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Sample records for tumor growth delay

  1. NOS Inhibition Modulates Immune Polarization and Improves Radiation-Induced Tumor Growth Delay.

    PubMed

    Ridnour, Lisa A; Cheng, Robert Y S; Weiss, Jonathan M; Kaur, Sukhbir; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Basudhar, Debashree; Heinecke, Julie L; Stewart, C Andrew; DeGraff, William; Sowers, Anastasia L; Thetford, Angela; Kesarwala, Aparna H; Roberts, David D; Young, Howard A; Mitchell, James B; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Wiltrout, Robert H; Wink, David A

    2015-07-15

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are important mediators of progrowth signaling in tumor cells, as they regulate angiogenesis, immune response, and immune-mediated wound healing. Ionizing radiation (IR) is also an immune modulator and inducer of wound response. We hypothesized that radiation therapeutic efficacy could be improved by targeting NOS following tumor irradiation. Herein, we show enhanced radiation-induced (10 Gy) tumor growth delay in a syngeneic model (C3H) but not immunosuppressed (Nu/Nu) squamous cell carcinoma tumor-bearing mice treated post-IR with the constitutive NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). These results suggest a requirement of T cells for improved radiation tumor response. In support of this observation, tumor irradiation induced a rapid increase in the immunosuppressive Th2 cytokine IL10, which was abated by post-IR administration of L-NAME. In vivo suppression of IL10 using an antisense IL10 morpholino also extended the tumor growth delay induced by radiation in a manner similar to L-NAME. Further examination of this mechanism in cultured Jurkat T cells revealed L-NAME suppression of IR-induced IL10 expression, which reaccumulated in the presence of exogenous NO donor. In addition to L-NAME, the guanylyl cyclase inhibitors ODQ and thrombospondin-1 also abated IR-induced IL10 expression in Jurkat T cells and ANA-1 macrophages, which further suggests that the immunosuppressive effects involve eNOS. Moreover, cytotoxic Th1 cytokines, including IL2, IL12p40, and IFN?, as well as activated CD8(+) T cells were elevated in tumors receiving post-IR L-NAME. Together, these results suggest that post-IR NOS inhibition improves radiation tumor response via Th1 immune polarization within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25990221

  2. Tumor growth delay studies in patients with multiple metastatic nodules: practical difficulties

    SciTech Connect

    Urtasun, R.C.; Band, P.; Ferri, H.

    1980-07-01

    The tumor growth delay assay is a well accepted technique in experimental animal tumor models for the measurement of response to treatment when comparing new treatment modalities. Patients have several measurabe metastatic nodules provide a good opportunity to measure the effects of new treatments as the patient can be used as his own matched control. Regression and regrowth of the treated lesions can be measured and differences can be assessed in terms of growth delay. The present material consists of a group of patients treated with fixed, single doses of radiation and single doses of the radiosensitizer, Metronidazole. The same amount of radiation was delivered to the test and control lesions; the test lesion was treated in combination with the drug. An unexpected high number of invalidations and occasional lack of reproducibility have been encountered with the first six patients. Investigation using this mehod for the first time should be aware of some of its pitfalls.

  3. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation. PMID:26276694

  4. Silencing of Doublecortin-Like (DCL) Results in Decreased Mitochondrial Activity and Delayed Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Carla S.; Elands, Rachel; Cheng, Sou; Saaltink, Dirk-Jan; ter Horst, Judith P.; Alme, Maria N.; Pont, Chantal; van de Water, Bob; Hvik, Bjarte; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.; Vreugdenhil, Erno

    2013-01-01

    Doublecortin-like (DCL) is a microtubule-binding protein crucial for neuroblastoma (NB) cell proliferation. We have investigated whether the anti-proliferative effect of DCL knockdown is linked to reduced mitochondrial activity. We found a delay in tumor development after DCL knockdown in vivo in doxycycline-inducible NB tumor xenografts. To understand the mechanisms underlying this tumor growth retardation we performed a series of in vitro experiments in NB cell lines. DCL colocalizes with mitochondria, interacts with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein OMP25/ SYNJ2BP and DCL knockdown results in decreased expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, DCL knockdown decreases cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. We identified the C-terminal Serine/Proline-rich domain and the second microtubule-binding area as crucial DCL domains for the regulation of cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. Furthermore, DCL knockdown causes a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of NB cells under an energetic challenge induced by low glucose availability. Together with our previous studies, our results corroborate DCL as a key player in NB tumor growth in which DCL controls not only mitotic spindle formation and the stabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, but also regulates mitochondrial activity and energy availability, which makes DCL a promising molecular target for NB therapy. PMID:24086625

  5. Inhibition of vacuolar ATPase subunit in tumor cells delays tumor growth by decreasing the essential macrophage population in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Katara, G K; Kulshrestha, A; Jaiswal, M K; Pamarthy, S; Gilman-Sachs, A; Beaman, K D

    2016-02-25

    In cancer cells, vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a multi-subunit enzyme, is expressed on the plasma as well as vesicular membranes and critically influences metastatic behavior. The soluble, cleaved N-terminal domain of V-ATPase a2 isoform is associated with in vitro induction of tumorigenic characteristics in macrophages. This activity led us to further investigate its in vivo role in cancer progression by inhibition of a2 isoform (a2V) in tumor cells and the concomitant effect on tumor microenvironment in the mouse 4T-1 breast cancer model. Results showed that macrophages cocultivated with a2V knockdown (sh-a2) 4T-1 cells produce lower amounts of tumorigenic factors in vitro and have reduced ability to suppress T-cell activation and proliferation compared with control 4T-1 cells. Data analysis showed a delayed mammary tumor growth in Balb/c mice inoculated with sh-a2 4T-1 cells compared with control. The purified CD11b(+) macrophages from sh-a2 tumors showed a reduced expression of mannose receptor-1 (CD206), interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-?, arginase-1, matrix metalloproteinase and vascular endothelial growth factor. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor-infiltrated macrophages showed a significantly low number of F4/80(+)CD11c(+)CD206(+) macrophages in sh-a2 tumors compared with control. In sh-a2 tumors, most of the macrophages were F4/80(+)CD11c(+) (antitumor M1 macrophages) suggesting it to be the reason behind delayed tumor growth. Additionally, tumor-infiltrating macrophages from sh-a2 tumors showed a reduced expression of CD206 compared with control whereas CD11c expression was unaffected. These findings demonstrate that in the absence of a2V in tumor cells, the resident macrophage population in the tumor microenvironment is altered which affects in vivo tumor growth. We suggest that by involving the host immune system, tumor growth can be controlled through targeting of a2V on tumor cells. PMID:25961933

  6. Silencing of Foxp3 delays the growth of murine melanomas and modifies the tumor immunosuppressive environment

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Molina, Moisés A; Miranda-Hernández, Diana F; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Coronado-Cerda, Erika E; Sierra-Rivera, Crystel A; Saavedra-Alonso, Santiago; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression was believed to be specific for T-regulatory cells but has recently been described in non-hematopoietic cells from different tissue origins and in tumor cells from both epithelial and non-epithelial tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of Foxp3 in murine melanoma. The B16F10 cell line Foxp3 silenced with small interference Foxp3 plasmid transfection was established and named B16F10.1. These cells had lower levels of Foxp3 mRNA (quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [0.235-fold]), protein (flow cytometry [0.02%]), CD25+ expression (0.06%), cellular proliferation (trypan blue staining), and interleukin (IL)-2 production (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [72.35 pg/mL]) than those in B16F10 wild-type (WT) cells (P<0.05). Subcutaneous inoculation of the B16F10.1 cell line into C57BL/6 mice delayed the time of visible tumor appearance, increased the time of survival, and affected the weight of tumors, and also decreased the production of IL-10, IL-2, and transforming growth factor beta compared with mice inoculated with the B16F10 WT cell line. The B16F10.1 cells derived from tumors and free of T-cells (isolated by Dynabeads and plastic attachment) expressed relatively lower levels of Foxp3 and CD25+ than B16F10 WT cells (P<0.05) in a time-dependent manner. The population of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of T CD4+ cells (CD4+, CD4+CD25+, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) increased in a time-dependent manner (P<0.05) in tumors derived from B16F10 WT cells and decreased in tumors derived from B16F10.1 cells. Similar data were obtained from spleen cells. These results suggest that, in melanomas, Foxp3 partly induces tumor growth by modifying the immune system at the local and peripheral level, shifting the environment toward an immunosuppressive profile. Therapies incorporating this transcription factor could be strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:26834483

  7. Silencing of Foxp3 delays the growth of murine melanomas and modifies the tumor immunosuppressive environment.

    PubMed

    Franco-Molina, Moiss A; Miranda-Hernndez, Diana F; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Coronado-Cerda, Erika E; Sierra-Rivera, Crystel A; Saavedra-Alonso, Santiago; Tamz-Guerra, Reyes S; Rodrguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression was believed to be specific for T-regulatory cells but has recently been described in non-hematopoietic cells from different tissue origins and in tumor cells from both epithelial and non-epithelial tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of Foxp3 in murine melanoma. The B16F10 cell line Foxp3 silenced with small interference Foxp3 plasmid transfection was established and named B16F10.1. These cells had lower levels of Foxp3 mRNA (quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [0.235-fold]), protein (flow cytometry [0.02%]), CD25(+) expression (0.06%), cellular proliferation (trypan blue staining), and interleukin (IL)-2 production (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [72.35 pg/mL]) than those in B16F10 wild-type (WT) cells (P<0.05). Subcutaneous inoculation of the B16F10.1 cell line into C57BL/6 mice delayed the time of visible tumor appearance, increased the time of survival, and affected the weight of tumors, and also decreased the production of IL-10, IL-2, and transforming growth factor beta compared with mice inoculated with the B16F10 WT cell line. The B16F10.1 cells derived from tumors and free of T-cells (isolated by Dynabeads and plastic attachment) expressed relatively lower levels of Foxp3 and CD25(+) than B16F10 WT cells (P<0.05) in a time-dependent manner. The population of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of T CD4(+) cells (CD4(+), CD4(+)CD25(+), and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)) increased in a time-dependent manner (P<0.05) in tumors derived from B16F10 WT cells and decreased in tumors derived from B16F10.1 cells. Similar data were obtained from spleen cells. These results suggest that, in melanomas, Foxp3 partly induces tumor growth by modifying the immune system at the local and peripheral level, shifting the environment toward an immunosuppressive profile. Therapies incorporating this transcription factor could be strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:26834483

  8. STI571 (Gleevec) improves tumor growth delay and survival in irradiated mouse models of glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Geng Ling; Shinohara, Eric T.; Kim, Dong; Tan Jiahuai; Osusky, Kate; Shyr, Yu; Hallahan, Dennis E. . E-mail: Dennis.Hallahan@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a devastating brain neoplasm that is essentially incurable. Although radiation therapy prolongs survival, GBMs progress within areas of irradiation. Recent studies in invertebrates have shown that STI571 (Gleevec; Novartis, East Hanover, NJ) enhances the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the effectiveness of STI571 in combination with radiation was studied in mouse models of GBM. Methods and Materials: Murine GL261 and human D54 GBM cell lines formed tumors in brains and hind limbs of C57BL6 and nude mice, respectively. GL261 and D54 cells were treated with 5 {mu}mol/L of STI571 for 1 h and/or irradiated with 3 Gy. Protein was analyzed by Western immunoblots probed with antibodies to caspase 3, cleaved caspase 3, phospho-Akt, Akt, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) {alpha} and {beta}. Tumor volumes were assessed in mice bearing GL261 or D54 tumors treated with 21 Gy administered in seven fractionated doses. Histologic sections from STI571-treated mice were stained with phospho-Akt and phospho-PDGFR {beta} antibodies. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to study the response of mice bearing intracranial implants of GL261. Results: STI571 penetrated the blood-brain barrier, which resulted in a reduction in phospho-PDGFR in GBM. STI571-induced apoptosis in GBM was significantly enhanced by irradiation. STI571 combined with irradiation induced caspase 3 cleavage in GBM cells. Glioblastoma multiforme response to therapy correlated with an increase in tumor growth delay and survival when STI571 was administered in conjunction with daily irradiation. Conclusion: These findings suggest that STI571 has the potential to augment radiotherapy and thereby improve median survival.

  9. Delayed growth

    MedlinePLUS

    Growth - slow (child 0 - 5 years); Weight gain - slow (child 0 - 5 years); Slow rate of growth; Retarded growth and development; ... A child should have regular, well-baby check-ups with a health care provider. These checkups are usually scheduled ...

  10. Irradiation combined with SU5416: Microvascular changes and growth delay in a human xenograft glioblastoma tumor line

    SciTech Connect

    Schuuring, Janneke; Bussink, Johan . E-mail: J.Bussink@rther.umcn.nl; Bernsen, Hans; Peeters, Wenny; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and the antiangiogenic compound SU5416 was tested and compared with irradiation alone in a human glioblastoma tumor line xenografted in nude mice. The aim of this study was to monitor microenvironmental changes and growth delay. Methods and materials: A human glioblastoma xenograft tumor line was implanted in nude mice. Irradiations consisted of 10 Gy or 20 Gy with and without SU5416. Several microenvironmental parameters (tumor cell hypoxia, tumor blood perfusion, vascular volume, and microvascular density) were analyzed after imunohistochemical staining. Tumor growth delay was monitored for up to 200 days after treatment. Results: SU5416, when combined with irradiation, has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation alone. Analysis of the tumor microenvironment showed a decreased vascular density during treatment with SU5416. In tumors regrowing after reaching only a partial remission, vascular characteristics normalized shortly after cessation of SU5416. However, in tumors regrowing after reaching a complete remission, permanent microenvironmental changes and an increase of tumor necrosis with a subsequent slower tumor regrowth was found. Conclusions: Permanent vascular changes were seen after combined treatment resulting in complete remission. Antiangiogenic treatment with SU5416 when combined with irradiation has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation or antiangiogenic treatment alone.

  11. AZD1480 delays tumor growth in a melanoma model while enhancing the suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Maenhout, Sarah K.; Four, Stephanie Du; Corthals, Jurgen; Neyns, Bart; Thielemans, Kris; Aerts, Joeri L.

    2014-01-01

    AZD1480 is a potent, competitive small-molecule inhibitor of JAK1/2 kinase which inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and tumor growth. Here we investigated the effects of AZD1480 on the function of different immune cell populations in a melanoma model. When MO4 tumor-bearing mice were treated with AZD1480 we observed a strong inhibition of tumor growth as well as a prolonged survival. Moreover, a significant decrease in the percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) was observed after treatment with AZD1480. However, AZD1480 enhanced the suppressive capacity of murine MDSCs while at the same time impairing the proliferative as well as the IFN-? secretion capacity of murine T cells. The addition of AZD1480 to co-cultures of human MDSCs and T cells does not affect the suppressive activity of MDSCs but it does reduce the IFN-? secretion and the proliferative capacity of T cells. We showed that although AZD1480 has the ability to delay the tumor growth of MO4 tumor-bearing mice, this drug has detrimental effects on several aspects of the immune system. These data indicate that systemic targeting of the JAK/STAT pathway by JAK1/2 inhibition can have divergent effects on tumor growth and anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:25149535

  12. Lysates of S. pyogenes serotype M49 induce pancreatic tumor growth delay by specific and unspecific antitumor immune responses.

    PubMed

    Linnebacher, Michael; Maletzki, Claudia; Emmrich, Jrg; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2008-10-01

    Treatment of pancreatic cancer by active unspecific bacterial immunotherapy is a promising new strategy. Recently, we showed that a single intratumoral injection of wildtype Streptococcus pyogenes M49 results in complete regression of pancreatic carcinoma in mice mediated both by unspecific cytotoxicity and by specific immune reactions against tumor cells. As for potential clinical use, conditioning and especially inactivation of bacteria would abolish the risk of systemic bacterial infections; we here explored the potential of a streptococcal lysate prepared by bacteriophage lysine to affect pancreatic carcinoma growth in vivo. Application of the lysate into established Panc02 tumors resulted in pronounced growth cessation accompanied by raises in levels of circulating monocytes, granulocytes, and natural killer cells. Detailed analysis of splenocyte subsets revealed lysate-induced transient increases in pre-B cells followed by raised levels of activated T cells. Moreover, blood levels of proinflammatory, T helper-1-type cytokines were significantly elevated. These systemic immunologic effects were accompanied by massive infiltrations of cytotoxic T cells into the tumors. Concomitantly, lymphocytes obtained from treated mice specifically recognized Panc02 tumor cells in IFN-gamma-enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot and in cellular cytotoxicity assays. In rechallenge experiments, these immunologic effector cells were found to delay, but not completely prevent growth of secondary tumors. However, when considering the notoriously depressed immune status of individuals suffering from pancreatic carcinoma, the orchestrated antitumoral immune responses we analyzed here in detail significantly strengthen the potential usefulness of microbial compounds as active unspecific immunotherapeutic agent for treatment of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:18779749

  13. Aspirin delays mesothelioma growth by inhibiting HMGB1-mediated tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H; Pellegrini, L; Napolitano, A; Giorgi, C; Jube, S; Preti, A; Jennings, C J; De Marchis, F; Flores, E G; Larson, D; Pagano, I; Tanji, M; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Gaudino, G; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Pinton, P; Bianchi, M E; Carbone, M

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory molecule that has a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces the incidence, metastatic potential and mortality of many inflammation-induced cancers. We hypothesized that ASA may exert anticancer properties in MM by abrogating the carcinogenic effects of HMGB1. Using HMGB1-secreting and -non-secreting human MM cell lines, we determined whether aspirin inhibited the hallmarks of HMGB1-induced MM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrated that ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), inhibit motility, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony formation of MM cells via a novel HMGB1-mediated mechanism. ASA/SA, at serum concentrations comparable to those achieved in humans taking therapeutic doses of aspirin, and BoxA, a specific inhibitor of HMGB1, markedly reduced MM growth in xenograft mice and significantly improved survival of treated animals. The effects of ASA and BoxA were cyclooxygenase-2 independent and were not additive, consistent with both acting via inhibition of HMGB1 activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the well documented, yet poorly understood antitumorigenic activity of aspirin, which we show proceeds via HMGB1 inhibition. Moreover, the use of BoxA appears to allow a more efficient HMGB1 targeting while eluding the known gastrointestinal side effects of ASA. Our findings are directly relevant to MM. Given the emerging importance of HMGB1 and its tumor-promoting functions in many cancer types, and of aspirin in cancer prevention and therapy, our investigation is poised to provide broadly applicable information. PMID:26068794

  14. Correlation Between Tumor Growth Delay and Expression of Cancer and Host VEGF, VEGFR2, and Osteopontin in Response to Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solberg, Timothy D.; Nearman, Jessica; Mullins, John; Li Sicong; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the late effects of radiotherapy (RT) on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2), and osteopontin (OPN) expression in cancer and stromal cells. Methods and Materials: LS174T xenografted athymic mice were used as a tumor model. Radiation was delivered in two equivalent fractionation schemes: 5 x 7 Gy and 1 x 20 Gy, the latter at two dose rates. Results: Tumor growth arrest was similar in all treatment groups, with the exception of a better response of small-size tumors in the 5 x 7-Gy group. The host VEGF and OPN levels were directly proportional to the tumor doubling time and were independent of the fractionation scheme. The host and cancer cell VEGFR2 levels in tumor were also directly related to the tumor response to RT. Conclusion: Upregulated VEGFR2 in cancer cells suggest paracrine signaling in the VEGFR2 pathway of cancer cells as the factor contributing to RT failure. The transient activation of the host VEGF/VEGFR2 pathway in tumor supports the model of angiogenic regeneration and suggests that radiation-induced upregulation of VEGF, VEGFR2, and downstream proteins might contribute to RT failure by escalating the rate of vascular repair. Coexpression of host OPN and VEGF, two factors closely associated with angiogenesis, indicate that OPN can serve as a surrogate marker of tumor recovery after RT. Taken together, these results strongly support the notion that to achieve optimal therapeutic outcomes, the scheduling of RT and antiangiogenic therapies will require patient-specific post-treatment monitoring of the VEGF/VEGFR2 pathway and that tumor-associated OPN can serve as an indicator of tumor regrowth.

  15. Multiple Delivery of siRNA against Endoglin into Murine Mammary Adenocarcinoma Prevents Angiogenesis and Delays Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dolinsek, Tanja; Markelc, Bostjan; Sersa, Gregor; Coer, Andrej; Stimac, Monika; Lavrencak, Jaka; Brozic, Andreja; Kranjc, Simona; Cemazar, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Endoglin is a transforming growth factor-? (TGF- ?) co-receptor that participates in the activation of a signaling pathway that mediates endothelial cell proliferation and migration in angiogenic tumor vasculature. Therefore, silencing of endoglin expression is an attractive approach for antiangiogenic therapy of tumors. The aim of our study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules against endoglin in vitro and in vivo. Therapeutic potential in vitro was assessed in human and murine endothelial cells (HMEC-1, 2H11) by determining endoglin expression level, cell proliferation and tube formation. In vivo, the therapeutic potential of siRNA molecules was evaluated in TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma growing in BALB/c mice. Results of our study showed that siRNA molecules against endoglin have a good antiangiogenic therapeutic potential in vitro, as expression of endoglin mRNA and protein levels in mouse and human microvascular endothelial cells after lipofection were efficiently reduced, which resulted in the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. In vivo, silencing of endoglin with triple electrotransfer of siRNA molecules into TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma also significantly reduced the mRNA levels, number of tumor blood vessels and the growth of tumors. The obtained results demonstrate that silencing of endoglin is a promising antiangiogenic therapy of tumors that could not be used as single treatment, but as an adjunct to the established cytotoxic treatment approaches. PMID:23593103

  16. Cordycepin-enriched Cordyceps militaris induces immunomodulation and tumor growth delay in mouse-derived breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Min-Ho; Lee, Chang-Min; Lee, Sang-Wha; Seo, Su-Yeong; Seo, Min-Jeong; Kang, Byoung-Won; Jeong, Yong-Kee; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Yang, Kwang-Mo; Jo, Wol-Soon

    2013-10-01

    Cordyceps militaris (C. militaris) and its main functional component, cordycepin, has been shown to possess a number of pharmacological activities including immunological stimulation and antitumor effects. However, the pharmacological mechanisms of C. militaris on tumor immunity underlying its antitumor effect have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we evaluated the antitumor and immunomodulatory effects of C.militaris on FM3A tumor-bearing C3H/He mice, comparing wild-type C. militaris and cordycepin-enriched C.militaris (JLM 0636). The concentration of cordycepin produced by crossbred JLM 0636 was 7.42mg/g dry weight, which was 7-fold higher than that of wild-type C. militaris. Dietary administration of C. militaris revealed retardation of tumor growth as well as elongation of survival rates of tumor-bearing mice. This effect was more pronounced in JLM0636. There was a cordycepin-dependent decrease in IL-2 and TGF-? secretion and an increase in IL-4 secretion without changes in the proliferative responses of concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes, which suggested that C. militaris feeding might induce changes in the subpopulations of tumor-derived Tlymphocytes. CD4+CD25+ cell population was significantly reduced in the total splenocytes from JLM 0636-administered mice, while CD4+ T cell population remained unchanged. FoxP3+-expressing Treg cells among CD4+CD25+ population showed a similar pattern. On the contrary, CD8+ T cells as well as the IFN-? expressing CD8+ T cells from tumor-bearing mice were significantly upregulated by the administration of JLM 0636. These results demonstrated the suppressive role of JLM 0636 on the function of Treg cells contributing to tumor specific IFN-?-expressing CD8+ T cell responses in tumor-bearing mice, which explained the underlying mechanism of the antitumor immunity of cordycepin. Therefore, cordycepin-enriched C. militaris is a promising candidate for an adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23921598

  17. Knockdown of platinum-induced growth differentiation factor 15 abrogates p27-mediated tumor growth delay in the chemoresistant ovarian cancer model A2780cis

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Julia C; Haendler, Bernard; Seidel, Henrik; Groth, Philip; Adams, Robert; Ziegelbauer, Karl; Kreft, Bertolt; Beckmann, Georg; Sommer, Anette; Kopitz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to platinum-based treatment in patients with ovarian cancer remain poorly understood. This is mainly due to the lack of appropriate in vivo models allowing the identification of resistance-related factors. In this study, we used human whole-genome microarrays and linear model analysis to identify potential resistance-related genes by comparing the expression profiles of the parental human ovarian cancer model A2780 and its platinum-resistant variant A2780cis before and after carboplatin treatment in vivo. Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) was identified as one of five potential resistance-related genes in the A2780cis tumor model. Although A2780-bearing mice showed a strong carboplatin-induced increase of GDF15 plasma levels, the basal higher GDF15 plasma levels of A2780cis-bearing mice showed no further increase after short-term or long-term carboplatin treatment. This correlated with a decreased DNA damage response, enhanced AKT survival signaling and abrogated cell cycle arrest in the carboplatin-treated A2780cis tumors. Furthermore, knockdown of GDF15 in A2780cis cells did not alter cell proliferation but enhanced cell migration and colony size in vitro. Interestingly, in vivo knockdown of GDF15 in the A2780cis model led to a basal-enhanced tumor growth, but increased sensitivity to carboplatin treatment as compared to the control-transduced A2780cis tumors. This was associated with larger necrotic areas, a lobular tumor structure and increased p53 and p16 expression of the carboplatin-treated shGDF15-A2780cis tumors. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated GDF15 knockdown abrogated p27 expression as compared to control-transduced A2780cis tumors. In conclusion, these data show that GDF15 may contribute to carboplatin resistance by suppressing tumor growth through p27. These data show that GDF15 might serve as a novel treatment target in women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25490861

  18. Inhibition of ILK in PTEN-mutant human glioblastomas inhibits PKB/Akt activation, induces apoptosis, and delays tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Lincoln A; Thiessen, B; Dragowska, Wieslawa H; Daynard, Tim; Bally, Marcel B; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2005-05-19

    The tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) regulates the phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway and has been shown to correlate with poor prognosis in high-grade astrocytomas when mutational inactivation or loss of the PTEN gene occurs. PTEN mutation leads to constitutive activation of protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt with phosphorylation at the PKB/Akt sites Thr-308 and Ser-473. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) has been shown to regulate PKB/Akt activity with the loss of PTEN in prostate cancer. We now demonstrate that ILK activity regulates PKB/Akt activity in glioblastoma cells. The activity of ILK is constitutively elevated in a serum-independent manner in PTEN mutant cells, and transfection of wild-type PTEN under the control of an inducible promoter into mutant PTEN cells inhibits ILK activity. Transfection of ILK antisense (ILKAS) or exposure to a small-molecule ILK inhibitor suppresses the constitutive phosphorylation of PKB/Akt on Ser-473 in PTEN-mutant glioblastoma cell lines. In addition, the delivery of ILKAS to PTEN-negative glioblastoma cells resulted in apoptosis. Rag-2M mice bearing established ( approximately 100 mg) human U87MG glioblastoma tumors, treated QD x 5 for 3 consecutive weeks with ILKAS (i.p. 5 mg/kg), exhibited stable disease with < or =7% increase in tumor volume over the 3-week course of treatment. In contrast, animals treated with an oligonucleotide control or saline exhibited a >100% increase in tumor volume over the same time period. Our initial results indicate that therapeutic strategies targeting ILK may be beneficial in the treatment of glioblastomas. PMID:15782140

  19. In vivo studies in NCT with a boronated porphyrin and tumor growth delay as an end point

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, B.H. State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY . Dept. of Radiation Oncology); Kahl, S.B. . Dept. of Pharmaceutical Chemistry); Warkentien, L.; Bond, V.P. )

    1992-01-01

    The robust carrying capacity of the porphyrin molecule and its propensity for localizing in tumor justified the synthesizing of a porphyrin labeled with boron for use in BNCT. However, problems associated with poor solubility impeded the utility of the molecule. Until BOPP was synthesized porphyrins were promising, but impractical. After in vitro experiments had demonstrated the biological efficacy of BOPP and had confirmed its intracellular localizing ability in vivo studies were carried out using mice. Irradiation of KHJJ murine mammary carcinoma to the TCD[sub 50] in a single fraction was precluded since this whole body dose is lethal. This problem was overcome by the use of radiation. BOPP was administered either as three 0.5 ml injections per day over two days or by continuous i.v. infusion, 2 ml per day over three days for a total dose of about 42 [mu]g [sup 10]B/gbw. Boron-10 distribution in the tumor at the time of irradiation was [approximately]20 [mu]g.

  20. In vivo studies in NCT with a boronated porphyrin and tumor growth delay as an end point

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, B.H. |; Kahl, S.B.; Warkentien, L.; Bond, V.P.

    1992-12-31

    The robust carrying capacity of the porphyrin molecule and its propensity for localizing in tumor justified the synthesizing of a porphyrin labeled with boron for use in BNCT. However, problems associated with poor solubility impeded the utility of the molecule. Until BOPP was synthesized porphyrins were promising, but impractical. After in vitro experiments had demonstrated the biological efficacy of BOPP and had confirmed its intracellular localizing ability in vivo studies were carried out using mice. Irradiation of KHJJ murine mammary carcinoma to the TCD{sub 50} in a single fraction was precluded since this whole body dose is lethal. This problem was overcome by the use of radiation. BOPP was administered either as three 0.5 ml injections per day over two days or by continuous i.v. infusion, 2 ml per day over three days for a total dose of about 42 {mu}g {sup 10}B/gbw. Boron-10 distribution in the tumor at the time of irradiation was {approximately}20 {mu}g.

  1. Delayed tumor onset and reduced tumor growth progression after immunization with a Her-2/neu multi-peptide vaccine and IL-12 in c-neu transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan; Jasinska, Joanna; Breiteneder, Heimo; Kundi, Michael; Pehamberger, Hubert; Scheiner, Otto; Zielinski, Christoph C; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2007-11-01

    Passive immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies is a routinely performed but cost intensive treatment against certain cancers. Induction of humoral anti-tumor responses by active peptide immunization has therefore become a favorable treatment concept. We have recently identified three peptides representing B-cell epitopes of the extracellular domain of Her-2/neu each of them inducing Her-2/neu specific immune responses with anti-tumor activity in vitro. The present study was performed to evaluate the in vivo protective capacity of a combined vaccination with these three peptides in FVB/N transgenic mice spontaneously developing c-neu overexpressing breast cancers. The three Her-2/neu peptides coupled to tetanus toxoid were administered with or without addition of recombinant IL-12. At the time all untreated mice had developed tumors about 40% of peptide-immunized mice and nearly 60% of mice immunized with the peptide vaccine co-applied with IL-12 remained tumor free. Moreover, co-administration of IL-12 had a significant impact on the retardation of tumor progression. The enhanced anti-tumor efficacy of the vaccine by IL-12 was associated with a Th1 biased immune response as demonstrated by an increased IFN-gamma production in vitro and elevated Her-2-specific IgG levels. Our findings clearly demonstrate that this multi-peptide vaccine is effective in tumor prevention and support its use against minimal disease, drug-resistant tumors or even for prophylaxis against cancers overexpressing Her-2/neu. PMID:17203384

  2. Growth factors in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuejing; Nie, Daotai; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2012-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in tumor initiation and progression. Components in the microenvironment can modulate the growth of tumor cells, their ability to progress and metastasize. A major venue of communication between tumor cells and their microenvironment is through polypeptide growth factors and receptors for these growth factors. This article discusses three major classes of growth-stimulatory polypeptide growth factors and receptors for these growth factors. It also discusses how deregulation of these growth factors or their receptors can drive malignant transformation and progression. PMID:20036812

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Tumor Growth

    Cancer.gov

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGF1R) is over-expressed by many tumors and mediates proliferation, motility, and protection from apoptosis. Agents that inhibit IGF1R expression or function can potentially block tumor growth and metastasis. Its major ligands, IGF-I, and IGF-II are over-expressed by multiple tumor types.

  4. The TCD[sub 50] and regrowth delay assay in human tumor xenografts: Differences and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Budach, W.; Budach, V.; Stuschke, M.; Dinges, S.; Sack, H. )

    1993-01-15

    The response to irradiation of five human xenograft cell lines - a malignant paraganglioma, a neurogenic sarcoma, a malignant histiocytoma, a primary lymphoma of the brain, and a squamous cell carcinoma - were tested in nude mice. All mice underwent 5 Gy whole body irradiation prior to xenotransplantation to minimize the residual immune response. The subcutaneous tumors were irradiated at a tumor volume of 120 mm[sup 3] under acutely hypoxic conditions with single doses between 8 Gy and 80 Gy depending on the expected radiation sensitivity of the tumor line. Endpoints of the study were the tumor control dose 50% (TCD[sub 50]) and the regrowth delay endpoints growth delay, specific growth delay, and the tumor bed effect corrected specific growth delay. Specific growth delay and corrected specific growth delay at 76% of the TCD[sub 50] was used in order to compare the data to previously published data from spheroids. The lowest TCD[sub 50] was found in the lymphoma with 24.9 Gy, whereas the TCD[sub 50] of the soft tissue sarcomas and the squamous cell carcinoma ranged from 57.8 Gy to 65.6 Gy. The isoeffective dose levels for the induction of 30 days growth delay, a specific growth delay of 3, and a corrected specific growth delay of 3 ranged from 15.5 Gy (ECL1) to 37.1 Gy (FADU), from 7.2 Gy (ENE2) to 45.6 Gy (EPG1) and from 9.2 Gy (ENE2) to 37.6 Gy (EPG1), respectively. The corrected specific growth delay at 76% of the TCD[sub 50] was correlated with the number of tumor rescue units per 100 cells in spheroids, which was available for three tumor lines, and with the tumor doubling time in xenografts (n = 5). The TCD[sub 50] values corresponded better to the clinical experience than the regrowth delay data. There was no correlation between TCD[sub 50] and any of the regrowth delay endpoints. This missing correlation was most likely a result of large differences in the number of tumor rescue units in human xenografts of the same size.

  5. Periodic and chaotic oscillations in a tumor and immune system interaction model with three delays

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Ping; Center for Partial Differential Equations, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200241 ; Ruan, Shigui; Zhang, Xinan

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, a tumor and immune system interaction model consisted of two differential equations with three time delays is considered in which the delays describe the proliferation of tumor cells, the process of effector cells growth stimulated by tumor cells, and the differentiation of immune effector cells, respectively. Conditions for the asymptotic stability of equilibria and existence of Hopf bifurcations are obtained by analyzing the roots of a second degree exponential polynomial characteristic equation with delay dependent coefficients. It is shown that the positive equilibrium is asymptotically stable if all three delays are less than their corresponding critical values and Hopf bifurcations occur if any one of these delays passes through its critical value. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the rich dynamical behavior of the model with different delay values including the existence of regular and irregular long periodic oscillations.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor Cell Growth and Immune System Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Fathalla A.; Safan, Muntaser; Abdeen, Mohamed A.; Abdel-Rahman, Duaa H.

    In this paper, we provide a family of ordinary and delay differential equations to describe the dynamics of tumor-growth and immunotherapy interactions. We explore the effects of adoptive cellular immunotherapy on the model and describe under what circumstances the tumor can be eliminated. The possibility of clearing the tumor, with a strategy, is based on two parameters in the model: the rate of influx of the effector cells, and the rate of influx of IL2. The critical tumor-growth rate, below which endemic tumor does not exist, has been found. One can use the model to make predictions about tumor-dormancy.

  7. Stochastic resonance in a tumor-immune system subject to bounded noises and time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most recent approaches in cancer therapy. A mathematical model of tumor-immune interaction, subject to a periodic immunotherapy treatment (imitated by a periodic signal), correlative and bounded stochastic fluctuations and time delays, is investigated by numerical simulations for its signal power amplification (SPA). Within the tailored parameter regime, the synchronous response of tumor growth to the immunotherapy, stochastic resonance (SR), versus both the noises and delays is obtained. The details are as follows (i) the peak values of SPA versus the noise intensity (A) in the proliferation term of tumor cells decrease as the frequency of periodic signal increases, i.e. an increase of the frequency restrains the SR; (ii) an increase of the amplitude of periodic signal restrains the SR versus A, but boosts up the SR versus the noise intensity B in the immune term; (iii) there is an optimum cross-correlated degree between the two bounded noises, at which the system exhibits the strongest SR versus the delay time τα(the reaction time of tumor cell population to their surrounding environment constraints); (iv) upon increasing the delay time τα, double SR versus the delay time τβ (the time taken by both the tumor antigen identification and tumor-stimulated proliferation of effectors) emerges. These results may be helpful for an immunotherapy treatment for the sufferer.

  8. Hybrid Models of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Rejniak, Katarzyna A.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is a complex, multiscale process, in which genetic mutations occurring at a subcellular level manifest themselves as functional changes at the cellular and tissue scale. The multiscale nature of cancer requires mathematical modeling approaches that can handle multiple intra- and extracellular factors acting on different time and space scales. Hybrid models provide a way to integrate both discrete and continuous variables that are used to represent individual cells and concentration or density fields, respectively. Each discrete cell can also be equipped with sub-models that drive cell behavior in response to microenvironmental cues. Moreover, the individual cells can interact with one another to form and act as an integrated tissue. Hybrid models form part of a larger class of individual-based-models that can naturally connect with tumor cell biology and allow for the integration of multiple interacting variables both intrinsically and extrinsically and are therefore perfectly suited to a systems biology approach to tumor growth. PMID:21064037

  9. Angiogenesis inhibitor DC101 delays growth of intracerebral glioblastoma but induces morbidity when combined with irradiation.

    PubMed

    Verhoeff, Joost J C; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Troost, Dirk; Ramkema, Marja D; van Bree, Chris; Song, Ji-Ying; Donker, Mila; Chekenya, Martha; Vandertop, W Peter; Richel, Dick J; van Furth, Wouter R

    2009-11-18

    The combination of irradiation with angiogenic inhibition is increasingly being investigated for treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We investigated whether vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) inhibitor DC101 affects morbidity and tumor growth in irradiated and non-irradiated intracerebral GBM-bearing mice, controlled with sham treatments. End-points were toxicity, morbidity and histology. Irradiation either or not combined, reduced tumor size strongly, whereas DC101 mono-treatment reduced tumor size by 64%. Irradiation delayed morbidity from 5.8 weeks in sham-treated mice to 10.3 weeks. Morbidity after combined treatment occurred after 5.9 weeks. Treatment with angiogenesis inhibitor DC101 delays tumor growth but it induces morbidity, by itself or combined with irradiation. PMID:19473756

  10. Discrete or distributed delay? Effects on stability of population growth.

    PubMed

    Beretta, Edoardo; Breda, Dimitri

    2016-02-01

    The growth of a population subject to maturation delay is modeled by using either a discrete delay or a delay continuously distributed over the population. The occurrence of stability switches (stable-unstable-stable) of the positive equilibrium as the delay increases is investigated in both cases. Necessary and sufficient conditions are provided by analyzing the relevant characteristic equations. It is shown that for any choice of parameter values for which the discrete delay model presents stability switches there exists a maximum delay variance beyond which no switch occurs for the continuous delay model: the delay variance has a stabilizing effect. Moreover, it is illustrated how, in the presence of switches, the unstable delay domain is as larger as lower is the ratio between the juveniles and the adults mortality rates. PMID:26776255

  11. Sunscreens for delay of ultraviolet induction of skin tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Wulf, H.C.; Poulsen, T.; Brodthagen, H.; Hou-Jensen, K.

    1982-08-01

    Sunscreens with different sun protection factors (SPFs) have been tested for their capability of delaying or preventing actinic damage and skin cancer development in groups of hairless, pigmented mice exposed to artificial ultraviolet (UV) light of increasing intensity. The dose delivered was less than or equal to 1 minimal erythema dose (MED) in the group of untreated mice, so that the mice to which sunscreens were applied never obtained a sunburn after UV exposure. The quality of UV light was similar to bright midday sun at a latitude of 56 degrees (city of Copenhagen). Tumorigenesis was demonstrated to be delayed corresponding to the SPF claimed by the manufacturer, but almost all of the UV-irradiated mice developed skin tumors. Histologic examination revealed actinic degeneration and tumors of squamous cell type with marked variation in differentiation. Metastases to lymph nodes and lungs were found in only 10%. Toxic reactions, such as eczematous-like skin reactions, dark coloring, and amyloidosis, were observed predominantly in the group treated with the sunscreen of highest SPF value. Long-term investigations seem to be necessary to unveil these problems--in particular, the specific SPF value, in sunscreens, that should be recommended to the public for prevention or delay of actinic damage and/or cancer development.

  12. Cancer Progression and Tumor Growth Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, Krastan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wilkerson, Julia; Sprinkhuizen, Sara; Song, Yi-Qiao; Bates, Susan; Rosen, Bruce; Fojo, Tito

    2013-03-01

    We present and analyze tumor growth data from prostate and brain cancer. Scaling the data from different patients shows that early stage prostate tumors show non-exponential growth while advanced prostate and brain tumors enter a stage of exponential growth. The scaling analysis points to the existence of cancer stem cells and/or massive apoptosis in early stage prostate cancer and that late stage cancer growth is not dominated by cancer stem cells. Statistical models of these two growth modes are discussed. Work supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health

  13. Fragile histidine triad expression delays tumor development and induces apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Dumon, K R; Ishii, H; Vecchione, A; Trapasso, F; Baldassarre, G; Chakrani, F; Druck, T; Rosato, E F; Williams, N N; Baffa, R; During, M J; Huebner, K; Croce, C M

    2001-06-15

    The fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene is a tumor suppressor gene that is altered by deletion in a large fraction of human tumors, including pancreatic cancer. To evaluate the potential of FHIT gene therapy, we developed recombinant adenoviral and adenoassociated viral (AAV) FHIT vectors and tested these vectors in vitro and in vivo for activity against human pancreatic cancer cells. Our data show that viral FHIT gene delivery results in apoptosis by activation of the caspase pathway. Furthermore, Fhit overexpression enhances the susceptibility of pancreatic cancer cells to exogenous inducers of apoptosis. In vivo results show that FHIT gene transfer delays tumor growth and prolongs survival in a murine model mimicking human disease. PMID:11406559

  14. Simulating tumor growth in confined heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    Gevertz, Jana L; Gillies, George T; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    The holy grail of computational tumor modeling is to develop a simulation tool that can be utilized in the clinic to predict neoplastic progression and propose individualized optimal treatment strategies. In order to develop such a predictive model, one must account for many of the complex processes involved in tumor growth. One interaction that has not been incorporated into computational models of neoplastic progression is the impact that organ-imposed physical confinement and heterogeneity have on tumor growth. For this reason, we have taken a cellular automaton algorithm that was originally designed to simulate spherically symmetric tumor growth and generalized the algorithm to incorporate the effects of tissue shape and structure. We show that models that do not account for organ/tissue geometry and topology lead to false conclusions about tumor spread, shape and size. The impact that confinement has on tumor growth is more pronounced when a neoplasm is growing close to, versus far from, the confining boundary. Thus, any clinical simulation tool of cancer progression must not only consider the shape and structure of the organ in which a tumor is growing, but must also consider the location of the tumor within the organ if it is to accurately predict neoplastic growth dynamics. PMID:18824788

  15. Simulating tumor growth in confined heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevertz, Jana L.; Gillies, George T.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-09-01

    The holy grail of computational tumor modeling is to develop a simulation tool that can be utilized in the clinic to predict neoplastic progression and propose individualized optimal treatment strategies. In order to develop such a predictive model, one must account for many of the complex processes involved in tumor growth. One interaction that has not been incorporated into computational models of neoplastic progression is the impact that organ-imposed physical confinement and heterogeneity have on tumor growth. For this reason, we have taken a cellular automaton algorithm that was originally designed to simulate spherically symmetric tumor growth and generalized the algorithm to incorporate the effects of tissue shape and structure. We show that models that do not account for organ/tissue geometry and topology lead to false conclusions about tumor spread, shape and size. The impact that confinement has on tumor growth is more pronounced when a neoplasm is growing close to, versus far from, the confining boundary. Thus, any clinical simulation tool of cancer progression must not only consider the shape and structure of the organ in which a tumor is growing, but must also consider the location of the tumor within the organ if it is to accurately predict neoplastic growth dynamics.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-related, apoptosis-inducing ligand supports growth of mouse mastocytoma tumors by killing tumor-infiltrating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Strebel, Alessandro; Bachmann, Felix; Wernli, Marion; Erb, Peter

    2002-08-20

    TRAIL antisense transfected mastocytoma cells (R56VTas) injected into syngeneic DBA/2 mice demonstrate significantly delayed tumor growth compared to mock transfected cells (R56VTMo). TRAIL expression in R56VTas cells was successfully, albeit not completely, downregulated, as shown by Western blots, flow-cytometric analysis and functionally by loss of cytolytic activity against TRAIL-R-bearing target cells. Immunohistochemic and immunoblotting analyses of ex vivo tumors confirmed the lower expression of TRAIL by the antisense transfection compared to the mock transfection. Investigating the mechanism of the delayed tumor growth, it was found that neither T nor NK cells but activated macrophages infiltrated the tumors. The number of infiltrating macrophages was significantly lower in the mock transfected compared to the TRAIL antisense transfected tumor sections, indicating that TRAIL-expressing tumor cells may lyse macrophages. Indeed, activated macrophages proved to be sensitive to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. This indicates that, although macrophages can infiltrate the mastocytoma R56VT, they are in part eliminated by TRAIL-expressing tumor cells, allowing the tumor to rapidly grow. Hence, downregulation of TRAIL allows more macrophages to survive and to better attack the tumor cells, slowing down tumor growth. In conclusion, TRAIL expressed on R56VT tumor cells can impair an important innate immune defense mechanism against tumors by eliminating effector macrophages. PMID:12209599

  17. ROLE OF CHEMOKINES IN TUMOR GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Baugher, Paige J.; Thu, Yee Mon; Richmond, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines play a paramount role in the tumor progression. Chronic inflammation promotes tumor formation. Both tumor cells and stromal cells elaborate chemokines and cytokines. These act either by autocrine or paracrine mechanisms to sustain tumor cell growth, induce angiogenesis and facilitate evasion of immune surveillance through immunoediting. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 and its ligands promote tumor angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration into the tumor microenvironment. In harsh acidic and hypoxic microenvironmental conditions tumor cells up-regulate their expression of CXCR4, which equips them to migrate up a gradient of CXCL12 elaborated by carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to a normoxic microenvironment. The CXCL12-CXCR4 axis facilitates metastasis to distant organs and the CCL21-CCR7 chemokine ligand-receptor pair favors metastasis to lymph nodes. These two chemokine ligand-receptor systems are common key mediators of tumor cell metastasis for several malignancies and as such provide key targets for chemotherapy. In this paper, the role of specific chemokines/chemokine receptor interactions in tumor progression, growth and metastasis and the role of chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions in the stromal compartment as related to angiogenesis, metastasis, and immune response to the tumor are reviewed. PMID:17629396

  18. Effects of time-delay in stationary properties of a logistic growth model with correlated noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lu-Chun; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2010-03-01

    A time-delayed tumor cell growth model with correlated noises is investigated. In the condition of small delay time, the stationary probability distribution is derived and the stationary mean value ( <) and normalized varianceλ2 of the tumor cell population and state transition rate ( κ) between two steady states are numerically calculated. The results indicate that: (i) The delay time ( τ) enhances the coherence resonance in < as a function of the multiplicative noise intensity ( D) and increases < as a function of the additive noise intensity ( α), i.e., τ enhances fluctuation of the system, however, the strength ( λ) of correlations between multiplicative and additive noise plays a contrary role to τ on these; (ii) τ enhances the coherence resonance in κ as a function of D and increases κ as a function of α, i.e., τ speeds up the rate of state transition, however, λ also plays a contrary role to τ on these.

  19. Autocrine growth factors and solid tumor malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J. H.; Karnes, W. E.; Cuttitta, F.; Walker, A.

    1991-01-01

    The ability of malignant cells to escape the constraint that normally regulate cell growth and differentiation has been a primary focus of attention for investigators of cancer cell biology. An outcome of this attention has been the discovery that the protein products of oncogenes play a role in the activation of growth signal pathways. A second outcome, possibly related to abnormal oncogene expression, has been the discovery that malignant cells frequently show an ability to regulate their own growth by the release of autocrine growth modulatory substances. Most important, the growth of certain malignant cell types has been shown to depend on autocrine growth circuits. A malignant tumor whose continued growth depends on the release of an autocrine growth factor may be vulnerable to treatment with specific receptor antagonists or immunoneutralizing antibodies designed to break the autocrine circuit. Information is rapidly emerging concerning autocrine growth factors in selected human solid tissue malignancy. Images PMID:1926844

  20. Lead acetate delays rapid postnatal mouse brain and body growth

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, H.T.; Fenton, K.; Shimpach, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Starting at parturition and continuing until weaning, mothers of five mouse litters received tap water while five others had 10 mg PbAc/ml in their drinking water. The offspring receiving lead from the mothers had significantly lower body weights after the first days of receiving lead; their slowed body growth led to a 2-day delay of onset of their last rapid body growth stage. They also had significantly smaller brain weights between age 14 days and weaning. The onset of rapid brain growth was delayed from its usual onset at 16-18 days to about 22-23 days before rising to about the same value as the control mice at 26 days. Thus, the initial effect on brain growth is decidedly greater than on body growth, though brain weight later reaches close to the control value.

  1. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  2. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  3. Blood porphyrin luminescence and tumor growth correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrol, Lilia Coronato; Silva, Flávia Rodrigues de Oliveira; Bellini, Maria Helena; Mansano, Ronaldo Domingues; Schor, Nestor; Vieira, Nilson Dias, Jr.

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescence technique appears very important for the diagnosis of cancer. Fluorescence detection has advantages over other light-based investigation methods: high sensitivity, high speed, and safety. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3% of new cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. Unfortunately many RCC masses remain asymptomatic and nonpalpable until they are advanced. Diagnosis and localization of early carcinoma play an important role in the prevention and curative treatment of RCC. Certain drugs or chemicals such as porphyrin derivatives accumulate substantially more in tumors than normal tissues. The autofluorescence of blood porphyrin of healthy and tumor induced male SCID mice was analyzed using fluorescence and excitation spectroscopy. A significant contrast between normal and tumor blood could be established. Blood porphyrin fluorophore showed enhanced fluorescence band (around 630 nm) in function of the tumor growth. This indicates that either the autofluorescence intensity of the blood fluorescence may provide a good parameter for the "first approximation" characterization of the tumor stage.

  4. Circulating Fibronectin Controls Tumor Growth12

    PubMed Central

    von Au, Anja; Vasel, Matthaeus; Kraft, Sabrina; Sens, Carla; Hackl, Norman; Marx, Alexander; Stroebel, Philipp; Hennenlotter, Jrg; Todenhfer, Tilman; Stenzl, Arnulf; Schott, Sarah; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Wetterwald, Antoinette; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Cecchini, Marco G; Nakchbandi, Inaam A

    2013-01-01

    Fibronectin is ubiquitously expressed in the extracellular matrix, and experimental evidence has shown that it modulates blood vessel formation. The relative contribution of local and circulating fibronectin to blood vessel formation in vivo remains unknown despite evidence for unexpected roles of circulating fibronectin in various diseases. Using transgenic mouse models, we established that circulating fibronectin facilitates the growth of bone metastases by enhancing blood vessel formation and maturation. This effect is more relevant than that of fibronectin produced by endothelial cells and pericytes, which only exert a small additive effect on vessel maturation. Circulating fibronectin enhances its local production in tumors through a positive feedback loop and increases the amount of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) retained in the matrix. Both fibronectin and VEGF then cooperate to stimulate blood vessel formation. Fibronectin content in the tumor correlates with the number of blood vessels and tumor growth in the mouse models. Consistent with these results, examination of three separate arrays from patients with breast and prostate cancers revealed that a high staining intensity for fibronectin in tumors is associated with increased mortality. These results establish that circulating fibronectin modulates blood vessel formation and tumor growth by modifying the amount of and the response to VEGF. Furthermore, determination of the fibronectin content can serve as a prognostic biomarker for breast and prostate cancers and possibly other cancers. PMID:23908593

  5. Connective tissue growth factor in tumor pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Key roles for connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) are demonstrated in the wound repair process where it promotes myofibroblast differentiation and angiogenesis. Similar mechanisms are active in tumor-reactive stroma where CTGF is expressed. Other potential roles include prevention of hypoxia-induced apoptosis and promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transistion (EMT). CTGF expression in tumors has been associated to both tumor suppression and progression. For example, CTGF expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, breast, pancreas and gastric cancer correlates to worse prognosis whereas the opposite is true for colorectal, lung and ovarian cancer. This discrepancy is not yet understood. High expression of CTGF is a hallmark of ileal carcinoids, which are well-differentiated endocrine carcinomas with serotonin production originating from the small intestine and proximal colon. These tumors maintain a high grade of differentiation and low proliferation. Despite this, they are malignant and most patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis. These tumors demonstrate several phenotypes potentially related to CTGF function namely: cell migration, absent tumor cell apoptosis, as well as, reactive and well vascularised myofibroblast rich stroma and fibrosis development locally and in distal organs. The presence of CTGF in other endocrine tumors indicates a role in the progression of well-differentiated tumors. PMID:23259759

  6. Ontogenetic tumor growth and evolution equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattoli, G.; Ottaviani, P. L.; Pagnutti, S.

    2008-07-01

    We review the theory of ontogenetic tumor growth by discussing different evolution equations which account for the relevant dynamics. It is shown that most of the equations proposed can be treated from a unitary point of view. We extend the West ontogenetic evolution model to cancer growth and show that the relevant predictions agree with the experimental data from breast and prostate cancer. We finally prove that aging effects can be easily included in the theoretical scheme proposed.

  7. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Santagiuliana, R.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution.

  8. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    PubMed Central

    Scium, G; Santagiuliana, R; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, B A

    2015-01-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution. PMID:25427284

  9. Thymoquinone reduces mouse colon tumor cell invasion and inhibits tumor growth in murine colon cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Gali-Muhtasib, Hala; Ocker, Matthias; Kuester, Doerthe; Krueger, Sabine; El-Hajj, Zeina; Diestel, Antje; Evert, Matthias; El-Najjar, Nahed; Peters, Brigitte; Jurjus, Abdo; Roessner, Albert; Schneider-Stock, Regine

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We have shown that thymoquinone (TQ) is a potent antitumor agent in human colorectal cancer cells. In this study, we evaluated TQ's therapeutic potential in two different mice colon cancer models [1,2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) and xenografts]. We also examined TQ effects on the growth of C26 mouse colorectal carcinoma spheroids and assessed tumor invasion in vitro. Mice were treated with saline, TQ, DMH, or combinations once per week for 30 weeks and the multiplicity, size and distribution of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and tumors were determined at weeks 10, 20 and 30. TQ injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) significantly reduced the numbers and sizes of ACF at week 10; ACF numbers were reduced by 86%. Tumor multiplicity was reduced at week 20 from 17.8 in the DMH group to 4.2 in mice injected with TQ. This suppression was observed at week 30 and was long-term; tumors did not re-grow even when TQ injection was discontinued for 10 weeks. In a xenograft model of HCT116 colon cancer cells, TQ significantly (P < 0.05) delayed the growth of the tumor cells. Using a matrigel artificial basement membrane invasion assay, we demonstrated that sub-cyto-toxic doses of TQ (40?M) decreased C26 cell invasion by 50% and suppressed growth in three-dimensional spheroids. Apoptotic signs seen morphologically were increased significantly in TQ-treated spheroids. TUNEL staining of xenografts and immunostaining for caspase 3 cleavage in DMH tumors confirmed increased apoptosis in mouse tumors in response to TQ. These data should encourage further in vivo testing and support the potential use of TQ as a therapeutic agent in human colorectal cancer. PMID:18366456

  10. Heavy water delays growth of human carcinoma in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Altermatt, H.J.; Gebbers, J.O.; Laissue, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    Deuterium-enriched water has an antiproliferative effect on transplantable mouse tumors without toxic side effects. Since the response to treatment of human carcinomas growing in nude mice is deemed to be a good indicator of the potential clinical behavior of these tumors, we studied the influence of this stable isotope of hydrogen on the growth of xenotransplanted human carcinomas of various histologic types, grades, and primary sites. Seven-week-old Balb/c-nu/nu mice were inoculated subcutaneously, either with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas or with carcinomas of the large intestine. After tumor inoculation, the mice were given drinking water containing 30 atom% D/sub 2/O. Heavy water effectively retarded the growth of the human carcinomas. At the end of the experiment, the weight of the tumors was reduced to values ranging from 22% to 65% of the control values. The reproducible antiproliferative effect was more conspicuous in poorly differentiated carcinomas than in moderately well-differentiated variants. Since animals in both groups, kept under identical conditions, drank the same amount of water and had similar body weights, the difference in tumor growth can be attributed to the moderate deuteration of the hosts.

  11. Heavy water delays growth of human carcinoma in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Altermatt, H J; Gebbers, J O; Laissue, J A

    1988-08-01

    Deuterium-enriched water has an antiproliferative effect on transplantable mouse tumors without toxic side effects. Since the response to treatment of human carcinomas growing in nude mice is deemed to be a good indicator of the potential clinical behavior of these tumors, we studied the influence of this stable isotope of hydrogen on the growth of xenotransplanted human carcinomas of various histologic types, grades, and primary sites. Seven-week-old Balb/c-nu/nu mice were inoculated subcutaneously, either with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas or with carcinomas of the large intestine. After tumor inoculation, the mice were given drinking water containing 30 atom% D2O. Heavy water effectively retarded the growth of the human carcinomas. At the end of the experiment, the weight of the tumors was reduced to values ranging from 22% to 65% of the control values. The reproducible antiproliferative effect was more conspicuous in poorly differentiated carcinomas than in moderately well-differentiated variants. Since animals in both groups, kept under identical conditions, drank the same amount of water and had similar body weights, the difference in tumor growth can be attributed to the moderate deuteration of the hosts. PMID:2839279

  12. Modelling population growth with delayed nonlocal reaction in 2-dimensions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Wu, Jianhong; Zhang, Fan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the population growth of a single species living in a two-dimensional spatial domain. New reaction-difusion equation models with delayed nonlocal reaction are developed in two-dimensional bounded domains combining diferent boundary conditions. The important feature of the models is the reflection of the joint efect of the difusion dynamics and the nonlocal maturation delayed efect. We consider and ana- lyze numerical solutions of the mature population dynamics with some wellknown birth functions. In particular, we observe and study the occurrences of asymptotically stable steady state solutions and periodic waves for the two-dimensional problems with nonlocal delayed reaction. We also investigate numerically the efects of various parameters on the period, the peak and the shape of the periodic wave as well as the shape of the asymptotically stable steady state solution. PMID:20369915

  13. Radiosensitivity of different human tumor cells lines grown as multicellular spheroids determined from growth curves and survival data

    SciTech Connect

    Schwachoefer, J.H.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.; van Gasteren, J.J.; Hoogenhout, J.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Kal, H.B.; Theeuwes, A.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Five human tumor cell lines were grown as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) to determine whether multicellular tumor spheroids derived from different types of tumors would show tumor-type dependent differences in response to single-dose irradiation, and whether these differences paralleled clinical behavior. Multicellular tumor spheroids of two neuroblastoma, one lung adenocarcinoma, one melanoma, and a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue, were studied in terms of growth delay, calculated cell survival, and spheroid control dose50 (SCD50). Growth delay and cell survival analysis for the tumor cell lines showed sensitivities that correlated well with clinical behavior of the tumor types of origin. Similar to other studies on melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids our spheroid control dose50 results for the melanoma cell line deviated from the general pattern of sensitivity. This might be due to the location of surviving cells, which prohibits proliferation of surviving cells and hence growth of melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids. This study demonstrates that radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines can be evaluated in terms of growth delay, calculated cell survival, and spheroid control dose50 when grown as multicellular tumor spheroids. The sensitivity established from these evaluations parallels clinical behavior, thus offering a unique tool for the in vitro analysis of human tumor radiosensitivity.

  14. Stochastic model for tumor growth with immunization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Thomas; Trimper, Steffen

    2009-05-01

    We analyze a stochastic model for tumor cell growth with both multiplicative and additive colored noises as well as nonzero cross correlations in between. Whereas the death rate within the logistic model is altered by a deterministic term characterizing immunization, the birth rate is assumed to be stochastically changed due to biological motivated growth processes leading to a multiplicative internal noise. Moreover, the system is subjected to an external additive noise which mimics the influence of the environment of the tumor. The stationary probability distribution Ps is derived depending on the finite correlation time, the immunization rate, and the strength of the cross correlation. Ps offers a maximum which becomes more pronounced for increasing immunization rate. The mean-first-passage time is also calculated in order to find out under which conditions the tumor can suffer extinction. Its characteristics are again controlled by the degree of immunization and the strength of the cross correlation. The behavior observed can be interpreted in terms of a biological model of tumor evolution.

  15. Endogenous T cell responses to antigens expressed in lung adenocarcinomas delay malignant tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    DuPage, Michel; Cheung, Ann; Mazumdar, Claire; Winslow, Monte M.; Bronson, Roderick; Schmidt, Leah M.; Crowley, Denise; Chen, Jianzhu; Jacks, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Neoantigens derived from somatic mutations in tumors may provide a critical link between the adaptive immune system and cancer. Here we describe a system to introduce exogenous antigens into genetically engineered mouse lung cancers to mimic tumor neoantigens. We show that endogenous T cells respond to and infiltrate tumors, significantly delaying malignant progression. Despite continued antigen expression, T cell infiltration does not persist and tumors ultimately escape immune attack. Transplantation of cell lines derived from these lung tumors or prophylactic vaccination against the autochthonous tumors, however, results in rapid tumor eradication or selection of tumors that lose antigen expression. These results provide insight into the dynamic nature of the immune response to naturally arising tumors. PMID:21251614

  16. Replicator dynamics with alternate growth functions, delay, and quasiperiodic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Elizabeth Nicholas

    Evolutionary dynamics combines game theory and nonlinear dynamics to model competition in biological and social situations. The replicator equation is a standard paradigm in evolutionary dynamics. The growth rate of each strategy is its excess fitness: the deviation of its fitness from the average. The gametheoretic aspect of the model lies in the choice of fitness function, which is determined by a payoff matrix. Two well-known replicator systems are the threestrategy Rock-Paper-Scissors game and the two-strategy Hawk-Dove game. In this work, we analyze the dynamics of replicator systems with three different types of modifications. The first generalization of the replicator model is given by considering alternate growth functions. We find that in the Rock-Paper-Scissors game with a logistic growth function, there are several fixed points that do not exist in the standard replicator model. The system exhibits both periodic motion and convergence to attractors. We also analyze replicator systems with delayed interactions between strategies. We consider a symmetric delay model, in which the fitness of each strategy is its expected payoff delayed by a time interval; and an asymmetric model, in which same-strategy terms appearing in the fitness of a given strategy are not delayed. In both cases, limit cycles arise that cannot occur in the usual replicator model. Finally, we examine Rock-Paper-Scissors systems with quasiperiodic forcing of the payoff coefficients. This model may represent systems in which the competition is affected by cyclical processes on different time-scales. We find that the stability of the equilibrium state depends sensitively on the two forcing frequencies; in fact, the region of stability has fractal boundary.

  17. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition kills glioblastoma multiforme brain tumor cells in part through loss of SOX2 and delays tumor progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cathy; Fotovati, Abbas; Triscott, Joanna; Chen, James; Venugopal, Chitra; Singhal, Ash; Dunham, Christopher; Kerr, John M; Verreault, Maite; Yip, Stephen; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Jones, Chris; Jayanthan, Aarthi; Narendran, Aru; Singh, Sheila K; Dunn, Sandra E

    2012-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) ranks among the deadliest types of cancer and given these new therapies are urgently needed. To identify molecular targets, we queried a microarray profiling 467 human GBMs and discovered that polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was highly expressed in these tumors and that it clustered with the proliferative subtype. Patients with PLK1-high tumors were more likely to die from their disease suggesting that current therapies are inactive against such tumors. This prompted us to examine its expression in brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) given their association with treatment failure. BTICs isolated from patients expressed 110-470 times more PLK1 than normal human astrocytes. Moreover, BTICs rely on PLK1 for survival because the PLK1 inhibitor BI2536 inhibited their growth in tumorsphere cultures. PLK1 inhibition suppressed growth, caused G(2) /M arrest, induced apoptosis, and reduced the expression of SOX2, a marker of neural stem cells, in SF188 cells. Consistent with SOX2 inhibition, the loss of PLK1 activity caused the cells to differentiate based on elevated levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein and changes in cellular morphology. We then knocked glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) down SOX2 with siRNA and showed that it too inhibited cell growth and induced cell death. Likewise, in U251 cells, PLK1 inhibition suppressed cell growth, downregulated SOX2, and induced cell death. Furthermore, BI2536 delayed tumor growth of U251 cells in an orthotopic brain tumor model, demonstrating that the drug is active against GBM. In conclusion, PLK1 level is elevated in GBM and its inhibition restricts the growth of brain cancer cells. PMID:22415968

  18. A comparison and catalog of intrinsic tumor growth models.

    PubMed

    Sarapata, E A; de Pillis, L G

    2014-08-01

    Determining the mathematical dynamics and associated parameter values that should be used to accurately reflect tumor growth continues to be of interest to mathematical modelers, experimentalists and practitioners. However, while there are several competing canonical tumor growth models that are often implemented, how to determine which of the models should be used for which tumor types remains an open question. In this work, we determine the best fit growth dynamics and associated parameter ranges for ten different tumor types by fitting growth functions to at least five sets of published experimental growth data per type of tumor. These time-series tumor growth data are used to determine which of the five most common tumor growth models (exponential, power law, logistic, Gompertz, or von Bertalanffy) provides the best fit for each type of tumor. PMID:25081547

  19. TUSC1, a putative tumor suppressor gene, reduces tumor cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zhihong; Shakoori, Abbas; Bodaghi, Sohrab; Goldsmith, Paul; Jin, Jen; Wiest, Jonathan S

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the identification of TUSC1 (Tumor Suppressor Candidate 1), as a novel intronless gene isolated from a region of homozygous deletion at D9S126 on chromosome 9p in human lung cancer. In this study, we examine the differential expression of TUSC1 in human lung cancer cell lines by western blot and in a primary human lung cancer tissue microarray by immunohistochemical analysis. We also tested the functional activities and mechanisms of TUSC1 as a tumor suppressor gene through growth suppression in vitro and in vivo. The results showed no expression of TUSC1 in TUSC1 homozygously deleted cells and diminished expression in some tumor cell lines without TUSC1 deletion. Interestingly, the results from a primary human lung cancer tissue microarray suggested that higher expression of TUSC1 was correlated with increased survival times for lung cancer patients. Our data demonstrated that growth curves of tumor cell lines transfected with TUSC1 grew slower in vitro than those transfected with the empty vector. More importantly, xenograph tumors in nude mice grew significantly slower in vivo in cells stably transfected with TUSC1 than those transfected with empty vector. In addition, results from confocal microscopy and immunohistochemical analyses show distribution of TUSC1 in the cytoplasm and nucleus in tumor cell lines and in normal and tumor cells in the lung cancer tissue microarray. Taken together, our results support TUSC1 has tumor suppressor activity as a candidate tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 9p. PMID:23776618

  20. Pancreatic cancers require autophagy for tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shenghong; Wang, Xiaoxu; Contino, Gianmarco; Liesa, Marc; Sahin, Ergun; Ying, Haoqiang; Bause, Alexandra; Li, Yinghua; Stommel, Jayne M.; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Mautner, Josef; Tonon, Giovanni; Haigis, Marcia; Shirihai, Orian S.; Doglioni, Claudio; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Kimmelman, Alec C.

