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Sample records for turbulent friction factors

  1. United Formula for the Friction Factor in the Turbulent Region of Pipe Flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuolin; Huai, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Friction factor is an important element in both flow simulations and river engineering. In hydraulics, studies on the friction factor in turbulent regions have been based on the concept of three flow regimes, namely, the fully smooth regime, the fully rough regime, and the transitional regime, since the establishment of the Nikuradze's chart. However, this study further demonstrates that combining the friction factor with Reynolds number yields a united formula that can scale the entire turbulent region. This formula is derived by investigating the correlation between friction in turbulent pipe flow and its influencing factors, i.e., Reynolds number and relative roughness. In the present study, the formulae of Blasius and Stricklerare modified to rearrange the implicit model of Tao. In addition, we derive a united explicit formula that can compute the friction factor in the entire turbulent regimes based on the asymptotic behavior of the improved Tao's model. Compared with the reported formulae of Nikuradze, the present formula exhibits higher computational accuracy for the original pipe experiment data of Nikuradze. PMID:27136099

  2. United Formula for the Friction Factor in the Turbulent Region of Pipe Flow

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuolin; Huai, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Friction factor is an important element in both flow simulations and river engineering. In hydraulics, studies on the friction factor in turbulent regions have been based on the concept of three flow regimes, namely, the fully smooth regime, the fully rough regime, and the transitional regime, since the establishment of the Nikuradze’s chart. However, this study further demonstrates that combining the friction factor with Reynolds number yields a united formula that can scale the entire turbulent region. This formula is derived by investigating the correlation between friction in turbulent pipe flow and its influencing factors, i.e., Reynolds number and relative roughness. In the present study, the formulae of Blasius and Stricklerare modified to rearrange the implicit model of Tao. In addition, we derive a united explicit formula that can compute the friction factor in the entire turbulent regimes based on the asymptotic behavior of the improved Tao’s model. Compared with the reported formulae of Nikuradze, the present formula exhibits higher computational accuracy for the original pipe experiment data of Nikuradze. PMID:27136099

  3. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore » the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  4. Single-Phase, Turbulent Heat-Transfer Friction-Factor Data Base Flow Enhanced Tb

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    Heat-exchanger designers need to know what type of performance improvement can be obtained before they will consider enhanced tubes. In particular, they need access to the heat-transfer coefficients and friction-factor values of enhanced tube types that are commercially available. To compile these data from the numerous publications and reports in the open literature is a formidable task that can discourage the designer from using them. A computer program that contains a comprehensive data base withmore » a search feature would be a handy tool for the designer to obtain an estimate of the performance improvement that can be obtained with a particular enhanced tube geometry. In addition, it would be a valuable tool for researchers who are developing and/or validating new prediction methods. This computer program can be used to obtain friction-factor and/or heat-transfer data for a broad range of internally enhanced tube geometries with forced-convective turbulent flow. The program has search features; that is the user can select data for tubes with a particular enhancement geometry range or data obtained from a particular source or publication. The friction factor data base contains nearly 5,000 points and the heat-transfer data base contains more than 4,700 points. About 360 different tube geometries are included from the 36 different sources. Data for tubes with similar geometries and the same and/or different types can be easily extracted with the sort feature of this data base and compared. Users of the program are heat-exchanger designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  5. Friction factors and heat transfer coefficients in turbulated cooling passages of different aspect ratios. I - Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslim, M. E.; Spring, S. D.

    1987-06-01

    In advanced turbine airfoil cooling designs where multiple-pass cooling circuits are used, a range of cooling passage aspect ratios (height/width) are encountered. The objective of this experimental investigation was to determine the effect that increasing aspect ratios have on friction factors and Nusselt numbers in internal cooling passages with rib-roughened (turbulated) surfaces. Aspect ratios ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 were tested over a Reynolds number range of 30,000 to 190,000. Each aspect ratio was tested at three different turbulator-height/hydraulic-diameter ratios and at a constant turbulator-height/pitch ratio of 0.10.

  6. On laminar and turbulent friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH

    1946-01-01

    Report deals, first with the theory of the laminar friction flow, where the basic concepts of Prandtl's boundary layer theory are represented from mathematical and physical points of view, and a method is indicated by means of which even more complicated cases can be treated with simple mathematical means, at least approximately. An attempt is also made to secure a basis for the computation of the turbulent friction by means of formulas through which the empirical laws of the turbulent pipe resistance can be applied to other problems on friction drag. (author)

  7. Heat Transfer Through Turbulent Friction Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, H.

    1943-01-01

    The "general Prandtl number" Pr(exp 1) - A(sub q)/A Pr, aside from the Reynolds number determines the ratio of turbulent to molecular heat transfer, and the temperature distribution in turbulent friction layers. A(sub q) = exchange coefficient for heat; A = exchange coefficient for momentum transfer. A formula is derived from the equation defining the general Prandtl number which describes the temperature as a function of the velocity. For fully developed thermal boundary layers all questions relating to heat transfer to and from incompressible fluids can be treated in a simple manner if the ratio of the turbulent shear stress to the total stress T(sub t)/T in the layers near the wall is known, and if the A(sub q)/A can be regarded as independent of the distance from the wall. The velocity distribution across a flat smooth channel and deep into the laminar sublayer was measured for isothermal flow to establish the shear stress ratio T(sub t)/T and to extend the universal wall friction law. The values of T(sub t)/T which resulted from these measurements can be approximately represented by a linear function of the velocity in the laminar-turbulent transition zone. The effect of the temperature relationship of the material values on the flow near the wall is briefly analyzed. It was found that the velocity at the laminar boundary (in contrast to the thickness of the laminar layer) is approximately independent of the temperature distribution. The temperature gradient at the wall and the distribution of temperature and heat flow in the turbulent friction layers were calculated on the basis of the data under two equations. The derived formulas and the figures reveal the effects of the Prandtl number, the Reynolds number, the exchange quantities and the temperature relationship of the material values.

  8. Friction-factor characteristics for narrow channels with honeycomb surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, T. W.; Morrison, G. L.; Childs, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental determination of friction-factors for the flow of air in a narrow channel lined with various honeycomb geometries has been carried out. Test results show that, generally, the friction-factor is nearly constant or slightly decreases as the Reynolds number increases, a characteristic common to turbulent flow in pipes. However, in some test geometries this trend is remarkably different. The friction factor dramatically drops and then rises as the Reynolds number increases. This phenomenon can be characterized as a 'friction-factor jump'. Further investigations of the acoustic spectrum and friction-factor measurements for a broad range of Reynolds numbers indicate that the 'friction-factor jump' phenomenon is accompanied by an onset of a normal mode resonance excited coherent flow fluctuation structure, which occurs at Reynolds number of the order of 10,000. The purpose of this paper is to explain the friction-factor-jump phenomenon and friction-factor characteristics.

  9. Experimental determination of average turbulent heat transfer and friction factor in stator internal rib-roughened cooling channels.

    PubMed

    Battisti, L; Baggio, P

    2001-05-01

    In gas turbine cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to the hot stream are based on the increase of the inner heat transfer areas and on the promotion of the turbulence of the cooling flow. This is currently obtained by casting periodic ribs on one or more sides of the serpentine passages into the core of the blade. Fluid dynamic and thermal behaviour of the cooling flow have been extensively investigated by means of experimental facilities and many papers dealing with this subject have appeared in the latest years. The evaluation of the average value of the heat transfer coefficient most of the time is inferred from local measurements obtained by various experimental techniques. Moreover the great majority of these studies are not concerned with the overall average heat transfer coefficient for the combined ribs and region between them, but do focus just on one of them. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the average Nusselt number inside a straight ribbed duct. Series of measurements have been performed in steady state eliminating the error sources inherently connected with transient methods. A low speed wind tunnel, operating in steady state flow, has been built to simulate the actual flow condition occurring in a rectilinear blade cooling channel. A straight square channel with 20 transverse ribs on two sides has been tested for Re of about 3 x 10(4), 4.5 x 10(4) and 6 x 10(4). The ribbed wall test section is electrically heated and the heat removed by a stationary flow of known thermal and fluid dynamic characteristics. PMID:11460662

  10. Phenomenological Blasius-type friction equation for turbulent power-law fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Anbarlooei, H R; Cruz, D O A; Ramos, F; Silva Freire, A P

    2015-12-01

    We propose a friction formula for turbulent power-law fluid flows, a class of purely viscous non-Newtonian fluids commonly found in applications. Our model is derived through an extension of the friction factor analysis based on Kolmogorov's phenomenology, recently proposed by Gioia and Chakraborty. Tests against classical empirical data show excellent agreement over a significant range of Reynolds number. Limits of the model are also discussed. PMID:26764803

  11. Phenomenological Blasius-type friction equation for turbulent power-law fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbarlooei, H. R.; Cruz, D. O. A.; Ramos, F.; Silva Freire, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a friction formula for turbulent power-law fluid flows, a class of purely viscous non-Newtonian fluids commonly found in applications. Our model is derived through an extension of the friction factor analysis based on Kolmogorov's phenomenology, recently proposed by Gioia and Chakraborty. Tests against classical empirical data show excellent agreement over a significant range of Reynolds number. Limits of the model are also discussed.

  12. The process of separation in the turbulent friction layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruschwitz, E

    1933-01-01

    The separation of the flow which occurs at large angles of attack on the suction side of an airplane wing is attributable to phenomena in the flowing fluid layer adjacent to the surface; the fluid particles slowed up by the friction on the surface can no longer advance against an unduly great pressure rise. It is of vital importance that there exist two types of flow - laminar and turbulent - in the fluid layer flowing in the immediate vicinity of a body. According to Prandtl, by whom the whole theory was developed, we speak in the first case of a laminar boundary layer, in the second, of a turbulent friction layer. (author)

  13. Tidal friction in rotating turbulent convectivestellar and planetary regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.; Auclair-Desrotour, P.; Guenel, M.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulent friction in stellar and planetary convection zones is one of the key physical mechanisms that drive the dissipation of the kinetic energy of tidal flows in stars and planets hosting companions. This friction acting both on the equilibrium tide and on tidal inertial waves thus deeply impacts the dynamics of the spin of the host star/planet and the orbital architecture of the surrounding system. It is thus very important to obtain robust prescription for this friction. In the current state-of-the-art, it is modeled by a turbulent viscosity coefficient using mixing-length theory. However, none of the existing prescriptions take into account the action of the possibly rapid rotation that strongly affects convective flows. In this work, we propose such a new prescription that takes into account rotation and discuss the possible implication for tidal dissipation in rotating stars and planets.

  14. Compliant wall-turbulent skin-friction reduction research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. C.; Weinstein, L. M.; Bushnell, D. M.; Ash, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Previous compliant-wall experiments successful in reducing skin-friction drag probably have had a (unplanned) membrane resonance at a favorable frequency, amplitude, wave shape, length, and speed. The most probable drag reduction mechanism involves a direct coupling between the fluid and the moving wall when the wall natural resonance frequencies are near the fundamental turbulent burst frequency. Local skin-friction reductions of 61% were measured with mylar/PVC plastisol compliant surfaces. These reductions were observed only at certain flow conditions, indicating that changing tunnel total temperature may have altered the substrate dynamic modulus, damping, and coupled mylar tension. Apparently, the coupled membrane/substrate must be excited in compatible narrow-band natural frequency modes. An accelerated effort is required to develop practical durable compliant surfaces optimized for maximum drag reduction. Application of compliant walls to other transportation modes appears feasible with liquid flows offering the greatest skin-friction drag reduction potential.

  15. Theoretical prediction of turbulent skin friction on geometrically complex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peet, Yulia; Sagaut, Pierre

    2009-10-01

    This article can be considered as an extension of the paper of Fukagata et al. [Phys. Fluids 14, L73 (2002)] which derived an analytical expression for the constituent contributions to skin friction in a turbulent channel, pipe, and plane boundary layer flows. In this paper, we extend the theoretical analysis of Fukagata et al. (formerly limited to canonical cases with two-dimensional mean flow) to a fully three-dimensional situation allowing complex wall shapes. We start our analysis by considering arbitrarily shaped surfaces and then formulate a restriction on a surface shape for which the current analysis is valid. A theoretical formula for skin friction coefficient is thus given for streamwise and spanwise homogeneous surfaces of any shape, as well as some more complex configurations, including spanwise-periodic wavy patterns. The theoretical analysis is validated using the results of large eddy simulations of a turbulent flow over straight and wavy riblets with triangular and knife-blade cross-sections. Decomposition of skin friction into different constituent contributions allows us to analyze the influence of different dynamical effects on a skin friction modification by riblet-covered surfaces.

  16. Predicting friction factor in herbaceous emergent wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn-Thompson, T.; Hall, K.

    2012-12-01

    Over 53% of all wetlands in the US have been lost since the mid-1780s; to counteract wetland losses, wetland land area is being replaced through wetland restoration and mitigation. Development of the target wetland hydroperiod is critical to restoration success. For wetlands in which outflow is a component of the water budget, such as in riparian wetlands, surface water stage is controlled all or in part by the hydraulic resistance within the wetland, requiring accurate simulation of hydraulic resistance due to vegetation. Hydraulic models that consider vegetation rely on an accurate determination of a resistance parameter such as a friction factor or drag coefficient. At low Reynolds numbers typical of flows in wetlands, hydraulic resistance is orders of magnitude higher than fully turbulent flows and resistance parameters are functions of the flow regime as well as the vegetation density and structure. The exact relationship between hydraulic resistance, flow regime, and vegetation properties at the low-Reynolds number flows remains unclear. Prior research has typically involved laboratory studies of flow through idealized, individual stems. However, emergent wetland vegetation frequently grows as clumps. The goals of this research were to investigate the effect of clumping vegetation on flow resistance and to develop a prediction equation for use in wetland design. A 6-m by 1-m by 0.4-m recirculating flume was planted with mature common rush, Juncus effusus, a common emergent wetland plant. Three different flow rates (3, 4, and 5 L/s) and three different tailgate heights (0, 2.5, and 5 cm) were used to simulate a range of flow conditions. Plant spacing and clump diameter were varied (20 and 25 cm, 8 and 12 cm, respectively). Friction factors ranged from 9 to 40 and decreased with increasing plant density. Non-dimensional parameters determined through Buckingham Pi analysis were used in a regression analysis to develop a prediction model. Results of the regression analysis showed that the fraction of vegetated occupied area was most significant factor in determining friction factor.

  17. Non-unique frictional drag in turbulent plane Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongrong; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    There is a long standing mystery concerning frictional drag in fully developed turbulent plane Couette flows. In manifest defiance to the predictions from dimensional analysis, experiments have consistently shown that the frictional drag, f, is not a unique function of the Reynolds number, Re. In fact, the f vs. Re data fall on two distinct curves. The origin of these two curves dates back to the 1950s when Reichardt and Robertson independently performed their classical experiments. Subsequent works have found f vs. Re data to be in accord with the Reichardt curve or with the Robertson curve. Here we examine this problem from the perspective of the spectral link, the link between macroscopic properties (like f and the mean velocity profile, MVP) and the turbulent energy spectrum. We argue that since the flow is driven by moving boundaries, the boundaries affect the large length scales of the spectrum differently in the different setups. Using the spectral link we predict that the Reichardt and Robertson curves correspond to disparate features in the MVP: the presence or absence of an overshooting wake, respectively. Whilst the different experiments and simulations did not report the spectrum, we verify our predictions by comparing the f vs. Re curves with the attendant MVPs.

  18. Experimental verification of turbulent skin friction reduction with compliant walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, L. M.; Fischer, M. C.; Ash, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary compliant wall skin friction test results obtained in a low-turbulence pressure tunnel are reported. Compliant surface skins consisted of 0.0025 cm thick mylar, stretched under tension and area-bonded or longitudinally strip-bonded with silicone rubber adhesive to polyurethane foam. Mean velocity and fluctuating survey data were obtained with a single slanted hot wire. Mean velocity profiles for the area-bonded mylar surface skins indicated up to a 20% reduction in boundary-layer thickness (and lower momentum thickness) over rigid surfaces. This reduction in boundary-layer thickness indicates that a drag reduction occurred. In addition, a 16% reduction in wall shear was evident for the mylar/compressor foam compliant surface.

  19. Program helps friction factor for non-Newtonian fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ohen, H.A. )

    1989-01-02

    A Fortran program has been developed that gives more accurate predictions for shear rates, effective viscosity, Reynold's number, and hence the friction factor from which frictional pressure losses for flowing non-Newtonian fluids can be obtained. The method presented can handle flow in smooth pipes, transition, and fully rough zones of turbulence. Two mathematical models, namely the power law and the Bingham have been widely used with drilling fluids and cement slurries for relating shear stress to shear rate, the most popular being Bingham. However, most non-Newtonian fluids are not correctly represented by either of these models. In fact, experience has shown that the consistency curves of most non-Newtonian fluids fall in between those predicted by these models.

  20. The relation between skin friction fluctuations and turbulent fluctuating velocities in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Daniel, Carlos; Laizet, Sylvain; Vassilicos, John Christos

    2015-11-01

    The Townsend-Perry hypothesis of wall-attached eddies relates the friction velocity uτ at the wall to velocity fluctuations at a position y from the wall, resulting in a wavenumber range where the streamwise fluctuating velocity spectrum scales as E (k) ~k-1 and the corresponding structure function scales as uτ2 in the corresponding length-scale range. However, this model does not take in account the fluctuations of the skin friction velocity, which are in fact strongly intermittent. A DNS of zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer suggests a 10 to 15 degree angle from the lag of the peak in the cross-correlations between the fluctuations of the shear stress and streamwise fluctuating velocities at different heights in the boundary layer. Using this result, it is possible to refine the definition of the attached eddy range of scales, and our DNS suggests that, in this range, the second order structure function depends on filtered skin friction fluctuations in a way which is about the same at different distances from the wall and different local Reynolds numbers.

  1. Review of Research into the Concept of the Microblowing Technique for Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A new technology for reducing turbulent skin friction, called the Microblowing Technique (MBT), is presented. Results from proof-of-concept experiments show that this technology could potentially reduce turbulent skin friction by more than 50% of the skin friction of a solid flat plate for subsonic and supersonic flow conditions. The primary purpose of this review paper is to provide readers with information on the turbulent skin friction reduction obtained from many experiments using the MBT. Although the MBT has a penalty for obtaining the microblowing air associated with it, some combinations of the MBT with suction boundary layer control methods are an attractive alternative for a real application. Several computational simulations to understand the flow physics of the MBT are also included. More experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations are needed for the understanding of the unsteady flow nature of the MBT and the optimization of this new technology.

  2. An Experimental Study of Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction in Supersonic Flow Using a Microblowing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.

    1999-01-01

    A new turbulent skin friction reduction technology, called the microblowing technique has been tested in supersonic flow (Mach number of 1.9) on specially designed porous plates with microholes. The skin friction was measured directly by a force balance and the boundary layer development was measured by a total pressure rake at the tailing edge of a test plate. The free stream Reynolds number was 1.0(10 exp 6) per meter. The turbulent skin friction coefficient ratios (C(sub f)/C(sub f0)) of seven porous plates are given in this report. Test results showed that the microblowing technique could reduce the turbulent skin friction in supersonic flow (up to 90 percent below a solid flat plate value, which was even greater than in subsonic flow).

  3. Turbulent Friction in the Boundary Layer of a Flat Plate in a Two-Dimensional Compressible Flow at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankl, F.; Voishel, V.

    1943-01-01

    In the present report an investigation is made on a flat plate in a two-dimensional compressible flow of the effect of compressibility and heating on the turbulent frictional drag coefficient in the boundary layer of an airfoil or wing radiator. The analysis is based on the Prandtl-Karman theory of the turbulent boundary later and the Stodola-Crocco, theorem on the linear relation between the total energy of the flow and its velocity. Formulas are obtained for the velocity distribution and the frictional drag law in a turbulent boundary later with the compressibility effect and heat transfer taken into account. It is found that with increase of compressibility and temperature at full retardation of the flow (the temperature when the velocity of the flow at a given point is reduced to zero in case of an adiabatic process in the gas) at a constant R (sub x), the frictional drag coefficient C (sub f) decreased, both of these factors acting in the same sense.

  4. Skin-friction drag reduction in the turbulent regime using random-textured hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidkar, Rahul A.; Leblanc, Luc; Kulkarni, Ambarish J.; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Ceccio, Steven L.; Perlin, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Technologies for reducing hydrodynamic skin-friction drag have a huge potential for energy-savings in applications ranging from propulsion of marine vessels to transporting liquids through pipes. The majority of previous experimental studies using hydrophobic surfaces have successfully shown skin-friction drag reduction in the laminar and transitional flow regimes (typically Reynolds numbers less than ≃106 for external flows). However, this hydrophobicity induced drag reduction is known to diminish with increasing Reynolds numbers in experiments involving wall bounded turbulent flows. Using random-textured hydrophobic surfaces (fabricated using large-length scalable thermal spray processes) on a flat plate geometry, we present water-tunnel test data with Reynolds numbers ranging from 106 to 9 × 106 that show sustained skin-friction drag reduction of 20%-30% in such turbulent flow regimes. Furthermore, we provide evidence that apart from the formation of a Cassie state and hydrophobicity, we also need a low surface roughness and an enhanced ability of the textured surface to retain trapped air, for sustained drag reduction in turbulent flow regimes. Specifically, for the hydrophobic test surfaces of the present and previous studies, we show that drag reduction seen at lower Reynolds numbers diminishes with increasing Reynolds number when the surface roughness of the underlying texture becomes comparable to the viscous sublayer thickness. Conversely, test data show that textures with surface roughness significantly smaller than the viscous sublayer thickness and textures with high porosity show sustained drag reduction in the turbulent flow regime. The present experiments represent a significant technological advancement and one of the very few demonstrations of skin-friction reduction in the turbulent regime using random-textured hydrophobic surfaces in an external flow configuration. The scalability of the fabrication method, the passive nature of this surface technology, and the obtained results in the turbulent regime make such hydrophobic surfaces a potentially attractive option for hydrodynamic skin-friction drag reduction.

