predictive models of downstream fining by abrasion need to incorporate the lithologic sources of both systematic and stochastic variability in the rate of bulk mass loss and the resulting evolution of grain size distributions.

  18. Calculating Divorce Rates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Joseph Carroll

    This exercise from a course in family sociology asseses students' ability to interpret divorce rates from provided spreadsheet data and to critically analyze three articles that use divorce rates in their content.

  19. Heart Rate and Exercise

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barbara Z. Tharp

    2009-01-01

    In this activity about heart health (on page 27 of the PDF), learners measure their heart rates after a variety of physical activities and compare the results with their resting heart rates, and with the heart rates of other learners in their groups. Learners also make predictions about their pulse rates. This lesson guide includes background information, setup and management tips, extension ideas, information about the heart in space and a handout.

  20. Target Heart Rates

    MedlinePLUS

    ... safer than others. Learn more: All About Heart Rate (Pulse) Blood Pressure Vs. Heart Rate The AHA Recommendations for Physical ... of High Blood Pressure? 5 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 6 Low Blood Pressure 7 What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean 8 Warning ...

  1. Handbook of noise ratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Bennett, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The handbook was compiled to provide information in a concise form, describing the multitude of noise rating schemes. It is hoped that by describing the noise rating methods in a single volume the user will have better access to the definitions, application and calculation procedures of the current noise rating methods.

  2. RateNet

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    RateNet was jointly developed by DataTrac, PR Newswire (discussed in the February 7, 1997 Scout Report) and IDC Financial Publishing. RateNet connects consumers to financial institutions on the Internet by providing a ranking service for the banking industry. Users may examine the current and historic interest rates of over 11,000 financial institutions from 175 markets across America. There are also 116 RateNet indices which monitor the deposit and lending rates for 776 of the largest institutions.

  3. Rate theories for biologists

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Some of the rate theories that are most useful for modeling biological processes are reviewed. By delving into some of the details and subtleties in the development of the theories, the review will hopefully help the reader gain a more than superficial perspective. Examples are presented to illustrate how rate theories can be used to generate insight at the microscopic level into biomolecular behaviors. Attempt is made to clear up a number of misconceptions in the literature regarding popular rate theories, including the appearance of Planck’s constant in the transition-state theory and the Smoluchowski result as an upper limit for protein-protein and protein-DNA association rate constants. Future work in combining the implementation of rate theories through computer simulations with experimental probes of rate processes, and in modeling effects of intracellular environments so theories can be used for generating rate constants for systems biology studies is particularly exciting. PMID:20691138

  4. The shape and rotation of the tumbling asteroid (99942) Apophis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirich, P.; Pravec, P.; Durech, J.; Pollock, J.; Kusnirak, P.; Hornoch, K.; Galad, A.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Opitom, C.; Gillon, M.; Colas, F.; Oey, J.; Vrastil, J.; Reichart, D.; Ivarsen, K.; Haislip, J.; LaCluyze, A.

    2014-07-01

    Photometric observations of the asteroid (99942) Apophis taken from December 2012 to April 2013 revealed that it is in a non-principal axis rotation state. We constructed a numerical model of the asteroid's shape and rotation. The asteroid is in a short-axis mode (SAM) of excited rotation. The precession and rotation periods are P_? = 27.38 ± 0.07 h and P_? = 263 ± 6 h, respectively. The rotation is retrograde with the angular momentum vector's ecliptic longitude and latitude of 250° and -75° (the uncertainty area is approximately an ellipse with the major and minor semiaxes of 27° and 14°, respectively). The shape of the asteroid is dynamically close to a prolate ellipsoid, with the lengths of largest and intermediate axes of 1.64 ± 0.09 and 1.14^{+0.04}_{-0.08}, respectively (the shortest axis is normalized to unity); the largest and intermediate moments of inertia differ by 3-4 % only. The asteroid is close to the lowest-energy rotation state, the rotational kinetic energy is greater than the minimum kinetic energy (for rotation around the principal axis with the largest moment of inertia) by only 2-3 %. Despite this low-energy level of excitation, the figure with the two principal moments of inertia nearly equal results in the wobbling angle reaching substantial values of 50-60°.

  5. Far Wake Rotorcraft Vortex Tumbling James H. Stephenson

    E-print Network

    Tinney, Charles E.

    -scale, 1 m diame- ter, four-bladed rotor during hover is studied using vortex methods combined during hover conditions. The nominal operating condition of the rotor is at a rotational speed of 1520RPM validation of CFD codes. I. Introduction The aerodynamic wake of a helicopter in hover is highly complex

  6. Reentry survival analysis of tumbling metallic hollow cylinder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyung-Seok Sim; Kyu-Hong Kim

    2011-01-01

    The survival of orbital debris reentering the Earth’s atmosphere is considered. The numerical approach of NASA’s Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) is reviewed, and a new equation accounting for reradiation heat loss of hollow cylindrical objects is presented. Based on these, a code called Survivability Analysis Program for Atmospheric Reentry (SAPAR) has been developed, and the new equation for

  7. Reentry survival analysis of tumbling metallic hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Hyung-seok; Kim, Kyu-hong

    2011-09-01

    The survival of orbital debris reentering the Earth's atmosphere is considered. The numerical approach of NASA's Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) is reviewed, and a new equation accounting for reradiation heat loss of hollow cylindrical objects is presented. Based on these, a code called Survivability Analysis Program for Atmospheric Reentry (SAPAR) has been developed, and the new equation for reradiation heat loss is validated. Using this equation in conjunction with the formulation used in ORSAT, a comparative case study on the Delta-II second stage cylindrical tank is given, demonstrating that the analysis using the proposed equation is in good agreement with the actual recovered object when a practical value for thermal emissivity is used. A detailed explanation of the revised formulation is given, and additional simulation results are presented. Finally, discussions are made to address the applicability of the proposed equation to be incorporated in future survival analyses of orbital debris.

  8. Take a Tumble: Weathering and Erosion Using a Rock Tumbler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Patrick; Mattox, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Weathering--the physical and chemical breakdown of geologic materials--and erosion--the transport of materials by wind, water, or ice--can be subtle, yet powerful forces. For example, shale, a rock made of mud-sized particles, is by far the most common sedimentary rock, a testament to the ability of weathering and erosion to take a rock and reduce…

  9. Grinding media oscillation: effect on torsional vibrations in tumble mills

    E-print Network

    Toram, Kiran Kumar

    2005-11-01

    speeds using a gear reduction unit and often have vibration problems. These vibration problems result in increased gear wear and occasional catastrophic failures resulting in production loss. The objective of this research is to investigate the effect...

  10. Rolling and tumbling: status of the SuperAGILE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Mastropietro, M.; Morelli, E.; Pacciani, L.; Rapisarda, M.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.