    2011-01-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is a regulated catabolic pathway to degrade cellular organelles and macromolecules. The role of autophagy in cancer is complex and may differ depending on tumor type or context. Here we show that pancreatic cancers have a distinct dependence on autophagy. Pancreatic cancer primary tumors and cell lines show elevated autophagy under basal conditions. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy leads to increased reactive oxygen species, elevated DNA damage, and a metabolic defect leading to decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Together, these ultimately result in significant growth suppression of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Most importantly, inhibition of autophagy by genetic means or chloroquine treatment leads to robust tumor regression and prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer xenografts and genetic mouse models. These results suggest that, unlike in other cancers where autophagy inhibition may synergize with chemotherapy or targeted agents by preventing the up-regulation of autophagy as a reactive survival mechanism, autophagy is actually required for tumorigenic growth of pancreatic cancers de novo, and drugs that inactivate this process may have a unique clinical utility in treating pancreatic cancers and other malignancies with a similar dependence on autophagy. As chloroquine and its derivatives are potent inhibitors of autophagy and have been used safely in human patients for decades for a variety of purposes, these results are immediately translatable to the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients, and provide a much needed, novel vantage point of attack. PMID:21406549

  1. Decorin: A Growth Factor Antagonist for Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A. H.; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is the best characterized member of the extracellular small leucine-rich proteoglycan family present in connective tissues, typically in association with or “decorating” collagen fibrils. It has substantial interest to clinical medicine owing to its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Studies on DCN knockout mice have established that a lack of DCN is permissive for tumor development and it is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. A reduced expression or a total disappearance of DCN has been reported to take place in various forms of human cancers during tumor progression. Furthermore, when used as a therapeutic molecule, DCN has been shown to inhibit tumor progression and metastases in experimental cancer models. DCN affects the biology of various types of cancer by targeting a number of crucial signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The active sites for the neutralization of different growth factors all reside in different parts of the DCN molecule. An emerging concept that multiple proteases, especially those produced by inflammatory cells, are capable of cleaving DCN suggests that native DCN could be inactivated in a number of pathological inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we review the role of DCN in cancer. PMID:26697491

  2. Decorin: A Growth Factor Antagonist for Tumor Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jrvinen, Tero A H; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is the best characterized member of the extracellular small leucine-rich proteoglycan family present in connective tissues, typically in association with or "decorating" collagen fibrils. It has substantial interest to clinical medicine owing to its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Studies on DCN knockout mice have established that a lack of DCN is permissive for tumor development and it is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. A reduced expression or a total disappearance of DCN has been reported to take place in various forms of human cancers during tumor progression. Furthermore, when used as a therapeutic molecule, DCN has been shown to inhibit tumor progression and metastases in experimental cancer models. DCN affects the biology of various types of cancer by targeting a number of crucial signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The active sites for the neutralization of different growth factors all reside in different parts of the DCN molecule. An emerging concept that multiple proteases, especially those produced by inflammatory cells, are capable of cleaving DCN suggests that native DCN could be inactivated in a number of pathological inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we review the role of DCN in cancer. PMID:26697491

  3. Stochastic resonance and stability for a time-delayed cancer growth system subjected to multiplicative and additive noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Liu, Xian-Bin

    2015-08-01

    In the present paper, the steady-state properties of a time-delayed cancer growth system that is driven by a correlated multiplicative noise and an additive one are investigated. The numerical results show that the conventional stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon occurs in the tumor cell growth model for different system parameter values. The results indicate that the additive noise strength always weakens the SR phenomenon, while the time delay mainly increases the SR phenomenon. On the other hand, it is shown that the effects of the strength of the multiplicative noise are different.

  4. Tumor delayed hypersensitivity reactions. "In vivo" functional differences between spleen and peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    de Bonaparte, Y P; Oisgold-Dag, S; Klein, S; Stillitani-D'Elia, I

    1980-02-01

    In a syngeneic BALB/c transplantable tumor model, specific delayed hypersensitvity reaction, detected by foot-pad swelling test appeared specifically suppressed or "eclipsed" in advanced tumor bearing mice. This "eclipsed" response could not be reversed after tumor resection. Unresponsiveness was analyzed by local adoptive transfer of lymphocytes from two different sources. When spleen cells (SC) from advanced tumor bearing and advanced tumor resected mice were locally transferred into normal recipients, a positive cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity (CDH) reaction was observed. While when peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from the same anergic donors were transferred, no CDH reactivity was elicited. Functional differences between SC and PBL populations are suggested to explain these findings. PMID:7370382

  5. Delaying cluster growth of ionotropic induced alginate gelation by oligoguluronate.

    PubMed

    Padoł, Anna Maria; Maurstad, Gjertrud; Draget, Kurt Ingar; Stokke, Bjørn Torger

    2015-11-20

    Alginates form gels in the presence of various divalent ions, such as Ca(2+) that mediate lateral association of chain segments. Various procedures exist that introduce Ca(2+) to yield alginate hydrogels with overall homogeneous or controlled gradients in the concentration profiles. In the present study, the effect of adding oligomers of α-l-guluronic acid (oligoGs) to gelling solutions of alginate was investigated by determination of the cluster growth stimulated by in situ release of Ca(2+). Three different alginate samples varying in fraction of α-l-guluronic acid and molecular weights were employed. The cluster growth was determined for both pure alginates and alginates with two different concentrations of the oligoGs employing dynamic light scattering. The results show that addition of oligoG slows down the cluster growth, the more efficient for the alginates with higher fraction of α-l-guluronic acid, and the higher molecular weight. The efficiency in delaying and slowing the cluster growth induced by added oligoG were discussed in view of the molecular parameters of the alginates. These results show that oligoG can be added to alginate solutions to control the cluster growth and eventually also transition to the gel state. Quantitative relation between the concentration of added oligoG, type and molecular weight of the alginate, and concentration, can be employed as guidelines in tuning alginate cluster growth with specific properties. PMID:26344264

  6. Meningeal Solitary Fibrous Tumors with Delayed Extracranial Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Nayoung; Kim, Hannah; Min, Soo Kee; Paek, Sun-Ha; Park, Chul-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hong; Chae, U-Ri; Park, Sung-Hye

    2016-01-01

    Background: The term solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is preferred over meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC), because NAB2-STAT6 gene fusion has been observed in both intracranial and extracranial HPCs. HPCs are now considered cellular variants of SFTs. Methods: This study analyzes 19 patients with STAT6-confirmed SFTs, who were followed for over 11 years in a single institution. Ten patients (10/19, 56.2%) had extracranial metastases (metastatic group), while the remainder (9/19) did not (non-metastatic group). These two groups were compared clinicopathologically. Results: In the metastatic group, the primary metastatic sites were the lungs (n = 6), bone (n = 4), and liver (n = 3). There was a mean lag time of 14.2 years between the diagnosis of the initial meningeal tumor to that of systemic metastasis. The median age at initial tumor onset was 37.1 years in the metastatic group and 52.5 in the non-metastatic group. The 10-year survival rates of the metastatic- and non-metastatic groups were 100% and 33%, respectively. The significant prognostic factors for poor outcomes on univariate analysis included advanced age (≥45 years) and large initial tumor size (≥5 cm). In contrast, the patients with higher tumor grade, high mitotic rate (≥5/10 high-power fields), high Ki-67 index (≥5%), and the presence of necrosis or CD34 positivity showed tendency of poor prognosis but these parameters were not statistically significant poor prognostic markers. Conclusions: Among patients with SFTs, younger patients (<45 years) experienced longer survival times and paradoxically had more frequent extracranial metastases after long latent periods than did older patients. Therefore, young patients with SFTs require careful surveillance and follow-up for early detection of systemic metastases. PMID:26657311

  7. Myeloid Cell COX-2 deletion reduces mammary tumor growth through enhanced cytotoxic T-lymphocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Edward P.; Markosyan, Nune; Connolly, Emma; Lawson, John A.; Li, Xuanwen; Grant, Gregory R.; Grosser, Tilo; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Smyth, Emer M.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is associated with poor prognosis across a range of human cancers, including breast cancer. The contribution of tumor cell-derived COX-2 to tumorigenesis has been examined in numerous studies; however, the role of stromal-derived COX-2 is ill-defined. Here, we examined how COX-2 in myeloid cells, an immune cell subset that includes macrophages, influences mammary tumor progression. In mice engineered to selectively lack myeloid cell COX-2 [myeloid-COX-2 knockout (KO) mice], spontaneous neu oncogene-induced tumor onset was delayed, tumor burden reduced, and tumor growth slowed compared with wild-type (WT). Similarly, growth of neu-transformed mammary tumor cells as orthotopic tumors in immune competent syngeneic myeloid-COX-2 KO host mice was reduced compared with WT. By flow cytometric analysis, orthotopic myeloid-COX-2 KO tumors had lower tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) infiltration consistent with impaired colony stimulating factor-1-dependent chemotaxis by COX-2 deficient macrophages in vitro. Further, in both spontaneous and orthotopic tumors, COX-2-deficient TAM displayed lower immunosuppressive M2 markers and this was coincident with less suppression of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in myeloid-COX-2 KO tumors. These studies suggest that reduced tumor growth in myeloid-COX-2 KO mice resulted from disruption of M2-like TAM function, thereby enhancing T-cell survival and immune surveillance. Antibody-mediated depletion of CD8+, but not CD4+ cells, restored tumor growth in myeloid-COX-2 KO to WT levels, indicating that CD8+ CTLs are dominant antitumor effectors in myeloid-COX-2 KO mice. Our studies suggest that inhibition of myeloid cell COX-2 can potentiate CTL-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and may provide a novel therapeutic approach in breast cancer therapy. PMID:24590894

  8. Cellular Potts Modeling of Tumor Growth, Tumor Invasion, and Tumor Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, András; Merks, Roeland M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a growing wealth of available molecular data, the growth of tumors, invasion of tumors into healthy tissue, and response of tumors to therapies are still poorly understood. Although genetic mutations are in general the first step in the development of a cancer, for the mutated cell to persist in a tissue, it must compete against the other, healthy or diseased cells, for example by becoming more motile, adhesive, or multiplying faster. Thus, the cellular phenotype determines the success of a cancer cell in competition with its neighbors, irrespective of the genetic mutations or physiological alterations that gave rise to the altered phenotype. What phenotypes can make a cell “successful” in an environment of healthy and cancerous cells, and how? A widely used tool for getting more insight into that question is cell-based modeling. Cell-based models constitute a class of computational, agent-based models that mimic biophysical and molecular interactions between cells. One of the most widely used cell-based modeling formalisms is the cellular Potts model (CPM), a lattice-based, multi particle cell-based modeling approach. The CPM has become a popular and accessible method for modeling mechanisms of multicellular processes including cell sorting, gastrulation, or angiogenesis. The CPM accounts for biophysical cellular properties, including cell proliferation, cell motility, and cell adhesion, which play a key role in cancer. Multiscale models are constructed by extending the agents with intracellular processes including metabolism, growth, and signaling. Here we review the use of the CPM for modeling tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor progression. We argue that the accessibility and flexibility of the CPM, and its accurate, yet coarse-grained and computationally efficient representation of cell and tissue biophysics, make the CPM the method of choice for modeling cellular processes in tumor development. PMID:23596570

  9. Cellular potts modeling of tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor evolution.

    PubMed

    Szabó, András; Merks, Roeland M H

    2013-01-01

    Despite a growing wealth of available molecular data, the growth of tumors, invasion of tumors into healthy tissue, and response of tumors to therapies are still poorly understood. Although genetic mutations are in general the first step in the development of a cancer, for the mutated cell to persist in a tissue, it must compete against the other, healthy or diseased cells, for example by becoming more motile, adhesive, or multiplying faster. Thus, the cellular phenotype determines the success of a cancer cell in competition with its neighbors, irrespective of the genetic mutations or physiological alterations that gave rise to the altered phenotype. What phenotypes can make a cell "successful" in an environment of healthy and cancerous cells, and how? A widely used tool for getting more insight into that question is cell-based modeling. Cell-based models constitute a class of computational, agent-based models that mimic biophysical and molecular interactions between cells. One of the most widely used cell-based modeling formalisms is the cellular Potts model (CPM), a lattice-based, multi particle cell-based modeling approach. The CPM has become a popular and accessible method for modeling mechanisms of multicellular processes including cell sorting, gastrulation, or angiogenesis. The CPM accounts for biophysical cellular properties, including cell proliferation, cell motility, and cell adhesion, which play a key role in cancer. Multiscale models are constructed by extending the agents with intracellular processes including metabolism, growth, and signaling. Here we review the use of the CPM for modeling tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor progression. We argue that the accessibility and flexibility of the CPM, and its accurate, yet coarse-grained and computationally efficient representation of cell and tissue biophysics, make the CPM the method of choice for modeling cellular processes in tumor development. PMID:23596570

  10. Delayed Frost Growth on Jumping-Drop Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Collier, Pat

    2013-01-01

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an inter-drop frost wave. The growth of this inter-drop frost front is shown to be up to three times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of inter-drop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an inter-drop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser was found to be superior to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by minimizing the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  11. The Role of Complement in Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Ruben; Corrales, Leticia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a central part of the immune system that has developed as a first defense against non-self cells. Neoplastic transformation is accompanied by an increased capacity of the malignant cells to activate complement. In fact, clinical data demonstrate complement activation in cancer patients. On the basis of the use of protective mechanisms by malignant cells, complement activation has traditionally been considered part of the body's immunosurveillance against cancer. Inhibitory mechanisms of complement activation allow cancer cells to escape from complement-mediated elimination and hamper the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody–based cancer immunotherapies. To overcome this limitation, many strategies have been developed with the goal of improving complement-mediated effector mechanisms. However, significant work in recent years has identified new and surprising roles for complement activation within the tumor microenvironment. Recent reports suggest that complement elements can promote tumor growth in the context of chronic inflammation. This chapter reviews the data describing the role of complement activation in cancer immunity, which offers insights that may aid the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to control cancer. PMID:24272362

  12. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  13. Resveratrol Treatment Delays Growth Plate Fusion and Improves Bone Growth in Female Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Elham; Tamm, Chen; Chagin, Andrei S.; Samuelsson, Karin; Kjartansdttir, Kristn Rs; Ohlsson, Claes; Svendahl, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Trans-resveratrol (RES), naturally produced by many plants, has a structure similar to synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol, but any effect on bone growth has not yet been clarified. Pre-pubertal ovary-intact New Zealand white rabbits received daily oral administration of either vehicle (control) or RES (200 mg/kg) until growth plate fusion occurred. Bone growth and growth plate size were longitudinally monitored by X-ray imaging, while at the endpoint, bone length was assessed by a digital caliper. In addition, pubertal ovariectomized (OVX) rabbits were treated with vehicle, RES or estradiol cypionate (positive control) for 7 or 10 weeks and fetal rat metatarsal bones were cultured in vitro with RES (0.03 M50 M) and followed for up to 19 days. In ovary-intact rabbits, sixteen-week treatment with RES increased tibiae and vertebrae bone growth and subsequently improved final length. In OVX rabbits, RES delayed fusion of the distal tibia, distal femur and proximal tibia epiphyses and femur length and vertebral bone growth increased when compared with controls. Histomorphometrical analysis showed that RES-treated OVX rabbits had a wider distal femur growth plate, enlarged resting zone, increased number/size of hypertrophic chondrocytes, increased height of the hypertrophic zone, and suppressed chondrocyte expression of VEGF and laminin. In cultured fetal rat metatarsal bones, RES stimulated growth at 0.3 M while at higher concentrations (10 ?M and 50 ?M) growth was inhibited. We conclude that RES has the potential to improve longitudinal bone growth. The effect was associated with a delay of growth plate fusion resulting in increased final length. These effects were accompanied by a profound suppression of VEGF and laminin expression suggesting that impairment of growth plate vascularization might be an underlying mechanism. PMID:23840780

  14. Caloric restriction reduces growth of mammary tumors and metastases

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, Mariana S.; Baljinnyam, Erdene; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Abarza, Patricio; Vatner, Stephen F.; Rabson, Arnold B.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on growth of tumors and metastases in the 4T1 mammary tumor model and found that CR, compared with normal diet, reduced the growth of mammary tumors and metastases and the total number of metastases that originated both spontaneously from the primary tumor and also experimentally from i.v. injection of the tumor cells. CR also decreased proliferation and angiogenesis and increased apoptosis in tumors. CR reduced levels of insulin, leptin, insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 and increased adiponectin in tumors. We also demonstrated that tumors from CR mice possessed lower levels of transforming growth factor-?, lower intratumor deposition of collagen IV and reduced invasiveness due to a decrease in tumor secretion of active matrix metalloproteinase 9. Our results suggest that CR-induced metabolic and signaling changes affect the stroma and the tumor cells resulting in a microenvironment that prevents proliferation of breast tumors and their metastases. PMID:21665891

  15. Rare cancers yield potential source of tumor growth

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a genetic mutation that appears to increase production of red blood cells in tumors. The discovery, based on analysis of tissue from rare endocrine tumors, may help clarify how some tumors generate a new blood supply to sustain their growth, the researchers explained.

  16. P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion promotes tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cuiling; Wei, Bo; Zhou, Weijie; Yang, Yang; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; Li, Jialin; Ye, Jie; Li, Jiangchao; Zhang, Qianqian; Lan, Tian; He, Xiaodong; Cao, Liu; Zhou, Jia; Geng, Jianguo; Wang, Lijing

    2015-03-30

    Blood platelets foster carcinogenesis. We found that platelets are accumulated in human tumors. P-selectin deficiency and soluble P-selectin abolish platelet deposition within tumors, decreasing secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis, thereby suppressing tumor growth. Binding of the P-selectin cytoplasmic tail to talin1 triggers the talin1 N-terminal head to interact with the ?3 cytoplasmic tail. This activates ?IIb?3 and recruits platelets into tumors. Platelet infiltration into solid tumors occurs through a P-selectin-dependent mechanism. PMID:25762641

  17. Modified Gompertz equation for electrotherapy murine tumor growth kinetics: predictions and new hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Electrotherapy effectiveness at different doses has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies; however, several aspects that occur in the tumor growth kinetics before and after treatment have not yet been revealed. Mathematical modeling is a useful instrument that can reveal some of these aspects. The aim of this paper is to describe the complete growth kinetics of unperturbed and perturbed tumors through use of the modified Gompertz equation in order to generate useful insight into the mechanisms that underpin this devastating disease. Methods The complete tumor growth kinetics for control and treated groups are obtained by interpolation and extrapolation methods with different time steps, using experimental data of fibrosarcoma Sa-37. In the modified Gompertz equation, a delay time is introduced to describe the tumor's natural history before treatment. Different graphical strategies are used in order to reveal new information in the complete kinetics of this tumor type. Results The first stage of complete tumor growth kinetics is highly non linear. The model, at this stage, shows different aspects that agree with those reported theoretically and experimentally. Tumor reversibility and the proportionality between regions before and after electrotherapy are demonstrated. In tumors that reach partial remission, two antagonistic post-treatment processes are induced, whereas in complete remission, two unknown antitumor mechanisms are induced. Conclusion The modified Gompertz equation is likely to lead to insights within cancer research. Such insights hold promise for increasing our understanding of tumors as self-organizing systems and, the possible existence of phase transitions in tumor growth kinetics, which, in turn, may have significant impacts both on cancer research and on clinical practice. PMID:21029411

  18. Intratumorally Establishing Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells Blocks Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyang; Kim, Wonyoung; Moon, U J; Kim, Hyun J; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Sin, Jeong-Im; Park, Neung H; Cho, Hong R; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2016-03-01

    A long-standing question in the field of tumor immunotherapy is how Th2 cytokines block tumor growth. Their antitumor effects are particularly prominent when they are secreted continuously in tumors, suggesting that Th2 cytokines may create a tumor microenvironment unfavorable for tumor growth independently of adaptive immunity. In this study, we show that local production of IL-33 establishes a high number of type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) with potent antitumor activity. IL-33 promotes secretion of a massive amount of CXCR2 ligands from ILC2s but creates a tumor microenvironment where tumor cells express CXCR2 through a dysfunctional angiogenesis/hypoxia/reactive oxygen species axis. These two signaling events converge to reinforce tumor cell-specific apoptosis through CXCR2. Our results identify a previously unrecognized antitumor therapeutic pathway wherein ILC2s play a central role. PMID:26829987

  19. Translocator Receptor Blockade Reduces Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fafalios, Arlee; Akhavan, Ardavan; Parwani, Anil V.; Bies, Robert R.; McHugh, Kevin J.; Pflug, Beth R.

    2009-01-01

    Statement of Translational Relevance Although benzodiazepines have been used clinically for over 50 years, their application as a form of cancer therapy is largely unexplored. Here we show that lorazepam, a benzodiazepine commonly prescribed to treat anxiety disorders and acts on both central and peripheral receptors, inhibits prostate cancer cell growth and survival. Our studies further elucidate the mechanism by which Translocator Protein (TSPO) antagonists alter cancer cell function. Antagonists for TSPO are already used in the clinic for other indications and demonstrate very minor side effects. Because lorazepam is a commonly prescribed FDA-approved drug, the translation of our preclinical results to the prostate cancer patient population could be readily achieved. Our studies could lead to a significant change in the management of prostate cancer by providing a treatment option with minimal toxicity for use after failure of androgen-deprivation therapy and could ultimately prevent prostate cancer deaths. Purpose The transmembrane molecule, Translocator Protein (TSPO) has been implicated in the progression of epithelial tumors. TSPO gene expression is high in tissues involved in steroid biosynthesis, neurodegenerative disease and in cancer and overexpression has been shown to contribute to pathologic conditions including cancer progression in several different models. The goal of our study was to examine the expression and biological relevance of TSPO in prostate cancer and demonstrate that the commonly prescribed benzodiazepine lorazepam, a ligand for TSPO, exhibits anti-cancer properties. Experimental Design Immunohistochemical analysis using tissue microarrays was used to determine the expression profile of TSPO in human prostate cancer tissues. To demonstrate the effect of benzodiazepines (lorazepam and PK11195) in prostate cancer, we utilized cell proliferation assays, apoptosis ELISA, prostate cancer xenograft study, and immunohistochemistry. Results TSPO expression is increased in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, primary prostate cancer, and metastases compared to normal prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Furthermore, TSPO expression correlates with disease progression, as TSPO levels increased with increasing Gleason sum and stage with prostate cancer metastases demonstrating the highest level of expression among all tissues examined. Functionally, we have demonstrated that lorazepam has anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, we have shown that TSPO overexpression in nontumorigenic cells conferred susceptibility to lorazepam-induced growth inhibition. Conclusion These data suggest that blocking TSPO function in tumor cells induces cell death and denotes a survival role for TSPO in prostate cancer and provide the first evidence for the use of benzodiazepines in prostate cancer therapeutics. PMID:19789311

  20. Tumor growth modeling based on cell and tumor lifespans.

    PubMed

    Keinj, R; Bastogne, T; Vallois, P

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with the lifespan modeling of heterogenous tumors treated by radiotherapy. A bi-scale model describing the cell and tumor lifespans by random variables is proposed. First- and second-order moments as well as the cumulative distribution functions and confidence intervals are expressed for the two lifespans with respect to the model parameters. One interesting result is that the mean value of the tumor lifespan can be approached by a logarithmic function of the initial cancer cell number. Moreover, we show that TCP and NTCP, used in radiotherapy to evaluate, optimize and compare treatment plans, can be derived from the tumor lifespan and the surrounding healthy tissue, respectively. Finally, we propose a ROC curve, entitled ECT (Efficiency-Complication Trade-off), suited to the selection by clinicians of the appropriate treatment planning. PMID:22820494

  1. IRP2 regulates breast tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Deng, Zhiyong; Hatcher, Heather; Miller, Lance D.; Di, Xiumin; Tesfay, Lia; Sui, Guangchao; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggest that dysregulation of proteins involved in iron metabolism plays a critical role in cancer. The mechanisms by which cancer cells alter homeostatic iron regulation are just beginning to be understood. Here we demonstrate that iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) plays a key role in iron accumulation in breast cancer. Although both IRP1 and IRP2 are over-expressed in breast cancer, the overexpression of IRP2, but not IRP1, is associated with decreased ferritin H and increased transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1). Knock-down of IRP2 in triple negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells increases ferritin H expression and decreases TfR1 expression, resulting in a decrease in the labile iron pool. Further, IRP2 knockdown reduces growth of MDA-MB-231 cells in the mouse mammary fat pad. Gene expression microarray profiles of breast cancer patients demonstrate that increased IRP2 expression is associated with high grade cancer. Increased IRP2 expression is observed in luminal A, luminal B and basal breast cancer subtypes, but not in breast tumors of the ERBB2 molecular subtype. These results suggest that dysregulation of IRP2 is an early nodal point underlying altered iron metabolism in breast cancer and may contribute to poor outcome of some breast cancer patients. PMID:24285726

  2. Endothelial cell-derived interleukin-6 regulates tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial cells play a complex role in the pathobiology of cancer. This role is not limited to the making of blood vessels to allow for influx of oxygen and nutrients required for the high metabolic demands of tumor cells. Indeed, it has been recently shown that tumor-associated endothelial cells secrete molecules that enhance tumor cell survival and cancer stem cell self-renewal. The hypothesis underlying this work is that specific disruption of endothelial cell-initiated signaling inhibits tumor growth. Methods Conditioned medium from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) stably transduced with silencing RNA for IL-6 (or controls) was used to evaluate the role of endothelial-derived IL-6 on the activation of key signaling pathways in tumor cells. In addition, these endothelial cells were co-transplanted with tumor cells into immunodefficient mice to determine the impact of endothelial cell-derived IL-6 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. Results We observed that tumor cells adjacent to blood vessels show strong phosphorylation of STAT3, a key mediator of tumor progression. In search for a possible mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 signaling pathway, we observed that silencing interleukin (IL)-6 in tumor-associated endothelial cells inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation in tumor cells. Notably, tumors vascularized with IL-6-silenced endothelial cells showed lower intratumoral microvessel density, lower tumor cell proliferation, and slower growth than tumors vascularized with control endothelial cells. Conclusions Collectively, these results demonstrate that IL-6 secreted by endothelial cells enhance tumor growth, and suggest that cancer patients might benefit from targeted approaches that block signaling events initiated by endothelial cells. PMID:24533454

  3. Primary tumor dependent inhibition of tumor growth, angiogenesis, and perfusion of secondary breast cancer in bone.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Christian; Schroeder, Malte; Fuhrhop, Ina; Viezens, Lennart; Otten, Jasmin; Fiedler, Walter; Rther, Wolfgang; Hansen-Algenstaedt, Nils

    2011-08-01

    The systemic balance of angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors has been proposed to play a key-role in primary tumor growth dependent growth suppression of secondary tumors. Despite the importance of the organ microenvironment to angiogenesis and microcirculation, the influence of a primary tumor on secondary bone tumors has not been investigated so far. Since breast cancer has a high propensity to spread to bone, we used an in vivo xenograft model to determine the impact of growing breast cancer cells (MCF-7) in the mammary fat pad on the microvascular properties of subsequently inoculated secondary breast cancer tumors in bone. Mice were either treated with a resection of the primary tumor (n?=?10) or no surgery (n?=?9) and intravital microscopy was performed over 25 days in bone tumors. Tumor growth in bone was temporarily suppressed by the primary tumor on days 10 and 14. While microvascular permeability and vascular diameter decreased in both groups over time, the presence of the primary tumor was accompanied by a decreased tumor perfusion on days 8 and 10 through a reduction in vessels with diameters between 5 and 20?m. The results imply a potential benefit of a therapeutic regime in which the resection of the primary tumor is combined with an anti-angiogenic therapy in the perioperative or direct postoperative period. This might result in reduced progression of bone metastasis subsequent to excision of the primary tumor. PMID:21381098

  4. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Scium, G; Shelton, S; Gray, WG; Miller, CT; Hussain, F; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, BA

    2014-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behaviour of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT). A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TC), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HC); and an interstitial fluid (IF) for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a Finite Element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behaviour: initially, the rapidly growing tumor cells tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 ?m, surrounded by a shell of viable tumor cells whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case mostly due to the relative adhesion of the tumor and healthy cells to the ECM, and the less favourable transport of nutrients. In particular, for tumor cells adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced as the malignant mass grows, whereas tumor cell infiltration is predicted for the opposite condition. Interestingly, the infiltration potential of the tumor mass is mostly driven by the relative cell adhesion to the ECM. In the third case, a tumor cord model is analyzed where the malignant cells grow around microvessels in a 3D geometry. It is shown that tumor cells tend to migrate among adjacent vessels seeking new oxygen and nutrient. This model can predict and optimize the efficacy of anticancer therapeutic strategies. It can be further developed to answer questions on tumor biophysics, related to the effects of ECM stiffness and cell adhesion on tumor cell proliferation. PMID:24554920

  5. Decreased Mitochondrial OGG1 Expression is Linked to Mitochondrial Defects and Delayed Hepatoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Kyoung; Youn, Hwang-Guem; Wang, Hee-Jung; Yoon, Gyesoon

    2013-01-01

    Many solid tumor cells exhibit mitochondrial respiratory impairment; however, the mechanisms of such impairment in cancer development remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that SNU human hepatoma cells with declined mitochondrial respiratory activity showed decreased expression of mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase/lyase (mtOGG1), a mitochondrial DNA repair enzyme; similar results were obtained with human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. Among several OGG1-2 variants with a mitochondrial- targeting sequence (OGG1-2a, -2b, -2c, -2d, and -2e), OGG1-2a was the major mitochondrial isoform in all examined hepatoma cells. Interestingly, hepatoma cells with low mtOGG1 levels showed delayed cell growth and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Knockdown of OGG1-2 isoforms in Chang-L cells, which have active mitochondrial respiration with high mtOGG1 levels, significantly decreased cellular respiration and cell growth, and increased intracellular ROS. Overexpression of OGG1-2a in SNU423 cells, which have low mtOGG1 levels, effectively recovered cellular respiration and cell growth activities, and decreased intracellular ROS. Taken together, our results suggest that mtOGG1 plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial respiration, thereby contributing to cell growth of hepatoma cells. PMID:23677377

  6. Natural history of tumor growth and immune modulation in common spontaneous murine mammary tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren; Slota, Meredith; Koehnlein, Marlese; Treuting, Piper M.; Dang, Yushe; Stanton, Sasha; Disis, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies in patients with breast cancer suggest the immune microenvironment influences response to therapy. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between growth rates of tumors in common spontaneous mammary tumor models and immune biomarkers evaluated in the tumor and blood. Methods TgMMTV-neu and C3(1)-Tag transgenic mice were followed longitudinally from birth, and MPA-DMBA treated mice from the time of carcinogen administration, for the development of mammary tumors. Tumor infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Serum cytokines were evaluated in subsets of mice. Fine needle aspirates of tumors were collected and RNA isolated to determine levels of immune and proliferation markers. Results Age of tumor onset and kinetics of tumor growth were significantly different among the models. Mammary tumors from TgMMTV-neu contained a lower CD8/CD4 ratio than other models (p<0.05). MPA-DMBA induced tumors contained a higher percentage of FOXP3+ CD4+ T-cells (p<0.01) and MDSC (p<0.001) as compared to the other models. Individuals with significantly slower tumor growth demonstrated higher levels of Type I serum cytokines prior to the development of lesions as compared to those with rapid tumor growth. Moreover, the tumors of animals with more rapid tumor growth demonstrated a significant increase in expression of genes associated with Type II immunity than those with slower progressing tumors. Conclusions These data provide a foundation for the development of in vivo models to explore the relationship between endogenous immunity and response to standard therapies for breast cancer. PMID:25395320

  7. A Mathematical Model of Prostate Tumor Growth Under Hormone Therapy with Mutation Inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Youshan; Guo, Qian; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-04-01

    This paper extends Jackson’s model describing the growth of a prostate tumor with hormone therapy to a new one with hypothetical mutation inhibitors. The new model not only considers the mutation by which androgen-dependent (AD) tumor cells mutate into androgen-independent (AI) ones but also introduces inhibition which is assumed to change the mutation rate. The tumor consists of two types of cells (AD and AI) whose proliferation and apoptosis rates are functions of androgen concentration. The mathematical model represents a free-boundary problem for a nonlinear system of parabolic equations, which describe the evolution of the populations of the above two types of tumor cells. The tumor surface is a free boundary, whose velocity is equal to the cell’s velocity there. Global existence and uniqueness of solutions of this model is proved. Furthermore, explicit formulae of tumor volume at any time t are found in androgen-deprived environment under the assumption of radial symmetry, and therefore the dynamics of tumor growth under androgen-deprived therapy could be predicted by these formulae. Qualitative analysis and numerical simulation show that controlling the mutation may improve the effect of hormone therapy or delay a tumor relapse.

  8. Curcumin delays development of MPA-accelerated DMBA-induced mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Candace E.; Benakanakere, Indira; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Hyder, Salman M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Combined hormone replacement therapy (HRT) containing estrogen and progestin (medroxyprogesterone acetate [MPA]) leads to increased risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, compared with HRT regimens containing estrogen alone, or placebo. We previously reported that, in animal models, progestins can accelerate the development of mammary tumors by increasing VEGF levels. We furthermore showed that curcumin, an Indian spice derived from the turmeric root, specifically inhibits MPA-induced VEGF secretion from breast cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated whether curcumin inhibits DMBA-induced, MPA-accelerated tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats. Design On Day 0, virgin female Sprague-Dawley rats (55 days old) were given DMBA (20 mg/rat). 60-day timed-release pellets containing 25 mg MPA were implanted into rats on day 30. Curcumin was administered daily at a rate of 200 mg/kg/day from day 26 to day 50 and animals were sacrificed on day 52 (n=15-19 per group). Results Treatment with curcumin delayed the first appearance of MPA-accelerated tumors by 7 days, decreased tumor incidence by the end of the experiment, and reduced tumor multiplicity in DMBA-induced MPA accelerated tumors. Curcumin also prevented many of the gross histological changes seen in the MPA-treated mammary gland. Immunohistochemical analyses of mammary tumors showed that curcumin decreased MPA-induced VEGF induction in hyperplastic lesions, although it did not affect the levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors. Conclusions We suggest that curcumin be tested as a dietary chemopreventive agent in women already exposed to MPA in an effort to decrease or delay the risk of breast cancer associated with combined HRT. PMID:19629015

  9. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These findings revealed that OGCs in the tumor environment promoted tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis, at least in part, by secreting VEGF-C.

  10. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  11. Joint tumor growth prediction and tumor segmentation on therapeutic follow-up PET images.

    PubMed

    Mi, Hongmei; Petitjean, Caroline; Vera, Pierre; Ruan, Su

    2015-07-01

    Tumor response to treatment varies among patients. Patient-specific prediction of tumor evolution based on medical images during the treatment can help to build and adapt patient's treatment planning in a non-invasive way. Personalized tumor growth modeling allows patient-specific prediction by estimating model parameters based on individual's images. The model parameters are often estimated by optimizing a cost function constructed based on the tumor delineations. In this paper, we propose a joint framework for tumor growth prediction and tumor segmentation in the context of patient's therapeutic follow ups. Throughout the treatment, a series of sequential positron emission tomography (PET) images are acquired for tumor response monitoring. We propose to take into account the predicted information, which is used in combination with the random walks (RW) algorithm, to develop an automatic tumor segmentation method on PET images. Moreover, we propose an iterative scheme of RW, making the segmentation more performant. Furthermore, the obtained segmentation is applied to the process of model parameter estimation so as to get the model based prediction of tumor evolution. We evaluate our methods on 7 lung tumor patients, totaling 29 PET exams, under radiotherapy by comparing the obtained tumor prediction and tumor segmentation with manual tumor delineation by expert. Our system produces promising results when compared to the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25988489

  12. [Delayed growth due to growth hormone deficiency (study of 16 cases)].

    PubMed

    Hachicha, Mongia; Kammoun, Thouraya; Kolsi, Sémia; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid; Jardak, Naziha; Aloulou, Hajer; Bouaziz, Noura; Triki, Ali

    2002-06-01

    Growth hormone deficiency is one of the scarce statural backward causes. It is difficult to make a diagnosis. The purpose of growth hormone treatment is to reach a final normal height and to avoid hypoglycemia after-effects. We give a retrospective account of 16 children (11 boys and 5 girls) who have a growth-delay due to a total growth hormone deficiency confirmed by the stimulation tests and who have also been given benefit of a biosynthetic growth hormone from 1990 to 1999. The statural backwardness varies from--2.5 DS to--4 DS, with an average of--3.5 DS. In all the cases it is a matter of a harmonious backwardness discovered at an average age of 6 years. The bone age has revealed an important backwardness of bone maturation: average bone age of 3 years for boys and 4 years for girls. The hormone balance sheet reveals, in all the cases, a total growth hormone deficiency (GH < 5 ng/ml) combined with a corticotrope deficiency (2 cases) and thyreotrope (3 cases). It is a growth hormone idiopathic deficiency among our patients. The growth hormone treatment has been administered at the average age of 8 years. The weekly doses were (0.4 to 0.8 U/kg). The evolution was favorable with an average growth speed that has gone up from 3 cm/year before the treatment to 10 cm in the first year of the treatment and to 5.5 cm during the second year of the treatment. An average statural gain of 0.8 DS and a bone maturation gain of one year over one year treatment. The authors put into relief the importance of diagnosis criteria of growth backwardness through a GH deficiency and suggest a therapeutic diagram, and a follow-up of the GH biosynthetic treatment. PMID:12534042

  13. An adenoviral cancer vaccine co-encoding a tumor associated antigen together with secreted 4-1BBL leads to delayed tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Andersson, Anne-Marie C; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Laursen, Henriette; Holst, Peter J

    2016-04-19

    Previous studies have shown promising results when using an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody treatment against established tumors. While this is promising, this type of treatment can induce severe side effects. Therefore, we decided to incorporate the membrane form of 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL) in a replicative deficient adenovirus vaccine expressing the invariant chain (Ii) adjuvant fused to a tumor associated antigen (TAA). The Ii adjuvant increases and prolongs TAA specific CD8+ T cells as previously shown and local expression of 4-1BBL was chosen to avoid the toxicity associated with systemic antibody administration. Furthermore, adenovirus encoded 4-1BBL expression has previously been successfully used to enhance responses toward Plasmodium falciparum and Influenza A antigens. We showed that the incorporation of 4-1BBL in the adenovirus vector led to surface expression of 4-1BBL on antigen presenting cells, but it did not enhance T cell responses in mice towards the Ii linked antigen. In tumor-bearing mice, our vaccine was found to decrease the frequency of TAA specific CD8+ T cells, but this difference did not alter the therapeutic efficacy. In order to reconcile our findings with the previous reports of increased anti-cancer efficacy using systemically delivered 4-1BB agonists, we incorporated a secreted version of 4-1BBL (Fc-4-1BBL) in our vaccine and co-expressed it with the Ii linked to TAA. In tumor bearing mice, this vaccine initially delayed tumor growth and slightly increased survival compared to the vaccine expressing the membrane form of 4-1BBL. Accordingly, secreted 4-1BBL co-encoded with the Ii linked antigen may offer a simplification compared to administration of drug and vaccine separately. PMID:27004934

  14. Time delay and noise explaining the behaviour of the cell growth in fermentation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuobi, Tawfiqullah; Rosli, Norhayati; Bahar, Arifah; Salleh, Madihah Md

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes to investigate the interplay between time delay and external noise in explaining the behaviour of the microbial growth in batch fermentation process. Time delay and noise are modelled jointly via stochastic delay differential equations (SDDEs). The typical behaviour of cell concentration in batch fermentation process under this model is investigated. Milstein scheme is applied for solving this model numerically. Simulation results illustrate the effects of time delay and external noise in explaining the lag and stationary phases, respectively for the cell growth of fermentation process.

  15. Time delay and noise explaining the behaviour of the cell growth in fermentation process

    SciTech Connect

    Ayuobi, Tawfiqullah; Rosli, Norhayati; Bahar, Arifah; Salleh, Madihah Md

    2015-02-03

    This paper proposes to investigate the interplay between time delay and external noise in explaining the behaviour of the microbial growth in batch fermentation process. Time delay and noise are modelled jointly via stochastic delay differential equations (SDDEs). The typical behaviour of cell concentration in batch fermentation process under this model is investigated. Milstein scheme is applied for solving this model numerically. Simulation results illustrate the effects of time delay and external noise in explaining the lag and stationary phases, respectively for the cell growth of fermentation process.

  16. In vivo-like growth of human tumors in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, A E; Hoffman, R M

    1986-01-01

    We show that diverse human tumors obtained directly from surgery or biopsy can grow at high frequency in vitro for long periods of time and still maintain many of their in vivo properties. The in vivo properties maintained in vitro include three-dimensional growth; maintenance of tissue organization and structure, including changes associated with oncogenic transformation; retention of differentiated function; tumorigenicity; and the growth of multiple types of cells from a single tumor. Images PMID:3458228

  17. Phase transition in tumor growth: I avascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Rebelo, I.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular tumor growth based on a simple chemical network. This model presents a logistic behavior and shows a “second order” phase transition. We prove the fractal origin of the empirical logistics and Gompertz constant and its relation to mitosis and apoptosis rate. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates the entropy production rate as a Lyapunov function during avascular tumor growth.

  18. A Mathematical Model Coupling Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for vascular tumor growth. We use phase fields to model cellular growth and reaction-diffusion equations for the dynamics of angiogenic factors and nutrients. The model naturally predicts the shift from avascular to vascular growth at realistic scales. Our computations indicate that the negative regulation of the Delta-like ligand 4 signaling pathway slows down tumor growth by producing a larger density of non-functional capillaries. Our results show good quantitative agreement with experiments. PMID:26891163

  19. Host Prostaglandin E2-EP3 Signaling Regulates Tumor-Associated Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Hideki; Hayashi, Izumi; Endo, Hirahito; Kitasato, Hidero; Yamashina, Shohei; Maruyama, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Michiyoshi; Satoh, Kazutoyo; Narita, Masami; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Murata, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Hirokuni; Narumiya, Shuh; Majima, Masataka

    2003-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatories are known to suppress incidence and progression of malignancies including colorectal cancers. However, the precise mechanism of this action remains unknown. Using prostaglandin (PG) receptor knockout mice, we have evaluated a role of PGs in tumor-associated angiogenesis and tumor growth, and identified PG receptors involved. Sarcoma-180 cells implanted in wild-type (WT) mice formed a tumor with extensive angiogenesis, which was greatly suppressed by specific inhibitors for cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 but not for COX-1. Angiogenesis in sponge implantation model, which can mimic tumor-stromal angiogenesis, was markedly suppressed in mice lacking EP3 (EP3−/−) with reduced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) around the sponge implants. Further, implanted tumor growth (sarcoma-180, Lewis lung carcinoma) was markedly suppressed in EP3−/−, in which tumor-associated angiogenesis was also reduced. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that major VEGF-expressing cells in the stroma were CD3/Mac-1 double-negative fibroblasts, and that VEGF-expression in the stroma was markedly reduced in EP3−/−, compared with WT. Application of an EP3 receptor antagonist inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis in WT, but not in EP3−/−. These results demonstrate significance of host stromal PGE2-EP3 receptor signaling in tumor development and angiogenesis. An EP3 receptor antagonist may be a candidate of chemopreventive agents effective for malignant tumors. PMID:12538661

  20. Alcohol promotes mammary tumor growth through activation of VEGF-dependent tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    LU, YANMIN; NI, FANG; XU, MEI; YANG, JINLIAN; CHEN, JI; CHEN, ZHUO; WANG, XINYI; LUO, JIA; WANG, SIYING

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has been recognized as a risk factor for breast cancer. Experimental studies demonstrate that alcohol exposure promotes the progression of existing mammary tumors. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. In the present study, the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in alcohol promotion of breast cancer development was investigated using a mouse xenograft model of mammary tumors and a three-dimensional (3D) tumor/endothelial cell co-culture system. For the mouse xenograft model, mouse E0771 breast cancer cells were implanted into the mammary fat pad of C57BL6 mice. These mice were exposed to alcohol in their drinking water. For the 3D co-culture system, E0771 cells and MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells were co-cultured with SVEC4-10EE2 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, respectively. The results demonstrated that alcohol increased tumor angiogenesis and accelerated tumor growth. Furthermore, it appeared that alcohol induced VEGF expression in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Blocking VEGF signaling by SU5416 inhibited tumor angiogenesis in the 3D tumor/endothelial cell co-culture system. Furthermore, injection of SU5416 into mice inhibited alcohol-promoted mammary tumor growth in vivo. These results indicate that alcohol may promote mammary tumor growth by stimulating VEGF-dependent angiogenesis. PMID:25009649

  1. Tumor suppressor XAF1 induces apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li Ming; Shi, Dong Mei; Dai, Qiang; Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Yao, Wei Yan; Sun, Ping Hu; Ding, Yan Fei; Qiao, Min Min; Wu, Yun Lin; Jiang, Shi Hu; Tu, Shui Ping

    2014-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1), a XIAP-binding protein, is a tumor suppressor gene. XAF1 was silent or expressed lowly in most human malignant tumors. However, the role of XAF1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of XAF1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatocellular cancer cells. Our results showed that XAF1 expression was lower in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, Hep G2 and BEL-7404 and liver cancer tissues than that in paired non-cancer liver tissues. Adenovirus-mediated XAF1 expression (Ad5/F35-XAF1) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells in dose- and time- dependent manners. Infection of Ad5/F35-XAF1 induced cleavage of caspase -3, -8, -9 and PARP in HCC cells. Furthermore, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model of liver cancer cells. Western Blot and immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is associated with tumor angiogenesis, in cancer cells and xenograft tumor tissues. Moreover, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that XAF1 inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. XAF1 may be a promising target for liver cancer treatment. PMID:24980821

  2. Tumor suppressor XAF1 induces apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li Ming; Shi, Dong Mei; Dai, Qiang; Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Yao, Wei Yan; Sun, Ping Hu; Ding, Yanfei; Qiao, Min Min; Wu, Yun Lin; Jiang, Shi Hu; Tu, Shui Ping

    2014-07-30

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1), a XIAP-binding protein, is a tumor suppressor gene. XAF1 was silent or expressed lowly in most human malignant tumors. However, the role of XAF1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of XAF1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatocellular cancer cells. Our results showed that XAF1 expression was lower in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, Hep G2 and BEL-7404 and liver cancer tissues than that in paired non-cancer liver tissues. Adenovirus-mediated XAF1 expression (Ad5/F35-XAF1) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells in dose- and time- dependent manners. Infection of Ad5/F35-XAF1 induced cleavage of caspase -3, -8, -9 and PARP in HCC cells. Furthermore, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model of liver cancer cells. Western Blot and immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is associated with tumor angiogenesis, in cancer cells and xenograft tumor tissues. Moreover, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that XAF1 inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. XAF1 may be a promising target for liver cancer treatment. PMID:24980821

  3. Tumor-induced osteomalacia due to a recurrent mesenchymal tumor overexpressing several growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gerothanasi, Nikolina; Frydas, Athanasios; Triantafyllou, Evangelia; Poulios, Chris; Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Apostolou, Panagiotis; Papasotiriou, Ioannis; Tournis, Symeon; Kesisoglou, Isaak; Yovos, John G

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome caused primarily by benign mesenchymal tumors. These tumors typically follow a benign clinical course and local recurrence occurs in <5% of cases. We investigated a 49-year-old man with a recurrent mesenchymal phosphaturic tumor showing no signs of malignancy. The patient suffered from chronic muscle weakness, myalgia and cramps. His medical record included the diagnosis of oncogenic osteomalacia, for which he was submitted to tumor resection in the left leg three times before. Laboratory examination showed hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphaturia and an elevated serum FGF23 level. A radical surgical approach (amputation) was advised, however, complete biochemical and clinical remission was not reached. Molecular analysis of the tumor cells demonstrated overexpression of growth factor receptors implicated in tumor angiogenesis and metastatic potential (platelet derived growth factor type A (PDGFRA), PDGFRB and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor) together with increased expression of FGF23, x-linked-phosphate-regulating endopeptidase and KLOTHO. TIO is usually associated with benign phosphauturic tumors and, when identified, resection of the tumor leads to complete remission in the majority of cases. The underlying pathophysiology of recurrences in these tumors is not known. This is the first report showing increased expression of growth factor receptors in a locally aggressive but histopathologically benign phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor. Learning points TIO is usually associated with benign soft tissue or bone neoplasms of mesenchymal origin.These tumors typically follow a benign clinical course and even in the rare malignant cases local recurrence occurs in <5%.Successful identification and removal of the tumor leads to full recovery in the majority of cases. PMID:26155363

  4. Patient specific tumor growth prediction using multimodal images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixun; Sadowski, Samira M; Weisbrod, Allison B; Kebebew, Electron; Summers, Ronald M; Yao, Jianhua

    2014-04-01

    Personalized tumor growth model is valuable in tumor staging and therapy planning. In this paper, we present a patient specific tumor growth model based on longitudinal multimodal imaging data including dual-phase CT and FDG-PET. The proposed Reaction-Advection-Diffusion model is capable of integrating cancerous cell proliferation, infiltration, metabolic rate and extracellular matrix biomechanical response. To bridge the model with multimodal imaging data, we introduce Intracellular Volume Fraction (ICVF) measured from dual-phase CT and Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) measured from FDG-PET into the model. The patient specific model parameters are estimated by fitting the model to the observation, which leads to an inverse problem formalized as a coupled Partial Differential Equations (PDE)-constrained optimization problem. The optimality system is derived and solved by the Finite Difference Method. The model was evaluated by comparing the predicted tumors with the observed tumors in terms of average surface distance (ASD), root mean square difference (RMSD) of the ICVF map, average ICVF difference (AICVFD) of tumor surface and tumor relative volume difference (RVD) on six patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The ASD between the predicted tumor and the reference tumor was 2.40.5mm, the RMSD was 4.30.4%, the AICVFD was 2.60.6%, and the RVD was 7.71.3%. PMID:24607911

  5. Amplified Ras-MAPK signal states correlate with accelerated EGFR internalization, cytostasis and delayed HER2 tumor onset in Fer-deficient model systems.

    PubMed

    Sangrar, W; Shi, C; Mullins, G; LeBrun, D; Ingalls, B; Greer, P A

    2015-07-30

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Fer belongs to a distinct subfamily of F-BAR domain containing kinases implicated in vesicular trafficking and signaling downstream of adhesion and growth factor receptors. Targeted inactivation of the fer gene in a transgenic mouse model of HER2(+), breast cancer was associated with delayed tumor onset and reduced proliferative rates in tumor cells. Fer deficiency was associated with increased rates of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) internalization and amplified Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk (Ras-MAPK) signaling in primary mammary tumor epithelial cells, as well as increased cytotoxic and anti-proliferative sensitivity to the dual EGFR/HER2 inhibitor Lapatinib (LPN). These observations suggest a model in which accelerated ligand-induced EGFR internalization in Fer-deficient cells hypersensitizes the Ras-MAPK pathway to EGF, resulting in MAPK signal amplification to levels that induce cytostasis, rather than proliferation. Thus, Ras-MAPK cytostatic signaling delays HER2 tumor initiation and increases LPN cytotoxicity in Fer-deficient model systems. Taken together, these data suggest that targeting Fer alone, or in combination with LPN, may be of therapeutic benefit in HER2(+) breast cancer. PMID:25347743

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cell 1 (MSC1)-Based Therapy Attenuates Tumor Growth Whereas MSC2-Treatment Promotes Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Ruth S.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Betancourt, Aline M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation. Conclusion/Significance These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease. PMID:23029122

  7. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (15 ?g/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-?B activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-?B inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-?B pathway. PMID:25730901

  8. Host STAT2/type I interferon axis controls tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Chanyu; Xu, Jun; Estioko, Marc Daryl Tan; Kotredes, Kevin P.; Lopez-Otalora, Yolanda; Hilliard, Brendan A.; Baker, Darren P.; Gallucci, Stefania; Gamero, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    The role of STAT2 in mediating the antigrowth effects of type I interferon (IFN) is well-documented in vitro. Yet evidence of IFN-activated STAT2 as having tumor suppressor function in vivo and participation in antitumor immunity is lacking. Here we show in a syngeneic tumor transplantation model that STAT2 reduces tumor growth. Stat2?/? mice formed larger tumors compared to wild type (WT) mice. IFN-? treatment of Stat2?/? mice did not cause tumor regression. Gene expression analysis revealed a small subset of immunomodulatory genes to be downregulated in tumors established in Stat2?/? mice. Additionally, we found tumor antigen cross-presentation by Stat2?/? dendritic cells to T cells to be impaired. Adoptive transfer of tumor antigen specific CD8+ T cells primed by Stat2?/? dendritic cells into tumor-bearing Stat2?/? mice did not induce tumor regression with IFN-? intervention. We observed that an increase in the number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph nodes of IFN-?-treated tumor-bearing WT mice was absent in IFN-? treated Stat2?/? mice. Thus our study provides evidence for further evaluation of STAT2 function in cancer patients receiving type I IFN based immunotherapy. PMID:24895110

  9. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  10. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  11. Acriflavine inhibits HIF-1 dimerization, tumor growth, and vascularization.

    PubMed

    Lee, KangAe; Zhang, Huafeng; Qian, David Z; Rey, Sergio; Liu, Jun O; Semenza, Gregg L

    2009-10-20

    HIF-1 is a heterodimeric transcription factor that mediates adaptive responses to hypoxia and plays critical roles in cancer progression. Using a cell-based screening assay we have identified acriflavine as a drug that binds directly to HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha and inhibits HIF-1 dimerization and transcriptional activity. Pretreatment of mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts with acriflavine prevented tumor growth and treatment of mice bearing established tumors resulted in growth arrest. Acriflavine treatment inhibited intratumoral expression of angiogenic cytokines, mobilization of angiogenic cells into peripheral blood, and tumor vascularization. These results provide proof of principle that small molecules can inhibit dimerization of HIF-1 and have potent inhibitory effects on tumor growth and vascularization. PMID:19805192

  12. Acriflavine inhibits HIF-1 dimerization, tumor growth, and vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, KangAe; Zhang, Huafeng; Qian, David Z.; Rey, Sergio; Liu, Jun O.; Semenza, Gregg L.

    2009-01-01

    HIF-1 is a heterodimeric transcription factor that mediates adaptive responses to hypoxia and plays critical roles in cancer progression. Using a cell-based screening assay we have identified acriflavine as a drug that binds directly to HIF-1? and HIF-2? and inhibits HIF-1 dimerization and transcriptional activity. Pretreatment of mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts with acriflavine prevented tumor growth and treatment of mice bearing established tumors resulted in growth arrest. Acriflavine treatment inhibited intratumoral expression of angiogenic cytokines, mobilization of angiogenic cells into peripheral blood, and tumor vascularization. These results provide proof of principle that small molecules can inhibit dimerization of HIF-1 and have potent inhibitory effects on tumor growth and vascularization. PMID:19805192

  13. Tumor endothelial marker 1 (Tem1) functions in the growth and progression of abdominal tumors.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Akash; Karim, Baktiar; Peng, Zhongsheng; Liu, Guosheng; Qiu, Weiping; Gan, Christine; Vogelstein, Bert; St Croix, Brad; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Huso, David L

    2006-02-28

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (Tem1; endosialin) is the prototypical member of a family of genes expressed in the stroma of tumors. To assess the functional role of Tem1, we disrupted the Tem1 gene in mice by targeted homologous recombination. Tem1(-/-) mice were healthy, their wound healing was normal, and tumors grew normally when implanted in s.c. sites. However, there was a striking reduction in tumor growth, invasiveness, and metastasis after transplantation of tumors to abdominal sites in mice without functional Tem1 genes. These data indicate that the stroma can control tumor aggressiveness and that this control varies with anatomic site. Therefore, they have significant implications for the mechanisms underlying tumor invasiveness and for models that evaluate this process. PMID:16492758

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Branching Morphogenesis and Vascular Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huaming

    Feedback regulation of cell lineages is known to play an important role in tissue size control, but the effect in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. We first use a non-spatial model to show that a combination of positive and negative feedback on stem and/or progenitor cell self-renewal leads to bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors and ultrasensitivity to external growth cues. Next, a spatiotemporal model is used to demonstrate spatial patterns such as local budding and branching arise in this setting, and are not consequences of Turing-type instabilities. We next extend the model to a three-dimensional hybrid discrete-continuum model of tumor growth to study the effects of angiogenesis, tumor progression and cancer therapies. We account for the crosstalk between the vasculature and cancer stem cells (CSCs), and CSC transdifferentiation into vascular endothelial cells (gECs), as observed experimentally. The vasculature stabilizes tumor invasiveness but considerably enhances growth. A gEC network structure forms spontaneously within the hypoxic core, consistent with experimental findings. The model is then used to study cancer therapeutics. We demonstrate that traditional anti-angiogenic therapies decelerate tumor growth, but make the tumor highly invasive. Chemotherapies help to reduce tumor sizes, but cannot control the invasion. Anti-CSC therapies that promote differentiation or disturb the stem cell niche effectively reduce tumor invasiveness. However, gECs inherit mutations present in CSCs and are resistant to traditional therapies. We show that anti-gEC treatments block the support on CSCs by gECs, and reduce both tumor size and invasiveness. Our study suggests that therapies targeting the vasculature, CSCs and gECs, when combined, are highly synergistic and are capable of controlling both tumor size and shape.

  15. Comparative Effects of CT Imaging Measurement on RECIST End Points and Tumor Growth Kinetics Modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, C H; Bies, R R; Wang, Y; Sharma, M R; Karovic, S; Werk, L; Edelman, M J; Miller, A A; Vokes, E E; Oto, A; Ratain, M J; Schwartz, L H; Maitland, M L

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative assessments of tumor burden and modeling of longitudinal growth could improve phase II oncology trials. To identify obstacles to wider use of quantitative measures we obtained recorded linear tumor measurements from three published lung cancer trials. Model-based parameters of tumor burden change were estimated and compared with similarly sized samples from separate trials. Time-to-tumor growth (TTG) was computed from measurements recorded on case report forms and a second radiologist blinded to the form data. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST)-based progression-free survival (PFS) measures were perfectly concordant between the original forms data and the blinded radiologist re-evaluation (intraclass correlation coefficient = 1), but these routine interrater differences in the identification and measurement of target lesions were associated with an average 18-week delay (range, -20 to 55 weeks) in TTG (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.32). To exploit computational metrics for improving statistical power in small clinical trials will require increased precision of tumor burden assessments. PMID:26790562

  16. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scium, G.; Shelton, S.; Gray, W. G.; Miller, C. T.; Hussain, F.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behavior of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory. A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TCs), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HCs); and an interstitial fluid for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a finite element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTSs) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behavior: initially, the rapidly growing TCs tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 ?m, surrounded by a shell of viable TCs whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first casemostly due to the relative adhesion of the TCs and HCs to the ECM, and the less favorable transport of nutrients. In particular, for HCs adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced as the malignant mass grows, whereas TC infiltration is predicted for the opposite condition. Interestingly, the infiltration potential of the tumor mass is mostly driven by the relative cell adhesion to the ECM. In the third case, a tumor cord model is analyzed where the malignant cells grow around microvessels in a three-dimensional geometry. It is shown that TCs tend to migrate among adjacent vessels seeking new oxygen and nutrients. This model can predict and optimize the efficacy of anticancer therapeutic strategies. It can be further developed to answer questions on tumor biophysics, related to the effects of ECM stiffness and cell adhesion on TC proliferation.

  17. Delay-based control model for Czochralski growth of high-quality oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, D.; Klemenz, C. F.

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a study to model the Czochralski growth process as a time-varying time delay linear input-output model. It was especially designed for the slow growing of oxide crystals (?2 mm/h). Such crystals pose a significant challenge to the control system design because of the delayed effect of the power change on the growth rate. This delay is caused by slow heat-mass transfer and large measurement lag. In this study, controlled perturbations were applied during the growth process to identify the effects of system parameters such as melt level on the time delay. We observed that the time delay rises with the decreasing melt level. For advanced adaptive control system with such time-varying delay, real time process identification is needed. Higher-order autoregressive moving average with exogenous input (ARMAX) model with recursive estimation was considered to represent the growth process with delay in real time. The use of such high-order model and especially its stability for real-time process identification are discussed. Also during these experiments, constraints on the process control to preserve the crystal quality were identified. These experiments were carried out on the growth of high-quality La 3Ga 5.5Ta 0.5O 14 (LGT).

  18. Thymidine Phosphorylase is Angiogenic and Promotes Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Amir; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Fan, Tai-Ping D.; Hu, De-En; Lees, Vivien C.; Turley, Helen; Fox, Stephen B.; Gatter, Kevin C.; Harris, Adrian L.; Bicknell, Roy

    1995-02-01

    Platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor was previously identified as the sole angiogenic activity present in platelets; it is now known to be thymidine phosphorylase (TP). The effect of TP on [methyl-^3H]thymidine uptake does not arise from de novo DNA synthesis and the molecule is not a growth factor. Despite this, TP is strongly angiogenic in a rat sponge and freeze-injured skin graft model. Neutralizing antibodies and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that the enzyme activity of TP is a condition for its angiogenic activity. The level of TP was found to be elevated in human breast tumors compared to normal breast tissue (P < 0.001). Overexpression of TP in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells had no effect on growth in vitro but markedly enhanced tumor growth in vivo. These data and the correlation of expression in tumors with malignancy identify TP as a target for antitumor strategies.

  19. Obesity promotes melanoma tumor growth: Role of leptin

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Elizabeth L.; Gu, Jian-Wei; Cantwell, Lauren; He, Zhi; Wallace, Gray; Hall, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that obesity increases the risk of developing several cancers, including melanoma. Obesity increases the expression of angiogenic factors, such as leptin, that may contribute to tumor growth. However, a direct cause and effect relationship between obesity and tumor growth has not been clearly established and the role of leptin in accelerating tumor growth is unclear. Our objective in the present study was to examine the rate of melanoma tumor growth in lean and obese mice with leptin deficiency or high levels of plasma leptin. We injected 1 106 B16F10 melanoma cells subcutaneously into lean wild type (WT), obese melanocortin receptor 4 knockout (MC4R?/?), which have high leptin levels, obese leptin-deficient(ob ?/?), pair fed lean ob?/?, and lean ob+/? mice. Mean body weights were 29.7 0.3 g (WT), 46.3 1.9 g (MC4R?/?), 63.7 0.9 g (ob?/?), 30.5 1.0 g (pair fed ob?/?) and 31.6 1.7 g (ob+/?). Tumors were much larger in the obese leptin deficientob?/? (5.1 0.9 g) and obese MC4R?/? (5.1 0.7 g) than in lean WT (1.9 0.3 g) and ob+/? (2.8 0.7 g) mice. prevention of obesity by pair feeding ob?/? mice dramatically reduced tumor weight (0.95 0.2 g) to a level that was significantly lower than in WT mice of the same weight. Tumor VEGF levels were the highest in the obese mouse tumors (p < 0.05), regardless of the host leptin levels. Except for the lean ob+/?, MC4R?/? and ob?/? melanomas had the highest VEGF receptor 1 and VEGF receptor 2 protein expression (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05), respectively. These results indicate that obesity markedly increases melanoma tumor growth rate by mechanisms that may involve upregulation of VEGF pathways. although tumor growth does not require host leptin, melanoma tumor growth may be accelerated by leptin. PMID:19713740

  20. TNF? antagonization alters NOS2 dependent nasopharyngeal carcinoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Bourouba, Mehdi; Zergoun, Ahmed-Amine; Maffei, Joseph S; Chila, Dalia; Djennaoui, Djamel; Asselah, Fatima; Amir-Tidadini, Zine-Charef; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2015-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF?) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which mediates via nitric oxide (NO) several carcinogenic processes. Increasing evidences suggest that NO promotes inflammation induced growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In patients, TNF? synthesis associates with poor survival. To explore the effect of the cytokine on NO production and NOS2 dependent NPC growth, NO2(-) (nitrite) producing cells in patients were analyzed in vitro. We observed that patients' monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) and primary tumor biopsies synthesized significant amounts of NO2(-). Interestingly, tumor explants derived NO2(-) levels were more important in elderly patients in comparison with juveniles. Endogenous TNF? neutralization with an anti-TNF? monoclonal antibody (mAb) successfully inhibited NO2(-) synthesis by blood mononuclear cells and tumor explants. Recombinant TNF? (rTNF?) enhanced NO2(-) synthesis and C666-1 NPC cell proliferation. NOS2 selective inhibition (1400W) and TNF? antagonization with an anti-TNF? mAb potently inhibited rTNF? induced C666-1 proliferation and NO2(-) production. Importantly, primary tumors treated with the anti-TNF? mAb also displayed reduced proliferation index (Ki67). Altogether, our results define monocytes/macrophages and the primary tumor as major sources of circulating NO2(-) in NPC patients and support the idea that antibody dependent inhibition of the TNF?/NOS2 pathway may alter NPC tumor growth. PMID:25912222

  1. Induction of apoptosis in tumor cells as a mechanism of tumor growth reduction in allergic mice.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Flávia C H; Menezes, Gustavo B; Moura, Sandra A L; Cassali, Geovanni D; Teixeira, Mauro M; Cara, Denise C

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Analysis of epidemiological data has revealed a negative relationship between allergic conditions and cancer incidence. This study addresses the effects of chronic antigen ingestion by sensitized mice (allergy) on Ehrlich tumor growth in mouse footpad. Mice were sensitized (allergic) or not (sham) with ovalbumin and challenged orally with egg white solution. After one week of oral challenge, all mice were inoculated with experimental Ehrlich tumor (EET) cells in the footpad, and tumor growth was evaluated for 21 days. A decrease in tumor growth occurred, as assessed by paw thickness in the allergic group, which was associated with smaller areas of necrosis, reduced infiltration of neutrophils, and reduced levels of IFN-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10. Although, the tumor proliferation rate was similar in both groups, an increase in apoptosis occurred in allergic mice. In conclusion, analysis of the data obtained allows us to suggest that a concomitant allergic condition would reduce tumor progression through increased tumor cell apoptosis, accompanied by reduced areas of necrosis at the tumor site. Indeed, such findings suggested a possible mechanism for the reduced cancer incidence observed in allergic individuals. PMID:19268488

  2. Inhibition of tumor growth by histoincompatible cells expressing interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Roth, C; Mir, L M; Cressent, M; Quintin-Colonna, F; Ley, V; Fradelizi, D; Kourilsky, P

    1992-12-01

    Murine tumor cells engineered to express IL-2 have been shown to be rejected by the syngeneic host, which is then protected against a subsequent tumorigenic challenge. To assess whether IL-2 has to be produced by the tumor cells themselves, or whether its local delivery would be sufficient to promote such beneficial effects, the syngeneic tumor cells were co-inoculated with allogeneic or xenogeneic cells secreting IL-2, selected after gene transfection. In several murine systems, it was observed that this is an efficient approach for controlling the growth of the syngeneic tumor. However, animals which rejected the tumor were not protected against a subsequent challenge. Several lines of evidence indicate that NK cells play a major role in tumor rejection induced by the IL-2 expressing histoincompatible vector cells. Thus, while local delivery of IL-2 in the vicinity of a tumor might not be sufficient to promote a systemic long-term specific antitumor immune response, it can control the growth of the primary syngeneic tumor. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using genetically engineered histoincompatible cells (which are rejected by the host's immune system) as a transient delivery system in vivo. PMID:1286066

  3. Tumor-environment biomimetics delay peritoneal metastasis formation by deceiving and redirecting disseminated cancer cells.