  5. Dynamical Turbulent Flow on the Galton Board with Friction

    SciTech Connect

    Chepelianskii, A. D.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2001-07-16

    We study numerically and analytically the dynamics of charged particles on the Galton board, a regular lattice of disk scatters, in the presence of constant external force, magnetic field, and friction. It is shown that under certain conditions friction leads to the appearance of a strange chaotic attractor. In this regime the average velocity and direction of particle flow can be effectively affected by electric and magnetic fields. We discuss the applications of these results to the charge transport in antidot superlattices and the stream of suspended particles in a viscous flow through scatters.

  6. Dynamical turbulent flow on the Galton board with friction.

    PubMed

    Chepelianskii, A D; Shepelyansky, D L

    2001-07-16

    We study numerically and analytically the dynamics of charged particles on the Galton board, a regular lattice of disk scatters, in the presence of constant external force, magnetic field, and friction. It is shown that under certain conditions friction leads to the appearance of a strange chaotic attractor. In this regime the average velocity and direction of particle flow can be effectively affected by electric and magnetic fields. We discuss the applications of these results to the charge transport in antidot superlattices and the stream of suspended particles in a viscous flow through scatters. PMID:11461559

  7. Flow friction of the turbulent coolant flow in cryogenic porous cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Yeroshenko, V. M.; Zaichik, L. I.; Yanovsky, L. S.

    1979-01-01

    Considered are cryogenic power transmission cables with porous cores. Calculations of the turbulent coolant flow with injection or suction through the porous wall are presented within the framework of a two-layer model. Universal velocity profiles were obtained for the viscous sublayer and flow core. Integrating the velocity profile, the law of flow friction in the pipe with injection has been derived for the case when there is a tangential injection velocity component. The effect of tangential velocity on the relative law of flow friction is analyzed. The applicability of the Prandtl model to the problem under study is discussed. It is shown that the error due to the acceptance of the model increases with the injection parameter and at lower Reynolds numbers; under these circumstances, the influence of convective terms in the turbulent energy equation on the mechanism of turbulent transport should be taken into account.

  8. Friction factors of colloidal suspension containing silicon dioxide nanoparticles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Clement; Pant, Sarbottam; Sharif, Md. Tanveer

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to experimentally characterize the friction factor of a colloidal suspension flow in circular and square tubes. The suspension contained silicon dioxide nanoparticles dispersed in distilled water at 9.58% volume concentration. Rheological measurements indicated that the suspension exhibits non-Newtonian behavior, and could be modelled as a power-law generalized Newtonian fluid. The experimental study showed that, with proper characterization of the consistency and flow behavior indices, the suspension flow friction factors in circular and square tubes exhibit similarities with those of Newtonian fluid flow. In the laminar fully-developed flow region, the Poiseuille numbers are similar to those established for Newtonian fluid flow. In the turbulent region, the Dodge and Metzner relation between the friction factor and a generalized Reynolds number can adequately describe the flow. The onsets of transition to turbulent flow for the suspension vary with the shape of the tube and differ from those of Newtonian fluid flow. The deviations suggest that the flow passage shape and the presence of nanoparticles affect the onset of transition to turbulent flow. Supported by North Dakota NASA EPSCoR.

  9. Riblets. [for aerodynamic drag reduction of turbulent skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    In addition to characterizing the various concepts reported in the literature on longitudinally-ribbed surface for aerodynamic surface drag reduction, the present development status evaluation of this technology correlates all available experimental data. An analysis of these data is then conducted to ascertain the parameters most directly involved in drag reduction, and to evaluate the effects which have thus far been exerted on turbulent boundary layer structures. Such advanced riblet techniques as compound and three-dimensional riblets, riblets in combination with large-eddy breakup devices, and riblets with suction/blowing, are also discussed.

  10. Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Couette-Poiseuille Flow With Zero Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Gary N.; Spalart, Philippe R.

    2015-01-01

    The near-wall scaling of mean velocity U(yw) is addressed for the case of zero skin friction on one wall of a fully turbulent channel flow. The present DNS results can be added to the evidence in support of the conjecture that U is proportional to the square root of yw in the region just above the wall at which the mean shear dU=dy = 0.

  11. A model for rough wall turbulent heating and skin friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers on rough walls is used to investigate the effects of roughness character and compressibility. The flow around roughness elements is treated as form drag. A method is presented for deriving the required roughness shape and spacing from profiometer surface measurements. Calculations based on the model compare satisfactorily with low speed data on roughness character and hypersonic measurements with grit roughness. The computer model is exercised systematically over a wide range of parameters to derive a practical scaling law for the equivalent roughness. In contrast to previous correlations, for most roughness element shapes the effective roughness does not show a pronounced maximum as the element spacing decreases. The effect of roughness tends to be reduced with increasing edge Mach number, primarily due to decreasing density in the vicinity of the roughness elements. It is further shown that the required roughness Reynolds number for fully rough behavior increases with increasing Mach number, explaining the small roughness effects observed in some hypersonic tests.

  12. Skin-friction Drag Reduction in Turbulent Channel Flow with Idealized Superhydrophobic Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratsegari, Amirreza; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2013-11-01

    Skin-friction drag reduction by super-hydrophobic (SH) surfaces was investigated using Lattice Boltzmann DNS in turbulent channel flow with SH longitudinal microgrooves on both walls. The liquid/gas interfaces in the SH microgrooves were modeled as flat, shear-free surfaces. Drag reductions (DR) ranging from 5 % to 47 % were observed for microgrooves of size 4 <=g+0 =w+0 <= 128 in channels of bulk Reynolds number Reb =Ub h / ν = 3600 (Reτ0 =uτ0 h / ν ~ 230), where g+0 and w+0 denote the widths of the slip and no-slip surfaces in base flow wall units. It is shown that in both laminar and turbulent flow, DR scales as DR =Us /Ub + ɛ . In laminar flow, where DR is purely due to surface slip, ɛ = 0 . In turbulent flow, ɛ remains negligible when the slip length is smaller than the thickness of the viscous sublayer. For DR > 40 % , where the effect of surface slip can be felt in the buffer layer, ɛ attains a small non-zero value. Analysis of turbulence statistics and turbulence kinetic energy budgets confirms that outside of a layer of size approximately one slip length from the walls, the turbulence dynamics proceeds as in regular channel flow with no-slip walls.

  13. Heat transfer and friction factors in the ribbed square convergent and divergent channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. S.; Ahn, S. W.

    2016-06-01

    Heat transfer and friction factors are reported for the measurements of turbulent flows in the convergent and divergent square channels with one-sided ribbed wall as well as two opposite in-line ribbed walls. The study covers three different hydraulic diameter ratios between inlet and exit at the test section such as Dho/Dhi = 0.75, 1.0, and 1.33 and Reynolds numbers in the range of 25,000-79,000. The channels, composing of ten isolated copper sections in the length of test section of 1 m, have the hydraulic diameter of 87.5 mm for the straight channel (Dho/Dhi = 1.0); the rib height-to-hydraulic diameter is 0.114; the rib pitch-to-height ratio equals 10. On the contrary to public opinion that the friction factor depends on the portion of the ribbed area, the total friction factor in the two opposite ribbed walls are lower than in the one-sided ribbed wall in the divergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 1.33 because the total pressure, summing positive dynamic and negative static pressures, is acted. The results show that the two opposite ribbed divergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 1.33 provides the best heat transfer enhancement and the two opposite ribbed convergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 0.75 provides the worst friction factor enhancement, and the ribbed divergent channels are generally recommended.

  14. A numerical study of the effects of superhydrophobic surface on skin-friction drag in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunwook; Park, Hyungmin; Kim, John

    2013-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have attracted much attention lately as they present the possibility of achieving a substantial skin-friction drag reduction in turbulent flows. In this paper, the effects of a superhydrophobic surface, consisting of microgrates aligned in the flow direction, on skin-friction drag in turbulent flows were investigated through direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flows. The superhydrophobic surface was modeled through a shear-free boundary condition on the air-water interface. Dependence of the effective slip length and resulting skin-friction drag on Reynolds number and surface geometry was examined. In laminar flows, the effective slip length depended on surface geometry only, independent of Reynolds number, consistent with an existing analysis. In turbulent flows, the effective slip length was a function of Reynolds number, indicating its dependence on flow conditions near the surface. The resulting drag reduction was much larger in turbulent flows than in laminar flows, and near-wall turbulence structures were significantly modified, suggesting that indirect effects resulting from modified turbulence structures played a more significant role in reducing drag in turbulent flows than the direct effect of the slip, which led to a modest drag reduction in laminar flows. It was found that the drag reduction in turbulent flows was well correlated with the effective slip length normalized by viscous wall units.

  15. Friction drag reduction achievable by near-wall turbulence manipulation in spatially developing boundary-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannier, Amaury; Garnier, Eric; Sagaut, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Various control strategies, such as active feedback control or riblets, end up restraining near-wall turbulence. An analytical study is conducted to estimate the drag-reduction achievable by such control in zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary-layers. Based on an idealized control which damps all fluctuations within a near-wall layer, a composite flow profile is established. It leads to explicit models for both the drag-reduction and the boundary-layer development rate. A skin-friction decomposition is applied and gives physical insights on the underlying phenomena. The control is found to alter the spatial development of the boundary-layer, resulting in detrimental impact on the skin-friction. However, the drag-reducing mechanism, attributed to the turbulence weakening, is found predominant and massive drag reductions remain achievable at high Reynolds number, although a minute part of the boundary-layer is manipulated. The model is finally assessed against Large Eddy Simulations of riblet-controlled flow.

  16. Direct measurement of turbulent skin-friction reduction on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyungmin; Sun, Guangyi; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''

    2012-11-01

    Recent advances in superhydrophobic (SHPo) surfaces have spurred a great interest in fluid mechanics because their large slip may result in a significant reduction of skin friction in turbulent flows. However, experimental confirmation of the reduction has been sporadic (only internal flows) and equivocal because most times the surface slip was small and the drag measurement indirect. Here we present a direct measurement of the drag on large-slip surfaces in a turbulent boundary-layer flow. The silicon-micromachined sample has a SHPo (microgrates) next to a reference (smooth) surface, each suspended by identical micro flexure beams. Monolithically fabricated in a batch process and sharing all the variations, the two surfaces shift differently only by the difference in the drag. The drag reduction was measured optically (directly) in a turbulent boundary layer in a water tunnel experiment at a moderate Reynolds number (Reτ ~ 250) over a gas fraction (fraction of the shear-free surface area) of 30 % - 90 % . Unlike other reports, the drag reduction clearly increased with the gas fraction. More than 50 % skin-friction reduction was achieved with 90% gas fraction. During the flow tests, the SHPo surfaces were visually confirmed to contain the air without any loss. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Program (N000141110503).

  17. Skin-Friction Measurements on Mathematically Generated Roughness in a Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Engineering systems are affected by surface roughness, however, predicting frictional drag has proven to be challenging. One open question is how roughness topography, whether it is idealized 2D and 3D or irregular with multi-scale features, impacts the frictional drag. A previous study from Flack and Schultz (2010) presented a new model to estimate frictional drag based on surfaces statistics. The present work takes a systematic approach by generating and manufacturing surfaces roughness where surface statistics, such as rms, skewness and power-spectral density can be controlled. Skin-friction measurements are conducted in a high Reynolds number turbulent channel flow facility, where the experiments cover all roughness regimes, from hydraulic-smooth to fully-rough. The surface roughness studied herein is produced using the random Fourier modes method with a varying power-law spectral slope, whereas the rms and surface amplitude are kept constant (krms ~ 45 μm and kt ~ 200 μm) while still possessing a Gaussian probability-density-function. These surfaces are then 3D-printed and replicated using a mold/cast technique to generate the top and bottom walls of the channel flow facility. Department of Mechanical Engineering.

  18. Friction factors and roughness measurements of tubular mineral membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    René, F.; Leuliet, J. C.; Delplace, F.

    1993-08-01

    No direct measurement of the relative roughness is available for mineral porous media because of the low mechanical resistance of such materials. In this study a method for the experimental determination of the internal diameter and the equivalent roughness is proposed for different commercial membranes used in ultrafiltration and microfiltration processes. The use of classical friction factor correlations is also discussed. The main results are the estimation of the hydraulic diameter of tubular membranes and the use of a quadratic form in order to predict friction factors and the equivalent roughness with an accuracy better than 15%.

  19. Effects of Riblets on Skin Friction in High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2012-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of spatially developing turbulent boundary layers over riblets are conducted to examine the effects of riblets on skin friction at supersonic speeds. Zero-pressure gradient boundary layers with an adiabatic wall, a Mach number of M1 = 2.5, and a Reynolds number based on momentum thickness of Re = 1720 are considered. Simulations are conducted for boundary-layer flows over a clean surface and symmetric V- groove riblets with nominal spacings of 20 and 40 wall units. The DNS results confirm the few existing experimental observations and show that a drag reduction of approximately 7% is achieved for riblets with proper spacing. The influence of riblets on turbulence statistics is analyzed in detail with an emphasis on identifying the differences, if any, between the drag reduction mechanisms for incompressible and high-speed boundary layers.

  20. Friction Factor Characterization for High-Porosity Random Fiber Regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, the Department of Energy (DOE), and Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Kennewick, Washington are developing a Stirling convertor for a high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Power System to provide electric power for NASA Space Science Missions. STC is developing the 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC) under contract to DOE. Steady-flow tests were completed to determine the friction factor for the high-porosity regenerators that are used in the TDC. STC fabricated a flow test fixture and three random fiber regenerator test samples, one each at approximately 80, 88, and 96 percent porosities. The flow tests were then completed by the NASA Glenn Flow Calibration Laboratory, and the data reduced to Reynolds number and friction factor. The results showed that the 80 and 88 percent porosity samples had similar characteristics while the 96 percent porosity sample had significantly higher friction factors for given Reynolds numbers compared to the samples with lower porosities. Comparisons were also made between the test data and existing correlations. STC used this data to derive a modified regenerator friction factor correlation for use in the Stirling design code GLIMPS for porosities greater than 88 percent. Using this new correlation, the final optimized regenerator design porosity was reduced from 96 to 90 percent.

  1. Friction law and turbulent properties in a laboratory Ekman boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sous, D.; Sommeria, J.; Boyer, D.

    2013-04-01

    We use spin-up/spin-down laboratory experiments to study the neutrally stratified Ekman boundary layer. The experiments are performed in the 13 m diameter, 1 m deep Coriolis rotating tank of the LEGI in Grenoble, France. A global flow rotation is produced by an initial change in the tank rotation speed. It then slowly decays under the effect of Ekman friction, evolving from the turbulent state to the laminar state. It is checked that the Ekman layer itself remains in a quasi-steady state during this decay. The velocity is measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) at two scales: the global rotation in a horizontal plane, and the vertical profile inside the boundary layer, where the three velocity components are obtained by stereoscopic PIV. The friction law is obtained by relating the decay rate of the bulk velocity to the velocity itself. This method is justified by the fact that this bulk velocity is independent of height beyond the top of the boundary layer (a few cm), as expected from the Taylor-Proudman theorem for rotating fluids. The local measurements inside the boundary layer provide profiles of the mean velocity and Reynolds stress components, in particular the cross-isobar angle between the interior and near surface velocities. In the laminar regime, good agreement is obtained with the classical Ekman's theory, which validates the method. In the turbulent regime, the results are found consistent with the classical Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) model based on the von Karman logarithmic layer. Our experiments therefore indicate that this theory, in principle valid for very large Reynolds numbers, is already relevant close to the transitional regimes. A fit of the empirical coefficients A and B appearing in this theory yields A = 3.3 and B = 3.0. Extrapolating the results to the atmospheric case gives a friction velocity u* about 12% higher than the traditional fit for the ABL. We may safely deduce that for the oceanic bottom boundary layer, corresponding to lower Reynolds numbers than the atmosphere, our result provides a correct estimate within 10%. The previous laboratory results of Caldwell et al. ["A laboratory study of the turbulent Ekman layer," Geophys. Fluid Dyn. 3, 125-160 (1972), 10.1080/03091927208236078] provided frictions velocities about 20% higher than in our experiments, and slightly higher cross-isobar angles. We attribute this difference to the higher vortical Rossby number Rot in those experiments, and maybe also to roughness effects. We take into account the effect of this vortical Rossby number within the framework of the Ekman layer (Rot → 0) by replacing the tank rotation rate by the fluid rotation rate.

  2. Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Yoshihiro; Clarke, Daryl D.; Ozeki, Shinichi

    Friction materials such as disk pads, brake linings, and clutch facings are widely used for automotive applications. Friction materials function during braking due to frictional resistance that transforms kinetic energy into thermal energy. There has been a rudimentary evolution, from materials like leather or wood to asbestos fabric or asbestos fabric saturated with various resins such as asphalt or resin combined with pitch. These efforts were further developed by the use of woven asbestos material saturated by either rubber solution or liquid resin binder and functioned as an internal expanding brake, similar to brake lining system. The role of asbestos continued through the use of chopped asbestos saturated by rubber, but none was entirely successful due to the poor rubber heat resistance required for increased speeds and heavy gearing demands of the automobile industry. The use of phenolic resins as binder for asbestos friction materials provided the necessary thermal resistance and performance characteristics. Thus, the utility of asbestos as the main friction component, for over 100 years, has been significantly reduced in friction materials due to asbestos identity as a carcinogen. Steel and other fibrous components have displaced asbestos in disk pads. Currently, non-asbestos organics are the predominate friction material. Phenolic resins continue to be the preferred binder, and increased amounts are necessary to meet the requirements of highly functional asbestos-free disk pads for the automotive industry. With annual automobile production exceeding 70 million vehicles and additional automobile production occurring in developing countries worldwide and increasing yearly, the amount of phenolic resin for friction material is also increasing (Fig. 14.1). Fig. 14.1 Worldwide commercial vehicle production In recent years, increased fuel efficiency of passenger car is required due to the CO2 emission issue. One of the solutions to improve fuel efficiency is to lower the car body weight. It means that the weight of car components must be decreased. In the case of reduced weight for friction parts, the load applied to the friction parts would be higher (more heat also) and trend would lead to phenolic resins with improved heat resistance.

  3. Simple LMFBR axial-flow friction-factor correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Y.N.; Todreas, N.E.

    1982-12-01

    Complicated LMFBR axial lead-length averaged friction-factor correlations are reduced to an easy, ready-to-use function of bundle Reynolds number for wire-wrapped bundles. The function together with the power curves to calculate the associated constants are incorporated in a computer preprocessor, EZFRIC. The constants required for the calculation of the subchannels and bundle friction factors are derived and correlated into power curves of geometrical parameters. A computer program, FRIC, which can alternatively be used to accurately calculate these constants is also included. The accurate values of the constants and the corresponding values predicted by the power curves and percentage error of prediction are tabulated for a wide variety of geometries of interest.

  4. Friction Factor Measurements in an Equally Spaced Triangular Tube Array

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo P, Symolon P

    2007-03-19

    Friction factor data for adiabatic cross-flow of water in a staggered tube array was obtained over a Reynolds number range (based on hydraulic diameter and gap velocity) of about 10,000 to 250,000. The tubes were 12.7mm (0.5 inch) outer diameter, in a uniformly spaced triangular arrangement with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. The friction factor was compared to several literature correlations, and was found to be best matched by the Idelchik correlation. Other correlations were found to vary significantly from the test data. Based on the test data, a new correlation is proposed for this tube bundle geometry which covers the entire Reynolds number range tested.

  5. Skin friction and velocity profile family for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Bradshaw, P.; Coakley, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents a general approach to constructing mean velocity profiles for compressible turbulent boundary layers with isothermal or adiabatic walls. The theory is based on a density-weighted transformation that allows the extension of the incompressible similarity laws of the wall to the compressible regions. The velocity profile family is compared to a range of experimental data, and excellent agreement is obtained. A self-consistent skin friction law, which satisfies the proposed velocity profile family, is derived and compared with the well-known Van Driest II theory for boundary layers in zero pressure gradient. The results are found to be at least as good as those obtained by using the Van Driest II transformation.