    2010-07-01

    The SuperAGILE experiment is the hard X-ray monitor of the AGILE mission. It is a 2 x one-dimensional imager, with 6-arcmin angular resolution in the energy range 18 - 60 keV and a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. SuperAGILE is successfully operating in orbit since Summer 2007, providing long-term monitoring of bright sources and prompt detection and localization of gamma-ray bursts. Starting on October 2009 the AGILE mission lost its reaction wheel and the satellite attitude is no longer stabilized. The current mode of operation of the AGILE satellite is a Spinning Mode, around the Sun-pointing direction, with an angular velocity of about 0.8 degree/s (corresponding to 8 times the SuperAGILE point spread function every second). In these new conditions, SuperAGILE continuously scans a much larger fraction of the sky, with much smaller exposure to each region. In this paper we review some of the results of the first 2.5 years of "standard" operation of SuperAGILE, and show how new implementations in the data analysis software allows to continue the hard X-ray sky monitoring by SuperAGILE also in the new attitude conditions.

  11. Vesicle tumbling inhibited by inertia Aymen Laadhari,1

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    circulatory system the Reynolds number (at the scale of the RBC) is not always small enough for the Stokes constitute a model system for the study of red blood cells (RBCs) dynamics and blood rheology. In the blood,8 correspond to the very small Reynolds numbers limit. However, in the blood circulatory sys- tem, especially

  12. The Effect of Erosion Rate on Hillslope Rock Fragment Production: Implications for Supply of Bedload Material to Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Attal, M.; Sklar, L. S.; Riebe, C. S.; Hurst, M. D.; Mudd, S. M.; Yoo, K.

    2009-12-01

    The size distribution, abundance and durability of coarse sediment supplied by hillslopes to channels fundamentally influences channel morphodynamics, including the rate of river incision into bedrock. However, little is known about how hillslope boundary conditions such as erosion rate, climate and lithology, affect the production of bedload-sized rock fragments (> 2mm) on soil-mantled hillslopes. We hypothesize that more rapidly eroding hillslopes should produce larger, more abundant and more durable rock fragments, all else equal, because soils should be thinner, residence times shorter, and soil-producing disturbances such as tree throw more likely to transport unweathered bedrock to the surface. Here we present measurements of soil grain size distributions from three climatically distinct sites in northern California, where erosion rates vary widely within each site. Two of our sites are in granitic terrain in the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Fort Sage and Feather River), where rates of erosion and chemical weathering are constrained from previous measurements of cosmogenic radionuclides exposure ages and insoluble element enrichment. At the third site (Butano Ridge), an asymmetrical ridge underlain by massive sandstone in the Santa Cruz Mountains, we infer variable erosion rates from analysis of topographic curvature and hillslope gradient using a high-resolution LiDAR-derived DEM. We focus on the creep-dominated portion of the landscape to avoid sampling in landscape scars where the size distribution may not reflect long-term average production patterns. Bulk soil samples are taken from pits excavated to below the soil saprolite-bedrock boundary. We then sieve to obtain the full grain-size distribution in the soil column above the saprolite. We are also using laboratory tumbling mills to characterize rock fragment durability and assess the potential for fragment survival as bedload, once delivered to the channel. We find that rock fragment abundance generally increases with erosion rate, although significant differences in rock fragment size distribution can occur within sub-sites that share similar erosion rate and bedrock lithology. Preliminary results also suggest that the durability of rock fragments is positively correlated with erosion rate. From this limited data set, we do not see evidence for a strong influence of climate. For example, the rock fragment size distributions of the slowly eroding sub-sites in the two granite terrains are indistinguishable, despite a nearly seven-fold difference in mean annual precipitation. Taken together, these preliminary findings suggest that spatial variations in rock fragment size, abundance, and durability may be primarily an expression of physical weathering mechanisms, and driven by differences in relative base-level lowering rates.

  13. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  14. Distance Rate Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Middle School Portal Staff

    2008-03-10

    Measurement is one of the core NCTM Principals and Standards for School Mathematics content standards, and rate is central to its practical application. While most middle school students know the distance-rate-time formula, they may still benefit from a closer study of the relationship through these online resources.

  15. Tests of Rating Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masin, Sergio Cesare; Busetto, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The study reports empirical tests of Anderson's, Haubensak's, Helson's, and Parducci's rating models when two end anchors are used for rating. The results show that these models cannot predict the judgment effect called here the Dai Pra effect. It is shown that an extension of Anderson's model is consistent with this effect. The results confirm…

  16. Rates and Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website showcases teaching activities, strategies and methods for teaching about dates, rates, and time that are used in the many disciplines encompassed by geoscience education. This site was created to support a session on Geologic Rates and Time at the Geological Society of America meeting in 2005.

  17. Scaling metabolic rate fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Labra, Fabio A.; Marquet, Pablo A.; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Complex ecological and economic systems show fluctuations in macroscopic quantities such as exchange rates, size of companies or populations that follow non-Gaussian tent-shaped probability distributions of growth rates with power-law decay, which suggests that fluctuations in complex systems may be governed by universal mechanisms, independent of particular details and idiosyncrasies. We propose here that metabolic rate within individual organisms may be considered as an example of an emergent property of a complex system and test the hypothesis that the probability distribution of fluctuations in the metabolic rate of individuals has a “universal” form regardless of body size or taxonomic affiliation. We examined data from 71 individuals belonging to 25 vertebrate species (birds, mammals, and lizards). We report three main results. First, for all these individuals and species, the distribution of metabolic rate fluctuations follows a tent-shaped distribution with power-law decay. Second, the standard deviation of metabolic rate fluctuations decays as a power-law function of both average metabolic rate and body mass, with exponents ?0.352 and ?1/4 respectively. Finally, we find that the distributions of metabolic rate fluctuations for different organisms can all be rescaled to a single parent distribution, supporting the existence of general principles underlying the structure and functioning of individual organisms. PMID:17578913

  18. Thermonuclear reaction rates. II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. A. Fowler; G. R. Caughlan; B. A. Zimmerman

    1975-01-01

    A revision and updating of charged particle reactions involving nuclei ; with A less than or approximately equal to 30, except for the $sup ; 2$H(d,$gamma$)⁴He reaction whose reaction rate is very uncertain, is ; presented. Reactions involving neutrons are treated as neutron-producing ; reactions but factors for calculating the reverse reaction rate are provided for ; all reactions. The

  19. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  20. Rate of Solution Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Science House

    2014-01-28

    In this chemistry demonstration, learners investigate the factors that increase the rate of dissolution for a solid. Learners will compare how crushing sugar cubes, stirring and water temperature affect the rate at which the sugar dissolved. This resource guide includes extensions and notes about factors that accelerate dissolution and Henry's Law.

  1. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... workout Enter your age to find a target heart rate during exercise. You'll get the most out of your activities by staying within this range of heartbeats/minute. What is your age? years. How to Check Your Heart Rate Right after you stop exercising, take your pulse: ...

  2. Controlled Rate Cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled-rate cooling is one of several techniques available for the long-term storage of plants in liquid nitrogen. In this technique samples are slowly cooled to an intermediate temperature and then plunged in liquid nitrogen. Controlled rate cooling is based on osmotic regulation of cell conte...

  3. Optimal firing rate estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulin, M. G.; Hoffman, L. F.

    2001-01-01

    We define a measure for evaluating the quality of a predictive model of the behavior of a spiking neuron. This measure, information gain per spike (Is), indicates how much more information is provided by the model than if the prediction were made by specifying the neuron's average firing rate over the same time period. We apply a maximum Is criterion to optimize the performance of Gaussian smoothing filters for estimating neural firing rates. With data from bullfrog vestibular semicircular canal neurons and data from simulated integrate-and-fire neurons, the optimal bandwidth for firing rate estimation is typically similar to the average firing rate. Precise timing and average rate models are limiting cases that perform poorly. We estimate that bullfrog semicircular canal sensory neurons transmit in the order of 1 bit of stimulus-related information per spike.