    PubMed

    De Vlieghere, Elly; Gremonprez, Flix; Verset, Laurine; Marin, Lore; Jones, Christopher J; De Craene, Bram; Berx, Geert; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Remon, Jean-Paul; Ceelen, Wim; Demetter, Pieter; Bracke, Marc; De Geest, Bruno G; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is life threatening and is the result of an extensive communication between disseminated cancer cells, mesothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF). CAFs secrete extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins creating a receptive environment for peritoneal implantation. Considering cancer as an ecosystem may provide opportunities to exploit CAFs to create biomimetic traps to deceive and redirect cancer cells. We have designed microparticles (MP) containing a CAF-derived ECM-surface that is intended to compete with natural niches. CAFs were encapsulated in alginate/gelatine beads (500-750?m in diameter) functionalised with a polyelectrolyte coating (MP[CAF]). The encapsulated CAFs remain viable and metabolically active (?35 days), when permanently encapsulated. CAF-derived ECM proteins are retained by the non-biodegradable coating. Adhesion experiments mimicking the environment of the peritoneal cavity show the selective capture of floating cancer cells from different tumor origins by MP[CAF] compared to control MP. MP[CAF] are distributed throughout the abdominal cavity without attachment to intestinal organs and without signs of inflammatory reaction. Intraperitoneal delivery of MP[CAF] and sequential removal redirects cancer cell adhesion from the surgical wound to the MP[CAF], delays peritoneal metastasis formation and prolongs animal survival. Our experiments suggest the use of a biomimetic trap based on tumor-environment interactions to delay peritoneal metastasis. PMID:25907048

  4. Three-Dimensional Multispecies Nonlinear Tumor GrowthII: Tumor Invasion and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Frieboes, H.B.; Jin, F.; Chuang, Y.-L.; Wise, S.M.; Lowengrub, J.S.; Cristini, V.

    2010-01-01

    We extend the diffuse interface model developed in Wise et al. (2008) to study nonlinear tumor growth in 3D. Extensions include the tracking of multiple viable cell species populations through a continuum diffuse-interface approach, onset and aging of discrete tumor vessels through angiogenesis, and incorporation of individual cell movement using a hybrid continuum-discrete approach. We investigate disease progression as a function of cellular-scale parameters such as proliferation and oxygen/nutrient uptake rates. We find that heterogeneity in the physiologically complex tumor microenvironment, caused by non-uniform distribution of oxygen, cell nutrients, and metabolites, as well as phenotypic changes affecting cellular-scale parameters, can be quantitatively linked to the tumor macro-scale as a mechanism that promotes morphological instability. This instability leads to invasion through tumor infiltration of surrounding healthy tissue. Models that employ a biologically-founded, multiscale approach, as illustrated in this work, could help to quantitatively link the critical effect of heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment with clinically observed tumor growth and invasion. Using patient tumor-specific parameter values, this approach may provide a predictive tool to characterize the complex in vivo tumor physiological characteristics and clinical response, and thus lead to improved treatment modalities and prognosis. PMID:20303982

  5. Dietary rice bran component γ-oryzanol inhibits tumor growth in tumor-bearing mice.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Kim SP; Kang MY; Nam SH; Friedman M

    2012-06-01

    SCOPE: We investigated the effects of rice bran and components on tumor growth in mice.METHODS AND RESULTS: Mice fed standard diets supplemented with rice bran, γ-oryzanol, Ricetrienol®, ferulic acid, or phytic acid for 2 weeks were inoculated with CT-26 colon cancer cells and fed the same diet for two additional weeks. Tumor mass was significantly lower in the γ-oryzanol and less so in the phytic acid group. Tumor inhibition was associated with the following biomarkers: increases in cytolytic activity of splenic natural killer (NK) cells; partial restoration of nitric oxide production and phagocytosis in peritoneal macrophages increases in released the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 from macrophages; and reductions in the number of blood vessels inside the tumor. Pro-angiogenic biomarkers vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and 5-lipoxygenase-5 (5-LOX) were also significantly reduced in mRNA and protein expression by tumor genes. ELISA of tumor cells confirmed reduced expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX up to 30%. Reduced COX-2 and 5-LOX expression downregulated VEGF and inhibited neoangiogenesis inside the tumors.CONCLUSION: Induction of NK activity, activation of macrophages, and inhibition of angiogenesis seem to contribute to the inhibitory mechanism of tumor regression by γ-oryzanol.

  6. Mathematical modeling of tumor growth and metastatic spreading: validation in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Niklas; Mollard, Sverine; Barbolosi, Dominique; Benabdallah, Assia; Chapuisat, Guillemette; Henry, Gerard; Giacometti, Sarah; Iliadis, Athanassios; Ciccolini, Joseph; Faivre, Christian; Hubert, Florence

    2014-11-15

    Defining tumor stage at diagnosis is a pivotal point for clinical decisions about patient treatment strategies. In this respect, early detection of occult metastasis invisible to current imaging methods would have a major impact on best care and long-term survival. Mathematical models that describe metastatic spreading might estimate the risk of metastasis when no clinical evidence is available. In this study, we adapted a top-down model to make such estimates. The model was constituted by a transport equation describing metastatic growth and endowed with a boundary condition for metastatic emission. Model predictions were compared with experimental results from orthotopic breast tumor xenograft experiments conducted in Nod/Scid? mice. Primary tumor growth, metastatic spread and growth were monitored by 3D bioluminescence tomography. A tailored computational approach allowed the use of Monolix software for mixed-effects modeling with a partial differential equation model. Primary tumor growth was described best by Bertalanffy, West, and Gompertz models, which involve an initial exponential growth phase. All other tested models were rejected. The best metastatic model involved two parameters describing metastatic spreading and growth, respectively. Visual predictive check, analysis of residuals, and a bootstrap study validated the model. Coefficients of determination were [Formula: see text] for primary tumor growth and [Formula: see text] for metastatic growth. The data-based model development revealed several biologically significant findings. First, information on both growth and spreading can be obtained from measures of total metastatic burden. Second, the postulated link between primary tumor size and emission rate is validated. Finally, fast growing peritoneal metastases can only be described by such a complex partial differential equation model and not by ordinary differential equation models. This work advances efforts to predict metastatic spreading during the earliest stages of cancer. PMID:25217520

  7. Dual targeting of glioma U251 cells with nanoparticles prevents tumor angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongjie; Fan, Kaichun; Wang, Shousen; Liu, Zheng; Zheng, Zhaocong

    2012-05-01

    Important advances have been made within in past few years in the treatment of glioma, however, the longterm prognosis after resection of glioma remains unsatisfactory as a result of a high incidence of recurrence. To solve this problem, many biologic therapies have been investigated. In the present study, we report a nanoparticle with properties for dual targeting of tumor cells and the neovasculature. The nanoparticle comprises encoding vasohibin and RGD 12-mer cationic peptide RKKRRQRRRRGD (Tat49-57RGD) peptides, which a nuclear nanoparticle within an extranuclear peptide envelope. Our results demonstrate that the nanoparticle could prevent tumor angiogenesis and inhibit tumor growth via attenuating neovasculature formation and inducing tumor apoptosis. Therefore, the dual targeting strategy of tumor cells and neovasculature represents an integrative approach in glioma therapy. This can be extended to additional agents to target multiple signal pathways or distinct tumor compartments. PMID:22475398

  8. Delayed Effects of Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Germ Cell Tumor Patients With Central Nervous System Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Danielle M. Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases are uncommon in patients with germ cell tumors, with an incidence of 2-3%. CNS metastases have been managed with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and concomitant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Our previous study did not observe serious CNS toxicity (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1991;22:17-22). We now report on 5 patients who developed delayed significant CNS toxicity. Patients and Methods: We observed 5 patients with delayed CNS toxicity. The initial diagnosis was between 1981 and 2003. All patients had poor-risk disease according to the International Germ Cell Consensus Collaborative Group criteria. Of the 5 patients, 3 had CNS metastases at diagnosis and 2 developed relapses with CNS metastases. These 5 patients underwent WBRT to 4,000-5,000 cGy in 18-28 fractions concurrently with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: All 5 patients developed delayed symptoms consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The symptoms included seizures, hemiparesis, cranial neuropathy, headaches, blindness, dementia, and ataxia. The median time from WBRT to CNS symptoms was 72 months (range, 9-228). Head imaging revealed multiple abnormalities consistent with gliosis and diffuse cerebral atrophy. Of the 5 patients, 3 had progressive and 2 stable symptoms. Treatment with surgery and/or steroids had modest benefit. The progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy resulted in significant debility in all 5 patients, resulting in death (3 patients), loss of work, steroid-induced morbidity, and recurrent hospitalizations. Conclusion: Whole brain radiotherapy is not innocuous in young patients with germ cell tumors and can cause late CNS toxicity.

  9. An antibody to amphiregulin, an abundant growth factor in patients' fluids, inhibits ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, S; Lindzen, M; Lauriola, M; Shirazi, N; Sinha, S; Abdul-Hai, A; Levanon, K; Korach, J; Barshack, I; Cohen, Y; Onn, A; Mills, G; Yarden, Y

    2016-01-28

    Growth factors of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)/neuregulin family are involved in tumor progression and, accordingly, antibodies that intercept a cognate receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ERBB1, or a co-receptor, HER2, have been approved for cancer therapy. Although they might improve safety and delay onset of chemoresistance, no anti-ligand antibodies have been clinically approved. To identify suitable ligands, we surveyed fluids from ovarian and lung cancer patients and found that amphiregulin (AREG) is the most abundant and generalized ligand secreted by advanced tumors. AREG is a low affinity EGFR ligand, which is upregulated following treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Because AREG depletion retarded growth of xenografted ovarian tumors in mice, we generated a neutralizing monoclonal anti-AREG antibody. The antibody inhibited growth of ovarian cancer xenografts and strongly enhanced chemotherapy efficacy. Taken together, these results raise the possibility that AREG and other low- or high-affinity binders of EGFR might serve as potential targets for cancer therapy. PMID:25915843

  10. Molecular Cochaperones: Tumor Growth and Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular chaperones play important roles in all cellular organisms by maintaining the proteome in an optimally folded state. They appear to be at a premium in cancer cells whose evolution along the malignant pathways requires the fostering of cohorts of mutant proteins that are employed to overcome tumor suppressive regulation. To function at significant rates in cells, HSPs interact with cochaperones, proteins that assist in catalyzing individual steps in molecular chaperoning as well as in posttranslational modification and intracellular localization. We review current knowledge regarding the roles of chaperones such as heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and Hsp70 and their cochaperones in cancer. Cochaperones are potential targets for cancer therapy in themselves and can be used to assess the likely prognosis of individual malignancies. Hsp70 cochaperones Bag1, Bag3, and Hop play significant roles in the etiology of some cancers as do Hsp90 cochaperones Aha1, p23, Cdc37, and FKBP1. Others such as the J domain protein family, HspBP1, TTC4, and FKBPL appear to be associated with more benign tumor phenotypes. The key importance of cochaperones for many pathways of protein folding in cancer suggests high promise for the future development of novel pharmaceutical agents. PMID:24278769

  11. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors. PMID:19845874

  12. Pinning of tumoral growth by enhancement of the immune response.

    PubMed

    Br, A; Albertos, S; Lpez Garca-Asenjo, J A; Br, I

    2004-06-11

    Tumor growth is a surface phenomenon of the molecular beam epitaxy universality class in which diffusion at the surface is the determining factor. This Letter reports experiments performed in mice showing that these dynamics can, however, be changed. By stimulating the immune response, we induced strong neutrophilia around the tumor. The neutrophils hindered cell surface diffusion so much that they induced new dynamics compatible with the slower quenched-disorder Edwards-Wilkinson universality class. Important clinical effects were also seen, including remarkably high tumor necrosis (around 80%-90% of the tumor), a general increase in survival time [the death ratio in the control group is 15.76 times higher than in the treated group (equivalent to a Cox's model hazard ratio of 0.85; 95% confidence interval 0.76-0.95, p=0.004)], and even the total elimination of some tumors. PMID:15245196

  13. Pinning of Tumoral Growth by Enhancement of the Immune Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brú, A.; Albertos, S.; García-Asenjo, J. A.; Brú, I.

    2004-06-01

    Tumor growth is a surface phenomenon of the molecular beam epitaxy universality class in which diffusion at the surface is the determining factor. This Letter reports experiments performed in mice showing that these dynamics can, however, be changed. By stimulating the immune response, we induced strong neutrophilia around the tumor. The neutrophils hindered cell surface diffusion so much that they induced new dynamics compatible with the slower quenched-disorder Edwards-Wilkinson universality class. Important clinical effects were also seen, including remarkably high tumor necrosis (around 80% 90% of the tumor), a general increase in survival time [the death ratio in the control group is 15.76 times higher than in the treated group (equivalent to a Cox's model hazard ratio of 0.85; 95% confidence interval 0.76 0.95, p=0.004)], and even the total elimination of some tumors.

  14. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts and Tumor Growth: Focus on Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    De Veirman, Kim; Rao, Luigia; De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Van Riet, Ivan; Frassanito, Maria Antonia; Di Marzo, Lucia; Vacca, Angelo; Vanderkerken, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) comprise a heterogeneous population that resides within the tumor microenvironment. They actively participate in tumor growth and metastasis by production of cytokines and chemokines, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors, creating a more supportive microenvironment. The aim of the current review is to summarize the origin and characteristics of CAFs, and to describe the role of CAFs in tumor progression and metastasis. Furthermore, we focus on the presence of CAFs in hypoxic conditions in relation to multiple myeloma disease. PMID:24978438

  15. Regulatory B cells preferentially accumulate in tumor-draining lymph nodes and promote tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Ganti, Sheila N.; Albershardt, Tina C.; Iritani, Brian M.; Ruddell, Alanna

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies found that B16-F10 melanoma growth in the rear footpad of immunocompetent mice induces marked B cell accumulation within tumor-draining popliteal lymph nodes (TDLN). This B cell accumulation drives TDLN remodeling that precedes and promotes metastasis, indicating a tumor-promoting role for TDLN B cells. Here we show that phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes in mice bearing B16-F10 melanomas identifies preferential accumulation of T2-MZP B cells in the TDLN. Comparison of non-draining LNs and spleens of tumor-bearing mice with LNs and spleens from nave mice determined that this pattern of B cell accumulation was restricted to the TDLN. B cell-deficient and immunocompetent mice reconstituted with T2-MZP B cells but not with other B cell subsets displayed accelerated tumor growth, demonstrating that T2-MZP B cells possess regulatory activity in tumor-bearing mice. Unlike splenic regulatory B cells, however, these TDLN B cells did not exhibit increased IL-10 production, nor did they promote Treg generation in the TDLN. These findings demonstrate that tumors initially signal via the lymphatic drainage to stimulate the preferential accumulation of T2-MZP regulatory B cells. This local response may be an early and critical step in generating an immunosuppressive environment to permit tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26193241

  16. Heparanase-neutralizing antibodies attenuate lymphoma tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Marina; Arvatz, Gil; Horowitz, Netanel; Feld, Sari; Naroditsky, Inna; Zhang, Yi; Ng, Mary; Hammond, Edward; Nevo, Eviatar; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2016-01-19

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans, resulting in disassembly of the extracellular matrix underlying endothelial and epithelial cells and associating with enhanced cell invasion and metastasis. Heparanase expression is induced in carcinomas and sarcomas, often associating with enhanced tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. In contrast, the function of heparanase in hematological malignancies (except myeloma) was not investigated in depth. Here, we provide evidence that heparanase is expressed by human follicular and diffused non-Hodgkin's B-lymphomas, and that heparanase inhibitors restrain the growth of tumor xenografts produced by lymphoma cell lines. Furthermore, we describe, for the first time to our knowledge, the development and characterization of heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that inhibit cell invasion and tumor metastasis, the hallmark of heparanase activity. Using luciferase-labeled Raji lymphoma cells, we show that the heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies profoundly inhibit tumor load in the mouse bones, associating with reduced cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Notably, we found that Raji cells lack intrinsic heparanase activity, but tumor xenografts produced by this cell line exhibit typical heparanase activity, likely contributed by host cells composing the tumor microenvironment. Thus, the neutralizing monoclonal antibodies attenuate lymphoma growth by targeting heparanase in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26729870

  17. Histone Methylase MLL1 plays critical roles in tumor growth and angiogenesis and its knockdown suppresses tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed lineage leukemias (MLL) are human histone H3 lysine-4 specific methyl transferases that play critical roles in gene expression, epigenetics, and cancer. Herein, we demonstrated that antisense-mediated knockdown of MLL1 induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cultured cells. Intriguingly, application of MLL1-antisense specifically knocked down MLL1 in vivo and suppressed the growth of xenografted cervical tumor implanted in nude mouse. MLL1-knockdown downregulated various growth and angiogenic factors such as HIF1?, VEGF and CD31 in tumor tissue affecting tumor growth. MLL1 is overexpressed along the line of vascular network and localized adjacent to endothelial cell layer expressing CD31, indicating potential roles of MLL1 in vasculogenesis. MLL1 is also overexpressed in the hypoxic regions along with HIF1?. Overall, our studies demonstrated that MLL1 is a key player in hypoxia signaling, vasculogenesis, and tumor growth, and its depletion suppresses tumor growth in vivo, indicating its potential in novel cancer therapy. PMID:22926525

  18. Embelin suppresses pancreatic cancer growth by modulating tumor immune microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Justine L; Jackman, Chris P; Tang, Su-Ni; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2014-01-01

    Since pancreatic carcinoma is largely refractory to conventional therapies, development of novel agents is required for the effective treatment of pancreatic cancer. The objective of this paper was to examine the molecular mechanisms by which embelin inhibited human pancreatic cancer growth in mice by modulating tumor immune microenvironment. Embelin inhibited PANC-1 tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis which were associated with suppression of Akt and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways. Embelin inhibited the expression of Bcl-2, cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK6, IL-6 and IL-8, and induced the expression of Bax in tumor tissues. Embelin also reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of Snail, Slug and Zeb1. Embelin inhibited pancreatic cancer growth in Kras(G12D) mice by modulating tumor immune microenvironment where CTL, NKT, ??T, NK, and IFN? (Th1 type) cells were up-regulated, and Th17, PMN-MDSC, IL-6 and IL-8 (Th2 type) immune cells were inhibited. These data suggest that embelin can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth by modulating tumor immune microenvironment and Akt and Shh pathways, and inhibiting inflammation. Embelin may offer therapeutic benefits for the treatment and/or prevention of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24389175

  19. Inhibition of lung tumor growth and augmentation of radiosensitivity by decreasing peroxiredoxin I expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F.; Keng, Peter C.; Shau Hungyi; Wu, C.-T.; Hu, Y.-C.; Liao, S.-K.; Chen, W.-C. . E-mail: miaofen@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: In this study, we examined the role of peroxiredoxin I (Prx I) in lung cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and its influence on these tumor cells' sensitivity to radiotherapy. Methods and materials: We established stable transfectants of A549 (p53+) and H1299 (p53-) lung carcinoma cell lines with Prx I antisense to downregulate their Prx I protein. We then examined their in vitro biologic changes and used nude mice xenografts of these cell lines to compare tumor invasion, spontaneous metastatic capacity, and sensitivity to radiotherapy. Results: The Prx I antisense transfectants of both cell lines showed a significant reduction in Prx I protein production. Prx I antisense transfectants grew more slowly than did the wild type. As xenografts in mice, A549 Prx I antisense transfectants showed a threefold delay in the generation of palpable tumors. The incidence of spontaneous metastasis of Prx I antisense transfectants was significantly less than that of the wild-type cells. Furthermore, irradiation of Prx I antisense transfectants caused more than twice the growth delay compared with the wild type. Conclusion: The results of these studies suggest that inactivation of Prx I may be a promising approach to improve the treatment outcome of patients with lung cancer.

  20. Language growth in children with expressive language delay.

    PubMed

    Fischel, J E; Whitehurst, G J; Caulfield, M B; DeBaryshe, B

    1989-02-01

    Developmental expressive language disorder is a frequently occurring condition in children, characterized by severe delay in the development of expressive language compared with receptive language and cognitive skills. Opinions differ regarding whether expressive language delay is a disorder worthy of active intervention or an indication of normal variation in the onset of expressive language. The purpose of this research was to follow for 5 months 26 2-year-old children in whom expressive language disorder had been carefully diagnosed to discover the rate of improvement and its predictors. Improvement was variable, with approximately one third of the children showing no improvement, one third showing mild improvement, and one third in the normal range at posttest. Nearly two thirds of the variance in improvement could be accounted for by three child variables measured by the pretest: parentally reported vocabulary size, parentally reported problems with having regular meals, and observed frequency of quiet activity not requiring the parent's management. A screening procedure involving only one of those variables, reported vocabulary size, was 81% accurate in identifying children's improvement status. The implications of these results for the management of children with expressive language disorder are discussed. PMID:2913552

  1. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  2. Autocrine and paracrine growth factors in tumor growth: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Michelson, S; Leith, J

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of tumor growth including autocrine and paracrine control has been developed. The model starts with the logistic equation of Verhulst: dV/dt = rV (1-V/K). Autocrine controls are described as modifiers of the Malthusian growth rate (r), while paracrine controls modify the carrying capacity (K) of the system. The control mechanisms are expressed in terms of "candidate" functions, which are based upon the dynamic distribution of TGF-alpha TGF-beta in the local tumor environment. Three paradigms of tissue growth have been modeled: normal tissue wound repair, unrestricted, unperturbed tumor growth, and tumor growth in a (radiation) damaged environment (the Tumor Bed Effect, TBE). These scenarios were used to test the dynamics of the system against known phenomena. Computer simulations are presented for each case. The mode is being extended to include the description of heterogeneous tumors, within which subpopulations can express differential degrees of growth activity. Heterogeneous tumor models, with and without emergent subpopulations, and models of terminal differentiation are also discussed. PMID:1933032

  3. CHIP is a novel tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer and inhibits tumor growth through targeting EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianxiao; Yang, Jingxuan; Xu, Jianwei; Li, Jian; Cao, Zhe; Zhou, Li; You, Lei; Shu, Hong; Lu, Zhaohui; Li, Huihua; Li, Min; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2014-01-01

    Carboxyl terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is involved in protein quality control and mediates several tumor-related proteins in many cancers, but the function of CHIP in pancreatic cancer is not known. Here we show that CHIP interacts and ubiquitinates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for proteasome-mediated degradation in pancreatic cancer cells, thereby inhibiting the activation of EGFR downstream pathways. CHIP suppressed cell proliferation, anchor-independent growth, invasion and migration, as well as enhanced apoptosis induced by erlotinib in vitro and in vivo. The expression of CHIP was decreased in pancreatic cancer tissues or sera. Low CHIP expression in tumor tissues was correlated with tumor differentiation and shorter overall survival. These observations indicate that CHIP serves as a novel tumor suppressor by down-regulating EGFR pathway in pancreatic cancer cells, decreased expression of CHIP was associated with poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24722501

  4. Delay in fatigue crack growth. [in Ti-Al-V alloy under loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Shih, T. T.

    1974-01-01

    The importance of delay, or retardation in the rate of fatigue crack growth, produced by load interactions in variable amplitude loading on the accurate prediction of fatigue lives of engineering structures has been well recognized for some time. Heretofore, only a few simple loading combinations or spectra have been examined systematically. In this investigation the effects of a broad range of loading variables on delay in fatigue crack growth at room temperature are examined for a mill annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The results are used to estimate crack growth behavior under programmed loads.

  5. Growth suppressing factor for endothelial cells exhibits tumor regressing activity.

    PubMed

    Usui, S; Matsunaga, T; Ukai, S; Kiho, T; Hirano, K

    1999-04-01

    Endothelium growth suppressing and tumor-regressing activities were copurified from the conditioned medium of P388D1 culture in the presence of 100 microg/ml carboxymethylated curdlan by a procedure including ammonium sulfate fractionation and six column chromatographies of Ceramic hydroxyapatite, Q-Sepharose, Sephacryl S-300 HR, Matrex PBA-30, PBE94, and anti-bovine serum albumin (anti-BSA) agarose. The intravenous administration of the purified growth suppressing factor for endothelial cells to sarcoma 180-bearing mouse caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable tumor cells in tumor lumps within 16 h. Immunohistochemical study showed that the intravenous injection of the purified factor to sarcoma 180-bearing mouse resulted in hemorrhagic disorder all over the tissue in the tumor lamp. Thus, the purified factor exhibited not only growth suppressing activity for endothelial cells but also tumor regressing activity at a concentration as low as about 15 ng/mouse. The purified factor significantly inhibited in vitro tubulogenesis of bovine artery, human umbilical vein, and adult human darmal microvascular endothelial cells on collagen gel at a concentration of about 5 ng/ml. After the tube formation of endothelial cells was completed on a collagen gel, the purified factor disrupted the tubes at a concentration of about 5 ng/ml within 48 h. These findings demonstrate that endothelium growth suppressing factor is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis as well as the growth of endothelial cells, and may bring about the regression of a solid tumor by inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:10328553

  6. Growth of melanoma brain tumors monitored by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Jacob; Grogan, Patrick; Samadi, Abbas K.; Cui, Huizhong; Cohen, Mark S.; Yang, Xinmai

    2010-07-01

    Melanoma is a primary malignancy that is known to metastasize to the brain and often causes death. The ability to image the growth of brain melanoma in vivo can provide new insights into its evolution and response to therapies. In our study, we use a reflection mode photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) system to detect the growth of melanoma brain tumor in a small animal model. The melanoma tumor cells are implanted in the brain of a mouse at the beginning of the test. Then, PAM is used to scan the region of implantation in the mouse brain, and the growth of the melanoma is monitored until the death of the animal. It is demonstrated that PAM is capable of detecting and monitoring the brain melanoma growth noninvasively in vivo.

  7. Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by photoimmunotherapy targeting tumor-associated macrophage in a sorafenib-resistant tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenran; Gao, Liquan; Cai, Yuehong; Liu, Hao; Gao, Duo; Lai, Jianhao; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play essential roles in tumor invasion and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. Clinical evidence suggests that TAM levels are correlated with local tumor relapse, distant metastasis, and poor prognosis in patients. In this study, we synthesized a TAM-targeted probe (IRD-αCD206) by conjugating a monoclonal anti-CD206 antibody with a near-infrared phthalocyanine dye. We then investigated the potential application of the IRD-αCD206 probe to near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of tumors resistant to treatment with the kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Sorafenib treatment had no effect on tumor growth in a 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer, but induced M2 macrophage polarization in tumors. M2 macrophage recruitment by sorafenib-treated 4T1 tumors was noninvasively visualized by in vivo NIRF imaging of IRD-αCD206. Small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and intratumoral microdistribution analysis indicated TAM-specific localization of the IRD-αCD206 probe in 4T1 tumors after several rounds of sorafenib treatment. Upon light irradiation, IRD-αCD206 suppressed the growth of sorafenib-resistant tumors. In vivo CT imaging and ex vivo histological analysis confirmed the inhibition of lung metastasis in mice by IRD-αCD206 PIT. These results demonstrate the utility of the IRD-αCD206 probe for TAM-targeted diagnostic imaging and treatment of tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutics. PMID:26803407

  8. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Prez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-Garca, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  9. Robo4 vaccines induce antibodies that retard tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaodong; Ahmed, Forhad; Zhang, Yang; Ferguson, Henry J; Steele, Jane C; Steven, Neil M; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Heath, Victoria L; Toellner, Kai-Michael; Bicknell, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Tumor endothelial specific expression of Robo4 in adults identifies this plasma membrane protein as an anti-cancer target for immunotherapeutic approaches, such as vaccination. In this report, we describe how vaccination against Robo4 inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. To break tolerance to the auto-antigen Robo4, mice were immunised with the extracellular domain of mouse Robo4, fused to the Fc domain of human immunoglobulin within an adjuvant. Vaccinated mice show a strong antibody response to Robo4, with no objectively detectable adverse effects on health. Robo4 vaccinated mice showed impaired fibrovascular invasion and angiogenesis in a rodent sponge implantation assay, as well as a reduced growth of implanted syngeneic Lewis lung carcinoma. The anti-tumor effect of Robo4 vaccination was present in CD8 deficient mice but absent in B cell or IgG1 knockout mice, suggesting antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity as the anti-vascular/anti-tumor mechanism. Finally, we show that an adjuvant free soluble Robo4-carrier conjugate can retard tumor growth in carrier primed mice. These results point to appropriate Robo4 conjugates as potential anti-angiogenic vaccines for cancer patients. PMID:25348086

  10. Hypoxia promotes tumor growth in linking angiogenesis to immune escape.

    PubMed

    Chouaib, Salem; Messai, Yosra; Couve, Sophie; Escudier, Bernard; Hasmim, Meriem; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem

    2012-01-01

    Despite the impressive progress over the past decade, in the field of tumor immunology, such as the identification of tumor antigens and antigenic peptides, there are still many obstacles in eliciting an effective immune response to eradicate cancer. It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in the control of immune protection. Tumors have evolved to utilize hypoxic stress to their own advantage by activating key biochemical and cellular pathways that are important in progression, survival, and metastasis. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) play a determinant role in promoting tumor cell growth and survival. Hypoxia contributes to immune suppression by activating HIF-1 and VEGF pathways. Accumulating evidence suggests a link between hypoxia and tumor tolerance to immune surveillance through the recruitment of regulatory cells (regulatory T cells and myeloid derived suppressor cells). In this regard, hypoxia (HIF-1α and VEGF) is emerging as an attractive target for cancer therapy. How the microenvironmental hypoxia poses both obstacles and opportunities for new therapeutic immune interventions will be discussed. PMID:22566905

  11. Hypoxia Promotes Tumor Growth in Linking Angiogenesis to Immune Escape

    PubMed Central

    Chouaib, Salem; Messai, Yosra; Couve, Sophie; Escudier, Bernard; Hasmim, Meriem; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem

    2012-01-01

    Despite the impressive progress over the past decade, in the field of tumor immunology, such as the identification of tumor antigens and antigenic peptides, there are still many obstacles in eliciting an effective immune response to eradicate cancer. It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in the control of immune protection. Tumors have evolved to utilize hypoxic stress to their own advantage by activating key biochemical and cellular pathways that are important in progression, survival, and metastasis. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) play a determinant role in promoting tumor cell growth and survival. Hypoxia contributes to immune suppression by activating HIF-1 and VEGF pathways. Accumulating evidence suggests a link between hypoxia and tumor tolerance to immune surveillance through the recruitment of regulatory cells (regulatory T cells and myeloid derived suppressor cells). In this regard, hypoxia (HIF-1α and VEGF) is emerging as an attractive target for cancer therapy. How the microenvironmental hypoxia poses both obstacles and opportunities for new therapeutic immune interventions will be discussed. PMID:22566905

  12. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    What happens in the early, still undetectable human malignancy is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a “Big Bang” model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed sub-clones that are not subject to stringent selection, and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors revealed the absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), and sub-clone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations, and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear born-to-be-bad, with sub-clone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH with significant clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  13. Iron-tumor cell interaction and regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis: their implication in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Anghileri, L J; Martinez, A C; Maleki, P

    1992-01-01

    Using [59Fe] ferric lactate, a direct relationship between iron concentration and [59Fe] uptake by Ehrlich ascites tumor cells was found. Deferoxamine and albumin inhibited this uptake. Electrophoresis showed that both molecules complexed iron from ferric lactate. [45Ca] uptake in the presence of ferric lactate showed the same inhibition, and an iron mass-dependence, these findings suggest an iron--cell membrane interaction as the cause of this phenomenon. The implication of iron--tumor cell membrane interaction in tumor growth regulation is discussed. PMID:1528320

  14. Adipose-derived stem cells promote tumor initiation and accelerate tumor growth by interleukin-6 production

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hong-Jian; Zeng, Rong; Lu, Jui-Hua; Lai, Wen-Fu T.; Chen, Wei-Hong; Liu, Hen-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ting; Deng, Win-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent cells that have attracted much recent attention. Here, we show that ADSCs enhance sphere formation and in vivo tumor initiation of breast and colon cancer cells. In co-culture, ADSCs induced several stem cell markers in cancer cells. ADSCs also accelerated tumor growth. Interaction of ADSCs and cancer cells stimulated secretion of interlukin-6 in ADSCs, which in turn acted in a paracrine manner on cancer cells to enhance their malignant properties. Interleukin-6 regulated stem cell-related genes and activated JAK2/STAT3 in cancer cells. We suggest that ADSCs may enhance tumor initiation and promotion. PMID:25797257

  15. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss

  16. Altered tumor cell growth and tumorigenicity in models of microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, K.; Taga, M.; Furian, L.; Odle, J.; Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N.; Andrassy, R.; Kulkarni, A.

    Spaceflight environment and microgravity (MG) causes immune dysfunction and is a major health risk to humans, especially during long-term space missions. The effects of microgravity environment on tumor growth and carcinogenesis are yet unknown. Hence, we investigated the effects of simulated MG (SMG) on tumor growth and tumorigenicity using in vivo and in vitro models. B16 melanoma cells were cultured in static flask (FL) and rotating wall vessel bioreactors (BIO) to measure growth and properties, melanin production and apoptosis. BIO cultures had 50% decreased growth (p<0.01), increased doubling time and a 150% increase in melanin production (p<0.05). Flow cytometric analysis showed increased apoptosis in BIO. When BIO cultured melanoma cells were inoculated sc in mice there was a significant increase in tumorigenicity as compared to FL cells. Thus SMG may have supported &selected highly tumorigenic cells and it is pos sible that in addition to decreased immune function MG may alter tumor cell characteristics and invasiveness. Thus it is important to study effects of microgravity environment and its stressors using experimental tumors and SMG to understand and evaluate carcinogenic responses to true microgravity. Further studies on carcinogenic events and their mechanisms will allow us develop and formulate countermeasures and protect space travelers. Additional results will be presented. (Supported by NASA NCC8-168 grant, ADK)

  17. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  18. Polyploidization delay in rat hepatocytes under liver growth inhibition by hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faktor, V. M.; Malyutin, V. F.; Li, S. Y.; Brodskiy, V. Y.

    1981-01-01

    A study of young rats, weighing 55 to 59 g, after being for 10 days in conditions of limited mobility, shows a retardation of body growth as well as that of liver growth. The decrease in the rate of growth is accompanied by a reduction of cell proliferation and by delay polyploidization of hepatocytes in the liver of experimental rats. The materials, methods, and results of research are discussed.

  19. Implication of scatter/growth factors in tumor progression.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Boyer B; Valls AM; Jouanneau J; Delouve A; Thiery JP

    1994-01-01

    Several steps during cancer progression have been distinguished on the basis of anatomo-pathological observations and experimental data. The first step, which consists of the detachment of the cancer cells from the primary tumor prior to their migration, has received much attention. Several lines of evidence have indicated that inducer molecules of tumor cell dispersion are scatter factors which are similar or identical to some growth factors. Our studies have focused on the dispersing effect of growth factors, such as acidic FGF (aFGF) on a rat bladder carcinoma cell line. These studies demonstrated that specific extracellular matrix components might contribute to the scattering effect of soluble growth factors. Additionally, our results indicated that the dispersing action of aFGF is counterbalanced by its mitogenic effect, since these two functions of aFGF cannot be observed simultaneously for the same cell. Depending on its location in the cell collective, a given cell chooses to enter mitosis or to scatter in response to aFGF. The choice between the two responses is apparently driven by molecules belonging to the transducing pathways of aFGF signaling. Finally, our data indicated that aFGF-induced tumor cell scattering leads to increased in vitro invasiveness and in vivo metastasis. Interestingly, the presence of few aFGF-producing tumor cells in a population of non-producing cells dramatically enhances the growth rate and the metastatic properties of the whole tumor, suggesting that a low proportion of highly metastatic cells in a heterogeneous cell population might modify the behavior of the tumor mass.

  20. Ketone body utilization drives tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously proposed that catabolic fibroblasts generate mitochondrial fuels (such as ketone bodies) to promote the anabolic growth of human cancer cells and their metastasic dissemination. We have termed this new paradigm two-compartment tumor metabolism. Here, we further tested this hypothesis by using a genetic approach. For this purpose, we generated hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts overexpressing the rate-limiting enzymes that promote ketone body production, namely BDH1 and HMGCS2. Similarly, we generated MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells overexpressing the key enzyme(s) that allow ketone body re-utilization, OXCT1/2 and ACAT1/2. Interestingly, our results directly show that ketogenic fibroblasts are catabolic and undergo autophagy, with a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) protein expression. Moreover, ketogenic fibroblasts increase the mitochondrial mass and growth of adjacent breast cancer cells. However, most importantly, ketogenic fibroblasts also effectively promote tumor growth, without a significant increase in tumor angiogenesis. Finally, MDA-MB-231 cells overexpressing the enzyme(s) required for ketone re-utilization show dramatic increases in tumor growth and metastatic capacity. Our data provide the necessary genetic evidence that ketone body production and re-utilization drive tumor progression and metastasis. As such, ketone inhibitors should be designed as novel therapeutics to effectively treat advanced cancer patients, with tumor recurrence and metastatic disease. In summary, ketone bodies behave as onco-metabolites, and we directly show that the enzymes HMGCS2, ACAT1/2 and OXCT1/2 are bona fide metabolic oncogenes. PMID:23082722

  1. Dietary branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) and tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.; Baron, L.; Baron, P.; White, F.; Banks, W.L. Jr.

    1986-03-05

    The effects of high dietary BCAA on tumor growth was examined in adult male Fischer 344 rats inoculated with 10/sup 6/ viable MCA fibrosarcoma cells. Ten days after tumor inoculation, when tumors were of palpable size, rats were divided into two groups at random. The experimental(E) group was fed the AIN-76 diet supplemented with 4X the BCAA content of diet casein and the control(C) group was fed the AIN-76 made isonitrogenous with the E diet by glutamic acid supplementation. Five rats from each group were killed at days 0,3,6, and 9. Rats were injected with /sup 14/C-Tyrosine and /sup 3/H-Thymidine i.p. (2 and 4 uCi/100g BW, respectively) an hour before they were killed. The incorporation of /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H into the acid insoluble fraction of the tumor tissues samples were measured. Single cell suspension of tumor were prepared for cell cycle kinetics analysis using a Coulter EPICS IV flow microflorometer. The percentage of normal and hyperdiploid cells were analyzed. Results showed that both tumor size and weight were doubled at each time point the rats were killed. At day 0, the /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C incorporation were 32 +/- 10dpm and 27 +/- 4dpm/mg tumor, respectively. The /sup 3/H incorporation dropped in both diet groups at days 6 and 9 but the /sup 14/C incorporation showed a decrease only at day 9. These changes were statistically significant, P>0.05. No difference in the tumor growth parameters used in this study can be attributed to the high dietary BCAA.

  2. Dispersal, survival and delayed growth of benthic foraminiferal propagules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alve, Elisabeth; Goldstein, Susan T.

    2010-01-01

    New data support our previously published propagule dispersal hypothesis and show that propagules of some benthic foraminiferal species can survive for two years before growth commences. Following exposure to simulated shallow-water conditions, shallow-water species of benthic foraminifera appeared and grew in large numbers (commonly >100 ind/12 ml sediment) in the <32 m-size sediment fraction collected from 320 m water depth in the Skagerrak basin (North Sea). None of the shallow-water species that grew abundantly ( Planorbulina mediterranensis, Morulaeplecta bulbosa, Bolivina pseudoplicata, Cuneata arctica, Eggerelloides scaber, Gavelinopsis praegeri) seem to grow or reproduce at or in the vicinity of the sampling site. Consequently, they must have been transported there as <32 m-sized individuals. Their sudden appearance when exposed to shallow-water conditions suggests that they had been transported to the sampling site as propagules and that they could survive in the sediments until conditions became suitable for growth and, for some, reproduction. The lack of agglutination on the proloculi of the agglutinated taxa that appeared in the growth-chambers may enhance their passive transport via currents and, thereby, dispersal. Of all the indigenous foraminiferal species that occur at the sampling site, only Textularia earlandi and Bolivinellina pseudopunctata continued to grow and reproduce when transferred from bathyal (320 m) to simulated shallow-water (0 m) conditions. The former is considered a highly opportunistic species. According to the literature, most of the morphospecies which grew in the experiments are cosmopolitan. Our results indicate substantial inter-specific differences in dispersal potential and support previous suggestions that among free-living species, some serial forms have the potential for long-distance dispersal. Still, oceanographic, physical and ecological boundaries and barriers constrain the distribution of most species. In addition to benthic foraminifera, Gromia spp. (rhizarian protists related to the foraminifera) grew in >60% of the experimental growth-chambers.

  3. Stability and Hopf bifurcation for a regulated logistic growth model with discrete and distributed delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shengle; Jiang, Minghui

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability and Hopf bifurcation of a new regulated logistic growth with discrete and distributed delays. By choosing the discrete delay τ as a bifurcation parameter, we prove that the system is locally asymptotically stable in a range of the delay and Hopf bifurcation occurs as τ crosses a critical value. Furthermore, explicit algorithm for determining the direction of the Hopf bifurcation and the stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions is derived by normal form theorem and center manifold argument. Finally, an illustrative example is also given to support the theoretical results.

  4. Pancreatic Tumor Growth Prediction with Multiplicative Growth and Image-Derived Motion.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken C L; Summers, Ronald M; Kebebew, Electron; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are abnormal growths of hormone-producing cells in the pancreas. Different from the brain in the skull, the pancreas in the abdomen can be largely deformed by the body posture and the surrounding organs. In consequence, both tumor growth and pancreatic motion attribute to the tumor shape difference observable from images. As images at different time points are used to personalize the tumor growth model, the prediction accuracy may be reduced if such motion is ignored. Therefore, we incorporate the image-derived pancreatic motion to tumor growth personalization. For realistic mechanical interactions, the multiplicative growth decomposition is used with a hyperelastic constitutive law to model tumor mass effect, which allows growth modeling without compromising the mechanical accuracy. With also the FDG-PET and contrast-enhanced CT images, the functional, structural, and motion data are combined for a more patient-specific model. Experiments on synthetic and clinical data show the importance of image-derived motion on estimating physiologically plausible mechanical properties and the promising performance of our framework. From six patient data sets, the recall, precision, Dice coefficient, relative volume difference, and average surface distance were 89.8 3.5%, 85.6 7.5%, 87.4 3.6%, 9.7 7.2%, and 0.6 0.2 mm, respectively. PMID:26221698

  5. Harnessing High Density Lipoproteins to Block Transforming Growth Factor Beta and to Inhibit the Growth of Liver Tumor Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, Jos; Fioravanti, Jessica; Daz-Valds, Nancy; Frank, Kathrin; Aranda, Fernando; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Dotor, Javier; Umansky, Viktor; Prieto, Jess; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) is a powerful promoter of cancer progression and a key target for antitumor therapy. As cancer cells exhibit active cholesterol metabolism, high density lipoproteins (HDLs) appear as an attractive delivery system for anticancer TGF?-inhibitory molecules. We constructed a plasmid encoding a potent TGF-?-blocking peptide (P144) linked to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) through a flexible linker (pApoLinkerP144). The ApoLinkerP144 sequence was then incorporated into a hepatotropic adeno-associated vector (AAVApoLinkerP144). The aim was to induce hepatocytes to produce HDLs containing a modified ApoA-I capable of blocking TGF-?. We observed that transduction of the murine liver with pApoLinkerP144 led to the appearance of a fraction of circulating HDL containing the fusion protein. These HDLs were able to attenuate TGF-? signaling in the liver and to enhance IL-12 -mediated IFN-? production. Treatment of liver metastasis of MC38 colorectal cancer with AAVApoLinkerP144 resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth and enhanced expression of IFN-? and GM-CSF in cancerous tissue. ApoLinkerP144 also delayed MC38 liver metastasis in Rag2?/?IL2r??/? immunodeficient mice. This effect was associated with downregulation of TGF-? target genes essential for metastatic niche conditioning. Finally, in a subset of ret transgenic mice, a model of aggressive spontaneous metastatic melanoma, AAVApoLinkerP144 delayed tumor growth in association with increased CD8+ T cell numbers in regional lymph nodes. In conclusion, modification of HDLs to transport TGF-?-blocking molecules is a novel and promising approach to inhibit the growth of liver metastases by immunological and non-immunological mechanisms. PMID:24797128

  6. Thymoquinone inhibits tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth through suppressing AKT and ERK signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tingfang; Cho, Sung-Gook; Yi, Zhengfang; Pang, Xiufeng; Rodriguez, Melissa; Wang, Ying; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Liu, Mingyao

    2008-01-01

    Thymoquinone, a component derived from the medial plant Nigella sativa, has been used for medical purposes for more than two thousands of years. Recent studies reported that thymoquinone exhibited inhibitory effects on cell proliferation of many cancer cell lines and hormone-refractory prostate cancer by suppressing androgen receptor and E2F-1. Whether thymoquinone inhibits angiogenesis, the critical step of tumor growth and metastasis, is still unknown. In this study, we found that thymoquinone effectively inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) migration, invasion, and tube formation. Thymoquinone inhibited cell proliferation and suppressed the activation of AKT and ERK. Thymoquinone blocked angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, prevented tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft human prostate cancer (PC3) model in mouse and inhibited human prostate tumor growth at low dosage with almost no chemotoxicitical side effects. Furthermore, we observed that endothelial cells were more sensitive to thymoquinone-induced cell apoptosis, cell proliferation and migration inhibition compared to PC3 cancer cells. Thymoquinone inhibited VEGF-induced ERK activation, but showed no inhibitory effects on VEGF receptor 2 activation. Overall, our results indicate that thymoquinone inhibits tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth, and could be used as a potential drug candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:18644991

  7. Dietary rice component, Oryzanol, inhibits tumor growth in tumor-bearing Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scope: We investigated the effects of rice bran and components on tumor growth in mice. Methods and results: Mice fed standard diets supplemented with rice bran, '-oryzanol, Ricetrienol®, ferulic acid, or phytic acid for 2 weeks were inoculated with CT-26 colon cancer cells and fed the same diet fo...

  8. Growth Pattern of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma in Patients with Delayed Surgical Intervention: Fast Growth Rate Correlates with High Grade and May Result in Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wenshi; Yao, Lin; Li, Xuesong; Fang, Dong; Ren, Da; Zhang, Zhongyuan; Fan, Yu; He, Qun; Ci, Weimin; He, Zhisong; Zhou, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Previous studies revealed an unclear correlation between the growth rate of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and tumor grade and did not focus on certain histological subtype. This report investigated the correlation between the growth rate and tumor grade in clear cell RCC (ccRCC). Methods. We reviewed 60 patients with 61 ccRCC confirmed by delayed surgeries after at least 12 months of active surveillance. The linear growth rate (LGR), volumetric growth rate (VGR), and volume doubling time (VDT) were calculated, and their correlations with clinicopathologic characteristics were analyzed. Results. The mean LGR, VGR, and VDT were 0.86 (range 04.74) cm/year, 20.96 (range 0.31211.93) cm3/year, and 667 (range 333321) days, respectively. ccRCCs with high grade had greater LGR (P < 0.001) and VGR (P = 0.001) and lower VDT (P = 0.017) than ccRCCs with low grade. Grade (OR = 5.185, P = 0.004) was the only independent risk factor of LGR >0.5?cm/year, and grade (OR = 3.006, P = 0.046) and initial size (OR = 0.392, P = 0.004) were independent risk factors of VDT <1 year. Five patients developed metastasis after surgery with LGR >0.5?cm/yr altogether; of them, four had cancer-related death by the last follow-up. Conclusions. Fast growth rate of ccRCC is significantly correlated with high tumor grade and may result in poor prognosis, especially for those with LGR >0.5?cm/yr. PMID:26421295

  9. Netrin-4 regulates angiogenic responses and tumor cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nacht, Mariana; St Martin, Thia B.; Byrne, Ann; Klinger, Katherine W.; Teicher, Beverly A.; Madden, Stephen L. Jiang, Yide

    2009-03-10

    Netrin-4 is a 628 amino acid basement membrane component that promotes neurite elongation at low concentrations but inhibits neurite extension at high concentrations. There is a growing body of literature suggesting that several molecules, including netrins, are regulators of both neuronal and vascular growth. It is believed that molecules that guide neural growth and development are also involved in regulating morphogenesis of the vascular tree. Further, netrins have recently been implicated in controlling epithelial cell branching morphogenesis in the breast, lung and pancreas. Characterization of purified netrin-4 in in vitro angiogenesis assays demonstrated that netrin-4 markedly inhibits HMVEC migration and tube formation. Moreover, netrin-4 inhibits proliferation of a variety of human tumor cells in vitro. Netrin-4 has only modest effects on proliferation of endothelial and other non-transformed cells. Netrin-4 treatment results in phosphorylation changes of proteins that are known to control cell growth. Specifically, Phospho-Akt-1, Phospho-Jnk-2, and Phospho-c-Jun are reduced in tumor cells that have been treated with netrin-4. Together, these data suggest a potential role for netrin-4 in regulating tumor growth.

  10. Formation of giant crystalline grain via delayed growth process driven by organic molecular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mahboob, A.; Fujikawa, Y.; Sadowski, J. T.; Hashizume, T.; Sakurai, T.

    2010-12-01

    The growth of (001)-oriented pentacene ( C22H14 , Pn) thin films on silicon surfaces has been extensively studied to elucidate the role of molecular anisotropy in nucleation and island evolution in organic film growth. In situ real-time low-energy electron microscopy studies of growth of Pn revealed a delayed, low-density nucleation that could be related to the difference in the orientation of this anisotropic molecule in its diffusing state and in the crystalline film. In contrast to the growth of Pn on self-assembled monolayers or SiO2 , we observed a delayed nucleation and formation of extraordinarily large grains (in submillimeter scale) on semiconducting α3-Bi-Si(111) and on semimetallic Bi(0001)/Si(111) with a continuation in film growth after stopping Pn deposition. The delayed and very low-density nucleation and continuing growth after stopping deposition could be explained by a incorporation-limited growth processes resulted from a large energy barrier for Pn nucleation in standing-up orientation, as the molecule needs to reorient itself from a lying-down, diffusing state in order to build into the crystalline film.

  11. The role of mechanical forces in tumor growth and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rakesh K.; Martin, John D.; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2014-01-01

    Tumors generate physical forces during growth and progression. These physical forces are able to compress blood and lymphatic vessels, reducing perfusion rates and creating hypoxia. When exerted directly on cancer cells, they can increase their invasive and metastatic potential. Tumor vessels - while nourishing the tumor - are usually leaky and tortuous, which further decreases perfusion. Hypo-perfusion and hypoxia contribute to immune-evasion, promote malignant progression and metastasis, and reduce the efficacy of a number of therapies, including radiation. In parallel, vessel leakiness together with vessel compression cause a uniformly elevated interstitial fluid pressure that hinders delivery of blood-borne therapeutic agents, lowering the efficacy of chemo- and nano-therapies. In addition, shear stresses exerted by flowing blood and interstitial fluid modulate the behavior of cancer and a variety of host cells. Taming these physical forces can improve therapeutic outcomes in many cancers. PMID:25014786

  12. Polyphenol-rich extract of Pimenta dioica berries (Allspice) kills breast cancer cells by autophagy and delays growth of triple negative breast cancer in athymic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Shamaladevi, Nagarajarao; Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K.; Patil, Bhimu S.; Lokeshwar, Bal L.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive compounds from edible plants have limited efficacy in treating advanced cancers, but they have potential to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs in a combined treatment. An aqueous extract of berries of Pimenta dioica (Allspice) shows promise as one such candidate for combination therapy or chemoprevention. An aqueous extract of Allspice (AAE) was tested against human breast cancer (BrCa) cells in vitro and in vivo. AAE reduced the viability and clonogenic growth of several types of BrCa cells (IC50 ≤ 100 μg/ml) with limited toxicity in non-tumorigenic, quiescent cells (IC50 >200 μg/ml). AAE induced cytotoxicity in BrCa was inconsistent with apoptosis, but was associated with increased levels of autophagy markers LC3B and LC3B-positive puncta. Silencing the expression of autophagy related genes (ATGs) prevented AAE-induced cell death. Further, AAE caused inhibition of Akt/mTOR signaling, and showed enhanced cytotoxicity when combined with rapamycin, a chemotherapy drug and an inhibitor of mTOR signaling. Oral administration (gavage) of AAE into athymic mice implanted with MDA-MB231 tumors inhibited tumor growth slightly but not significantly (mean decrease ~ 14%, p ≥ 0.20) if mice were gavaged post-tumor implant. Tumor growth showed a significant delay (38%) in tumor palpability and growth rate (time to reach tumor volume ≥ 1,000 mm3) when mice were pre-dosed with AAE for two weeks. Analysis of tumor tissues showed increased levels of LC3B in AAE treated tumors, indicating elevated autophagic tumor cell death in vivo in treated mice. These results demonstrate antitumor and chemo-preventive activity of AAE against BrCa and potential for adjuvant to mTOR inhibition. PMID:25945840

  13. Polyphenol-rich extract of Pimenta dioica berries (Allspice) kills breast cancer cells by autophagy and delays growth of triple negative breast cancer in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Shamaladevi, Nagarajarao; Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K; Patil, Bhimu S; Lokeshwar, Bal L

    2015-06-30

    Bioactive compounds from edible plants have limited efficacy in treating advanced cancers, but they have potential to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs in a combined treatment. An aqueous extract of berries of Pimenta dioica (Allspice) shows promise as one such candidate for combination therapy or chemoprevention. An aqueous extract of Allspice (AAE) was tested against human breast cancer (BrCa) cells in vitro and in vivo. AAE reduced the viability and clonogenic growth of several types of BrCa cells (IC50 ? 100 ?g/ml) with limited toxicity in non-tumorigenic, quiescent cells (IC50 >200 ?g/ml). AAE induced cytotoxicity in BrCa was inconsistent with apoptosis, but was associated with increased levels of autophagy markers LC3B and LC3B-positive puncta. Silencing the expression of autophagy related genes (ATGs) prevented AAE-induced cell death. Further, AAE caused inhibition of Akt/mTOR signaling, and showed enhanced cytotoxicity when combined with rapamycin, a chemotherapy drug and an inhibitor of mTOR signaling. Oral administration (gavage) of AAE into athymic mice implanted with MDA-MB231 tumors inhibited tumor growth slightly but not significantly (mean decrease ~ 14%, p ? 0.20) if mice were gavaged post-tumor implant. Tumor growth showed a significant delay (38%) in tumor palpability and growth rate (time to reach tumor volume ? 1,000 mm3) when mice were pre-dosed with AAE for two weeks. Analysis of tumor tissues showed increased levels of LC3B in AAE treated tumors, indicating elevated autophagic tumor cell death in vivo in treated mice. These results demonstrate antitumor and chemo-preventive activity of AAE against BrCa and potential for adjuvant to mTOR inhibition. PMID:25945840

  14. Liver-Tumor Hybrid Organoids for Modeling Tumor Growth and Drug Response In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Skardal, Aleksander; Devarasetty, Mahesh; Rodman, Christopher; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay

    2015-01-01

    Current in vitro models for tumor growth and metastasis are poor facsimiles of in vivo cancer physiology and thus, are not optimal for anti-cancer drug development. Three dimensional (3D) tissue organoid systems, which utilize human cells in a tailored microenvironment, have the potential to recapitulate in vivo conditions and address the drawbacks of current tissue culture dish 2D models. In this study, we created liver-based cell organoids in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor. The organoids were further inoculated with colon carcinoma cells in order to create liver-tumor organoids for in vitro modeling of liver metastasis. Immunofluorescent staining revealed notable phenotypic differences between tumor cells in 2D and inside the organoids. In 2D they displayed an epithelial phenotype, and only after transition to the organoids did the cells present with a mesenchymal phenotype. The cell surface marker expression results suggested that WNT pathway might be involved in the phenotypic changes observed between cells in 2D and organoid conditions, and may lead to changes in cell proliferation. Manipulating the WNT pathway with an agonist and antagonist showed significant changes in sensitivity to the anti-proliferative drug 5-fluoruracil. Collectively, the results show the potential of in vitro 3D liver-tumor organoids to serve as a model for metastasis growth and for testing the response of tumor cells to current and newly discovered drugs. PMID:25777294

  15. The role of the microenvironment in tumor growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yangjin; Stolarska, Magdalena A.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computational analysis are essential for understanding the dynamics of the complex gene networks that control normal development and homeostasis, and can help to understand how circumvention of that control leads to abnormal outcomes such as cancer. Our objectives here are to discuss the different mechanisms by which the local biochemical and mechanical microenvironment, which is comprised of various signaling molecules, cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM), affects the progression of potentially-cancerous cells, and to present new results on two aspects of these effects. We first deal with the major processes involved in the progression from a normal cell to a cancerous cell at a level accessible to a general scientific readership, and we then outline a number of mathematical and computational issues that arise in cancer modeling. In Section 2 we present results from a model that deals with the effects of the mechanical properties of the environment on tumor growth, and in Section 3 we report results from a model of the signaling pathways and the tumor microenvironment (TME), and how their interactions affect the development of breast cancer. The results emphasize anew the complexities of the interactions within the TME and their effect on tumor growth, and show that tumor progression is not solely determined by the presence of a clone of mutated immortal cells, but rather that it can be ‘community-controlled’. It Takes a Village – Hilary Clinton PMID:21736894

  16. Integrative models of vascular remodeling during tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Heiko; Welter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Malignant solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth, and gain of metastatic potential. Angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), vessel cooption (the integration of existing blood vessels into the tumor vasculature), and vessel regression remodel the healthy vascular network into a tumor-specific vasculature that is in many respects different from the hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network of the host tissues. Integrative models based on detailed experimental data and physical laws implement in silico the complex interplay of molecular pathways, cell proliferation, migration, and death, tissue microenvironment, mechanical and hydrodynamic forces, and the fine structure of the host tissue vasculature. With the help of computer simulations high-precision information about blood flow patterns, interstitial fluid flow, drug distribution, oxygen and nutrient distribution can be obtained and a plethora of therapeutic protocols can be tested before clinical trials. In this review, we give an overview over the current status of integrative models describing tumor growth, vascular remodeling, blood and interstitial fluid flow, drug delivery, and concomitant transformations of the microenvironment. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808551

  17. Tumor growth and its effect on Magnetic Resonance Imaging signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cersosimo, Homero; Colon, Jorge; Ramos, Elio; Zypman, Fredy

    2000-03-01

    The goal of this project is twofold. On one hand, we have developed computer code based on simple probabilistic rules to model the growth (or shrinking) of cancerigenous tissue. We assume that initially there exists a differentiated cell, which has a time- dependent probability of reproducing. If it did reproduce, then we assume that it has a finite probability of dying before reproducing again. This simple model falls into the Eden-type kind, and presents appropriate bulk growth characteristics, as it follows Gompert observational law. We propose new methods of geometrical characterization of the tumor. Besides its total mass, we also consider higher multipolar order of mass distribution and surface fractal dimension. In addition, we study how the geometrical properties of the tumor affect the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) signal. To this end, we consider a human brain in the presence of radiofrequency fields. We calculate the MRI image of this object. Then, we introduce a tumor in the white-gray matter region and reobtain the MRI image. We associate the signal changes with the geometrical properties of the tumor.

  18. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Sano, Michael B; Arena, Christopher B; Bittleman, Katelyn R; DeWitt, Matthew R; Cho, Hyung J; Szot, Christopher S; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W; Davalos, Rafael V

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 ?s and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 ?s, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 ?s in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  19. Cyclooxygenase-Dependent Tumor Growth through Evasion of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zelenay, Santiago; van der Veen, Annemarthe G.; Böttcher, Jan P.; Snelgrove, Kathryn J.; Rogers, Neil; Acton, Sophie E.; Chakravarty, Probir; Girotti, Maria Romina; Marais, Richard; Quezada, Sergio A.; Sahai, Erik; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which melanoma and other cancer cells evade anti-tumor immunity remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that the growth of tumors formed by mutant BrafV600E mouse melanoma cells in an immunocompetent host requires their production of prostaglandin E2, which suppresses immunity and fuels tumor-promoting inflammation. Genetic ablation of cyclooxygenases (COX) or prostaglandin E synthases in BrafV600E mouse melanoma cells, as well as in NrasG12D melanoma or in breast or colorectal cancer cells, renders them susceptible to immune control and provokes a shift in the tumor inflammatory profile toward classic anti-cancer immune pathways. This mouse COX-dependent inflammatory signature is remarkably conserved in human cutaneous melanoma biopsies, arguing for COX activity as a driver of immune suppression across species. Pre-clinical data demonstrate that inhibition of COX synergizes with anti-PD-1 blockade in inducing eradication of tumors, implying that COX inhibitors could be useful adjuvants for immune-based therapies in cancer patients. PMID:26343581

  20. Cyclooxygenase-Dependent Tumor Growth through Evasion of Immunity.

    PubMed

    Zelenay, Santiago; van der Veen, Annemarthe G; Bttcher, Jan P; Snelgrove, Kathryn J; Rogers, Neil; Acton, Sophie E; Chakravarty, Probir; Girotti, Maria Romina; Marais, Richard; Quezada, Sergio A; Sahai, Erik; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-09-10

    The mechanisms by which melanoma and other cancer cells evade anti-tumor immunity remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that the growth of tumors formed by mutant Braf(V600E) mouse melanoma cells in an immunocompetent host requires their production of prostaglandin E2, which suppresses immunity and fuels tumor-promoting inflammation. Genetic ablation of cyclooxygenases (COX) or prostaglandin E synthases in Braf(V600E) mouse melanoma cells, as well as in Nras(G12D) melanoma or in breast or colorectal cancer cells, renders them susceptible to immune control and provokes a shift in the tumor inflammatory profile toward classic anti-cancer immune pathways. This mouse COX-dependent inflammatory signature is remarkably conserved in human cutaneous melanoma biopsies, arguing for COX activity as a driver of immune suppression across species. Pre-clinical data demonstrate that inhibition of COX synergizes with anti-PD-1 blockade in inducing eradication of tumors, implying that COX inhibitors could be useful adjuvants for immune-based therapies in cancer patients. PMID:26343581

  1. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; DeWitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  2. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; Dewitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-10-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models.