  6. The impact of algal biofilms on skin-friction in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen; Steppe, Cecily; Walker, Jessica

    2014-11-01

    Experiments were carried out in a fully-developed, turbulent channel flow facility over a wide Reynolds number range. The wall shear stress was determined using the bulk flow rate and the streamwise pressure gradient in the downstream section of the channel. A biofilm dominated by three species of diatoms developed on acrylic test surfaces exposed for four days in a brackish tidal environment at the United States Naval Academy. The resulting biofilm had an average thickness of 200 μm. This biofilm had a significant effect on the flow showing a doubling of the skin-friction compared to the hydraulically-smooth condition at the highest Reynolds number. Scale up of the present results to ship scale indicates that this biofilm would generate an 18% powering penalty for a mid-sized naval ship at cruising speed. This research was funded by ONR.

  7. Experimental Study of Characteristics of Micro-Hole Porous Skins for Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.

    2002-01-01

    Characteristics of micro-hole porous skins for the turbulent skin friction reduction technology called the micro-blowing technique (MBT) were assessed experimentally at Mach 0.4 and blowing fractions from zero to 0.005. The objective of this study was to provide guidelines for the selection of porous plates for MBT. The hole angle, pattern, diameter, aspect ratio, and porosity were the parameters considered for this study. The additional effort to angle and stagger the holes was experimentally determined to be unwarranted in terms of skin friction benefit; therefore, these parameters were systematically eliminated from the parametric study. The impact of the remaining three parameters was evaluated by fixing two parameters at the reference values while varying the third parameter. The best hole-diameter Reynolds number was found to be around 400, with an optimum aspect ratio of about 6. The optimum porosity was not conclusively discerned because the range of porosities in the test plates considered was not great enough. However, the porosity was estimated to be about 15 percent or less.

  8. Linear modeling of turbulent skin-friction reduction due to spanwise wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque-Daza, Carlos; Baig, Mirza; Lockerby, Duncan; Chernyshenko, Sergei; Davies, Christopher; University of Warwick Team; Imperial College Team; Cardiff University Team

    2012-11-01

    We present a study on the effect of streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity on the growth of near-wall turbulent streaks using a linearized formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The changes in streak amplification due to the travelling waves induced by the wall velocity are compared to published results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions of the turbulent skin-friction reduction over a range of parameters; a clear correlation between these two sets of results is observed. Additional linearized simulations but at a much higher Reynolds numbers, more relevant to aerospace applications, produce results that show no marked differences to those obtained at low Reynolds number. It is also observed that a close correlation exists between DNS data of drag reduction and a very simple characteristic of the ``generalized'' Stokes layer generated by the streamwise-travelling waves. Carlos.Duque-Daza@warwick.ac.uk - School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK caduqued@unal.edu.co - Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  9. Skin-Friction Drag Reduction over Super-Hydrophobic Materials in Fully-Developed Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gose, James W.; Golovin, Kevin; Ceccio, Steven L.; Perlin, Marc; Tuteja, Anish

    2015-11-01

    As part an on-going research initiative to develop super-hydrophobic (SH) materials for high-speed naval applications, a team at the University of Michigan investigated SH materials for drag reduction in fully-developed turbulent flow. The SH materials were evaluated in a high-aspect ratio (width/height) channel flow facility capable of producing average flow speeds of 20 m/s, yielding a height (7 mm) based Reynolds number of 140,000. The SH materials examined were developed for large-scale application using various technologies including spraying, chemical etching, and mechanical abrasion. The materials were applied over a 100 mm (spanwise/width) by 1100 mm (streamwise/length) area. The drag measurement methods were pressure drop along the test surface over length 150H (1050 mm) and by means of the velocity profile via particle image velocimetry. The SH materials were investigated further to determine the effects of various flow conditions including low (vacuum) and high pressures. The drag reduction measurements were coupled with extensive topological evaluation of the materials to illustrate the importance of each aspect of the individual SH features, as well as the collective structure of the surface, leading to insight regarding the relevant characteristics of an SH material's ability to reduce skin-friction in fully-developed turbulent flow. The authors recognize the support of ONR.

  10. Measuring and modelling the frictional velocity u*, turbulence and heat fluxes above the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambke, Jens; Bye, John A. T.; Schmidt, Michael; Wolff, Jörg-Olaf

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we analyse the frictional velocity u*, drag coefficient, vertical wind speed and turbulence profiles observed at different met-masts in the German North and Baltic Sea. We present an analysis of different models for the frictional velocity u* in convective, neutral and stable thermal stratification of the atmosphere. Atmospheric turbulent momentum and heat flux measurements performed with ultra-sonic anemometers are compared to profile-derived values and a bulk Richardson number formulation of the atmospheric thermal stability. Modelling: An improved approach to model the vertical wind speed profile is presented and compared against meso-scale model results (WRF, COSMO): Bye-Ekman-Coupling (BEC) describes the flux of momentum from the Ekman layer of the atmosphere through the Prandtl layer down to the air-sea interface by a modified wave boundary layer with enhanced Charnock dynamics (Bye et al. 2010). The BEC model is based on the coupled pair of similarity relations for "aerodynamically rough flow" in both fluids (air and sea). The derived drag law is of Charnock form, almost independent of the wave age and consistent with the transfer of momentum to the wave spectrum - which takes place in the smaller rather than the dominant wavelengths. Measurements: It was found that the frictional velocity u* is considerably smaller than predicted by conventional approaches using the Charnock relation: For wind speeds between 10 m/s and 15 m/s at 40 m height above the sea surface, u*(observed) is 14% smaller than u*(Charnock). Most important, we found unexpected, strong and obviously artificial distortions concerning the three wind speed components in the 10Hz data of the three ultra-sonic anemometers at the offshore met-mast FINO1 at 40 m, 60 m and 80 m height. The pattern of these distortions is independent from different post-processing procedures (planar-fit etc.). We anticipate that these artefacts imply severe problems for the eddy covariance technique. Moreover, these artefacts may be relevant in other (previous and on-going) ultra-sonic measurement campaigns where turbulent parameters such as u* and heat fluxes are derived. A simple, but innovative analysis is proposed to check ultra-sonic measurements with respect to these artefacts, using the original temporal 10Hz resolution of the data: The instantaneous vertical wind speed component w is analysed versus the instantaneous wind direction (called wind.dir in the following), computed from the instantaneous horizontal components u and v. The observational density is then plotted in the (w; wind.dir)-space. We found a pattern of stripes of very strong densities for specific wind direction bins, which are thinner than 1° and which cannot be attributed directly to the geometry of the anemometer (transducers, physical structure etc.). The source of this artificial pattern is still unclear and open for discussion. References: Bye JAT, Ghantous M, Wolff J-O (2010) On the variability of the Charnock constant and the functional dependence of the drag coefficient on wind speed. Ocean Dynamics 60(4) 851-860

  11. A Comparative Study of Material Flow Behavior in Friction Stir Welding Using Laminar and Turbulent Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadian, Arun Kumar; Biswas, Pankaj

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding has been quite successful in joining aluminum alloy which has gained importance in almost all industrial sectors over the past two decades. It is a newer technique and therefore needs more attention in many sectors, flow of material being one among them. The material flow pattern actually helps in deciding the parameters required for particular tool geometry. The knowledge of material flow is very significant in removing defects from the weldment. In the work presented in this paper, the flow behavior of AA6061 under a threaded tool has been studied. The convective heat loss has been considered from all the surfaces, and a comparative study has been made with and without the use of temperature-dependent properties and their significance in the finite volume method model. The two types of models that have been implemented are turbulent and laminar models. Their thermal histories have been studied for all the cases. The material flow velocity has been analyzed to predict the flow of material. A swirl inside the weld material has been observed in all the simulations.

  12. Laser Interferometer Skin-Friction measurements of crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    Wall shear stress measurements beneath crossingshock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions have been made for three interactions of different strengths. The interactions are generated by two sharp fins at symmetric angles of attack mounted on a flat plate. The shear stress measurements were made for fin angles of 7 and 11 degrees at Mach 3 and 15 degrees at Mach 4. The measurements were made using a Laser Interferometer Skin Friction (LISF) meter; a device which determines the wail shear by optically measuring the time rate of thinning of an oil film placed on the test model surface. Results of the measurements reveal high skin friction coefficients in the vicinity of the fin/plate junction and the presence of quasi-two-dimensional flow separation on the interaction centerline. Additionally, two Navier-Stokes computations, one using a Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and one using a k- model, are compared to the experimental results for the Mach 4, 15 degree interaction case. While the k- model did a reasonable job of predicting the overall trend in portions of the skin friction distribution, neither computation fully captured the physics of the near surface flow in this complex interaction.

  13. Laser Interferometer Skin-Friction measurements of crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-07-01

    Wall shear stress measurements beneath crossingshock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions have been made for three interactions of different strengths. The interactions are generated by two sharp fins at symmetric angles of attack mounted on a flat plate. The shear stress measurements were made for fin angles of 7 and 11 degrees at Mach 3 and 15 degrees at Mach 4. The measurements were made using a Laser Interferometer Skin Friction (LISF) meter; a device which determines the wail shear by optically measuring the time rate of thinning of an oil film placed on the test model surface. Results of the measurements reveal high skin friction coefficients in the vicinity of the fin/plate junction and the presence of quasi-two-dimensional flow separation on the interaction centerline. Additionally, two Navier-Stokes computations, one using a Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and one using a k-~ model, are compared to the experimental results for the Mach 4, 15 degree interaction case. While the k-~ model did a reasonable job of predicting the overall trend in portions of the skin friction distribution, neither computation fully captured the physics of the near surface flow in this complex interaction.

  14. Friction-factor data for flat-plate tests of smooth and honeycomb surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, T. W.; Childs, Dara W.

    1992-01-01

    Friction factors for honeycomb surfaces were measured with a flat plate tester. The flat plate test apparatus was described and a method was discussed for determining the friction factor experimentally. The friction factor model was developed for the flat plate test based on the Fanno Line Flow. The comparisons of the friction factor were plotted for smooth surfaces and six-honeycomb surfaces with three-clearances, 6.9 bar to 17.9 bar range of inlet pressures, and 5,000 to 100,000 range of the Reynolds number. The optimum geometries for the maximum friction factor were found as a function of cell width to cell depth and cell width to clearance ratios.

  15. Friction factor data for flat plate tests of smooth and honeycomb surfaces. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Tae Woong

    1989-01-01

    Friction factors for honeycomb surfaces were measured with a flat plate tester. The flat plate test apparatus was described and a method was discussed for determining the friction factor experimentally. The friction factor model was developed for the flat plate test based on the Fanno Line Flow. The comparisons of the friction factor were plotted for smooth surfaces and six-honeycomb surfaces with three-clearances, 6.9 bar to 17.9 bar range of inlet pressures, and 5,000 to 100,000 range of the Reynolds number. The optimum geometries for the maximum friction factor were found as a function of cell width to cell depth and cell width to clearance ratios.

  16. Factors affecting friction in the pre-adjusted appliance.

    PubMed

    Moore, M M; Harrington, E; Rock, W P

    2004-12-01

    A jig was constructed to measure the frictional forces created by various tip and torque values in association with two types of straightwire bracket moving along tainless steel (SS) archwires. Forces were measured during translation of the bracket using an Instron machine. Steel and cobalt chromium brackets were tested in association with 0.019 x 0.025 and 0.021 x 0.025 inch steel archwires at tips from 0 to 3 degrees and torque values in 2 degree increments from 0 to 6 degrees. The mean values for static (2.2 N) and kinetic (2.1 N) friction were very similar (P = 0.71), as were the overall friction values for stainless steel (2.1 N) and chromium cobalt (2.2 N) brackets of similar dimensions (P = 0.44). Use of 0.021 x 0.025 inch wire produced three times as much friction as 0.019 x 0.025 inch wire, 3.0 N against 1.2 N (P < 0.01). Increased tip and torque were associated with highly significant increases in friction (P < 0.01). Every degree of tip produced approximately twice as much friction as comparable torque. The main conclusion of the study was that space closure should be completed on a 0.019 x 0.025 inch archwire before a 0.021 x 0.025 inch wire is used to complete tooth alignment. PMID:15650066

  17. Direct measurements and analysis of skin friction and cooling downstream of multiple flush-slot injection into a turbulent Mach 6 boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, F. G.; Strokowski, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the reduction in surface skin friction and the effectiveness of surface cooling downstream of one to four successive flush slots injecting cold air at an angle of 10 deg into a turbulent Mach 6 boundary layer. Data were obtained by direct measurement of surface shear and equilibrium temperatures, respectively. Increasing the number of slots decreased the skin friction, but the incremental improvement in skin-friction reduction decreased as the number of slots was increased. Cooling effectiveness was found to improve, for a given total mass injection, as the number of slots was increased from one to four. Comparison with previously reported step-slot data, however, indicated that step slots with tangential injection are more effective for both reducing skin friction and cooling than the present flush-slot configuration. Finite-difference predictions are in reasonable agreement with skin-friction data and with boundary-layer profile data.

  18. Development of colburn ` j' factor and fanning friction factor ` f' correlations for compact heat exchanger plain fins by using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala Sundar Rao, R.; Ranganath, G.; Ranganayakulu, C.

    2013-07-01

    A numerical model has been developed for plain fin of plate fin heat exchanger. Plain fin performance has been analyzed with the help of CFD by changing the various parameters of the fin, Colburn ` j' and fanning friction ` f' factors are calculated. These values compared with the standard values. The correlations have been developed between Reynolds number Re, fin height h, fin thickness t, fin spacing s, Colburn factor ` j' and friction factor ` f'.

  19. Friction Factor Evaluation Using Experimental and Finite Element Methods for Al-4%Cu Preforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desalegn, Wogaso; Davidson, M. J.; Khanra, A. K.

    2014-08-01

    In this study, ring compression tests and finite element (FE) simulations have been utilized to evaluate the friction factor, m, under different lubricating conditions for powder metallurgical (P/M) Al-4%Cu preforms. A series of ring compression tests were carried out to obtain friction factor ( m) for a number of lubricating conditions, including zinc stearate, graphite, molybdenum disulfide powder, and unlubricated condition. FE simulations were used to analyze materials deformation, densification, and geometric changes, and to derive the friction calibration curves. The friction factor has been determined for various initial relative densities and different lubricating conditions, and a proper lubricant for cold forging of P/M Al-4%Cu preforms is found. Studies show that the use of lubricants has reduced the friction. However, increase in the number of pores in the preforms leads to excessive friction. The FE simulation results demonstrate a shift in the neutral plane distance from the axis of ring specimen, which occurred due to variations in the frictional conditions and initial relative densities. The load requirement for deformation, effective stress, and effective strain induced, and bulging phenomena obtained by FE simulations have a good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Entrance and exit region friction factor models for annular seal analysis. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David Alan

    1988-01-01

    The Mach number definition and boundary conditions in Nelson's nominally-centered, annular gas seal analysis are revised. A method is described for determining the wall shear stress characteristics of an annular gas seal experimentally. Two friction factor models are developed for annular seal analysis; one model is based on flat-plate flow theory; the other uses empirical entrance and exit region friction factors. The friction factor predictions of the models are compared to experimental results. Each friction model is used in an annular gas seal analysis. The seal characteristics predicted by the two seal analyses are compared to experimental results and to the predictions of Nelson's analysis. The comparisons are for smooth-rotor seals with smooth and honeycomb stators. The comparisons show that the analysis which uses empirical entrance and exit region shear stress models predicts the static and stability characteristics of annular gas seals better than the other analyses. The analyses predict direct stiffness poorly.

  1. Fluid dynamics of airlift reactors; Two-phase friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Calvo, E. )

    1992-10-01

    Airlift loop reactors (ALR) are useful equipment in biotechnology in a wide range of uses, however their design is not a simple task since prediction of fluid dynamics in these reactors is difficult. Most of the different strategies found in the literature in order to predict two main parameters, namely, gas holdup and liquid velocity, are based on energy or momentum balances. The balances include frictional effects, and it is not yet clear how to predict these effects. The objective of this article is to show how criteria corresponding to one-phase flow may be used in order to predict the frictional effects in ALRs. Based on a model proposed by Garcia-Calvo (1989, 1991), we simulated experimental data of liquid velocity profiles and gas holdup obtained by Young et al. in an ALR with two different configurations. Experimental data obtained in other three external ALRs with different shapes and sizes are also simulated.

  2. The behavior of the skin-friction coefficient of a turbulent boundary layer flow over a flat plate with differently configured transverse square grooves

    SciTech Connect

    Wahidi, R.; Chakroun, W.; Al-Fahed, S.

    2005-11-01

    Skin-friction coefficient of turbulent boundary layer flow over a smooth-wall with transverse square grooves was investigated. Four grooved-wall cases were investigated. The four grooved-wall configurations are single 5mm square grooved-wall, and 5mm square grooves spaced 10, 20 and 40 element widths apart in the streamwise direction. Laser-Doppler Anemometer (LDA) was used for the mean velocity and turbulence intensity measurements. The skin-friction coefficient determined from the velocity profile increases sharply just downstream of the groove. This overshoot is followed by an undershoot and then relaxation back to the smooth-wall value. This behavior is observed in most grooved-wall cases. Integrating the skin-friction coefficient in the streamwise direction indicates that there is an increase in the overall drag in all the grooved-wall cases.

  3. Calculation of skin-friction coefficients for low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer flows. M.S. Thesis - California Univ. at Davis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, P. K.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the reliability of various generally accepted empirical expressions for the prediction of the skin-friction coefficient C/sub f/ of turbulent boundary layers at low Reynolds numbers in zero-pressure-gradient flows on a smooth flat plate. The skin-friction coefficients predicted from these expressions were compared to the skin-friction coefficients of experimental profiles that were determined from a graphical method formulated from the law of the wall. These expressions are found to predict values that are consistently different than those obtained from the graphical method over the range 600 Re/sub theta 2000. A curve-fitted empirical relationship was developed from the present data and yields a better estimated value of C/sub f/ in this range. The data, covering the range 200 Re/sub theta 7000, provide insight into the nature of transitional flows. They show that fully developed turbulent boundary layers occur at Reynolds numbers Re/sub theta/ down to 425. Below this level there appears to be a well-ordered evolutionary process from the laminar to the turbulent profiles. These profiles clearly display the development of the turbulent core region and the shrinking of the laminar sublayer with increasing values of Re/sub theta/.

  4. Friction factor and mean velocity profile for pipe flow at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, N.; Terao, Y.; Wada, Y.; Tsuji, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The friction factor for a fully developed pipe flow is examined at high Reynolds numbers up to ReD = 1.8 × 107 with high accuracy using the high Reynolds number actual flow facility "Hi-Reff" at AIST, NMIJ. The precise measurement of the friction factor is achieved by the highly accurate measurement of the flow rate, and the measurement uncertainty is estimated to be approximately 0.9% with a coverage factor of k = 2. The result examined here is obviously different from the Prandtl equation and the experimental results from the superpipe at Princeton University. The deviation of the present result from the Prandtl equation in the lower Reynolds number region is approximately 2.5% and -3% at the higher Reynolds number. For ReD < 2.0 × 105, the present friction factor obtained here agrees very well with the results at the superpipe, but a deviation is observed for ReD > 2.0 × 105, and it increases with the Reynolds number and reaches -6% at ReD = 1.0 × 107. The Kármán constant estimated by the measured friction factor is 0.385. Using inner scale variables estimated by the present friction factor, the velocity profile measured by laser Doppler velocimetry in the same measurement configuration for the friction factor is normalized in order to observe the consistency of the Kármán constants between both the measurements. The Kármán constant estimated by the measured velocity profiles for ReD > 3.0 × 105 is 0.382.

  5. An annular gas seal analysis using empirical entrance and exit region friction factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, D. A.; Childs, D. W.; Nelson, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Wall shear stress results from stationary-rotor flow tests of five annular gas seals are used to develop entrance and exit region friction factor models. The friction factor models are used in a bulk-flow seal analysis which predicts leakage and rotor-dynamic coefficients. The predictions of the analysis are compared to experimental results and to the predictions of Nelson's analysis (1985). The comparisons are for smooth-rotor seals with smooth and honeycomb-stators. The present analysis predicts the destabilizing cross-coupled stiffness of a seal better than Nelson's analysis. Both analyses predict direct damping well and direct stiffness poorly.

  6. A robust post-processing method to determine skin friction in turbulent boundary layers from the velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2015-04-01

    The present paper describes a method to extrapolate the mean wall shear stress, , and the accurate relative position of a velocity probe with respect to the wall, , from an experimentally measured mean velocity profile in a turbulent boundary layer. Validation is made between experimental and direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer flows with independent measurement of the shear stress. The set of parameters which minimize the residual error with respect to the canonical description of the boundary layer profile is taken as the solution. Several methods are compared, testing different descriptions of the canonical mean velocity profile (with and without overshoot over the logarithmic law) and different definitions of the residual function of the optimization. The von Kármán constant is used as a parameter of the fitting process in order to avoid any hypothesis regarding its value that may be affected by different initial or boundary conditions of the flow. Results show that the best method provides an accuracy of for the estimation of the friction velocity and for the position of the wall. The robustness of the method is tested including unconverged near-wall measurements, pressure gradient, and reduced number of points; the importance of the location of the first point is also tested, and it is shown that the method presents a high robustness even in highly distorted flows, keeping the aforementioned accuracies if one acquires at least one data point in . The wake component and the thickness of the boundary layer are also simultaneously extrapolated from the mean velocity profile. This results in the first study, to the knowledge of the authors, where a five-parameter fitting is carried out without any assumption on the von Kármán constant and the limits of the logarithmic layer further from its existence.