  4. Study Rates Migraine Medications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Study Rates Migraine Medications Findings will be basis of new guidelines ... Preidt Tuesday, January 20, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Migraine Pain Relievers TUESDAY, Jan. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- ...

  5. Entertainment Advertising Rates

    E-print Network

    Peters, Richard

    Entertainment Advertising Rates FROM MAY, 2014 NATAGE F001 YAMAHA NATIONAL PIANO SALE ONE WEEKEND of direct response driven media solutions comprising of newspaper inserts/catalogues, bespoke printing

  6. Rating the Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slovic, Paul; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explains how people arrive at personal hazard assessments. Explores why people overestimate some hazards and underestimate others. Examines risk ratings for activities and technologies such as nuclear power, motor vehicles, pesticides, and vaccinations. (MA)

  7. On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    E-print Network

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    1996-12-02

    Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

  8. Thermonuclear reaction rates V

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Caughlan; W. A. Fowler

    1988-01-01

    Analytic expressions are given for the reaction rates of astrophysically important thermonuclear reactions involving low-mass nuclei (1less than or equal toZless than or equal to14). Numerical values of the rates are tabulated for the temperature range 10⁶less than or equal toTless than or equal to10¹° K. This provides a comprehensive update of our previous publications. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  9. Precision biological rate calibrator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Cousin

    1978-01-01

    A circuit design for a precison rate calibrator intended for biological use is discussed in detail. Although the simulator\\u000a is quite general in nature, an e.c.g. output stage is designed as an example of its use in calibrating a cardiotachometer.\\u000a Rates available range from 1 beat\\/min to 999 beats\\/min in 1 beat\\/min increments. It is a battery-powered low-cost unit.

  10. Rates of Hydrothermal Reactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard J. Wood; John V. Walther

    1983-01-01

    The rates of reactions of silicates and aqueous fluids follow zero-order kinetics controlled by the reacting surface area with the rate constant given by the equation: log k\\/bumpeq -2900\\/T - 6.85, where T is temperature and where k has the unit's gram-atoms of oxygen per square centimeter per second. This expression appears to hold for all silicates and for reactions

  11. Heart Rate Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  12. Modelling Heart Rate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual’s cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  13. Interest rates factor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwook; Kim, Min Jae; Kim, Soo Yong

    2011-07-01

    Interdependence of the interest rates of the US, the UK, and Japan is analyzed in this work by means of spectral analysis and network methods. A predominant effective factor in the interest rate market is which country floats a bond issue, and a minor effective factor is time to maturity of bonds. Power-law cross-correlation among different countries is analyzed by the detrended cross-correlation analysis method. Long-range cross-correlation is found between the first factors of interest rate, while there is no cross-correlation between some of the second factors. The tail dependency is indicated by tail indices from Archimedean copulas, including an empirical copula. In contrast to other pairs, the US-UK first factor pair has tail dependencies in both the upper-tail and lower-tail. Dynamic properties of interest rate are modeled by a stochastic volatility model. The properties of mean reverting and volatility clustering are observed and reflected in this model. The proposed simulation method combines the dependence structures and the factor dynamics model; it simultaneously describes the interest rates of different countries.

  14. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-01-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  15. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-12-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  16. Federal Reserve Rate Cuts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Waters, Megan.

    1998-01-01

    This week's In the News chronicles recent Federal Reserve Board decisions to lower interest rates. The eleven resources discussed provide news, opinion, and consumer information on the FRB BOG action. Following the first US interest rate cut in three years on September 29, 1998, FED Chairman Alan Greenspan caught fire from Wall Street. "Traders were disappointed" in the mere quarter point drop, according to Time business reporter Bernard Baumohl, but "Greenspan will have to make do with the gratitude of the rest of the world." Although the DOW initially fell 54 points Tuesday, a second 0.25% cut to short-term interest rates on October 15, 1998 sent stocks soaring 330 points--the third largest one-day point gain in history. Analysts now hope that US investor optimism--coupled with IMF and World Bank action in Brazil, Russia, and Asia--will ease the world-wide economic crises.

  17. Poetic Evaluation Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Richard D.; Pedersen, Darhl M.

    Designed to assess readers' evaluations of poems or other works of fiction, the Poetic Evaluation Rating Scale (PERS) is a set of 15 semantic differential scales. After each set of 11 poems, the reader checks a point along a line between two adjectives with opposite meanings (bi-polar adjectives). Each pair of adjectives is 1 of the 15 scales, all…

  18. Estimating Rates of Photosynthesis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Keirle, Matt

    In this lab activity from the Biotechnology Alliance for Suncoast Biology Educators, students will explore photosynthesis, develop a testable hypothesis about the effect of light quality (color) on the rate of photosynthesis of Elodea, and graph measurement data from their testing. The lesson includes background information on photosynthesis, the materials needed, and the procedure.

  19. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual consumers…

  20. Strain and strain rate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-U. Voigt; F. A. Flachskampf

    2004-01-01

    Zusammenfassung. Myokardiale Verformung (strain) und Verformungsgeschwindigkeit (strain rate) sind neue Parameter der regionalen Myokardfunktion, die sich aus Gewebedopplerdaten berechnen lassen. Sie sind weniger von der Bildqualität abhängig als die Erkennung der Endokardkontur und weniger subjektiv als die visuelle Beurteilung der Wandbewegung. Die regionalen Verformungsparameter können echokardiographisch mit sehr hoher zeitlicher Auflösung (weitaus höher als mittels Magnetresonanztomographie) errechnet werden. Dadurch werden

  1. Paradoxes in Film Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    The author selected a simple random sample of 100 movies from the "Movie and Video Guide" (1996), by Leonard Maltin. The author's intent was to obtain some basic information on the population of roughly 19,000 movies through a small sample. The "Movie and Video Guide" by Leonard Maltin is an annual ratings guide to movies. While not all films ever…

  2. What's in a Rating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Brian A.; Walsh, Elias

    2011-01-01

    We examine the relationship between the formal ratings that principals give teachers and a variety of observable teacher characteristics, including proxies for productivity. Prior work has shown that principals can differentiate between more and less effective teachers, especially at the tails of the quality distribution, and that subjective…

  3. DATA ATTRIBUTE RATING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a data attribute rating system (DARS), developed by EPA to assist in evaluating data associated with emission inventories. he paper presents DARS for evaluation by the potential user community. ARS was originally conceived as a method for evaluating country-sp...

  4. Faucet Flow Rate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students conduct experiments to determine the flow rate of faucets by timing how long it takes to fill gallon jugs. They do this for three different faucet flow levels (quarter blast, half blast, full blast), averaging three trials for each level. They convert their results from gallons per second (gps) to cubic feet per second (cfs).

  5. Average Rate of Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Roberts, Lila F.

    2005-04-21

    This demo provides students with a concrete understanding of the average rate of change for physical situations and for functions described in tabular or graphic form. Animations in gif and Quicktime format are available, as well as Excel programs for classroom or student use.