  3. Atg7 cooperates with Pten loss to drive prostate cancer tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Santanam, Urmila; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Abate-Shen, Cory; Shen, Michael M; White, Eileen; DiPaola, Robert S

    2016-02-15

    Understanding new therapeutic paradigms for both castrate-sensitive and more aggressive castrate-resistant prostate cancer is essential to improve clinical outcomes. As a critically important cellular process, autophagy promotes stress tolerance by recycling intracellular components to sustain metabolism important for tumor survival. To assess the importance of autophagy in prostate cancer, we generated a new autochthonous genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) with inducible prostate-specific deficiency in the Pten tumor suppressor and autophagy-related-7 (Atg7) genes. Atg7 deficiency produced an autophagy-deficient phenotype and delayed Pten-deficient prostate tumor progression in both castrate-nave and castrate-resistant cancers. Atg7-deficient tumors display evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, suggesting that autophagy may promote prostate tumorigenesis through management of protein homeostasis. Taken together, these data support the importance of autophagy for both castrate-nave and castrate-resistant growth in a newly developed GEMM, suggesting a new paradigm and model to study approaches to inhibit autophagy in combination with known and new therapies for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26883359

  4. A recombinant endogenous retrovirus amplified in a mouse neuroblastoma is involved in tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pothlichet, Julien; Heidmann, Thierry; Mangeney, Marianne

    2006-08-15

    The theory of immunoediting postulates that tumor cells exhibit a reduced immunogenicity to escape eradication by the host immune system. It has been proposed that endogenous retroviruses--provided that they are active--could play a role in this process, via the immunosuppressive domain carried by their envelope protein. Here, we demonstrate that the Neuro-2a tumor cell line--originating from a spontaneous A/J mouse neuroblastoma--produces an infectious retrovirus that most probably results from a recombination event between 2 mouse endogenous retroviral elements. This Neuro-2a-associated recombinant retrovirus derives from the unique ecotropic provirus located at the Emv-1 locus, but with a gag sequence conferring B-tropism, thus allowing its high-level amplification in Neuro-2a cells. We show that knocking down -by RNA interference- this endogenous retrovirus in Neuro-2a cells has no effect on the transformed phenotype of the cells, but results in delayed tumor growth and prolonged animal survival, following engraftment of the cells into immunocompetent mice. Recombination between endogenous retroviruses, amplification of the resulting element and high-level expression of its immunosuppressive activity are therefore likely steps of an immunoediting process, leading to an invading tumor. PMID:16550601

  5. Caveolin-1 is down-regulated in alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas and negatively regulates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Huertas-Martnez, Juan; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Herrero-Martn, David; Barrau, Ignasi; Garca-Moncls, Silvia; Sinz-Jaspeado, Miguel; Lagares-Tena, Laura; Nez-lvarez, Yaiza; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Mora, Jaume; Roma, Josep; Toran, Nuria; Moran, Sebastian; Lpez-Alemany, Roser; Gallego, Soledad; Esteller, Manel; Peinado, Miguel A; Del Muro, Xavier Garca; Tirado, Oscar M

    2014-10-30

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Despite advances in therapy, patients with histological variant of rhabdomyosarcoma known as alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) have a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Caveolin-1 (CAV1), encoding the structural component of cellular caveolae, is a suggested tumor suppressor gene involved in cell signaling. In the present study we report that compared to other forms of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) CAV1 expression is either undetectable or very low in ARMS cell lines and tumor samples. DNA methylation analysis of the promoter region and azacytidine-induced re-expression suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in the silencing of CAV1. Reintroduction of CAV1 in three of these cell lines impairs their clonogenic capacity and promotes features of muscular differentiation. In vitro, CAV1-expressing cells show high expression of Caveolin-3 (CAV3), a muscular differentiation marker. Blockade of MAPK signaling is also observed. In vivo, CAV1-expressing xenografts show growth delay, features of muscular differentiation and increased cell death. In summary, our results suggest that CAV1 could function as a potent tumor suppressor in ARMS tumors. Inhibition of CAV1 function therefore, could contribute to aberrant cell proliferation, leading to ARMS development. PMID:25313138

  6. Bridging population and tissue scale tumor dynamics: A new paradigm for understanding differences in tumor growth and metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Gallaher, Jill; Babu, Aravind

    2013-01-01

    To provide a better understanding of the relationship between primary tumor growth rates and metastatic burden, we present a method that bridges tumor growth dynamics at the population-level, extracted from the SEER database, to those at the tissue level. Specifically, with this method, we are able to relate estimates of tumor growth rates and metastatic burden derived from a population level model to estimates of the primary tumor vascular response and the circulating tumor cell (CTC) fraction derived from a tissue level model. Variation in the population level model parameters produce differences in cancer-specific survival and cure fraction. Variation in the tissue level model parameters produces different primary tumor dynamics that subsequently lead to different growth dynamics of the CTCs. Our method to bridge the population and tissue scales was applied to lung and breast cancer separately, and the results were compared. The population model suggests that lung tumors grow faster and shed a significant number of lethal metastatic cells at small sizes, whereas breast tumors grow slower and do not significantly shed lethal metastatic cells until becoming larger. Although the tissue level model does not explicitly model the metastatic population, we are able to disengage the direct dependency of the metastatic burden on primary tumor growth by introducing the CTC population as an intermediary and assuming dependency. We calibrate the tissue level model to produce results consistent with the population model while also revealing a more dynamic relationship between the primary tumor and the CTCs. This leads to exponential tumor growth in lung and power law tumor growth in breast. We conclude that the vascular response of the primary tumor is a major player in the dynamics of both the primary tumor and the CTCs, and is significantly different in breast and lung cancer. PMID:24408919

  7. Bridging population and tissue scale tumor dynamics: a new paradigm for understanding differences in tumor growth and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Gallaher, Jill; Babu, Aravind; Plevritis, Sylvia; Anderson, Alexander R A

    2014-01-15

    To provide a better understanding of the relationship between primary tumor growth rates and metastatic burden, we present a method that bridges tumor growth dynamics at the population level, extracted from the SEER database, to those at the tissue level. Specifically, with this method, we are able to relate estimates of tumor growth rates and metastatic burden derived from a population-level model to estimates of the primary tumor vascular response and the circulating tumor cell (CTC) fraction derived from a tissue-level model. Variation in the population-level model parameters produces differences in cancer-specific survival and cure fraction. Variation in the tissue-level model parameters produces different primary tumor dynamics that subsequently lead to different growth dynamics of the CTCs. Our method to bridge the population and tissue scales was applied to lung and breast cancer separately, and the results were compared. The population model suggests that lung tumors grow faster and shed a significant number of lethal metastatic cells at small sizes, whereas breast tumors grow slower and do not significantly shed lethal metastatic cells until becoming larger. Although the tissue-level model does not explicitly model the metastatic population, we are able to disengage the direct dependency of the metastatic burden on primary tumor growth by introducing the CTC population as an intermediary and assuming dependency. We calibrate the tissue-level model to produce results consistent with the population model while also revealing a more dynamic relationship between the primary tumor and the CTCs. This leads to exponential tumor growth in lung and power law tumor growth in breast. We conclude that the vascular response of the primary tumor is a major player in the dynamics of both the primary tumor and the CTCs, and is significantly different in breast and lung cancer. PMID:24408919

  8. In-vivo visualization of melanoma tumor microvessels and blood flow velocity changes accompanying tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hiroki; Hachiga, Tadashi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Akiguchi, Shunsuke

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that using micro multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry (?-MLDV) for noninvasive in-vivo imaging of blood vessels is useful for diagnosing malignant melanomas by comparison with visual diagnosis by dermoscopy. The blood flow velocity in microvessels varied during growth of melanomas transplanted in mouse ears. Mouse ears were observed by ?-MLDV up to 16 days after transplantation. The blood flow velocity in the tumor increased with increasing time and reached maximum of 4.5 mm/s at 9 days, which is more than twice that prior to transplantation. After 12 days, when the lesion had grown to an area of 6.6 mm2, we observed the formation of new blood vessels in the tumor. Finally, when the lesion had an area of 18 mm2 after 16 days, the flow velocity in the tumor decreased to approximately 3.2 mm/s.

  9. Congenital Cutis Laxa Type 2 Associated With Recurrent Aspiration Pneumonia and Growth Delay: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Mohammadbagher; Yazdanparast, Maryam; Jahanshahi, Keramatallah; Zakeri, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a connective tissue disorder caused by deficiency of fibro elastic plexus, which can involve multiple organs. It is inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked. Autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 2, which appears to compromise a spectrum of disorders, starts with severe wrinkly skin syndrome and leads to more severe diseases related to growth and developmental delays and skeletal anomalies. The clinical manifestations in some of cases of Cutis laxa consist of redundant loose skin, pre-and post-natal growth deficiency, mental retardation, large fontanels, and dislocation of the hips. The authors present the case of a female patient with involved internal organ disorder and delay in growth in addition to skin laxity in which gene sequence analysis of PYCR1 indicated C.797G>A mutation. PMID:26516448

  10. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists inhibit tumor growth and metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Qamri, Zahida; Preet, Anju; Nasser, Mohd W; Bass, Caroline E; Leone, Gustavo; Barsky, Sanford H; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2009-11-01

    Cannabinoids have been reported to possess antitumorogenic activity. Not much is known, however, about the effects and mechanism of action of synthetic nonpsychotic cannabinoids on breast cancer growth and metastasis. We have shown that the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 are overexpressed in primary human breast tumors compared with normal breast tissue. We have also observed that the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB231, MDA-MB231-luc, and MDA-MB468 express CB1 and CB2 receptors. Furthermore, we have shown that the CB2 synthetic agonist JWH-133 and the CB1 and CB2 agonist WIN-55,212-2 inhibit cell proliferation and migration under in vitro conditions. These results were confirmed in vivo in various mouse model systems. Mice treated with JWH-133 or WIN-55,212-2 showed a 40% to 50% reduction in tumor growth and a 65% to 80% reduction in lung metastasis. These effects were reversed by CB1 and CB2 antagonists AM 251 and SR144528, respectively, suggesting involvement of CB1 and CB2 receptors. In addition, the CB2 agonist JWH-133 was shown to delay and reduce mammary gland tumors in the polyoma middle T oncoprotein (PyMT) transgenic mouse model system. Upon further elucidation, we observed that JWH-133 and WIN-55,212-2 mediate the breast tumor-suppressive effects via a coordinated regulation of cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin E2 signaling pathways and induction of apoptosis. These results indicate that CB1 and CB2 receptors could be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies against breast cancer growth and metastasis. PMID:19887554

  11. Differential growth and responsiveness to cancer therapy of tumor cells in different environments.

    PubMed

    Alsaggar, Mohammad; Yao, Qian; Cai, Houjian; Liu, Dexi

    2016-02-01

    Tumor metastasis often confers poor prognosis for cancer patients due to lack of comprehensive strategy in dealing with cells growing in different environment. Current anticancer therapies have incomplete effectiveness because they were designed assuming metastatic tumors behave similarly in different organs. We hypothesize that tumors growing in different sites are biologically heterogeneous in growth potential, as well as in tumor response to anti-cancer therapies. To test this hypothesis, we have developed a multi-organ tumor growth model using the hydrodynamic cell delivery method to establish simultaneous and quantifiable tumor growth in the liver, lungs and kidneys of mice. We demonstrated that growth rate of melanoma tumor in the liver is higher than that of the lungs and kidneys. Tumors in the lungs and kidneys grew minimally at the early stage and aggressively thereafter. Tumors in different organs were also heterogeneous in response to chemotherapy and immune gene therapy using dacarbazine and interferon beta gene, respectively. Lung tumors responded to chemotherapy better than tumors in the liver, but showed minimal response to interferon beta gene therapy, compared to tumors in the liver and kidneys. We also confirmed differential tumor growth of the metastatic colon cancer in mice. Our results point out the importance of a better understanding of the differences in tumor growing in diverse environments. The biological heterogeneity of metastatic tumors demonstrated in this study necessitates establishing new drug screening strategies that take into account the environmental difference at the sites of tumor growth. PMID:26476830

  12. Mo polyoxometalate nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjing; Yang, Licong; Liu, Ying; Qin, Xiuying; Zhou, Yanhui; Zhou, Yunshan; Liu, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Tumor growth depends on angiogenesis, which can furnish the oxygen and nutrients that proliferate tumor cells. Thus, blocking angiogenesis can be an effective strategy to inhibit tumor growth. In this work, three typical nanoparticles based on polyoxometalates (POMs) have been prepared; we investigated their capability as antitumor and anti-angiogenesis agents. We found that Mo POM nanoparticles, especially complex 3, inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) through cellular reactive oxygen species levels’ elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential damage. Complex 3 also suppressed the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and chicken chorioallantoic membrane development ex vivo. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cell signaling molecules indicated that Mo POMs blocked the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways in endothelial cells. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated their cellular uptake and localization within the cytoplasm of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that, owing to the extraordinary physical and chemical properties, Mo POM nanoparticles can significantly inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis, which makes them potential drug candidates in anticancer and anti-angiogenesis therapies.

  13. HE4 (WFDC2) gene overexpression promotes ovarian tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Moore, Richard G; Hill, Emily K; Horan, Timothy; Yano, Naohiro; Kim, KyuKwang; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Tseng, YiTang Don; Padbury, James F; Miller, M Craig; Lange, Thilo S; Singh, Rakesh K

    2014-01-01

    Selective overexpression of Human epididymal secretory protein E4 (HE4) points to a role in ovarian cancer tumorigenesis but little is known about the role the HE4 gene or the gene product plays. Here we show that elevated HE4 serum levels correlate with chemoresistance and decreased survival rates in EOC patients. HE4 overexpression promoted xenograft tumor growth and chemoresistance against cisplatin in an animal model resulting in reduced survival rates. HE4 displayed responses to tumor microenvironment constituents and presented increased expression as well as nuclear translocation upon EGF, VEGF and Insulin treatment and nucleolar localization with Insulin treatment. HE4 interacts with EGFR, IGF1R, and transcription factor HIF1?. Constructs of antisense phosphorothio-oligonucleotides targeting HE4 arrested tumor growth in nude mice. Collectively these findings implicate increased HE4 expression as a molecular factor in ovarian cancer tumorigenesis. Selective targeting directed towards the HE4 protein demonstrates therapeutic benefits for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:24389815

  14. Hybrid Cellular Continuum Simulations of Heterogeneity in Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, H. G. E.; Family, Fereydoon; van Meir, Erwin; Grossniklaus, Hans

    2010-03-01

    We will discuss simulations of pre-angiogenic tumor growth using a class of hybrid cellular-continuum models. A lattice site can be occupied either by a cell of a specific tumor cell population or consist of extracellular matrix. The local concentrations of oxygen is described by continuum reaction-diffusion equations. Dynamic linked lists of cells are evolved in time and contain information on cell type, position, age, concentration of oxygen at cell site. When cells proliferate via mitosis or differentiate, new cells are added to the list, if mutation occurs the cell types are altered, and if the cell dies via apoptosis the cells are removed from the linked list. The motion of individual cells consist of random walks subject to caging and chemotaxis away from regions of low oxygen concentration. We will describe the heterogenous spatial segregation of different cell types in the tumor, the development of necrotic cores as well as micronecrotic regions, and the effects of externally applied drugs on cell populations and overall tumor shape.

  15. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation invivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. PMID:26775840

  16. Effect of high cell density on the growth properties of tumor cells: a role in tumor cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the role of tumor progression in the growth properties of tumor cells and their susceptibility to the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs. A murine transplantable T cell lymphoma of spontaneous origin, designated as Dalton's lymphoma, was used as a model tumor for this investigation. Tumor cells were harvested from the early (5 days after tumor transplantation) and late tumor-bearing stages (17 days after tumor transplantation), with or without in-vivo administration of the chemotherapeutic drugs, cisplatin or doxorubicin. Tumor cells harvested at the late tumor-bearing stages showed a higher proliferative ability in vitro. Tumor progression was found to be associated with a decline in the tumor cytotoxicity of the chemotherapeutic drugs. Similar results were also obtained when tumor cells were cultured at low (10(5) cells/ml) and high (10(9) cells/ml) cell densities in vitro in medium alone or in one containing the chemotherapeutic drugs. An increase in the expression of heat shock protein (Hsp70), vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-2 receptor and interleukin-2 proteins along with an inhibition in the expression of caspase-activated DNase and p53 proteins was observed during the late tumor-bearing stage and also in the Dalton's lymphoma cells when cultured in vitro at a higher cell density. The ascitic fluid obtained from the late tumor-bearing stage and the culture supernatant of tumor cells incubated in vitro at high cell density showed high levels of cell growth-regulating cytokines: interleukin-1, interleukin-2, interferon-gamma, vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor growth factor-beta and interleukin-10. In-vivo administration of cisplatin in tumor-bearing mice at the late tumor-bearing stage did not alter the level of these cytokines in the ascitic fluid. In view of the results of this investigation, it is suggested that under high cellular density-associated environmental conditions the tumor cells alter their growth properties depending on an alteration in the expression of cell growth and apoptosis-regulating proteins. Tumor cells, thus, switch to a high level of proliferation, which renders them resistant to the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:17893512

  17. Transitions induced by time delays and cross-correlated sine-Wiener noises in a tumor-immune system interplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Du, Lu-Chun; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2012-02-01

    A model of tumor-immune system interplay with time delays and cross-correlated sine-Wiener noises is investigated by numerical simulations for the stationary probability distribution (SPD) and stationary mean value st of tumor cell population. Results show that (i) the structure of the SPD transfers from bimodal to unimodal as the reaction time (??) of the cell population to environmental constraints increases; (ii) conversely, as the time (??) of immune system to develop specific immune competence and the correlation time (?) of noises increase, the structure of the SPD transfers from unimodal to bimodal; (iii) as the cross-correlated intensity (??) between noises increases, the transitions induced by ? are suppressed.

  18. Erythropoietin Stimulates Tumor Growth via EphB4.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Sunila; Huang, Jie; Mora, Edna M; Nick, Alpa M; Cho, Min Soon; Wu, Sherry Y; Noh, Kyunghee; Pecot, Chad V; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Stein, Martin A; Brock, Stephan; Wen, Yunfei; Xiong, Chiyi; Gharpure, Kshipra; Hansen, Jean M; Nagaraja, Archana S; Previs, Rebecca A; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo; Han, Hee Dong; Hu, Wei; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Zand, Behrouz; Stagg, Loren J; Ladbury, John E; Ozpolat, Bulent; Alpay, S Neslihan; Nishimura, Masato; Stone, Rebecca L; Matsuo, Koji; Armaiz-Pea, Guillermo N; Dalton, Heather J; Danes, Christopher; Goodman, Blake; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Kruger, Carola; Schneider, Armin; Haghpeykar, Shyon; Jaladurgam, Padmavathi; Hung, Mien-Chie; Coleman, Robert L; Liu, Jinsong; Li, Chun; Urbauer, Diana; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Jackson, David B; Sood, Anil K

    2015-11-01

    While recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo) has been widely used to treat anemia in cancer patients, concerns about its adverse effects on patient survival have emerged. A lack of correlation between expression of the canonical EpoR and rhEpo's effects on cancer cells prompted us to consider the existence of an alternative Epo receptor. Here, we identified EphB4 as an Epo receptor that triggers downstream signaling via STAT3 and promotes rhEpo-induced tumor growth and progression. In human ovarian and breast cancer samples, expression of EphB4 rather than the canonical EpoR correlated with decreased disease-specific survival in rhEpo-treated patients. These results identify EphB4 as a critical mediator of erythropoietin-induced tumor progression and further provide clinically significant dimension to the biology of erythropoietin. PMID:26481148

  19. Notch Pathway Activation Induces Neuroblastoma Tumor Cell Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Zage, Peter E.; Nolo, Riitta; Fang, Wendy; Stewart, John; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Notch pathway signaling has critical roles in differentiation, proliferation and survival, and has oncogenic or tumor suppressor effects in a variety of malignancies. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of Notch activation on human neuroblastoma cells. Procedure Quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression of Notch receptors (Notch1–4), cleaved Notch1 (ICN1), and downstream targets (HES1–5) in human neuroblastoma cell lines and patient tumor samples. Notch pathway signaling was induced using intracellular Notch (ICN1–3) and HES gene constructs or direct culture on Notch ligands. Quantitative methylation-specific PCR was used to quantify methylation of the HES gene promoters, and the effects of treatment with decitabine were measured. Results Neuroblastoma cells express varying levels of Notch receptors and low levels of HES genes at baseline. However, no endogenous activation of the Notch pathway was detected in neuroblastoma cell lines or patient tumor samples. Expression of activated Notch intracellular domains and HES gene products led to growth arrest. The HES2 and HES5 gene promoters were found to be heavily methylated in most neuroblastoma lines, and HES gene expression could be induced through treatment with decitabine. Conclusions We report that neuroblastoma cell lines express multiple Notch receptors, which are inactive at baseline. Activation of the Notch pathway via ligand binding or downstream HES gene expression consistently resulted in growth arrest. HES gene expression appears to be regulated epigenetically and could be induced with decitabine. These findings support a tumor suppressor role for Notch signaling in neuroblastoma. PMID:21744479

  20. Ribonuclease binase inhibits primary tumor growth and metastases via apoptosis induction in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mironova, Nadezhda L.; Petrushanko, Irina Y.; Patutina, Olga A.; Sen’kova, Aexandra V.; Simonenko, Olga V.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Markov, Oleg V.; Zenkova, Marina A.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous ribonucleases are known to inhibit tumor growth via apoptosis induction in tumor cells, allowing to consider them as promising anticancer drugs for clinical application. In this work the antitumor potential of binase was evaluated in vivo and the mechanism of cytotoxic effect of binase on tumor cells was comprehensively studied in vitro. We investigated tumoricidal activity of binase using three murine tumor models of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC), lymphosarcoma RLS40 and melanoma B-16. We show for the first time that intraperitoneal injection of binase at a dose range 0.1–5 mg/kg results in retardation of primary tumor growth up to 45% in LLC and RLS40 and inhibits metastasis up to 50% in LLC and RLS40 and up to 70% in B-16 melanoma. Binase does not exhibit overall toxic effect and displays a general systemic and immunomodulatory effects. Treatment of RLS40-bearing animals with binase together with polychemotherapy revealed that binase decreases the hepatotoxicity of polychemotherapy while maintaining its antitumor effect. It was demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of binase is realized via the induction of the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. Activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is manifested by a drop of mitochondrial potential, increase in calcium concentration and inhibition of respiratory activity. Subsequent synthesis of TNF-α in the cells under the action of binase triggers extrinsic apoptotic pathway through the binding of TNF with cell-death receptors and activation of caspase 8. Thus binase is a potential anticancer therapeutics inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. PMID:23759588

  1. Ribonuclease binase inhibits primary tumor growth and metastases via apoptosis induction in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mironova, Nadezhda L; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Patutina, Olga A; Sen'kova, Aexandra V; Simonenko, Olga V; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Markov, Oleg V; Zenkova, Marina A; Makarov, Alexander A

    2013-07-01

    Exogenous ribonucleases are known to inhibit tumor growth via apoptosis induction in tumor cells, allowing to consider them as promising anticancer drugs for clinical application. In this work the antitumor potential of binase was evaluated in vivo and the mechanism of cytotoxic effect of binase on tumor cells was comprehensively studied in vitro. We investigated tumoricidal activity of binase using three murine tumor models of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC), lymphosarcoma RLS 40 and melanoma B-16. We show for the first time that intraperitoneal injection of binase at a dose range 0.1-5 mg/kg results in retardation of primary tumor growth up to 45% in LLC and RLS 40 and inhibits metastasis up to 50% in LLC and RLS 40 and up to 70% in B-16 melanoma. Binase does not exhibit overall toxic effect and displays a general systemic and immunomodulatory effects. Treatment of RLS 40-bearing animals with binase together with polychemotherapy revealed that binase decreases the hepatotoxicity of polychemotherapy while maintaining its antitumor effect. It was demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of binase is realized via the induction of the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. Activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is manifested by a drop of mitochondrial potential, increase in calcium concentration and inhibition of respiratory activity. Subsequent synthesis of TNF-α in the cells under the action of binase triggers extrinsic apoptotic pathway through the binding of TNF with cell-death receptors and activation of caspase 8. Thus binase is a potential anticancer therapeutics inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. PMID:23759588

  2. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  3. Delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to tumor-associated antigens in colon carcinoma patients immunized with an autologous tumor cell/Bacillus Calmette-Gurin vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bloemena, E; Gall, H; Ransom, J H; Pomato, N; Murray, J H; Bos, E; Scheper, R J; Meijer, C J; Hanna, M G; Vermorken, J B

    1993-02-01

    Five different colon tumor-associated antigens (CTAA) were tested for their ability to induce an immune response in vivo and in vitro in ten colon carcinoma patients immunized with an irradiated autologous tumor cell/Bacillus Calmette-Gurin vaccine (active specific immunization) after resection of the primary tumor. The CTAA were defined by two different human monoclonal antibodies (MCA 1688 and MCA 28A32) derived by immortalization of peripheral blood B-lymphocytes from an active specific immunization patient. Delayed-type cutaneous hypersensitivity responses against a mixture of CTAA 28A32-50K and -32K were positive in seven of ten patients tested. In vitro T-cell responses upon stimulation with CTAA 28A32-32K were found to be positive in seven of ten patients and correlated with delayed-type cutaneous hypersensitivity responses to the antigen mixture. These data suggest that CTAA 28A32-32K might contain an important tumor-related T-cell epitope. Moreover, this method is suitable to define potential future candidates for antitumor vaccine development. PMID:7678773

  4. [Effects of delayed first feeding on growth and survival of Hucho taimen larvae].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-quan; Yin, Jia-sheng; Du, Jia; Zhang, Ying; Tong, Guang-xiang

    2013-04-01

    This paper studied the effects of delaying first breeding Hucho taimen larvae for different days on the larvae growth, survival, and body size. Five treatments were installed, i. e. , feeding begins on the first eating day (control, S0) and on the 9th, 12th, 15th, and 18th days after the first eating day (S1 -S4) at 10.4-14.9 degree C, respectively. By the end of the experiment (36-day), the growth rate and initial feeding rate in S1 was higher than that in S0, and the overall mortality rate in S1 was lower, but the body size and mass in S1and S0 had no significant difference. Compared with S0, S2 had higher growth rate, initial feeding rate, total mortality, and self-mutilation mortality, the body mass was significantly lower, but the body size had less difference. S3 had higher first feeding rate, body size, total mortality, and self-mutilation mortality, but significantly lower body mass than S0, whereas the growth rate had less difference. In S4, the growth rate and body mass were lower, and the total mortality and self-mutilation mortality were higher than those in S0. It was suggested that under the same conditions, delaying first feeding for 9 days would induce H. taimen larvae presenting "completely compensatory growth", and this feeding way could be applied for the culture of H. taimen larvae in their initial feeding period. PMID:23898674

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction in breast cancer cells prevents tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Gandara, Ricardo; Sartini, Marina; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is a well-established diabetes drug that prevents the onset of most types of human cancers in diabetic patients, especially by targeting cancer stem cells. Metformin exerts its protective effects by functioning as a weak “mitochondrial poison,” as it acts as a complex I inhibitor and prevents oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). Thus, mitochondrial metabolism must play an essential role in promoting tumor growth. To determine the functional role of “mitochondrial health” in breast cancer pathogenesis, here we used mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs) to genetically induce mitochondrial dysfunction in either human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) or cancer-associated fibroblasts (hTERT-BJ1 cells). Our results directly show that all three UCP family members (UCP-1/2/3) induce autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in human breast cancer cells, which results in significant reductions in tumor growth. Conversely, induction of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer-associated fibroblasts has just the opposite effect. More specifically, overexpression of UCP-1 in stromal fibroblasts increases β-oxidation, ketone body production and the release of ATP-rich vesicles, which “fuels” tumor growth by providing high-energy nutrients in a paracrine fashion to epithelial cancer cells. Hence, the effects of mitochondrial dysfunction are truly compartment-specific. Thus, we conclude that the beneficial anticancer effects of mitochondrial inhibitors (such as metformin) may be attributed to the induction of mitochondrial dysfunction in the epithelial cancer cell compartment. Our studies identify cancer cell mitochondria as a clear target for drug discovery and for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:23257779

  6. Expression of fibroblast growth factors in ultraviolet radiation-induced corneal tumors and corneal tumor cell lines from Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, C L; Kusewitt, D F; Applegate, L A; Budge, C L; Ley, R D

    1993-01-01

    Chronic exposure of the gray, short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica, to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces highly vascularized mesenchymal tumors of the cornea. Cell lines derived from these UVR-induced corneal tumors and the corneal tumors themselves were examined for the presence of mRNA coding for basic and acidic fibroblast growth factors (FGF), transforming growth factors-beta and -alpha (TGF-beta and TGF-alpha), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Basic FGF was expressed in the cell lines derived from corneal tumors and in the corneal tumors. Expression of basic FGF was high in one corneal tumor. Transcripts for acidic FGF were detected only in the corneal tumor cell lines, not in primary tumors. TGF-beta expression was detected in the corneal tumors and tumor-derived cell lines. TGF-alpha, EGF, and TNF-alpha transcripts were not detectable in any opossum material; however, homologous gene sequences for TGF-alpha and EGF were detected on Southern blots of opossum genomic DNA. Southern blot analysis revealed no evidence of amplification or rearrangement of the genes for basic FGF or acidic FGF in the UVR-induced corneal tumor that expressed high levels of basic FGF. Opossum basic FGF, which stimulated the proliferation of fetal bovine heart endothelial cells, was purified by heparin affinity chromatography from a UVR-induced corneal tumor and a corneal tumor cell line. Immunoblotting of opossum basic FGF from a corneal tumor cell line using antiserum to bovine basic FGF showed two prominent immunoreactive bands of 17.5 and 18.5 kDa. Expression of basic FGF and acidic FGF may play a role in the development and progression of UVR-induced corneal tumors in M. domestica. PMID:7683886

  7. Fatty acid-binding protein E-FABP restricts tumor growth by promoting IFN-? responses in tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwen; Sun, Yanwen; Rao, Enyu; Yan, Fei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Ying; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Liu, Shujun; Sauter, Edward; Cleary, Margot P; Li, Bing

    2014-06-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABP) are known central regulators of both metabolic and inflammatory pathways, but their role in tumor development remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that host expression of epidermal FABP (E-FABP) protects against mammary tumor growth. We find that E-FABP is highly expressed in macrophages, particularly in a specific subset, promoting their antitumor activity. In the tumor stroma, E-FABP-expressing tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) produce high levels of IFN-? through upregulation of lipid droplet formation in response to tumors. E-FABP-mediated IFN-? signaling can further enhance recruitment of tumoricidal effector cells, in particular natural killer cells, to the tumor stroma for antitumor activity. These findings identify E-FABP as a new protective factor to strengthen IFN-? responses against tumor growth. PMID:24713431

  8. Fatty acid binding protein E-FABP restricts tumor growth by promoting IFN? responses in tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwen; Sun, Yanwen; Rao, Enyu; Yan, Fei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Ying; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Liu, Shujun; Sauter, Edward; Cleary, Margot P.; Li, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are known central regulators of both metabolic and inflammatory pathways, but their role in tumor development remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that host expression of epidermal FABP (E-FABP) protects against mammary tumor growth. We find that E-FABP is highly expressed in macrophages, particularly in a specific subset, promoting their antitumor activity. In the tumor stroma E-FABP-expressing tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) produce high levels of interferon ? (IFN?) through upregulation of lipid droplet (LD) formation in response to tumors. E-FABP-mediated IFN? signaling can further enhance recruitment of tumoricidal effector cells, in particular NK cells, to the tumor stroma for antitumor activity. These findings identify E-FABP as a new protective factor to strengthen IFN? responses against tumor growth. PMID:24713431

  9. A High-Performance Cellular Automaton Model of Tumor Growth with Dynamically Growing Domains

    PubMed Central

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Enderling, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Tumor growth from a single transformed cancer cell up to a clinically apparent mass spans many spatial and temporal orders of magnitude. Implementation of cellular automata simulations of such tumor growth can be straightforward but computing performance often counterbalances simplicity. Computationally convenient simulation times can be achieved by choosing appropriate data structures, memory and cell handling as well as domain setup. We propose a cellular automaton model of tumor growth with a domain that expands dynamically as the tumor population increases. We discuss memory access, data structures and implementation techniques that yield high-performance multi-scale Monte Carlo simulations of tumor growth. We discuss tumor properties that favor the proposed high-performance design and present simulation results of the tumor growth model. We estimate to which parameters the model is the most sensitive, and show that tumor volume depends on a number of parameters in a non-monotonic manner. PMID:25346862

  10. Delayed hydride crack growth study on irradiated Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Priti Kotak; Dubey, J. S.; Kumar, Ashwini; Shriwastaw, R. S.; Rath, B. N.; Pandit, K. M.; Dhotre, M. P.; Mishra, P.; Alur, V. D.; Anantharaman, S.

    2015-05-01

    Delayed hydride crack (DHC) growth study was carried out on irradiated Indian Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube which had seen around 8 effective full power years of operation. Disc compact tension type specimens were used for the DHC tests at 210 C, 250 C, 265 C and 290 C. This paper discusses the test methodology, results generated and compares it with that obtained on the as-fabricated pressure tube of similar specification.

  11. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

    PubMed Central

    Chauviere, Arnaud; Hatzikirou, Haralambos; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Lowengrub, John S.; Cristini, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT) extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth. PMID:22489279

  12. Mechanism of delayed frost growth on superhydrophobic surfaces with jumping condensates: more than interdrop freezing.

    PubMed

    Hao, Quanyong; Pang, Yichuan; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Jie; Yao, Shuhuai

    2014-12-30

    Delayed frost growth on superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) with jumping condensates has been found by many researchers recently. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon has not been elucidated clearly. In this study, copper SHSs with or without jumping condensates were selected as the substrates for observing condensation icing at a relative humidity (RH) of 60%. The results showed that only SHS with jumping condensates showed delayed condensation icing. Moreover, when such SHSs were placed upward and the surface temperature was held at -10 °C, some discrete frozen drops first appeared on the SHSs. The following icing mainly occurred on these discrete global crystals and then expanded around them until covering the entire surface. Little macroscopic interdrop freezing phenomenon was found. The growth of the frost front is mainly dominated by jumping freezing (the condensed droplets jumped onto the ice crystals and were frozen) or direct vapor-ice deposition. Using microscopy, we found interdrop freezing occurred, in addition to the two mechanisms mentioned above. By placing the SHS downward at -10 °C and intentionally introducing or eliminating tiny dusts, we confirmed that there were no superhydrophobic defects on our SHSs. The discrete frozen drops first appearing on the SHSs were triggered by tiny dusts falling on the surface before or during condensation icing. The key approach in delaying or resisting frost growth on SHSs with jumping condensates is to retard initial ice crystal formation, e.g., eliminating the edge effect and keeping the SHSs clean. PMID:25466489

  13. The Motor Protein KIF14 Inhibits Tumor Growth and Cancer Metastasis in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Pei-Fang; Hong, Tse-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chang, Yih-Leong; Wu, Chen-Tu; Chang, Gee-Chen; Jou, Yuh-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The motor protein kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are involved in cancer progression. The depletion of one of the KIFs, KIF14, might delay the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, resulting in a binucleated status, which enhances tumor progression; however, the exact correlation between KIF14 and cancer progression remains ambiguous. In this study, using loss of heterozygosity and array comparative genomic hybridization analyses, we observed a 30% loss in the regions surrounding KIF14 on chromosome 1q in lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, the protein expression levels of KIF14 in 122 lung adenocarcinomas also indicated that approximately 30% of adenocarcinomas showed KIF14 down-regulation compared with the expression in the bronchial epithelial cells of adjacent normal counterparts. In addition, the reduced expression of KIF14 mRNA or proteins was correlated with poor overall survival (P?=?0.0158 and <0.0001, respectively), and the protein levels were also inversely correlated with metastasis (P<0.0001). The overexpression of KIF14 in lung adenocarcinoma cells inhibited anchorage-independent growth in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 also inhibited or enhanced cancer cell migration, invasion and adhesion to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen IV. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion molecules cadherin 11 (CDH11) and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) as cargo on KIF14. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 enhanced or reduced the recruitment of CDH11 in the membrane fraction, suggesting that KIF14 might act through recruiting adhesion molecules to the cell membrane and modulating cell adhesive, migratory and invasive properties. Thus, KIF14 might inhibit tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:23626713

  14. Anti–Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Therapies as a Novel Therapeutic Approach to Treating Neurofibromatosis-Related Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hon Kit; Lahdenranta, Johanna; Kamoun, Walid S.; Chan, Annie W.; McClatchey, Andrea I.; Plotkin, Scott R.; Jain, Rakesh K.; di Tomaso, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular schwannomas associated with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) experience significant morbidity such as complete hearing loss. We have recently shown that treatment with bevacizumab provided tumor stabilization and hearing recovery in a subset of NF2 patients with progressive disease. In the current study, we used two animal models to identify the mechanism of action of anti–vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy in schwannomas. The human HEI193 and murine Nf2−/− cell lines were implanted between the pia and arachnoid meninges as well as in the sciatic nerve to mimic central and peripheral schwannomas. Mice were treated with bevacizumab (10 mg/kg/wk i.v.) or vandetanib (50 mg/kg/d orally) to block the VEGF pathway. Using intravital and confocal microscopy, together with whole-body imaging, we measured tumor growth delay, survival rate, as well as blood vessel structure and function at regular intervals. In both models, tumor vessel diameter, length/surface area density, and permeability were significantly reduced after treatment. After 2 weeks of treatment, necrosis in HEI193 tumors and apoptosis in Nf2−/− tumors were significantly increased, and the tumor growth rate decreased by an average of 50%. The survival of mice bearing intracranial schwannomas was extended by at least 50%. This study shows that anti-VEGF therapy normalizes the vasculature of schwannoma xenografts in nude mice and successfully controls the tumor growth, probably by reestablishing a natural balance between VEGF and semaphorin 3 signaling. PMID:20406973

  15. Senescence Mediates Pituitary Hypoplasia and Restrains Pituitary Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Rubinek, Tami; Yu, Run; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Kovacs, Kalman; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Melmed, Shlomo

    2009-01-01

    Understanding factors subserving pituitary cell proliferation enables understanding mechanisms underlying uniquely benign pituitary tumors. Pituitary tumor-transforming gene (Pttg) deletion results in pituitary hypoplasia, low pituitary cell proliferation rates, and rescue of pituitary tumor development in Rb+/? mice. Pttg?/? pituitary glands exhibit ARF/p53/p21-dependent senescence pathway activation evidenced by up-regulated p19, cyclin D1, and Bcl-2 protein levels and p53 stabilization. High pituitary p21 levels in the absence of PTTG were associated with suppressed cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity, Rb phosphorylation, and cyclin A expression, all required for cell cycle progression. Although senescence-associated ?-galactosidase was enhanced in Pttg-deficient pituitary glands, telomere lengths were increased. DNA damage signaling pathways were activated and aneuploidy was evident in the Pttg-deficient pituitary, triggering senescence-associated genes. To confirm the p21 dependency of decreased proliferation and senescence in the Pttg-null pituitary, mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) colony formation was tested in wild-type, Pttg?/?, Rb+/?, Rb+/?Pttg?/?, and Rb+/?Pttg?/?p21?/? cells. Rb+/?Pttg?/? MEFs, unlike Rb+/? cells, failed to produce colonies and exhibited high levels of senescence. p21 deletion from Rb+/?Pttg?/? MEFs enhanced anchorage-independent cell growth, accompanied by a marked decrease in senescence. As cell proliferation assessed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was higher in Rb+/?Pttg?/?p21?/? relative to Rb+/?Pttg?/? pituitary glands, p21-dependent senescence provoked by Pttg deletion may underlie pituitary hypoplasia and decreased tumor development in Rb+/?Pttg?/? mice. PMID:17975001

  16. VCC-1, a novel chemokine, promotes tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Edward J.; Head, Richard; Griggs, David W.; Sun Duo; Evans, Robert J.; Swearingen, Michelle L.; Westlin, Marisa M.; Mazzarella, Richard . E-mail: richard.a.mazzarella@pfizer.com

    2006-11-10

    We have identified a novel human gene by transcriptional microarray analysis, which is co-regulated in tumors and angiogenesis model systems with VEGF expression. Isolation of cDNA clones containing the full-length VCC-1 transcript from both human and mouse shows a 119 amino acid protein with a 22 amino acid cleavable signal sequence in both species. Comparison of the protein product of this gene with hidden Markov models of all known proteins shows weak but significant homology with two known chemokines, SCYA17 and SCYA16. Northern analysis of human tissues detects a 1 kb band in lung and skeletal muscle. Murine VCC-1 expression can also be detected in lung as well as thyroid, submaxillary gland, epididymis, and uterus tissues by slot blot analysis. By quantitative real time RT-PCR 71% of breast tumors showed 3- to 24-fold up-regulation of VCC-1. In situ hybridization of breast carcinomas showed strong expression of the gene in both normal and transformed mammary gland ductal epithelial cells. In vitro, human microvascular endothelial cells grown on fibronectin increase VCC-1 expression by almost 100-fold. In addition, in the mouse angioma endothelial cell line PY4.1 the gene was over-expressed by 28-fold 6 h after induction of tube formation while quiescent and proliferating cells showed no change. VCC-1 expression is also increased by VEGF and FGF treatment, about 6- and 5-fold, respectively. Finally, 100% of mice injected with NIH3T3 cells over-expressing VCC-1 develop rapidly progressing tumors within 21 days while no growth is seen in any control mice injected with NIH3T3 cells containing the vector alone. These results strongly suggest that VCC-1 plays a role in angiogenesis and possibly in the development of tumors in some tissue types.

  17. Expression of growth factors and growth factor receptors in normal and tumorous human thyroid tissues.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, B F; Freeman, J L; Asa, S L

    1995-02-01

    A number of growth factors have been implicated as stimuli of thyroid cell proliferation; overexpression of these growth factors and/or their receptors may play a role in the growth of thyroid tumors. To determine if immunohistochemical detection of growth factors and/or their receptors correlates with morphological alterations in proliferative lesions of thyroid, we examined the localization of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) and their common receptor, EGF-receptor (EGF-R), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF-1-receptor (IGF-R) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP)-1, -2, -3, and -4, nerve growth factor (NGF), and its receptor NGF-receptor (NGF-R), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), in normal thyroid tissue and various thyroid tumors. We applied the streptavidin-biotin technique to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. We studied 8-16 different cases of each of the following: normal human thyroid, multinodular hyperplasia, follicular adenoma, papillary carcinoma, follicular carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, and anaplastic carcinoma. EGF, TGF-alpha, and their receptor EGF-R were widely expressed in normal thyroid and in all the thyroid lesions examined. IGF-1 and IGFBP-1 were diffusely present in all different thyroid tissues as well. There was no difference in staining intensity or distribution that correlated with the pathological process. IGFBP-4 seemed to have a variable expression. IGFBP-2 and -3 were detected only in medullary carcinomas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7787437

  18. Effect of Time-Delay in the Logistic Growth Model Driven by Weak Signal and White Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Rong

    2010-08-01

    Effect of delayed time in the logistic growth model subject to weak periodic signal and correlated multiplicative and additive white noise is investigated. Using small time delay approximation, we obtain the expression of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is found that the SNR is non-monotonic functions of the delayed times, the system parameters, the intensities of the multiplicative and additive noise, as well as the correlation strength of the two noises.

  19. Role of Constitutive Behavior and Tumor-Host Mechanical Interactions in the State of Stress and Growth of Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgis, Panagiotis; Odysseos, Andreani D.; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces play a crucial role in tumor patho-physiology. Compression of cancer cells inhibits their proliferation rate, induces apoptosis and enhances their invasive and metastatic potential. Additionally, compression of intratumor blood vessels reduces the supply of oxygen, nutrients and drugs, affecting tumor progression and treatment. Despite the great importance of the mechanical microenvironment to the pathology of cancer, there are limited studies for the constitutive modeling and the mechanical properties of tumors and on how these parameters affect tumor growth. Also, the contribution of the host tissue to the growth and state of stress of the tumor remains unclear. To this end, we performed unconfined compression experiments in two tumor types and found that the experimental stress-strain response is better fitted to an exponential constitutive equation compared to the widely used neo-Hookean and Blatz-Ko models. Subsequently, we incorporated the constitutive equations along with the corresponding values of the mechanical properties - calculated by the fit - to a biomechanical model of tumor growth. Interestingly, we found that the evolution of stress and the growth rate of the tumor are independent from the selection of the constitutive equation, but depend strongly on the mechanical interactions with the surrounding host tissue. Particularly, model predictions - in agreement with experimental studies - suggest that the stiffness of solid tumors should exceed a critical value compared with that of the surrounding tissue in order to be able to displace the tissue and grow in size. With the use of the model, we estimated this critical value to be on the order of 1.5. Our results suggest that the direct effect of solid stress on tumor growth involves not only the inhibitory effect of stress on cancer cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis, but also the resistance of the surrounding tissue to tumor expansion. PMID:25111061

  20. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qingwen; State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 ; Jiang, Songmin; Han, Baohui; Sun, Tongwen; Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Jialin

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  1. Nore1 inhibits tumor cell growth independent of Ras or the MST1/2 kinases.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Yumi; Avruch, Joseph; Zhang, Xian-Feng

    2004-04-22

    Nore1, a noncatalytic protein identified by its ability to bind selectively to active Ras, is most closely related in amino-acid sequence to the tumor suppressor RASSF1. Both are expressed predominantly as a longer (Nore1A/RASSF1A) and/or shorter (Nore1B/RASSF1C) polypeptide; all four polypeptides contain a Ras-association domain and bind, through their conserved carboxytermini, the proapoptotic protein kinases MST1 and MST2. Moreover, the expression of the longer polypeptide is downregulated in human tumor cell lines through promoter methylation (frequently for RASSF1A, less regularly for Nore1A). Forced expression of RASSF1A in several such lines (including the NSCLC line A549) has been shown to suppress tumorigenicity; herein we inquire whether Nore has growth inhibitory activity. Four tumor cell lines were tested, selected for their low expression of both Nore1A and Nore1B; the two NSCLC lines, A549 and NCI-H460, each have a mutant active Ras oncogene, whereas the two melanoma lines G361 and M14 each contain the constitutively active BRaf(V599E) oncogene and wild-type Ras. The expression of Nore1A or Nore1B suppresses colony formation by the A549 and G361 lines, as effectively in A549 as does RASSF1A; colony formation in the NCI-H460 and M14 lines is unaffected. Nore1A inhibits anchorage-independent growth by A549 cells and delays A549 progression through G1 without evidence of increased apoptosis. The growth suppressive action of Nore1A is largely unaffected by deletion of both the MST- and Ras-binding domains, as well as by mutation of the Nore1A zinc finger. Thus, Nore1 suppresses the growth of some tumor cell lines through as yet unidentified effectors, independent of Ras-like proteins or MST1/2. PMID:15007383

  2. Tumor-secreted Hsp90 subverts polycomb function to drive prostate tumor growth and invasion.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Krystal D; Franco, Omar E; Hance, Michael W; Hayward, Simon W; Isaacs, Jennifer S

    2015-03-27

    Prostate cancer remains the second highest contributor to male cancer-related lethality. The transition of a subset of tumors from indolent to invasive disease is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Activation of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) genetic program is a major risk factor for cancer progression. We recently reported that secreted extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) initiates EMT in prostate cancer cells, coincident with its enhanced expression in mesenchymal models. Our current work substantially extended these findings in defining a pathway linking eHsp90 signaling to EZH2 function, a methyltransferase of the Polycomb repressor complex. EZH2 is also implicated in EMT activation, and its up-regulation represents one of the most frequent epigenetic alterations during prostate cancer progression. We have now highlighted a novel epigenetic function for eHsp90 via its modulation of EZH2 expression and activity. Mechanistically, eHsp90 initiated sustained activation of MEK/ERK, a signal critical for facilitating EZH2 transcriptional up-regulation and recruitment to the E-cadherin promoter. We further demonstrated that an eHsp90-EZH2 pathway orchestrates an expanded repertoire of EMT-related events including Snail and Twist expression, tumor cell motility, and anoikis resistance. To evaluate the role of eHsp90 in vivo, eHsp90 secretion was stably enforced in a prostate cancer cell line resembling indolent disease. Remarkably, eHsp90 was sufficient to induce tumor growth, suppress E-cadherin, and initiate localized invasion, events that are exquisitely dependent upon EZH2 function. In summary, our findings illuminate a hitherto unknown epigenetic function for eHsp90 and support a model wherein tumor eHsp90 functions as a rheostat for EZH2 expression and activity to orchestrate mesenchymal properties and coincident aggressive behavior. PMID:25670862

  3. Reexpression of LSAMP inhibits tumor growth in a preclinical osteosarcoma model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteosarcomas are the most common primary malignant tumors of bone, showing complex chromosomal rearrangements with multiple gains and losses. A frequent deletion within the chromosomal region 3q13.31 has been identified by us and others, and is mainly reported to be present in osteosarcomas. The purpose of the study was to further characterize the frequency and the extent of the deletion in an extended panel of osteosarcoma samples, and the expression level of the affected genes within the region. We have identified LSAMP as the target gene for the deletion, and have studied the functional implications of LSAMP-reexpression. Methods LSAMP copy number, expression level and protein level were investigated by quantitative PCR and western blotting in an osteosarcoma panel. The expression of LSAMP was restored in an osteosarcoma cell line, and differences in proliferation rate, tumor formation, gene expression, migration rate, differentiation capabilities, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were investigated by metabolic dyes, tumor formation in vivo, gene expression profiling, time-lapse photography, differentiation techniques and flow cytometry, respectively. Results We found reduced copy number of LSAMP in 45/76 osteosarcoma samples, reduced expression level in 25/42 samples and protein expression in 9/42 samples. By restoring the expression of LSAMP in a cell line with a homozygous deletion of the gene, the proliferation rate in vitro was significantly reduced and tumor growth in vivo was significantly delayed. In response to reexpression of LSAMP, mRNA expression profiling revealed consistent upregulation of the genes hairy and enhancer of split 1 (HES1), cancer/testis antigen 2 (CTAG2) and kruppel-like factor 10 (KLF10). Conclusions The high frequency and the specificity of the deletion indicate that it is important for the development of osteosarcomas. The deletion targets the tumor suppressor LSAMP, and based on the functional evidence, the tumor suppressor function of LSAMP is most likely exerted by reducing the proliferation rate of the tumor cells, possibly by indirectly upregulating one or more of the genes HES1, CTAG2 or KLF10. To our knowledge, this study describes novel functions of LSAMP, a first step to understanding the functional role of this specific deletion in osteosarcomas. PMID:24885297

  4. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clment, Genevive; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Reifenberger, J.; Reifenberger, G.; Ichimura, K.; Schmidt, E. E.; Wechsler, W.; Collins, V. P.

    1996-01-01

    A series of 13 oligodendrogliomas (WHO grade II) and 20 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (WHO grade III) was studied for gene amplification and expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR). EGFR gene amplification was found in only one case of anaplastic oligodendroglioma, which additionally showed a deletion/rearrangement at the 5' end of the gene. Northern blot analysis, however, revealed increases of EGFR mRNA expression relative to non-neoplastic control brain in 6 of 13 oligodendrogliomas and 10 of 18 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. All cases with increased mRNA expression showed strong immunoreactivity for EGFR protein. Our findings thus indicate that increased expression of EGFR mRNA and protein is common in low-grade and high-grade oligodendroglial tumors and in the vast majority of cases is not caused by gene amplification. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8686753

  6. Analysis of a ``phase transition'' from tumor growth to latency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsanto, P. P.; Romano, A.; Scalerandi, M.; Pescarmona, G. P.

    2000-08-01

    A mathematical model, based on the local interaction simulation approach, is developed in order to allow simulations of the spatiotemporal evolution of neoplasies. The model consists of a set of rules, which govern the interaction of cancerous cells among themselves and in competition with other cell populations for the acquisition of essential nutrients. As a result of small variations in the basic parameters, it leads to four different outcomes: indefinite growth, metastasis, latency, and complete regression. In the present contribution a detailed analysis of the dormant phase is carried on and the critical parameters for the transition to other phases are computed. Interesting chaotic behaviors can also be observed, with different attractors in the parameters space. Interest in the latency phase has been aroused by therapeutical strategies aiming to reduce a growing tumor to dormancy. The effect of such strategies may be simulated with our approach.

  7. Heparanase Enhances Tumor Growth and Chemoresistance by Promoting Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shteingauz, Anna; Boyango, Ilanit; Naroditsky, Inna; Hammond, Edward; Gruber, Maayan; Doweck, Ilana; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2015-09-15

    Heparanase is the only enzyme in mammals capable of cleaving heparan sulfate, an activity implicated in tumor inflammation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Heparanase is secreted as a latent enzyme that is internalized and subjected to proteolytic processing and activation in lysosomes. Its role under normal conditions has yet to be understood. Here, we provide evidence that heparanase resides within autophagosomes, where studies in heparanase-deficient or transgenic mice established its contributions to autophagy. The protumorigenic properties of heparanase were found to be mediated, in part, by its proautophagic function, as demonstrated in tumor xenograft models of human cancer and through use of inhibitors of the lysosome (chloroquine) and heparanase (PG545), both alone and in combination. Notably, heparanase-overexpressing cells were more resistant to stress and chemotherapy in a manner associated with increased autophagy, effects that were reversed by chloroquine treatment. Collectively, our results establish a role for heparanase in modulating autophagy in normal and malignant cells, thereby conferring growth advantages under stress as well as resistance to chemotherapy. Cancer Res; 75(18); 3946-57. 2015 AACR. PMID:26249176

  8. Sanguinarine Suppresses Prostate Tumor Growth and Inhibits Survivin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Lou, Wei; Chun, Jae Yeon; Cho, Daniel S.; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Evans, Christopher P.; Chen, Jun; Yue, Jiao; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequently occurring disease and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths of men in the United States. Current treatments have proved inadequate in curing or controlling prostate cancer, and a search for agents for the management of this disease is urgently needed. Survivin plays an important role in both progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to chemotherapy. Altered expression of survivin in prostate cancer cells is associated with cancer progression, drug/radiation resistance, poor prognosis, and short patient survival. In the present study, the authors performed a cell-based rapid screen of the Prestwick Chemical Library consisting of 1120 Food and Drug Administrationapproved compounds with known safety and bioavailability in humans to identify potential inhibitors of survivin and anticancer agents for prostate cancer. Sanguinarine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid derived primarily from the bloodroot plant, was identified as a novel inhibitor of survivin that selectively kills prostate cancer cells over normal prostate epithelial cells. The authors found that sanguinarine inhibits survivin protein expression through protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Sanguinarine induces apoptosis and inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells and in vivo tumor formation. Administration of sanguinarine, beginning 3 days after ectopic implantation of DU145 human prostate cancer cells, reduces both tumor weight and volume. In addition, sanguinarine sensitized paclitaxel-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis, offering a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming taxol resistance. These results suggest that sanguinarine may be developed as an agent either alone or in combination with taxol for treatment of prostate cancer overexpressing survivin. PMID:21318089

  9. Sanguinarine suppresses prostate tumor growth and inhibits survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Lou, Wei; Chun, Jae Yeon; Cho, Daniel S; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Evans, Christopher P; Chen, Jun; Yue, Jiao; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C

    2010-03-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequently occurring disease and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths of men in the United States. Current treatments have proved inadequate in curing or controlling prostate cancer, and a search for agents for the management of this disease is urgently needed. Survivin plays an important role in both progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to chemotherapy. Altered expression of survivin in prostate cancer cells is associated with cancer progression, drug/radiation resistance, poor prognosis, and short patient survival. In the present study, the authors performed a cell-based rapid screen of the Prestwick Chemical Library consisting of 1120 Food and Drug Administration-approved compounds with known safety and bioavailability in humans to identify potential inhibitors of survivin and anticancer agents for prostate cancer. Sanguinarine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid derived primarily from the bloodroot plant, was identified as a novel inhibitor of survivin that selectively kills prostate cancer cells over "normal" prostate epithelial cells. The authors found that sanguinarine inhibits survivin protein expression through protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Sanguinarine induces apoptosis and inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells and in vivo tumor formation. Administration of sanguinarine, beginning 3 days after ectopic implantation of DU145 human prostate cancer cells, reduces both tumor weight and volume. In addition, sanguinarine sensitized paclitaxel-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis, offering a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming taxol resistance. These results suggest that sanguinarine may be developed as an agent either alone or in combination with taxol for treatment of prostate cancer overexpressing survivin. PMID:21318089

  10. A critical role for GRP78/BiP in the tumor microenvironment for neovascularization during tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dezheng; Stapleton, Christopher; Luo, Biquan; Xiong, Shigang; Ye, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Jhaveri, Niyati; Zhu, Genyuan; Ye, Risheng; Liu, Zhi; Bruhn, Kevin W; Craft, Noah; Groshen, Susan; Hofman, Florence M; Lee, Amy S

    2011-04-15

    Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78)/BiP is a multifunctional protein which plays a major role in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein processing, protein quality control, maintaining ER homeostasis, and controlling cell signaling and viability. Previously, using a transgene-induced mammary tumor model, we showed that Grp78 heterozygosity impeded cancer growth through suppression of tumor cell proliferation and promotion of apoptosis and the Grp78(+/-) mice exhibited dramatic reduction (70%) in the microvessel density (MVD) of the endogenous mammary tumors, while having no effect on the MVD of normal organs. This observation suggests that GRP78 may critically regulate the function of the host vasculature within the tumor microenvironment. In this article, we interrogated the role of GRP78 in the tumor microenvironment. In mouse tumor models in which wild-type (WT), syngeneic mammary tumor cells were injected into the host, we showed that Grp78(+/-) mice suppressed tumor growth and angiogenesis during the early phase but not during the late phase of tumor growth. Growth of metastatic lesions of WT, syngeneic melanoma cells in the Grp78(+/-) mice was potently suppressed. We created conditional heterozygous knockout of GRP78 in the host endothelial cells and showed severe reduction of tumor angiogenesis and metastatic growth, with minimal effect on normal tissue MVD. Furthermore, knockdown of GRP78 expression in immortalized human endothelial cells showed that GRP78 is a critical mediator of angiogenesis by regulating cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Our findings suggest that concomitant use of current chemotherapeutic agents and novel therapies against GRP78 may offer a powerful dual approach to arrest cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. PMID:21467168

  11. Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Line; Idorn, Manja; Olofsson, Gitte H; Lauenborg, Britt; Nookaew, Intawat; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Becker, Jürgen C; Pedersen, Katrine S; Dethlefsen, Christine; Nielsen, Jens; Gehl, Julie; Pedersen, Bente K; Thor Straten, Per; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-03-01

    Regular exercise reduces the risk of cancer and disease recurrence. Yet the mechanisms behind this protection remain to be elucidated. In this study, tumor-bearing mice randomized to voluntary wheel running showed over 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across five different tumor models. Microarray analysis revealed training-induced upregulation of pathways associated with immune function. NK cell infiltration was significantly increased in tumors from running mice, whereas depletion of NK cells enhanced tumor growth and blunted the beneficial effects of exercise. Mechanistic analyses showed that NK cells were mobilized by epinephrine, and blockade of β-adrenergic signaling blunted training-dependent tumor inhibition. Moreover, epinephrine induced a selective mobilization of IL-6-sensitive NK cells, and IL-6-blocking antibodies blunted training-induced tumor suppression, intratumoral NK cell infiltration, and NK cell activation. Together, these results link exercise, epinephrine, and IL-6 to NK cell mobilization and redistribution, and ultimately to control of tumor growth. PMID:26895752

  12. Kinetics of tumor growth and regression in IgG multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Peter W.; Salmon, Sydney E.

    1972-01-01

    Studies of immunoglobulin synthesis, total body tumor cell number, and tumor kinetics were carried out in a series of patients with IgG multiple myeloma. The changes in tumor size associated with tumor growth or with regression were underestimated when the concentration of serum M-component was used as the sole index of tumor mass. Calculation of the total body M-component synthetic rate (corrected for concentration-dependent changes in IgG metabolism) and tumor cell number gave a more accurate and predictable estimate of changes in tumor size. Tumor growth and drug-induced tumor regression were found to follow Gompertzian kinetics, with progressive retardation of the rate of change of tumor size in both of these circumstances. This retardation effect, describable with a constant ?, may be caused by a shift in the proportion of tumor cells in the proliferative cycle. Drug sensitivity of the tumor could be described quantitatively with a calculation of BO, the tumor's initial sensitivity to a given drug regimen. Of particular clinical significance, the magnitude of a given patient's tumor regression could be predicted from the ratio of BO to ?. Mathematical proof was obtained that the retardation constant determined during tumor regression also applied to the earlier period of tumor growth, and this constant was used to reconstruct the preclinical history of disease. In the average patient, fewer than 5 yr elapse from the initial tumor cell doubling to its clinical presentation with from 1011 to more than 1012 myeloma cells in the body. The reduction in total body tumor mass in most patients responding to therapy ranges from less than one to almost two orders of magnitude. Application of predictive kinetic analysis to the design of sequential drug regimens may lead to further improvement in the treatment of multiple myeloma and other tumors with similar growth characteristics. PMID:5040867

  13. Host Cxcr2-dependent regulation of mammary tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhawna; Nannuru, Kalyan C; Varney, Michelle L; Singh, Rakesh K

    2015-01-01

    Host-derived angiogenic and inflammatory tumor supportive microenvironment regulates progression and metastasis, but the molecular mechanism(s) underlying host-tumor interactions remains unclear. Tumor expression of CXCR2 and its ligands have been shown to regulate angiogenesis, invasion, tumor growth, and metastasis. In this report, we hypothesized that host-derived Cxcr2-dependent signaling plays an important role in breast cancer growth and metastasis. Two mammary tumor cell lines Cl66 and 4T1 cells were orthotopically implanted into the mammary fat pad of wild-type and Cxcr2(-/-) female BALB/c mice. Tumor growth and spontaneous lung metastasis were monitored. Immunohistochemical analyses of the tumor tissues were performed to analyze proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis and immune cell infiltration. Our results demonstrated that knock-down of host Cxcr2 decreases tumor growth and metastasis by reducing angiogenesis, proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Host Cxcr2 plays an important role in governing the pro-inflammatory response in mammary tumors as evaluated by decreased Gr1(+) tumor-associated granulocytes, F4/80(+) tumor associated macrophages, and CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid derived suppressor cells in Cxcr2(-/-) mice as compared to control wild-type mice. Together, these results demonstrate that host Cxcr2-dependent signaling regulates mammary tumor growth and metastasis by promoting angiogenesis and pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:25511644

  14. Early life exposure to PCB126 results in delayed mortality and growth impairment in the zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Carolina; Groh, Ksenia J; Zennegg, Markus; Vermeirssen, Etinne L M; Murk, Albertinka J; Eggen, Rik I L; Hollert, Henner; Werner, Inge; Schirmer, Kristin

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of chronic or delayed toxicity resulting from the exposure to sublethal chemical concentrations is an increasing concern in environmental risk assessment. The Fish Embryo Toxicity (FET) test with zebrafish provides a reliable prediction of acute toxicity in adult fish, but it cannot yet be applied to predict the occurrence of chronic or delayed toxicity. Identification of sublethal FET endpoints that can assist in predicting the occurrence of chronic or delayed toxicity would be advantageous. The present study characterized the occurrence of delayed toxicity in zebrafish larvae following early exposure to PCB126, previously described to cause delayed effects in the common sole. The first aim was to investigate the occurrence and temporal profiles of delayed toxicity during zebrafish larval development and compare them to those previously described for sole to evaluate the suitability of zebrafish as a model fish species for delayed toxicity assessment. The second aim was to examine the correlation between the sublethal endpoints assessed during embryonal and early larval development and the delayed effects observed during later larval development. After exposure to PCB126 (3-3000ng/L) until 5 days post fertilization (dpf), larvae were reared in clean water until 14 or 28 dpf. Mortality and sublethal morphological and behavioural endpoints were recorded daily, and growth was assessed at 28 dpf. Early life exposure to PCB126 caused delayed mortality (300 ng/L and 3000 ng/L) as well as growth impairment and delayed development (100 ng/L) during the clean water period. Effects on swim bladder inflation and cartilaginous tissues within 5 dpf were the most promising for predicting delayed mortality and sublethal effects, such as decreased standard length, delayed metamorphosis, reduced inflation of swim bladder and column malformations. The EC50 value for swim bladder inflation at 5 dpf (169 ng/L) was similar to the LC50 value at 8 dpf (188 and 202 ng/L in two experiments). Interestingly, the patterns of delayed mortality and delayed effects on growth and development were similar between sole and zebrafish. This indicates the comparability of critical developmental stages across divergent fish species such as a cold water marine flatfish and a tropical freshwater cyprinid. Additionally, sublethal effects in early embryo-larval stages were found promising for predicting delayed lethal and sublethal effects of PCB126. Therefore, the proposed method with zebrafish is expected to provide valuable information on delayed mortality and delayed sublethal effects of chemicals and environmental samples that may be extrapolated to other species. PMID:26551687

  15. Simulation of the effect of plasma species on tumor growth and apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, William; Carroll, Caitlin; Keidar, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Tumor modeling is a technique that entails using mathematical and physical equations to describe the biological disease, most importantly uncontrolled cell growth and the tumor life cycle. The model utilized in this paper makes use of a three-dimensional hybrid discrete-continuum model to show the apoptotic effect a tumor volume undergoes when treated with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species from the cold atmospheric plasma. The results compare untreated and treated tumors of varying sizes by measuring spatiotemporal data to predict trends of tumor evolution. The simulation results show that the treated tumor death, irrespective of tumor volume, follows an exponential decay and that the untreated tumor follows an expected growth pattern. Future experiments and applications can lead to a predictive tumor model allowing for individualized treatment planning for the cold atmospheric plasma therapy.