  7. Experimental determination of friction factors for mist and foam drilling and well cleanout operations

    SciTech Connect

    Okpobiri, G.A.; Ikoku, C.U.

    1983-12-01

    This work covers both theoretical and experimental analysis of frictional losses due to the presence of solids in vertical flow of solids-foam slurries. RabinowitshMooney generalized flow equations for time-independent fluids from the theoretical basis for the rheological analysis. Experimental work was done with an apparatus designed to simulate actual field conditions as closely as possible. The test section consists of an annulus with 4.0-in. casing and 1.5-in. tubing. The surface active agent used is an aniomic biodegradable foamer (ADOFOAM BF-1) and constitutes 1 percent of the liquid volume. Foam qualities and wall shear rates ranged from 0.64 to 0.99, and 100 to 1000 sec/sup -1/, respectively. Semi-empirical equations for predicting friction factors due to solids are presented. Sandstone and limestone particles were used. Average particle size ranged from 0.025 to 0.11 in. and a total of 337 data points were used in the correlations. Data collection was carried out above solid saltation velocities under fully developed steady-state flow conditions. Results show that the friction factor of suspension can be treated as the sum of the friction factor due to the fluid and that due to the solids. For a constant foam Reynold's number, the frictional losses due to the presence of solids increase as the solids mass flow rate (or solids content) increases. Solids friction factor was found to increase with increasing particles Froude number (gd /SUB s/ /V/sup 2/ /SUB F/ ), density ratio (p /SUB s/ /p /SUB F/ ), solids concentration, but decreases with increasing fluid Reynolds' number.

  8. Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-04-01

    Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

  9. Surface-specific flow factors for prediction of friction of cross-hatched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, M.; Rahmani, R.; Rahnejat, H.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a combined numerical and experimental study of generated sliding friction at low sliding speeds and high load intensity, typical of the top compression ring-cylinder liner conjunction at top dead centre in the compression stroke of high performance race engines. Frictional losses in the transition from compression to power stroke represent a significant portion of cyclic cylinder losses. The cylinder liner is cross-hatch honed with non-Gaussian topography, including larger groove features and a fairly smooth plateau roughness. Surface-specific flow factors are derived to closely represent the actual real rough conjunction. The predictions closely agree with the representative reported precision tribometric study of measured friction.

  10. Evaluation of thermophysical properties, friction factor, and heat transfer of alumina nanofluid flow in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sanjib

    Various thermophysical properties, fluid flow parameter and heat transfer characteristics were measured for nanofluid with 6% volume concentration of solid Al2O3 nanoparticles in water. Thermal conductivity measurements showed that there is a definite enhancement in thermal conductivity of the nanofluid compared to that of water. At 7°C, the enhancement was 16% which decreased to 6.96% at 50°C. The viscosity measurements of the 6% volume concentration Al2O 3/water nanofluid showed that its viscosity is higher by a factor of 1.25 to 10.24 than the viscosity of water. Also the measurements of the viscosity of different volume concentration of Al2O3/water nanofluid showed that, the viscosity decreases as the volume concentration decreases. The plot between the shear stress and strain rate for the 6% volume concentration Al2O3/water nanofluid showed that it is a Newtonian fluid for the range of strain rate between 6-122 s-1. Several readings of viscosity were taken by subjecting the nanofluid to heating and cooling cycle. It was found that above 62.65°C, the 6% volume concentration Al2O3/water nanofluid experiences an irrecoverable increase in viscosity and when cooled from beyond this temperature, a hysteresis effect on the viscosity is seen. The friction factor results for laminar flow for the 6% volume concentration Al2O3/water nanofluid showed that it matches the value given by the Hagen-Poiseulle equation (f = 64/Re ). The transition from laminar flow to turbulent was found to occur at a Reynolds number of approximately 1500. The convective heat transfer results were in agreement with that proposed by the Lienhard correlation (Lienhard and Lienhard, 2008). For fully developed laminar flow, the Nusselt number under constant heat flux condition was found to be within ±7% of 4.36. In the laminar flow regime, the Nusselt numbers for thermally developing flow were within ±10% of the value calculated from the Lienhard correlation.

  11. Optimization of conical hydrostatic bearing for minimum friction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Hamrock, B. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Anderson, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Equations for the flow rate, load capacity, and friction torque for a conical hydrostatic bearing were developed. These equations were solved by a digital computer program to determine bearing configurations for minimum friction torque. Design curves are presented that show optimal bearing dimensions for minimum friction torque as a function of dimensionless flow rate for a range of dimensionless load capacity. Results are shown for both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The results indicate that hydrostatic pocket friction is a significant portion of the total friction torque. However, the bearing dimensions for a minimum friction design are affected very little by inclusion of pocket friction in the analysis. For laminar flow the values of the outer-land radius ratio X3 and outer bearing radius ratio X4 did not change significantly with increasing friction factor. For turbulent flow, the outer bearing radius ratio X4 did not change with increasing friction factor; therefore the value determined for X4 in the laminar flow case is valid for all turbulent flows.

  12. Internal friction Q factor measurements in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.

    1977-01-01

    Investigations to aid in the interpretation of seismic data obtained below the lunar surface are reported. Fine grained basalt with about 1.0% open core porosity was encapsulated under hard vacuum and measured. A Q value just under 2,000 at 0.5 kbar was achieved for a terrestrial analog of lunar basalt. In contrast to the modulus which increases by as much as 10%, the quality factor Q shows little or no change with pressure (a well outgassed sample maintains a high Q, whereas one exposed to laboratory atmosphere maintains a low Q). This result suggests that the absence of volatiles plays an important role in determining the q factor even at a depth of 10 km below the lunar surface.

  13. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures. PMID:25553671

  14. A Model for Water Flow Through Rock Fractures Based on Friction Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Nemcik, Jan; Qiao, Qiuqiu; Geng, Xueyu

    2015-03-01

    Rock fracture roughness and tortuosity caused by contact asperities produce extra resistance for fluid flow in comparison with the channel consisting of two smooth parallel plates. To characterise the role of roughness and tortuosity in water flow through rock fractures, the existing studies of the effect of fracture roughness and contact area (tortuosity) on fluid flow through rock fractures were firstly reviewed. Then, an explicit flow model was derived using the friction factor predictor previously proposed according to the flow data of sandstone fractures. Regarding the introduced relative roughness of rock fracture as the correction variable, the developed flow model can be considered as a corrected form of classic cubic law, where the relative roughness is defined as the ratio of the averaged peak asperity height to equivalent hydraulic aperture. Sensitivity analysis shows that the cubic law can overestimate the flow rate by 10 % when the relative roughness increases to 70.7. With further increase in relative roughness up to 300, which usually represents tight rock fractures, the flow rate is only approximately 64 % of that predicted by cubic law. The verification of this friction factor to granite and limestone fractures shows that the used friction factor predictor is in good accordance with the experimental data.

  15. Charge/mass dynamic structure factors of water and applications to dielectric friction and electroacoustic conversion.

    PubMed

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Shadkhoo, Shahriar; Bruinsma, Robijn; Netz, Roland R

    2014-02-01

    We determine time correlation functions and dynamic structure factors of the number and charge density of liquid water from molecular dynamics simulations. Using these correlation functions we consider dielectric friction and electro-acoustic coupling effects via linear response theory. From charge-charge correlations, the drag force on a moving point charge is derived and found to be maximal at a velocity of around 300 m/s. Strong deviations in the resulting friction coefficients from approximate theory employing a single Debye relaxation mode are found that are due to non-Debye-like resonances at high frequencies. From charge-mass cross-correlations the ultrasonic vibration potential is derived, which characterizes the conversion of acoustic waves into electric time-varying potentials. Along the dispersion relation for normal sound waves in water, the ultrasonic vibration potential is shown to strongly vary and to increase for larger wavelengths. PMID:24511957

  16. Apparatus for measuring internal friction Q factors in brittle materials. [applied to lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Curnow, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    A flexural analog of the torsion pendulum for measuring the Young's modulus and the internal friction Q factor of brittle materials has been developed for Q greater than 10 to the 3rd measurements at a zero static stress and at 10 to the -7th strains of brittle materials in the Hz frequency range. The present design was motivated by the desire to measure Q in fragile lunar return samples at zero static stress to shed light on the anomalously low attenuation of seismic waves on the moon. The use of the apparatus is demonstrated with data on fused silica and on a terrestrial analog of lunar basalt.

  17. Laminar heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of carbon nano tube/water nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Rathnakumar, P; Mayilsamy, K; Suresh, S; Murugesan, P

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of CNT/water nanofluid through a circular tube fitted with helical screw tape inserts with constant heat flux under laminar flow condition. Nanofluids of 0.1% and 0.2% volume fractions are prepared by two step method. Thermo-physical properties like thermal conductivity and viscosity are measured by using KD2 thermal property analyzer and Brooke field cone and plate viscometer respectively. From the measurements, it is found that the viscosity increase is substantially higher than the increase in the thermal conductivity. The helical screw tape insets with twist ratios Y = 3, 2.44 and 1.78 are used to study the convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics under laminar flow in the Reynolds number range of 520-2500. It is observed that, in a plain tube, maximum enhancement in Nusselt number for 0.1% and 0.2% volume fractions of nanofluids compared to pure water is 15% and 32% respectively. With the use of inserts, maximum enhancement in Nusselt number corresponding to twist ratios of 1.78, 2.44 and 3 are obtained as 8%, 16% and 4.6% for 0.1% volume fraction of nanofluid and 5%, 4% and 12% for 0.2% volume fraction of nanofluid when compared with water in plain tube. Thermal performance factor evaluation revealed that the values at all Reynolds number for all twist ratios and both concentration of CNT nanofluid are greater than unity which indicates that helical screw tape inserts with twist ratios considered are feasible in terms of energy saving in laminar flow. PMID:24745238

  18. Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Written five centuries after the first studies of Leonardo da Vinci and half a century after A.N. Kolmogorov's first attempt to predict the properties of flow, this textbook presents a modern account of turbulence, one of the greatest challenges in physics. "Fully developed turbulence" is ubiquitous in both cosmic and natural environments, in engineering applications and in everyday life. Elementary presentations of dynamical systems ideas, probabilistic methods (including the theory of large deviations) and fractal geometry make this a self-contained textbook. This is the first book on turbulence to use modern ideas from chaos and symmetry breaking. The book will appeal to first-year graduate students in mathematics, physics, astrophysics, geosciences and engineering, as well as professional scientists and engineers.

  19. Evidence of rare backflow and skin-friction critical points in near-wall turbulence using micropillar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, Ch.

    2015-03-01

    The recent discovery of rare backflow events in turbulent boundary layer flows based on the analysis of simulation data has again raised the need of experimental visualizations of wall-shear stress fields in unsteady flows. The localization of critical points, which are thought to strongly correlate with large-scale events in the log-layer, is of importance. Up to now, there is no experimental proof of these rare events and their topological patterns. Their existence in a turbulent boundary-layer flow along a flat plate is shown herein by means of imaging with 2D arrays of flexible micropillars attached at the wall.

  20. Correlation equations for friction factors and convective coefficients in tubes containing bundles of internal, longitudinal fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, A.; Chang, J.

    Finned tubes are commonly employed in tubular heat exchangers to augment the heat transfer rates between two dissimilar fluid streams. The goal of this study is two-fold: a) to determine the laminar, fully developed velocity and temperature fields for long, internal, longitudinal finned tubes; and b) to construct empirical correlation equations applicable for the asymptotic friction factor and the asymptotic Nusselt numbers as a function of the number of fins and the relative fin height in the bundle. Neither the fluid dynamics nor the heat transfer literature provides information for the second goal, which can be extremely useful to thermal engineers for the implementation of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) of internal, longitudinal finned tubes in heat exchange devices. Moreover, for the validity of the correlation equations, a seldom adopted criterion for the critical Reynolds number has also been introduced as an indispensable guideline to warrant laminar regimes.

  1. Analysis of interfacial and wall friction factors of countercurrent flow in vertical pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Yutaka; Akimoto, Hajime; Murao, Yoshio

    1990-01-01

    Countercurrent flow (CCF) is one of the most important phenomena observed during a loss-of-coolant accident in a light water reactor because it affects core cooling water mass flow. Reactor safety analysis codes such as TRAC-PF1 and RELAP5 were developed for precise analysis of various phenomena including CCF. In these codes, the basic equations for the gas and liquid phase are solved numerically with the constitutive equations for the interfacial and wall friction factors. The equations should be chosen for each specific flow situation to obtain sufficiently accurate solutions for a best-estimate analysis. In this study, interfacial and wall shear stress are estimated with an analytical model and Bharathan and Wallis' CCF data. The applicability of the constitutive equation used in current best=estimate codes for CCF is investigated.

  2. Numerical studies of the effects of neutrally buoyant large particles on turbulent channel flow at the friction Reynolds number up to 395

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaosheng; Wang, Yu; Shao, Xueming

    2012-11-01

    A direct-forcing fictitious domain method was employed to perform fully-resolved numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow laden with large neutrally buoyant particles at constant pressure gradients. The effects of the particles on the turbulence (including the fluid-phase average velocity, the root-mean-square (rms) of the velocity fluctuation, the probability density function of the velocity and the vortex structures) at the friction Reynolds number of 180 and 395 were investigated. The results show that the drag-reduction effect caused by the spherical particle at low particle volumes is very small. The presence of particles decreases the maximum rms of streamwise velocity fluctuation near wall via weakening the large-scale streamwise vortices, and on the other hand increases the rms of transverse and spanwise fluctuating velocities in vicinity of the wall via inducing smaller-scale vortices. The effects of the particles on the fluid velocity PDF (probability density function) normalized with the rms velocity are small, irrespective of the particle size, particle volume fraction and Reynolds number. The work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11072217 and 11132008), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University.

  3. Turbulent flow in a channel with transverse rib heat transfer augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, B. H.; Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent flow in a 2D channel with repeated rectangular rib roughness was numerically simulated using a low Reynolds number form of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Friction factors and average Stanton numbers were calculated for various pitch to rib height ratios and bulk Reynolds numbers. Comparisons with experiment were generally adequate, with the predictions of friction superior to those for heat transfer. The effect of variable properties for channel flow was investigated, and the results showed a greater effect for friction than for heat transfer. Comparison with experiment yielded no clear conclusions. The turbulence model was also validated for a related problem, that of flow downstream of an abrupt pipe expansion.

  4. Friction reduction and heat transfer enhancement in turbulent pipe flow of non-Newtonian liquid-solid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, U.S.; Liu, K.V.

    1988-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has identified two concepts for developing advanced energy transmission fluids for thermal systems, in particular district heating and cooling systems. A test series was conducted at ANL to prove these concepts. This paper presents experimental results and discusses the degradation behavior of linear polymer additives and the flow and heat transfer characteristics of non-melting slurry flows. The test results furnished strong evidence that the use of friction reducing additives and slurries can yield improved thermal-hydraulic performance of thermal systems. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Analysis of turbulent heat transfer, mass transfer, and friction in smooth tubes at high Prandtl and Schmidt numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G

    1955-01-01

    The expression for eddy diffusivity from a previous analysis was modified in order to account for the effect of kinematic viscosity on the turbulence in the region close to a wall. By using the modified expression, good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental results for heat and mass transfer at Prandtl and Schmidt numbers between 0.5 and 3000. The effects of length-to-diameter ratio and of variable viscosity were also investigated for a wide range of Prandtl numbers.

  6. Turbulent developing fluid flow in helical pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.X.; Ebadian, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    A fully elliptic numerical study has been carried out to investigate three-dimensional turbulent developing fluid flow in helical pipes with finite pitch. The {kappa}-{epsilon} standard two-equation turbulence model is applied. The governing equations are solved by a Control-Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM). The results presented here cover a Reynolds number range of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 4}--2.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, a pitch range of 0.0 {approximately} 0.6, and a curvature ratio range of 0.025--0.050. The developments of main and secondary flow fields, turbulent kinetic energy fields, and local and average friction factors are reported and discussed. It has been found that three parameters--Reynolds number, pitch and curvature ratio--generate very complex effects on the development of the turbulent flow fields. Moreover, along the axial direction, the friction factor experiences an oscillatory period before the flow becomes fully developed.

  7. Supersonic boundary-layer flow turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi-Rong

    1993-01-01

    Baldwin-Lomax and kappa-epsilon turbulence models were modified for use in Navier-Stokes numerical computations of Mach 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows along compression ramps. The computational results of Reynolds shear stress profiles were compared with experimental data. The Baldwin-Lomax model was modified to account for the Reynolds shear stress amplification within the flow field. A hybrid kappa-epsilon model with viscous sublayer turbulence treatment was constructed to predict the Reynolds shear stress profiles within the entire flow field. These modified turbulence models were effective for the computations of the surface pressure and the skin friction factor variations along an 8 deg ramp surface. The hybrid kappa-epsilon model could improve the predictions of the Reynolds shear stress profile and the skin friction factor near the corner of a 16 deg ramp.

  8. Diminishing friction of joint surfaces as initiating factor for destabilising permafrost rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Daniel; Krautblatter, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Degrading alpine permafrost due to changing climate conditions causes instabilities in steep rock slopes. Due to a lack in process understanding, the hazard is still difficult to asses in terms of its timing, location, magnitude and frequency. Current research is focused on ice within joints which is considered to be the key-factor. Monitoring of permafrost-induced rock failure comprises monitoring of temperature and moisture in rock-joints. The effect of low temperatures on the strength of intact rock and its mechanical relevance for shear strength has not been considered yet. But this effect is signifcant since compressive and tensile strength is reduced by up to 50% and more when rock thaws (Mellor, 1973). We hypotheisze, that the thawing of permafrost in rocks reduces the shear strength of joints by facilitating the shearing/damaging of asperities due to the drop of the compressive/tensile strength of rock. We think, that decreasing surface friction, a neglected factor in stability analysis, is crucial for the onset of destabilisation of permafrost rocks. A potential rock slide within the permafrost zone in the Wetterstein Mountains (Zugspitze, Germany) is the basis for the data we use for the empirical joint model of Barton (1973) to estimate the peak shear strength of the shear plane. Parameters are the JRC (joint roughness coefficient), the JCS (joint compressive strength) and the residual friction angle (φr). The surface roughness is measured in the field with a profile gauge to create 2D-profiles of joint surfaces. Samples of rock were taken to the laboratory to measure compressive strength using a high-impact Schmidt-Hammer under air-dry, saturated and frozen conditions on weathered and unweathered surfaces. Plugs where cut out of the rock and sand blasted for shear tests under frozen and unfrozen conditions. Peak shear strength of frozen and unfrozen rocks will be calculated using Barton's model. First results show a mean decrease of compressive strength of around 40% when frozen water-saturated rock is exposed to thawing. The friction of sand-blasted rock-plugs decreases by a mean value of 32% considering degradation of rocks by freeze-thaw cycles. Surface roughness could be measured succesfully with the profile gauge and the results show a significant difference between untouched and sheared joint surfaces in the field. Here we show, that shear resistance of rock joints will be diminshed just by the thawing of intact rock. This study will help to establish a sound concept for the destabilization of rocks in permafrost and provide the data for first stability modelling. This will be crucial for predict rock instability in permafrost regions. References: Barton, N. (1973): Review of new shear strength criterion for rock jonts. Engineering Geology 7: 287-332 Mellor, M. (1973): Mechanical Properties of Rocks at Low Temperatures. 2nd International Conference on Permafrost, Yakutsk, Siberia, 334-343.

  9. Controlling turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  10. Effects of unsteady free-stream velocity and free-stream turbulence at a stagnation point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, R. S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The combined effects of transient free stream velocity and turbulence at a stagnation point on a cylinder situated in a crossflow is investigated analytically, and a model is formulated for the eddy diffusivity induced by free-stream turbulence. The steepest descent method is used to integrate the governing momentum expression, and numerical solutions are given for the unsteady wall shear stress function for specific free-stream transients. It is found after correlation of the results by means of a new turbulence parameter that wall friction increases with increasing free-stream turbulence intensity, and that the friction factor increases with increasing reduced frequency of oscillation values.

  11. Is internal friction friction?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Byerlee, J.D.; Lockner, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Mogi [1974] proposed a simple model of the incipient rupture surface to explain the Coulomb failure criterion. We show here that this model can plausibly be extended to explain the Mohr failure criterion. In Mogi's model the incipient rupture surface immediately before fracture consists of areas across which material integrity is maintained (intact areas) and areas across which it is not (cracks). The strength of the incipient rupture surface is made up of the inherent strength of the intact areas plus the frictional resistance to sliding offered by the cracked areas. Although the coefficient of internal friction (slope of the strength versus normal stress curve) depends upon both the frictional and inherent strengths, the phenomenon of internal friction can be identified with the frictional part. The curvature of the Mohr failure envelope is interpreted as a consequence of differences in damage (cracking) accumulated in prefailure loading at different confining pressures.