  6. Statistical Rate Monotonic Scheduling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alia Atlas; Azer Bestavros

    1998-01-01

    Statistical Rate Monotonic Scheduling (SRMS) is a general- ization of the classical RMS results of Liu and Layland (10) for periodic tasks with highly variable execution times and statistical QoS requirements. The main tenet of SRMS is that the variability in task resource requirements could be smoothed through aggregation to yield guaranteedQoS. This aggregation is done over time for a

  7. Rates of Chemical Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Passow

    In this activity, students will investigate the weathering of rocks by chemical processes. They will use effervescent cleansing tablets as a model for rock, and vary surface area, temperature, and acidity to see how rapidly the "rock" dissolves. This investigation will help them understand three of the factors that affect the rate of chemical weathering and develop better understanding of how to design controlled experiments by exploring only one experimental variable at a time.

  8. Rate Tornado Damage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tornadoes can produce damage that ranges from broken tree limbs to a block of houses swept from their foundations. They can inflict utter devastation across a wide swath of land or, destroy one house and leave others on either side largely untouched. In this interactive feature from NOVA Online, sudents examine a series of photos of tornado damage and assign intensity ratings (on the Fulita scale) based on what they see.

  9. Dual scan rate radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. M. Waters

    1986-01-01

    A dual scan rate radar system (DSR) includes a phased array antenna, a transmitter, a receiver and a control unit. Each rf pulse from the transmitter includes contiguous long-range and short-range pulses. The control unit adjusts the antenna so that the long-range pulse is transmitted into a slow beam at theta s and the short-range pulse is transmitted into a

  10. Stocking Rate Decisions

    E-print Network

    White, Larry D.; McGinty, Allan

    1999-02-15

    perspective. Timber Press, Inc. Portland, Ore- gon. pp. 191-199. Forage and Grazing Terminology Committee. 1991. Terminology for grazing lands and grazing ani- mals. Pocahontas Press, Inc. Blacksburg, Virginia. Hanson, D. and J. W. Stuth. 1988. Disturbance... Stocking Rate Decisions Key to Successful Ranch Management Larry D. White and AlIan McGinty Extension Range Specialists, The Texas A&M University System On any ranch, decisions must be made as to the management of each ranch resource (land, animals...

  11. Plasma Adiabatic Lapse Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Bellei, Claudio; Wilks, Scott

    2012-08-01

    The plasma analog of an adiabatic lapse rate (or temperature variation with height) in atmospheric physics is obtained. A new source of plasma temperature gradient in a binary ion species mixture is found that is proportional to the concentration gradient ??? and difference in average ionization states Z2-Z1. Application to inertial-confinement-fusion implosions indicates a potentially strong effect in plastic (CH) ablators that is not modeled with mainline (single-fluid) simulations. An associated plasma thermodiffusion coefficient is derived, and charge-state diffusion in a single-species plasma is also predicted.

  12. Target Heart Rate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Peterson

    2011-09-18

    Students will practice how to calculate their Target Heart Rate to use during exercise routines. This will help students monitor the intensity of their workouts, and ultimately help them achieve results from their workout. Standard 2: Objective 2: a,b,c Before we discuss what the Target Heart Range is and how we can us it, we must first have some basic knowledge of the heart and it's functions. Click the "habits of the heart" to learn the basics of the heart and how it circulates blood throughout the body. Habits of the Heart The hearts ...

  13. Flow Rates Model

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Maryland Virtual High School

    The Flow Rates activity is highly recommended both for math teachers and for science teachers in all fields. It can be used effectively for a variety of content applications and at various points in a course sequence. By allowing students to practice making and testing hypotheses about liquid flowing through a simple burette, it provides an excellent introduction to the scientific method. The collection and analysis of real-time data provides students with the opportunity to use their graphing and algebra skills in a real problem-solving situation. Finally, it facilitates a direct mental mapping between students' demonstration observations and mathematical modeling using STELLA software.

  14. Heart Rate and Function

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Mike Peterson (Frazer Public School)

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this activity is to discover and learn about heart rate and the function of the heart. The students will investigate whether their hearts beat slower/faster at different times; develop an understanding of why their hearts beat slower/faster at different times; use data to develop an explanation of why their hearts beat slower/faster at different times; be aware of the effect of exercise on respiration; and be able to describe the major function of the heart.

  15. Heart-Rate and Breath-Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Circuit requiring only four integrated circuits (IC's) measures both heart rate and breath rate. Phase-locked loops lock on heart-rate and respiration-rate input signals. Each loop IC contains two phase comparators. Positive-edge-triggered circuit used in making monitors insensitive to dutycycle variations.

  16. 15 CFR 700.3 - Priority ratings and rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL...BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Overview § 700.3 Priority ratings and rated orders....

  17. Rates of Earth degassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onions, R. K.

    1994-01-01

    The degassing of the Earth during accretion is constrained by Pu-U-I-Xe systematics. Degassing was much more efficient during the first 100-200 Ma than subsequently, and it was more complete for Xe than for the lighter gases. More than 90 percent of the degassed Xe escaped from the atmosphere during this period. The combination of fractional degassing of melts and rare gas escape from the atmosphere is able to explain the deficit of terrestrial Xe as a simple consequence of this early degassing history. By the time Xe was quantitatively retained in the atmosphere, the abundances of Kr and the lighter gases in the Earth's interior were similar to or higher than the present-day atmospheric abundances. Subsequent transfer of these lighter rare gases into the atmosphere requires a high rate of post-accretion degassing and melt production. Considerations of Pu-U-Xe systematics suggest that relatively rapid post-accretion degassing was continued to ca. 4.1-4.2 Ga. The present-day degassing history of the Earth is investigated through consideration of rare gas isotope abundances. Although the Earth is a highly degassed body, depleted in rare gases by many orders of magnitude relative to their solar abundances, it is at the present-day losing primordial rare gases which were trapped at the time of accretion.

  18. National Utility Rate Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

    2012-08-01

    When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

  19. Unemployment rate as predictor of rate of psychiatric admission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R M Kammerling; S OConnor

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relation between rates of psychiatric admissions and both the rate of unemployment and the underprivileged area score within small areas. DESIGN--Calculation of correlation coefficients and explanatory power by using data on psychiatric admissions from April 1990 to March 1992. Crude and age standardised rates were used based on all admissions and also on the number of people

  20. Interest Rate Transmission to Commercial Credit Rates in Austria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johann Burgstaller; Johannes Kepler

    2003-01-01

    The transmission process from policy-controlled interest rates to bank lending rates deserves reconsideration owing to the implementation of the European Monetary Union (EMU) in 1999. Additional attention to the subject in Austria is due to several large banks which, in 2002, have been charged for not passing on interest rate decreases to their customers. I examine dynamic responses of commercial

  1. Slip Rates on young faults

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Audrey Huerta

    Students use measured ages and offset of quaternary surfaces to determine vertical slip rates of a young fault. Students then must determine if vertical slip rates have varied significantly through time.