  16. Transforming Growth Factor-β3 Therapy Delays Postoperative Reossification and Improves Craniofacial Growth in Craniosynostotic Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J; Karski, M; Smith, T D; Burrows, A M; Norbutt, C; Siegel, M I; Costello, B J; Cray, J J; Losee, J E; Moursi, A M; Cooper, G M; Mooney, M P

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative reossification is a common clinical correlate following surgery. It has been suggested that an underexpression of transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) may be related to craniosynostosis and postoperative reossification. Adding TGF-β3 may delay reossification and improve postoperative growth. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis. Thirty 10-day-old New Zealand white rabbits with hereditary coronal suture synostosis were divided into three groups: (1) suturectomy controls (n = 14), (2) suturectomy treated with bovine serum albumin (n = 8), and (3) suturectomy treated with TGF-β3 protein (n = 8). At 10 days of age, a 3-mm × 15-mm coronal suturectomy was performed, and serial three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scans and cephalographs were taken at 10, 25, 42, and 84 days of age. Calvaria were harvested at 84 days of age for histomorphometric analysis. Mean differences were analyzed using a group by age analysis of variance. Analysis of the 3D CT scan data revealed that sites treated with TGF-β3 had significantly (P < .05) greater defect areas and significantly (P < .05) greater intracranial volumes through 84 days of age compared with controls. Histomorphometry showed that sites treated with TGF-β3 had patent suturectomy sites and significantly (P < .001) less new bone in the suturectomy site compared with controls. Serial radiograph data revealed significant (P < .05) differences in craniofacial growth from 25 to 84 days in TGF-β3-treated rabbits compared with controls. Data show that TGF-β3 administration delayed reossification and improved craniofacial growth in this rabbit model. These findings also suggest that this molecular-based therapy may have potential clinical use. PMID:26090789

  17. Destruction of tumor vasculature and abated tumor growth upon VEGF blockade is driven by proapoptotic protein Bim in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Naik, Edwina; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse; Merino, Delphine; Lin, Ann; Cook, Michele; Coultas, Leigh; Bouillet, Philippe; Adams, Jerry M; Strasser, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    For malignant growth, solid cancers must stimulate the formation of new blood vessels by producing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), which is required for the survival of tumor-associated vessels. Novel anticancer agents that block VEGF-A signaling trigger endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis and vascular regression preferentially within tumors, but how the ECs die is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that VEGF-A deprivation, provoked either by drug-induced tumor shrinkage or direct VEGF-A blockade, up-regulates the proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3)-only Bcl-2 family member Bim in ECs. Importantly, the tumor growth inhibitory activity of a VEGF-A antagonist required Bim-induced apoptosis of ECs. These findings thus reveal the mechanism by which VEGF-A blockade induces EC apoptosis and impairs tumor growth. They also indicate that drugs mimicking BH3-only proteins may be exploited to kill tumor cells not only directly but also indirectly by ablating the tumor vasculature. PMID:21646395

  18. Tumor-derived osteopontin reprograms normal mammary fibroblasts to promote inflammation and tumor growth in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Yoray; Raz, Yael; Cohen, Noam; Ben-Shmuel, Amir; Schwartz, Hila; Geiger, Tamar; Erez, Neta

    2015-03-15

    Breast tumors are characterized by an extensive desmoplastic stroma, abundantly populated by fibroblasts. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, and invasion. CAF also orchestrate tumor-promoting inflammation in multiple tumor types, including breast cancer. However, the mechanisms through which normal tissue fibroblasts are reprogrammed to tumor-promoting CAFs are mainly obscure. Here, we show that mammary fibroblasts can be educated by breast cancer cells to become activated to a proinflammatory state that supports malignant progression. Proteomic analysis of breast cancer cell-secreted factors identified the secreted proinflammatory mediator osteopontin, which has been implicated in inflammation, tumor progression, and metastasis. Osteopontin was highly secreted by mouse and human breast cancer cells, and tumor cell-secreted osteopontin activated a CAF phenotypes in normal mammary fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo. Osteopontin was sufficient to induce fibroblast reprogramming and neutralizing antibodies against osteopontin-blocked fibroblast activation induced by tumor cells. The ability of secreted osteopontin to activate mammary fibroblasts relied upon its known receptors CD44 and αVβ3 integrin. Strikingly, osteopontin silencing in tumor cells in vivo attenuated stromal activation and inhibited tumor growth. Our findings establish a critical functional role for paracrine signaling by tumor-derived osteopontin in reprograming normal fibroblasts into tumor-promoting CAFs. PMID:25600648

  19. Type I cytokines synergize with oncogene inhibition to induce tumor growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Acquavella, Nicolas; Clever, David; Yu, Zhiya; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Palmer, Douglas C; Xi, Liqiang; Pflicke, Holger; Ji, Yun; Gros, Alena; Hanada, Ken-Ichi; Goldlust, Ian S; Mehta, Gautam U; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Crompton, Joseph G; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Morrow, James J; Franco, Zulmarie; Gattinoni, Luca; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David F; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Raffeld, Mark; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Both targeted inhibition of oncogenic driver mutations and immune-based therapies show efficacy in treatment of patients with metastatic cancer, but responses can be either short lived or incompletely effective. Oncogene inhibition can augment the efficacy of immune-based therapy, but mechanisms by which these two interventions might cooperate are incompletely resolved. Using a novel transplantable BRAF(V600E)-mutant murine melanoma model (SB-3123), we explored potential mechanisms of synergy between the selective BRAF(V600E) inhibitor vemurafenib and adoptive cell transfer (ACT)-based immunotherapy. We found that vemurafenib cooperated with ACT to delay melanoma progression without significantly affecting tumor infiltration or effector function of endogenous or adoptively transferred CD8(+) T cells, as previously observed. Instead, we found that the T-cell cytokines IFN? and TNF? synergized with vemurafenib to induce cell-cycle arrest of tumor cells in vitro. This combinatorial effect was recapitulated in human melanoma-derived cell lines and was restricted to cancers bearing a BRAF(V600E) mutation. Molecular profiling of treated SB-3123 indicated that the provision of vemurafenib promoted the sensitization of SB-3123 to the antiproliferative effects of T-cell effector cytokines. The unexpected finding that immune cytokines synergize with oncogene inhibitors to induce growth arrest has major implications for understanding cancer biology at the intersection of oncogenic and immune signaling and provides a basis for design of combinatorial therapeutic approaches for patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:25358764

  20. An RGD motif present in cadherin 17 induces integrin activation and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Bartolom, Rubn A; Pelez-Garca, Alberto; Gomez, Inmaculada; Torres, Sofa; Fernandez-Aceero, Mara Jess; Escudero-Paniagua, Beatriz; Imbaud, J Ignacio; Casal, J Ignacio

    2014-12-12

    Little is known about the mechanism of integrin activation by cadherin 17 (CDH17). Here we observed the presence of a tri-peptide motif, RGD, in domain 6 of the human CDH17 sequence and other cadherins such as cadherin 5 and cadherin 6. The use of CDH17 RAD mutants demonstrated a considerable decrease of proliferation and adhesion in RKO and KM12SM colon cancer cells. Furthermore, RGD peptides inhibited the adhesion of both cell lines to recombinant CDH17 domain 6. The RGD motif added exogenously to the cells provoked a change in ?1 integrin to an active, high-affinity conformation and an increase in focal adhesion kinase and ERK1/2 activation. In vivo experiments with Swiss nude mice demonstrated that cancer cells expressing the CDH17 RAD mutant showed a considerable delay in tumor growth and liver homing. CDH17 RGD effects were also active in pancreatic cancer cells. Our results suggest that ?2?1 integrin interacts with two different ligands, collagen IV and CDH17, using two different binding sites. In summary, the RGD binding motif constitutes a switch for integrin pathway activation and shows a novel capacity of CDH17 as an integrin ligand. This motif could be targeted to avoid metastatic dissemination in tumors overexpressing CDH17 and other RGD-containing cadherins. PMID:25336636

  1. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor presenting as a delayed sequela to cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Barasch, E.S.; Altieri, D.; Decker, R.E.; Ahmed, S.; Lin, J.

    1988-11-01

    A patient developed a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) many years after therapeutic cerebral radiation and methotrexate treatment for leukemia. The differential radiologic and histologic diagnoses, as well as the possible co-oncogenic effects of radiation and methotrexate, are evaluated.

  2. [Suspicion of anorexia nervosa as a cause of delayed diagnosis of brain tumor. A case report].

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Ewa; W?c?awek-Tompol, Jadwiga; Kazanowska, Bernarda; Barg, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) are the most common solid tumors diagnosed in children. The most frequent symptoms of brain tumors in this age group are headaches and vomiting, regardless of the location of the lesions. These symptoms are non-specific, and in each case require differential diagnosis, especially if there is no gradual improvement in the patient's condition or progression. The most common signs of anorexia nervosa are chronic vomiting, weakness of the body, pain and in extreme cases cachexia. These symptoms are similar to the clinical image of CNS tumor. Teenager, described in our case report presented the following signs for several weeks prior to the diagnosis of a brain tumor: vomiting (especially after meals), non-specific headache and epigastric pain. No significant progression in the patient's condition oriented the diagnostic process towards anorexia nervosa. Although anorexia in this age group is much more common disease, compared to a brain tumor, it is vital to ruled out/ exclude organic disorders prior to diagnosis of psychogenic disorder. At the same time the waiting for the specialist consultations (ophthalmologist, neurologist) and test results (head CT, head NMR) should not prolong the patients referral to a specialist center. PMID:26615049

  3. Targeting tumor micro-environment for design and development of novel anti-angiogenic agents arresting tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Gacche, Rajesh N; Meshram, Rohan J

    2013-11-01

    Angiogenesis: a process of generation of new blood vessels has been proved to be necessary for sustained tumor growth and cancer progression. Inhibiting angiogenesis pathway has long been remained a significant hope for the development of novel, effective and target orientated antitumor agents arresting the tumor proliferation and metastasis. The process of neoangiogenesis as a biological process is regulated by several pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, especially vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, hypoxia inducible factor 1 and transforming growth factor. Every endothelial cell destined for vessel formation is equipped with receptors for these angiogenic peptides. Moreover, numerous other angiogenic cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor (PGDF), placenta growth factor (PGF), nerve growth factor (NGF), stem-cell factor (SCF), and interleukins-2, 4, 6 etc. These molecular players performs critical role in regulating the angiogenic switch. Couple of decade's research in molecular aspects of tumor biology has unraveled numerous structural and functional mysteries of these angiogenic peptides. In present article, a detailed update on the functional and structural peculiarities of the various angiogenic peptides is described focusing on structural opportunities made available that has potential to be used to modulate function of these angiogenic peptides in developing therapeutic agents targeting neoplastic angiogenesis. The data may be useful in the mainstream of developing novel anticancer agents targeting tumor angiogenesis. We also discuss major therapeutic agents that are currently used in angiogenesis associated therapies as well as those are subject of active research or are in clinical trials. PMID:24139944

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 of 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.

  5. PHOSPHOLIPASE D (PLD) DRIVES CELL INVASION, TUMOR GROWTH AND METASTASIS IN A HUMAN BREAST CANCER XENOGRAPH MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Henkels, Karen M.; Boivin, Gregory P.; Dudley, Emily S.; Berberich, Steven J.; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in human females in the world. One protein that has elevated enzymatic lipase activity in breast cancers in vitro is phospholipase D (PLD), which is also involved in cell migration. We demonstrate that the PLD2 isoform, which was analyzed directly in the tumors, is crucial for cell invasion that contributes critically to the growth and development of breast tumors and lung metastases in vivo. We used three complementary strategies in a SCID mouse model and also addressed the underlying molecular mechanism. First, the PLD2 gene was silenced in highly metastatic, aggressive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) with lentivirus-based shRNA, which were xenotransplanted in SCID mice. The resulting mouse primary mammary tumors were reduced in size (65%, p<0.05) and their onset delayed when compared to control tumors. Second, we stably overexpressed PLD2 in low-invasive breast cancer cells (MCF-7) with a biscistronic MIEG retroviral vector and observed that these cells were converted into a highly aggressive phenotype, as primary tumors that formed following xenotransplantation were larger, grew faster and developed lung metastases more readily. Third, we implanted osmotic pumps into SCID xenotransplanted mice that delivered two different small-molecule inhibitors of PLD activity (FIPI and NOPT). These inhibitors led to significant (>70%, p<0.05) inhibition of primary tumor growth, metastatic axillary tumors and lung metastases. In order to define the underlying mechanism, we determined that the machinery of PLD-induced cell invasion is mediated by phosphatidic acid (PA), WASp, Grb2 and Rac2 signaling events that ultimately affect actin polymerization and cell invasion. In summary, this study shows that PLD has a central role in the development, metastasis and level of aggressiveness of breast cancer, raising the possibility that PLD2 could be used as a new therapeutic target. PMID:23752189

  6. Preliminary investigation of the inhibitory effects of mechanical stress in tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Ishita; Miga, Michael I.

    2008-03-01

    In the past years different models have been formulated to explain the growth of gliomas in the brain. The most accepted model is based on a reaction-diffusion equation that describes the growth of the tumor as two separate components- a proliferative component and an invasive component. While many improvements have been made to this basic model, the work exploring the factors that naturally inhibit growth is insufficient. It is known that stress fields affect the growth of normal tissue. Due to the rigid skull surrounding the brain, mechanical stress might be an important factor in inhibiting the growth of gliomas. A realistic model of glioma growth would have to take that inhibitory effect into account. In this work a mathematical model based on the reaction-diffusion equation was used to describe tumor growth, and the affect of mechanical stresses caused by the mass effect of tumor cells was studied. An initial tumor cell concentration with a Gaussian distribution was assumed and tumor growth was simulated for two cases- one where growth was solely governed by the reaction-diffusion equation and second where mechanical stress inhibits growth by affecting the diffusivity. All the simulations were performed using the finite difference method. The results of simulations show that the proposed mechanism of inhibition could have a significant affect on tumor growth predictions. This could have implications for varied applications in the imaging field that use growth models, such as registration and model updated surgery.

  7. Conditions supporting repair of potentially lethal damage cause a significant reduction of ultraviolet light-induced division delay in synchronized and plateau-phase Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iliakis, G.; Nusse, M.

    1982-09-01

    Repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) induced by uv light in synchronized and in plateau-phase cultures of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells was studied by measuring cell survival. In particlar the influence of conditions supporting repair of PLD on growth kinetics was investigated. In synchronized G/sub 1/, S, or G/sub 2/ + M cells as well as in plateau-phase cells, uv light induced, almost exclusively, delay in the next S phase. A significant decrease of this delay was observed when the cells were incubated for 24 hr in balanced salt solution. Repair of PLD after uv irradiation was found to occur in plateau-phase cells and in cells in different phases of the cell cycle provided that after irradiation these were kept under conditions inhibiting cell multiplication (incubation in balanced salt solution or in conditioned medium). The repair time constant t/sub 50/ was significantly higher than those found for X irradiation (5-10 hr compared to 2 hr), and repair was not significantly inhibited by either 20 ..mu..g/ml cycloheximide or 2 mM caffeine in 24 hr.

  8. Dual inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase synergistically suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Panigrahy, Dipak; Hwang, Sung Hee; Yang, Jun; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Wettersten, Hiromi I.; Liu, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yanru; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Tam, Sarah; Kieran, Mark W.; Weiss, Robert H.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins derived from the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) from the cytochrome P450/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway are important eicosanoids that regulate angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. COX-2 inhibitors, which block the formation of prostaglandins, suppress tumor growth, whereas sEH inhibitors, which increase endogenous EETs, stimulate primary tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional interactions of these two pathways in cancer are unknown. Using pharmacological inhibitors as probes, we show here that dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH synergistically inhibits primary tumor growth and metastasis by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. COX-2/sEH dual pharmacological inhibitors also potently suppress primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis via selective inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical interaction of these two lipid metabolism pathways on tumorigenesis and suggest dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25024195

  9. Longitudinal Bioluminescence Imaging of Primary versus Abdominal Metastatic Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Pancreatic Tumor Models in NSG Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Harlan E.; Fishel, Melissa L.; Xie, Jingwu; Gu, Dongsheng; McCarthy, Brian P.; Riley, Amanda A.; Sinn, Anthony L.; Silver, Jayne M.; Peterman, Kacie; Kelley, Mark R.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Korc, Murray; Pollok, Karen E.; Territo, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate noninvasive bioluminescence imaging methods for differentially monitoring primary and abdominal metastatic tumor growth in mouse orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. Methods A semiautomated maximum entropy segmentation method was implemented for the primary tumor region-of-interest, and a rule-based method for manually drawing a region-of-interest for the abdominal metastatic region was developed for monitoring tumor growth in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. The two region-of-interest methods were validated by having two observers independently segment Panc-1 tumors, and the results compared with the number of mesenteric lymph node nodules, and histopathological assessment of liver metastases. The findings were extended to orthotopic tumors of the more metastatic MIA PaCa-2 and AsPC-1 cells where separate groups of animals were implanted with different numbers of cells. Results The results demonstrated that the segmentation methods were highly reliable, reproducible and robust, and allowed statistically significant discrimination in the growth rates of primary and abdominal metastatic tumors of different cell lines implanted with different numbers of cells. Conclusions The present results demonstrate that primary tumors and abdominal metastatic foci in orthotopic pancreatic cancer models can be reliably quantified separately and noninvasively over time with bioluminescence imaging. PMID:25406955

  10. PRIMA-1MET Inhibits Growth of Mouse Tumors Carrying Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Zache, Nicole; Lambert, Jeremy M. R.; Wiman, Klas G.; Bykov, Vladimir J. N.

    2008-01-01

    Reactivation of the tumor suppressor activity to mutant p53 should trigger massive apoptosis and eliminate tumors. The low molecular weight compounds PRIMA-1 and the structural analog PRIMA-1MET reactivate human mutant p53 in vitro and suppress growth of human tumor xenografts in SCID mice. However, little is known about their effect on mouse mutant p53 in mouse tumor cells. We have examined the effect of PRIMA-1MET on mouse sarcomas, mammary carcinomas and chemically induced fibrosarcomas. PRIMA-1MET showed potent growth suppression in mutant p53-carrying mouse tumors in vitro and a significant anti-tumor effect in syngeneic mice in vivo. These results demonstrate that PRIMA-1MET targets mouse tumors carrying mutant p53 and provide strong support for the anti-tumor efficiency of PRIMA-1METin vivo. PMID:18791272

  11. Targeting matriptase in breast cancer abrogates tumor progression via impairment of stromal-epithelial growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zoratti, Gina L.; Tanabe, Lauren M.; Varela, Fausto A.; Murray, Andrew S.; Bergum, Christopher; Colombo, Eloic; Lang, Julie; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Leduc, Richard; Marsault, Eric; Boerner, Julie; List, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Matriptase is an epithelia-specific membrane-anchored serine protease that has received considerable attention in recent years due to its consistent dysregulation in human epithelial tumors, including breast cancer. Mice with reduced levels of matriptase display a significant delay in oncogene-induced mammary tumor formation and blunted tumor growth. The abated tumor growth is associated with a decrease in cancer cell proliferation. Here we demonstrate by genetic deletion and silencing that the proliferation impairment in matriptase deficient breast cancer cells is caused by their inability to initiate activation of the c-Met signaling pathway in response to fibroblast-secreted pro-HGF. Similarly, inhibition of matriptase catalytic activity using a selective small-molecule inhibitor abrogates the activation of c-Met, Gab1 and AKT, in response to pro-HGF, which functionally leads to attenuated proliferation in breast carcinoma cells. We conclude that matriptase is critically involved in breast cancer progression and represents a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25873032

  12. Neuronal system-dependent facilitation of tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth by calcitonin gene-related peptide

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Masaya; Suzuki, Tatsunori; Hosono, Kanako; Hayashi, Izumi; Hashiba, Shinichiro; Onuma, Yuichiro; Amano, Hideki; Kurihara, Yukiko; Kurihara, Hiroki; Okamoto, Hirotsugu; Hoka, Sumio; Majima, Masataka

    2008-01-01

    A neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is widely distributed in neuronal systems and exhibits numerous biological activities. Using CGRP-knockout mice (CGRP?/?), we examined whether or not endogenous CGRP facilitates angiogenesis indispensable to tumor growth. CGRP increased tube formation by endothelial cells in vitro and enhanced sponge-induced angiogenesis in vivo. Tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis in CGRP?/? implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells were significantly reduced compared with those in wild-type (WT) mice. A CGRP antagonist, CGRP8-37 or denervation of sciatic nerves (L15) suppressed LLC growth in the sites of denervation compared with vehicle infusion or sham operation. CGRP precursor mRNA levels in the dorsal root ganglion in LLC-bearing WT were increased compared with those in non-LLC-bearing mice. This increase was abolished by denervation. The expression of VEGF in tumor stroma was down-regulated in CGRP?/?. These results indicate that endogenous CGRP facilitates tumor-associated angiogenesis and tumor growth and suggest that relevant CGRP may be derived from neuronal systems including primary sensory neurons and may become a therapeutic target for cancers. PMID:18757746

  13. Neuronal system-dependent facilitation of tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth by calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Toda, Masaya; Suzuki, Tatsunori; Hosono, Kanako; Hayashi, Izumi; Hashiba, Shinichiro; Onuma, Yuichiro; Amano, Hideki; Kurihara, Yukiko; Kurihara, Hiroki; Okamoto, Hirotsugu; Hoka, Sumio; Majima, Masataka

    2008-09-01

    A neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is widely distributed in neuronal systems and exhibits numerous biological activities. Using CGRP-knockout mice (CGRP(-/-)), we examined whether or not endogenous CGRP facilitates angiogenesis indispensable to tumor growth. CGRP increased tube formation by endothelial cells in vitro and enhanced sponge-induced angiogenesis in vivo. Tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis in CGRP(-/-) implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells were significantly reduced compared with those in wild-type (WT) mice. A CGRP antagonist, CGRP8-37 or denervation of sciatic nerves (L(1-5)) suppressed LLC growth in the sites of denervation compared with vehicle infusion or sham operation. CGRP precursor mRNA levels in the dorsal root ganglion in LLC-bearing WT were increased compared with those in non-LLC-bearing mice. This increase was abolished by denervation. The expression of VEGF in tumor stroma was down-regulated in CGRP(-/-). These results indicate that endogenous CGRP facilitates tumor-associated angiogenesis and tumor growth and suggest that relevant CGRP may be derived from neuronal systems including primary sensory neurons and may become a therapeutic target for cancers. PMID:18757746

  14. Unexpected Delayed Colon Perforation after the Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection with Snaring of a Laterally Spreading Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Bo; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Kim, Wan Soo; Kwak, Min Seob; Lee, Ji Wan; Shin, Dong Yeol; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Byeon, Jeong-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Colonic perforation may occur as a complication of diagnostic and therapeutic colonoscopy. The risk factors for perforation after colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) include an inexperienced endoscopist, a large tumor size, and submucosal fibrosis. The mechanisms of perforation include unintended endoscopic resection/dissection and severe thermal injury. Here, we report a case of colon perforation that occurred after ESD with snaring of a laterally spreading tumor. The perforation was completely unexpected because there were no colorectal ESD-associated risk factors for perforation, deep dissection, or severe coagulation injury in our patient. PMID:26668808

  15. The triterpenoid CDDO-Me delays murine acute graft-versus-host disease with the preservation of graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghui; Sun, Kai; Redelman, Doug; Welniak, Lisbeth A.; Murphy, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and tumor relapse represent the two major obstacles impeding the efficacy of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in cancer. We have previously shown that the synthetic triterpenoid CDDO can inhibit murine early acute GVHD but anti-tumor effects were not assessed. In the current study, we found that a new derivative of CDDO, CDDO-Me, had an increased ability to inhibit allogeneic T cell responses and induce cell death of alloreactive T cells in vitro. Administration of CDDO-Me to mice following allogeneic BMT resulted in significant and increased protection from acute lethal GVHD compared to CDDO. This correlated with reduced TNF-? production, reduced donor T cell proliferation and decreased adhesion molecule (?4?7 integrin) expression on the donor T cells. CDDO-Me was also superior to CDDO in inhibiting leukemia growth in vitro. When CDDO-Me was administered following an allogeneic BMT to leukemia-bearing mice, significant increases in survival were observed. These findings suggest that CDDO-Me is superior to CDDO in delaying acute GVHD while preserving or possibly even augmenting GVT effects. PMID:20338256

  16. Delayed growth, motor function and learning in preterm pigs during early postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Anders D; Sangild, Per T; Munch, Sara L; van der Beek, Eline M; Renes, Ingrid B; Ginneken, Chris van; Greisen, Gorm O; Thymann, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    Preterm birth interrupts normal fetal growth with consequences for postnatal growth and organ development. In preterm infants, many physiological deficits adapt and disappear with advancing postnatal age, but some may persist into childhood. We hypothesized that preterm birth would induce impaired organ growth and function during the first postnatal week in pigs, while motor abilities and behavioral characteristics would show more persistent developmental delay. Cesarean-delivered preterm (n = 112, 90% gestation) or term (n = 56, 100% gestation) piglets were reared under identical conditions and euthanized for blood and organ collection on postnatal days 0, 5, or 26. Body weight gain remained lower in preterm vs. term pigs up to day 26 (25.5 ± 1.5 vs. 31.0 ± 0.5 g·kg(-1)·day(-1), P < 0.01) when relative weights were higher for brain and kidneys and reduced for liver and spleen. Neonatal preterm pigs had reduced values for blood pH, Po2, glucose, lactate, hematocrit, and cortisol, but at day 26, most values were normalized, although plasma serotonin and IGF 1 levels remained reduced. Preterm pigs showed delayed neonatal arousal and impaired physical activity, coordination, exploration, and learning, relative to term pigs (all P < 0.05). Supplementation of parenteral nutrition during the first 5 days with an enteral milk diet did not affect later outcomes. In preterm pigs, many physiological characteristics of immaturity disappeared by 4 wk, while some neurodevelopmental deficits remained. The preterm pig is a relevant animal model to study early dietary and pharmacological interventions that support postnatal maturation and neurodevelopment in preterm infants. PMID:26764054

  17. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-?-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  18. In Vitro Growth of Thymic Tumor Cell Lines from Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Pasquier, Louis du; Robert, Jacques

    1992-01-01

    A spontaneous lymphoid thymus tumor was discovered in a male Xenopus of the MHC ff genotype. The tumor cell can be transplanted in histocompatible larval ff hosts, but not in ff adults unless irradiated (3000 rad). The tumor is rejected by allogeneic hosts. The tumor cells express neither markers of the B-cell lineage nor MHC encoded molecules; they express only markers of the T-cell lineage. Its lymphoid population is clonal as revealed by the existence of a stable rearrangement pattern of the immunoglobulin genes. Cell lines growing continuously in vitro have been derived from the tumor. PMID:1343098

  19. RPA Inhibition increases Replication Stress and Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Liu, Shengqin; Wang, Ling; Mosel, Adam; Peng, Aimin; Oakley, Greg G.

    2014-01-01

    The ATR/Chk1 pathway is a critical surveillance network that maintains genomic integrity during DNA replication by stabilizing the replication forks during normal replication to avoid replication stress. One of the many differences between normal cells and cancer cells is the amount of replication stress that occurs during replication. Cancer cells with activated oncogenes generate increased levels of replication stress. This creates an increased dependency on the ATR/Chk1 pathway in cancer cells and opens up an opportunity to preferentially kill cancer cells by inhibiting this pathway. In support of this idea, we have identified a small molecule termed HAMNO ((1Z)-1-[(2-hydroxyanilino)methylidene]naphthalen-2-one), a novel protein interaction inhibitor of replication protein A (RPA), a protein involved in the ATR/Chk1 pathway. HAMNO selectively binds the N-terminal domain of RPA70, effectively inhibiting critical RPA protein interactions which rely on this domain. HAMNO inhibits both ATR autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of RPA32 Ser33 by ATR. By itself, HAMNO treatment creates DNA replication stress in cancer cells that are already experiencing replication stress, but not in normal cells, and it acts synergistically with etoposide to kill cancer cells in vitro and slow tumor growth in vivo. Thus, HAMNO illustrates how RPA inhibitors represent candidate therapeutics for cancer treatment, providing disease selectivity in cancer cells by targeting their differential response to replication stress. PMID:25070753

  20. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote growth and angiogenesis of breast and prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to migrate to tumor tissues. This behavior of MSCs has been exploited as a tumor-targeting strategy for cell-based cancer therapy. However, the effects of MSCs on tumor growth are controversial. This study was designed to determine the effect of MSCs on the growth of breast and prostate tumors. Methods Bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) were isolated and characterized. Effects of BM-MSCs on tumor cell proliferation were analyzed in a co-culture system with mouse breast cancer cell 4T1 or human prostate cancer cell DU145. Tumor cells were injected into nude mice subcutaneously either alone or coupled with BM-MSCs. The expression of cell proliferation and angiogenesis-related proteins in tumor tissues were immunofluorescence analyzed. The angiogenic effect of BM-MSCs was detected using a tube formation assay. The effects of the crosstalk between tumor cells and BM-MSCs on expression of angiogenesis related markers were examined by immunofluorescence and real-time PCR. Results Both co-culturing with mice BM-MSCs (mBM-MSCs) and treatment with mBM-MSC-conditioned medium enhanced the growth of 4T1 cells. Co-injection of 4T1 cells and mBM-MSCs into nude mice led to increased tumor size compared with injection of 4T1 cells alone. Similar experiments using DU145 cells and human BM-MSCs (hBM-MSCs) instead of 4T1 cells and mBM-MSCs obtained consistent results. Compared with tumors induced by injection of tumor cells alone, the blood vessel area was greater in tumors from co-injection of tumor cells with BM-MSCs, which correlated with decreased central tumor necrosis and increased tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, both conditioned medium from hBM-MSCs alone and co-cultures of hBM-MSCs with DU145 cells were able to promote tube formation ability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. When hBM-MSCs are exposed to the DU145 cell environment, the expression of markers associated with neovascularization (macrophage inflammatory protein-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta and IL-6) was increased. Conclusion These results indicate that BM-MSCs promote tumor growth and suggest that the crosstalk between tumor cells and BM-MSCs increased the expression of pro-angiogenic factors, which may have induced tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis thereby increasing solid tumor growth. PMID:23763837

  1. IMP1 promotes tumor growth, dissemination and a tumor-initiating cell phenotype in colorectal cancer cell xenografts.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kathryn E; Noubissi, Felicite K; Katti, Prateek S; Hahn, Christopher M; Davey, Sonya R; Lundsmith, Emma T; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Rhim, Andrew D; Spiegelman, Vladimir S; Rustgi, Anil K

    2013-11-01

    Igf2 mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1, CRD-BP, ZBP-1) is a messenger RNA binding protein that we have shown previously to regulate colorectal cancer (CRC) cell growth in vitro. Furthermore, increased IMP1 expression correlates with enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in CRC patients. In the current study, we sought to elucidate IMP1-mediated functions in CRC pathogenesis in vivo. Using CRC cell xenografts, we demonstrate that IMP1 overexpression promotes xenograft tumor growth and dissemination into the blood. Furthermore, intestine-specific knockdown of Imp1 dramatically reduces tumor number in the Apc (Min/+) mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis. In addition, IMP1 knockdown xenografts exhibit a reduced number of tumor cells entering the circulation, suggesting that IMP1 may directly modulate this early metastatic event. We further demonstrate that IMP1 overexpression decreases E-cadherin expression, promotes survival of single tumor cell-derived colonospheres and promotes enrichment and maintenance of a population of CD24+CD44+ cells, signifying that IMP1 overexpressing cells display evidence of loss of epithelial identity and enhancement of a tumor-initiating cell phenotype. Taken together, these findings implicate IMP1 as a modulator of tumor growth and provide evidence for a novel role of IMP1 in early events in CRC metastasis. PMID:23764754

  2. IMP1 promotes tumor growth, dissemination and a tumor-initiating cell phenotype in colorectal cancer cell xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kathryn E.; Noubissi, Felicite K.; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    Igf2 mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1, CRD-BP, ZBP-1) is a messenger RNA binding protein that we have shown previously to regulate colorectal cancer (CRC) cell growth in vitro. Furthermore, increased IMP1 expression correlates with enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in CRC patients. In the current study, we sought to elucidate IMP1-mediated functions in CRC pathogenesis in vivo. Using CRC cell xenografts, we demonstrate that IMP1 overexpression promotes xenograft tumor growth and dissemination into the blood. Furthermore, intestine-specific knockdown of Imp1 dramatically reduces tumor number in the Apc Min/+ mouse model of intestinal tumorigenesis. In addition, IMP1 knockdown xenografts exhibit a reduced number of tumor cells entering the circulation, suggesting that IMP1 may directly modulate this early metastatic event. We further demonstrate that IMP1 overexpression decreases E-cadherin expression, promotes survival of single tumor cell-derived colonospheres and promotes enrichment and maintenance of a population of CD24+CD44+ cells, signifying that IMP1 overexpressing cells display evidence of loss of epithelial identity and enhancement of a tumor-initiating cell phenotype. Taken together, these findings implicate IMP1 as a modulator of tumor growth and provide evidence for a novel role of IMP1 in early events in CRC metastasis. PMID:23764754

  3. Tumor Growth Modeling from the Perspective of Multiphase Porous Media Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Scium, G.; Shelton, S.E.; Gray, W.G.; Miller, C.T.; Hussain, F.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B.A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiphase porous media mechanics is used for modeling tumor growth, using governing equations obtained via the Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT). This approach incorporates the interaction of more phases than legacy tumor growth models. The tumor is treated as a multiphase system composed of an extracellular matrix, tumor cells which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient level and the pressure, healthy cells and an interstitial fluid which transports nutrients. The governing equations are numerically solved within a Finite Element framework for predicting the growth rate of the tumor mass, and of its individual components, as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, and mechanical strain. Preliminary results are shown. PMID:23285734

  4. Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity and Longitudinal Growth in Children With Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Triana, Clímaco Andres; Castelán-Martínez, Osvaldo D.; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Jiménez-Méndez, Ricardo; Medina, Aurora; Clark, Patricia; Rassekh, Rod; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Carleton, Bruce; Medeiros, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cisplatin, a major antineoplastic drug used in the treatment of solid tumors, is a known nephrotoxin. This retrospective cohort study evaluated the prevalence and severity of cisplatin nephrotoxicity in 54 children and its impact on height and weight. We recorded the weight, height, serum creatinine, and electrolytes in each cisplatin cycle and after 12 months of treatment. Nephrotoxicity was graded as follows: normal renal function (Grade 0); asymptomatic electrolyte disorders, including an increase in serum creatinine, up to 1.5 times baseline value (Grade 1); need for electrolyte supplementation <3 months and/or increase in serum creatinine 1.5 to 1.9 times from baseline (Grade 2); increase in serum creatinine 2 to 2.9 times from baseline or need for electrolyte supplementation for more than 3 months after treatment completion (Grade 3); and increase in serum creatinine ≥3 times from baseline or renal replacement therapy (Grade 4). Nephrotoxicity was observed in 41 subjects (75.9%). Grade 1 nephrotoxicity was observed in 18 patients (33.3%), Grade 2 in 5 patients (9.2%), and Grade 3 in 18 patients (33.3%). None had Grade 4 nephrotoxicity. Nephrotoxicity patients were younger and received higher cisplatin dose, they also had impairment in longitudinal growth manifested as statistically significant worsening on the height Z Score at 12 months after treatment. We used a multiple logistic regression model using the delta of height Z Score (baseline-12 months) as dependent variable in order to adjust for the main confounder variables such as: germ cell tumor, cisplatin total dose, serum magnesium levels at 12 months, gender, and nephrotoxicity grade. Patients with nephrotoxicity Grade 1 where at higher risk of not growing (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.07–24.3, P = 0.04). The cisplatin total dose had a significant negative relationship with magnesium levels at 12 months (Spearman r = −0.527, P = <0.001). PMID:26313789

  5. Preterm Birth: A Primary Etiological Factor for Delayed Oral Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Thayath, Muhamad Nishad; Singh, Shikha; Sinha, Anju

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preterm and low birthweight children comprise approximately 6% of all live births. It is now a well-known fact that premature children experience many oral complications associated with their preterm births. Prematurely born infants have a short prenatal development period and they are prone to many serious medical problems during the neonatal period, which may affect the development of oral tissues. Adverse perinatal factors, premature birth and exceptional early adaptation to extra-uterine life and functional activity may influence dental occlusal development and symmetry in the jaws. Thus, the goal of the present paper is to elucidate further the effect of preterm birth on the development of the dentition. How to cite this article: Zaidi I, Thayath MN, Singh S, Sinha A. Preterm Birth: A Primary Etiological Factor for Delayed Oral Growth and Development. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3): 215-219. PMID:26628856

  6. The autophagic tumor stroma model of cancer or "battery-operated tumor growth": A simple solution to the autophagy paradox.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pavlides, Stephanos; Chiavarina, Barbara; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Casey, Trimmer; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Migneco, Gemma; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka; Balliet, Renee; Mercier, Isabelle; Wang, Chengwang; Flomenberg, Neal; Howell, Anthony; Lin, Zhao; Caro, Jaime; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2010-11-01

    The role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is controversial. Both autophagy inhibitors (chloroquine) and autophagy promoters (rapamycin) block tumorigenesis by unknown mechanism(s). This is called the "Autophagy Paradox". We have recently reported a simple solution to this paradox. We demonstrated that epithelial cancer cells use oxidative stress to induce autophagy in the tumor microenvironment. As a consequence, the autophagic tumor stroma generates recycled nutrients that can then be used as chemical building blocks by anabolic epithelial cancer cells. This model results in a net energy transfer from the tumor stroma to epithelial cancer cells (an energy imbalance), thereby promoting tumor growth. This net energy transfer is both unilateral and vectorial, from the tumor stroma to the epithelial cancer cells, representing a true host-parasite relationship. We have termed this new paradigm "The Autophagic Tumor Stroma Model of Cancer Cell Metabolism" or "Battery-Operated Tumor Growth". In this sense, autophagy in the tumor stroma serves as a "battery" to fuel tumor growth, progression and metastasis, independently of angiogenesis. Using this model, the systemic induction of autophagy will prevent epithelial cancer cells from using recycled nutrients, while the systemic inhibiton of autophagy will prevent stromal cells from producing recycled nutrients-both effectively "starving" cancer cells. We discuss the idea that tumor cells could become resistant to the systemic induction of autophagy, by the upregulation of natural endogenous autophagy inhibitors in cancer cells. Alternatively, tumor cells could also become resistant to the systemic induction of autophagy, by the genetic silencing/deletion of pro-autophagic molecules, such as Beclin1. If autophagy resistance develops in cancer cells, then the systemic inhibition of autophagy would provide a therapeutic solution to this type of drug resistance, as it would still target autophagy in the tumor stroma. As such, an anti-cancer therapy that combines the alternating use of both autophagy promoters and autophagy inhibitors would be expected to prevent the onset of drug resistance. We also discuss why anti-angiogenic therapy has been found to promote tumor recurrence, progression and metastasis. More specifically, anti-angiogenic therapy would induce autophagy in the tumor stroma via the induction of stromal hypoxia, thereby converting a non-aggressive tumor type to a "lethal" aggressive tumor phenotype. Thus, uncoupling the metabolic parasitic relationship between cancer cells and an autophagic tumor stroma may hold great promise for anti-cancer therapy. Finally, we believe that autophagy in the tumor stroma is the local microscopic counterpart of systemic wasting (cancer-associated cachexia), which is associated with advanced and metastatic cancers. Cachexia in cancer patients is not due to decreased energy intake, but instead involves an increased basal metabolic rate and increased energy expenditures, resulting in a negative energy balance. Importantly, when tumors were surgically excised, this increased metabolic rate returned to normal levels. This view of cachexia, resulting in energy transfer to the tumor, is consistent with our hypothesis. So, cancer-associated cachexia may start locally as stromal autophagy, and then spread systemically. As such, stromal autophagy may be the requisite precursor of systemic cancer-associated cachexia. PMID:21051947

  7. Influence of Cancer-Associated Endometrial Stromal Cells on Hormone-Driven Endometrial Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, M. J.; Lu, Z.; Cao, D.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts have been shown to inhibit or stimulate tumor growth depending on stage, grade, and tumor type. It remains unclear, however, the effect of endometrial-cancer-associated fibroblasts on hormone-driven responses in endometrial cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of normal and cancer-associated stromal cells from patients with and without endometrial cancer on endometrial tumor growth in response to estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4). Compared to benign endometrial stromal cells, the low-grade and high-grade cancer-associated stromal cells exhibited a blunted hormone response for proliferation as well as IGFBP1 secretion. Additional analysis of the influence of stromal cells on hormone-driven tumor growth was done by mixing stromal cells from benign, low-grade, or high-grade tumors, with Ishikawa cells for subcutaneous tumor formation. The presence of both benign and high-grade cancer-associated stromal cells increased estradiol-driven xenografted tumor growth compared to Ishikawa cells alone. Low-grade cancer-associated stromal cells did not significantly influence hormone-regulated tumor growth. Addition of P4 attenuated tumor growth in Ishikawa + benign or high-grade stromal cells, but not in Ishikawa cells alone or with low-grade stromal cells. Using an angiogenesis focused real-time array TGFA, TGFB2 and TGFBR1 and VEGFC were identified as potential candidates for hormone-influenced growth regulation of tumors in the presence of benign and high-grade stromal cells. In summary, endometrial-cancer-associated cells responded differently to in vitro hormone treatment compared to benign endometrial stromal cells. Additionally, presence of stromal cells differentially influenced hormone-driven xenograft growth in vivo depending on the disease status of the stromal cells. PMID:25976290

  8. [Metabolic changes of lymphocytes and neoplastic cells in mice with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma during tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Inzhevatkin, E V; Fomenko, E Iu; Slepov, E V; Savchenko, A A

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the activities of NAD+- and NADP-dependent dehydrogenases of lymphocytes and tumor cells were studied in mice with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma, as well as changes in the concentrations of oxaloacetate, lactate, and NAD+ in the course of tumor growth. During the major period of tumor growth, conditions are produced in the lymphocytes for increased intensity of aerobic reactions directed at energy reproduction combined with a somewhat decreased intensity of synthetic processes. In the tumor cells, conditions predominantly arise for intensification of plastic metabolic reactions and reactions related to anaerobic energy reproduction. PMID:17853702

  9. pHLIP-mediated targeting of truncated tissue factor to tumor vessels causes vascular occlusion and impairs tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Yinlong; Su, Shishuai; Wang, Jing; Wu, Meiyu; Shi, Quanwei; Anderson, Gregory J.; Thomsen, Johannes; Zhao, Ruifang; Ji, Tianjiao; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Occluding tumor blood supply by delivering the extracellular domain of coagulation-inducing protein tissue factor (truncated tissue factor, tTF) to tumor vasculature has enormous potential to eliminate solid tumors. Yet few of the delivery technologies are moved into clinical practice due to their non-specific tissue biodistribution and rapid clearance by the reticuloendothelial system. Here we introduced a novel tTF delivery method by generating a fusion protein (tTF-pHLIP) consisting of tTF fused with a peptide with a low pH-induced transmembrane structure (pHLIP). This protein targets the acidic tumor vascular endothelium and effectively induces local blood coagulation. tTF-pHLIP, wherein pHLIP is cleverly designed to mimic the natural tissue factor transmembrane domain, triggered thrombogenic activity of the tTF by locating it to the endothelial cell surface, as demonstrated by coagulation assays and confocal microscopy. Systemic administration of tTF-pHLIP into tumor-bearing mice selectively induced thrombotic occlusion of tumor vessels, reducing tumor perfusion and impairing tumor growth without overt side effects. Our work introduces a promising strategy for using tTF as an anti-cancer drug, which has great potential value for clinical applications. PMID:26143637

  10. Macrophage depletion reduces postsurgical tumor recurrence and metastatic growth in a spontaneous murine model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Muly; Khoo, Karen; Yeo, Kim Pin; Kato, Masashi; Prevost-Blondel, Amelle; Angeli, Veronique; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection of tumors is often followed by regrowth at the primary site and metastases may emerge rapidly following removal of the primary tumor. Macrophages are important drivers of tumor growth, and here we investigated their involvement in postoperative relapse as well as explore macrophage depletion as an adjuvant to surgical resection. RETAAD mice develop spontaneous metastatic melanoma that begins in the eye. Removal of the eyes as early as 1 week of age did not prevent the development of metastases; rather, surgery led to increased proliferation of tumor cells locally and in distant metastases. Surgery-induced increase in tumor cell proliferation correlated with increased macrophage density within the tumor. Moreover, macrophages stimulate tumor sphere formation from tumor cells of post-surgical but not control mice. Macrophage depletion with a diet containing the CSF-1R specific kinase inhibitor Ki20227 following surgery significantly reduced postoperative tumor recurrence and abrogated enhanced metastatic outgrowth. Our results confirm that tumor cells disseminate early, and show that macrophages contribute both to post-surgical tumor relapse and growth of metastases, likely through stimulating a population of tumor-initiating cells. Thus macrophage depletion warrants exploration as an adjuvant to surgical resection. PMID:25762633

  11. Aberrant IDH3? expression promotes malignant tumor growth by inducing HIF-1-mediated metabolic reprogramming and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, L; Morinibu, A; Kobayashi, M; Zhu, Y; Wang, X; Goto, Y; Yeom, C J; Zhao, T; Hirota, K; Shinomiya, K; Itasaka, S; Yoshimura, M; Guo, G; Hammond, E M; Hiraoka, M; Harada, H

    2015-09-01

    Cancer cells gain a growth advantage through the so-called Warburg effect by shifting glucose metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) has been suggested to function in metabolic reprogramming; however, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. We found that the aberrant expression of wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 3? (IDH3?), a subunit of the IDH3 heterotetramer, decreased ?-ketoglutarate levels and increased the stability and transactivation activity of HIF-1? in cancer cells. The silencing of IDH3? significantly delayed tumor growth by suppressing the HIF-1-mediated Warburg effect and angiogenesis. IDH3? expression was associated with the poor postoperative overall survival of lung and breast cancer patients. These results justify the exploitation of IDH3 as a novel target for the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. PMID:25531325

  12. Control of Tumor Growth in Animals by Infusion of an Angiogenesis Inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Robert; Conn, Howard; Vacanti, Joseph; Haudenschild, Christian; Folkman, Judah

    1980-07-01

    Angiogenesis and tumor growth were inhibited in two different animal models by regional infusion of a partially purified cartilage extract. In rabbits bearing corneal implants of V2 carcinoma and receiving the inhibitor, vascular growth rates were <3% of those in control animals receiving either Ringer's solution or bovine trypsin inhibitor (Trasylol). Subconjunctival B16 melanoma implants in mice receiving the inhibitor weighed <2.5% of implants in mice receiving Ringer's solution, Trasylol, or albumin. Histologic study of major organs and standard blood tests revealed no toxic effects in any of the animals. The inhibitor did not retard the growth of either tumor cell type in tissue culture at concentrations as high as 1 mg/ml. These results suggest that the cartilage factor does not interfere with the growth of the tumor cell population directly but that it prevents tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis.

  13. Insulin-like growth factors and insulin: at the crossroad between tumor development and longevity.

    PubMed

    Novosyadlyy, Ruslan; Leroith, Derek

    2012-06-01

    Numerous lines of evidence indicate that insulin-like growth factor signaling plays an important role in the regulation of life span and tumor development. In the present paper, the role of individual components of insulin-like growth factor signaling in aging and tumor development has been extensively analyzed. The molecular mechanisms underlying aging and tumor development are frequently overlapping. Although the link between reduced insulin-like growth factor signaling and suppressed tumor growth and development is well established, it remains unclear whether extended life span results from direct suppression of insulin-like growth factor signaling or this effect is caused by indirect mechanisms such as improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:22421704

  14. Control exponential growth of tumor cells with slow spread of oncolytic virus.

    PubMed

    Si, Wen; Zhang, Weinian

    2015-02-21

    Great attention has been paid to cancer therapy by means of oncolytic viruses, but the fast virus-spread, which eliminates all tumor cells, cannot be applied to solid tumors. As slow virus-spread is applied, solid tumors are expected to be controlled but complicated dynamical behaviors appear. In this paper we investigate bifurcations of equilibria in the oncolytic virus dynamics model with exponential growth of tumor cells and slow virus-spread. We find conditions of parameters for saddle-node bifurcation, Hopf bifurcation and Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation. Those conditions give thresholds for slow virus-spread to control the population of tumor cells within an appropriate range. PMID:25435412

  15. SSAO inhibitors suppress hepatocellular tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Li, Hui; Luo, Hong-Jun; Lin, Zhe-Xuan; Jiang, Zhi-Wu; Luo, Wen-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is both an endothelial adhesion molecule involved in leukocytes emigration, and an oxidase belonging to the family of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidases (SSAOs). The enzyme activity of VAP-1 plays an important role in the migration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) into tumor site, and SSAO inhibitors can block the function of VAP-1. The effects of SSAO inhibitors on leukocyte infiltration and tumor progression were evaluated in H22 hepatocellular carcinoma-bearing C57BL/6 mice. Tumor weight and volume were measured after SSAO inhibitor treatment. Then, MDSCs recruitment and neo-angiogenesis were determined using immunostaining. SSAO inhibitors significantly blocked the catalytic activity of VAP-1 in tumor, attenuated tumor progression, and reduced neo-angiogenesis. CD11b(+) and Gr-1(+) MDSCs, which normally infiltrate into tumors, were significantly diminished in tumor-bearing mice treated with SSAO inhibitors. The present study demonstrated that SSAO inhibitors might have an anti-tumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma by inhibiting recruitment of CD11b(+) and Gr-1(+) cells and hindering angiogenesis, which could be attributed to impairing the catalytic activity of VAP-1. PMID:23850964

  16. Fufang Kushen injection inhibits sarcoma growth and tumor-induced hyperalgesia via TRPV1 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhizheng; Fan, Huiting; Higgins, Tim; Qi, Jia; Haines, Diana; Trivett, Anna; Oppenheim, Joost J.; Wei, Hou; Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng; Howard, O.M. Zack

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain is a deleterious consequence of tumor growth and related inflammation. Opioids and antiinflammatory drugs provide first line treatment for cancer pain, but both are limited by side effects. Fufang Kushen injection (FKI) is GMP produced, traditional Chinese medicine used alone or with chemotherapy to reduce cancer-associated pain. FKI limited mouse sarcoma growth both in vivo and in vitro, in part, by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT kinases and BAD. FKI inhibited TRPV1 mediated capsaicin-induced ERK phosphorylation and reduced tumor-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus, FKI limited cancer pain both directly by blocking TRPV1 signaling and indirectly by reducing tumor growth. PMID:25242356

  17. Is tumor growth sustained by rare cancer stem cells or dominant clones?

    PubMed

    Adams, Jerry M; Strasser, Andreas

    2008-06-01

    A key issue for cancer biology and therapy is whether the relentless growth of a tumor is driven by a substantial proportion of its cells or exclusively by a rare subpopulation, commonly termed "cancer stem cells." Support for the cancer stem cell model has been stimulated by experiments in which human tumor cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Most notably, in human acute myeloid leukemia, only a minute proportion of the cells, displaying a defined phenotype, could seed leukemia in mice. Xenotransplantation, however, may fail to reveal many tumor growth-sustaining cells because the foreign microenvironment precludes essential interactions with support cells. In studies that instead have transplanted mouse leukemias and lymphomas into syngeneic animals, most of the tumors seem to be maintained by the dominant cell population, and only a few types of mouse leukemia seem to be sustained by a minor tumor growth-sustaining subpopulation. The collective evidence suggests that various tumors may span the spectrum between the extremes represented by the two models. If tumor growth can indeed be sustained either by rare cancer stem cells or dominant clones or both, as current evidence suggests, curative therapy for many types of tumors will most likely require targeting all the tumor cell populations. PMID:18519656

  18. Omental adipose tissue-derived stromal cells promote vascularization and growth of endometrial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Klopp, Ann H.; Zhang, Yan; Solley, Travis; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Marini, Frank; Andreeff, Michael; Debeb, Bisrat; Woodward, Wendy; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Broaddus, Russell; Lu, Karen; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Adipose tissue contains a population of tumor-tropic mesenchymal progenitors, termed adipose stromal cells (ASC), which engraft in neighboring tumors to form supportive tumor stroma. We hypothesized that intra-abdominal visceral adipose tissue may contain a uniquely tumor promoting population of ASC to account for the relationship between excess visceral adipose tissue and mortality of intra-abdominal cancers. Experimental Design To investigate this, we isolated and characterized ASC from intra-abdominal omental adipose tissue (O-ASC) and characterized their effects on endometrial cancer progression as compared to subcutaneous adipose derived mesenchymal stromal cells (SC-ASC), bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC) and lung fibroblasts. To model chronic recruitment of ASC by tumors, cells were injected metronomically into mice bearing Hec1a xenografts. Results O-ASC expressed cell surface markers characteristic of BM-MSC and differentiated into mesenchymal lineages. Co-culture with O-ASC increased endometrial cancer cell proliferation in-vitro. Tumor tropism of O-ASC and SC-ASC for human Hec1a endometrial tumor xenografts was comparable, but O-ASC more potently promoted tumor growth. Compared with tumors in SC-ASC-injected mice, tumors in O-ASC-injected mice contained higher numbers of large tortuous desmin-positive blood vessels, which correlated with decreased central tumor necrosis and increased tumor cell proliferation. O-ASC-exhibited enhanced motility as compared to SC-ASC in response to Hec1a secreted factors. Conclusions Visceral adipose contains a population of multipotent MSC that promote endometrial tumor growth more potently than MSC from subcutaneous adipose tissue. We propose that O-ASC recruited to tumors express specific factors that enhance tumor vascularization, promoting survival and proliferation of tumor cells. PMID:22167410

  19. Integrin ?v?6 sustains and promotes tumor invasive growth in colon cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang-Yun; Guo, Sen; Dong, Cong-Ying; Wang, Xian-Qiang; Hu, Bing-Yang; Liu, Yang-Feng; Chen, Yong-Wei; Niu, Jun; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To detect the mechanism by which colon tumor escapes the growth constraints imposed on normal cells by cell crowding and dense pericellular matrices. METHODS: An immunohistochemical study of integrin ?v?6 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was performed on tissue microarrays of 200 spots, including 100 cases of colon tumors. RESULTS: High immunoreactivity for ?v?6 (73.7%; 28/38) and MMP-9 (76.5%; 52/68) was observed in invasive tumor portions. Furthermore, the effects of integrin ?v?6 on tumor invasive growth in nude mice were detected. Tumor invasive growth and high expression of both ?v?6 and MMP-9 were only seen in tumors resulting from WiDr cells expressing ?v?6 in the tumorigenicity assay. Flow cytometry was applied to analyze ?v?6 expression in colon cancer WiDr and SW480 cells. The effects of cell density on ?v?6 expression and MMP-9 secretion were also detected by Biotrak MMP-9 activity assay and gelatin zymography assay. High cell density evidently enhanced ?v?6 expression and promoted MMP-9 secretion compared with low density. CONCLUSION: Integrin ?v?6 sustains and promotes tumor invasive growth in tumor progression via a self-perpetuating mechanism. Integrin ???6-mediated MMP-9 secretion facilitates pericellular matrix degradation at high cell density, which provides the basis of invasive growth. PMID:26139991

  20. Naproxen, clenbuterol and insulin administration ameliorates cancer cachexia and reduce tumor growth in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Piffar, P M; Fernandez, R; Tchaikovski, O; Hirabara, S M; Folador, A; Pinto, G J; Jakobi, S; Gobbo-Bordon, D; Rohn, T V; Fabrcio, V E B; Moretto, K D; Tosta, E; Curi, R; Fernandes, L C

    2003-11-25

    Cancer cachexia is characterized by anorexia and intense peripheral catabolism. We examine the potential benefits of combination of different anabolic agents such as insulin and clenbuterol associated to prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor (naproxen) on tumor growth, cachexia and renal function in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats (WK). Groups were separated into WK, and WK with naproxen (WK N) or naproxen plus clenbuterol (WK NCb) or naproxen plus clenbuterol plus insulin (WK NCbI). Treatment begins at the 4th day after tumor inoculation, at the 14th day they were killed, glycemia, lacticidemia, glycogen content from liver, soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, tumor mass, body weight and kidney function were determined. Glycemia and glycogen content were reduced and lacticidemia increased in WK (p<0.05) as compared to control rats. The glycogen content recovered in all treated groups. Tumor weight was significantly reduced by the different treatments. At the 14th weight change (carcass-initial body weight) in the control increased by 38% and in the WK -2%. Naproxen treatment (WK N) induced an increased by 14%. The inclusion of clenbuterol (WK NCb) and insulin (WK NCbI) by 38 and 41%, respectively. Mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) increased in the WK (p<0.05) as compared to control, but in the WK NCb the GFR was similar to control. Our results suggest that naproxen is able to reduce tumor growth and its association with insulin and clenbuterol induce mass weight gain and recovery energy fuel. PMID:14607327

  1. Hyaluronan suppresses prostate tumor cell proliferation through diminished expression of N-cadherin and aberrant growth factor receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Goodrich, Nathaniel P.; McAtee, Caitlin O.; Haferbier, Katie; Oakley, Gregory G.; Wahl, James K.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2011-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production has been functionally implicated in prostate tumorigenesis and metastasis. We previously used prostate tumor cells overexpressing the HA synthesizing enzyme HAS3 or the clinically relevant hyaluronidase Hyal1 to show that excess HA production suppresses tumor growth, while HA turnover accelerates spontaneous metastasis from the prostate. Here, we examined pathways responsible for effects of HAS3 and Hyal1 on tumor cell phenotype. Detailed characterization of cell cycle progression revealed that expression of Hyal1 accelerated cell cycle re-entry following synchronization, whereas HAS3 alone delayed entry. Hyal1 expressing cells exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to sustain ERK phosphorylation upon stimulation by growth factors, and in their expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. In contrast, HAS3 expressing cells showed prolonged ERK phosphorylation and increased expression of both p21 and p27, in asynchronous and synchronized cultures. Changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins were accompanied by HA-induced suppression of N-cadherin, while E-cadherin expression and {beta}-catenin expression and distribution remained unchanged. Our results are consistent with a model in which excess HA synthesis suppresses cell proliferation by promoting homotypic E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion, consequently signaling to elevate cell cycle inhibitor expression and suppress G1- to S-phase transition.

  2. Pharmacological Inhibition of Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1 Suppresses Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mediated Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bocci, Elena; Coletta, Isabella; Polenzani, Lorenzo; Mangano, Giorgina; Alisi, Maria Alessandra; Cazzolla, Nicola; Giachetti, Antonio; Ziche, Marina; Donnini, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Background Blockade of Prostaglandin (PG) E2 production via deletion of microsomal Prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) gene reduces tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo on xenograft tumors. So far the therapeutic potential of the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 has not been elucidated. PGE2 promotes epithelial tumor progression via multiple signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we evaluated the antitumor activity of AF3485, a compound of a novel family of human mPGES-1 inhibitors, in vitro and in vivo, in mice bearing human A431 xenografts overexpressing EGFR. Treatment of the human cell line A431 with interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) increased mPGES-1 expression, PGE2 production and induced EGFR phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) expression. AF3485 reduced PGE2 production, both in quiescent and in cells stimulated by IL-1β. AF3485 abolished IL-1β-induced activation of the EGFR, decreasing VEGF and FGF-2 expression, and tumor-mediated endothelial tube formation. In vivo, in A431 xenograft, AF3485, administered sub-chronically, decreased tumor growth, an effect related to inhibition of EGFR signalling, and to tumor microvessel rarefaction. In fact, we observed a decrease of EGFR phosphorylation, and VEGF and FGF-2 expression in tumours explanted from treated mice. Conclusion Our work demonstrates that the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 reduces squamous carcinoma growth by suppressing PGE2 mediated-EGFR signalling and by impairing tumor associated angiogenesis. These results underscore the potential of mPGES-1 inhibitors as agents capable of controlling tumor growth. PMID:22815767

  3. Growth Delay as an Index of Allostatic Load in Young Children: Predictions to Disinhibited Social Approach and Diurnal Cortisol Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Anna E.; Bruce, Jacqueline; Tarullo, Amanda R.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine whether growth delay can serve as an index of allostatic load during early development, as it is well known that the activity of stress-mediating systems inhibits growth. The participants were children adopted internationally from institutional care (n = 36), children adopted internationally from foster care (n = 6), and nonadopted children (n = 35). For the adopted children, height-for-age and weight-for-height were assessed at adoption; for all children, disinhibited social approach (DSA; termed elsewhere as indiscriminate friendliness) and diurnal cortisol were assessed at 68 years (M = 6.9 years). For internationally adopted children in general, and postinstitutionalized children specifically, linear growth delay assessed at the time of adoption was associated with more dysregulated behavior in response to an unfamiliar adult (i.e., greater DSA) and a more dysregulated diurnal cortisol rhythm (i.e., higher late-afternoon and evening values). Further, among the most growth-delayed children, higher cortisol levels later in the day were correlated with DSA. The potential for using growth delay as an allostatic load indicator and the possible problems and limitations in its use in child populations are discussed. PMID:21756437

  4. Endothelial Jagged1 promotes solid tumor growth through both pro-angiogenic and angiocrine functions

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Ana-Rita; Trindade, Alexandre; Carvalho, Catarina; Graça, José; Carvalho, Sandra; Peleteiro, Maria C.; Adams, Ralf H.; Duarte, António

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process required for tumor growth and progression. The Notch signaling pathway has been identified as a key regulator of the neo-angiogenic process. Jagged-1 (Jag1) is a Notch ligand required for embryonic and retinal vascular development, which direct contribution to the regulation of tumor angiogenesis remains to be fully characterized. The current study addresses the role of endothelial Jagged1-mediated Notch signaling in the context of tumoral angiogenesis in two different mouse tumor models: subcutaneous Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor transplants and the autochthonous Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP). The role of endothelial Jagged1 in tumor growth and neo-angiogenesis was investigated with endothelial-specific Jag1 gain- and loss-of-function mouse mutants (eJag1OE and eJag1cKO). By modulating levels of endothelial Jag1, we observed that this ligand regulates tumor vessel density, branching, and perivascular maturation, thus affecting tumor vascular perfusion. The pro-angiogenic function is exerted by its ability to positively regulate levels of Vegfr-2 while negatively regulating Vegfr-1. Additionally, endothelial Jagged1 appears to exert an angiocrine function possibly by activating Notch3/Hey1 in tumor cells, promoting proliferation, survival and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), potentiating tumor development. These findings provide valuable mechanistic insights into the role of endothelial Jagged1 in promoting solid tumor development and support the notion that it may constitute a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:26213336

  5. Delaying Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Hormone Receptor–Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brufsky, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Global guidelines for the management of locally advanced or metastatic hormone receptor–positive (HR-positive), human epidermal growth factor 2–negative (HER2-negative) breast cancer recommend endocrine therapy as first-line treatment for all patients, regardless of age or postmenopausal status. However, current practice patterns in the United States and Europe suggest that these modes of therapy are not being used as recommended, and many patients with advanced HR-positive, HER2-negative disease are being treated first-line with chemotherapy or switched to chemotherapy after a single endocrine therapy. Given that chemotherapy is associated with increased toxicity and reduced quality of life (QOL) compared with endocrine therapy, prolonging the duration of response obtained with endocrine therapy may help delay chemotherapy and its attendant toxicities. Several strategies to delay or overcome endocrine resistance and thereby postpone chemotherapy have been explored, including the use of second-line endocrine agents with different mechanisms of action, adding targeted agents that inhibit specific resistance pathways, and adding agents that act in complementary or synergistic ways to inhibit tumor cell proliferation. This review analyzes the different therapy options available to HR-positive, HER2-negative patients with advanced breast cancer that can be used to delay chemotherapy and enhance QOL. PMID:26793013

  6. On a Nonlinear Model for Tumor Growth: Global in Time Weak Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donatelli, Donatella; Trivisa, Konstantina

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a class of tumor growth models known as mixed models. The key characteristic of these type of tumor growth models is that the different populations of cells are continuously present everywhere in the tumor at all times. In this work we focus on the evolution of tumor growth in the presence of proliferating, quiescent and dead cells as well as a nutrient. The system is given by a multi-phase flow model and the tumor is described as a growing continuum Ω with boundary ∂Ω both of which evolve in time. Global-in-time weak solutions are obtained using an approach based on penalization of the boundary behavior, diffusion and viscosity in the weak formulation.

  7. Tumor growth model for atlas based registration of pathological brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moualhi, Wafa; Ezzeddine, Zagrouba

    2015-02-01

    The motivation of this work is to register a tumor brain magnetic resonance (MR) image with a normal brain atlas. A normal brain atlas is deformed in order to take account of the presence of a large space occupying tumor. The method use a priori model of tumor growth assuming that the tumor grows in a radial way from a starting point. First, an affine transformation is used in order to bring the patient image and the brain atlas in a global correspondence. Second, the seeding of a synthetic tumor into the brain atlas provides a template for the lesion. Finally, the seeded atlas is deformed combining a method derived from optical flow principles and a model for tumor growth (MTG). Results show that an automatic segmentation method of brain structures in the presence of large deformation can be provided.