  12. Reynolds-number dependence of the longitudinal dispersion in turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Christopher; Angheluta, Luiza; Krotkiewski, Marcin; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    In Taylor's theory, the longitudinal dispersion in turbulent pipe flows approaches, on long time scales, a diffusive behavior with a constant diffusivity KL, which depends empirically on the Reynolds number Re. We show that the dependence on Re can be determined from the turbulent energy spectrum. By using the intimate connection between the friction factor and the longitudinal dispersion in wall-bounded turbulence, we predict different asymptotic scaling laws of KL(Re) depending on the different turbulent cascades in two-dimensional turbulence. We also explore numerically the KL(Re) dependence in turbulent channel flows with smooth and rough walls using a lattice Boltzmann method.

  13. An entrance region friction factor model applied to annular seal analysis - Theory versus experiment for smooth and honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, D.; Nelson, C.; Childs, D.

    1989-01-01

    A friction factor model is developed for the entrance-region of a duct. The model is used in an annular gas seal analysis similar to Nelson's (1984). Predictions of the analysis are compared to experimental results for a smooth-stator/smooth-rotor seal and three honeycomb-stator/smooth-rotor seals. The model predicts a leakage and direct damping well. The model overpredicts the dependence of cross-coupled stiffness on fluid prerotation. The model predicts direct stiffness poorly.

  14. Equivalence of Non-Equilibrium Ensembles and Representation of Friction in Turbulent Flows: The Lorenz 96 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Gallavotti, Giovanni

    We construct different equivalent non-equilibrium ensembles in the Lorenz '96 model of atmospheric turbulence. The vector field can be decomposed into an energy-conserving, time-reversible part, plus a non-time reversible part, including forcing and dissipation. We construct a modified version of the model where viscosity varies with time, so that energy is conserved, and the dynamics is time-reversible. The statistical properties of the irreversible and reversible model are in excellent agreement, if in the latter the energy is kept constant at a value equal to the time-average realized with the irreversible model. The average contraction rate of the phase space of the time-reversible model agrees with that of the irreversible model, where it is constant by construction. We show that the phase space contraction rate obeys the fluctuation relation, and we interpret its finite time corrections. A local version of the fluctuation relation is explored and successfully checked. The equivalence between the two ensembles extends to the Lyapunov exponents.These results have relevance in motivating the importance of the chaotic hypothesis. in explaining that we have the freedom to model non-equilibrium systems using different but equivalent approaches.

  15. Propagation factors of multi-sinc Schell-model beams in non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhenzhen; Liu, Zhengjun; Zhou, Keya; Sun, Qiongge; Liu, Shutian

    2016-01-25

    We derive several analytical expressions for the root-mean-square (rms) angular width and the M2-factor of the multi-sinc Schell-model (MSSM) beams propagating in non-Kolmogorov turbulence with the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function. Numerical results show that a MSSM beam with dark-hollow far fields in free space has advantage over the one with flat-topped or multi-rings far fields for reducing the turbulence-induced degradation, which will become more obvious with larger dark-hollow size. Beam quality of MSSM beams can be further improved with longer wavelength and larger beam width, or under the condition of weaker turbulence. We also demonstrate that the non-Kolmogorov turbulence has significantly less effect on the MSSM beams than the Gaussian Schell-model beam. PMID:26832558

  16. Equivalence of Non-Equilibrium Ensembles and Representation of Friction in Turbulent Flows: The Lorenz 96 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We construct different equivalent non-equilibrium statistical ensembles in a simple yet instructive N-degrees of freedom model of atmospheric turbulence, introduced by Lorenz in 1996. The vector field can be decomposed into an energy-conserving, time-reversible part, plus a non-time reversible part, including forcing and dissipation. We construct a modified version of the model where viscosity varies with time, in such a way that energy is conserved, and the resulting dynamics is fully time-reversible. For each value of the forcing, the statistical properties of the irreversible and reversible model are in excellent agreement, if in the latter the energy is kept constant at a value equal to the time-average realized with the irreversible model. In particular, the average contraction rate of the phase space of the time-reversible model agrees with that of the irreversible model, where instead it is constant by construction. We also show that the phase space contraction rate obeys the fluctuation relation, and we relate its finite time corrections to the characteristic time scales of the system. A local version of the fluctuation relation is explored and successfully checked. The equivalence between the two non-equilibrium ensembles extends to dynamical properties such as the Lyapunov exponents, which are shown to obey to a good degree of approximation a pairing rule. These results have relevance in motivating the importance of the chaotic hypothesis. in explaining that we have the freedom to model non-equilibrium systems using different but equivalent approaches, and, in particular, that using a model of a fluid where viscosity is kept constant is just one option, and not necessarily the only option, for describing accurately its statistical and dynamical properties.

  17. Equivalence of Non-equilibrium Ensembles and Representation of Friction in Turbulent Flows: The Lorenz 96 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallavotti, Giovanni; Lucarini, Valerio

    2014-09-01

    We construct different equivalent non-equilibrium statistical ensembles in a simple yet instructive -degrees of freedom model of atmospheric turbulence, introduced by Lorenz in 1996. The vector field can be decomposed into an energy-conserving, time-reversible part, plus a non-time reversible part, including forcing and dissipation. We construct a modified version of the model where viscosity varies with time, in such a way that energy is conserved, and the resulting dynamics is fully time-reversible. For each value of the forcing, the statistical properties of the irreversible and reversible model are in excellent agreement, if in the latter the energy is kept constant at a value equal to the time-average realized with the irreversible model. In particular, the average contraction rate of the phase space of the time-reversible model agrees with that of the irreversible model, where instead it is constant by construction. We also show that the phase space contraction rate obeys the fluctuation relation, and we relate its finite time corrections to the characteristic time scales of the system. A local version of the fluctuation relation is explored and successfully checked. The equivalence between the two non-equilibrium ensembles extends to dynamical properties such as the Lyapunov exponents, which are shown to obey to a good degree of approximation a pairing rule. These results have relevance in motivating the importance of the chaotic hypothesis. in explaining that we have the freedom to model non-equilibrium systems using different but equivalent approaches, and, in particular, that using a model of a fluid where viscosity is kept constant is just one option, and not necessarily the only option, for describing accurately its statistical and dynamical properties.

  18. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  19. Unsteady turbulent boundary layers and friction; Proceedings of the Energy Sources Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, February 12-15, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggert, D. C.; Martin, C. S.

    1983-09-01

    The present conference discusses experiments in periodic turbulent pipe flow whose fluids include air, water, oil, and electrolyte solutions, as well as pressure and heat transfer measurements around a cylinder in pulsating crossflow and the calculation of oscillatory turbulent flows in open channels. Also considered are the transient response of a turbulent boundary layer to a spontaneous change in freestream velocity distribution, evidence of large scale time-dependent flow in a wing-wall interaction wake, and the effect of the interaction between mean and fluctuating velocity components on turbulent dispersion in unsteady turbulent boundary layers.

  20. Overflow: Facts on Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Scott

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents results of three minor studies into the behavior of the OVERFLOW with respect to the prediction of skin friction drag on wing bodies at cruise Mach number and wind tunnel Reynolds number. The studies include a preliminary assessment of the behavior of the two new 2-equation turbulence models introduced with the latest version of OVERFLOW (v. 1.8f), an investigation into potential improvements in the matrix dissipation scheme currently implemented in OVERFLOW, and an analysis of the observed sensitivity of the code's skin friction predictions to grid stretching at solid surface boundaries.

  1. Friction in orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Prashant, P. S.; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology used hardly simulates the oral conditions. Lately studies have concluded that more emphasis should be laid on binding and notching of archwires as these are considered to be the primary factors involved in retarding the tooth movement. This article reviews the various components involved in RS and the factors affecting friction. Further, research work should be carried out to provide cost effective alternatives aimed at reducing friction. PMID:26538873

  2. A new method for predicting friction pressures and rheology of proppant-laden fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, R.G.; Nehmer, W.L.; Strumolo, G.S. )

    1992-02-01

    The prediction of fiction pressures for proppant-laden fracturing fluids requires estimations of both the base-gel friction factor and the effect of proppant on fluid rheology. This paper introduces two new expressions, each theoretically based with constants determined from data, that address these two issues for hydroxpropyl guar (HPG)-based fracturing fluids in laminar and turbulent flow. The paper first introduces a new expression for the turbulent friction factor of HPG base gels. This implicit expression for the friction factor is more theoretically correct and requires one less empirical constant than explicit forms currently used. The effect of proppant on the effective viscosity of non-Newtonian fluids is then discussed and a new expression, which includes shear rate, temperature, gel concentration, and proppant volume fraction as parameters, is derived. Developed from laboratory data and existing slurry rheology theories, this expression is shown to provide excellent predictions of laboratory and field data for both tubing and annulus injection.

  3. Heat transfer and friction factor correlations for a solar air heater duct roughened artificially with multiple v-ribs

    SciTech Connect

    Hans, V.S.; Saini, R.P.; Saini, J.S.

    2010-06-15

    The use of artificial roughness on the underside of the absorber plate is an effective and economic way to improve the thermal performance of a solar air heater. Several experimental investigations, involving different types of roughness elements, have been carried out to improve the heat transfer from the absorber plate to air flowing in solar air heaters. This paper presents an experimental investigation carried out to study the effect of multiple v-rib roughness on heat transfer coefficient and friction factor in an artificially roughened solar air heater duct. The experiment encompassed Reynolds number (Re) from 2000 to 20000, relative roughness height (e/D) values of 0.019-0.043, relative roughness pitch (P/e) range of 6-12, angle of attack ({alpha}) range of 30-75 and relative roughness width (W/w) range of 1-10. Extensive experimentation has been conducted to collect data on heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of a rectangular duct roughened with multiple v-ribs. Using these experimental data, correlations for Nusselt number and friction factor in terms of roughness geometry and flow parameters have been developed. (author)

  4. Heat transfer and friction in a high-enthalpy converging gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Strelkov, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper turbulent flow in the boundary layer of a convergent nozzle is considered. On the basis of the Prandtl two-layer model expressions are obtained for determining the relative laws of friction, heat transfer, velocity and enthalpy profiles taking into account the mutual effect of such disturbing factors as nonisothermicity, compressibility and a negative pressure gradient.

  5. Factors controlling threshold friction velocity in semiarid and arid areas of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marticorena, Beatrice; Bergametti, G.; Belnap, Jayne

    1997-01-01

    A physical model was developed to explain threshold friction velocities u*t for particles of the size 60a??120 I?m lying on a rough surface in loose soils for semiarid and arid parts of the United States. The model corrected for the effect of momentum absorption by the nonerodible roughness. For loose or disturbed soils the most important parameter that controls u*t is the aerodynamic roughness height z 0. For physical crusts damaged by wind the size of erodible crust pieces is important along with the roughness. The presence of cyanobacteriallichen soil crusts roughens the surface, and the biological fibrous growth aggregates soil particles. Only undisturbed sandy soils and disturbed soils of all types would be expected to be erodible in normal wind storms. Therefore disturbance of soils by both cattle and humans is very important in predicting wind erosion as confirmed by our measurements.

  6. The influence of phase aperture on Beam propagation factor of partially coherent flat-topped beams in a turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavinejad, M.; Hadilou, N.; Taherabadi, G.

    2013-01-01

    Analytical formula has been derived for the M-factor of a partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) beam truncated by a phase aperture in turbulent atmosphere based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function. The M-factor of the mentioned beams in atmospheric turbulence have been discussed precisely with numerical analysis. It can be shown that the M-factor of a PCFT beam truncated by a phase aperture in turbulent atmosphere increases with propagation distance, and is mainly determined by the parameters of the beam, phase aperture and turbulent atmosphere. The presented results are expected to be useful in long-distance free-space optical communications.

  7. Turbulent pipe flow of power-law fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, M.R.

    1997-11-01

    Flows of non-Newtonian fluids through pipes are relevant in many engineering applications, especially within the manufacturing, process and wastewater industries. This paper reports on the numerical computation of the turbulent flow of power-law fluids in smooth circular tubes. The turbulence is represented by means of a modified version of an existing two-equation turbulence model. Numerical results are presented for the fully-developed friction factor and velocity profile, and compared with experimental data. The model is shown to produce fairly good agreement with experiment over a wide range of values for the power-law index and generalized Reynolds number.

  8. Experimental studies on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of forced circulation solar water heater system fitted with helical twisted tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaisankar, S.; Radhakrishnan, T.K.; Sheeba, K.N.

    2009-11-15

    Experimental investigation of heat transfer, friction factor and thermal performance of twisted tape solar water heater with various twist ratios has been conducted and the results are compared with plain tube collector for the same operating conditions with Reynolds number varied from 3000 to 23,000. Experimental data from plain tube collector is validated with the fundamental equations and found that the discrepancy is less than {+-}5.35% and {+-}8.80% for Nusselt number and friction factor, respectively. Correlations have been developed for Nusselt number and friction factor with various twist ratios (Y = 3, 4, 5, 6) and are compared with the experimental values. Results conclude that, heat transfer and pressure drop are higher in twisted tape collector compared to the plain one. Among the various twist ratios, the minimum twist ratio 3 is found to enhance the heat transfer and pressure drop due to swirl generation. As the twist ratio increases, the swirl generation decreases and minimizes the heat transfer and friction factor. (author)

  9. Direct Measurements of Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, Satish

    1953-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure local skin friction on a flat plate by measuring the force exerted upon a very small movable part of the surface of the flat plate. These forces, which range from about 1 milligram to about 100 milligrams, are measured by means of a reactance device. The apparatus was first applied to measurements in the low-speed range, both for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The measured skin-friction coefficients show excellent agreement with Blasius' and Von Karman's results. The device was then applied to high-speed subsonic flow and the turbulent-skin-friction coefficients were determined up to a Mach number of about 0.8. A few measurements in supersonic flow were also made. This paper describes the design and construction of the device and the results of the measurements.

  10. Measurement of Heat Transfer in the Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Flat Plate in a Supersonic Flow and Comparison with Skin Friction Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, C C

    1954-01-01

    Local heat-transfer rates on the surface of a heated flat plate at zero incidence to an air stream flowing at Mach numbers of 1.69 and 2.27 are presented. The Reynolds number range for both Mach numbers was 1 million to 10 million. Surface temperatures were maintained near recovery temperature. It was found that the variation of heat transfer with Mach number was in agreement with previously reported variations of directly measured skin friction with Mach number on unheated bodies. The variation with Mach number of the average skin coefficient, as determined from impact-pressure surveys, was in agreement with that from other momentum loss measurements but differed from the variation obtained from directly measured skin friction as reported by others. (author)

  11. Factors Influencing Pitot Probe Centerline Displacement in a Turbulent Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosser, Wendy I.

    1997-01-01

    When a total pressure probe is used for measuring flows with transverse total pressure gradients, a displacement of the effective center of the probe is observed (designated Delta). While this phenomenon is well documented in incompressible flow and supersonic laminar flow, there is insufficient information concerning supersonic turbulent flow. In this study, three NASA Lewis Research Center Supersonic Wind Tunnels (SWT's) were used to investigate pitot probe centerline displacement in supersonic turbulent boundary layers. The relationship between test conditions and pitot probe centerline displacement error was to be determined. For this investigation, ten circular probes with diameter-to-boundary layer ratios (D/delta) ranging from 0.015 to 0.256 were tested in the 10 ft x 10 ft SWT, the 15 cm x 15 cm SWT, and the 1 ft x 1 ft SWT. Reynolds numbers of 4.27 x 10(exp 6)/m, 6.00 x 10(exp 6)/in, 10.33 x 10(exp 6)/in, and 16.9 x 10(exp 6)/m were tested at nominal Mach numbers of 2.0 and 2.5. Boundary layer thicknesses for the three tunnels were approximately 200 mm, 13 mm, and 30 mm, respectively. Initial results indicate that boundary layer thickness, delta, and probe diameter, D/delta play a minimal role in pitot probe centerline offset error, Delta/D. It appears that the Mach gradient, dM/dy, is an important factor, though the exact relationship has not yet been determined. More data is needed to fill the map before a conclusion can be drawn with any certainty. This research provides valuable supersonic, turbulent boundary layer data from three supersonic wind tunnels with three very different boundary layers. It will prove a valuable stepping stone for future research into the factors influencing pitot probe centerline offset error.

  12. Friction welding.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Results of an exploratory study of the structure and properties of friction welds in Udimet 700 (U-700) and TD-nickel (TD-Ni) bar materials, as well as dissimilar U-700/TD-Ni friction welds. Butt welds were prepared by friction welding 12.7-mm-diam U-700 bars and TD-Ni bars. Specimens for elevated temperature tensile and stress rupture testing were machined after a postweld heat treatment. Friction welding of U-700 shows great potential because the welds were found to be as strong as the parent metal in stress rupture and tensile tests at 760 and 980 C. In addition, the weld line was not detectable by metallographic examination after postheating. Friction welds in TD-Ni or between U-700 and TD-Ni were extremely weak at elevated temperatures. The TD-Ni friction welds could support only 9% as much stress as the base metal for 10-hour stress rupture life at 1090 C. The U-700/TD-Ni weld could sustain only 15% as much stress as the TD-Ni parent metal for a 10-hour stress rupture life at 930 C. Thus friction welding is not a suitable joining method for obtaining high-strength TD-Ni or U-700/TD-Ni weldments.

  13. Use of a Stanton Tube for Skin-Friction Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, S. S.; Hakkinen, R. J.; Trilling, L.

    1959-01-01

    A small total-pressure tube resting against a flat-plate surface was used as a Stanton tube and calibrated as a skin-friction meter at various subsonic and supersonic speeds. Laminar flow was maintained for the supersonic runs at a Mach number M(sub infinity) of 2. At speeds between M(sub infinity) = 1.33 and M(sub infinity) = 1.87, the calibrations were carried-out in a turbulent boundary layer. The subsonic flows were found to be in transition. The skin-friction readings of a floating-element type of balance served as the reference values against which the Stanton tube was calibrated. A theoretical model was developed which, for moderate values of the shear parameter tau, accurately predicts the performance of the Stanton tube in subsonic and supersonic flows. A "shear correction factor" was found to explain the deviations from the basic model when T became too large. Compressibility effects were important only in the case of turbulent supersonic flows, and they did not alter the form of the calibration curve. The test Reynolds numbers, based on the distance from the leading edge and free-stream conditions, ranged from 70,000 to 875,000. The turbulent-boundary-layer Reynolds numbers, based on momentum thickness, varied between 650 and 2,300. Both laminar and turbulent velocity profiles were taken and the effect of pressure gradient on the calibration was investigated.

  14. An experimental investigation regarding the laminar to turbulent flow transition in helically coiled pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Cioncolini, Andrea; Santini, Lorenzo

    2006-03-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in helically coiled pipes. Twelve coils have been tested, with ratios of coil diameter to tube diameter ranging from 6.9 to 369, and the interaction between turbulence emergence and coil curvature has been analyzed from direct observation of the experimental friction factor profiles. The experimental data compare favorably with existing results and reveal new features that apparently were not observed in previous research. (author)

  15. Modeling of unsteady friction and viscoelastic damping in piping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, C.; Nicolet, C.; Bergant, A.; Müller, A.; Avellan, F.

    2012-11-01

    In real systems, the phenomena, such as pipe-wall viscoelasticity, unsteady friction or fluid structure interaction induce additional damping and dispersion of transient pressure waves than that defined by classical waterhammer. In this paper, unsteady friction models and viscoelastic damping models will be presented and a theoretical formulation of the viscoelastic damping in piping systems without cavitation will be developed. Firstly, the friction factor will be presented as the sum of the quasi-steady part and the unsteady part related to the instantaneous local acceleration and instantaneous convective acceleration. This unsteady friction model has been incorporated into the method of characteristic algorithm (MOC). Secondly, the damping will be defined in terms of viscoelastic effect attributed to a second viscosity μ'. This model is solved using the Finite Difference Method. Finally, numerical results from the unsteady friction and viscoelastic models are compared with results of laboratory measurements for waterhammer cases with low Reynolds number turbulent flows. This comparison validates the new viscoelastic model.

  16. New Empirical Relationship between Thrust Coefficient and Induction Factor for the Turbulent Windmill State

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, M.L., Jr.

    2005-08-01

    Wind turbines sometimes experience the turbulent windmill state during startup or shutdown. This rarely happens during normal operation, so it has little effect on power curves or energy production. However, for completeness we need to be able to model situations where the axial induction factor exceeds 0.5. Classical momentum theory, which shows a relationship between the thrust coefficient and the axial induction factor, is not valid in this region. Glauert plotted some experimental data taken by Lock in the 1920s against this parabolic relationship and found very poor agreement for operation in this high-induction state. He proposed a new empirical relationship to fit the experimental data. Unfortunately, the new empirical curve does not account for tip or hub losses. Others have proposed multiplying the axial induction factor by the loss factor to correct the curve, but this still leaves a mathematical no-man's-land between the classical curve and the modified version of Glauert's empirical curve. The purpose of this paper is to document the derivation of a new curve that accounts for tip and hub losses and eliminates the numerical problems of the previous approaches.