  2. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01

    This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

  3. Determinants of heart rate variability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hisako Tsuji; Ferdinand J. Venditti; Emily S. Manders; Jane C. Evans; Martin G. Larson; Charles L. Feldman; Daniel Levy

    1996-01-01

    Objectives. This study sought to examine clinical determinants of heart rate variability and to report normative reference values for eight heart rate variability measures.Background. Although the clinical implications of heart rate variability have been described, clinical determinants and normative values of heart rate variability measures have not been studied systematically in a large community-based population.Methods. The first 2 h of

  4. Car Depreciation (rate and slope)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is for students to use the concept of the rate of depreciation in a real world situation to investigate the relationship between rate and slope. Students create ordered pairs, graph depreciating car values, and calculate rates of depreciation, then identify that the rate of depreciation = slope of the line. Using the equation they then solve for future values and times.

  5. Catch Curves and Mortality Rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. Robson; D. G. Chapman

    1961-01-01

    The assumptions necessary to obtain a valid estimate of survival rate from a single catch curve are discussed. An example of the best estimate of survival rate and its variance is worked out for the case that age is known exactly for the entire sample. A test for validity of the model is illustrated. Methods of estimating the survival rate

  6. Dual-rate adaptive control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pedro Albertos; Julian Salt; Josep Tornero

    1996-01-01

    An operator, called the dual-rate transfer function, describing a dual-rate discretized continuous-time system is presented. It can be easily related to single-rate transfer functions of the same system, and its parameters can be experimentally estimated. Based on these models, two adaptive control strategies are outlined, and some results are illustrated by a simple example.

  7. Stocking Rates for Horse Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decision on which stocking rate to graze a horse pasture is critical, particularly if the forage is expected to meet the nutrient needs of the horses. Challenges and management for targeting the optimum stocking rate, defined as the stocking rate that allows forage consumption to approximately equ...

  8. Changes in Maine's Unemployment Rate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William G. Stohner

    2005-01-01

    The Changes in Maine's Unemployment Rates map was created using data and shapefiles provided by the U.S. Census Bureau and shows changes in unemployment rates within labor market areas between January 2004 and January 2005. Overall, there has been a general decrease in unemployment rates throughout the state.

  9. ANNUAL ADULT SURVIVAL RATES OF

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DON P. FANKHAIJSER

    The purposes of this study were (1) to determine annual adult survival rates from banding data for each sex of the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula), Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), and Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), and (2) to compare survival rates calculated from band returns with survival rates calculated from band recoveries. Others have studied annual adult survival

  10. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    MedlinePLUS

    All About Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Sep 30,2014 What should you know about your heart rate? Even if you’re not an athlete, ... Where is it and what is a normal heart rate? The best places to find your pulse ...

  11. Hummingbirds as net rate maximisers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alasdair I. Houston; David C. Krakauer

    1993-01-01

    The behaviour of foraging hummingbirds can be accounted for by assuming the maximisation of net rate. The currency, net energy per unit volume consumed suggested by Montgomerie et al. (1984), is shown to be an unnecessary means of interpreting behaviour when compared alongside an extended net rate model. The reason for the failure of previous net rate models to account

  12. AGRICULTURAL EXCHANGE RATE DATA SHEET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ERS data set contains annual and monthly data for exchange rates important to U.S. agriculture. It includes both nominal and real exchange rates for 80 countries (plus the European Union) as well as real trade-weighted exchange rate indexes for many commodities and aggregatio...

  13. Saturn component failure rate and failure rate modifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Failure mode frequency ratios, environmental adjustment factors, and failure rates for mechanical and electromechanical component families are presented. The failure rates and failure rate modifiers resulted from a series of studies whose purpose was to provide design, tests, reliability, and systems engineers with accurate, up-to-date failure rate information. The results of the studies were achieved through an extensive engineering analysis of the Saturn Program test data and Unsatisfactory Condition Reports (UCR's) and the application of mathematical techniques developed for the studies.

  14. Scaling surface velocities in rotating cylinders as a function of vessel radius, rotation rate, and particle size

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Alexander; Troy Shinbrot; Fernando J. Muzzio

    2002-01-01

    In industrial practice, scale-up of granular flows in tumbling devices has been largely attempted using one of two parameters, either the vessel tangential speed (?) or the Froude (Fr) number. In this communication, we measure surface velocities of 1.6-mm particles in half-filled rotating cylinders and find that neither ? nor Fr accurately scales changes in particle velocity with changes in

  15. Fed to Raise Interest Rates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Missner, Emily D.

    As expected, the Federal Reserve voted to raise interest rates 0.25 percent, the fifth rate raise since June. The interest rate boost is expected to help keep inflation in check during this record period (108 months) of economic expansion. Technology companies have continued to signal healthy economic growth, and unemployment rates remain low. Despite drastic price hikes in gasoline and heating oil prices, consumers are still spending. This worries economists who watched consumers pay little heed to the last four interest rate increases. The quarter point interest rate increase will average out to an extra $1 a month on consumers's credit cards, which in this period of prosperity, will not curb consumers's spending.

  16. MONTHLY DENTAL RATES for Retirees

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    MONTHLY DENTAL RATES for Retirees Effective 7/1/2012 - 6/30/2013 UNDER 65 Dental Rates Delta Dental.00 $17.00 Family $40.00 $14.00 $35.00 $19.00 $29.00 $25.00 Delta Dental Premier (High Option) Annualized.00 $69.00 $59.00 OVER 65 Dental Rates Delta Dental PPO (Low Option) Delta Dental Premier (High Option

  17. A new silicon rate gyroscope

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Geiger; B. Folkmer; J. Merz; H. Sandmaier; W. Lang

    1998-01-01

    HSG-IMIT is developing a new silicon rate gyroscope of very small size, low cost, and high performance. The device is called MARS-RR, which means micromachined angular rate sensor with two rotary oscillation modes. First prototypes, MARS-RRI yielded random walk and bias stability as low as 0.27 deg\\/?h and 65 deg\\/h, respectively. The noise equivalent rate (3 ?) corresponds to a

  18. Change to the standard rate of VAT Rate change

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    and purchase order input) will use the new 20% rate. Tax point The tax point is the date at which a supply of goods and services is deemed to have taken place in VAT law. The rate of VAT that should be applied to a taxable transaction is that which prevails at the tax point. The basic rule; the tax point is the date

  19. Are performance appraisal ratings from different rating sources comparable?

    PubMed

    Facteau, J D; Craig, S B

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether a multisource performance appraisal instrument exhibited measurement invariance across different groups of raters. Multiple-groups confirmatory factor analysis as well as item response theory (IRT) techniques were used to test for invariance of the rating instrument across self, peer, supervisor, and subordinate raters. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the rating instrument was invariant across these rater groups. The IRT analysis yielded some evidence of differential item and test functioning, but it was limited to the effects of just 3 items and was trivial in magnitude. Taken together, the results suggest that the rating instrument could be regarded as invariant across the rater groups, thus supporting the practice of directly comparing their ratings. Implications for research and practice are discussed, as well as for understanding the meaning of between-source rating discrepancies. PMID:11393435

  20. 47 CFR 64.1801 - Geographic rate averaging and rate integration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Geographic rate averaging and rate integration. 64.1801 Section 64.1801... Geographic Rate Averaging and Rate Integration § 64.1801 Geographic rate averaging and rate integration. (a) The rates charged...

  1. 47 CFR 64.1801 - Geographic rate averaging and rate integration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Geographic rate averaging and rate integration. 64.1801 Section 64.1801... Geographic Rate Averaging and Rate Integration § 64.1801 Geographic rate averaging and rate integration. (a) The rates charged...