  8. Therapeutic effects of intrabone and systemic mesenchymal stem cell cytotherapy on myeloma bone disease and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Ling, Wen; Khan, Sharmin; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2012-08-01

    The cytotherapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been evaluated in various disorders including those involving inflammation, autoimmunity, bone regeneration, and cancer. Multiple myeloma (MM) is a systemic malignancy associated with induction of osteolytic lesions that often are not repaired even after prolonged remission. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of intrabone and systemic injections of MSCs on MM bone disease, tumor growth, and tumor regrowth in the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-rab model and to shed light on the exact localization of systemically injected MSCs. Intrabone injection of MSCs, but not hematopoietic stem cells, into myelomatous bones prevented MM-induced bone disease, promoted bone formation, and inhibited MM growth. After remission was induced with melphalan treatment, intrabone-injected MSCs promoted bone formation and delayed myeloma cell regrowth in bone. Most intrabone or systemically injected MSCs were undetected 2 to 4 weeks after injection. The bone-building effects of MSCs were mediated through activation of endogenous osteoblasts and suppression of osteoclast activity. Although a single intravenous injection of MSCs had no effect on MM, sequential weekly intravenous injections of MSCs prevented MM-induced bone disease but had no effect on tumor burden. MSCs expressed high levels of anti-inflammatory (eg, HMOX1) and bone-remodeling (eg, Decorin, CYR61) mediators. In vitro, MSCs promoted osteoblast maturation and suppressed osteoclast formation, and these effects were partially prevented by blocking decorin. A subset of intravenously or intracardially injected MSCs trafficked to myelomatous bone in SCID-rab mice. Although the majority of intravenously injected MSCs were trapped in lungs, intracardially injected MSCs were mainly localized in draining mesenteric lymph nodes. This study shows that exogenous MSCs act as bystander cells to inhibit MM-induced bone disease and tumor growth and that systemically injected MSCs are attracted to bone by myeloma cells or conditions induced by MM and inhibit bone disease. PMID:22460389

  9. The effect of interstitial pressure on tumor growth: coupling with the blood and lymphatic vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B.; McDougall, Steven R.; Chaplain, Mark A.J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John

    2013-01-01

    The flow of interstitial fluid and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in solid tumors and surrounding host tissues have been identified as critical elements in cancer growth and vascularization. Both experimental and theoretical studies have shown that tumors may present elevated IFP, which can be a formidable physical barrier for delivery of cell nutrients and small molecules into the tumor. Elevated IFP may also exacerbate gradients of biochemical signals such as angiogenic factors released by tumors into the surrounding tissues. These studies have helped to understand both biochemical signaling and treatment prognosis. Building upon previous work, here we develop a vascular tumor growth model by coupling a continuous growth model with a discrete angiogenesis model. We include fluid/oxygen extravasation as well as a continuous lymphatic field, and study the micro-environmental fluid dynamics and their effect on tumor growth by accounting for blood flow, transcapillary fluid flux, interstitial fluid flow, and lymphatic drainage. We thus elucidate further the non-trivial relationship between the key elements contributing to the effects of interstitial pressure in solid tumors. In particular, we study the effect of IFP on oxygen extravasation and show that small blood/lymphatic vessel resistance and collapse may contribute to lower transcapillary fluid/oxygen flux, thus decreasing the rate of tumor growth. We also investigate the effect of tumor vascular pathologies, including elevated vascular and interstitial hydraulic conductivities inside the tumor as well as diminished osmotic pressure differences, on the fluid flow across the tumor capillary bed, the lymphatic drainage, and the IFP. Our results reveal that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity together with poor lymphatic function is the root cause of the development of plateau profiles of the IFP in the tumor, which have been observed in experiments, and contributes to a more uniform distribution of oxygen, solid tumor pressure and a broad-based collapse of the tumor lymphatics. We also find that the rate that IFF is fluxed into the lymphatics and host tissue is largely controlled by an elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity in the tumor. We discuss the implications of these results on microenvironmental transport barriers, and the tumor invasive and metastatic potential. Our results suggest the possibility of developing strategies of targeting tumor cells based on the cues in the interstitial fluid. PMID:23220211

  10. Targeted Resequencing of the Pericentromere of Chromosome 2 Linked to Constitutional Delay of Growth and Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Cousminer, Diana L.; Leinonen, Jaakko T.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Chheda, Himanshu; Surakka, Ida; Wehkalampi, Karoliina; Ellonen, Pekka; Ripatti, Samuli; Dunkel, Leo; Palotie, Aarno; Widn, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP) is the most common cause of pubertal delay. CDGP is defined as the proportion of the normal population who experience pubertal onset at least 2 SD later than the population mean, representing 2.3% of all adolescents. While adolescents with CDGP spontaneously enter puberty, they are at risk for short stature, decreased bone mineral density, and psychosocial problems. Genetic factors contribute heavily to the timing of puberty, but the vast majority of CDGP cases remain biologically unexplained, and there is no definitive test to distinguish CDGP from pathological absence of puberty during adolescence. Recently, we published a study identifying significant linkage between a locus at the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2 (chr 2) and CDGP in Finnish families. To investigate this region for causal variation, we sequenced chr 2 between the genomic coordinates of 79124 Mb (genome build GRCh37) in the proband and affected parent of the 13 families contributing most to this linkage signal. One gene, DNAH6, harbored 6 protein-altering low-frequency variants (< 6% in the Finnish population) in 10 of the CDGP probands. We sequenced an additional 135 unrelated Finnish CDGP subjects and utilized the unique Sequencing Initiative Suomi (SISu) population reference exome set to show that while 5 of these variants were present in the CDGP set, they were also present in the Finnish population at similar frequencies. Additional variants in the targeted region could not be prioritized for follow-up, possibly due to gaps in sequencing coverage or lack of functional knowledge of non-genic genomic regions. Thus, despite having a well-characterized sample collection from a genetically homogeneous population with a large population-based reference sequence dataset, we were unable to pinpoint variation in the linked region predisposing delayed puberty. This study highlights the difficulties of detecting genetic variants under linkage regions for complex traits and suggests that advancements in annotation of gene function and regulatory regions of the genome will be critical for solving the genetic background of complex phenotypes like CDGP. PMID:26030606

  11. Targeted resequencing of the pericentromere of chromosome 2 linked to constitutional delay of growth and puberty.

    PubMed

    Cousminer, Diana L; Leinonen, Jaakko T; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Chheda, Himanshu; Surakka, Ida; Wehkalampi, Karoliina; Ellonen, Pekka; Ripatti, Samuli; Dunkel, Leo; Palotie, Aarno; Widn, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP) is the most common cause of pubertal delay. CDGP is defined as the proportion of the normal population who experience pubertal onset at least 2 SD later than the population mean, representing 2.3% of all adolescents. While adolescents with CDGP spontaneously enter puberty, they are at risk for short stature, decreased bone mineral density, and psychosocial problems. Genetic factors contribute heavily to the timing of puberty, but the vast majority of CDGP cases remain biologically unexplained, and there is no definitive test to distinguish CDGP from pathological absence of puberty during adolescence. Recently, we published a study identifying significant linkage between a locus at the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2 (chr 2) and CDGP in Finnish families. To investigate this region for causal variation, we sequenced chr 2 between the genomic coordinates of 79-124 Mb (genome build GRCh37) in the proband and affected parent of the 13 families contributing most to this linkage signal. One gene, DNAH6, harbored 6 protein-altering low-frequency variants (< 6% in the Finnish population) in 10 of the CDGP probands. We sequenced an additional 135 unrelated Finnish CDGP subjects and utilized the unique Sequencing Initiative Suomi (SISu) population reference exome set to show that while 5 of these variants were present in the CDGP set, they were also present in the Finnish population at similar frequencies. Additional variants in the targeted region could not be prioritized for follow-up, possibly due to gaps in sequencing coverage or lack of functional knowledge of non-genic genomic regions. Thus, despite having a well-characterized sample collection from a genetically homogeneous population with a large population-based reference sequence dataset, we were unable to pinpoint variation in the linked region predisposing delayed puberty. This study highlights the difficulties of detecting genetic variants under linkage regions for complex traits and suggests that advancements in annotation of gene function and regulatory regions of the genome will be critical for solving the genetic background of complex phenotypes like CDGP. PMID:26030606

  12. Co-implanting orthotopic tissue creates stroma microenvironment enhancing growth and angiogenesis of multiple tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Tumor models are needed to study cancer. Noninvasive imaging of tumors under native conditions in vivo is critical but challenging. Intravital microscopy (IVM) of subcutaneous tumors provides dynamic, continuous, long-term imaging at high resolution. Although popular, subcutaneous tumor models are often criticized for being ectopic and lacking orthotopic tissue microenvironments critical for proper development. Similar IVM of orthotopic and especially spontaneous tumors is seldom possible. Here, we generate and characterize tumor models in mice for breast, lung, prostate and ovarian cancer by co-engrafting tumor spheroids with orthotopic tissue in dorsal skin window chambers for IVM. We use tumor cells and tissue, both genetically engineered to express distinct fluorescent proteins, in order to distinguish neoplastic cells from engrafted tissue. IVM of this new, two-colored model reveals classic tumor morphology with red tumor cell nests surrounded by green stromal elements. The co-implanted tissue forms the supportive stroma and vasculature of these tumors. Tumor growth and angiogenesis are more robust when tumor cells are co-implanted with orthotopic tissue versus other tissues, or in the skin alone. The orthotopic tissue promotes tumor cell mitosis over apoptosis. With time, tumor cells can adapt to new environments and ultimately even grow better in the non-orthotopic tissue over the original orthotopic tissue. These models offer a significant advance by recreating an orthotopic microenvironment in an ectopic location that is still easy to image by IVM. These ectopic-orthotopic models provide an exceptional way to study tumor and stroma cells in cancer, and directly show the critical importance of microenvironment in the development of multiple tumors. PMID:24715954

  13. Paracrine signaling by platelet-derived growth factor-CC promotes tumor growth by recruitment of cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Charlotte; Li, Hong; Fredriksson, Linda; Andrae, Johanna; Betsholtz, Christer; Li, Xuri; Eriksson, Ulf; Pietras, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Cancer results from the concerted performance of malignant cells and stromal cells. Cell types populating the microenvironment are enlisted by the tumor to secrete a host of growth-promoting cues, thus upholding tumor initiation and progression. Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGF) support the formation of a prominent tumor stromal compartment by as of yet unidentified molecular effectors. Whereas PDGF-CC induces fibroblast reactivity and fibrosis in a range of tissues, little is known about the function of PDGF-CC in shaping the tumor-stroma interplay. Herein, we present evidence for a paracrine signaling network involving PDGF-CC and PDGF receptor-alpha in malignant melanoma. Expression of PDGFC in a mouse model accelerated tumor growth through recruitment and activation of different subsets of cancer-associated fibroblasts. In seeking the molecular identity of the supporting factors provided by cancer-associated fibroblasts, we made use of antibody arrays and an in vivo coinjection model to identify osteopontin as the effector of the augmented tumor growth induced by PDGF-CC. In conclusion, we establish paracrine signaling by PDGF-CC as a potential drug target to reduce stromal support in malignant melanoma. PMID:19118022

  14. Defining MAP3 kinases required for MDA-MB-231 cell tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cronan, M R; Nakamura, K; Johnson, N L; Granger, D A; Cuevas, B D; Wang, J-G; Mackman, N; Scott, J E; Dohlman, H G; Johnson, G L

    2012-08-23

    Analysis of patient tumors suggests that multiple MAP3 kinases (MAP3Ks) are critical for growth and metastasis of cancer cells. MAP3Ks selectively control the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 and ERK5 in response to receptor tyrosine kinases and GTPases. We used MDA-MB-231 cells because of their ability to metastasize from the breast fat pad to distant lymph nodes for an orthotopic xenograft model to screen the function of seven MAP3Ks in controlling tumor growth and metastasis. Stable short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown was used to inhibit the expression of each of the seven MAP3Ks, which were selected for their differential regulation of the MAPK network. The screen identified two MAP3Ks, MEKK2 and MLK3, whose shRNA knockdown caused significant inhibition of both tumor growth and metastasis. Neither MEKK2 nor MLK3 have been previously shown to regulate tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. These results demonstrated that MAP3Ks, which differentially activate JNK, p38 and ERK5, are necessary for xenograft tumor growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 tumors. The requirement for MAP3Ks signaling through multiple MAPK pathways explains why several members of the MAPK network are activated in cancer. MEKK2 was required for epidermal growth factor receptor and Her2/Neu activation of ERK5, with ERK5 being required for metastasis. Loss of MLK3 expression increased mitotic infidelity and apoptosis in vitro. Knockdown of MEKK2 and MLK3 resulted in increased apoptosis in orthotopic xenografts relative to control tumors in mice, inhibiting both tumor growth and metastasis; MEKK2 and MLK3 represent untargeted kinases in tumor biology for potential therapeutic development. PMID:22139075

  15. Functional analysis of tumor cell growth and clearance in living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Thomas J.; Mailaender, V.; Tucker, Amanda A.; Olomu, A. B.; Zhang, Weisheng; Negrin, Robert S.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    Evaluation of antineoplastic therapies would be enhanced by sensitive methods that noninvasively asses both tumor location and neoplastic growth kinetics in living animals. Since light is transmitted through mammalian tissues, it was possible to externally monitor growth and regression of luciferase labeled murine tumor cells engrafted into immunodeficient mice. External quantification of tumor burden revealed the biological impact of the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide on the kinetics of tumor growth in living animals. Therapeutic activity was apparent but this drug did not eliminate the NIH 3T3 cell signal over the 28 d time course. This novel, noninvasive system allowed sensitive, real time spatiotemporal analyses of neoplastic cell growth and may facilitate rapid optimization of effective therapeutic treatment regimes.

  16. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase suppresses NK cell activity and accelerates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Kai, Seiichiro; Goto, Shigeru; Tahara, Kouichirou; Sasaki, Atsushi; Kawano, Katsunori; Kitano, Seigo

    2003-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a tryptophan catabolizing enzyme, is induced under various pathological conditions, including viral and bacterial infection, allograft rejection, cerebral ischemia, and tumor growth. We have previously reported that the expression of IDO mRNA was increased in some clinical cases of hepatocellular carcinoma in which the recurrence-free survival rate in these IDO-positive patients was significantly higher than that in patients without IDO mRNA induction in tumors. Additionally, IDO expressed in tumors was localized not to the tumor cells but instead to tumor-infiltrating cells by immunohistochemistry. In this study, in order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying anti-tumor effect of IDO, we investigated whether IDO inhibitor (1-methyl-dl-tryptophan, 1MT) affects the growth of subcutaneous B16 tumors in mice. Subsequently, the activity of natural killer (NK) cells was investigated under the conditions of inhibited IDO activity in vivo and in vitro. IDO mRNA expression of B16 cells, B16 subcutaneous tumor, sprenocytes of mice, and human NK cells were studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. B16 subcutaneous tumor growth with or without IDO inhibition was observed and cytotoxic activity of NK cells were investigated under the conditions of inhibited IDO activity in vivo and in vitro. IDO mRNA was expressed in B16 subcutaneous tumor, splenocytes of tumor bearing mice, co-cultured splenocytes with B16, and human NK cells. On day 14, after injection of B16 melanoma cells, the sizes of tumors in IDO-inhibited mice were significantly larger than those in control mice. The cytotoxic activity of mice NK cells was reduced by IDO inhibition in vivo. In vitro inhibition of IDO, NK activity was reduced in dose-dependent manner of 1MT. In conclusion, these results indicated that IDO plays an important role in anti-tumor immunity by regulating cytotoxic activity of NK cells. PMID:14678522

  17. Human primary brain tumor cell growth inhibition in serum-free medium optimized for neuron survival.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Gregory J; LeRoux, Peter D

    2007-07-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults from which about 15,000 patients die each year in the United States. Despite aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, median survival remains only 1 year. Here we evaluate growth of primary human brain tumor cells in a defined nutrient culture medium (Neuregen) that was optimized for neuron regeneration. We hypothesized that Neuregen would inhibit tumor cell growth because of its ability to inhibit gliosis in rat brain. Tumor tissue was collected from 18 patients including 10 males and 8 females (mean age 60+/-12 years) who underwent craniotomy for newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed brain tumors. The tissue was shipped overnight in Hibernate transport medium. Tumor cells were isolated and plated in Neurobasal/serum or Neuregen on culture plastic. After 1 week, growth in Neuregen was significantly less in 9/10 glioblastoma multiforme cases, 5/5 meningioma cases and 3/3 cases of brain metastasis. Analysis of deficient formulations of Neuregen and formulations to which selected components were added back implicate no single active component. However, individual cases were sensitive to corticosterone, selenium, ethanolamine, fatty acids and/or antioxidants. Therefore, a defined culture medium that promotes neuron regeneration inhibits the growth of human primary glioblastoma, meningioma and metastatic tumor cells in culture. The possible in vivo efficacy of Neuregen for treatment of brain tumor resections remains to be determined. PMID:17537410

  18. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: a chimeric antibody, C225, inhibits EGFR activation and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, John; Prewett, Marie; Rockwell, Patricia; Goldstein, Neil I

    2015-01-15

    Murine mAb 225 was effective against the EGFR tyrosine kinase and inhibited tumor growth in preclinical studies. A phase I trial showed safety, tumor localization, and satisfactory pharmacokinetics. Human:murine chimeric C225 retained biologic activity, which was essential for the conduct of subsequent combination therapy trials and eventual regulatory approval. PMID:25593342

  19. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jskelinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  20. Repair capacity and kinetics in spheroids from a lung metastasis of a human soft tissue sarcoma: A growth delay study

    SciTech Connect

    Stuschke, M.; Budach, V.; Sack, H.; Streffer, C. )

    1991-01-01

    Spheroids grown from the human cell line EF8 of a lung metastasis of a human malignant fibrous histiocytoma were given fractionated irradiation with 60Co gamma rays at passages 31 and 32. The mean diameter of the spheroids at the time of treatment was 250 microns. Growth delay was used as the end point in these studies. Two experiments were carried out to determine the capacity and kinetics of repair of sublethal damage. In the first experiment, one, two, and five fractions were given at three or four dose levels with fixed intervals of 360 min. In the second experiment, schedules with two and four dose fractions and intervals of 0, 20, 60, 120, and 360 min were used, each at two dose levels. Data analysis was performed by a direct method based on the alpha/beta model and first-order repair kinetics of radiation damage. In both experiments, the alpha/beta value of EF8 spheroids was estimated to be about 8 (6-10) Gy. The rate constant of repair, mu, and its 95% confidence interval were estimated to be 0.62 (0.40-0.84) 10(-2) min-1, equivalent to a half-time of repair (T1/2) of 112 (83-172) min. A more detailed analysis of the data of the second experiment revealed a significant dependence of the rate constant of repair, mu, on the total radiation effect induced by the fractionated radiation treatments with short overall times. With increasing level of effect, mu decreased. These data indicate that the half-time of recovery of a human tumor can be longer than that of the surrounding normal tissue, in this case lung, at least for a limited range of doses and for some fractionation schedules.

  1. 2'-hydroxyflavanone inhibits prostate tumor growth through inactivation of AKT/STAT3 signaling and induction of cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaijie; Ning, Zhongyun; Zhou, Jiancheng; Wang, Bin; Fan, Jinhai; Zhu, Jianning; Gao, Yang; Wang, Xinyang; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; He, Dalin

    2014-07-01

    Although there have been advances in therapeutic regimes for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), these recent developments have not led to improved cure rates. Thus, more novel agents to prolong patient survival are desired. 2'-Hydroxyflavanone (2HF), a nontoxic natural flavonoid, has been shown to exhibit pleiotropic anticancer effects in many cancer types, including prostate cancer (PCa). However, the therapeutic effects of 2HF on tumor growth and its potential mechanisms in CRPC have not been completely elucidated. In the present study, utilizing three different metastatic and androgen-independent PCa cell models (PC-3, DU145 and C4-2), we found that 2HF treatment not only resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro, but also delayed subcutaneous tumor growth in vivo. Mechanistically, besides its known inhibitory effects on aldo?keto reductase activity and de novo androgen synthesis, 2HF also markedly suppressed AKT phosphorylation, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and transactivation subsequently regulating the expression of members of the BCL-2 family (i.e., Mcl-1, Bcl-2 and Bax) and modulating caspase-mediated cell apoptosis. Overall, this study revealed a novel mechanism for 2HF targeting metastatic CRPC, in which inactivation of AKT/STAT3 signaling led to cell apoptosis and growth inhibition. PMID:24859932

  2. Selective expression of constitutively active pro-apoptotic protein BikDD gene in primary mammary tumors inhibits tumor growth and reduces tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Omar M; Nie, Lei; Chan, Li-Chuan; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Jennifer; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that specifically delivering BikDD, a constitutive active mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, to breast cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice has a potent activity against tumor initiating cells (TICs), and that the combination between tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and BikDD gene therapy yielded synergistic effect on EGFR and HER2 positive breast cancer cells in immunodeficient nude mice. Those encouraging results have allowed us to propose a clinical trial using the liposome-complexing plasmid DNA expressing BikDD gene which has been approved by the NIH RAC Advisory committee. However, it is imperative to test whether systemic delivery of BikDD-expressing plasmid DNAs with liposomes into immunocompetent mice has therapeutic efficacy and tolerable side effects as what we observed in the nude mice model. In this study, we investigated the effects of BikDD gene-therapy on the primary mammary tumors, especially on tumor initiating cells (TICs), of a genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse harboring normal microenvironment and immune response. The effects on TIC population in tumors were determined by FACS analysis with different sets of murine specific TIC markers, CD49fhighCD61high and CD24+Jagged1-. First we showed in vitro that ectopic expression of BikDD in murine N202 cells derived from MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mouse tumors induced apoptosis and decreased the number of TICs. Consistently, systemic delivery of VISA-Claudin4-BikDD by liposome complexes significantly inhibited mammary tumor growth and slowed down residual tumor growth post cessation of therapy in MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mice compared to the controls. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of BikDD in vivo were consistent with decreased TIC population assessed by FACS analysis and in vitro tumorsphere formation assay of freshly isolated tumor cells. Importantly, systemic administration of BikDD did not cause significant cytotoxic response in standard toxicity assays or body weight changes. Taken together, our findings validated that selective expression of BikDD in the primary mammary tumors in immunocompetent hosts significantly reduced tumor burden and inhibited the residual tumor growth at off-therapy stage by eliminating TICs. Hence, the VISA-Claudin4-BikDD-mediated gene therapy is worthy of further investigation in breast cancer clinical trials. PMID:26885451

  3. Angiogenesis-independent tumor growth mediated by stem-like cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakariassen, Per .; Prestegarden, Lars; Wang, Jian; Skaftnesmo, Kai-Ove; Mahesparan, Rupavathana; Molthoff, Carla; Sminia, Peter; Sundlister, Eirik; Misra, Anjan; Tysnes, Berit Blge; Chekenya, Martha; Peters, Hans; Lende, Gabriel; Kalland, Karl Henning; yan, Anne M.; Petersen, Kjell; Jonassen, Inge; van der Kogel, Albert; Feuerstein, Burt G.; Terzis, A. Jorge A.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Enger, Per yvind

    2006-01-01

    In this work, highly infiltrative brain tumors with a stem-like phenotype were established by xenotransplantation of human brain tumors in immunodeficient nude rats. These tumors coopted the host vasculature and presented as an aggressive disease without signs of angiogenesis. The malignant cells expressed neural stem cell markers, showed a migratory behavior similar to normal human neural stem cells, and gave rise to tumors in vivo after regrafting. Serial passages in animals gradually transformed the tumors into an angiogenesis-dependent phenotype. This process was characterized by a reduction in stem cells markers. Gene expression profiling combined with high throughput immunoblotting analyses of the angiogenic and nonangiogenic tumors identified distinct signaling networks in the two phenotypes. Furthermore, proinvasive genes were up-regulated and angiogenesis signaling genes were down-regulated in the stem-like tumors. In contrast, proinvasive genes were down-regulated in the angiogenesis-dependent tumors derived from the stem-like tumors. The described angiogenesis-independent tumor growth and the uncoupling of invasion and angiogenesis, represented by the stem-like cancer cells and the cells derived from them, respectively, point at two completely independent mechanisms that drive tumor progression. This article underlines the need for developing therapies that specifically target the stem-like cell pools in tumors. PMID:17056721

  4. The ADAMTS1 Protease Gene Is Required for Mammary Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardelli, Carmela; Frewin, Kate M.; Tan, Izza de Arao; Williams, Elizabeth D.; Opeskin, Kenneth; Pritchard, Melanie A.; Ingman, Wendy V.; Russell, Darryl L.

    2011-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs protein 1 (ADAMTS1) is a protease commonly up-regulated in metastatic carcinoma. Its overexpression in cancer cells promotes experimental metastasis, but whether ADAMTS1 is essential for metastatic progression is unknown. To address this question, we investigated mammary cancer progression and spontaneous metastasis in the MMTV-PyMT mouse mammary tumor model in Adamts1 knockout mice. Adamts1?/?/PyMT mice displayed significantly reduced mammary tumor and lung metastatic tumor burden and increased survival, compared with their wild-type and heterozygous littermates. Histological examination revealed an increased proportion of tumors with ductal carcinoma in situ and a lower proportion of high-grade invasive tumors in Adamts1?/?/PyMT mice, compared with Adamts1+/+/PyMT mice. Increased apoptosis with unaltered proliferation and vascular density in the Adamts1?/?/PyMT tumors suggested that reduced cell survival accounts for the lower tumor burden in ADAMTS1-deficient mice. Furthermore, Adamts1?/? tumor stroma had significantly lesser amounts of proteolytically cleaved versican and increased numbers of CD45+ leukocytes. Characterization of immune cell gene expression indicated that cytotoxic cell activation was increased in Adamts1?/? tumors, compared with Adamts1+/+ tumors. This finding is supported by significantly elevated IL-12+ cell numbers in Adamts1?/? tumors. Thus, in vivo ADAMTS1 may promote mammary tumor growth and progression to metastasis in the PyMT model and is a potential therapeutic target to prevent metastatic breast cancer. PMID:22001177

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α promotes primary tumor growth and tumor-initiating cell activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Overexpression of the oxygen-responsive transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) correlates with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The mouse mammary tumor virus polyoma virus middle T (MMTV-PyMT) mouse is a widely utilized preclinical mouse model that resembles human luminal breast cancer and is highly metastatic. Prior studies in which the PyMT model was used demonstrated that HIF-1α is essential to promoting carcinoma onset and lung metastasis, although no differences in primary tumor end point size were observed. Using a refined model system, we investigated whether HIF-1α is directly implicated in the regulation of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in breast cancer. Methods Mammary tumor epithelial cells were created from MMTV-PyMT mice harboring conditional alleles of Hif1a, followed by transduction ex vivo with either adenovirus β-galactosidase or adenovirus Cre to generate wild-type (WT) and HIF-1α-null (KO) cells, respectively. The impact of HIF-1α deletion on tumor-initiating potential was investigated using tumorsphere assays, limiting dilution transplantation and gene expression analysis. Results Efficient deletion of HIF-1α reduced primary tumor growth and suppressed lung metastases, prolonging survival. Loss of HIF-1α led to reduced expression of markers of the basal lineage (K5/K14) in cells and tumors and of multiple genes involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. HIF-1α also enhanced tumorsphere formation at normoxia and hypoxia. Decreased expression of several genes in the Notch pathway as well as Vegf and Prominin-1 (CD133)was observed in response to Hif1a deletion. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that CD133 expression was reduced in KO cells and in tumorspheres. Tumorsphere formation was enhanced in CD133hi versus CD133neg cells sorted from PyMT tumors. Limiting dilution transplantation of WT and KO tumor cells into immunocompetent recipients revealed > 30-fold enrichment of TICs in WT cells. Conclusion These results demonstrate that HIF-1α plays a key role in promoting primary mammary tumor growth and metastasis, in part through regulation of TICs. HIF-1α regulates expression of several members of the Notch pathway, CD133 and markers of the basal lineage in mammary tumors. Our results suggest that CD133, which has not been profiled extensively in breast cancer, may be a useful marker of TICs in the PyMT mouse model. These data reveal for the first time that HIF-1α directly regulates breast TIC activity in vivo. PMID:22225988

  6. Ethanol Promotes Mammary Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis: the Involvement of Chemoattractant Factor MCP-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siying; Xu, Mei; Li, Feifei; Wang, Xin; Bower, Kimberly A.; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Lu, Yanmin; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhuo; Ke, Zunji; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a risk factor for breast cancer in humans. Experimental studies indicate that alcohol exposure promotes malignant progression of mammary tumors. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Alcohol induces a pro-inflammatory response by modulating the expression of cytokines and chemokines. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), also known as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), is a pro-inflammatory chemokine implicated in breast cancer development/malignancy. We investigated the role of MCP-1 in alcohol-promoted mammary tumor progression. Using a xenograft model, we demonstrated that alcohol increased tumor angiogenesis and promoted growth/metastasis of breast cancer cells in C57BL/6 mice. Alcohol up-regulated the expression of MCP-1 and its receptor CCR2 in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Using a three-dimensional (3-D) tumor/endothelial cell co-culture system, we demonstrated MCP-1 regulated tumor/endothelial cell interaction and promoted tumor angiogenesis. More importantly, MCP-1 mediated alcohol-promoted angiogenesis; an antagonist of the MCP-1 receptor CCR2 significantly inhibited alcohol-stimulated tumor angiogenesis. The CCR2 antagonist abolished ethanol-stimulated growth of mammary tumors in mice. We further demonstrated that MCP-1 enhanced the migration, but not the proliferation of endothelial cells as well as breast cancer cells. These results suggest that MCP-1 plays an important role in ethanol-stimulated tumor angiogenesis and tumor progression. PMID:22160640

  7. Differential feeding patterns induced by tumor growth and by TPN.

    PubMed

    Meguid, M M; Yang, Z J; Gleason, J R; Kubota, A

    1999-01-01

    The effects of anorexia induced by early tumor, and anorexia induced by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on food intake and the indexes of food intake, were investigated in rats infused with saline after jugular catheter placement and concomitant inoculation with methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced tumor cells on day 0, and in rats without catheters receiving tumor only. Tumor became palpable around day 10 and increased to represent 6-8% of host body weight by day 26. On day 18, food intake started to decrease. Catheter-bearing rats were then randomized to saline controls (n = 9) for 11 d or to TPN-100 (n = 9) for 4 d providing 100% of daily caloric needs. Both then received saline until day 26. Food intake and feeding indexes were continuously measured using the Automated Computerized Rat Eater Meter (ACREM) and data was analyzed using ANOVA and regression analysis. In controls (both with and without catheter) the tumor induced a specific feeding pattern which consisted of a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in food intake via a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in meal size. A non-significant decrease in meal number and meal duration occurred. Two other feeding-related activities, meal consumption rate and intermeal sniffs, also decreased. Infusion of TPN-100 into the already anorectic rat led to a further significant (P < 0.0001) decrease in food intake via a significant decrease in both meal size (P < 0.0001) and in meal number (P < 0.0001). A decrease in all other feeding indexes also occurred, resulting in a different feeding pattern. After stopping TPN-100, the TPN-100-induced feeding pattern returned to that of the tumor-induced feeding pattern. That the tumor-induced feeding pattern differs from the TPN-100-induced feeding pattern suggests that the mechanisms whereby these two factors induce anorexia may also differ. PMID:10422086

  8. Dioscin inhibits colon tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis through regulating VEGFR2 and AKT/MAPK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Qingyi; Qing, Yong; Wu, Yang; Hu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Lei; Wu, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    Dioscin has shown cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but its in vivo effects and the mechanisms have not elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study was to assess the antitumor effects and the molecular mechanisms of dioscin. We showed that dioscin could inhibit tumor growth in vivo and has no toxicity at the test condition. The growth suppression was accompanied by obvious blood vessel decrease within solid tumors. We also found dioscin treatment inhibited the proliferation of cancer and endothelial cell lines, and most sensitive to primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). What's more, analysis of HUVECs migration, invasion, and tube formation exhibited that dioscin has significantly inhibitive effects to these actions. Further analysis of blood vessel formation in the matrigel plugs indicated that dioscin could inhibit VEGF-induced blood vessel formation in vivo. We also identified that dioscin could suppress the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src, FAK, AKT and Erk1/2, accompanied by the increase of phosphorylated P38MAPK. The results potently suggest that dioscin may be a potential anticancer drug, which efficiently inhibits angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathways. - Highlights: • Dioscin inhibits tumor growth in vivo and does not exhibit any toxicity. • Dioscin inhibits angiogenesis within solid tumors. • Dioscin inhibits the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs. • Dioscin inhibits VEGF–induced blood vessel formation in vivo. • Dioscin inhibits VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathway.

  9. Tumor growth in complex, evolving microenvironmental geometries: A diffuse domain approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Lowengrub, John S.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model of tumor growth in complex, dynamic microenvironments with active, deformable membranes. Using a diffuse domain approach, the complex domain is captured implicitly using an auxiliary function and the governing equations are appropriately modified, extended and solved in a larger, regular domain. The diffuse domain method enables us to develop an efficient numerical implementation that does not depend on the space dimension or the microenvironmental geometry. We model homotypic cell-cell adhesion and heterotypic cell-basement membrane (BM) adhesion with the latter being implemented via a membrane energy that models cell-BM interactions. We incorporate simple models of elastic forces and the degradation of the BM and ECM by tumor-secreted matrix degrading enzymes. We investigate tumor progression and BM response as a function of cell-BM adhesion and the stiffness of the BM. We find tumor sizes tend to be positively correlated with cell-BM adhesion since increasing cell-BM adhesion results in thinner, more elongated tumors. Prior to invasion of the tumor into the stroma, we find a negative correlation between tumor size and BM stiffness as the elastic restoring forces tend to inhibit tumor growth. In order to model tumor invasion of the stroma, we find it necessary to downregulate cell-BM adhesiveness, which is consistent with experimental observations. A stiff BM promotes invasiveness because at early stages the opening in the BM created by MDE degradation from tumor cells tends to be narrower when the BM is stiffer. This requires invading cells to squeeze through the narrow opening and thus promotes fragmentation that then leads to enhanced growth and invasion. In three dimensions, the opening in the BM was found to increase in size even when the BM is stiff because of pressure induced by growing tumor clusters. A larger opening in the BM can increase the potential for further invasiveness by increasing the possibility that additional tumor cells could invade the stroma. PMID:25014472

  10. Microvesicle-mediated delivery of transforming growth factor ?1siRNA for the suppression of tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaqin; Li, Limin; Yu, Jianxiong; Zhu, Dihan; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Xihan; Gu, Hongwei; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke

    2014-05-01

    Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) have been recently shown as an efficient carrier to deliver small RNAs into the target cells. In the present study, we characterized the inhibitory effect of TGF-?1 siRNA delivered by mouse fibroblast L929 cell-derived MVs (L929 MVs) on the growth and metastasis of murine sarcomas 180 cells both invitro and invivo. We found that, comparing to the same concentration of free TGF-?1 siRNA, TGF-?1 siRNA delivered by L929 MVs much more efficiently decreased the level of TGF-?1 in the recipient tumor cells. Functionally, MVs containing TGF-?1 siRNA significantly decreased the viability and migration of sarcomas 180 cells and promoted the apoptosis of tumor cells. Co-immunoprecipitation with Argonaute 2 (AGO2) via anti-AGO2 antibody indicated that the majority of TGF-?1 siRNA in the MVs were associated with AGO2 complex. A tumor implantation mouse model further showed that intravenous injection of TGF-?1 siRNA-containing MVs strongly suppressed TGF-?1 expression and TGF-?1 signaling downstream in the implanted tumor cells, and thus inhibited the growth and lung metastases of tumor cells. In conclusion, our results collectively demonstrate that the delivery of therapeutic TGF-?1 siRNA by cell-derived MVs provides an effective strategy to control tumor cell growth and metastasis. PMID:24565517

  11. Mechanisms of vascularization in murine models of primary and metastatic tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Bugyik, Edina; Renyi-Vamos, Ferenc; Szabo, Vanessza; Dezso, Katalin; Ecker, Nora; Rokusz, Andras; Nagy, Peter; Dome, Balazs; Paku, Sandor

    2016-01-01

    Directed capillary ingrowth has long been considered synonymous with tumor vascularization. However, the vasculature of primary tumors and metastases is not necessarily formed by endothelial cell sprouting; instead, malignant tumors can acquire blood vessels via alternative vascularization mechanisms, such as intussusceptive microvascular growth, vessel co-option, and glomeruloid angiogenesis. Importantly, in response to anti-angiogenic therapies, malignant tumors can switch from one vascularization mechanism to another. In this article, we briefly review the biological features of these mechanisms and discuss on their significance in medical oncology. PMID:26873579

  12. Failure of thalidomide to inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gutman, M; Szold, A; Ravid, A; Lazauskas, T; Merimsky, O; Klausner, J M

    1996-01-01

    Thalidomide was recently suggested to be angiogenesis-inhibitor following the demonstration of its activity in a rabbit cornea micropocket model. The purpose of the present study was to test its efficacy in solid tumors in mice. B16-F10 melanoma and CT-26 colon carcinoma cells were injected subcutaneously, intravenously and intraperitoneally, and mice received daily gavage of 0.3-1.0 mg thalidomide starting either two or 10 days following tumor cell injection. The tumors were measured and compared with controls. There was no growth retardation in CT-26 bearing mice nor in mice with pulmonary or peritoneal metastases of B16-F10 melanoma. In 3/7 groups of mice with SC B16-F10 tumors, growth retardation was demonstrated, however the difference was not statistically significant. All tumors eventually reached maximal size, similar to controls. Morphological evaluation of the blood vessels oriented towards the tumor revealed that in both thalidomide and control groups, all mice had developed an intact network of new blood vessels. In our model for the oral administration of thalidomide inhibition of tumor growth and angiogenesis did not occur. We hypothesize that the lack of sustained antiangiogenic response was either due to immune modulation or to tumor heterogeneity and adaptation. PMID:9042240

  13. Computational Modeling of 3D Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis for Chemotherapy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lei; van de Ven, Anne L.; Guo, Dongmin; Andasari, Vivi; Cristini, Vittorio; Li, King C.; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors develop abnormally at spatial and temporal scales, giving rise to biophysical barriers that impact anti-tumor chemotherapy. This may increase the expenditure and time for conventional drug pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. In order to facilitate drug discovery, we propose a mathematical model that couples three-dimensional tumor growth and angiogenesis to simulate tumor progression for chemotherapy evaluation. This application-oriented model incorporates complex dynamical processes including cell- and vascular-mediated interstitial pressure, mass transport, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and vessel maturation to model tumor progression through multiple stages including tumor initiation, avascular growth, and transition from avascular to vascular growth. Compared to pure mechanistic models, the proposed empirical methods are not only easy to conduct but can provide realistic predictions and calculations. A series of computational simulations were conducted to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed comprehensive model. The computational simulation results suggest that solid tumor geometry is related to the interstitial pressure, such that tumors with high interstitial pressure are more likely to develop dendritic structures than those with low interstitial pressure. PMID:24404145

  14. Adipocytes promote ovarian cancer metastasis and provide energy for rapid tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Kristin M; Kenny, Hilary A; Penicka, Carla V; Ladanyi, Andras; Buell-Gutbrod, Rebecca; Zillhardt, Marion R; Romero, Iris L; Carey, Mark S; Mills, Gordon B; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Yamada, S Diane; Peter, Marcus E; Gwin, Katja; Lengyel, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Intra-abdominal tumors, such as ovarian cancer1,2, have a clear predilection for metastasis to the omentum, an organ primarily composed of adipocytes. Currently, it is unclear why tumor cells preferentially home to and proliferate in the omentum, yet omental metastases typically represent the largest tumor in the abdominal cavities of women with ovarian cancer. We show here that primary human omental adipocytes promote homing, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells, and that adipokines including interleukin-8 (IL-8) mediate these activities. Adipocyte–ovarian cancer cell coculture led to the direct transfer of lipids from adipocytes to ovarian cancer cells and promoted in vitro and in vivo tumor growth. Furthermore, coculture induced lipolysis in adipocytes and β-oxidation in cancer cells, suggesting adipocytes act as an energy source for the cancer cells. A protein array identified upregulation of fatty acid–binding protein 4 (FABP4, also known as aP2) in omental metastases as compared to primary ovarian tumors, and FABP4 expression was detected in ovarian cancer cells at the adipocyte-tumor cell interface. FABP4 deficiency substantially impaired metastatic tumor growth in mice, indicating that FABP4 has a key role in ovarian cancer metastasis. These data indicate adipocytes provide fatty acids for rapid tumor growth, identifying lipid metabolism and transport as new targets for the treatment of cancers where adipocytes are a major component of the microenvironment. PMID:22037646

  15. Simulation of avascular tumor growth by agent-based game model involving phenotype-phenotype interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Wang, Hengtong; Zhang, Jiangang; Chen, Ke; Li, Yumin

    2015-01-01

    All tumors, both benign and metastatic, undergo an avascular growth stage with nutrients supplied by the surrounding tissue. This avascular growth process is much easier to carry out in more qualitative and quantitative experiments starting from tumor spheroids in vitro with reliable reproducibility. Essentially, this tumor progression would be described as a sequence of phenotypes. Using agent-based simulation in a two-dimensional spatial lattice, we constructed a composite growth model in which the phenotypic behavior of tumor cells depends on not only the local nutrient concentration and cell count but also the game among cells. Our simulation results demonstrated that in silico tumors are qualitatively similar to those observed in tumor spheroid experiments. We also found that the payoffs in the game between two living cell phenotypes can influence the growth velocity and surface roughness of tumors at the same time. Finally, this current model is flexible and can be easily extended to discuss other situations, such as environmental heterogeneity and mutation. PMID:26648395

  16. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 silencing inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yang-Fan; Yan, Guang-Ning; Meng, Gang; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Qiao-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) methyltransferase is the catalytic subunit of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which acts as a transcription repressor via the trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone 3 (H3K27me3). EZH2 has been recognised as an oncogene in several types of tumors; however, its role in osteosarcoma has not been fully elucidated. Herein, we show that EZH2 silencing inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis in osteosarcoma by facilitating re-expression of the imprinting gene tumor-suppressing STF cDNA 3 (TSSC3). Our previous study showed that TSSC3 acts as a tumor suppressor in osteosarcoma. In this study, we found that EZH2 was abnormally elevated in osteosarcoma, and its overexpression was associated with poor prognosis in osteosarcoma. Silencing of EZH2 resulted in tumor growth inhibition, apoptosis and chemosensitivity enhancement. Moreover, suppression of EZH2 markedly inhibited tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, EZH2 knockdown facilitated the re-expression of TSSC3 by reducing H3K27me3 in the promoter region. Cotransfection with siEZH2 and siTSSC3 could partially reverse the ability of siEZH2 alone. We have demonstrated that EZH2 plays a crucial role in tumor growth and distant metastasis in osteosarcoma; its oncogenic role is related to its regulation of the expression of TSSC3. PMID:26265454

  17. DNA vaccination with CD44 variant isoform reduces mammary tumor local growth and lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wallach-Dayan, Shulamit Batya; Rubinstein, Ariel M; Hand, Carla; Breuer, Raphael; Naor, David

    2008-06-01

    We have shown recently that cDNA vaccination, using a virtual lymph node, ameliorates experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Successful cure from mammary tumor requires resolution of local tumor growth and metastases. We have examined whether targeting of CD44 cell surface adhesion molecule by cDNA vaccination plays a role in resolving mammary tumor development. We show here that CD44 cDNA vaccination decreases the tumor mass and metastatic potential in experimental mammary tumor of BALB/c mice. Vaccination of mice, inoculated with the mammary tumors, by cDNA of CD44 variant (CD44v) but not by cDNA of standard CD44, markedly reduced local tumor development and lung metastasis. Concomitantly, transfection of CD44 antisense into a highly metastatic mammary tumor cell line disrupted the CD44 expression of the cells and reduced their ability to establish local tumors as well as metastatic colonies in the lung. Moreover, when CD44v, but not standard CD44 sense cDNA, was transfected into the poorly metastatic cell line, tumor development was markedly enhanced. It is possible therefore that DNA vaccination with a specific CD44v construct could induce an immune resistance to mammary tumor progression. PMID:18566232

  18. A small-molecule antagonist of CXCR4 inhibits intracranial growth of primary brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Joshua B.; Kung, Andrew L.; Klein, Robyn S.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Sun, Yanping; Schmidt, Karl; Kieran, Mark W.; Luster, Andrew D.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2003-11-01

    The vast majority of brain tumors in adults exhibit glial characteristics. Brain tumors in children are diverse: Many have neuronal characteristics, whereas others have glial features. Here we show that activation of the Gi protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 is critical for the growth of both malignant neuronal and glial tumors. Systemic administration of CXCR4 antagonist AMD 3100 inhibits growth of intracranial glioblastoma and medulloblastoma xenografts by increasing apoptosis and decreasing the proliferation of tumor cells. This reflects the ability of AMD 3100 to reduce the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt, all of which are pathways downstream of CXCR4 that promote survival, proliferation, and migration. These studies (i) demonstrate that CXCR4 is critical to the progression of diverse brain malignances and (ii) provide a scientific rationale for clinical evaluation of AMD 3100 in treating both adults and children with malignant brain tumors.

  19. Apparent involvement of opioid peptides in stress-induced enhancement of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J W; Shavit, Y; Terman, G W; Nelson, L R; Gale, R P; Liebeskind, J C

    1983-01-01

    Exposure to stress has been associated with alterations in both immune function and tumor development in man and laboratory animals. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a particular type of inescapable footshock stress, known to cause an opioid mediated form of analgesia, on survival time of female Fischer 344 rats injected with a mammary ascites tumor. Rats subjected to inescapable footshock manifested an enhanced tumor growth indicated by a decreased survival time and decreased percent survival. This tumor enhancing effect of stress was prevented by the opiate antagonist, naltrexone, suggesting a role for endogenous opioid peptides in this process. In the absence of stress, naltrexone did not affect tumor growth. PMID:6686324

  20. Mitochondrial biogenesis in epithelial cancer cells promotes breast cancer tumor growth and confers autophagy resistance

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Ahmed F.; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we set out to test the novel hypothesis that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in epithelial cancer cells would fuel enhanced tumor growth. For this purpose, we generated MDA-MB-231 cells (a triple-negative human breast cancer cell line) overexpressing PGC-1? and MitoNEET, which are established molecules that drive mitochondrial biogenesis and increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Interestingly, both PGC-1? and MitoNEET increased the abundance of OXPHOS protein complexes, conferred autophagy resistance under conditions of starvation and increased tumor growth by up to ~3-fold. However, this increase in tumor growth was independent of neo-angiogenesis, as assessed by immunostaining and quantitation of vessel density using CD31 antibodies. Quantitatively similar increases in tumor growth were also observed by overexpression of PGC-1? and POLRMT in MDA-MB-231 cells, which are also responsible for mediating increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, we propose that increased mitochondrial power in epithelial cancer cells oncogenically promotes tumor growth by conferring autophagy resistance. As such, PGC-1?, PGC-1?, mitoNEET and POLRMT should all be considered as tumor promoters or metabolic oncogenes. Our results are consistent with numerous previous clinical studies showing that metformin (a weak mitochondrial poison) prevents the onset of nearly all types of human cancers in diabetic patients. Therefore, metformin (a complex I inhibitor) and other mitochondrial inhibitors should be developed as novel anticancer therapies, targeting mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells. PMID:23070475

  1. Mitochondrial biogenesis in epithelial cancer cells promotes breast cancer tumor growth and confers autophagy resistance.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed F; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-11-15

    Here, we set out to test the novel hypothesis that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in epithelial cancer cells would "fuel" enhanced tumor growth. For this purpose, we generated MDA-MB-231 cells (a triple-negative human breast cancer cell line) overexpressing PGC-1α and MitoNEET, which are established molecules that drive mitochondrial biogenesis and increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Interestingly, both PGC-1α and MitoNEET increased the abundance of OXPHOS protein complexes, conferred autophagy resistance under conditions of starvation and increased tumor growth by up to ~3-fold. However, this increase in tumor growth was independent of neo-angiogenesis, as assessed by immunostaining and quantitation of vessel density using CD31 antibodies. Quantitatively similar increases in tumor growth were also observed by overexpression of PGC-1β and POLRMT in MDA-MB-231 cells, which are also responsible for mediating increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, we propose that increased mitochondrial "power" in epithelial cancer cells oncogenically promotes tumor growth by conferring autophagy resistance. As such, PGC-1α, PGC-1β, mitoNEET and POLRMT should all be considered as tumor promoters or "metabolic oncogenes." Our results are consistent with numerous previous clinical studies showing that metformin (a weak mitochondrial "poison") prevents the onset of nearly all types of human cancers in diabetic patients. Therefore, metformin (a complex I inhibitor) and other mitochondrial inhibitors should be developed as novel anticancer therapies, targeting mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells. PMID:23070475

  2. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan F.; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L.; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M.; Castaño, Justo P.; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human acromegaly including gigantism and visceromegaly. However, GC tumors remain poorly characterized at a molecular level. In the present work, we report a detailed histological and molecular characterization of GC tumors using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and imaging techniques. GC tumors display histopathological and molecular features of human GH-producing tumors, including hormone production, cell architecture, senescence activation and alterations in cell cycle gene expression. Furthermore, GC tumors cells displayed sensitivity to somatostatin analogues, drugs that are currently used in the treatment of human GH-producing adenomas, thus supporting the GC tumor model as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic agents. The information obtained would help to maximize the usefulness of the GC rat model for research and preclinical studies in GH-secreting tumors. PMID:26549306

  3. Inhibition of tumor growth by a newly-identified activator for epidermal fatty acid binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Enyu; Singh, Puja; Zhai, Xiuhong; Li, Yan; Zhu, Ganqian; Zhang, Yuwen; Hao, Jiaqing; Chi, Young-In; Brown, Rhoderick E.; Cleary, Margot P.; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that expression of epidermal fatty acid binding protein (E-FABP) in tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) promotes macrophage anti-tumor activity by enhancing IFN? responses in tumor models. Thus, E-FABP represents a new protective factor in enhancing tumor immune surveillance against tumor development. Herein, we report the compound 5-(benzylamino)-2-(3-methylphenyl)-1,3-oxazole-4-carbonitrile (designated EI-05) as a novel E-FABP activator for inhibition of mammary tumor growth. EI-05 was selected from the ZINC compound library using molecular docking analysis based on the crystal structure of E-FABP. Although EI-05 is unable to bind E-FABP directly, it significantly increases E-FABP expression in macrophages during inflammation. Stimulation of macrophages with EI-05 remarkably enhances lipid droplet formation and IFN? production, which further promotes the anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Importantly, administering EI-05 in vivo significantly inhibits mammary tumor growth in a syngeneic mouse model. Altogether, these results suggest that EI-05 may represent a promising drug candidate for anti-tumor treatment through enhancing E-FABP activity and IFN? responses in macrophages. PMID:25796556

  4. Ephrin-A1 inhibits NSCLC tumor growth via induction of Cdx-2 a tumor suppressor gene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tumor formation is a complex process which involves constitutive activation of oncogenes and suppression of tumor suppressor genes. Receptor EphA2 and its ligand ephrin-A1 form an important cell communication system with its functional role in cell-cell interaction and tumor growth. Loss of cell-cell adhesion is central to the cellular transformation and acquisition of metastatic potential. Claudins, the integrated tight junction (TJ) cell-cell adhesion proteins located on the apico-lateral portion of epithelial cells, functions in maintaining cell polarity. There is extensive evidence implicating Eph receptors and ephrins in malignancy, but the mechanisms how these molecular players affect TJ proteins and regulate tumor growth are not clear. In the present study we hypothesized that EphA2 signaling modulates claudin-2 gene expression via induction of cdx-2, a tumor suppressor gene in NSCLC cells. Methods The expression of EphA2, claudin-2 was determined in various NSCLC cell lines by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. The claudin-2 expression was also analyzed by immunofluorescence analysis. EphA2 and erk1/erk2 phosphorylation in ephrin-A1 activated cells was evaluated by Western blot analysis. The cell proliferation and tumor colony formation were determined by WST-1 and 3-D matrigel assays respectively. Results NSCLC cells over expressed receptor EphA2 and claudin-2. Ephrin-A1 treatment significantly down regulated the claudin-2 and EphA2 expression in NSCLC cells. The transient transfection of cells with vector containing ephrin-A1 construct (pcDNA-EFNA1) decreased the expression of claudin-2, EphA2 when compared to empty vector. In addition ephrin-A1 activation increased cdx-2 expression in A549 cells. In contrast over-expression of EphA2 with plasmid pcDNA-EphA2 up regulated claudin-2 mRNA expression and decreased cdx-2 expression. The transient transfection of cells with vector containing cdx-2 construct (pcMV-cdx-2) decreased the expression of claudin-2 in A549 cells. Moreover, silencing the expression of receptor EphA2 by siRNA significantly reduced claudin-2 expression and decreased cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, silencing cdx-2 gene expression before ephrin-A1 treatment increased claudin-2 expression along with increased cell proliferation and tumor growth in A549 cells. Conclusions Our study suggests that EphA2 signaling up-regulates the expression of the TJ-protein claudin-2 that plays an important role in promoting cell proliferation and tumor growth in NSCLC cells. We conclude that receptor EphA2 activation by ephrin-A1 induces tumor suppressor gene cdx-2 expression which attenuates cell proliferation, tumor growth and thus may be a promising therapeutic target against NSCLC. PMID:22824143

  5. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most crucial model input. We conclude that the tumor growth model provides a method to account for anisotropic growth patterns of glioma, and may therefore provide a tool to make target delineation more objective and automated. PMID:24440875

  6. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most crucial model input. We conclude that the tumor growth model provides a method to account for anisotropic growth patterns of glioma, and may therefore provide a tool to make target delineation more objective and automated.

  7. Enhancement of experimental pulmonary metastasis and inhibition of subcutaneously transplanted tumor growth following cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Yamashita, T; Suzuki, K; Takeichi, N; Micallef, M; Hosokawa, M; Kobayashi, H; Murata, M; Arisue, M

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported that inhibition of anti-tumor immune responses and a corresponding enhancement of metastatic tumor growth occurred in rats following cryosurgery of 3-methylcholanthrene-induced WKA rat fibrosarcoma (KMT-17). In this study, to evaluate the enhancement of metastasis arising from the inhibition of anti-tumor immune responses following cryosurgery, we examined how cryosurgery affected experimental pulmonary metastasis and the growth of subcutaneously transplanted tumor. To reveal the effect of cryosurgery on pulmonary metastasis, rats received a subcutaneous inoculation of KMT-17 tumor in the right flank (1 x 10(6)) and i.v. injection (1 x 10(5)) on the same day or 4 days later. The right flank tumors were treated with cryosurgery 5 days after subcutaneous transplantation. The pulmonary metastasis of the rats, which were injected i.v. one day before treatment, was enhanced by cryosurgery as compared with surgical excision, though the pulmonary metastasis of rats, which were injected i.v. 5 days before treatment, was un-affected by cryosurgery. These observations suggest that cryosurgery may enhance the pulmonary metastasis in its early steps but has no effects in its later stages. To reveal the effect of cryosurgery on the growth of distant tumors, rats received subcutaneous inoculations of KMT-17 tumor in the right (1 x 10(6)) and left (1 x 10(4) approximately 10(5)) flanks. Tumors in the right flank were treated with cryosurgery 5 days after inoculation and the growth of untreated left flank tumors was observed. In this double grafted tumor system, however, cryosurgery significantly inhibited the growth of the untreated left flank tumors. Spleen cells obtained from rats which had undergone cryosurgery 4 or 10 days previously (cryo-spleen cells) were used for in vivo neutralizing Winn assay. Antitumor activity of cryo-spleen cells was decreased as compared with that of rats after surgical excision in both spleen cells from 4 and 10 days after treatment. These findings suggest that effector cells in the spleen may not participate in subcutaneous tumor regression and that the evaluation of antitumor effect using the double grafted tumor system needs caution. PMID:9891507

  8. Effect of Melatonin on Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in Xenograft Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Arbab, Ali S.; Ferreira, Lívia Carvalho; Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Varma, Nadimpalli R. S.; Iskander, A. S. M.; Shankar, Adarsh; Ali, Meser M.; de Campos Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires

    2014-01-01

    As neovascularization is essential for tumor growth and metastasis, controlling angiogenesis is a promising tactic in limiting cancer progression. Melatonin has been studied for their inhibitory properties on angiogenesis in cancer. We performed an in vivo study to evaluate the effects of melatonin treatment on angiogenesis in breast cancer. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay after melatonin treatment in triple-negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). After, cells were implanted in athymic nude mice and treated with melatonin or vehicle daily, administered intraperitoneally 1 hour before turning the room light off. Volume of the tumors was measured weekly with a digital caliper and at the end of treatments animals underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Technetium-99m tagged vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) C to detect in vivo angiogenesis. In addition, expression of pro-angiogenic/growth factors in the tumor extracts was evaluated by membrane antibody array and collected tumor tissues were analyzed with histochemical staining. Melatonin in vitro treatment (1 mM) decreased cell viability (p<0.05). The breast cancer xenografts nude mice treated with melatonin showed reduced tumor size and cell proliferation (Ki-67) compared to control animals after 21 days of treatment (p<0.05). Expression of VEGF receptor 2 decreased significantly in the treated animals compared to that of control when determined by immunohistochemistry (p<0.05) but the changes were not significant on SPECT (p>0.05) images. In addition, there was a decrease of micro-vessel density (Von Willebrand Factor) in melatonin treated mice (p<0.05). However, semiquantitative densitometry analysis of membrane array indicated increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor 1 in treated tumors compared to vehicle treated tumors (p<0.05). In conclusion, melatonin treatment showed effectiveness in reducing tumor growth and cell proliferation, as well as in the inhibition of angiogenesis. PMID:24416386

  9. Peptide-Drug Conjugate GnRH-Sunitinib Targets Angiogenesis Selectively at the Site of Action to Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Argyros, Orestis; Karampelas, Theodoros; Asvos, Xenophon; Varela, Aimilia; Sayyad, Nisar; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Davos, Constantinos H; Tzakos, Andreas G; Fokas, Demosthenes; Tamvakopoulos, Constantin

    2016-03-01

    The potential to heighten the efficacy of antiangiogenic agents was explored in this study based on active targeting of tumor cells overexpressing the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R). The rational design pursued focused on five analogues of a clinically established antiangiogenic compound (sunitinib), from which a lead candidate (SAN1) was conjugated to the targeting peptide [d-Lys(6)]-GnRH, generating SAN1GSC. Conjugation of SAN1 did not disrupt any of its antiangiogenic or cytotoxic properties in GnRH-R-expressing prostate and breast tumor cells. Daily SAN1GSC treatments in mouse xenograft models of castration-resistant prostate cancer resulted in significant tumor growth delay compared with equimolar SAN1 or sunitinib alone. This efficacy correlated with inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and S6, together with reduced Ki-67 and CD31 expression. The superior efficacy of the peptide-drug conjugate was also attributed to the finding that higher amounts of SAN1 were delivered to the tumor site (?4-fold) following dosing of SAN1GSC compared with equimolar amounts of nonconjugated SAN1. Importantly, treatment with SAN1GSC was associated with minimal hematotoxicity and cardiotoxicity based on measurements of the left ventricular systolic function in treated mice. Our results offer preclinical proof-of-concept for SAN1GSC as a novel molecule that selectively reaches the tumor site and downregulates angiogenesis with negligible cardiotoxicity, thus encouraging its further clinical development and evaluation. Cancer Res; 76(5); 1181-92. 2015 AACR. PMID:26645560

  10. Effects of Marsdenia tenacissima polysaccharide on the immune regulation and tumor growth in H22 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuang; Qiu, Limin; Li, Yiquan; Li, Lu; Wang, Xingyun; Liu, Zhi; Guo, Yan; Wang, Haotian

    2016-02-10

    One water-soluble polysaccharide (Marsdenia tenacissima polysaccharide, MTP), with an average molecular weight of 4.910(4)Da, was isolated from the dried rattan of M. tenacissima. MTP contained 93.8% carbohydrates, 5.6% proteins and 21.3% uronic acid, and were composed of arabinose, mannose, galactose, xylose, glucuronic acid at a molar ratio of 9.1, 17.7, 30.2, 22.4 and 20.6. The experiments on the animals showed that MTP could increase the serum hemolysin, promote the formation of antibody-forming cells and improve the phagocytosis of mononuclear macrophage in normal mice. Meanwhile, MTP could also inhibit the growth of tumor in H22 tumor-bearing mice dose-dependently, and increase the spleen index, thymus index and serum albumin level in the mice. In addition, MTP could elevate the serum level of TNF-? and IL-2, increase the activity of GSH-Px, CAT and SOD in the liver tissue, and reduce the content of VEGF and MDA. These results suggest that MTP can regulate the immune function in mice and suppress the growth of tumor in H22 tumor-bearing mice, and its antitumor activity may be related to its antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:26686104

  11. Effects of photodynamic hyperthermal therapy with indocyanine green on tumor growth in a colon 26 tumor-bearing mouse model

    PubMed Central

    ONOYAMA, MASAKI; AZUMA, KAZUO; TSUKA, TAKESHI; IMAGAWA, TOMOHIRO; OSAKI, TOMOHIRO; MINAMI, SABURO; OGAWA, NOBUHIKO; OKAMOTO, YOSHIHARU

    2014-01-01

    The present study used indocyanine green (ICG) and a broadband light source apparatus [photodynamic hyperthermal therapy (PHT) group] in order to treat a colon 26 tumor-bearing mouse model. The other groups were administered either ICG alone (ICG group), light alone (light group) or no treatment (control group). Following the treatment, tumor growth was measured. Nine days after the treatment, the tumors were resected and histological and immunohistological examinations were performed. In the PHT group, the growth rates of the tumor tissues were significantly decreased compared with those observed in the other groups (P<0.05). The proportion of necrotic areas in the PHT and light groups were increased significantly compared with those observed in the ICG and control groups. However, there were no significant differences between the PHT and light groups. The proportion of Ki-67 in the PHT and light groups was less than that observed in the ICG and control groups. The number of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells in the PHT group was significantly increased compared with that observed in the other groups. These data indicate that PHT is effective in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24944683

  12. Salmonella typhimurium Suppresses Tumor Growth via the Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Eun; Phan, Thuy Xuan; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Dinh-Vu, Hong-Van; Zheng, Jin Hai; Yun, Misun; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E.; Szardenings, Michael; Hwang, Won; Park, Jin-A; Park, SunHee; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Min, Jung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Although strains of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium and wild-type Escherichia coli show similar tumor-targeting capacities, only S. typhimurium significantly suppresses tumor growth in mice. The aim of the present study was to examine bacteria-mediated immune responses by conducting comparative analyses of the cytokine profiles and immune cell populations within tumor tissues colonized by E. coli or attenuated Salmonellae. CT26 tumor-bearing mice were treated with two different bacterial strains: S. typhimurium defective in ppGpp synthesis (ΔppGpp Salmonellae) or wild-type E. coli MG1655. Cytokine profiles and immune cell populations in tumor tissue colonized by these two bacterial strains were examined at two time points based on the pattern of tumor growth after ΔppGpp Salmonellae treatment: 1) when tumor growth was suppressed ('suppression stage') and 2) when they began to re-grow ('re-growing stage'). The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were markedly increased in tumors colonized by ΔppGpp Salmonellae. This increase was associated with tumor regression; the levels of both IL-1β and TNF-α returned to normal level when the tumors started to re-grow. To identify the immune cells primarily responsible for Salmonellae-mediated tumor suppression, we examined the major cell types that produce IL-1β and TNF-α. We found that macrophages and dendritic cells were the main producers of TNF-α and IL-1β. Inhibiting IL-1β production in Salmonellae-treated mice restored tumor growth, whereas tumor growth was suppressed for longer by local administration of recombinant IL-1β or TNF-α in conjunction with Salmonella therapy. These findings suggested that IL-1β and TNF-α play important roles in Salmonella-mediated cancer therapy. A better understanding of host immune responses in Salmonella therapy may increase the success of a given drug, particularly when various strategies are combined with bacteriotherapy. PMID:26516371

  13. Definition of Prostaglandin E2-EP2 Signals in the Colon Tumor Microenvironment That Amplify Inflammation and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojun; Aoki, Tomohiro; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Narumiya, Shuh

    2015-07-15

    Inflammation in the colon contributes significantly to colorectal cancer development. While aspirin reduces the colorectal cancer risk, its action mechanism, especially in inflammation in tumor microenvironment, still remains obscure. Here, we examined this issue by subjecting mice deficient in each prostaglandin (PG) receptor to colitis-associated cancer model. Deficiency of PGE receptor subtype EP2 selectively reduced, and deficiency of EP1 and EP3 enhanced, the tumor formation. EP2 is expressed in infiltrating neutrophils and tumor-associated fibroblasts in stroma, where it regulates expression of inflammation- and growth-related genes in a self-amplification manner. Notably, expression of cytokines such as TNF? and IL6, a chemokine, CXCL1, a PG-producing enzyme, COX-2, and Wnt5A was significantly elevated in tumor lesions of wild-type mice but this elevation was significantly suppressed in EP2-deficient mice. Intriguingly, EP2 stimulation in cultured neutrophils amplified expression of TNF?, IL6, CXCL1, COX-2, and other proinflammatory genes synergistically with TNF?, and EP2 stimulation in cultured fibroblasts induced expression of EP2 itself, COX-2, IL6, and Wnt genes. EP2 expression in infiltrating neutrophils and tumor-associated fibroblasts was also found in clinical specimen of ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Bone marrow transfer experiments suggest that EP2 in both cell populations is critical for tumorigenesis. Finally, administration of a selective EP2 antagonist potently suppressed tumorigenesis in this model. Our study has thus revealed that EP2 in neutrophils and tumor-associated fibroblasts promotes colon tumorigenesis by amplifying inflammation and shaping tumor microenvironment, and suggests that EP2 antagonists are promising candidates of aspirin-alternative for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:26018088

  14. Mechanisms by which SMARCB1 loss drives rhabdoid tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kimberly H; Roberts, Charles W M

    2014-09-01

    SMARCB1 (INI1/SNF5/BAF47), a core subunit of the SWI/SNF (BAF) chromatin-remodeling complex, is inactivated in the large majority of rhabdoid tumors, and germline heterozygous SMARCB1 mutations form the basis for rhabdoid predisposition syndrome. Mouse models validated Smarcb1 as a bona fide tumor suppressor, as Smarcb1 inactivation in mice results in 100% of the animals rapidly developing cancer. SMARCB1 was the first subunit of the SWI/SNF complex found mutated in cancer. More recently, at least seven other genes encoding SWI/SNF subunits have been identified as recurrently mutated in cancer. Collectively, 20% of all human cancers contain a SWI/SNF mutation. Consequently, investigation of the mechanisms by which SMARCB1 mutation causes cancer has relevance not only for rhabdoid tumors, but also potentially for the wide variety of SWI/SNF mutant cancers. Here we discuss normal functions of SMARCB1 and the SWI/SNF complex as well as mechanistic and potentially therapeutic insights that have emerged. PMID:24853101

  15. tert-Butyl hydroperoxide, an organic peroxide, causes temporary delay in hair growth in a neonatal rat model

    PubMed Central

    Wikramanayake, T. C.; Simon, J.; Mauro, L. M.; Perez, C. I.; Roberts, B.; Elgart, G.; Alvarez-Connelly, E.; Schachner, L. A.; Jimenez, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP), an organic peroxide, has been shown to cause irreversible damage to keratinocytes in vitro with prolonged administration at high concentrations, and reversible damage with short-term administration at low concentrations. To investigate the effects of tBHP on keratinocytes in vivo, we analysed hair growth in tBHP-treated neonatal rats. SpragueDawley and LongEvans rat pups were injected subcutaneously with tBHP or vehicle once daily for 6 days, and hair growth was monitored. The tBHP-treated rats had a significant delay in hair growth. However, this delay reversed within days, and the hair coats, including hair pigmentation, of tBHP-treated and sham-treated rats were indistinguishable 2 weeks later. Histological analysis and BrdU labelling of S phase cells confirmed the delay in hair-follicle growth and its reversal in tBHP-treated rats. Our results indicated that the changes incurred in hair follicles by short-term use of high-dose oxidants in vivo are temporary and reversible. PMID:21418283

  16. tert-butyl hydroperoxide, an organic peroxide, causes temporary delay in hair growth in a neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Wikramanayake, T C; Simon, J; Mauro, L M; Perez, C I; Roberts, B; Elgart, G; Alvarez-Connelly, E; Schachner, L A; Jimenez, J J

    2011-08-01

    tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP), an organic peroxide, has been shown to cause irreversible damage to keratinocytes in vitro with prolonged administration at high concentrations, and reversible damage with short-term administration at low concentrations. To investigate the effects of tBHP on keratinocytes in vivo, we analysed hair growth in tBHP-treated neonatal rats. Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rat pups were injected subcutaneously with tBHP or vehicle once daily for 6?days, and hair growth was monitored. The tBHP-treated rats had a significant delay in hair growth. However, this delay reversed within days, and the hair coats, including hair pigmentation, of tBHP-treated and sham-treated rats were indistinguishable 2?weeks later. Histological analysis and BrdU labelling of S phase cells confirmed the delay in hair-follicle growth and its reversal in tBHP-treated rats. Our results indicated that the changes incurred in hair follicles by short-term use of high-dose oxidants in vivo are temporary and reversible. PMID:21418283

  17. Host endothelial S1PR1 regulation of vascular permeability modulates tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisyan, Gor; Gay, Laurie J.; Nguyen, Nhan; Felding, Brunhilde H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding vascular growth and maturation in developing tumors has important implications for tumor progression, spread, and ultimately host survival. Modulating the signaling of endothelial G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in blood and lymphatic vessels can enhance or limit tumor progression. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is a GPCR for circulating lysophospholipid S1P that is highly expressed in blood and lymphatic vessels. Using the S1PR1- enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mouse model in combination with intravital imaging and pharmacologic modulation of S1PR1 signaling, we show that boundary conditions of high and low S1PR1 signaling retard tumor progression by enhancing or destabilizing neovasculature integrity, respectively. In contrast, midrange S1PR1 signaling, achieved by receptor antagonist titration, promotes abundant growth of small, organized vessels and thereby enhances tumor progression. Furthermore, in vivo S1PR1 antagonism supports lung colonization by circulating tumor cells. Regulation of endothelial S1PR1 dynamically controls vascular integrity and maturation and thus modulates angiogenesis, tumor growth, and hematogenous metastasis. PMID:24740542

  18. Modeling tumor growth in a complex evolving confinement using a diffuse domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Lowengrub, John; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiangrong; Frieboes, Hermann; Cristini, Vittorio

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal evolution of tumor growth represents an essential step towards engineering effective treatment for cancer patients. At the macroscopic scale, various biophysical models describing tumors as continuum fluids have been constructed, particularly on a Cartesian grid, where efficient numerical schemes are available to analyze the model for general tumor behaviors in a relatively unconfined space. For practical problems, however, tumors are often found in a confined sub-domain, which can even be dilated and distorted by the growing tumor within. To study such tumors, we adopt a novel diffuse domain approach that enables us to adapt a model to an evolving sub-domain and formulate the modified problem on a Cartesian grid to utilize existing numerical schemes. To demonstrate this approach, we adapt a diffuse-interface model presented in Wise et al. [2008, Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear tumor growth - I Model and numerical method, J. Theor. Biol. 253, 524-543] to simulate lymphoma growth in a lymph node structure. Supported by NIH-PSOC grant 1U54CA143907-01.