  17. Turbulence models and Reynolds analogy for two-dimensional supersonic compression ramp flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.; Bidek, Maleina C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of the application of turbulence models and the Reynolds analogy to the Navier-Stokes computations of Mach 2.9 two-dimensional compression ramp flows are presented. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model and the kappa-epsilon turbulence transport equations for the turbulent momentum flux modeling in the Navier-Stokes equations are studied. The Reynolds analogy for the turbulent heat flux modeling in the energy equation was also studied. The Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation were numerically solved for the flow properties. The Reynolds shear stress, the skin friction factor, and the surface heat transfer rate were calculated and compared with their measurements. It was concluded that with a hybrid kappa-epsilon turbulence model for turbulence modeling, the present computations predicted the skin friction factors of the 8 deg and 16 deg compression ramp flows and with the turbulent Prandtl number Pr(sub t) = 0.93 and the ratio of the turbulent thermal and momentum transport coefficients mu(sub q)/mu(sub t) = 2/Prt, the present computations also predicted the surface heat transfer rates beneath the boundary layer flow of the 16 compression ramp.

  18. Semiempirical methods for computing turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belov, I. A.; Ginzburg, I. P.

    1986-01-01

    Two semiempirical theories which provide a basis for determining the turbulent friction and heat exchange near a wall are presented: (1) the Prandtl-Karman theory, and (2) the theory utilizing an equation for the energy of turbulent pulsations. A comparison is made between exact numerical methods and approximate integral methods for computing the turbulent boundary layers in the presence of pressure, blowing, or suction gradients. Using the turbulent flow around a plate as an example, it is shown that, when computing turbulent flows with external turbulence, it is preferable to construct a turbulence model based on the equation for energy of turbulent pulsations.

  19. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation. PMID:27127498

  20. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation.

    PubMed

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 10(8) and between 10(-7) and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation. PMID:27127498

  1. Navier-Stokes Computations With One-Equation Turbulence Model for Flows Along Concave Wall Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the use of a time-marching three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation numerical solver with a one-equation turbulence model to simulate the flow fields developed along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension flat wall surface. The 3-D Navier- Stokes numerical solver came from the NASA Glenn-HT code. The one-equation turbulence model was derived from the Spalart and Allmaras model. The computational approach was first calibrated with the computations of the velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles of a steady flat plate boundary layer flow. The computational approach was then used to simulate developing boundary layer flows along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension wall. The author investigated the computational results of surface friction factors, near surface velocity components, near wall temperatures, and a turbulent shear stress component in terms of turbulence modeling, computational mesh configurations, inlet turbulence level, and time iteration step. The computational results were compared with existing measurements of skin friction factors, velocity components, and shear stresses of the developing boundary layer flows. With a fine computational mesh and a one-equation model, the computational approach could predict accurately the skin friction factors, near surface velocity and temperature, and shear stress within the flows. The computed velocity components and shear stresses also showed the vortices effect on the velocity variations over a concave wall. The computed eddy viscosities at the near wall locations were also compared with the results from a two equation turbulence modeling technique. The inlet turbulence length scale was found to have little effect on the eddy viscosities at locations near the concave wall surface. The eddy viscosities, from the one-equation and two-equation modeling, were comparable at most stream-wise stations. The present one-equation turbulence model is an effective approach for turbulence modeling in the near solid wall surface region of flow over a concave wall.

  2. Ribbon turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venaille, Antoine; Nadeau, Louis-Philippe; Vallis, Geoffrey

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel with an initial eastward baroclinically unstable jet in the upper layer, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization in the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these results by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the initial eastward jet in the upper layer appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the global distribution of potential vorticity levels. Statistical mechanical theory of the 1 1/2 layer quasi-geostrophic model predicts the formation of two regions of homogenized potential vorticity separated by a minimal interface. We explain that cascade phenomenology leads to the same result. We then show that the dynamics of the ribbons results from a competition between a tendency to reach the equilibrium state and baroclinic instability that induces meanders of the interface. These meanders intermittently break and induce potential vorticity mixing, but the interface remains sharp throughout the flow evolution. We show that for some parameter regimes, the ribbons act as a mixing barrier which prevents relaxation toward equilibrium, favouring the emergence of multiple zonal (eastward) jets.

  3. Skin-Friction Measurements in Incompressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Donald W.; Walker, John H.

    1959-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to measure the local surface-shear stress and the average skin-friction coefficient in Incompressible flow for a turbulent boundary layer on a smooth flat plate having zero pressure gradient. Data were obtained for a range of Reynolds numbers from 1 million to 45 million. The local surface-shear stress was measured by a floating-element skin-friction balance and also by a calibrated total head tube located on the surface of the test wall. The average skin-friction coefficient was obtained from boundary-layer velocity profiles.

  4. Free-stream turbulence and concave curvature effects on heated, transitional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the transition process on flat-plate and concave curved-wall boundary layers for various free-stream turbulence levels was performed. Results show that for transition of a flat-plate, the two forms of boundary layer behavior, identified as laminar-like and turbulent-like, cannot be thought of as separate Blasius and fully-turbulent profiles, respectively. Thus, simple transition models in which the desired quantity is assumed to be an average, weighted on intermittency, of the theoretical laminar and fully turbulent values is not expected to be successful. Deviation of the flow identified as laminar-like from theoretical laminar behavior is shown to be due to recovery after the passage of a turbulent spot, while deviation of the flow identified as turbulent-like from the full-turbulent values is thought to be due to incomplete establishment of the fully-turbulent power spectral distribution. Turbulent Prandtl numbers for the transitional flow, computed from measured shear stress, turbulent heat flux and mean velocity and temperature profiles, were less than unity. For the curved-wall case with low free-stream turbulence intensity, the existence of Gortler vortices on the concave wall within both laminar and turbulent flows was established using liquid crystal visualization and spanwise velocity and temperature traverses. Transition was found to occur via a vortex breakdown mode. The vortex wavelength was quite irregular in both the laminar and turbulent flows, but the vortices were stable in time and space. The upwash was found to be more unstable, with higher levels of u' and u'v', and lower skin friction coefficients and shape factors. Turbulent Prandtl numbers, measured using a triple-wire probe, were found to be near unity for all post-transitional profiles, indicating no gross violation of Reynolds analogy. No evidence of streamwise vortices was seen in the high turbulence intensity case.

  5. Numerical investigation of heat transfer and friction factor characteristics in a circular tube fitted with V-cut twisted tape inserts.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sami D; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Takriff, Mohd S; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration. PMID:24078795

  6. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer and Friction Factor Characteristics in a Circular Tube Fitted with V-Cut Twisted Tape Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration. PMID:24078795

  7. Elasto-inertial turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Devranjan; Dubief, Yves; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander N.; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature, yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water, our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance are more complicated (e.g., blood, polymer melts, paints), however; they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics, and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We demonstrate here for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates, turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but is suppressed and replaced by a different type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence. Elasto-inertial turbulence is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence, and the dynamical properties differ significantly. The friction scaling observed coincides with the so-called “maximum drag reduction” asymptote, which is exhibited by a wide range of viscoelastic fluids. PMID:23757498

  8. Elasto-inertial turbulence.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Devranjan; Dubief, Yves; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander N; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-06-25

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature, yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water, our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance are more complicated (e.g., blood, polymer melts, paints), however; they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics, and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We demonstrate here for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates, turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but is suppressed and replaced by a different type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence. Elasto-inertial turbulence is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence, and the dynamical properties differ significantly. The friction scaling observed coincides with the so-called "maximum drag reduction" asymptote, which is exhibited by a wide range of viscoelastic fluids. PMID:23757498

  9. Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomey, Jacques

    1952-01-01

    From the practical point of view, this analysis shows that each problem of friction or wear requires its particular solution. There is no universal solution; one or other of the factors predominates and defines the choice of the solution. In certain cases, copper alloys of great thermal conductivity are preferred; in others, plastics abundantly supplied with water. Sometimes, soft antifriction metals are desirable to distribute the load; at other times, hard metals with high resistance to abrasion or heat.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of viscoelastic-fluid-based nanofluid turbulent channel flow with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan-Cheng; Li, Feng-Chen; Cai, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Na; Yu, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Our previous experimental studies have confirmed that viscoelastic-fluid-based nanofluid (VFBN) prepared by suspending nanoparticles in a viscoelastic base fluid (VBF, behaves drag reduction at turbulent flow state) can reduce turbulent flow resistance as compared with water and enhance heat transfer as compared with VBF. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed in this study to explore the mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement (HTE) and flow drag reduction (DR) for the VFBN turbulent flow. The Giesekus model is used as the constitutive equation for VFBN. Our previously proposed thermal dispersion model is adopted to take into account the thermal dispersion effects of nanoparticles in the VFBN turbulent flow. The DNS results show similar behaviors for flow resistance and heat transfer to those obtained in our previous experiments. Detailed analyses are conducted for the turbulent velocity, temperature, and conformation fields obtained by DNSs for different fluid cases, and for the friction factor with viscous, turbulent, and elastic contributions and heat transfer rate with conductive, turbulent and thermal dispersion contributions of nanoparticles, respectively. The mechanisms of HTE and DR of VFBN turbulent flows are then discussed. Based on analogy theory, the ratios of Chilton-Colburn factor to friction factor for different fluid flow cases are investigated, which from another aspect show the significant enhancement in heat transfer performance for some cases of water-based nanofluid and VFBN turbulent flows. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51276046), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20112302110020), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561037), and the President Fund of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y3510213N00).

  11. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sandip

    2016-06-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features. PMID:26950615

  12. Hydrodynamic skin-friction reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Jason C. (Inventor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Inventor); Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for reducing skin friction, inhibiting the effects of liquid turbulence, and decreasing heat transfer in a system involving flow of a liquid along a surface of a body includes applying a substantially integral sheet of a gas, e.g., air, immediately adjacent to the surface of the body, e.g., a marine vehicle, which has a longitudinally grooved surface in proximity with the liquid and with a surface material having high contact angle between the liquid and said wall to reduce interaction of the liquid, e.g., water, with the surface of the body, e.g., the hull of the marine vehicle.

  13. Heat Transfer and Friction Characteristics of the Microfluidic Heat Sink with Variously-Shaped Ribs for Chip Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Lian; Yang, Da-Wei; Wang, Yan; Niu, Di; Zhao, Xiao-Lin; Ding, Gui-Fu

    2015-01-01

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigated the heat transfer and friction characteristics of microfluidic heat sinks with variously-shaped micro-ribs, i.e., rectangular, triangular and semicircular ribs. The micro-ribs were fabricated on the sidewalls of microfluidic channels by a surface-micromachining micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process and used as turbulators to improve the heat transfer rate of the microfluidic heat sink. The results indicate that the utilizing of micro-ribs provides a better heat transfer rate, but also increases the pressure drop penalty for microchannels. Furthermore, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microchannels are strongly affected by the rib shape. In comparison, the triangular ribbed microchannel possesses the highest Nusselt number and friction factor among the three rib types. PMID:25912351

  14. Heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microfluidic heat sink with variously-shaped ribs for chip cooling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Lian; Yang, Da-Wei; Wang, Yan; Niu, Di; Zhao, Xiao-Lin; Ding, Gui-Fu

    2015-01-01

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigated the heat transfer and friction characteristics of microfluidic heat sinks with variously-shaped micro-ribs, i.e., rectangular, triangular and semicircular ribs. The micro-ribs were fabricated on the sidewalls of microfluidic channels by a surface-micromachining micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process and used as turbulators to improve the heat transfer rate of the microfluidic heat sink. The results indicate that the utilizing of micro-ribs provides a better heat transfer rate, but also increases the pressure drop penalty for microchannels. Furthermore, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microchannels are strongly affected by the rib shape. In comparison, the triangular ribbed microchannel possesses the highest Nusselt number and friction factor among the three rib types. PMID:25912351

  15. Predicting Turbulent Convective Heat Transfer in Three-Dimensional Duct Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokni, M.; Gatski, T. B.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of an explicit algebraic stress model is assessed in predicting the turbulent flow and forced heat transfer in straight ducts, with square, rectangular, trapezoidal and triangular cross-sections, under fully developed conditions over a range of Reynolds numbers. Iso-thermal conditions are imposed on the duct walls and the turbulent heat fluxes are modeled by gradient-diffusion type models. At high Reynolds numbers (>/= 10(exp 5)), wall functions are used for the velocity and temperature fields; while at low Reynolds numbers damping functions are introduced into the models. Hydraulic parameters such as friction factor and Nusselt number are well predicted even when damping functions are used, and the present formulation imposes minimal demand on the number of grid points without any convergence or stability problems. Comparison between the models is presented in terms of the hydraulic parameters, friction factor and Nusselt number, as well as in terms of the secondary flow patterns occurring within the ducts.

  16. A Numerical Investigation of Turbulent Flow in Noncircular Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Hsiao C.

    1994-01-01

    Since turbulent duct flows play an important role in engineering, continuous efforts to investigate this problem have been made. Until recently, these investigations were limited mostly to experiments and various semi-analytic methods. Owing to the improvement of turbulence modeling, the prevailing method of prediction is now mainly numerical. The majority of these studies deals, however, with turbulent flows in circular or square ducts and only limited information is available for straight noncircular ducts. In view of this situation, we propose to conduct a numerical investigation of turbulent flow in a class of ducts, whose cross sections vary from a circle to a near square. Turbulent flow in a noncircular duct is characterized by the presence of secondary flow for which a more refined turbulence model than the k-epsilon equations is required. In order to show that the calculated results are credible, various modes of verification were used to examine the results for a selected configuration, including an accuracy check by a scaling law and observing the decay of secondary flow as the cross section changes from a noncircular shape to a circle. After this was done, computations were performed for other configurations and with different Reynolds numbers from which wall shear stresses and friction factors are plotted.

  17. Prediction of Very High Reynolds Number Compressible Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1998-01-01

    Flat plate skin friction calculations over a range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 3.5 at Reynolds numbers from 16 million to 492 million using a Navier Stokes method with advanced turbulence modeling are compared with incompressible skin friction coefficient correlations. The semi-empirical correlation theories of van Driest; Cope; Winkler and Cha; and Sommer and Short T' are used to transform the predicted skin friction coefficients of solutions using two algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence models in the Navier-Stokes method PAB3D. In general, the predicted skin friction coefficients scaled well with each reference temperature theory though, overall the theory by Sommer and Short appeared to best collapse the predicted coefficients. At the lower Reynolds number 3 to 30 million, both the Girimaji and Shih, Zhu and Lumley turbulence models predicted skin-friction coefficients within 2% of the semi-empirical correlation skin friction coefficients. At the higher Reynolds numbers of 100 to 500 million, the turbulence models by Shih, Zhu and Lumley and Girimaji predicted coefficients that were 6% less and 10% greater, respectively, than the semi-empirical coefficients.

  18. Friction surfacing and linear friction welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, E. D.

    The paper describes the development of the friction-surfacing and linear-friction welding technologies, with particular attention given to the equipment evolution and the application of the processes and advanced materials (such as intermetallics, metal-matrix composites (MMCs), ODS alloys, and powder metallurgy alloys) for the aerospace industry. The use of friction surfacing to modify the surface material with MMCs, to repair defects by plugging, and manufacture/reprocess materials is described.

  19. Friction, wear, and lubrication in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    A review of studies and observations on the friction, wear, and lubrication behavior of materials in a vacuum environment is presented. The factors that determine and influence friction and wear are discussed. They include topographical, physical, mechanical, and the chemical nature of the surface. The effects of bulk properties such as deformation characteristics, fracture behavior, and structure are included.

  20. Experimental study of boundary layer transition with elevated freestream turbulence on a heated flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Ki-Hyeon; Reshotko, Eli

    1991-01-01

    A detailed investigation to document momentum and thermal development of boundary layers undergoing natural transition on a heated flat plate was performed. Experimental results of both overall and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional, and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers are presented. Measurements were acquired in a low-speed, closed-loop wind tunnel with a freestream velocity of 100 ft/s and zero pressure gradient over a range of freestream turbulence intensities (TI) from 0.4 to 6 percent. The distributions of skin friction, heat transfer rate and Reynolds shear stress were all consistent with previously published data. Reynolds analogy factors for R(sub theta) is less than 2300 were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for an unheated starting length. The measured laminar value of Reynolds analogy factor was as much as 53 percent higher than the Pr(sup -2/3). A small dependence of turbulent results on TI was observed. Conditional sampling performed in the transitional boundary layer indicated the existence of a near-wall drop in intermittency, pronounced at certain low intermittencies, which is consistent with the cross-sectional shape of turbulent spots observed by others. Non-turbulent intervals were observed to possess large magnitudes of near-wall unsteadiness and turbulent intervals had peak values as much as 50 percent higher than were measured at fully turbulent stations. Non-turbulent and turbulent profiles in transitional boundary layers cannot be simply treated as Blasius and fully turbulent profiles, respectively. The boundary layer spectra indicate predicted selective amplification of T-S waves for TI is approximately 0.4 percent. However, for TI is approximately 0.8 and 1.1 percent, T-S waves are localized very near the wall and do not play a dominant role in transition process.

  1. A skin friction gauge for impulsive flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyne, C. P.; Paull, A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    A new skin friction gauge has been designed for use in impulsive facilities. The gauge was tested in the T4 free piston shock tunnel, at the University of Queensland, using a 1.5 m long plate that formed one of the inner walls of a rectangular duct. The test gas was fair and the test section free stream flow had a stagnation enthalpy of 4.7 MJ/kg. Measurements were conducted in a laminar and turbulent boundary layer. The measurements compared well with laminar and turbulent analytical theory.

  2. Friction measurement in a hip wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2016-05-01

    A torque measurement system was added to a widely used hip wear simulator, the biaxial rocking motion device. With the rotary transducer, the frictional torque about the drive axis of the biaxial rocking motion mechanism was measured. The principle of measuring the torque about the vertical axis above the prosthetic joint, used earlier in commercial biaxial rocking motion simulators, was shown to sense only a minor part of the total frictional torque. With the present method, the total frictional torque of the prosthetic hip was measured. This was shown to consist of the torques about the vertical axis above the joint and about the leaning axis. Femoral heads made from different materials were run against conventional and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups in serum lubrication. Regarding the femoral head material and the type of polyethylene, there were no categorical differences in frictional torque with the exception of zirconia heads, with which the lowest values were obtained. Diamond-like carbon coating of the CoCr femoral head did not reduce friction. The friction factor was found to always decrease with increasing load. High wear could increase the frictional torque by 75%. With the present system, friction can be continuously recorded during long wear tests, so the effect of wear on friction with different prosthetic hips can be evaluated. PMID:27160557

  3. Riblets for aircraft skin-friction reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    Energy conservation and aerodynamic efficiency are the driving forces behind research into methods to reduce turbulent skin friction drag on aircraft fuselages. Fuselage skin friction reductions as small as 10 percent provide the potential for a 250 million dollar per year fuel savings for the commercial airline fleet. One passive drag reduction concept which is relatively simple to implement and retrofit is that of longitudinally grooved surfaces aligned with the stream velocity. These grooves (riblets) have heights and spacings on the order of the turbulent wall streak and burst dimensions. The riblet performance (8 percent net drag reduction thus far), sensitivity to operational/application considerations such as yaw and Reynolds number variation, an alternative fabrication technique, results of extensive parametric experiments for geometrical optimization, and flight test applications are summarized.

  4. CFD Modeling of ITER Cable-in-Conduit Superconductors. Part I: Friction in the Central Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zanino, R.; Giors, S.; Mondino, R.

    2006-04-27

    In this paper, the first of a series, we propose a novel approach, based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), to understand the complex transverse thermal-hydraulic processes in the dual-channel cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC), which are used for the superconducting magnets of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Advanced 2D and 3D CFD, including sophisticated turbulence models, is used to compute the mass flow rate corresponding to an imposed pressure drop in rib-roughened pipes, including spirals mimicking the central channel of an ITER CICC and used in several experiments. The results of the calculation are validated against measured data and can be used to deduce the friction factor fH in the central channel, throwing at the same time some light on the role played by the different parameters (Reynolds number, spiral geometry, etc.) in the central channel friction process for an ITER CICC.