  2. Rating tourism and hospitality journals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bob McKercher; Rob Law; Terry Lam

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of a global study of tourism and hospitality academics asking them to rate their collective literature. The study adopted a peer assessment method, using a snowball sample to maximize response rates. Overall, 70 tourism and hospitality journals were assessed (40 tourism and 30 hospitality) by 314 tourism and 191 hospitality experts. The study revealed

  3. Rare Disasters and Exchange Rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuel Farhi; Xavier Gabaix

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new model of exchange rates, which yields a theory of the forward premium puzzle. Our explanation combines two ingredients: the possibility of rare economic disasters, and an asset view of the exchange rate. Our model is frictionless, has complete markets, and works for an arbitrary number of countries. In the model, rare worldwide disasters can occur and

  4. Evolution & the Cesarean Section Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution." This was the title of an essay by geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky writing in 1973. Many causes have been given for the increased Cesarean section rate in developed countries, but biologic evolution has not been one of them. The C-section rate will continue to rise, because the…

  5. Cancer Death Rates Declined Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011, is an update of rates for new cases, deaths and trends for the most common cancers in the United States. All rates in the report are per 100,000 people in the U.S. population.

  6. Predicting the Divorce Rate: Down?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Theodore D.

    1983-01-01

    Predicted a decline in the divorce rate based on 10 factors including: decline in marriage rate, older age at marriage, mental health improvement, upper limit on employed women, less migration, end of the cultural revolution, exhaustion of latency effect of no-fault divorce, and fear of the consequences of divorce. (JAC)

  7. Nontraditional Student Graduation Rate Benchmarks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Nathan B.

    2014-01-01

    The prominence of discourse on postsecondary degree completion, student persistence, and retention has increased in the national dialogue. Heightened attention to college completion rates by the federal government and pressure to tie state funding to performance metrics associated with graduation rates are catalysts for the discussion.…

  8. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  9. Matching and Conditioned Reinforcement Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahan, Timothy A.; Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina

    2006-01-01

    Attempts to examine the effects of variations in relative conditioned reinforcement rate on choice have been confounded by changes in rates of primary reinforcement or changes in the value of the conditioned reinforcer. To avoid these problems, this experiment used concurrent observing responses to examine sensitivity of choice to relative…

  10. Diabetes, Heart Rate, and Mortality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nalini Singh

    2002-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that a persistently high heart rate is associated with a significant risk for higher mortality and sudden death in individuals with a variety cardiovascu- lar disorders, as well as in the general population. Heart rates elevated beyond a certain threshold have been found to be a risk factor for mortality in patients with hypertension,

  11. Regulation of Human Heart Rate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ingrid Waldron

    Students learn how to measure heart rate accurately. Then students design and carry out an experiment to test the effects of an activity or stimulus on heart rate, analyze and interpret the data, and present their experiments in a poster session. In this activity students learn about both cardiac physiology and experimental method.

  12. Swap Rates and Credit Quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darrell Duffie; Ming Huang

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a model for valuing claims subject to default by both contracting parties, such as swaps and forwards. With counterparties of different default risk, the promised cash flows of a swap are discounted by a switching discount rate that, at any given state and time, is equal to the discount rate of the counterparty for whom the swap

  13. Risk, Uncertainty and Exchange Rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Hodrick

    1989-01-01

    This paper explores a new direction for empirical models of exchange rate determination. The motivation arises from two well documented facts, the failure of log-linear empirical exchange rate models of the 1970's and the variability of risk premiums in the forward market. Rational maximizing models of economic behavior imply that changes in the conditional variances of exogenous processes, such as

  14. Exchange Rates and Financial Fragility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry Eichengreen; Ricardo Hausmann

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we analyze three views of the relationship between the exchange rate and financial fragility: (1) the moral hazard hypothesis, according to which pegged exchange rates offer implicit insurance against exchange risk and thereby encourage reckless borrowing and lending; (2) the original sin hypothesis, which emphasizes an incompleteness in financial markets which prevents the domestic currency from being

  15. Sustainable Withdrawal and Accumulation Rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig Brandenburg; Nathan Franklin; John Healy; Danny Johnson; Collin LeMaistre; Brent Lew; Jason Meridth; Sara Meyer; Chris Mitchell; Jeffrey D. Oldham; Scott Schaefer; Peter Shaffer; Quenby Swinson

    Determining a sustainable withdrawal rate is an important factor to consider in retirement investment plan- ning. An equally important problem is determining an accumulation rate yielding an investment large enough for retirement. Both these problems involve predicting the effect of periodic incremental changes to an investment. Making predictions using historical averages does not yield accurate solutions because of the large

  16. RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

  17. 4, 120, 2004 Meteor rates

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 1­20, 2004 Meteor rates W. Singer et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions of meteor rates at the Arctic circle W. Singer, J. Wei�, and U. von Zahn Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric: 6 January 2004 Correspondence to: W. Singer (singer@iap-kborn.de) 1 #12;ACPD 4, 1­20, 2004 Meteor

  18. Age-specific divorce rates.

    PubMed

    Kunz, P R; England, J L

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines the various types of US divorce rates in 1970 and 1980 and concludes that the age-specific rate is most precise. Using data from the states' vital statistics reports and the 1980 census reports for states, the authors conclude that the teen and early 20s marriages are most at risk to divorce. Rates have increased from 1970 to 1980 with the most dramatic increases occurring in the 25-35 and 40-44 age groups. Study needs to be done to see what factors have led to such disproportionate increases in divorce rates in these age categories. Similarly, research is needed to understand why the 55 and over groups show no change of decline in rates between 1970 and 1980 in light of increases in other age groups. Contrary to general belief, however, divorce does not increase during the 'mid-life crisis' or ' after the children leave home.' PMID:12281968

  19. New fine structure cooling rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  20. Innovative Rates Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-21

    Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) provided financial assistance to state utility regulatory commissions, nonregulated electric utilities, and the Tennessee Valley Authority through the Innovative Rates Program. The financial assistance was to be used to plan or carry out electric utility regulatory rate reform initiatives relating to innovative rate structures that encourage conservation of energy, electric utility efficiency and reduced costs, and equitable rates to consumers. The Federal and local objectives of the project are described. Activities planned and accomplishments are summarized for the following: project management, data collection, utility bill evaluation, billing enclosure/mailing evaluation, media program evaluation, display evaluation, rate study sessions evaluation, speakers bureau evaluation, and individual customer contacts. A timetable/milestone chart and financial information are included. (MHR)

  1. High Rate Digital Demodulator ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghuman, Parminder; Sheikh, Salman; Koubek, Steve; Hoy, Scott; Gray, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The architecture of High Rate (600 Mega-bits per second) Digital Demodulator (HRDD) ASIC capable of demodulating BPSK and QPSK modulated data is presented in this paper. The advantages of all-digital processing include increased flexibility and reliability with reduced reproduction costs. Conventional serial digital processing would require high processing rates necessitating a hardware implementation in other than CMOS technology such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) which has high cost and power requirements. It is more desirable to use CMOS technology with its lower power requirements and higher gate density. However, digital demodulation of high data rates in CMOS requires parallel algorithms to process the sampled data at a rate lower than the data rate. The parallel processing algorithms described here were developed jointly by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The resulting all-digital receiver has the capability to demodulate BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, and DQPSK at data rates in excess of 300 Mega-bits per second (Mbps) per channel. This paper will provide an overview of the parallel architecture and features of the HRDR ASIC. In addition, this paper will provide an over-view of the implementation of the hardware architectures used to create flexibility over conventional high rate analog or hybrid receivers. This flexibility includes a wide range of data rates, modulation schemes, and operating environments. In conclusion it will be shown how this high rate digital demodulator can be used with an off-the-shelf A/D and a flexible analog front end, both of which are numerically computer controlled, to produce a very flexible, low cost high rate digital receiver.