  19. Akt1 and akt3 exert opposing roles in the regulation of vascular tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Phung, Thuy L; Du, Wa; Xue, Qi; Ayyaswamy, Sriram; Gerald, Damien; Antonello, Zeus; Nhek, Sokha; Perruzzi, Carole A; Acevedo, Isabel; Ramanna-Valmiki, Rajesh; Rodriguez-Waitkus, Paul; Enayati, Ladan; Hochman, Marcelo L; Lev, Dina; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Benjamin, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tumors are endothelial cell neoplasms whose mechanisms of tumorigenesis are poorly understood. Moreover, current therapies, particularly those for malignant lesions, have little beneficial effect on clinical outcomes. In this study, we show that endothelial activation of the Akt1 kinase is sufficient to drive de novo tumor formation. Mechanistic investigations uncovered opposing functions for different Akt isoforms in this regulation, where Akt1 promotes and Akt3 inhibits vascular tumor growth. Akt3 exerted negative effects on tumor endothelial cell growth and migration by inhibiting activation of the translation regulatory kinase S6-Kinase (S6K) through modulation of Rictor expression. S6K in turn acted through a negative feedback loop to restrain Akt3 expression. Conversely, S6K signaling was increased in vascular tumor cells where Akt3 was silenced, and the growth of these tumor cells was inhibited by a novel S6K inhibitor. Overall, our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the therapeutic utility of treating vascular tumors, such as angiosarcomas, with S6K inhibitors. PMID:25388284

  20. Novel xenograft model expressing human hepatocyte growth factor shows ligand-dependent growth of c-Met-expressing tumors.

    PubMed

    Francone, Todd D; Landmann, Ron G; Chen, Chin-Tung; Sun, Mark Y; Kuntz, Eleanor J; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Dematteo, Ronald P; Paty, Philip B; Weiser, Martin R

    2007-04-01

    c-Met, a receptor tyrosine kinase responsible for cellular migration, invasion, and proliferation, is overexpressed in human cancers. Although ligand-independent c-Met activation has been described, the majority of tumors are ligand dependent and rely on binding of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) for receptor activation. Both receptor and ligand are attractive therapeutic targets; however, preclinical models are limited because murine HGF does not activate human c-Met. The goal of this study was to develop a xenograft model in which human HGF (hHGF) is produced in a controllable fashion in the mouse. Severe combined immunodeficient mice were treated with adenovirus encoding the hHGF transgene (Ad-hHGF) via tail vein injection, and transgene expression was determined by the presence of hHGF mRNA in mouse tissue and hHGF in serum. Ad-hHGF administration to severe combined immunodeficient mice resulted in hHGF production that was (a) dependent on quantity of virus delivered; (b) biologically active, resulting in liver hypertrophy; and (c) sustainable over 40 days. In this model, the ligand-dependent human tumor cell line SW1417 showed enhanced tumor growth, whereas the ligand-independent cell lines SW480 and GTL-16 showed no augmented tumor growth. This novel xenograft model is ideal for investigating c-Met/HGF-dependent human tumor progression and for evaluating c-Met targeted therapy. PMID:17431125

  1. Inverse hormesis of cancer growth mediated by narrow ranges of tumor-directed antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Oliver M. T.; Lubli, Heinz; Verhagen, Andrea; Secrest, Patrick; Zhang, Jiquan; Varki, Nissi M.; Crocker, Paul R.; Bui, Jack D.; Varki, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Compelling evidence for naturally occurring immunosurveillance against malignancies informs and justifies some current approaches toward cancer immunotherapy. However, some types of immune reactions have also been shown to facilitate tumor progression. For example, our previous studies showed that although experimental tumor growth is enhanced by low levels of circulating antibodies directed against the nonhuman sialic acid N-glycolyl-neuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), which accumulates in human tumors, growth could be inhibited by anti-Neu5Gc antibodies from a different source, in a different model. However, it remains generally unclear whether the immune responses that mediate cancer immunosurveillance vs. those responsible for inflammatory facilitation are qualitatively and/or quantitatively distinct. Here, we address this question using multiple murine tumor growth models in which polyclonal antibodies against tumor antigens, such as Neu5Gc, can alter tumor progression. We found that although growth was stimulated at low antibody doses, it was inhibited by high doses, over a linear and remarkably narrow range, defining an immune response curve (IRC; i.e., inverse hormesis). Moreover, modulation of immune responses against the tumor by altering antibody avidity or by enhancing innate immunity shifted the IRC in the appropriate direction. Thus, the dualistic role of immunosurveillance vs. inflammation in modulating tumor progression can be quantitatively distinguished in multiple model systems, and can occur over a remarkably narrow range. Similar findings were made in a human tumor xenograft model using a narrow range of doses of a monoclonal antibody currently in clinical use. These findings may have implications for the etiology, prevention, and treatment of cancer. PMID:24711415

  2. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone suppress in vivo tumor growth and gene expression in triple negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Perez, Roberto; Schally, Andrew V; Vidaurre, Irving; Rincon, Ricardo; Block, Norman L; Rick, Ferenc G

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a modern antagonistic analog of GHRH on tumor growth and on expression of inflammatory cytokine genes in two models of human triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). The TNBC subtype is refractory to the treatment options available for other hormone-independent breast cancers. Inflammatory cytokines play a major role in the cellular signaling associated with breast cancer pathogenesis and enhance epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT), drug resistance, and metastatic potential. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide which regulates the synthesis and release of growth hormone by the pituitary and is an autocrine/paracrine growth factor for multiple human cancers. The effects of analogs of GHRH on tumoral cytokine expression have not been previously investigated. Animals bearing xenografts of the human TNBC cell lines, HCC1806 and MX-1, were treated with MIA-602, an antagonistic analog of GHRH. Treatment with MIA-602 significantly reduced tumor growth. We quantified transcript levels of the genes for several inflammatory cytokines. Expression of INF?, IL-1?, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF?, was significantly reduced by treatment with MIA-602. We conclude that treatment of TNBC with GHRH antagonists reduces tumor growth through an action mediated by tumoral GHRH receptors and produces a suppression of inflammatory cytokine signaling. Silencing of GHRH receptors in vitro with siRNA inhibited the expression of GHRH-R genes and inflammatory cytokine genes in HCC1806 and MX-1 cells. Further studies on GHRH antagonists may facilitate the development of new strategies for the treatment of resistant cancers. PMID:22941871

  3. Towards a Computer Aided Prognosis for Brain Glioblastomas Tumor Growth Estimation.

    PubMed

    Sallemi, Lamia; Njeh, Ines; Lehericy, Stephane

    2015-10-01

    Bridging the gap between mathematical and biological models and clinical applications could be considered as one of the new challenges of medical image analysis over the ten last years. This paper presents an advanced and convivial algorithm for brain glioblastomas tumor growth modelization. The brain glioblastomas tumor region would be extracted using a fast distribution matching developed algorithm based on global pixel wise information. A new model to simulate the tumor growth based on two major elements: cellular automata and fast marching method (CFMM) has been developed and used to estimate the brain tumor evolution during the time. On the basis of this model, experiments were carried out on twenty pathological MRI selected cases that were carefully discussed with the clinical part. The obtained simulated results were validated with ground truth references (real tumor growth measure) using dice metric parameter. As carefully discussed with the clinical partner, experimental results showed that our proposed algorithm for brain glioblastomas tumor growth model proved a good agreement. Our main purpose behind this research was of course to make advances and progress during clinical explorations helping therefore radiologists in their diagnosis. Clinical decisions and guidelines would be hence so more focused with such an advanced tool that could help clinicians and ensuring more accuracy and objectivity. PMID:26441424

  4. Morphology and growth characteristics of epithelial cells from classic Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen-Martin, D. J.; Garvin, A. J.; Gansler, T.; Tarnowski, B. I.; Sens, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The ability to establish cell cultures representing the epithelial component of Wilms' tumor was determined for 18 cases of classic Wilms' tumors. From these 18 cases only two resulted in the culture of epithelial cells. Although the tumors from both cases were composed of a prominent epithelial component, other classic tumors not producing epithelial cell cultures also possessed appreciable epithelial components. Likewise, heterotransplants of these two primary tumors failed to give rise to epithelial cell cultures, although cultures of the blastemal element were produced. This suggests that Wilms' tumors may be prone to differentiate in different directions at varying times during tumor growth, possibly dependent on local tumor environment. Epithelial cells from these two classic cases were grown in culture in basal medium composed of a 1:1 mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and Ham's F-12 medium, supplemented with selenium, insulin, transferrin, hydrocortisone, tri-iodothyronine, and epidermal growth factor, on a collagen type I matrix with absorbed fetal calf serum proteins. One of the two cases also required the addition of bovine pituitary extract, ethanolamine, prostaglandin E1, and putrescine for optimum growth. Morphological analysis disclosed that the cultured cells were very similar to normal renal tubular cells in culture, except that the cells displayed little evidence for differentiated active ion transport and tended to grow in a multilayered arrangement. The culture of the epithelial cells from classic Wilms' tumors provides a model system for the study of tumor differentiation and progression. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:8384407

  5. Measuring Growth and Gene Expression Dynamics of Tumor-Targeted S. Typhimurium Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hasty, Jeff; Bhatia, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    The goal of these experiments is to generate quantitative time-course data on the growth and gene expression dynamics of attenuated S. typhimurium bacterial colonies growing inside tumors. We generated model xenograft tumors in mice by subcutaneous injection of a human ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-8 (NCI DCTD Tumor Repository, Frederick, MD). We transformed attenuated strains of S. typhimurium bacteria (ELH430:SL1344 phoPQ- 1) with a constitutively expressed luciferase (luxCDABE) plasmid for visualization2. These strains specifically colonize tumors while remaining essentially non-virulent to the mouse1. Once measurable tumors were established, bacteria were injected intravenously via the tail vein with varying dosage. Tumor-localized, bacterial gene expression was monitored in real time over the course of 60 hours using an in vivo imaging system (IVIS). At each time point, tumors were excised, homogenized, and plated to quantitate bacterial colonies for correlation with gene expression data. Together, this data yields a quantitative measure of the in vivo growth and gene expression dynamics of bacteria growing inside tumors. PMID:23851642

  6. Depletion of Tumor-Associated Macrophages Slows the Growth of Chemically Induced Mouse Lung Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jason M.; Tennis, Meredith A.; Orlicky, David J.; Yin, Hao; Ju, Cynthia; Redente, Elizabeth F.; Choo, Kevin S.; Staab, Taylor A.; Bouchard, Ronald J.; Merrick, Daniel T.; Malkinson, Alvin M.; Dwyer-Nield, Lori D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for lung cancer, and low-dose aspirin intake reduces lung cancer risk. However, the roles that specific inflammatory cells and their products play in lung carcinogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated. In mice, alveolar macrophage numbers increase as lung tumors progress, and pulmonary macrophage programing changes within 2?weeks of carcinogen exposure. To examine how macrophages specifically affect lung tumor progression, they were depleted in mice bearing urethane-induced lung tumors using clodronate-encapsulated liposomes. Alveolar macrophage populations decreased to ?50% of control levels after 46?weeks of liposomal clodronate treatment. Tumor burden decreased by 50% compared to vehicle treated mice, and tumor cell proliferation, as measured by Ki67 staining, was also attenuated. Pulmonary fluid levels of insulin-like growth factor-I, CXCL1, IL-6, and CCL2 diminished with clodronate liposome treatment. Tumor-associated macrophages expressed markers of both M1 and M2 programing in vehicle and clodronate liposome-treated mice. Mice lacking CCR2 (the receptor for macrophage chemotactic factor CCL2) had comparable numbers of alveolar macrophages and showed no difference in tumor growth rates when compared to similarly treated wild-type mice suggesting that while CCL2 may recruit macrophages to lung tumor microenvironments, redundant pathways can compensate when CCL2/CCR2 signaling is inactivated. Depletion of pulmonary macrophages rather than inhibition of their recruitment may be an advantageous strategy for attenuating lung cancer progression. PMID:25505466

  7. In vivo Cytokine Gene Transfer by Gene Gun Reduces Tumor Growth in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenn H.; Burkholder, Joseph K.; Sun, Jian; Culp, Jerilyn; Turner, Joel; Lu, Xing G.; Pugh, Thomas D.; Ershler, William B.; Yang, Ning-Sun

    1995-03-01

    Implantation of tumor cells modified by in vitro cytokine gene transfer has been shown by many investigators to result in potent in vivo antitumor activities in mice. Here we describe an approach to tumor immunotherapy utilizing direct transfection of cytokine genes into tumorbearing animals by particle-mediated gene transfer. In vivo transfection of the human interleukin 6 gene into the tumor site reduced methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma growth, and a combination of murine tumor necrosis factor α and interferon γ genes inhibited growth of a renal carcinoma tumor model (Renca). In addition, treatment with murine interleukin 2 and interferon γ genes prolonged the survival of Renca tumor-bearing mice and resulted in tumor eradication in 25% of the test animals. Transgene expression was demonstrated in treated tissues by ELISA and immunohistochemical analysis. Significant serum levels of interleukin 6 and interferon γ were detected, demonstrating effective secretion of transgenic proteins from treated skin into the bloodstream. This in vivo cytokine gene therapy approach provides a system for evaluating the antitumor properties of various cytokines in different tumor models and has potential utility for human cancer gene therapy.

  8. Sudden cold temperature delays plant carbon transport and shifts allocation from growth to respiratory demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, M.; Cieraad, E.; Zakharova, A.; Hunt, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    Since substrates for respiration are supplied mainly by recent photo-assimilates, there is a strong but time-lagged link between short-term above- and belowground carbon (C) cycling. However, regulation of this coupling by environmental variables is poorly understood. Whereas recent studies focussed on the effect of drought and shading on the link between above- and belowground short-term C cycling, the effect of temperature remains unclear. We used a 13CO2 pulse-chase labelling experiment to investigate the effect of a sudden temperature change from 25 to 10 °C on the short-term coupling between assimilatory C uptake and respiratory loss. The study was done in the laboratory using two-month-old perennial rye-grass plants (Lolium perenne L.). After label application, the δ13C signal of respired shoot and root samples was analysed at regular time intervals using laser spectroscopy. In addition, δ13C was analysed in bulk root and shoot samples. Cold temperature (10 °C) reduced the short-term coupling between shoot and roots by delaying belowground transfer of recent assimilates and its subsequent respiratory use, as indicated by the δ13C signal of root respiration (δ13CRR). That is, the time lag from the actual shoot labelling to the first appearance of the label in 13CRR was about 1.5 times longer under cold temperature. Moreover, analysis of bulk shoot and root material revealed that plants at cold temperature invest relatively more carbon into respiration compared to growth or storage. While the whole plant C turnover increased under cold temperature, the turnover time of the labile C pool decreased, probably because less 13C is used for growth and/or storage. That is, (almost) all recent C remained in the labile pool serving respiration under these conditions. Overall, our results highlight the importance of temperature as a driver of C transport and relative C allocation within the plant-soil system.

  9. Decreased tumor growth in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats chronically supplemented with fish oil involves COX-2 and PGE2 reduction associated with apoptosis and increased peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Mund, Rogria C; Pizato, Nathalia; Bonatto, Sandro; Nunes, Everson A; Vicenzi, Thiago; Tanhoffer, Ricardo; de Oliveira, Heloisa H P; Curi, Rui; Calder, Philip C; Fernandes, Luiz C

    2007-02-01

    Many studies have shown that addition of fish oil (FO) to the diet reduces tumor growth but the mechanism(s) of action involved is (are) still unknown. In this study, we examine some possible mechanisms in tumor-bearing rats chronically supplemented with FO. Male Wistar rats (21 days old) were fed with regular chow and supplemented with coconut or FO (1g/kg body weight) until they reached 70 days of age. Then, they were inoculated with a suspension of Walker 256 ascitic tumor cells (2 x 10(7)ml) and after 14 days they were killed. Supplementation with FO resulted in significantly lower tumor weight, greater tumor cell apoptosis, lower ex vivo tumor cell proliferation, a higher tumor content of lipid peroxides, lower expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in tumor tissue and a lower plasma concentration of prostaglandin E2 than observed in rats fed regular chow or supplemented with coconut oil. These results suggest that reduction of tumor growth by FO involves an increase in apoptosis and of lipid peroxidation in tumor tissue, with a reduction in tumor cell proliferation ex vivo, COX-2 expression and PGE2 production. Thus, FO may act simultaneously through multiple effects to reduce tumor growth. Whether these effects are connected through a single underlying mechanism remains to be seen. PMID:17234396

  10. Tumor Growth Suppression and Enhanced Radioresponse by an Exogenous Epidermal Growth Factor in Mouse Xenograft Models with A431 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yu Jin; Jeon, Sang-Rok; Koh, Jae Moon; Wu, Hong-Gyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether an exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) could induce anti-tumor and radiosensitizing effects in vivo. Materials and Methods BALB/c-nu mice that were inoculated with A431 (human squamous cell carcinoma) cells in the right hind legs were divided into five groups: I (no treatment), II (EGF for 6 days), III (EGF for 20 days), IV (radiotherapy [RT]), and V (RT plus concomitant EGF). EGF was administered intraperitoneally (5 mg/kg) once a day and the RT dose was 30 Gy in six fractions. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections of tumor, liver, lung, and kidney tissues were investigated. Additionally, tumors were subjected to immunohistochemistry staining with caspase-3. Results EGF for 6 days decreased tumor volume, but it approached the level of the control group at the end of follow-up (p=0.550). The duration of tumor shrinkage was prolonged in group V while the slope of tumor re-growth phase was steeper in group IV (p=0.034). EGF for 20 days decreased tumor volume until the end of the observation period (p < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry revealed that mice in group V showed stronger intensity than those in group IV. There were no abnormal histological findings upon H&E staining of the normal organs. Conclusion EGF-induced anti-tumor effect was ascertained in the xenograft mouse models with A431 cells. Concomitant use of EGF has the potential role as a radiosensitizer in the design of fractionated irradiation. PMID:25600061

  11. Drugs Which Inhibit Osteoclast Function Suppress Tumor Growth through Calcium Reduction in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Liao, Jinhui; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J; Sadler, William D; Pienta, Kenneth J; Rosol, Thomas J; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma frequently metastasizes to bone where the microenvironment facilitates its growth. Inhibition of bone resorption is effective in reducing tumor burden and bone destruction in prostate cancer. However, whether drugs that inhibit osteoclast function inhibit tumor growth independent of inhibition of bone resorption is unclear. Calcium is released during bone resorption and the calcium sensing receptor is an important regulator of cancer cell proliferation. The goal of this investigation was to elucidate the role of calcium released during bone resorption and to determine the impact of drugs which suppress bone resorption on tumor growth in bone. To compare tumor growth in a skeletal versus non-skeletal site, equal numbers of canine prostate cancer cells expressing luciferase (ACE-1luc) prostate cancer cells were inoculated into a simple collagen matrix, neonatal mouse vertebrae (vossicles), human de-proteinized bone, or a mineralized collagen matrix. Implants were placed subcutaneously into athymic mice. Luciferase activity was used to track tumor growth weekly and at one month tumors were dissected for histologic analysis. Luciferase activity and tumor size were greater in vossicles, de-proteinized bone and mineralized collagen matrix versus non-mineralized collagen implants. The human osteoblastic prostate carcinoma cell line C4-2b also grew better in a mineral rich environment with a greater proliferation of C4-2b cells reflected by Ki-67 staining. Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate, and recombinant OPG-Fc, a RANKL inhibitor, were administered to mice bearing vertebral implants (vossicles) containing ACE-1 osteoblastic prostate cancer cells. Vossicles or collagen matrices were seeded with ACE-1luc cells subcutaneously in athymic mice (2 vossicles, 2 collagen implants/mouse). Mice received ZA (5?g/mouse, twice/week), (OPG-Fc at 10mg/kg, 3 times/week) or vehicle, and luciferase activity was measured weekly. Histologic analysis of the tumors, vossicles and endogenous bones and serum biochemistry were performed. Antiresorptive administration was associated with decreased serum TRAP5b and reduced osteoclast numbers, increased tibia and vossicle bone areas. ZA significantly decreased bone marrow calcium concentrations without affecting serum calcium. ZA and OPG-Fc significantly inhibited tumor growth in bone but not in collagen implants. In conclusion, the inhibitory effects of ZA or OPG-Fc on prostate tumor growth in bone are mediated via blocking bone resorption and calcium release from bone. PMID:21419883

  12. Congenital hypoparathyroidism, seizure, extreme growth failure with developmental delay and dysmorphic features--another case of this new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalam, M A; Hafeez, W

    1992-09-01

    A 4-year-old Saudi female child with extreme failure to thrive, striking dysmorphic features, developmental delay, congenital hypoparathyroidism, UTI, seizures, chronic otitis media, chronic non-specific gastroenteritis and repeated life-threatening infections was followed from birth. She was the product of first-cousin consanguineous marriage. She had striking facies with frontal prominence, deep-set eyes, depressed nasal bridge, beaked nose, long philtrum with thin upper lip, micrognathia, large floppy ears, bifid uvula, and growth retardation with SD score less than -2 for height, weight and head circumference. We believe these features which include congenital hypoparathyroidism, severe growth failure and developmental delay in the absence of chromosomal abnormality represent a newly described genetically determined syndrome. PMID:1395080

  13. The Importance of Neighborhood Scheme Selection in Agent-based Tumor Growth Modeling.

    PubMed

    Tzedakis, Georgios; Tzamali, Eleftheria; Marias, Kostas; Sakkalis, Vangelis

    2015-01-01

    Modeling tumor growth has proven a very challenging problem, mainly due to the fact that tumors are highly complex systems that involve dynamic interactions spanning multiple scales both in time and space. The desire to describe interactions in various scales has given rise to modeling approaches that use both continuous and discrete variables, known as hybrid approaches. This work refers to a hybrid model on a 2D square lattice focusing on cell movement dynamics as they play an important role in tumor morphology, invasion and metastasis and are considered as indicators for the stage of malignancy used for early prognosis and effective treatment. Considering various distributions of the microenvironment, we explore how Neumann vs. Moore neighborhood schemes affects tumor growth and morphology. The results indicate that the importance of neighborhood selection is critical under specific conditions that include i) increased hapto/chemo-tactic coefficient, ii) a rugged microenvironment and iii) ECM degradation. PMID:26396490

  14. Noncanonical K27-Linked Polyubiquitination of TIEG1 Regulates Foxp3 Expression and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Dong-Jun; Zeng, Minghui; Muromoto, Ryuta; Matsuda, Tadashi; Shimoda, Kazuya; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Wei, Wei-Zen; Venuprasad, K.

    2013-01-01

    Earlier, we demonstrated the essential role of Kruppel-like transcription factor, TIEG1, in TGF-?induced regulatory T cell (Treg) development. In this article, we demonstrate that IL-6, which promotes Th17 development, abrogated TIEG1 nuclear translocation and inhibited TGF-?induced Treg development. Tyrosine kinase Tyk2-mediated phosphorylation of TIEG1 at Tyr179 promoted noncanonical K-27linked polyubiquitination, which inhibited TIEG1 nuclear translocation. To test the role of TIEG1-regulated Treg/Th17 development in antitumor immunity, we analyzed TRAMP-C2 tumor growth in TIEG1/ mice. The defective Treg development and elevated Th17 response resulted in enhanced immune reactivity in the tumor and inhibition of TRAMP-C2 tumor growth in TIEG1/ mice. Thus, our results uncovered a novel regulatory mechanism that modulates Tregs and may regulate tumor progression. PMID:21471442

  15. The Importance of Neighborhood Scheme Selection in Agent-based Tumor Growth Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Tzedakis, Georgios; Tzamali, Eleftheria; Marias, Kostas; Sakkalis, Vangelis

    2015-01-01

    Modeling tumor growth has proven a very challenging problem, mainly due to the fact that tumors are highly complex systems that involve dynamic interactions spanning multiple scales both in time and space. The desire to describe interactions in various scales has given rise to modeling approaches that use both continuous and discrete variables, known as hybrid approaches. This work refers to a hybrid model on a 2D square lattice focusing on cell movement dynamics as they play an important role in tumor morphology, invasion and metastasis and are considered as indicators for the stage of malignancy used for early prognosis and effective treatment. Considering various distributions of the microenvironment, we explore how Neumann vs. Moore neighborhood schemes affects tumor growth and morphology. The results indicate that the importance of neighborhood selection is critical under specific conditions that include i) increased hapto/chemo-tactic coefficient, ii) a rugged microenvironment and iii) ECM degradation. PMID:26396490

  16. Both stromal cell and colonocyte epidermal growth factor receptors control HCT116 colon cancer cell growth in tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Colon cancer growth requires growth-promoting interactions between malignant colonocytes and stromal cells. Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) are expressed on colonocytes and many stromal cells. Furthermore, EGFR is required for efficient tumorigenesis in experimental colon cancer models. To dissect the cell-specific role of EGFR, we manipulated receptor function on stromal cells and cancer cells. To assess the role of stromal EGFR, HCT116 human colon cancer cells were implanted into immunodeficient mice expressing dominant negative (DN) EgfrVelvet/+ or Egfr+/+. To assess the role of cancer cell EGFR, HCT116 transfectants expressing inducible DN-Egfr were implanted into immunodeficient mice. To dissect EGFR signals in vitro, we examined colon cancer cells in monoculture or in cocultures with fibroblasts for EGFR transactivation and prostaglandin synthase 2 (PTGS2) induction. EGFR signals were determined by blotting, immunostaining and real-time PCR. Tumor xenografts in EgfrVelvet/+ mice were significantly smaller than tumors in Egfr+/+ mice, with decreased proliferation (Ki67) and increased apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) in cancer cells and decreased stromal blood vessels. Mouse stromal transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA), amphiregulin (AREG), PTGS2 and Il1b and interleukin-1 receptor 1 (Il1r1) transcripts and cancer cell beta catenin (CTNNB1) and cyclin D1 (CCND1) were significantly lower in tumors obtained from EgfrVelvet/+ mice. DN-EGFR HCT116 transfectants also formed significantly smaller tumors with reduced mouse Areg, Ptgs2, Il1b and Il1r1 transcripts. Coculture increased Caco-2 phospho-active ERBB (pERBB2), whereas DN-EGFR in Caco-2 cells suppressed fibroblast PTGS2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In monoculture, interleukin 1 beta (IL1B) transactivated EGFR in HCT116 cells. Stromal cell and colonocyte EGFRs are required for robust EGFR signals and efficient tumor growth, which involve EGFRinterleukin-1 crosstalk. PMID:22791816

  17. Oral administration of Polypodium leucotomos delays skin tumor development and increases epidermal p53 expression and the anti-oxidant status of UV-irradiated hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Yanes, Esperanza; Cuevas, Jesús; González, Salvador; Mallol, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces skin tumors in hairless mice. Daily oral administration of a Polypodium leucotomos (PL) extract significantly delayed tumor development in PL-treated versus non-PL-treated mice. UVR and/or PL treatment modified several oxidative stress markers. In all irradiated mice, erythrocytic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and glutathione disulphide (GSSG) content increased and in all PL-treated mice GSSG content decreased, specially in non-irradiated animals, and total plasma anti-oxidant capacity (ORAC) increased. In dorsolateral non-tumoral skin of all irradiated mice, glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities increased and GSSG decreased in non-irradiated PL-treated animals. UVR induced a steep increase of p53 expression in epidermal cells. In non-tumoral skin, this increase was significantly higher in PL-treated animals than in non-treated mice and can contribute in delaying tumor development, either by repairing the damaged DNA or by increasing apoptosis. These results reinforce the usefulness of PL as systemic photoprotective agent, especially in patients highly sensitive to UVR. PMID:24862559

  18. Porous biodegradable EW62 medical implants resist tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, O; Ventura, Y; Goldman, J; Vago, R; Aghion, E

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium alloys have been widely investigated for biodegradable medical applications. However, the shielding of harmful cells (eg. bacteria or tumorous cells) from immune surveillance may be compounded by the increased porosity of biodegradable materials. We previously demonstrated the improved corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of a novel EW62 (Mg-6%Nd-2%Y-0.5%Zr)) magnesium alloy by rapid solidification followed by extrusion (RS) compared to its conventional counterpart (CC). The present in vitro study evaluated the influence of rapid solidification on cytotoxicity to murine osteosarcoma cells. We found that CC and RS corrosion extracts significantly reduced cell viability over a 24-h exposure period. Cell density was reduced over 48h following direct contact on both CC and RS surfaces, but was further reduced on the CC surface. The direct presence of cells accelerated corrosion for both materials. The corroded RS material exhibited superior mechanical properties relative to the CC material. The data show that the improved corrosion resistance of the rapidly solidified EW62 alloy (RS) resulted in a relatively reduced cytotoxic effect on tumorous cells. Hence, the tested alloy in the form of a rapidly solidified substance may introduce a good balance between its biodegradation characteristics and cytotoxic effect towards cancerous and normal cells. PMID:26838879

  19. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors VEGF-B and VEGF-C Are Expressed in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Salven, Petri; Lymboussaki, Athina; Heikkilä, Päivi; Jääskela-Saari, Hilkka; Enholm, Bernd; Aase, Karin; von Euler, Gabriel; Eriksson, Ulf; Alitalo, Kari; Joensuu, Heikki

    1998-01-01

    The growth of solid tumors is dependent on angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a secreted endothelial-cell-specific mitogen. We have recently characterized two novel endothelial growth factors with structural homology to VEGF and named them VEGF-B and VEGF-C. To further define the roles of VEGF-B and VEGF-C, we have studied their expression in a variety of human tumors, both malignant and benign. VEGF-B mRNA was detected in most of the tumor samples studied, and the mRNA and the protein product were localized to tumor cells. Endothelial cells of tumor vessels were also immunoreactive for VEGF-B, probably representing the binding sites of the VEGF-B polypeptide secreted by adjacent tumor cells. VEGF-C mRNA was detected in approximately one-half of the cancers analyzed. Via in situ hybridization, VEGF-C mRNA was also localized to tumor cells. All lymphomas studied contained low levels of VEGF-C mRNA, possibly reflecting the cell-specific pattern of expression of the VEGF-C gene in the corresponding normal cells. The expression of VEGF-C is associated with the development of lymphatic vessels, and VEGF-C could be an important factor regulating the mutual paracrine relationships between tumor cells and lymphatic endothelial cells. Furthermore, VEGF-C and VEGF-B can, similarly to VEGF, be involved in tumor angiogenesis. PMID:9665470

  20. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jie; Cozzi, Paul; Hung, Tzong-Tyng; Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA) imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8). Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r(2) = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively) and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001). The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research. PMID:26947880

  1. Non-cell autonomous tumor-growth driving supports sub-clonal heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P.; Altrock, Philipp M.; Almendro, Vanessa; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancers arise through a process of somatic evolution that can result in substantial sub-clonal heterogeneity within tumors. The mechanisms responsible for the coexistence of distinct sub-clones and the biological consequences of this coexistence remain poorly understood. Here we used a mouse xenograft model to investigate the impact of sub-clonal heterogeneity on tumor phenotypes and the competitive expansion of individual clones. We found that tumor growth can be driven by a minor cell subpopulation, which enhances the proliferation of all cells within a tumor by overcoming environmental constraints and yet can be outcompeted by faster proliferating competitors, resulting in tumor collapse. We then developed a mathematical modeling framework to identify the rules underlying the generation of intratumor clonal heterogeneity. We found that non-cell autonomous driving, together with clonal interference, stabilizes sub-clonal heterogeneity, thereby enabling inter-clonal interactions that can lead to new phenotypic traits. PMID:25079331

  2. Effects of nanosized lithium carbonate particles on intact muscle tissue and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Bgatova, N P; Borodin, Yu I; Makarova, V V; Pozhidaeva, A A; Rachkovskaya, L N; Konenkov, V I

    2014-05-01

    The effects of nanosized lithium carbonate particles on muscle tissue structure and development of experimental hepatocarcinoma-29 transplanted into the hip were studied in CBA mice. Necrotic changes in all structural components of the muscle were detected after intramuscular injection of nanosized lithium carbonate particles to intact animals. Regeneration of the muscle fibers after lithium carbonate treatment was associated with a significant increase in macrophage count, number of microvessels, activation of fibroblasts, and complete recovery of the organ structure. Injection of lithium carbonate nanoparticles at the periphery of tumor growth caused tumor cell necrosis, destruction of the vascular bed, and attraction of neutrophils and macrophages to the tumor focus. After the preparation was discontinued, the tumor developed with lesser number of vessels, smaller tumor cells, and lesser deformation of the cell nuclei structure. PMID:24909724

  3. PPAR? ligands inhibit primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahy, Dipak; Singer, Samuel; Shen, Lucy Q.; Butterfield, Catherine E.; Freedman, Deborah A.; Chen, Emy J.; Moses, Marsha A.; Kilroy, Susan; Duensing, Stefan; Fletcher, Christopher; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Folkman, Judah; Kaipainen, Arja

    2002-01-01

    Several drugs approved for a variety of indications have been shown to exhibit antiangiogenic effects. Our study focuses on the PPAR? ligand rosiglitazone, a compound widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that PPAR? is highly expressed in tumor endothelium and is activated by rosiglitazone in cultured endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that rosiglitazone suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis by both direct and indirect antiangiogenic effects. Rosiglitazone inhibits bovine capillary endothelial cell but not tumor cell proliferation at low doses in vitro and decreases VEGF production by tumor cells. In our in vivo studies, rosiglitazone suppresses angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane, in the avascular cornea, and in a variety of primary tumors. These results suggest that PPAR? ligands may be useful in treating angiogenic diseases such as cancer by inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:12370270

  4. Catabolic cancer-associated fibroblasts transfer energy and biomass to anabolic cancer cells, fueling tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica

    2014-04-01

    Fibroblasts are the most abundant "non-cancerous" cells in tumors. However, it remains largely unknown how these cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promote tumor growth and metastasis, driving chemotherapy resistance and poor clinical outcome. This review summarizes new findings on CAF signaling pathways and their emerging metabolic phenotypes that promote tumor growth. Although it is well established that altered cancer metabolism enhances tumor growth, little is known about the role of fibroblast metabolism in tumor growth. New studies reveal that metabolic coupling occurs between catabolic fibroblasts and anabolic cancer cells, in many types of human tumors, including breast, prostate, and head & neck cancers, as well as lymphomas. These catabolic phenotypes observed in CAFs are secondary to a ROS-induced metabolic stress response. Mechanistically, this occurs via HIF1-alpha and NF?B signaling, driving oxidative stress, autophagy, glycolysis and senescence in stromal fibroblasts. These catabolic CAFs then create a nutrient-rich microenvironment, to metabolically support tumor growth, via the local stromal generation of mitochondrial fuels (lactate, ketone bodies, fatty acids, glutamine, and other amino acids). New biomarkers of this catabolic CAF phenotype (such as caveolin-1 (Cav-1) and MCT4), which are reversible upon treatment with anti-oxidants, are strong predictors of poor clinical outcome in various types of human cancers. How cancer cells metabolically reprogram fibroblasts can also help us to understand the effects of cancer cells at an organismal level, explaining para-neoplastic phenomena, such as cancer cachexia. In conclusion, cancer should be viewed more as a systemic disease, that engages the host-organism in various forms of energy-transfer and metabolic co-operation, across a whole-body "ecosystem". PMID:24486645

  5. A new computational tool for the phenomenological analysis of multipassage tumor growth curves.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, Antonio S; Guiot, Caterina; Delsanto, Pier Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Multipassage experiments are performed by subcutaneous implantation in lab animals (usually mice) of a small number of cells from selected human lines. Tumor cells are then passaged from one mouse to another by harvesting them from a growing tumor and implanting them into other healthy animals. This procedure may be extremely useful to investigate the various mechanisms involved in the long term evolution of tumoral growth. It has been observed by several researchers that, contrary to what happens in in vitro experiments, there is a significant growth acceleration at each new passage. This result is explained by a new method of analysis, based on the Phenomenological Universalities approach. It is found that, by means of a simple rescaling of time, it is possible to collapse all the growth curves, corresponding to the successive passages, into a single curve, belonging to the Universality Class U2. Possible applications are proposed and the need of further experimental evidence is discussed. PMID:19396358

  6. A New Computational Tool for the Phenomenological Analysis of Multipassage Tumor Growth Curves

    PubMed Central

    Gliozzi, Antonio S.; Guiot, Caterina; Delsanto, Pier Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Multipassage experiments are performed by subcutaneous implantation in lab animals (usually mice) of a small number of cells from selected human lines. Tumor cells are then passaged from one mouse to another by harvesting them from a growing tumor and implanting them into other healthy animals. This procedure may be extremely useful to investigate the various mechanisms involved in the long term evolution of tumoral growth. It has been observed by several researchers that, contrary to what happens in in vitro experiments, there is a significant growth acceleration at each new passage. This result is explained by a new method of analysis, based on the Phenomenological Universalities approach. It is found that, by means of a simple rescaling of time, it is possible to collapse all the growth curves, corresponding to the successive passages, into a single curve, belonging to the Universality Class U2. Possible applications are proposed and the need of further experimental evidence is discussed. PMID:19396358

  7. Fufang Kushen injection inhibits sarcoma growth and tumor-induced hyperalgesia via TRPV1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhizheng; Fan, Huiting; Higgins, Tim; Qi, Jia; Haines, Diana; Trivett, Anna; Oppenheim, Joost J; Wei, Hou; Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng; Howard, O M Zack

    2014-12-28

    Cancer pain is a deleterious consequence of tumor growth and related inflammation. Opioids and anti-inflammatory drugs provide first line treatment for cancer pain, but both are limited by side effects. Fufang Kushen injection (FKI) is GMP produced, traditional Chinese medicine used alone or with chemotherapy to reduce cancer-associated pain. FKI limited mouse sarcoma growth both in vivo and in vitro, in part, by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT kinases and BAD. FKI inhibited TRPV1 mediated capsaicin-induced ERK phosphorylation and reduced tumor-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus, FKI limited cancer pain both directly by blocking TRPV1 signaling and indirectly by reducing tumor growth. PMID:25242356

  8. Caveolin-1 is a negative regulator of tumor growth in glioblastoma and modulates chemosensitivity to temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Quann, Kevin; Gonzales, Donna M.; Mercier, Isabelle; Wang, Chenguang; Sotgia, Federica; Pestell, Richard G.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Jasmin, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a critical regulator of tumor progression in a variety of cancers where it has been shown to act as either a tumor suppressor or tumor promoter. In glioblastoma multiforme, it has been previously demonstrated to function as a putative tumor suppressor. Our studies here, using the human glioblastoma-derived cell line U-87MG, further support the role of Cav-1 as a negative regulator of tumor growth. Using a lentiviral transduction approach, we were able to stably overexpress Cav-1 in U-87MG cells. Gene expression microarray analyses demonstrated significant enrichment in gene signatures corresponding to downregulation of MAPK, PI3K/AKT and mTOR signaling, as well as activation of apoptotic pathways in Cav-1-overexpressing U-87MG cells. These same gene signatures were later confirmed at the protein level in vitro. To explore the ability of Cav-1 to regulate tumor growth in vivo, we further show that Cav-1-overexpressing U-87MG cells display reduced tumorigenicity in an ectopic xenograft mouse model, with marked hypoactivation of MAPK and PI3K/mTOR pathways. Finally, we demonstrate that Cav-1 overexpression confers sensitivity to the most commonly used chemotherapy for glioblastoma, temozolomide. In conclusion, Cav-1 negatively regulates key cell growth and survival pathways and may be an effective biomarker for predicting response to chemotherapy in glioblastoma. PMID:23598719

  9. Nav1.5 regulates breast tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michaela; Yang, Ming; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Brackenbury, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) mediate action potential firing and regulate adhesion and migration in excitable cells. VGSCs are also expressed in cancer cells. In metastatic breast cancer (BCa) cells, the Nav1.5 α subunit potentiates migration and invasion. In addition, the VGSC-inhibiting antiepileptic drug phenytoin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional activity of Nav1.5 and its specific contribution to tumor progression in vivo has not been delineated. Here, we found that Nav1.5 is up-regulated at the protein level in BCa compared with matched normal breast tissue. Na+ current, reversibly blocked by tetrodotoxin, was retained in cancer cells in tumor tissue slices, thus directly confirming functional VGSC activity in vivo. Stable down-regulation of Nav1.5 expression significantly reduced tumor growth, local invasion into surrounding tissue, and metastasis to liver, lungs and spleen in an orthotopic BCa model. Nav1.5 down-regulation had no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis within the in tumors, but increased apoptosis. In vitro, Nav1.5 down-regulation altered cell morphology and reduced CD44 expression, suggesting that VGSC activity may regulate cellular invasion via the CD44-src-cortactin signaling axis. We conclude that Nav1.5 is functionally active in cancer cells in breast tumors, enhancing growth and metastatic dissemination. These findings support the notion that compounds targeting Nav1.5 may be useful for reducing metastasis. PMID:26452220

  10. [Production of nitric oxide metabolites during transplanted tumors growth with different metastatic potential].

    PubMed

    Deriagina, V P; Ryzhova, N I; Krivosheeva, L V; Golubeva, I S

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous formation of metabolites of NO - nitrite (NI), nitrates (NA) and volatile nitrosamines in the body, tumor tissue and by abdominal cavity by macrophages for dynamics was investigated in mice F1(C57BlxCBA), Balb/c and BDF with subcutaneous transplanted tumors (Erlich carcinoma - EC and metastatic Lewis lung carcinoma - LLC). It was shown that growth of EC was accompanied by a statistically significant increase in the concentrations of NI and NA in tumor tissue to (7.34.67)'10-6 - (7.82.57)'10-5 (mol/kg) for the first three weeks and a sharp increase in urinary excretion of NI and NA. The maximum total concentration of NI and NA - (3.,60.46)'10-5 in tissue LLC was registered during the early stage of the tumor growth (7 days); it later declined, negatively correlating with the mass of the tumor. NI secretion by abdominal cavity macrophages demonstrated statistically significantly decrease at the stage of intensive growth LLC (14, 21 days). The tissue of EC contained varied concentration of cancerogenic N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrosodiethylamine at all investigated time points. Thus, the ability of different gistogenesis tumor tissue to synthesize metabolites NO depended on time parameters and was more pronounced for EC, than LLC. PMID:25552506

  11. Pre-existing Fas ligand (FasL) in cancer cells elicits tumor-specific protective immunity, but delayed induction of FasL expression after inoculation facilitates tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsiao-Ying; Sun, Guang-Huan; Chen, Shiow-Yi; Wang, Hsiao-Hsien; Ho, Ming-Yi; Chu, Chia-Yi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Jhou, Ren-Shiang; Tsai, Yi-Lin; Huang, Rui-Ting; Sun, Kuang-Hui; Tang, Shye-Jye

    2013-09-01

    Overexpression of Fas ligand (FasL) in cancer cells elicits potential antitumor effects via recruitment of neutrophils. Conversely, FasL-expressing tumors may counterattack tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes by delivering apoptotic death signals via Fas/FasL interactions, which may lead to tumor escape. In order to distinguish the role of FasL in antitumor activity and tumor progression, Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLC-1) were used to establish the cell line LLC-FasL, in which FasL expression was repressed by doxycycline (Dox) treatment and induced in the absence of Dox. LLC-FasL cells promote tumor regression when expressing FasL, whereas tumor outgrowth is observed by depletion of FasL expression. To investigate whether initial expression of FasL during tumor formation is critical for FasL-mediated tumor regression, Dox-treated LLC-FasL cells were inoculated into Dox-treated mice, but Dox treatment was stopped 5 days after inoculation. When low cell numbers were inoculated, we observed 80% survival and no tumor formation, whereas no mice survived inoculation with high cell numbers, despite the delayed induction of FasL by Dox withdrawal. The inoculation of a high density of cells may establish a favorable tumor microenvironment before the expression of FasL. Our findings demonstrate that FasL may elicit antitumor activity when it is initially present on injected cancer cells and thus can act prior to tumor microenvironment formation. Furthermore, a well-established tumor microenvironment abrogates FasL-mediated antitumor activity. PMID:22488710

  12. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J. M.; Custidiano, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  13. Production of vascular endothelial growth factor by human tumors inhibits the functional maturation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, D I; Chen, H L; Girgis, K R; Cunningham, H T; Meny, G M; Nadaf, S; Kavanaugh, D; Carbone, D P

    1996-10-01

    Inadequate presentation of tumor antigens by host professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs), is one potential mechanism for the escape of tumors from the host immune system. Here, we show that human cancer cell lines release a soluble factor or factors that dramatically affect DC maturation from precursors without affecting the function of relatively mature DCs. One factor responsible for these effects was identified as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Thus, VEGF may play a broader role in the pathogenesis of cancer than was previously thought, and therapeutic blockade of VEGF action may improve prospects for immunotherapy as well as inhibit tumor neovasculature. PMID:8837607

  14. Transplantation of human renal cell carcinoma into NMRI nu/nu mice. III. Effect of irradiation on tumor acceptance and tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, U.; Huland, H.; Baisch, H.; Kloeppel, G.

    1985-07-01

    Irradiation of human renal cell carcinoma before radical tumor nephrectomy resulted in a significantly lower acceptance rate (1 of 7) in nude mice than for nonirradiated tumors (all of 13). The tumor tissue was transplanted into NMRI nu/nu mice immediately after nephrectomy. In this experimental system the authors demonstrated the reduced vitality of human tumor cells after irradiation. In a second series of experiments, 3 morphologically different human renal cell carcinomas were irradiated at various doses after establishment in nude mice. The irradiated tumor tissue was transplanted to the next passage. The morphology, proliferation rate and growth of these tumors were compared with those of nonirradiated controls. Radiation effect was dose dependent in the responding tumor types. The characteristics correlated with radiosensitivity were high proliferation rate (measured by flow cytometry), low cytologic grading and fast growth rate in the nude mice.

  15. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of tumor growth kinetics in medullary thyroid cancer patients receiving cabozantinib.

    PubMed

    Miles, Dale R; Wada, David R; Jumbe, Nelson L; Lacy, Steven A; Nguyen, Linh T

    2016-04-01

    Nonlinear mixed effects models were developed to describe the relationship between cabozantinib exposure and target lesion tumor size in a phase III study of patients with progressive metastatic medullary thyroid cancer. These models used cabozantinib exposure estimates from a previously published population pharmacokinetic model for cabozantinib in cancer patients that was updated with data from healthy-volunteer studies. Semi-mechanistic models predict well for tumors with static, increasing, or decreasing growth over time, but they were not considered adequate for predicting tumor sizes in medullary thyroid cancer patients, among whom an early reduction in tumor size was followed by a late stabilization phase in those receiving cabozantinib. A semi-empirical tumor model adequately predicted tumor profiles that were assumed to have a net growth rate constant that was piecewise continuous in the regions of 0-110 and 110-280 days. Emax models relating average concentration to average change in tumor size predicted that an average concentration of 79 and 58?ng/ml, respectively, would yield 50% of the maximum possible tumor reduction during the first 110 days of dosing and during the subsequent 110-280 days of dosing. Simulations of tumor responses showed that daily doses of 60?mg or greater are expected to provide a similar tumor reduction. Both model evaluation of observed data and simulation results suggested that the two protocol-defined cabozantinib dose reductions from 140 to 100?mg/day and from 100 to 60?mg/day are not projected to result in a marked reduction in target lesion regrowth. PMID:26825867

  16. Antisense oligonucleotides and prevention of tumor growth: a different approach and proposal for a new method.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Deniz; Oztas, Haydar; Hilal Ates, Buse

    2005-01-01

    There have been several attempts to prevent tumor formation and growth. However, none of the developed methods gives a completely satisfying result for the treatment of tumor masses. The most often used therapies against tumor cells are radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, utilization of these methods to treat cancer generally result in generation of undesired side effects. In recent years, the antisense oligonucleotide technology has been employed, with success to an extent, in prevention of tumor growth. However, this method has its limitations. One of the most important limitation is that all of the crucial genes that play certain roles and are specifically expressed in tumor cells have not yet been identified. Therefore, only a few numbers of genes that are shown to play a role in tumor cells are targeted by the antisense oligonucleotide method. The aim of the present study is to propose a hypotheses and outline the involved procedure which could be used to generate oligonucleotides that are antisense to genes or mRNAs that display certain specific functions in tumor cells but are yet to be identified. The proposed hypotheses involves first, a careful isolation of differentially expressed mRNAs by using the tumor and the corresponding normal cells. These mRNAs should represent the genes that operate in tumor cells but not in the corresponding normal cells. Following the isolation of the differentially expressed mRNAs, they will be reverse transcribed and the desired amounts of cDNA copies will be obtained. The cDNA copies will then be used differentially as a source for oligonucleotides that are antisense to genes or mRNAs. To obtain the desired length oligonucleotides that will be used as antisense oligonucleotides the cDNA copies will be subjected to Maxam-Gilbert fragmentation and/or controlled enodonuclease digestion. These two mentioned procedures could be optimized and used together or separately to obtain the desired length oligonucleotides that will be used against tumor cells. PMID:15607566

  17. Arsenic trioxide disrupts glioma stem cells via promoting PML degradation to inhibit tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenchao; Cheng, Lin; Shi, Yu; Ke, Susan Q; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Chu, Cheng-wei; Xie, Qi; Bian, Xiu-wu; Rich, Jeremy N; Bao, Shideng

    2015-11-10

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor. Tumor relapse in GBM is inevitable despite maximal therapeutic interventions. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been found to be critical players in therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Therapeutic drugs targeting GSCs may significantly improve GBM treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (As2O3) effectively disrupted GSCs and inhibited tumor growth in the GSC-derived orthotopic xenografts by targeting the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML). As2O3 treatment induced rapid degradation of PML protein along with severe apoptosis in GSCs. Disruption of the endogenous PML recapitulated the inhibitory effects of As2O3 treatment on GSCs both in vitro and in orthotopic tumors. Importantly, As2O3 treatment dramatically reduced GSC population in the intracranial GBM xenografts and increased the survival of mice bearing the tumors. In addition, As2O3 treatment preferentially inhibited cell growth of GSCs but not matched non-stem tumor cells (NSTCs). Furthermore, As2O3 treatment or PML disruption potently diminished c-Myc protein levels through increased poly-ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of c-Myc. Our study indicated a potential implication of As2O3 in GBM treatment and highlighted the important role of PML/c-Myc axis in the maintenance of GSCs. PMID:26510911

  18. Arsenic trioxide disrupts glioma stem cells via promoting PML degradation to inhibit tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenchao; Cheng, Lin; Shi, Yu; Ke, Susan Q.; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Chu, Cheng-wei; Xie, Qi; Bian, Xiu-wu; Rich, Jeremy N.; Bao, Shideng

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor. Tumor relapse in GBM is inevitable despite maximal therapeutic interventions. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been found to be critical players in therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Therapeutic drugs targeting GSCs may significantly improve GBM treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (As2O3) effectively disrupted GSCs and inhibited tumor growth in the GSC-derived orthotopic xenografts by targeting the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML). As2O3 treatment induced rapid degradation of PML protein along with severe apoptosis in GSCs. Disruption of the endogenous PML recapitulated the inhibitory effects of As2O3 treatment on GSCs both in vitro and in orthotopic tumors. Importantly, As2O3 treatment dramatically reduced GSC population in the intracranial GBM xenografts and increased the survival of mice bearing the tumors. In addition, As2O3 treatment preferentially inhibited cell growth of GSCs but not matched non-stem tumor cells (NSTCs). Furthermore, As2O3 treatment or PML disruption potently diminished c-Myc protein levels through increased poly-ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of c-Myc. Our study indicated a potential implication of As2O3 in GBM treatment and highlighted the important role of PML/c-Myc axis in the maintenance of GSCs. PMID:26510911

  19. NKD2, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, S; Kurenbekova, L; Gao, Y; Roos, A; Creighton, CJ; Rao, P; Hicks, J; Man, T-K; Lau, C; Brown, AMC; Jones, SN; Lazar, AJ; Ingram, D; Lev, D; Donehower, LA; Yustein, JT

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most frequent pediatric malignant bone tumor that has a high propensity for metastases. Through osteoblast-specific alteration of p53 status, we developed a genetically engineered mouse model of localized and metastatic OS to gain an understanding into the molecular pathogenesis of OS. Microarray analysis of both localized tumors and metastatic tumors identified the downregulation of the naked cuticle homolog 2 (NKD2) gene, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling. Overexpression of NKD2 in metastatic human and mouse OS cells significantly decreases cell proliferation, migration and invasion ability in vitro and drastically diminishes OS tumor growth and metastasis in vivo, whereas downregulation enhances migratory and invasive potential. Evaluation of NKD2-overexpressing tumors revealed upregulation of tumor-suppressor genes and downregulation of molecules involved in blood vessel formation and cell migration. Furthermore, assessment of primary human OS revealed downregulation of NKD2 in metastatic and recurrent OS. Finally, we provide biological evidence that use of small-molecule inhibitors targeting the Wnt pathway can have therapeutic efficacy in decreasing metastatic properties in OS. Our studies provide compelling evidence that downregulation of NKD2 expression and alterations in associated regulated pathways have a significant role in driving OS tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:25579177

  20. Effect propagation in a toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic model explains delayed effects on the growth of unicellular green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus.

    PubMed

    Vogs, Carolina; Bandow, Nicole; Altenburger, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Ecotoxicological standard tests assess toxic effects by exposing an organism to high concentrations over defined periods of time. To evaluate toxicity under field conditions such as fluctuating and pulsed exposures, process-based toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic (TK/TD) models may be used for extrapolation from the existing evidence. A TK/TD model was developed that simulates the effect on growth of the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus continuously exposed to the model chemicals norflurazon, triclosan, and N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine. A pharmacological time-response model describing the effects of anticancer treatments on cancer cell growth was adapted and modified to model the affected growth of synchronized algae cells. The TK/TD model simulates the temporal effect course by linking the ambient concentration of a chemical to the observable adverse effect via an internal concentration and a sequence of biological events in the organism. The parameters of the toxicodynamic model are related to the growth characteristics of algae cells, a no effect concentration, the chemical efficacy as well as the ability of recovery and repair, and the delay during damage propagation. The TK/TD model fits well to the observed algae growth. The effect propagation through cumulative cell damage explained the observed delayed responses better than just the toxicokinetics. The TK/TD model could facilitate the link between several effect levels within damage propagation, which prospectively may be helpful to model adverse outcome pathways and time-dependent mixture effects. PMID:23359135

  1. miR-34a Silences c-SRC to Attenuate Tumor Growth in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brian D; Wali, Vikram B; Cheng, Christopher J; Inukai, Sachi; Booth, Carmen J; Agarwal, Seema; Rimm, David L; Gy?rffy, Balzs; Santarpia, Libero; Pusztai, Lajos; Saltzman, W Mark; Slack, Frank J

    2016-02-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype with no clinically proven biologically targeted treatment options. The molecular heterogeneity of TNBC and lack of high frequency driver mutations other than TP53 have hindered the development of new and effective therapies that significantly improve patient outcomes. miRNAs, global regulators of survival and proliferation pathways important in tumor development and maintenance, are becoming promising therapeutic agents. We performed miRNA-profiling studies in different TNBC subtypes to identify miRNAs that significantly contribute to disease progression. We found that miR-34a was lost in TNBC, specifically within mesenchymal and mesenchymal stem cell-like subtypes, whereas expression of miR-34a targets was significantly enriched. Furthermore, restoration of miR-34a in cell lines representing these subtypes inhibited proliferation and invasion, activated senescence, and promoted sensitivity to dasatinib by targeting the proto-oncogene c-SRC. Notably, SRC depletion in TNBC cell lines phenocopied the effects of miR-34a reintroduction, whereas SRC overexpression rescued the antitumorigenic properties mediated by miR-34a. miR-34a levels also increased when cells were treated with c-SRC inhibitors, suggesting a negative feedback exists between miR-34a and c-SRC. Moreover, miR-34a administration significantly delayed tumor growth of subcutaneously and orthotopically implanted tumors in nude mice, and was accompanied by c-SRC downregulation. Finally, we found that miR-34a and SRC levels were inversely correlated in human tumor specimens. Together, our results demonstrate that miR-34a exerts potent antitumorigenic effects in vitro and in vivo and suggests that miR-34a replacement therapy, which is currently being tested in human clinical trials, represents a promising therapeutic strategy for TNBC. Cancer Res; 76(4); 927-39. 2015 AACR. PMID:26676753

  2. Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity as Tumor Growth Promoter and Catalyst of Population Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Enderling, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly argued that cancer stem cells are not a cellular phenotype but rather a transient state that cells can acquire, either through intrinsic signaling cascades or in response to environmental cues. While cancer stem cell plasticity is generally associated with increased aggressiveness and treatment resistance, we set out to thoroughly investigate the impact of different rates of plasticity on early and late tumor growth dynamics and the response to therapy. We develop an agent-based model of cancer stem cell driven tumor growth, in which plasticity is defined as a spontaneous transition between stem and nonstem cancer cell states. Simulations of the model show that plasticity can substantially increase tumor growth rate and invasion. At high rates of plasticity, however, the cells get exhausted and the tumor will undergo spontaneous remission in the long term. In a series of in silico trials, we show that such remission can be facilitated through radiotherapy. The presented study suggests that stem cell plasticity has rather complex, nonintuitive implications on tumor growth and treatment response. Further theoretical, experimental, and integrated studies are needed to fully decipher cancer stem cell plasticity and how it can be harnessed for novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26858759

  3. Estrogen Exhibits a Biphasic Effect on Prostate Tumor Growth through the Estrogen Receptor ?-KLF5 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuka; Osakabe, Asami; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Akaogi, Kensuke; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Homma, Yukio; Inoue, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are effective in the treatment of prostate cancer; however, the effects of estrogens on prostate cancer are enigmatic. In this study, we demonstrated that estrogen (17?-estradiol [E2]) has biphasic effects on prostate tumor growth. A lower dose of E2 increased tumor growth in mouse xenograft models using DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, whereas a higher dose significantly decreased tumor growth. We found that anchorage-independent apoptosis in these cells was inhibited by E2 treatment. Similarly, in vivo angiogenesis was suppressed by E2. Interestingly, these effects of E2 were abolished by knockdown of either estrogen receptor ? (ER?) or Krppel-like zinc finger transcription factor 5 (KLF5). ?n addition, E2 suppressed KLF5-mediated transcription through ER?, which inhibits proapoptotic FOXO1 and proangiogenic PDGFA expression. Furthermore, we revealed that a nonagonistic ER ligand GS-1405 inhibited FOXO1 and PDGFA expression through the ER?-KLF5 pathway and regulated prostate tumor growth without ER? transactivation. Therefore, these results suggest that E2 biphasically modulates prostate tumor formation by regulating KLF5-dependent transcription through ER? and provide a new strategy for designing ER modulators, which will be able to regulate prostate cancer progression with minimal adverse effects due to ER transactivation. PMID:26483416

  4. Modulation of the Leptin Receptor Mediates Tumor Growth and Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chalfant, Madeleine C.; Gorden, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated as a significant risk factor for development of pancreatic cancer. In the setting of obesity, a systemic chronic inflammatory response is characterized by alterations in the production and secretion of a wide variety of growth factors. Leptin is a hormone whose level increases drastically in the serum of obese patients. High fat diet induced obesity in mice leads to an overall increased body weight, pancreatic weight, serum leptin, and pancreatic tissue leptin levels. Here we report the contribution of obesity and leptin to pancreatic cancer growth utilizing an in vivo orthotopic murine pancreatic cancer model, which resulted in increased tumor proliferation with concomitant increased tumor burden in the diet induced obese mice compared to lean mice. Human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines were found to express the short as well as the long form of the leptin receptor and functionally responded to leptin induced activation through an increased phosphorylation of AKT473. In vitro, leptin stimulation increased cellular migration which was blocked by addition of a PI3K inhibitor. In vivo, depletion of the leptin receptor through shRNA knockdown partially abrogated increased orthotopic tumor growth in obese mice. These findings suggest that leptin contributes to pancreatic tumor growth through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which promotes pancreatic tumor cell migration. PMID:25919692

  5. Vav1 promotes lung cancer growth by instigating tumor-microenvironment cross-talk via growth factor secretion.

    PubMed

    Sebban, Shulamit; Farago, Marganit; Rabinovich, Shiran; Lazer, Galit; Idelchuck, Yulia; Ilan, Lena; Pikarsky, Eli; Katzav, Shulamit

    2014-10-15

    Vav1 is a signal transducer that functions as a scaffold protein and a regulator of cytoskeleton organization in the hematopoietic system, where it is exclusively expressed. Recently, Vav1 was shown to be involved in diverse human cancers, including lung cancer. We demonstrate that lung cancer cells that abnormally express Vav1 secrete growth factors in a Vav1-dependent manner. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that Vav1 depletion results in a marked reduction in the expression of colony-stimulating-factor-1 (CSF1), a hematopoietic growth factor. The association between Vav1 expression and CSF1 was further supported by signal transduction experiments, supporting involvement of Vav1 in regulating lung cancer secretome. Blocking of ERK phosphorylation, led to a decrease in CSF1 transcription, thus suggesting a role for ERK, a downstream effector of Vav1, in CSF1 expression. CSF1-silenced cells exhibited reduced focus formation, proliferation abilities, and growth in NOD/SCID mice. CSF1-silenced H358 cells resulted in significantly smaller tumors, showing increased fibrosis and a decrease in tumor infiltrating macrophages. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of primary human lung tumors revealed a positive correlation between Vav1 and CSF1 expression, which was associated with tumor grade. Additional results presented herein suggest a potential cross-talk between cancer cells and the microenvironment controlled by CSF1/Vav1 signaling pathways. PMID:25313137

  6. Vav1 promotes lung cancer growth by instigating tumor-microenvironment cross-talk via growth factor secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Shiran; Lazer, Galit; Idelchuck, Yulia; Ilan, Lena; Pikarsky, Eli; Katzav, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Vav1 is a signal transducer that functions as a scaffold protein and a regulator of cytoskeleton organization in the hematopoietic system, where it is exclusively expressed. Recently, Vav1 was shown to be involved in diverse human cancers, including lung cancer. We demonstrate that lung cancer cells that abnormally express Vav1 secrete growth factors in a Vav1-dependent manner. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that Vav1 depletion results in a marked reduction in the expression of colony-stimulating-factor-1 (CSF1), a hematopoietic growth factor. The association between Vav1 expression and CSF1 was further supported by signal transduction experiments, supporting involvement of Vav1 in regulating lung cancer secretome. Blocking of ERK phosphorylation, led to a decrease in CSF1 transcription, thus suggesting a role for ERK, a downstream effector of Vav1, in CSF1 expression. CSF1-silenced cells exhibited reduced focus formation, proliferation abilities, and growth in NOD/SCID mice. CSF1-silenced H358 cells resulted in significantly smaller tumors, showing increased fibrosis and a decrease in tumor infiltrating macrophages. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of primary human lung tumors revealed a positive correlation between Vav1 and CSF1 expression, which was associated with tumor grade. Additional results presented herein suggest a potential cross-talk between cancer cells and the microenvironment controlled by CSF1/Vav1 signaling pathways. PMID:25313137

  7. A partial differential equation model and its reduction to an ordinary differential equation model for prostate tumor growth under intermittent hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Youshan; Guo, Qian; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-10-01

    Hormonal therapy with androgen suppression is a common treatment for advanced prostate tumors. The emergence of androgen-independent cells, however, leads to a tumor relapse under a condition of long-term androgen deprivation. Clinical trials suggest that intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) with alternating on- and off-treatment periods can delay the relapse when compared with continuous androgen suppression (CAS). In this paper, we propose a mathematical model for prostate tumor growth under IAS therapy. The model elucidates initial hormone sensitivity, an eventual relapse of a tumor under CAS therapy, and a delay of a relapse under IAS therapy, which are due to the coexistence of androgen-dependent cells, androgen-independent cells resulting from reversible changes by adaptation, and androgen-independent cells resulting from irreversible changes by genetic mutations. The model is formulated as a free boundary problem of partial differential equations that describe the evolution of populations of the abovementioned three types of cells during on-treatment periods and off-treatment periods. Moreover, the model can be transformed into a piecewise linear ordinary differential equation model by introducing three new volume variables, and the study of the resulting model may help to devise optimal IAS schedules. PMID:23982260

  8. Numerical Simulation of a Tumor Growth Dynamics Model Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell growth models involve high-dimensional parameter spaces that require computationally tractable methods to solve. To address a proposed tumor growth dynamics mathematical model, an instance of the particle swarm optimization method was implemented to speed up the search process in the multi-dimensional parameter space to find optimal parameter values that fit experimental data from mice cancel cells. The fitness function, which measures the difference between calculated results and experimental data, was minimized in the numerical simulation process. The results and search efficiency of the particle swarm optimization method were compared to those from other evolutional methods such as genetic algorithms.