  5. Friction--slipping--traction.

    PubMed

    Valiant, G A

    1993-12-01

    The minimum translational traction requirements of outsoles for shoes used for walking, running, and activities involving lateral movements are presented. Since it will be shown that the classical friction relationships described by Coulomb do not always apply to the elastomeric materials used in modern day athletic footwear, empirical measures of the traction characteristics of candidate materials and designs must be made. A physical traction testing device has been developed to make measurements of the traction characteristics of shoe outsoles will be described. This device quantifies both translational and rotational traction characteristics. Examples of factors affecting both of these variables are presented. Combining a knowledge of the traction characteristics of materials and designs and the factors influencing traction with knowledge of the traction requirements of different activities permits the matching of appropriate outsoles to shoes used for specific activities. PMID:8146755

  6. Drag reduction: enticing turbulence, and then an industry.

    PubMed

    Spalart, Philippe R; McLean, J Douglas

    2011-04-13

    We examine drag-reduction proposals, as presented in this volume and in general, first with concrete examples of how to bridge the distance from pure science through engineering to what makes inventions go into service; namely, the value to the public. We point out that the true drag reduction can be markedly different from an estimate based simply on the difference between turbulent and laminar skin friction over the laminarized region, or between the respective skin frictions of the baseline and the riblet-treated flow. In some situations, this difference is favourable, and is due to secondary differences in pressure drag. We reiterate that the benefit of riblets, if it is expressed as a percentage in skin-friction reduction, is unfortunately lower at full-size Reynolds numbers than in a small-scale experiment or simulation. The Reynolds number-independent measure of such benefits is a shift of the logarithmic law, or 'ΔU(+)'. Anticipating the design of a flight test and then a product, we note the relative ease in representing riblets or laminarization in computational fluid dynamics, in contrast with the huge numerical and turbulence-modelling challenge of resolving active flow control systems in a calculation of the full flow field. We discuss in general terms the practical factors that have limited applications of concepts that would appear more than ready after all these years, particularly riblets and laminar-flow control. PMID:21382831

  7. Active Dynamic Frictional Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2015-03-01

    In biological systems there are a myriad of interactions occurring instantaneously and these interactions can vary drastically in the strength of the interaction, the speed at which this interaction occurs, and the duration of the interaction. When multiple interactions occur any of these factors can determine which particular interaction is dominant. However, currently it is extremely difficult to measure binding affinity, Kon, and Koff rates in a relatively high throughput manner. Here we propose a novel and versatile system that will be able to detect differences in binding affinity of wide range of transient interactions and will be able to extract the relevant time scales of these interactions. Our system will utilize ferromagnetic particles that can be easily functionalized with a receptor of interest and the substrate will be coated in the corresponding ligand. A rotating magnetic field will cause particles, henceforth referred to as rollers, to rotate and this rotational motion will be converted into translational motion via the effective frictional force induced by interaction that is being probed. By measuring the translation of the rollers to a baseline, where only hydrodynamic friction occurs, we can measure the relative strength of the interactions. We can also potentially measure kinetic information by changing the frequency at which the magnetic field rotates, since changing the frequency at which the bead rotates is akin to changing the time allowed for bond formation. We will measure a wide range of interaction including ionic, metal-ion coordination, IgG-Protein A complex, and biotin-streptavidin complex.

  8. Internal (Annular) and Compressible External (Flat Plate) Turbulent Flow Heat Transfer Correlations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence; Smith, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide a discussion regarding the applicability of a family of traditional heat transfer correlation based models for several (unit level) heat transfer problems associated with flight heat transfer estimates and internal flow heat transfer associated with an experimental simulation design (Dobranich 2014). Variability between semi-empirical free-flight models suggests relative differences for heat transfer coefficients on the order of 10%, while the internal annular flow behavior is larger with differences on the order of 20%. We emphasize that these expressions are strictly valid only for the geometries they have been derived for e.g. the fully developed annular flow or simple external flow problems. Though, the application of flat plate skin friction estimate to cylindrical bodies is a traditional procedure to estimate skin friction and heat transfer, an over-prediction bias is often observed using these approximations for missile type bodies. As a correction for this over-estimate trend, we discuss a simple scaling reduction factor for flat plate turbulent skin friction and heat transfer solutions (correlations) applied to blunt bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack. The method estimates the ratio between axisymmetric and 2-d stagnation point heat transfer skin friction and Stanton number solution expressions for sub-turbulent Reynolds numbers %3C1x10 4 . This factor is assumed to also directly influence the flat plate results applied to the cylindrical portion of the flow and the flat plate correlations are modified by

  9. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Qu, Zhihua; Braiman, Yehuda; Zhang, Zhenyu; Barhen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  10. Evolution of turbulence characteristics from straight to curved pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoury, George K.; Noorani, Azad; Schlatter, Philipp; Fischer, Paul F.

    2012-11-01

    Large-scale direct numerical simulations are performed to study turbulent flow in straight and bent pipes at four different Reynolds numbers: Reb = 5300 , 11700 (bent and straight) and 19000 and 37700 (only straight). We consider a pipe of radius R and axial length 25 R with curvature parameter ? taken to be 0 , 0 . 01 and 0 . 1 for zero, mild and strong curvatures, respectively. The code used is Nek5000 based on the spectral element method. In the straight configuration, the obtained DNS data is carefully checked against other recent simulations, highlighting minute differences between the available data. Owing to a centrifugal instability mechanism, the flow in bent pipe (? ? 0) develops counter-rotating vortices, so-called Dean vortices. The presence of the secondary motion thus induces substantial asymmetries both in the mean flow and turbulence characteristics for the bent pipe. These asymmetries tend to damp turbulence along the inner side and correspondingly enhance it along the upper side. The results are validated with recent experiments, and we could confirm the peculiar behaviour of the friction factor for specific curvatures and Re , leading to a lower friction in curved pipes than in straight pipes for the same mass flux.

  11. Micromachine friction test apparatus

    DOEpatents

    deBoer, Maarten P.; Redmond, James M.; Michalske, Terry A.

    2002-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) friction test apparatus is disclosed for determining static or dynamic friction in MEM devices. The friction test apparatus, formed by surface micromachining, is based on a friction pad supported at one end of a cantilevered beam, with the friction pad overlying a contact pad formed on the substrate. A first electrostatic actuator can be used to bring a lower surface of the friction pad into contact with an upper surface of the contact pad with a controlled and adjustable force of contact. A second electrostatic actuator can then be used to bend the cantilevered beam, thereby shortening its length and generating a relative motion between the two contacting surfaces. The displacement of the cantilevered beam can be measured optically and used to determine the static or dynamic friction, including frictional losses and the coefficient of friction between the surfaces. The test apparatus can also be used to assess the reliability of rubbing surfaces in MEM devices by producing and measuring wear of those surfaces. Finally, the friction test apparatus, which is small in size, can be used as an in situ process quality tool for improving the fabrication of MEM devices.

  12. Microblowing Technique Demonstrated to Reduce Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Biesiadny, Tom J.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most challenging areas of research in aerodynamics is the reduction of skin friction, especially for turbulent flow. Reduced skin friction means less drag. For aircraft, less drag can lead to less fuel burned or to a greater flight range for a fixed amount of fuel. Many techniques and methods have been tried; however, none of them has significantly reduced skin friction in the flight environment. An innovative skin-friction reduction technique, the Microblowing Technique (MBT), was invented in 1993. This is a unique concept in which an extremely small amount of air is blown vertically at a surface through very small holes. It can be used for aircraft or marine vehicles, such as submarines (where water is blown through the holes instead of air). As shown in the figure, the outer layer, which controls vertical flow, is a plate with high-vertical holes. The inner layer, which produces evenly distributed flow, is a low-permeability porous plate. Microblowing reduces the surface roughness and changes the flow velocity profile on the surface, thereby reducing skin friction.

  13. Distinguishing ichthyogenic turbulence from geophysical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujiana, Kandaga; Moum, James N.; Smyth, William D.; Warner, Sally J.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of currents and turbulence beneath a geostationary ship in the equatorial Indian Ocean during a period of weak surface forcing revealed unexpectedly strong turbulence beneath the surface mixed layer. Coincident with the turbulence was a marked reduction of the current speeds registered by shipboard Doppler current profilers, and an increase in their variability. At a mooring 1 km away, measurements of turbulence and currents showed no such anomalies. Correlation with the shipboard echo sounder measurements indicate that these nighttime anomalies were associated with fish aggregations beneath the ship. The fish created turbulence by swimming against the strong zonal current in order to remain beneath the ship, and their presence affected the Doppler speed measurements. The principal characteristics of the resultant ichthyogenic turbulence are (i) low wave number roll-off of shear spectra in the inertial subrange relative to geophysical turbulence, (ii) Thorpe overturning scales that are small compared with the Ozmidov scale, and (iii) low mixing efficiency. These factors extend previous findings by Gregg and Horne (2009) to a very different biophysical regime and support the general conclusion that the biological contribution to mixing the ocean via turbulence is negligible.

  14. Cosmic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, I.; Canuto, V. M.

    1993-01-01

    Inflation is found to naturally provide mechanisms for the direct generation of cosmic turbulence on the same scales as those on which density perturbations are formed. Since the observational constraints on turbulence could translate into constraints on inflation itself, these results call for a reexamination of the issue of cosmic turbulence. It is found that by the end of inflation, the amplitude of the generated turbulent velocity has been suppressed by a factor approximately greater than 10 exp 100. Inflation therefore assures the absence of turbulence on scales of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. In addition, it is shown that the density fluctuations generated by inflation can excite longitudinal turbulence after they reenter the Hubble radius at later cosmic epochs.

  15. Friction of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results in the published literature show that at low normal stress the shear stress required to slide one rock over another varies widely between experiments. This is because at low stress rock friction is strongly dependent on surface roughness. At high normal stress that effect is diminished and the friction is nearly independent of rock type. If the sliding surfaces are separated by gouge composed of Montmorillonite or vermiculite the friction can be very low. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  16. Interstellar Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Jose; Carraminana, Alberto

    1999-06-01

    1. Turbulence in the interstellar medium: a retrospective review; 2. Mechanism of formation of atmospheric turbulence relevant for optical astronomy; 3. Properties of atomic gas in spiral galaxies; 4. Turbulence in the ionized gas in spiral galaxies; 5. Probing interstellar turbulence in the warm ionized medium using emission lines; 6. The spectrum and galactic distribution of microturbulence in diffuse ionized gas; 7. Small scale structure and turbulence in the interstellar medium; 8. What is the Reynolds number of the Reynolds' layer?; 9. Photoionized gas in the galactic halo; 10. Turbulent heating of the diffuse ionized gas; 11. Cosmic rays in interstellar turbulence; 12. Turbulence in line-driven stellar winds; 13. An introduction to compressible MHD turbulence; 14. Turbulence in atomic hydrogen; 15. Supershells in spiral galaxies; 16. The size distribution of superbubbles in the interstellar medium; 17. Large-scale motions in the ISM of elliptical and spiral galaxies; 18. Vortical motions driven by supernova explosions; 19. The intermittent dissipation of turbulence: is it observed in the interstellar medium?; 20. Chemistry in turbulent flows; 21. Supersonic turbulence in giant extragalactic HII regions; 22. Turbulence in HII regions: new results; 23. Hypersonic turbulence of H2O masers; 24. Water masers tracing alfvenic turbulence and magnetic fields in W51 M and W49 N; 25. Turbulence in the Ursa Major cirrus cloud; 26. The collisions of HVCs with a magnetized gaseous disk; 27. The initial stellar mass function as a statistical sample of turbulent cloud structure; 28. The structure of molecular clouds: are they fractal?; 29. Diagnosing properties of turbulent flows from spectral line observations of the molecular interstellar medium; 30. Centroid velocity increments as a probe of the turbulent velocity field in interstellar molecular clouds; 31. High-resolution C18O mapping observations of Heiles' cloud 2 - statistical properties of the line width; 32. Observations of magnetic fields in dense interstellar clouds: implications for MHD turbulence and cloud evolution; 33. The density PDFs of supersonic random flows; 34. Turbulence as an organizing agent in the ISM; 35. Turbulence and magnetic reconnection in the interstellar medium; 36. The evolution of self-gravitating, magnetized, turbulent clouds: numerical experiments; 37. Super-Alfvénic turbulent fragmentation in molecular clouds; 38. Decay timescales of MHD turbulence in molecular clouds; 39. Numerical magnetohydrodynamic studies of turbulence and star formation; 40. Direct numerical simulations of compressible magnetohydrodynamical turbulence; 41. Fragmentation in molecular clouds: the formation of a stellar cluster; 42. Accretion disk turbulence.

  17. Heat transfer performance evaluation and prediction of correlation for turbulent flow through a tube with helical tape inserts at higher Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiya, Muhammad Mostafa Kamal; Chowdhury, M. S. U.; Ahamed, J. U.; Azad, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental investigation was accomplished to evaluate the performance of heat transfer for turbulent flow through a tube with helical tape inserts. The mild steel helical tape inserts with different twist ratios of 1.88, 3.13, 4.69, 6.41 and 7.81 were used in the flow field. Heat transfer and pressure drop data were prompted for a wide range of Reynolds number from 7200 to 50,000. The experimental results indicated that the Nusselt number, friction factor and thermal performance factor were increased with decreasing twist ratio. The results also showed that helical tape inserts of different geometries in a circular tube enhanced the heat transfer rate significantly with corresponding increase in friction factor. Nusselt number and friction factor for the tube with inserts were found to be increased up to 260 and 285 %, respectively, than those over the plain tube values at the comparable Reynolds number. The heat transfer performance was evaluated and found to be 44 % higher compared to the plain tube based on the constant blower power. Finally, new correlations were proposed for the twist ratios ranging from 1.88 to 7.81 for predicting the heat transfer, friction factor and thermal performance factor for turbulent flow through a circular tube fitted with helical tape inserts.

  18. Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes with Two-Dimensional Rib Roughness

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-24

    A commonly used internal enhancement for single-phase forced-convective turbulent flow applications is tranverse and/or near tranverse ribs. These enhanced surfaces consist of a uniform inside diameter with periodic and discrete disruption of ribs. Enhanced tubes of this type are made by an extrusion process and are used in some condensers and evaporators in refrigeration systems. Tubes of this type fall into an enhancement category called separation and reattachment that has been identified as one ofmore » the most energy efficient. Lacking are prediction methods that are mechanistic based that can be used to calculate the heat-transfer coefficients and friction-factors for tubes with this enhancement type. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor for enhanced tubes with tranverse, rectangular ribs with a spacing exceeding the reattachment length. The input quantities are the enhancement height, spacing, and the width. The Nusselt number and friction factor are calculated for a specific Reynolds number or for a range of Reynolds numbers. Users of the program are heat-exchanger designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods. The manufacturers of refrigeration heat exchangers and enhanced tube suppliers are potential users of this software.« less

  19. Rotordynamic analysis of circumferentially-grooved turbulent seals - Theory and comparison to published test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Kevin W.; Kirk, R. G.; Elrod, David A.

    1993-04-01

    An analysis procedure is presented which determines the rotordynamic stiffness, damping, and added mass coefficients for circumferentially-grooved annular seals with turbulent incompressible flow. Hirs' turbulent lubrication theory is used as the basis for the governing equations. Friction factors in the groove are based on theory for a turbulent shear layer and an entrance loss model is applied at the inlet and land regions of the seal. The governing equations are expanded into zeroth and first order equations for small rotor displacements about a centered position. The zeroth order solution determines the velocity distribution and seal leakage. The first order solution determines the dynamic pressure distribution which is integrated to yield the fluid force reactions. Comparison to published experimental results shows moderate quantitative agreement and good qualitative agreement with seal test data.

  20. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  1. Passive and active control of near-wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, A.

    1998-04-01

    Wall skin friction reduction is the primary focus of this paper. Turbulent boundary layer structure and near-wall turbulence structure are considered in particular along with how passive and active modifications to the structure can lead to reductions in drag. Direct numerical simulation of low Reynolds number turbulent flow over streamwise aligned micro-grooved striations or riblets, particularly V-groove riblets and the application of a near-wall viscous model to the flow over more complicated riblet shapes (V and U groove, thin element, compound and spanwise non-continuous V-groove) are assessed. This assessment provides a qualitative basis for identifying features that may limit riblets to skin friction reduction of about 10%. This leads to consideration of three dimensional riblets or humplets, use of oscillations (both fluid and structural), selective interference with existing turbulence and selective introduction of new scales of turbulence with the aim always towards reducing skin friction.

  2. Polymer/riblet combination for hydrodynamic skin friction reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Jason C. (Inventor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A process is disclosed for reducing skin friction and inhibiting the effects of liquid turbulence in a system involving the flow of a liquid along the surface of a body, e.g. a marine vehicle. This process includes injecting a drag reducing polymer into the valleys of adjacent, evenly spaced, longitudinal grooves extending along the length of the surface of the body, so that the rate of diffusion of the polymer from individual grooves into the liquid flow is predictably controlled by the groove dimensions. When the polymer has diffused over the tips of the grooves into the near wall region of the boundary layer, the polymer effectively reduces the turbulent skin friction. A substantial drag reducing effect is achieved with less polymer than must be used to lower skin friction when the surface of the body is smooth.

  3. Friction plug welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Riki (Inventor); Hibbard, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Friction plug welding (FPW) usage is advantageous for friction stir welding (FSW) hole close-outs and weld repairs in 2195 Al--Cu--Li fusion or friction stir welds. Current fusion welding methods of Al--Cu--Li have produced welds containing varied defects. These areas are found by non-destructive examination both after welding and after proof testing. Current techniques for repairing typically small (<0.25) defects weaken the weldment, rely heavily on welders' skill, and are costly. Friction plug welding repairs increase strength, ductility and resistance to cracking over initial weld quality, without requiring much time or operator skill. Friction plug welding while pulling the plug is advantageous because all hardware for performing the weld can be placed on one side of the workpiece.

  4. Large-Eddy Simulation of the Flat-plate Turbulent Boundary Layer at High Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Michio

    The near-wall, subgrid-scale (SGS) model [Chung and Pullin, "Large-eddy simulation and wall-modeling of turbulent channel flow'', J. Fluid Mech. 631, 281--309 (2009)] is used to perform large-eddy simulations (LES) of the incompressible developing, smooth-wall, flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. In this model, the stretched-vortex, SGS closure is utilized in conjunction with a tailored, near-wall model designed to incorporate anisotropic vorticity scales in the presence of the wall. The composite SGS-wall model is presently incorporated into a computer code suitable for the LES of developing flat-plate boundary layers. This is then used to study several aspects of zero- and adverse-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers. First, LES of the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer are performed at Reynolds numbers Retheta based on the free-stream velocity and the momentum thickness in the range Retheta = 103-1012. Results include the inverse skin friction coefficient, 2/Cf , velocity profiles, the shape factor H, the Karman "constant", and the Coles wake factor as functions of Re theta. Comparisons with some direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiment are made, including turbulent intensity data from atmospheric-layer measurements at Retheta = O (106). At extremely large Retheta , the empirical Coles-Fernholz relation for skin-friction coefficient provides a reasonable representation of the LES predictions. While the present LES methodology cannot of itself probe the structure of the near-wall region, the present results show turbulence intensities that scale on the wall-friction velocity and on the Clauser length scale over almost all of the outer boundary layer. It is argued that the LES is suggestive of the asymptotic, infinite Reynolds-number limit for the smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer and different ways in which this limit can be approached are discussed. The maximum Retheta of the present simulations appears to be limited by machine precision and it is speculated, but not demonstrated, that even larger Retheta could be achieved with quad- or higher-precision arithmetic. Second, the time series velocity signals obtained from LES within the logarithmic region of the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer are used in combination with an empirical, predictive inner--outer wall model [Marusic et al., "Predictive model for wall-bounded turbulent flow'', Science 329, 193 (2010)] to calculate the statistics of the fluctuating streamwise velocity in the inner region of the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer. Results, including spectra and moments up to fourth order, are compared with equivalent predictions using experimental time series, as well as with direct experimental measurements at Reynolds numbers Retau based on the friction velocity and the boundary layer thickness, Retau = 7,300, 13,600 and 19,000. LES combined with the wall model are then used to extend the inner-layer predictions to Reynolds numbers Retau = 62,000, 100,000 and 200,000 that lie within a gap in log(Retau) space between laboratory measurements and surface-layer, atmospheric experiments. The present results support a log-like increase in the near-wall peak of the streamwise turbulence intensities with Retau and also provide a means of extending LES results at large Reynolds numbers to the near-wall region of wall-bounded turbulent flows. Finally, we apply the wall model to LES of a turbulent boundary layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient. Computed statistics are found to be consistent with recent experiments and some Reynolds number similarity is observed over a range of two orders of magnitude.

  5. Frictional drag reduction by bubble injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    The injection of gas bubbles into a turbulent boundary layer of a liquid phase has multiple different impacts on the original flow structure. Frictional drag reduction is a phenomenon resulting from their combined effects. This explains why a number of different void-drag reduction relationships have been reported to date, while early works pursued a simple universal mechanism. In the last 15 years, a series of precisely designed experimentations has led to the conclusion that the frictional drag reduction by bubble injection has multiple manifestations dependent on bubble size and flow speed. The phenomena are classified into several regimes of two-phase interaction mechanisms. Each regime has inherent physics of bubbly liquid, highlighted by keywords such as bubbly mixture rheology, the spectral response of bubbles in turbulence, buoyancy-dominated bubble behavior, and gas cavity breakup. Among the regimes, bubbles in some selected situations lose the drag reduction effect owing to extra momentum transfer promoted by their active motions. This separates engineers into two communities: those studying small bubbles for high-speed flow applications and those studying large bubbles for low-speed flow applications. This article reviews the roles of bubbles in drag reduction, which have been revealed from fundamental studies of simplified flow geometries and from development of measurement techniques that resolve the inner layer structure of bubble-mixed turbulent boundary layers.