  2. The Airline Quality Rating 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Headley, Dean E.

    2003-01-01

    The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) was developed and first announced in early 1991 as an objective method of comparing airline quality on combined multiple performance criteria. This current report, the Airline Quality Rating 2003, reflects monthly Airline Quality Rating scores for 2002. AQR scores for the calendar year 2002 are based on 15 elements that focus on airline performance areas important to air travel consumers. The Airline Quality Rating 2003 is a summary of month-by-month quality ratings for the 10 largest U.S. airlines operating during 2002. Using the Airline Quality Rating system of weighted averages and monthly performance data in the areas of ontime arrivals, involuntary denied boardings, mishandled baggage, and a combination of 12 customer complaint categories, airlines comparative performance for the calendar year of 2002 is reported. This research monograph contains a brief summary of the AQR methodology, detailed data and charts that track comparative quality for domestic airline operations for the 12-month period of 2002, and industry average results. Also, comparative Airline Quality Rating data for 2001 are included for each airline to provide historical perspective regarding performance quality in the industry.

  3. The Airline Quality Rating 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Mary M. (Editor); Bowen, Brent D.; Headley, Dean E.

    2004-01-01

    The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) was developed and first announced in early 1991 as an objective method of comparing airline quality on combined multiple performance criteria. This current report, the Airline Quality Rating 2004, reflects monthly Airline Quality Rating scores for 2003. AQR scores for the calendar year 2003 are based on 15 elements in four major areas that focus on airline performance aspects important to air travel consumers. The Airline Quality Rating 2004 is a summary of month-by-month quality ratings for U.S. airlines that have at least 1 % of domestic passenger volume during 2003. Using the Airline Quality Rating system of weighted averages and monthly performance data in the areas of on-time arrivals, involuntary denied boardings, mishandled baggage, and a combination of 12 customer complaint categories, airlines comparative performance for the calendar year of 2003 is reported. This research monograph contains a brief summary of the AQR methodology, detailed data and charts that track comparative quality for domestic airline operations for the 12-month period of 2003, and industry results. Also, comparative Airline Quality Rating data for 2002 are included, where available, to provide historical perspective regarding performance quality in the industry.

  4. The Airline Quality Rating 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Headley, Dean E.

    2002-01-01

    The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) was developed and first announced in early 1991 as an objective method of comparing airline quality on combined multiple performance criteria. This current report, Airline Quality Rating 2002, reflects monthly Airline Quality Rating scores for 2001. AQR scores for the calendar year 2001 are based on 15 elements that focus on airline performance areas important to air travel consumers. The Airline Quality Rating 2002 is a summary of month-by-month quality ratings for the 11 largest U.S. airlines operating during 2001. Using the Airline Quality Rating system of weighted averages and monthly performance data in the areas of on-time arrivals, involuntary denied boardings, mishandled baggage, and a combination of 12 customer complaint categories, airlines comparative performance for the calendar year of 2001 is reported. This research monograph contains a brief summary of the AQR methodology, detailed data and charts that track comparative quality for domestic airline operations for the 12-month period of 2001, and industry average results. Also, comparative Airline Quality Rating data for 2000 are included for each airline to provide historical perspective regarding performance quality in the industry.

  5. The Airline Quality Rating 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Headley, Dean E.

    2001-01-01

    The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) was developed and first announced in early 1991 as an objective method of comparing airline quality on combined multiple performance criteria. This current report, Airline Quality Rating 2001, reflects monthly Airline Quality Rating scores for 2000. AQR scores for the calendar year 2000 are based on 15 elements that focus on airline performance areas important to air travel consumers. The Airline Quality Rating 2001 is a summary of month-by-month quality ratings for the ten major U.S. airlines operating during 2000. Using the Airline Quality Rating system of weighted averages and monthly performance data in the areas of on-time arrivals, involuntary denied boardings, mishandled baggage, and a combination of 12 customer complaint categories, major airlines comparative performance for the calendar year of 2000 is reported. This research monograph contains a brief summary of the AQR methodology, detailed data and charts that track comparative quality for major airlines domestic operations for the 12 month period of 2000, and industry average results. Also, comparative Airline Quality Rating data for 1999 are included for each airline to provide historical perspective regarding performance quality in the industry.

  6. The Airline Quality Rating 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Headley, Dean E.

    2004-01-01

    The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) was developed and first announced in early 1991 as an objective method of comparing airline quality on combined multiple performance criteria. This current report, the Airline Quality Rating 2004, reflects monthly Airline Quality Rating scores for 2003. AQR scores far the calendar year 2003 are based on 15 elemnts in four major areas that focus on airline performance aspects important to air travel consumers. The Airline Quality Rating 2004 is a summary of month-by-month quality ratings for U.S. airlines that have at least 1% of domestic passenger volume during 2003. Using the Airline Quality Rating system of weighted averages and monthly performance data in the areas of on-time arrivals, involuntary denied boardings, mishandled baggage, and a combination of 12 customer complaint categories, airlines comparative performance for the calendar year of 2003 is reported. This research monograph contains a brief summary of the AQR methodology, detailed data and charts that track comparative quality for domestic airline operations for the 12-month period of 2003, and industry results. Also, comparative Airline Quality Rating data for 2002 are included, where available, to provide historical perspective

  7. The Airline Quality Rating 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Headley, Dean E.

    1999-01-01

    The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) was developed and first announced in early 1991 as an objective method of comparing airline performance on combined multiple criteria. This current report, Airline Quality Rating 1999, reflects an updated approach to calculating monthly Airline Quality Rating scores for 1998. AQR scores for the calendar year 1998 are based on 15 elements that focus on airline performance areas important to air travel consumers. The Airline Quality Rating is a summary of month-by-month quality ratings for the ten major U.S. airlines operating during 1998. Using the Airline Quality Rating system of weighted averages and monthly performance data in the areas of on-time arrivals, involuntary denied boardings, mishandled baggage, and a combination of 12 customer complaint categories, major airlines comparative performance for the calendar year 1998 is reported. This research monograph contains a brief summary of the AQR methodology, detailed data and charts that track comparative quality for major airlines domestic operations for the 12 month period of 1998, and industry average results. Also, comparative Airline Quality Rating data for 1997, using the updated criteria, are included to provide a reference point regarding quality in the industry.