  9. Tumor induced osteomalacia: associated with elevated circulating levels of fibroblast growth factor-7 in addition to fibroblast growth factor-23.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Shweta; Khazim, Khaled; Suri, Rajeev; Martin, DeAndra; Werner, Sherry; Fanti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Tumor induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by renal phosphate wasting, hypophosphatemia, and osteomalacia. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23, a phosphatonin i.e., phosphaturia-promoting hormone, is commonly implicated in the pathogenesis of TIO. However, very limited information is available about the circulating levels and clinical significance of other phosphatonins that are expressed by TIO-associated tumors. In addition, identification of the primary tumor constitutes a frequent major challenge in the management of TIO. Here, we report a patient with the clinical diagnosis of TIO with elevated blood levels of the phosphatonins FGF-23 and FGF-7; and extensive but unrewarding radiological search for the primary tumor. In selective venous sampling, both FGF-23 and FGF-7 displayed highest concentrations in the left femoral and iliac veins; although lateralization was much more pronounced for FGF-7 than FGF-23. This laboratory finding allowed us to focus on the left lower extremity as the likely location of the primary tumor. Our case is the first to show that FGF-7 can be analyzed in the circulation and used to assist in the diagnosis and localization of TIO-associated tumors. PMID:26521888

  10. Comparison of the selective estrogen receptor modulator arzoxifene (LY353381) with tamoxifen on tumor growth and biomarker expression in an MCF-7 human breast cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Detre, Simone; Riddler, Sharon; Salter, Janine; A'Hern, Roger; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen R D

    2003-10-01

    Arzoxifene (ARZ) is a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator with greater bioavailability than raloxifene which is being developed as treatment for breast cancer. We have used an in vivo model of hormone-sensitive breast cancer to study the growth-inhibitory and pharmacodynamic effects of ARZ in comparison with the most widely used antiestrogen, tamoxifen (TAM). We compared the abilities of ARZ and TAM to antagonize the estrogen (E2)-dependent growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer xenografts in oophorectomized athymic mice. At four different time points over 28 days, we studied their time-related pharmacodynamic effects on biomarkers of tumor growth (cell proliferation/death measured by Ki-67 and apoptosis scores), cell cycle activity (cyclin D1 and p27(kip1)), and hormone-regulated gene expression (ERalpha, progesterone receptor, and pS2). Although maximal growth inhibition was seen after E2 withdrawal, ARZ and TAM induced significant and similar inhibition of E2-stimulated tumor growth. Inhibition of growth was reflected by changes in the tumor growth index (ratio posttreatment/pretreatment Ki-67/apoptosis scores). ARZ and TAM resulted in a significant (P < 0.001) increase in ER expression and reduction in progesterone receptor expression, whereas changes in cyclin D1 score were inversely related to p27(kip1) score. A significant but delayed biological effect was observed with a 10-fold lower dose of ARZ. These results show that ARZ is an effective antagonist of E2-stimulated breast cancer growth with similar growth-inhibitory and pharmacodynamic effects to TAM in this model. PMID:14559845

  11. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model1

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Erin B; Steinberg, Howard; Breen, Matthew; Auerbach, Robert; Helfand, Stuart C

    2004-01-01

    Abstract We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and ?v?3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL)-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy. PMID:15140399

  12. Formononetin, a novel FGFR2 inhibitor, potently inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhen Feng; Chen, Che; Liu, Jia Yun; Wu, Guan Nan; Yao, Xue Quan; Liu, Fu Kun; Li, Gang; Shen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated in clinical trials target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other potential therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here we identified formononetin as a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities. Formononetin demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, formononetin suppressed FGF2-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of formononetin on different molecular components in treated endothelial cell, and found that formononetin suppressed FGF2-triggered activation of FGFR2 and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling. Moreover, formononetin directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the oncogenic signaling pathways in breast cancer cell. In vivo, using xenograft models of breast cancer, formononetin showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, formononetin enhanced the effect of VEGFR2 inhibitor sunitinib on tumor growth inhibition. Taken together, our results indicate that formononetin targets the FGFR2-mediated Akt signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis. PMID:26575424

  13. Biomarker- versus drug-driven tumor growth inhibition models: an equivalence analysis.

    PubMed

    Sardu, Maria Luisa; Poggesi, Italo; De Nicolao, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    The mathematical modeling of tumor xenograft experiments following the dosing of antitumor drugs has received much attention in the last decade. Biomarker data can further provide useful insights on the pathological processes and be used for translational purposes in the early clinical development. Therefore, it is of particular interest the development of integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) models encompassing drug, biomarker and tumor-size data. This paper investigates the reciprocal consistency of three types of models: drug-to-tumor, such as established drug-driven tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models, drug-to-biomarker, e.g. indirect response models, and biomarker-to-tumor, e.g. the more recent biomarker-driven TGI models. In particular, this paper derives a mathematical relationship that guarantees the steady-state equivalence of the cascade of drug-to-biomarker and biomarker-to-tumor models with a drug-to-tumor TGI model. Using the Simeoni TGI model as a reference, conditions for steady-state equivalence are worked out and used to derive a new biomarker-driven model. Simulated and real data are used to show that in realistic cases the steady-state equivalence extends also to transient responses. The possibility of predicting the drug-to-tumor potency of a new candidate drug based only on biomarker response is discussed. PMID:26209955

  14. HOIL-1L Functions as the PKC? Ubiquitin Ligase to Promote Lung Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Queisser, Markus A.; Dada, Laura A.; Deiss-Yehiely, Nimrod; Angulo, Martin; Zhou, Guofei; Kouri, Fotini M.; Knab, Lawrence M.; Liu, Jing; Stegh, Alexander H.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Budinger, G. R. Scott; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Ciechanover, Aaron; Iwai, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Protein kinase C zeta (PKC?) has been reported to act as a tumor suppressor. Deletion of PKC? in experimental cancer models has been shown to increase tumor growth. However, the mechanisms of PKC? down-regulation in cancerous cells have not been previously described. Objectives: To determine the molecular mechanisms that lead to decreased PKC? expression and thus increased survival in cancer cells and tumor growth. Methods: The levels of expression of heme-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase 1L (HOIL-1L), HOIL-1interacting protein (HOIP), Shank-associated RH domain-interacting protein (SHARPIN), and PKC? were analyzed by Western blot and/or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in different cell lines. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments were used to demonstrate the interaction between HOIL-1L and PKC?. Ubiquitination was measured in an in vitro ubiquitination assay and by Western blot with specific antibodies. The role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) was determined by gain/loss-of-function experiments. The effect of HOIL-1L expression on cell death was investigated using RNA interference approaches in vitro and on tumor growth in mice models. Increased HOIL-1L and decreased PKC? expression was assessed in lung adenocarcinoma and glioblastoma multiforme and documented in several other cancer types by oncogenomic analysis. Measurements and Main Results: Hypoxia is a hallmark of rapidly growing solid tumors. We found that during hypoxia, PKC? is ubiquitinated and degraded via the ubiquitin ligase HOIL-1L, a component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC). In vitro ubiquitination assays indicate that HOIL-1L ubiquitinates PKC? at Lys-48, targeting it for proteasomal degradation. In a xenograft tumor model and lung cancer model, we found that silencing of HOIL-1L increased the abundance of PKC? and decreased the size of tumors, suggesting that lower levels of HOIL-1L promote survival. Indeed, mRNA transcript levels of HOIL-1L were elevated in tumor of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, and in a lung adenocarcinoma tissue microarray the levels of HOIL-1L were associated with high-grade tumors. Moreover, we found that HOIL-1L expression was regulated by HIFs. Interestingly, the actions of HOIL-1L were independent of LUBAC. Conclusions: These data provide first evidence of a mechanism of cancer cell adaptation to hypoxia where HIFs regulate HOIL-1L, which targets PKC? for degradation to promote tumor survival. We provided a proof of concept that silencing of HOIL-1L impairs lung tumor growth and that HOIL-1L expression predicts survival rate in cancer patients suggesting that HOIL-1L is an attractive target for cancer therapy. PMID:25118570

  15. Ecto-5’-Nucleotidase Overexpression Reduces Tumor Growth in a Xenograph Medulloblastoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Cappellari, Angélica R.; Pillat, Micheli M.; Souza, Hellio D. N.; Dietrich, Fabrícia; Oliveira, Francine H.; Figueiró, Fabrício; Abujamra, Ana L.; Roesler, Rafael; Lecka, Joanna; Sévigny, Jean; Battastini, Ana Maria O.; Ulrich, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Background Ecto-5’-nucleotidase/CD73 (ecto-5’-NT) participates in extracellular ATP catabolism by converting adenosine monophosphate (AMP) into adenosine. This enzyme affects the progression and invasiveness of different tumors. Furthermore, the expression of ecto-5’-NT has also been suggested as a favorable prognostic marker, attributing to this enzyme contradictory functions in cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common brain tumor of the cerebellum and affects mainly children. Materials and Methods The effects of ecto-5’-NT overexpression on human MB tumor growth were studied in an in vivo model. Balb/c immunodeficient (nude) 6 to 14-week-old mice were used for dorsal subcutaneous xenograph tumor implant. Tumor development was evaluated by pathophysiological analysis. In addition, the expression patterns of adenosine receptors were verified. Results The human MB cell line D283, transfected with ecto-5’-NT (D283hCD73), revealed reduced tumor growth compared to the original cell line transfected with an empty vector. D283hCD73 generated tumors with a reduced proliferative index, lower vascularization, the presence of differentiated cells and increased active caspase-3 expression. Prominent A1 adenosine receptor expression rates were detected in MB cells overexpressing ecto-5’-NT. Conclusion This work suggests that ecto-5’-NT promotes reduced tumor growth to reduce cell proliferation and vascularization, promote higher differentiation rates and initiate apoptosis, supposedly by accumulating adenosine, which then acts through A1 adenosine receptors. Therefore, ecto-5’-NT might be considered an important prognostic marker, being associated with good prognosis and used as a potential target for therapy. PMID:26491983

  16. Three-dimensional multispecies nonlinear tumor growthI. Model and numerical method

    PubMed Central

    Wise, S.M.; Lowengrub, J.S.; Frieboes, H.B.; Cristini, V.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first paper in a two-part series in which we develop, analyze and simulate a diffuse interface continuum model of multispecies tumor growth and tumor-induced angiogenesis in two and three dimensions. Three dimensional simulations of nonlinear tumor growth and neovascularization using this diffuse interface model were recently presented in Frieboes et al. (2007), but that paper did not describe the details of the model or the numerical algorithm. This is done here. In this diffuse interface approach, sharp interfaces are replaced by narrow transition layers that arise due to differential adhesive forces among the cell-species. Accordingly, a continuum model of adhesion is introduced. The model is thermodynamically consistent, is related to recently developed mixture models, and thus is capable of providing a detailed description of tumor progression. The model is well-posed and consists of fourth-order nonlinear advection-reaction-diffusion equations (of Cahn-Hilliard-type) for the cell-species coupled with reaction-diffusion equations for the substrate components. We demonstrate analytically and numerically that when the diffuse interface thickness tends to zero, the system reduces to a classical sharp interface model. Using a new fully adaptive, nonlinear multigrid/finite difference method the system is simulated efficiently. In this first paper, we present simulations of unstable avascular tumor growth in two and three dimensions and demonstrate that our techniques now make large-scale three dimensional simulations of tumors with complex morphologies computationally feasible. In Part II of this study, we will investigate multispecies tumor invasion, tumor-induced angiogenesis and focus on the morphological instabilities that may underlie invasive phenotypes. PMID:18485374

  17. Ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma with a noninvasive growth pattern simulating a serous borderline tumor.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Hiroko; Ohishi, Yoshihiro; Aman, Murasaki; Shida, Kaai; Shinozaki, Tomoko; Yasutake, Nobuko; Sonoda, Kenzo; Kato, Kiyoko; Oda, Yoshinao

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian serous borderline tumors (SBTs) being a precursor of low-grade serous carcinomas are morphologically characterized by noninvasive growth and low-grade cytology. On the other hand, many pathologists regard cytologically high-grade, noninvasive (HG-noninv) ovarian serous tumors resembling SBTs in low magnification as conventional high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs) by personal experiences. Nonetheless, there are no established molecular characteristic of such tumors. In this study, therefore, we attempted to provide the molecular evidence. We selected 37 ovarian serous tumors that exhibited a cytologically HG-noninv growth pattern, including 36 tumors that coexisted with conventional invasive HGSC components (HG-inv) and a single tumor exclusively composed of pure HG-noninv. Histologically, all HG-noninv showed many mitotic figures, and serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas were identified in 3 tumors with HG-noninv. Immunohistochemically, most HG-noninv showed aberrant p53 expression, frequent IMP3 positivity, p16 overexpression, a high MIB-1 labeling index, and infrequent PAX2. By molecular analysis, the pure HG-noninv and 13 HGSCs with HG-noninv showed TP53 mutations, but KRAS/BRAF mutations were not detected in any of them. In 1 tumor, we detected an identical TP53 mutation in both HG-noninv and HG-inv components by using laser capture microdissection. These immunohistochemical and molecular features of HG-noninv were similar to those of conventional invasive HGSCs but different from those of SBTs. In conclusion, our results showed that a cytologically HG-noninv growth pattern simulating an SBT is a morphological spectrum of HGSC, but not a true SBT. PMID:26232113

  18. The Tumor Microenvironment Contribution to Development, Growth, Invasion and Metastasis of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Koontongkaew, Sittichai

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a complex tissue that contains tumor cells and the surrounding stroma, which is populated by different types of mesenchymal cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Collectively, they are referred to as the tumor microenvironment (TME). Recent studies have shown that TME has a more profound influence on the growth and metastasis of HNSCC than was previously appreciated. Because carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are frequently observed in the stroma of the tumor, this review focuses on the potential role of tumor-CAFs interactions in progression of HNSCC. Tumor-CAFs crosstalk enhances the production of growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and inflammatory mediators, which eventually facilitates tumor growth. In fact, factors and cells that do not support tumor growth are usually down regulated or mitigated in TME. Therefore TME may determine the fate of the tumors at the site of invasion and metastasis. For tumor cells that survive at these sites, stromal activation may serve to establish a supportive tumor stroma, fostering the outgrowth of the metastatic cells. The concept of tumor-stromal interactions and microenvironmental niche has profound consequences in tumor growth and metastasis and therefore, it's understanding will open up new strategies for the diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of HNSCC. PMID:23386906

  19. The RGD Domain of Human Osteopontin Promotes Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Activation of Survival Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Shirley; Kong, Christina; Banh, Alice; Kuo, Peiwen; Bouley, Donna M.; Vice, Carmen; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Denko, Nicholas C.; Koong, Albert C.; Giaccia, Amato; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2010-01-01

    Background Human osteopontin (OPN), a known tumor associated protein, exists in different isoforms, whose function is unclear. It also possesses a RGD domain, which has been implicated in diverse function. Here, we use genetic approaches to systematically investigate the function of the RGD domain in different OPN isoforms on tumor progression and metastasis for 2 different solid tumor models. Methodology/Principal Findings Using isoform-specific qRT-PCR, we found that OPN-A and B were the main isoforms overexpressed in evaluated human tumors, which included 4 soft tissue sarcomas, 24 lung and 30 head and neck carcinomas. Overexpression of either OPN-A or B in two different cell types promoted local tumor growth and lung metastasis in SCID mouse xenografts. However, expression of either isoform with the RGD domain either mutated or deleted decreased tumor growth and metastasis, and resulted in increased apoptosis by TUNEL staining. In vitro, whereas mutation of the RGD domain did not affect cell-cell adhesion, soft agar growth or cell migration, it increased apoptosis under hypoxia and serum starvation. This effect could be mitigated when the RGD mutant cells were treated with condition media containing WT OPN. Mechanistically, the RGD region of OPN inhibited apoptosis by inducing NF-?B activation and FAK phosphorylation. Inhibition of NF-?B (by siRNA to the p65 subunit) or FAK activation (by a inhibitor) significantly increased apoptosis under hypoxia in WT OPN cells, but not in RGD mutant cells. Conclusion/Significance Unlike prior reports, our data suggest that the RGD domain of both OPN-A and B promote tumor growth and metastasis mainly by protecting cells against apoptosis under stressed conditions and not via migration or invasion. Future inhibitors directed against OPN should target multiple isoforms and should inhibit cell survival mechanisms that involve the RGD domain, FAK phosphorylation and NF-?B activation. PMID:20224789

  20. Effect of soy isoflavones on the growth of human breast tumors: findings from preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and many women with breast cancer live more than 5years after their diagnosis. Breast cancer patients and survivors have a greater interest in taking soy foods and isoflavone supplements. However, the effect of isoflavones on breast cancer remains controversial. Thus, it is critical to determine if and when isoflavones are beneficial or detrimental to breast cancer patients. According to the available preclinical data, high concentrations of isoflavones inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cells, regardless of their estrogen receptor (ER) status. In comparison, genistein, a major isoflavone, has stimulated tumor growth at low concentrations and mitigated tamoxifen efficacy in ER-positive breast cancer. Studies have indicated that the relative levels of genistein and estrogen at the target site are important to determine the genistein effect on the ER-positive tumor growth. However, studies using ovariectomized mice and subcutaneous xenograft models might not truly reflect estrogen concentrations in human breast tumors. Moreover, it may be an oversimplification that isoflavones stimulate hormone-dependent tumor growth due to their potential estrogenic effect since studies also suggest nonestrogenic anticancer effects of isoflavones and ER-independent anticancer activity of tamoxifen. Therefore, the concentrations of isoflavones and estrogen in human breast tumors should be considered better in future preclinical studies and the parameters that can estimate those levels in breast tumors are required in human clinical/epidemiological investigation. In addition, it will be important to identify the molecular mechanisms that either inhibit or promote the growth of breast cancer cells by soy isoflavones, and use those molecules to evaluate the relevance of the preclinical findings to the human disease and to predict the health effects of isoflavones in human breast tumors. PMID:25493176

  1. Targeted doxorubicin nanotherapy strongly suppressing growth of multidrug resistant tumor in mice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dai Hai; Lee, Jung Seok; Bae, Jin Woo; Choi, Jong Hoon; Lee, Yunki; Son, Joo Young; Park, Ki Dong

    2015-11-10

    The rational design of nanomedicine to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) tumors in vivo is described in the study. We prepared multifunctionalized Pluronic micelles that are already well-established to be responsive to low pH and redox in order to systemically deliver doxorubicin (DOX) to MDR tumors. Folic acids (FAs) were introduced on the micelle surface as tumor-targeting molecules. In vitro, the DOX-loaded micelles exerted high cytotoxicity in the DOX-resistant cells by bypassing MDR efflux. Cellular uptake studies clearly demonstrated that FA-conjugated DOX micelles (FA/DOX micelles) were efficiently internalized and accumulated in the MDR cells. In vivo studies indicated significant efficacy of FA/DOX micelles for MDR tumors in mice, and that the volume of tumors was 3 times smaller in this group than that of tumors in the free DOX group, and 8 times smaller than the tumors in the saline group. To the best of our knowledge, this methodology has been recognized to have significantly high efficacy, compared to previously reported DOX nanoparticle formulations. This superior anti-tumor efficacy of FA/DOX micelles in MDR tumor-bearing mice can be attributed to FA-targeted and -mediated endocytosis, inhibition of MDR effect, and subsequent DOX release triggered by dual stimuli (low pH and redox) inside the tumor. Given the promise of the multifunctional micelle mediated delivery on inhibition of MDR tumor growth, FA/DOX micelle platform is a much sought after goal for cancer chemotherapy, especially for cancers resistant to anticancer drugs. PMID:26325307

  2. Effect of selumetinib on the growth of anastrozole-resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Sabnis, Gauri J; Kazi, Armina; Golubeva, Olga; Shah, Preeti; Brodie, Angela

    2013-04-01

    Despite significant improvement in the treatment outcome of hormone responsive postmenopausal breast cancer, some patients eventually acquire resistance to aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Using our MCF-7Ca xenograft model, we observed that although AIs such as anastrozole initially inhibit tumor growth effectively, tumors eventually began to grow. Our previous data show that anastrozole-resistant tumors upregulate growth factor receptor pathways as they adapt to grow in the low estrogen environment. Therefore, in the current study, we investigated the effect of inhibiting the growth factor receptor pathways with a MEK-1/2 inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244, ARRY-142866). We treated the mice with anastrozole-resistant tumors with selumetinib alone or in combination with anastrozole. MCF-7Ca cells were inoculated sc into ovariectomized athymic nude mice supplemented throughout the experiment with androstenedione (100 ?g/day), the substrate for aromatase conversion to estrogen. Once the tumors reached a measurable size (~300 mm(3)), the mice were treated with anastrozole (200 ?g/day), supplemented with androstenedione (?(4)A). The tumors in the anastrozole group doubled in volume after 6 weeks, at which time the animals were regrouped to receive the following treatments: (i) anastrozole, (ii) anastrozole withdrawal (?(4)A alone), (iii) selumetinib (25 mg/kg/d, bid, po), and (iv) selumetinib + anastrozole, (n = 10 mice/group). The treatments were given for 6 weeks (till week 12) and then the mice were euthanized, the tumors were collected and analyzed. The tumors of mice treated with selumetinib + anastrozole had significantly lower growth rates than those treated with single agents (p = 0.008). Western blot analysis of the tumors showed that treatment with anastrozole resulted in upregulation of proteins in the growth factor receptor cascade such as p-mTOR, pAkt, pMEK, and pMAPK. This was accompanied by downregulation of ER? protein, consistent with previous findings. The treatment of mice with selumetinib resulted in downregulation of activated MAPK, along with p-mTOR, which likely resulted in upregulation of ER?. Our results suggest that inhibition of the growth factor receptor pathway with selumetinib can reverse anastrozole resistance. PMID:23508762

  3. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: implications for spatial dose redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Gliomas differ from many other tumors as they grow infiltratively into the brain parenchyma rather than forming a solid tumor mass with a well-defined boundary. Tumor cells can be found several centimeters away from the central tumor mass that is visible using current imaging techniques. The infiltrative growth characteristics of gliomas question the concept of a radiotherapy target volume that is irradiated to a homogeneous dose—the standard in current clinical practice. We discuss the use of the Fisher-Kolmogorov glioma growth model in radiotherapy treatment planning. The phenomenological tumor growth model assumes that tumor cells proliferate locally and migrate into neighboring brain tissue, which is mathematically described via a partial differential equation for the spatio-temporal evolution of the tumor cell density. In this model, the tumor cell density drops approximately exponentially with distance from the visible gross tumor volume, which is quantified by the infiltration length, a parameter describing the distance at which the tumor cell density drops by a factor of e. This paper discusses the implications for the prescribed dose distribution in the periphery of the tumor. In the context of the exponential cell kill model, an exponential fall-off of the cell density suggests a linear fall-off of the prescription dose with distance. We introduce the dose fall-off rate, which quantifies the steepness of the prescription dose fall-off in units of Gy mm-1. It is shown that the dose fall-off rate is given by the inverse of the product of radiosensitivity and infiltration length. For an infiltration length of 3 mm and a surviving fraction of 50% at 2 Gy, this suggests a dose fall-off of approximately 1 Gy mm-1. The concept is illustrated for two glioblastoma patients by optimizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose fall-off rate concept reflects the idea that infiltrating gliomas lack a defined boundary and are characterized by a continuous fall-off of the density of infiltrating tumor cells. The approach can potentially be used to individualize the prescribed dose distribution if better methods to estimate radiosensitivity and infiltration length on a patient by patient basis become available.

  4. Massive T-lymphocyte infiltration into the host stroma is essential for fibroblast growth factor-2-promoted growth and metastasis of mammary tumors via neovascular stability.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Satoshi; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Saito, Yurika; Ueno, Yoko; Koizumi, Keiichi; Saiki, Ikuo

    2009-02-01

    Inflammation in the tumor stroma greatly influences tumor development. In the present study, we investigated the roles of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2-induced chronic inflammation in the development of 4T1 murine mammary tumors. Administration of FGF-2 into the tumor inoculation site during the initial phase of tumor growth enhanced tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis as well as microvessel density in tumor tissues in normal but not in nude mice. Infiltration of T lymphocytes and macrophages, recruitment of pericytes/vascular mural cells in neovascular walls, and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) were also enhanced in the FGF-2-activated host stroma of normal mice. In addition, FGF-2-induced tumor growth and metastasis was abrogated by administration of either an immunosuppressant, FK506, or a COX-2 inhibitor. FGF-2 enhanced prostaglandin E(2) secretion in cultured T lymphocytes. In addition, VEGFA secretion was increased in a co-culture of T lymphocytes and fibroblasts in vitro. These results indicate that the massive infiltration of T lymphocytes into FGF-2-activated host stroma during the initial phase of tumor growth enhances neovascular stability by regulating endogenous COX-2 and VEGFA levels because both compounds are known to play important roles in marked 4T1 mammary tumor development via FGF-2-induced inflammatory reactions. PMID:19116363

  5. APRIL promotes breast tumor growth and metastasis and is associated with aggressive basal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    García-Castro, Araceli; Zonca, Manuela; Florindo-Pinheiro, Douglas; Carvalho-Pinto, Carla E; Cordero, Alex; Gutiérrez del Fernando, Burgo; García-Grande, Aránzazu; Mañes, Santos; Hahne, Michael; González-Suárez, Eva; Planelles, Lourdes

    2015-05-01

    APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) is a cytokine of the tumor necrosis factor family associated mainly with hematologic malignancies. APRIL is also overexpressed in breast carcinoma tissue lesions, although neither its role in breast tumorigenesis nor the underlying molecular mechanism is known. Here, we show that several breast cancer cell lines express APRIL and both its receptors, B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) and transmembrane activator and CAML-interactor (TACI), independently of luminal or basal tumor cell phenotype, and that the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38, ERK1/2, and JNK1/2 are activated in response to APRIL. The inflammatory stimulus poly I:C, a toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 ligand, enhanced APRIL secretion. Silencing experiments decreased cell proliferation, demonstrating that APRIL is a critical autocrine factor for breast tumor growth. Studies of 4T1 orthotopic breast tumors in APRIL transgenic mice showed that an APRIL-enriched environment increased tumor growth and promoted lung metastasis associated with enhanced tumor cell proliferation; BCMA and TACI expression suggests that both participate in these processes. We detected APRIL, BCMA and TACI in human luminal, triple-negative breast carcinomas and HER2 breast carcinomas, with increased levels in more aggressive basal tumors. APRIL was observed near Ki67(+) nuclei and was distributed heterogeneously in the cancer cells, in the leukocyte infiltrate, and in the myoepithelial layer adjacent to the tumor area; these results imply that APRIL provides proliferation signals to tumor cells through paracrine and autocrine signaling. Our study identifies participation of APRIL signaling in breast cancer promotion; we propose impairment of this pathway as a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:25750171

  6. Photoactivation of lysosomally sequestered sunitinib after angiostatic treatment causes vascular occlusion and enhances tumor growth inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nowak-Sliwinska, P; Weiss, A; van Beijnum, J R; Wong, T J; Kilarski, W W; Szewczyk, G; Verheul, H M W; Sarna, T; van den Bergh, H; Griffioen, A W

    2015-01-01

    The angiogenesis inhibitor sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that acts mainly on the VEGF and PDGF pathways. We have previously shown that sunitinib is sequestered in the lysosomes of exposed tumor and endothelial cells. This phenomenon is part of the drug-induced resistance observed in the clinic. Here, we demonstrate that when exposed to light, sequestered sunitinib causes immediate destruction of the lysosomes, resulting in the release of sunitinib and cell death. We hypothesized that this photoactivation of sunitinib could be used as a vaso-occlusive vascular-targeting approach to treating cancer. Spectral properties of sunitinib and its lysosomal accumulation were measured in vitro. The human A2780 ovarian carcinoma transplanted onto the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the Colo-26 colorectal carcinoma model in Balb/c mice were used to test the effects of administrating sunitinib and subsequently exposing tumor tissue to light. Tumors were subsequently resected and subject to immunohistochemical analysis. In A2780 ovarian carcinoma tumors, treatment with sunitinib+light resulted in immediate specific angio-occlusion, leading to a necrotic tumor mass 24?h after treatment. Tumor growth was inhibited by 70% as compared with the control group (**P<0.0001). Similar observations were made in the Colo-26 colorectal carcinoma, where light exposure of the sunitinib-treated mice inhibited tumor growth by 50% as compared with the control and by 25% as compared with sunitinib-only-treated tumors (N?4; P=0.0002). Histology revealed that photoactivation of sunitinib resulted in a change in tumor vessel architecture. The current results suggest that the spectral properties of sunitinib can be exploited for application against certain cancer indications. PMID:25675301

  7. [Endothelial genesis inhibitor-8t (EDI-8t) against tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingwei; Du, Peng; Qian, Yue; Zhang, Qian; Feng, Baoshan; Ding, Hongzhen; Gan, Renbao; Zhang, Hui

    2010-12-01

    On the basis of the origin comparison of known endothelial genesis inhibitors, a 417-bp cDNA fragment was amplified from umbilical cord by RT-PCR and cloned into the expression vector pPIC9, followed by transformation into Pichia pastoris GS115. The resulted yeast was induced with methanol to express recombinant protein. The resulted protein was purified from culture broth and designated as EDI-8t. The in vitro study showed that EDI-8t, originated from collagen VIII, could specifically inhibit the growth and migration of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) stimulated by basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The protein also exhibited the activity to cause cell apoptosis. In vivo EDI-8t showed the identical activity comparing with endostatin to inhibit the growth of liver tumor transplanted into nude mice. Interestingly, EDI-8t showed higher activity than endostatin to inhibit tumor growth in metastatic model of melanoma mice. PMID:21387837

  8. Antioxidant supplementation accelerates cachexia development by promoting tumor growth in C26 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Assi, Mohamad; Derbr, Frdric; Lefeuvre-Orfila, Luz; Rbillard, Amlie

    2016-02-01

    More than 50% of patients with advanced stages of colon cancer suffer from progressive loss of skeletal muscle, called cachexia, resulting in reduced quality of life and shortened survival. It is becoming evident that reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate pathways controlling skeletal muscle atrophy. Herein we tested the hypothesis that antioxidant supplementation could prevent skeletal muscle atrophy in a model of cachectic Colon 26 (C26) tumor-bearing mice. Seven-week-old BALB/c mice were subcutaneously inoculated with colon 26 (C26) cancer cells or PBS. Then C26-mice were daily gavaged during 22 days either with PBS (vehicle) or an antioxidant cocktail whose composition is close to that of commercial dietary antioxidant supplements (rich in catechins, quercetin and vitamin C). We found that antioxidants enhanced weight loss and caused premature death of mice. Antioxidants supplementation failed to prevent (i) the increase in plasma TNF-? levels and systemic oxidative damage, (ii) skeletal muscle atrophy and (iii) activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (MuRF-1, MAFbx and polyubiquitinated proteins). Accordingly, immunohistological staining for Ki-67 and the expression of cell cycle inhibitors demonstrated that tumor of supplemented mice developed faster with a concomitant decrease in oxidative damage. Previous studies have shown that the use of catechins and quercetin separately can improve the musculoskeletal function in cachectic animals. However, our results indicate that the combination of these antioxidants reduced survival and enhanced cachexia in C26-mice. PMID:26708754

  9. Cellular and Tumor Radiosensitivity is Correlated to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Protein Expression Level in Tumors Without EGFR Amplification;Epidermal growth factor receptor; Radiotherapy; Squamous cell carcinoma; Biomarker; Local tumor control

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Saker, Jarob; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Krause, Mechthild; Yaromina, Ala; Meyer-Staeckling, Soenke; Scherkl, Benjamin; Kriegs, Malte; Brandt, Burkhard; Grenman, Reidar; Petersen, Cordula; Baumann, Michael; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: There is conflicting evidence for whether the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor in human tumors can be used as a marker of radioresponse. Therefore, this association was studied in a systematic manner using squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines grown as cell cultures and xenografts. Methods and Materials: The study was performed with 24 tumor cell lines of different tumor types, including 10 SCC lines, which were also investigated as xenografts on nude mice. Egfr gene dose and the length of CA-repeats in intron 1 were determined by polymerase chain reaction, protein expression in vitro by Western blot and in vivo by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and radiosensitivity in vitro by colony formation. Data were correlated with previously published tumor control dose 50% data after fractionated irradiation of xenografts of the 10 SCC. Results: EGFR protein expression varies considerably, with most tumor cell lines showing moderate and only few showing pronounced upregulation. EGFR upregulation could only be attributed to massive gene amplification in the latter. In the case of little or no amplification, in vitro EGFR expression correlated with both cellular and tumor radioresponse. In vivo EGFR expression did not show this correlation. Conclusions: Local tumor control after the fractionated irradiation of tumors with little or no gene amplification seems to be dependent on in vitro EGFR via its effect on cellular radiosensitivity.

  10. SDF-1? Mediates Wound-Promoted Tumor Growth in a Syngeneic Orthotopic Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stuelten, Christina H.; Cervoni-Curet, Frances N.; Busch, Johanna I.; Sutton, Emily; Webster, Joshua D.; Kavalukas, Sandra L.; Wakefield, Lalage M.; Barbul, Adrian; Niederhuber, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Increased growth of residual tumors in the proximity of acute surgical wounds has been reported; however, the mechanisms of wound-promoted tumor growth remain unknown. Here, we used a syngeneic, orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer to study mechanisms of wound-promoted tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that exposure of metastatic mouse breast cancer cells (4T1) to SDF-1?, which is increased in wound fluid, results in increased tumor growth. Both, wounding and exposure of 4T1 cells to SDF-1? not only increased tumor growth, but also tumor cell proliferation rate and stromal collagen deposition. Conversely, systemic inhibition of SDF-1? signaling with the small molecule AMD 3100 abolished the effect of wounding, and decreased cell proliferation, collagen deposition, and neoangiogenesis to the levels observed in control animals. Furthermore, using different mouse strains we could demonstrate that the effect of wounding on tumor growth and SDF-1? levels is host dependent and varies between mouse strains. Our results show that wound-promoted tumor growth is mediated by elevated SDF-1? levels and indicate that the effect of acute wounds on tumor growth depends on the predetermined wound response of the host background and its predetermined wound response. PMID:23593347

  11. Haploinsufficiency of ANO6, NELL2 and DBX2 in a boy with intellectual disability and growth delay.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Ellen Ø; Frengen, Eirik; Fannemel, Madeleine; Misceo, Doriana

    2015-08-01

    We report on a 10-year-old-boy presenting with moderate intellectual disability (ID), impaired motor skills, hypotonia, growth delay, minor anomalies, misaligned teeth, pectus excavatum, small hands and feet, widely spaced nipples, and a 1.13 Mb de novo deletion on HSA12q12 (chr12:44,830,147-45,964,945 bp, hg19), deleting ANO6, NELL2, and DBX2 and the pseudogenes PLEKHA8P1 and RACGAP1P. We suggest DBX2 and NELL2 as disease-causing genes and their haploinsufficiency to be involved in the psychomotor delay in the patient. DBX2 encodes a homeobox protein, highly expressed during neuronal development and regulating differentiation of interneurons in brain and spinal cord. NELL2 is expressed in most of the central and peripheral nervous system, with highest expression in hippocampus and cerebellum, maximizing during neuronal differentiation. The deletion in our patient is the smallest in HSA12q12 reported to date, and it is included in the deletion carried by four previously reported patients. The clinical presentation of these patients points to the recurrence of the following manifestation, possibly delineating a 12q12 deletion syndrome phenotype: moderate to severe developmental/intellectual delay, hypotonia, postnatal growth retardation, skeletal and dental anomalies, minor facial anomalies including strabismus, down slanting palpebral fissures, and large/low-set ears. PMID:25846056

  12. A cellular automata model for avascular solid tumor growth under the effect of therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, E. A.; Santos, L. B. L.; Pinho, S. T. R.

    2009-04-01

    Tumor growth has long been a target of investigation within the context of mathematical and computer modeling. The objective of this study is to propose and analyze a two-dimensional stochastic cellular automata model to describe avascular solid tumor growth, taking into account both the competition between cancer cells and normal cells for nutrients and/or space and a time-dependent proliferation of cancer cells. Gompertzian growth, characteristic of some tumors, is described and some of the features of the time-spatial pattern of solid tumors, such as compact morphology with irregular borders, are captured. The parameter space is studied in order to analyze the occurrence of necrosis and the response to therapy. Our findings suggest that transitions exist between necrotic and non-necrotic phases (no-therapy cases), and between the states of cure and non-cure (therapy cases). To analyze cure, the control and order parameters are, respectively, the highest probability of cancer cell proliferation and the probability of the therapeutic effect on cancer cells. With respect to patterns, it is possible to observe the inner necrotic core and the effect of the therapy destroying the tumor from its outer borders inwards.

  13. Mitochondrial Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Regulates Metabolic Adaptation and Enables Glucose-Independent Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Emma E; Sergushichev, Alexey; Griss, Takla; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Samborska, Bozena; Ntimbane, Thierry; Coelho, Paula P; Blagih, Julianna; Raissi, Thomas C; Choinire, Luc; Bridon, Galle; Loginicheva, Ekaterina; Flynn, Breanna R; Thomas, Elaine C; Tavar, Jeremy M; Avizonis, Daina; Pause, Arnim; Elder, Douglas J E; Artyomov, Maxim N; Jones, Russell G

    2015-10-15

    Cancer cells adapt metabolically to proliferate under nutrient limitation. Here we used combined transcriptional-metabolomic network analysis to identify metabolic pathways that support glucose-independent tumor cell proliferation. We found that glucose deprivation stimulated re-wiring of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and early steps of gluconeogenesis to promote glucose-independent cell proliferation. Glucose limitation promoted the production of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from glutamine via theactivity of mitochondrial PEP-carboxykinase (PCK2). Under these conditions, glutamine-derived PEP was used to fuel biosynthetic pathways normally sustained by glucose, including serine and purine biosynthesis. PCK2 expression was required tomaintain tumor cell proliferation under limited-glucose conditions invitro and tumor growth invivo. Elevated PCK2 expression is observed in several human tumor types and enriched in tumor tissue from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Our results define a role for PCK2 in cancer cell metabolic reprogramming that promotes glucose-independent cell growth and metabolic stress resistance in human tumors. PMID:26474064

  14. An Adaptive Multigrid Algorithm for Simulating Solid Tumor Growth Using Mixture Models

    PubMed Central

    Wise, S.M.; Lowengrub, J.S.; Cristini, V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we give the details of the numerical solution of a three-dimensional multispecies diffuse interface model of tumor growth, which was derived in (Wise et al., J. Theor. Biol. 253 (2008)) and used to study the development of glioma in (Frieboes et al., NeuroImage 37 (2007) and tumor invasion in (Bearer et al., Cancer Research, 69 (2009)) and (Frieboes et al., J. Theor. Biol. 264 (2010)). The model has a thermodynamic basis, is related to recently developed mixture models, and is capable of providing a detailed description of tumor progression. It utilizes a diffuse interface approach, whereby sharp tumor boundaries are replaced by narrow transition layers that arise due to differential adhesive forces among the cell-species. The model consists of fourth-order nonlinear advection-reaction-diffusion equations (of Cahn-Hilliard-type) for the cell-species coupled with reaction-diffusion equations for the substrate components. Numerical solution of the model is challenging because the equations are coupled, highly nonlinear, and numerically stiff. In this paper we describe a fully adaptive, nonlinear multigrid/finite difference method for efficiently solving the equations. We demonstrate the convergence of the algorithm and we present simulations of tumor growth in 2D and 3D that demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm in accurately and efficiently simulating the progression of tumors with complex morphologies. PMID:21076663

  15. Endothelial Cords Promote Tumor Initial Growth prior to Vascular Function through a Paracrine Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chengjian; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yuwei; Yang, Yun; Luo, Hui; Ji, Gaili; Dong, E; Deng, Hongxing; Lin, Shuo; Wei, Yuquan; Yang, Hanshuo

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic switch is an important oncogenic step that determines whether microtumors remain dormant or progresses further. It has been generally perceived that the primary function of this tumorgenic event is to supply oxygen and nutrients through blood circulation. Using in vivo imaging of zebrafish and mouse tumor models, we showed that endothelial cords aggressively penetrated into microtumors and remained non-circulatory for several days before undergoing vascular blood perfusion. Unexpectedly, we found that initial tumor growth in both models was significantly reduced if endothelial cords were removed by blocking VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling or using a vascular deficient zebrafish mutant. It was further shown that soluble factors including IL-8, secreted by endothelial cells (ECs) were responsible for stimulating tumor cells proliferation. These findings establish that tumor angiogenesis play a much earlier and broader role in promoting tumor growth, which is independent of vascular circulation. Understanding this novel mechanism of angiogenic tumor progression offers new entry points for cancer therapeutics. PMID:26762853

  16. Light deprivation retards the growth of the diethylstilbesterol-induced renal tumor in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Logan, J L; Benson, B

    1990-01-01

    Chronic treatment with diethylstilbesterol (DES) induces renal cancer in male Syrian hamsters. This tumor may result from direct carcinogenicity of the estrogen, but extrarenal neuroendocrine effects of DES may also be important in modulating tumor growth in the kidney. Since light deprivation is known to profoundly influence neuroendocrine function in the hamster, we elected to examine the effects of short photoperiod or blinding on the development of the DES-induced renal tumor in this species. Animals were maintained either in long (14 hours of light and 10 hours of dark) or short (10 hours of light and 14 hours of dark) photoperiod or blinded. Groups of six to eight animals were sacrificed after three, six or nine months of treatment with either DES or the vehicle. All animals treated with DES for nine months had evidence of renal tumors, but the rate of growth and final size of the tumors were significantly reduced by either maintenance in short photoperiod or blinding. These data provide unique evidence of the importance of neuroendocrine system in the modulation of the DES-induced renal tumor in hamsters. PMID:2210920

  17. Endothelial Cords Promote Tumor Initial Growth prior to Vascular Function through a Paracrine Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengjian; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yuwei; Yang, Yun; Luo, Hui; Ji, Gaili; Dong, E; Deng, Hongxing; Lin, Shuo; Wei, Yuquan; Yang, Hanshuo

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic switch is an important oncogenic step that determines whether microtumors remain dormant or progresses further. It has been generally perceived that the primary function of this tumorgenic event is to supply oxygen and nutrients through blood circulation. Using in vivo imaging of zebrafish and mouse tumor models, we showed that endothelial cords aggressively penetrated into microtumors and remained non-circulatory for several days before undergoing vascular blood perfusion. Unexpectedly, we found that initial tumor growth in both models was significantly reduced if endothelial cords were removed by blocking VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling or using a vascular deficient zebrafish mutant. It was further shown that soluble factors including IL-8, secreted by endothelial cells (ECs) were responsible for stimulating tumor cells proliferation. These findings establish that tumor angiogenesis play a much earlier and broader role in promoting tumor growth, which is independent of vascular circulation. Understanding this novel mechanism of angiogenic tumor progression offers new entry points for cancer therapeutics. PMID:26762853

  18. Ubiquitin E3 ligase MARCH7 promotes ovarian tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianguo; Meng, Ying; Yu, Tinghe; Hu, Lina; Mao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin E3 ligase MARCH7 is involved in T cell proliferation and neuronal development. We found that expression of MARCH7 was higher in ovarian cancer tissues than normal ovarian tissues. Silencing MARCH7 decreased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Ectopic expression of MARCH7 increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Silencing MARCH7 prevented ovarian cancer growth in mice. Silencing MARCH7 inhibited NFkB and Wnt/?-catenin pathway. In agreement, ectopically expressed MARCH7 activated NFkB and Wnt/?-catenin pathways. Finally, MARCH7 was regulated by miR-101. Thus, MARCH7 is oncogenic and a potential target (oncotarget) for ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:25895127

  19. Dynamic Quantitative Intravital Imaging of Glioblastoma Progression Reveals a Lack of Correlation between Tumor Growth and Blood Vessel Density

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Clment; Stanchi, Fabio; Rodriguez, Thieric; Amoureux, Marie-Claude; Rougon, Genevive; Debarbieux, Franck

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal and longitudinal monitoring of cellular processes occurring in tumors is critical for oncological research. We focused on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an untreatable highly vascularized brain tumor whose progression is thought to critically depend on the oxygen and metabolites supplied by blood vessels. We optimized protocols for orthotopic GBM grafting in mice that were able to recapitulate the biophysical constraints normally governing tumor progression and were suitable for intravital multiphoton microscopy. We repeatedly imaged tumor cells and blood vessels during GBM development. We established methods for quantitative correlative analyses of dynamic imaging data over wide fields in order to cover the entire tumor. We searched whether correlations existed between blood vessel density, tumor cell density and proliferation in control tumors. Extensive vascular remodeling and the formation of new vessels accompanied U87 tumor cell growth, but no strong correlation was found between local cell density and the extent of local blood vessel density irrespective of the tumor area or time points. The technique moreover proves useful for comparative analysis of mice subjected either to Bevacizumab anti-angiogenic treatment that targets VEGF or to AMD3100, an antagonist of CXCR4 receptor. Bevacizumab treatment massively reduced tumoral vessel densities but only transiently reduced U87 tumor growth rate. Again, there was no correlation between local blood vessel density and local cell density. Moreover, Bev applied only prior to tumor implantation inhibited tumor growth to the same extent as post-grafting treatment. AMD3100 achieved a potent inhibition of tumor growth without significant reduction in blood vessel density. These results indicate that in the brain, in this model, tumor growth can be sustained without an increase in blood vessel density and suggest that GBM growth is rather governed by stromal properties. PMID:24069154

  20. Growth Hormone Protects the Intestine Preserving Radiotherapy Efficacy on Tumors: A Short-Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Caz, Victor; Elvira, Marcos; Tabernero, Maria; Grande, Antonio G.; Lopez-Plaza, Bricia; de Miguel, Enrique; Largo, Carlota; Santamaria, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy on tumors is hampered by its devastating adverse effects on healthy tissue, particularly that of the gastrointestinal tract. These effects cause acute symptoms that are so disruptive to patients that they can lead to interruption of the radiotherapy program. These adverse effects could limit the intensity of radiation received by the patient, resulting in a sublethal dose to the tumor, thus increasing the risk of tumor resistance. The lack of an effective treatment to protect the bowel during radiation therapy to allow higher radiation doses that are lethal to the tumor has become a barrier to implementing effective therapy. In this study, we present a comparative analysis of both intestinal and tumor tissue in regard to the efficacy and the preventive impact of a short-term growth hormone (GH) treatment in tumor-bearing rats as a protective agent during radiotherapy. Our data show that the exogenous administration of GH improved intestinal recovery after radiation treatment while preserving the therapeutic effect against the tumor. GH significantly increased proliferation in the irradiated intestine but not in the irradiated tumors, as assessed by Positron Emission Tomography and the proliferative markers Ki67, cyclin D3, and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen. This proliferative effect was consistent with a significant increase in irradiated intestinal villi and crypt length. Furthermore, GH significantly decreased caspase-3 activity in the intestine, whereas GH did not produce this effect in the irradiated tumors. In conclusion, short-term GH treatment protects the bowel, inducing proliferation while reducing apoptosis in healthy intestinal tissue and preserving radiotherapy efficacy on tumors. PMID:26670463

  1. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth. PMID:26213205

  2. Personality-Targeted Interventions Delay the Growth of Adolescent Drinking and Binge Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrod, Patricia J.; Castellanos, Natalie; Mackie, Clare

    2008-01-01

    Background: Personality factors are implicated in the vulnerability to adolescent alcohol misuse. This study examined whether providing personality-targeted interventions in early adolescence can delay drinking and binge drinking in high-risk youth. Methods: A randomised control trial was carried out with 368 adolescents recruited from years 9 and

  3. Personality-Targeted Interventions Delay the Growth of Adolescent Drinking and Binge Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrod, Patricia J.; Castellanos, Natalie; Mackie, Clare

    2008-01-01

    Background: Personality factors are implicated in the vulnerability to adolescent alcohol misuse. This study examined whether providing personality-targeted interventions in early adolescence can delay drinking and binge drinking in high-risk youth. Methods: A randomised control trial was carried out with 368 adolescents recruited from years 9 and…

  4. Statins improve survival by inhibiting spontaneous metastasis and tumor growth in a mouse melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Takeda, Tomoya; Kino, Toshiki; Obata, Naoya; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Mashimo, Kenji; Fujiwara, Daichiro; Sakaguchi, Katsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a life-threatening disease for which no effective treatment is currently available. In melanoma cells, Rho overexpression promotes invasion and metastasis. However, the effect of statins on spontaneous metastasis and tumor growth remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of statin-mediated tumor growth and metastasis inhibition in an in vivo model. We found that statins significantly inhibited spontaneous metastasis and tumor growth. Statins inhibited the mRNA expression and enzymatic activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in vivo and also suppressed the mRNA and protein expression of very late antigens (VLAs). Moreover, statins inhibited the prenylation of Rho as well as the phosphorylation of LIM kinase, serum response factor (SRF), and c-Fos downstream of the Rho signaling pathway. In addition, statins enhanced p53, p21, and p27 expression and reduced phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase and expression of cyclin D1 and E2. These results indicate that statins suppress Rho signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting tumor metastasis and growth. Furthermore, statins markedly improved the survival rate in a metastasis model, suggesting that statins have potential clinical applications for the treatment of metastatic cancers. PMID:26693069

  5. A Generative Approach for Image-Based Modeling of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Menze, Bjoern H.; Van Leemput, Koen; Honkela, Antti; Konukoglu, Ender; Weber, Marc-Andr; Ayache, Nicholas; Golland, Polina

    2011-01-01

    Extensive imaging is routinely used in brain tumor patients to monitor the state of the disease and to evaluate therapeutic options. A large number of multi-modal and multi-temporal image volumes is acquired in standard clinical cases, requiring new approaches for comprehensive integration of information from different image sources and different time points. In this work we propose a joint generative model of tumor growth and of image observation that naturally handles multimodal and longitudinal data. We use the model for analyzing imaging data in patients with glioma. The tumor growth model is based on a reaction-diffusion framework. Model personalization relies only on a forward model for the growth process and on image likelihood. We take advantage of an adaptive sparse grid approximation for efficient inference via Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling. The approach can be used for integrating information from different multi-modal imaging protocols and can easily be adapted to other tumor growth models. PMID:21761700

  6. Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Metastasis by a Combination of Escherichia coli–mediated Cytolytic Therapy and Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Phan, Thuy X; Nam, Taek-Keun; Nguyen, Vu H; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Bom, Hee-Seung; Choy, Hyon E; Hong, Yeongjin; Min, Jung-Joon

    2010-01-01

    We have reported that Escherichia coli K-12 colonizes hypoxic and necrotic tumor regions after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. In this study, we established a novel strategy for cancer therapy using engineered bacteria to enhance the therapeutic effects of radiation. E. coli strain K-12 was engineered to produce cytolysin A (ClyA), and its effects on tumor growth in primary and metastatic tumor models were evaluated. A single treatment with E. coli–expressing ClyA significantly decreased tumor growth rates initially (9 days after treatment); however, the tumors tended to grow thereafter. With only radiotherapy (RT; 21 Gy), the tumor growth rates were retarded, but not the tumor sizes. A combination of therapy with E. coli–expressing ClyA and radiation [a total of 5 × 107 colony-forming units (CFU) and 21 Gy] resulted in significant tumor shrinkage and even complete disappearance of tumors in mice with tumors derived from murine CT26 colon cancer. Furthermore, treatment with E. coli–expressing ClyA markedly suppressed metastatic tumor growth and prolonged the survival time in mice. The results described here indicate that therapy with engineered E. coli could significantly improve the results of RT, and could exert a striking inhibitory effect on the development of lung metastasis. PMID:20051939

  7. Decreasing CNPY2 Expression Diminishes Colorectal Tumor Growth and Development through Activation of p53 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Gong, Hui; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Feng, Yi; Wu, Jun; He, Sheng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Xiaoxia; Guo, Rui; Xie, Jun; Li, Ren-Ke

    2016-04-01

    Neovascularization drives tumor development, and angiogenic factors are important neovascularization initiators. We recently identified the secreted angiogenic factor CNPY2, but its involvement in cancer has not been explored. Herein, we investigate CNPY2's role in human colorectal cancer (CRC) development. Tumor samples were obtained from CRC patients undergoing surgery. Canopy 2 (CNPY2) expression was analyzed in tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Stable lines of human HCT116 cells expressing CNPY2 shRNA or control shRNA were established. To determine CNPY2's effects on tumor xenografts in vivo, human CNPY2 shRNA HCT116 cells and controls were injected into nude mice, separately. Cellular apoptosis, growth, and angiogenesis in the xenografts were evaluated. CNPY2 expression was significantly higher in CRC tissues. CNPY2 knockdown in HCT116 cells inhibited growth and migration and promoted apoptosis. In xenografts, CNPY2 knockdown prevented tumor growth and angiogenesis and promoted apoptosis. Knockdown of CNPY2 in the HCT116 CRC cell line reversibly increased p53 activity. The p53 activation increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and decreased cyclin-dependent kinase 2, thereby inhibiting tumor cell growth, inducing cell apoptosis, and reducing angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. CNPY2 may play a critical role in CRC development by enhancing cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis and by inhibiting apoptosis through negative regulation of the p53 pathway. Therefore, CNPY2 may represent a novel CRC therapeutic target and prognostic indicator. PMID:26835537

  8. Forkhead box protein A1 is a prognostic predictor and promotes tumor growth of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongyu; Zhang, Pei; Tang, Yong; Wu, Mengping; Zhang, Weikang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the cancer-type specific role of forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) in human malignancies. However, the clinical significance of FOXA1 and its biological function in gastric cancer remain unknown. In this study, the expression of FOXA1 in 80 pairs of gastric cancer tissues and corresponding non-tumor tissues was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found that the levels of FOXA1 protein and mRNA in gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in matched tumor-adjacent tissues. Furthermore, clinical association analysis indicated that the positive expression of FOXA1 was associated with adverse clinicopathological characteristics of gastric cancer patients including poor tumor differentiation, large tumor size, and advanced tumor-node-metastasis tumor stage. Notably, gastric cancer patients with positive expression of FOXA1 had a poorer 5-year overall survival and recurrence-free survival. In addition, FOXA1 knockdown remarkably inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in both SGC-7901 and MGC-803 cells. In vivo studies indicated that FOXA1 knockdown prominently suppressed tumor growth of gastric cancer in a nude mouse xenograft model. Mechanistically, we disclosed that the expression of Yes-associated protein was decreased accordingly after FOXA1 knockdown in both SGC-7901 and MGC-803 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that FOXA1 may serve as a promising prognostic indicator and an attractive therapeutic target of gastric cancer. PMID:26527889

  9. VEGF-A/VEGFR Inhibition Restores Hematopoietic Homeostasis in the Bone Marrow and Attenuates Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Rebekah K; Falcon, Beverly; Hanson, Jeff; Goldstein, Whitney E; Perruzzi, Carole; Rafii, Shahin; Aird, William C; Benjamin, Laura E

    2016-02-01

    Antiangiogenesis-based cancer therapies, specifically those targeting the VEGF-A/VEGFR2 pathway, have been approved for subsets of solid tumors. However, these therapies result in an increase in hematologic adverse events. We surmised that both the bone marrow vasculature and VEGF receptor-positive hematopoietic cells could be impacted by VEGF pathway-targeted therapies. We used a mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer to decipher the mechanism by which VEGF pathway inhibition alters hematopoiesis. Tumor-bearing animals, while exhibiting increased angiogenesis at the primary tumor site, showed signs of shrinkage in the sinusoidal bone marrow vasculature accompanied by an increase in the hematopoietic stem cell-containing Lin-cKit(+)Sca1(+) (LKS) progenitor population. Therapeutic intervention by targeting VEGF-A, VEGFR2, and VEGFR3 inhibited tumor growth, consistent with observed alterations in the primary tumor vascular bed. These treatments also displayed systemic effects, including reversal of the tumor-induced shrinkage of sinusoidal vessels and altered population balance of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, manifested by the restoration of sinusoidal vessel morphology and hematopoietic homeostasis. These data indicate that tumor cells exert an aberrant systemic effect on the bone marrow microenvironment and VEGF-A/VEGFR targeting restores bone marrow function. Cancer Res; 76(3); 517-24. 2015 AACR. PMID:26719538

  10. MicroRNAs and Growth Factors: An Alliance Propelling Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kedmi, Merav; Sas-Chen, Aldema; Yarden, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression requires cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and attraction of blood and lymph vessels. These processes are tightly regulated by growth factors and their intracellular signaling pathways, which culminate in transcriptional programs. Hence, oncogenic mutations often capture growth factor signaling, and drugs able to intercept the underlying biochemical routes might retard cancer spread. Along with messenger RNAs, microRNAs play regulatory roles in growth factor signaling and in tumor progression. Because growth factors regulate abundance of certain microRNAs and the latter modulate the abundance of proteins necessary for growth factor signaling, the two classes of molecules form a dense web of interactions, which are dominated by a few recurring modules. We review specific examples of the alliance formed by growth factors and microRNAs and refer primarily to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway. Clinical applications of the crosstalk between microRNAs and growth factors are described, including relevance to cancer therapy and to emergence of resistance to specific drugs. PMID:26287249

  11. Insulin like growth factor binding protein-7 reduces growth of human breast cancer cells and xenografted tumors.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Y; Yang, W; Benatar, T; Nofech-Mozes, S; Yee, A; Kahn, H; Holloway, C; Seth, Arun

    2011-04-01

    Previously, we have shown that insulin-like growth factor binding protein-7 (IGFBP-7) expression is inversely correlated with disease progression in breast cancer and is associated with poor outcome. To further investigate the role of IGFBP-7 in the growth and metastatic behavior of breast cancer, primary breast tumors and metastatic tumors derived from the same patients were analyzed for IGFBP-7 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that IGFBP-7 is downregulated in half of the human metastatic breast tumors tested. IGFBP-7 has been linked to suppression of oncogenic pathways and can directly restore cellular senescence in melanomas, leading to their regression. It is possible that breast tumors with metastatic potential have escaped from IGFBP-7-induced suppression by its down-regulation. Twenty-two human primary breast tumor specimens were transplanted into human-bone NOD/SCID mice. One of the two triple negative primary breast tumors was serially xenotransplanted more than five times. Each serial transplant resulted in increased tumor take and rate of growth. Expression of IGFBP-7 was downregulated upon each serial implantation. To investigate the role of IGFBP-7 in breast tumor suppression, IGFBP-7 was overexpressed in the triple negative MDA-MB-468 human breast cancer line by stable transfection of a pSec-tag2-IGFBP-7 vector. The parental MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells expressed extremely low levels of endogenous IGFBP-7. The production of IGFBP-7 protein by the MDA-MB-468 cells stably transfected with IGFBP-7 was confirmed by immunoblotting with anti-IGFBP-7 antibody. Ectopic overexpression of IGFBP-7 significantly reduced the growth of the IGFBP-7 transfected MDA-MB-468 cells compared to the parental MDA-MB-468 cells. We also assessed the role of IGFBP-7 on cell migration, a key determinant of malignant progression and metastasis. When parental MDA-MB-468 cells were treated with various amounts of conditioned medium derived from the IGFBP-7 overexpressing cell line, a significant difference in cell migration rate was observed between untreated and treated cells. IGFBP-7 strongly suppressed the phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK-1/2, suggesting that IGFBP-7 mediates its anti-proliferative effects through negative feedback signaling. Levels of phospho-ERK-1/2 were higher in the parental MDA-MB-468 than in IGFBP-7-expressing cells derived from it. When injected subcutaneously into NOD/SCID mice, the increased expression of IGFBP-7 in the MDA-MB-468 transfected cells reduced the rate of tumor growth in comparison to the parental MDA-MB-468 controls. These results suggest that the growth of breast cancer could be prevented by the forced expression of IGFBP-7 protein. PMID:20464481

  12. Dioscin inhibits colon tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis through regulating VEGFR2 and AKT/MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qingyi; Qing, Yong; Wu, Yang; Hu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Lei; Wu, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    Dioscin has shown cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but its in vivo effects and the mechanisms have not elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study was to assess the antitumor effects and the molecular mechanisms of dioscin. We showed that dioscin could inhibit tumor growth in vivo and has no toxicity at the test condition. The growth suppression was accompanied by obvious blood vessel decrease within solid tumors. We also found dioscin treatment inhibited the proliferation of cancer and endothelial cell lines, and most sensitive to primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). What's more, analysis of HUVECs migration, invasion, and tube formation exhibited that dioscin has significantly inhibitive effects to these actions. Further analysis of blood vessel formation in the matrigel plugs indicated that dioscin could inhibit VEGF-induced blood vessel formation in vivo. We also identified that dioscin could suppress the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src, FAK, AKT and Erk1/2, accompanied by the increase of phosphorylated P38MAPK. The results potently suggest that dioscin may be a potential anticancer drug, which efficiently inhibits angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathways. PMID:25111127

  13. Efficacy of local delivery of ardipusilloside I using biodegradable implants against cerebral tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Huan; Wang, Ji; Cheng, Jiang-Xue; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Wang, Ying; Cheng, Li-Fei; Du, Caigan; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ardipusilloside I (ADS-I) is a natural compound that can be isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Ardisiapusilla A.DC, and has been reported to inhibit the growth of glioblastoma cells in cultures. This study was designed to test its efficacy by the delivery using biodegradable implants against glioblastoma in vivo. ADS-I was incorporated into polymer microspheres, which were prepared by a mixture of poly (D, L-lactic acid) and poly (D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymers and then fabricated into wafers. The anti-glioma activities of ADS-I-loaded wafers were examined by methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay in cultured rat C6 glioma cells, and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and survival monitoring in C6 glioma-bearing rats. Here, we showed that ADS-I-loaded wafers sustained ADS-I release in vitro for 36 days in Higuchi model of kinetics, and had the same cytotoxic activity as ADS-I in the solution against the growth of C6 glioma cells in cultures. In C6 glioma-bearing rats, ADS-I wafer implants inhibited tumor growth in a dose-dependent matter, and were more effective than the same dosage of ADS-I in the solution. The tumor suppression efficacies of ADS-I wafer implants were positively correlated with an increase in tumor cell apoptosis and prolonged animal survival, and were associated with a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor, C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-? and interleukin-6, and an increase in interleukin-2 expression. In conclusion, this study demonstrates significant efficacy of local delivery of ADS-I using polymer implants against glioma tumor growth in vivo, suggesting the potential of ADS-I-loaded wafers for glioma treatment. PMID:25628934

  14. Dietary protein restriction inhibits tumor growth in human xenograft models of prostate and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Antonella L.; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Ciamporcero, Eric; Longo, Valter D.; Nguyen, Holly; Vessella, Robert; Pili, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data from epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that dietary protein intake may play a role in inhibiting prostate and breast cancer by modulating the IGF/AKT/mTOR pathway. In this study we investigated the effects of diets with different protein content or quality on prostate and breast cancer. Experimental Design: To test our hypothesis we assessed the inhibitory effect of protein diet restriction on prostate and breast cancer growth, serum PSA and IGF-1 concentrations, mTOR activity and epigenetic markers, by using human xenograft cancer models. Results: Our results showed a 70% inhibition of tumor growth in the castrate-resistant LuCaP23.1 prostate cancer model and a 56% inhibition in the WHIM16 breast cancer model fed with a 7% protein diet when compared to an isocaloric 21% protein diet. Inhibition of tumor growth correlated, in the LuCaP23.1 model, with decreased serum PSA and IGF-1 levels, down-regulation of mTORC1 activity, decreased cell proliferation as indicated by Ki67 staining, and reduction in epigenetic markers of prostate cancer progression, including the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and the associated histone mark H3K27me3. In addition, we observed that modifications of dietary protein quality, independently of protein quantity, decreased tumor growth. A diet containing 20% plant protein inhibited tumor weight by 37% as compared to a 20% animal dairy protein diet. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that a reduction in dietary protein intake is highly effective in inhibiting tumor growth in human xenograft prostate and breast cancer models, possibly through the inhibition of the IGF/AKT/mTOR pathway and epigenetic modifications. PMID:24353195

  15. An in vitro system to study tumor dormancy and the switch to metastatic growth.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Dalit; Green, Jeffrey E

    2011-01-01

    Recurrence of breast cancer often follows a long latent period in which there are no signs of cancer, and metastases may not become clinically apparent until many years after removal of the primary tumor and adjuvant therapy. A likely explanation of this phenomenon is that tumor cells have seeded metastatic sites, are resistant to conventional therapies, and remain dormant for long periods of time. The existence of dormant cancer cells at secondary sites has been described previously as quiescent solitary cells that neither proliferate nor undergo apoptosis. Moreover, these solitary cells has been shown to disseminate from the primary tumor at an early stage of disease progression and reside growth-arrested in the patients' bone marrow, blood and lymph nodes. Therefore, understanding mechanisms that regulate dormancy or the switch to a proliferative state is critical for discovering novel targets and interventions to prevent disease recurrence. However, unraveling the mechanisms regulating the switch from tumor dormancy to metastatic growth has been hampered by the lack of available model systems. In vivo and ex vivo model systems to study metastatic progression of tumor cells have been described previously. However these model systems have not provided in real time and in a high throughput manner mechanistic insights into what triggers the emergence of solitary dormant tumor cells to proliferate as metastatic disease. We have recently developed a 3D in vitro system to model the in vivo growth characteristics of cells that exhibit either dormant (D2.OR, MCF7, K7M2-AS.46) or proliferative (D2A1, MDA-MB-231, K7M2) metastatic behavior in vivo. We demonstrated that tumor cells that exhibit dormancy in vivo at a metastatic site remain quiescent when cultured in a 3-dimension (3D) basement membrane extract (BME), whereas cells highly metastatic in vivo readily proliferate in 3D culture after variable, but relatively short periods of quiescence. Importantly by utilizing the 3D in vitro model system we demonstrated for the first time that the ECM composition plays an important role in regulating whether dormant tumor cells will switch to a proliferative state and have confirmed this in in vivo studies. Hence, the model system described in this report provides an in vitro method to model tumor dormancy and study the transition to proliferative growth induced by the microenvironment. PMID:21860375

  16. A two-clones tumor model: Spontaneous growth and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Stura, Ilaria; Venturino, Ezio; Guiot, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    The paper aims at providing a general theoretical frame bridging the macroscopic growth law with the complex heterogeneous structure of real tumors. We apply the "Phenomenological Universality" approach to model the growth of cancer cells accounting for "populations", which are defined not as biologically pre-defined cellular ensemble but as groups of cells behaving homogeneously with respect to their position (e.g. primary or metastatic tumor), growth characteristics, response to treatment, etc. Populations may mutually interact, limit each other their growth or even mutate into another population. To keep the description as simple and manageable as possible only two populations are considered, but the extension to a multiplicity of cell populations is straightforward. Our findings indicate that the eradication of the metastatic population is much more critical in the presence of mutations, either spontaneous or therapy-induced. Furthermore, a treatment that eradicates only the primary tumor, having a low kill rate on the metastases, is ultimately not successful but promotes a "growth spurt" in the latter. PMID:26524141