  8. Incentive Rates- At What Cost?

    E-print Network

    Schaeffer, S. C.

    marginally costed rates in place in the state. The intervenors, whom had argued in favor of cost based rate, had hoped that I would file an average fuel, average O&M, and small administrative charge rate since there were no capacity costs associated... of HL&P's tariff. While this flexibility is reasonably well accepted by our customers, unfortunately my relationship with our people who have to bill these arrangements leads me to wish that this speaking engagement could take place behind bullet...

  9. LADAR vision technology for automated rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Randy W.

    1991-01-01

    LADAR Vision Technology at Autonomous Technologies Corporation consists of two sensor/processing technology elements: high performance long range multifunction coherent Doppler laser radar (LADAR) technology; and short range integrated CCD camera with direct detection laser ranging sensors. Algorithms and specific signal processing implementations have been simulated for both sensor/processing approaches to position and attitude tracking applicable to AR&C. Experimental data supporting certain sensor measurement accuracies have been generated.

  10. Saturn/Titan Rendezvous: A Solar-Sail Aerocapture Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matloff, Gregory L.; Taylor, Travis; Powell, Conley

    2004-01-01

    A low-mass Titan orbiter is proposed that uses conservative or optimistic solar sails for all post-Earth-escape propulsion. After accelerating the probe onto a trans-Saturn trajectory, the sail is used parachute style for Saturn capture during a pass through Saturn's outer atmosphere. If the apoapsis of the Saturn-capture orbit is appropriate, the aerocapture maneuver can later be repeated at Titan so that the spacecraft becomes a satellite of Titan. An isodensity-atmosphere model is applied to screen aerocapture trajectories. Huygens/Cassini should greatly reduce uncertainties regarding the upper atmospheres of Saturn and Titan.

  11. Orbital Express AVGS Validation and Calibration for Automated Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Howard, Richard T.; Pinson, Robin M.

    2008-01-01

    From March to July of 2007, the DARPA Orbital Express mission achieved a number of firsts in autonomous spacecraft operations. The NASA Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) was the primary docking sensor during the first two dockings and was used in a blended mode three other automated captures. The AVGS performance exceeded its specification by approximately an order of magnitude. One reason that the AVGS functioned so well during the mission was that the validation and calibration of the sensor prior to the mission advanced the state-of-the-art for proximity sensors. Some factors in this success were improvements in ground test equipment and truth data, the capability for ILOAD corrections for optical and other effects, and the development of a bias correction procedure. Several valuable lessons learned have applications to future proximity sensors.

  12. A parallel rendezvous algorithm for interpolation between multiple grids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J. Plimpton; Bruce Hendrickson; James R. Stewart

    2004-01-01

    A number of computational procedures employ multiple grids on which solutions are computed. For example, in multiphysics simulations a primary grid may be used to compute mechanical deformation of an object while a secondary grid is used for thermal conduction calculations. When modeling coupled thermo-mechanical effects, solution data must be interpolated back and forth between the grids each timestep. On

  13. Laser space rendezvous and docking system trade-off study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S.; Levinson, S.

    1975-01-01

    The use, design, and fabrication feasibility of scanning the laser beam by swiveling the outside mirror with a ball joint swivel system is examined along with the applicability of graphite reinforced epoxy material for the construction of reflective optics. It is indicated that (1) the cost of graphite-epoxy will be more than that of many other materials due to the amount of special tooling required; (2) the weight advantage of graphite-epoxy over beryllium is minimal; the ball joint swivel system is accurate enough to perform the scanning function; and that the ball joint will result in a simpler and more cost effective scanning mechanism.

  14. Rendez-vous Evnements Intervenants Type Lieu mardi 17 janvier

    E-print Network

    Savoie, Université de

    .Decottignies rue Marcoz - Chambéry mardi 6, mercredi 7 jeudi 8 mars 20h30 Spectacle Jean-Jacques Rousseau mise enRendez-vous Evénements Intervenants Type Lieu mardi 17 janvier 17h30 « Rousseau : la politique - Chambéry jeudi 1er février 17h « La vérité chez Rousseau » JH. Call Futy Cours Amphithéâtre R

  15. Rendezvous layer protocols for Bluetooth-enabled smart devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Siegemund; Michael Rohs

    2003-01-01

    AbstractCommunication platforms for ubiquitous computing need to be flexible, self-organizing, highly scalable and energy efficient, because in the envisioned scenarios a large number of autonomous entities communicate in potentially unpredictable ways. Short-range wireless technologies form the basis of such communication platforms. In this paper we investigate device discovery in Bluetooth, a candidate wireless technology for ubiquitous computing. Detecting new devices

  16. Rendezvous Layer Protocols for Bluetooth-Enabled Smart Devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Siegemund; Michael Rohs

    2002-01-01

    Communication platforms for ubiquitous computing need to be flexible, self-organizing, highly scalable and energy efficient, because in the envisioned scenarios a large number of autonomous entities com- municate in potentially unpredictable ways. Short-range wireless technologies form the basis of such communi- cation platforms. In this paper we investigate device discovery in Bluetooth, a candidate wireless technology for ubiquitous computing. Detecting

  17. Optimizing the Earth-LISA "rendez-vous"

    E-print Network

    Fabrizio De Marchi; Giuseppe Pucacco; Massimo Bassan

    2011-07-14

    We present a general survey of heliocentric LISA orbits, hoping it might help in the exercise of rescoping the mission. We try to semi-analytically optimize the orbital parameters in order to minimize the disturbances coming from the Earth-LISA interaction. In a set of numerical simulations we include nonautonomous perturbations and provide an estimate of Doppler shift and breathing as a function of the trailing angle.

  18. Rendezvous with the World: Missouri Southern State University's Themed Semesters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbins, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Although most universities emphasize study abroad as the primary vehicle to internationalize the campus, in reality only a small percentage of students actually participate in this endeavor. The internationally themed semesters at Missouri Southern State University (MSSU) reach virtually every student, and provide a global perspective and cultural…

  19. Frozen-anomaly transformation for the elliptic rendezvous problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Javier; Peláez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    A new solution to relative motion on elliptical orbits is presented, based on a novel transformation from the reference state vector to the relative state vector. The relative orbit is constructed assuming that the anomaly, and not the time, is the invariant element throughout the transformation. This concept arises naturally from the variational form of anomaly-explicit formulations. In particular, this paper explores the capabilities of a formulation developed by Peláez et al. (Celest Mech Dyn Astron. 97, 131-150, 2007), called Dromo. This formulation exploits the advantages of the ideal reference frames and quaternionic descriptions of the orbital plane. The linear variational form of the equations of motion in Dromo is developed herein, and the resulting transformation matrix is presented. When applied to the reference state vector, this linear transformation provides the relative state vector at any step. The invariance in the anomaly implies a certain time delay in the results. Physical times for leader and follower do not coincide after the transformation. To recover the sense of the solution an additional correction is applied a posteriori to cancel this intrinsic time delay. The performance of the new transformation is compared against previous solutions to the problem through a set of numerical examples. Important error reductions in determining the relative orbit are observed in these tests.

  20. Orbital rendezvous using an Augmented Lambert Guidance scheme

    E-print Network

    MacLellan, Sara Jean

    2005-01-01

    The development of an Augmented Lambert Guidance Algorithm that matches the position and velocity of an orbiting target spacecraft is presented in this thesis. The Augmented Lambert Guidance Algorithm manipulates the inputs ...