  6. New DNS and modeling results for turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Arne; El Khoury, George; Grundestam, Olof; Schlatter, Philipp; Brethouwer, Geert; Linne Flow Centre Team

    2013-11-01

    The near-wall region of turbulent pipe and channel flows (as well as zero-pressure gradient boundary layers) have been shown to exhibit a very high degree of similarity in terms of all statistical moments and many other features, while even the mean velocity profile in the two cases exhibits significant differences between in the outer region. The wake part of the profile, i.e. the deviation from the log-law, in the outer region is of substantially larger amplitude in pipe flow as compared to channel flow (although weaker than in boundary layer flow). This intriguing feature has been well known but has no simple explanation. Model predictions typically give identical results for the two flows. We have analyzed a new set of DNS for pipe and channel flows (el Khoury et al. 2013, Flow, Turbulence and Combustion) for friction Reynolds numbers up to 1000 and made comparing calculations with differential Reynolds stress models (DRSM). We have strong indications that the key factor behind the difference in mean velocity in the outer region can be coupled to differences in the turbulent diffusion in this region. This is also supported by DRSM results, where interesting differences are seen depending on the sophistication of modeling the turbulent diffusion coefficient.

  7. Progress in modeling hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Otto

    1993-01-01

    A good knowledge of the turbulence structure, wall heat transfer, and friction in turbulent boundary layers (TBL) at high speeds is required for the design of hypersonic air breathing airplanes and reentry space vehicles. This work reports on recent progress in the modeling of high speed TBL flows. The specific research goal described here is the development of a second order closure model for zero pressure gradient TBL's for the range of Mach numbers up to hypersonic speeds with arbitrary wall cooling requirements.

  8. Eddy fluxes in baroclinic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Andrew F.

    The eddy heat flux generated by the statistically equilibrated baroclinic instability of a uniform, horizontal temperature gradient is studied using a two-mode quasigeostrophic model. An overview of the dependence of the eddy diffusivity of heat Dtau on the planetary potential vorticity gradient beta, the bottom friction kappa, the deformation radius lambda, the vertical shear of the large-scale flow 2U and the domain size L is provided at 70 numerical simulations with beta = 0 (f-plane) and 110 simulations with beta ≠ 0 (beta-plane). Strong, axisymmetric, well-separated baroclinic vortices dominate the equilibrated barotropic vorticity and temperature fields of f-plane turbulence. The heat flux arises from a systematic northward (southward) migration of anti-cyclonic (cyclonic) eddies with warm (cold) fluid trapped in the cores. Zonal jets form spontaneously on the beta-plane, and stationary, isotropic, jet-scale eddies align within the strong eastward-flowing regions of the jets. In both studies, the vortices and jets give rise to a strong anti-correlation between the barotropic vorticity zeta and the temperature field tau. The baroclinic mode is also an important contributor to dissipation by bottom friction and energizes the barotropic mode at scales larger than lambda. This in part explains why previous parameterizations for the eddy heat flux based on Kolmogorovian cascade theories are found to be unreliable. In a separate study, temperature and salinity profiles obtained with expendable conductivity, temperature and depth (XCTD) probes within Drake Passage, Southern Ocean are used to analyze the turbulent diapycnal eddy diffusivity kappa rho to a depth of 1000 meters. The Polar Front separates two dynamically different regions with strong, surface-intensified mixing north of the Front. South of the Polar Front mixing is weaker and peaks at a depth of approximately 500 m, near the local temperature maximum. Peak values of kapparho are found to exceed 10-3 m2 s -1. Wind-driven near-inertial waves, mesoscale eddies and thermohaline intrusions are discussed as possible factors contributing to observed mixing patterns.

  9. Kinetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory G.

    The weak collisionality typical of turbulence in many diffuse astrophysical plasmas invalidates an MHD description of the turbulent dynamics, motivating the development of a more comprehensive theory of kinetic turbulence. In particular, a kinetic approach is essential for the investigation of the physical mechanisms responsible for the dissipation of astrophysical turbulence and the resulting heating of the plasma. This chapter reviews the limitations of MHD turbulence theory and explains how kinetic considerations may be incorporated to obtain a kinetic theory for astrophysical plasma turbulence. Key questions about the nature of kinetic turbulence that drive current research efforts are identified. A comprehensive model of the kinetic turbulent cascade is presented, with a detailed discussion of each component of the model and a review of supporting and conflicting theoretical, numerical, and observational evidence.

  10. Reynolds shear stress near its maxima, turbulent bursting process and associated velocity profle in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Noor

    2014-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress around maxima, turbulent bursting process and associate velocity profile in ZGP turbulent boundary layer is considered in the intermediate layer/mesolayer proposed by Afzal (1982 Ing. Arch. 53, 355-277), in addition to inner and outer layers. The intermediate length scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 having velocity Um = mUe with 1 / 2 <= m <= 2 / 3 where Ue is velocity at boundary layer edge. Long & Chen (1981 JFM) intermediate layer/ mesolayer scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 with velocity Um the friction velocity uτ, is untenable assumption (Afzal 1984 AIAA J). For channel/pipe flow, Sreenivasan et al. (1981989, 1997, 2006a,b) proposed critical layer / mesolayer, cited/adopted work Long and Chen and McKeon, B.J. & Sharma, A. 2010 JFM 658, page 370 stated ``retaining the assumption that the critical layer occurs when U (y) = (2 / 3) UCL (i.e. that the critical layer scales with y+ ~Rτ+ 2 / 3),'' both untenable assumptions, but ignored citation of papers Afzal 1982 onwards on pipe flow. The present turbulent boundary layer work shows that Reynolds shear maxima, shape factor and turbulent bursting time scale with mesolayer variables and Taylor length/time scale. Residence, Embassy Hotel Rasal Gang Aligarh 202001 UP India.

  11. Turbulence forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    In order to forecast turbulence, one needs to have an understanding of the cause of turbulence. Therefore, an attempt is made to show the atmospheric structure that often results when aircraft encounter moderate or greater turbulence. The analysis is based on thousands of hours of observations of flights over the past 39 years of aviation meteorology.

  12. Near-bed turbulence and relict waveformed sand ripples: Observations from the inner shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Alex E.

    2008-04-01

    Results are presented from a field investigation of near-bed turbulence above degrading waveformed sand ripples in 17-m water depth on the inner shelf. The heights of the 50-cm wavelength primary ripples were about 5 cm at the start of the observation period, and decreased by a factor of 2 within 15 days. The principal degradation mechanism involved fish making pits in the seafloor. Near-bed turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates are estimated both from the energy spectrum and from the vertical structure function within the inertial subrange, and ranged from 0.1 × 10-6 to 3 × 10-6 W/kg. The friction velocity, u*, at the bed ranged from 0.3 to 0.5 cm/s, and the wave friction factor, fw, from 0.017 to 0.02. The nearbed turbulence intensities and consequently the estimated values of u2* and fw are likely too small by a factor of 2, partly to satisfy the smooth-wall constraint, and partly to account for the effects of small-scale turbulence within the finite-volume range cells of the coherent Doppler system used to make the turbulence estimates. Finally, the results indicate that the hydraulic roughness of relict ripples is likely a function of both ripple height and steepness, and that the relative roughness should also depend on the near-bed wave orbital excursion. For modeling purposes, Nielsen's ripple roughness formula is recommended, with a reduced proportionality constant to account for the effects of irregular wave forcing and non-equilibrium ripple history.

  13. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  14. Friction stir welding tool

    DOEpatents

    Tolle, Charles R.; Clark, Denis E.; Barnes, Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  15. Friction on the microscale.

    PubMed

    Paul, K B; Malkinski, L

    2009-08-01

    A new method is presented for measurements of friction of microsized particles on surfaces. Specifically in this work, the particles are alumina with diameters between approximately 1 and 50 microm and the surfaces are InP, Si, and Cr. Friction is analyzed, its components are determined, and the friction coefficients are estimated from the experimental results. The technique and the specific instrument allow measurements of coefficients of friction for spherical particles with radii as small as 1 microm. For smaller sizes, the instrument needs to be modified by using a more powerful power supply, actuator with extended frequency and amplitude ranges, cooling of the actuator and the power supply, and the related mechanical modifications of the sample holder. PMID:19725684

  16. Friction stir weld tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  17. Friction Stir Weld Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  18. Heat Transfer in a Turbulent Liquid or Gas Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latzko, H.

    1944-01-01

    The,theory of heat.transfer from a solid body to a liquid stream could he presented previously** only with limiting assumptions about the movement of the fluid (potential flow, laminar frictional flow). (See references 1, 2, and 3). For turbulent flow, the most important practical case, the previous theoretical considerations did not go beyond dimensionless formulas and certain conclusions as to the analogy between the friction factor and the unit thermal conductance, (See references 4, 5, 6, and 7,) In order to obtain numerical results, an experimental treatment of the problem was resorted to, which gave rise to numerous investigations because of the importance of this problem in many branches of technology. However, the results of these investigations frequently deviate from one another. The experimental results are especially dependent upon the overall dimensions and the specific proportions of the equipment. In the present work, the attempt will be made to develop systematically the theory of the heat transfer and of the dependence of the unit thermal conductance upon shape and dimensions, using as a basis the velocity distribution for turbulent flow set up by Prandtl and Von Karman.

  19. Mesolayer analysis in a turbulent boundary layer and DNS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Noor

    2012-11-01

    The intermediate layer (mesolayer) in turbulent boundary layer has been analysed by the matched asymptotic expansions where matching is implemented by Izakson-Millikan-Kolmogorov hypothesis. The large-scale motions and very large scale motion are modifying the influences of the outer geometries, and most significantly near the locus of the peak in shear stress in the mesolayer. The mesolayer is formed by the interaction of inner and outer layer scales, whose length (time) scale is the geometric mean of the inner and outer length (time) scales, and is also proportional to Taylor micro length (time) scale. The mesolayer variable is proportional to inverse square root of appropriate friction Reynolds number, provided Reynolds number is large. It is shown that the shape factor and Reynolds shear maxima scale with mesolayer scale equivalent to Taylor micro length scale. Further, the turbulent bursting time period scales is shown to mesolayer time scale which is equivalent to Taylor micro time scale. The implications of mesolayer on higher order effects on skin friction law for lower Reynolds number have also been analyzed. The implications of shift origin are proposed by the Prandtl's transposition theorem, and consequently without any closure model.

  20. Turbulence modeling for sharp-fin-induced shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are presented and compared with a family of experimental results for the 3-D interaction of a sharp fin induced shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. Several algebraic and two equation eddy viscosity turbulence models are employed. The computed results are compared with experimental surface pressure, skin friction, and yaw angle data as well as the overall size of the interaction. Although the major feature of the flow fields are correctly predicted, several discrepancies are noted. Namely, the maximum skin friction values are significantly underpredicted for the strongest interaction cases. These and other deficiencies are discussed.

  1. Experimental studies on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid in a circular pipe under laminar flow with wire coil inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekar, M.; Suresh, S.; Chandra Bose, A.

    2010-02-15

    In this paper, fully developed laminar flow convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid flowing through a uniformly heated horizontal tube with and without wire coil inserts is presented. For this purpose, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles of 43 nm size were synthesized, characterized and dispersed in distilled water to form stable suspension containing 0.1% volume concentration of nanoparticles. The Nusselt number in the fully developed region were measured and found to increase by 12.24% at Re = 2275 for plain tube with nanofluid compared to distilled water. Two wire coil inserts made of stainless steel with pitch ratios 2 and 3 were used which increased the Nusselt numbers by 15.91% and 21.53% respectively at Re = 2275 with nanofluid compared to distilled water. The better heat transfer performance of nanofluid with wire coil insert is attributed to the effects of dispersion or back-mixing which flattens the temperature distribution and make the temperature gradient between the fluid and wall steeper. The measured pressure loss with the use of nanofluids is almost equal to that of the distilled water. The empirical correlations developed for Nusselt number and friction factor in terms of Reynolds/Peclet number, pitch ratio and volume concentration fits with the experimental data within {+-}15%. (author)

  2. Critical instability and friction scaling of fluid flows through pipes with rough inner surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jianjun

    2009-12-31

    It has been shown experimentally over nearly 80 years that surface fine roughness of circular pipes has a crucial effect on the natural transition to turbulence. In this Letter, a theoretical explanation is suggested for the roughness-induced instability. Once the nonlinear effect of roughness is introduced (through a pipe with fine corrugation surface), the mean velocity profile becomes unstable to three-dimensional, asymmetric, and helical traveling waves at moderate Reynolds numbers. The threshold of the aspect ratio or shape factor of the roughness element required to cause instability scales as Re-2. Inspired by the current model, a scaling form is proposed and the scaled friction factor measurements in rough pipes collapse onto a universal curve. PMID:20366316

  3. Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhigang

    2010-05-21

    We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

  4. Wall turbulence control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Lindemann, A. Margrethe; Beeler, George B.; Mcginley, Catherine B.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of wall turbulence control devices which were experimentally investigated are discussed; these include devices for burst control, alteration of outer flow structures, large eddy substitution, increased heat transfer efficiency, and reduction of wall pressure fluctuations. Control of pre-burst flow was demonstrated with a single, traveling surface depression which is phase-locked to elements of the burst production process. Another approach to wall turbulence control is to interfere with the outer layer coherent structures. A device in the outer part of a boundary layer was shown to suppress turbulence and reduce drag by opposing both the mean and unsteady vorticity in the boundary layer. Large eddy substitution is a method in which streamline curvature is introduced into the boundary layer in the form of streamwise vortices. Riblets, which were already shown to reduce turbulent drag, were also shown to exhibit superior heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer efficiency as measured by the Reynolds Analogy Factor was shown to be as much as 36 percent greater than a smooth flat plate in a turbulent boundary layer. Large Eddy Break-Up (LEBU) which are also known to reduce turbulent drag were shown to reduce turbulent wall pressure fluctuation.

  5. Turbulent heat transfer as a control of platelet ice growth in supercool under-ice ocean boundary-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, M. G.; Stevens, C. L.; Smith, I. J.; Robinson, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    Late winter measurements of turbulent quantities in tidally modulated flow under land-fast sea ice near the Erebus Glacier Tongue, McMurdo Sound, identified processes that influence growth at the interface of an ice surface in contact with supercool seawater. The data suggest that turbulent heat exchange at the ocean-ice boundary is characterized by the product of friction velocity and (negative) water temperature departure from freezing, analogous to similar results for moderate melting rates in seawater above freezing. Platelet ice growth appears to increase the hydraulic roughness (drag) of fast ice compared with undeformed fast ice without platelets. We hypothesize that platelet growth in supercool water under thick ice is rate-limited by turbulent heat transfer and that this is a significant factor to be considered in mass transfer at the under-side of ice shelves and sea ice in the vicinity of ice shelves.

  6. Turbulent heat transfer as a control of platelet ice growth in supercooled under-ice ocean boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, Miles G.; Stevens, Craig L.; Smith, Inga J.; Robinson, Natalie J.

    2016-04-01

    Late winter measurements of turbulent quantities in tidally modulated flow under land-fast sea ice near the Erebus Glacier Tongue, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, identified processes that influence growth at the interface of an ice surface in contact with supercooled seawater. The data show that turbulent heat exchange at the ocean-ice boundary is characterized by the product of friction velocity and (negative) water temperature departure from freezing, analogous to similar results for moderate melting rates in seawater above freezing. Platelet ice growth appears to increase the hydraulic roughness (drag) of fast ice compared with undeformed fast ice without platelets. Platelet growth in supercooled water under thick ice appears to be rate-limited by turbulent heat transfer and that this is a significant factor to be considered in mass transfer at the underside of ice shelves and sea ice in the vicinity of ice shelves.

  7. Experimental measurements of skin friction on upper surface blown wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, D. D.; Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to obtain skin-friction measurements on a wing with a circular jet exhausting above it. A Preston tube was used to determine the local shear stress at a point on the wing's upper surface. Data were obtained for four nozzle pressures and four vertical displacements of the jet above the wing. The results indicated that the highest skin-friction values occurred with the jet closest to the wing and with the highest nozzle pressure. These data trends were validated by calculations which combined two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer theory with axisymmetric co-flowing jet theory.

  8. Measuring anisotropic friction on WTe2 using atomic force microscopy in the force-distance and friction modes.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Jolanta A

    2010-04-01

    Layered materials which can be easily cleaved have proved to be excellent samples for the study of atomic scale friction. The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have been particularly popular. These materials exhibit a number of interesting properties ranging from superconductivity to low frictional coefficients. In this paper we have investigated the tribology of the dichalcogenide-WTe2. The coefficient of friction is less than 0.040 along the Te rows and increases to over 0.045 across the rows. The frictional forces almost doubled at normal loads of 5000 nN when scanning in the [010] direction in comparison to the [100] direction. The frictional responses of the AFM probe have been monitored in the frictional force and force-versus-distance (f-d) mode. A comparison between the outcomes using the two different modes demonstrates the factors which need to be considered for accurate measurements. PMID:20355449

  9. Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, Matthew S.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2011-03-01

    We examine developments in the study of quantum turbulence with a special focus on clearly defining many of the terms used in the field. We critically review the diverse theoretical, computational, and experimental approaches from the point of view of experimental observers. Similarities and differences between the general properties of classical and quantum turbulence are elucidated. The dynamics and interactions of quantized vortices and their role in quantum turbulence are discussed with particular emphasis on reconnection and vortex ring collapse. A stark distinction between the velocity statistics of quantum and classical turbulence is exhibited and used to highlight a potential analogy between quantum turbulence and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. Although much of this review pertains to superfluid 4He (He II), the underlying science is broadly applicable to other quantum fluids such as 3He-B, type-II superconductors, Bose-Einstein condensates, Weinberg-Salam fields, and grand-unified-theory (GUT) Higgs fields.

  10. Experimental and numerical investigation of transition to turbulent flow and heat transfer inside a horizontal smooth rectangular duct under uniform bottom surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Kamil; Onur, Nevzat

    2013-07-01

    In this study, steady-state turbulent forced flow and heat transfer in a horizontal smooth rectangular duct both experimentally and numerically investigated. The study was carried out in the transition to turbulence region where Reynolds numbers range from 2,323 to 9,899. Flow is hydrodynamically and thermally developing (simultaneously developing flow) under uniform bottom surface temperature condition. A commercial CFD program Ansys Fluent 12.1 with different turbulent models was used to carry out the numerical study. Based on the present experimental data and three-dimensional numerical solutions, new engineering correlations were presented for the heat transfer and friction coefficients in the form of {{Nu}} = {{C}}2 {{Re}}^{{{{n}}_{ 1} }} and {{f}} = {{C}}3 {{Re}}^{{{{n}}3 }} , respectively. The results have shown that as the Reynolds number increases heat transfer coefficient increases but Darcy friction factor decreases. It is seen that there is a good agreement between the present experimental and numerical results. Examination of heat and mass transfer in rectangular cross-sectioned duct for different duct aspect ratio (α) was also carried out in this study. Average Nusselt number and average Darcy friction factor were expressed with graphics and correlations for different duct aspect ratios.

  11. Friction and Phase Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiman, Y.; Protopopescu, V.; Family, F.; Hentschel, H. G. E.

    2000-03-01

    Spatiotemporal fluctuations in small discrete nonlinear arrays affect the dynamics of the center of mass. We derive the equations describing the dynamics of the center of mass and the spatial fluctuations for each coherent mode of the array. Analysis of these equations indicates that depending on array stiffness, size, and the external forcing - quantized jumps occur in the minimum friction (maximum velocity) of the array. We propose an analytical formalism to determine the occurrences of these jumps. We present numerical evidence indicating that phase synchronization is related to the frictional properties of sliding objects at the atomic scale and discuss mechanisms of tuning and controlling nanoscale friction. Y. Braiman, F. Family, H. G. E. Hentschel, C. Mak, and J. Krim, Phys. Rev. E 59, R4737 (1999). H. G. E. Hentschel, F. Family, and Y. Braiman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 104 (1999).

  12. Skin friction balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ping, Tcheng (Inventor); Supplee, Frank H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A skin friction balance uses a parallel linkage mechanism to avoid inaccuracies in skin friction measurement attributable to off-center normal forces. The parallel linkage mechanism includes a stationary plate mounted in a cage, and an upper and lower movable plate which are linked to each other and to the stationary plate throught three vertical links. Flexure pivots are provided for pivotally connecting the links and the plates. A sensing element connected to the upper plate moves in response to skin friction, and the lower plate moves in the opposite direction of the upper plate. A force motor maintains a null position of the sensing element by exerting a restoring force in response to a signal generated by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT).

  13. Astrophysical Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2000-05-01

    It is difficult to exaggerate the importance of turbulence in astrophysics, or the challenges which it poses. Turbulence is responsible for dynamical pressure support, energy transport, angular momentum transport, chemical mixing, and magnetic field generation and evolution in a host of astrophysical settings. Turbulent astrophysical flows differ from terrestrial forms of turbulence which have been studied traditionally by virtue of their inherent compressibility, strong radiative cooling, self-gravity, and the importance in many environments of magnetic fields. Recent years have seen important advances in several distinct areas of astrophysical turbulence theory -- including modeling of turbulence in stars, accretion disks, and the interstellar medium, as well basic studies of MHD turbulence which provide the framework for all these applications. In one star, the Sun, helioseismologic data are allowing increasingly sophisticated comparison of observations with the theory of turbulent stellar interiors. Attempts to model the solar differential rotation has shown clearly that turbulent angular momentum transport is an essential ingredient, and attempts to model it are improving. Solar dynamo calculations are only slightly behind. Models of turbulent accretion disks are becoming increasingly realistic, with the dynamical role of magnetic fields a crucial element, and global, time-dependent modeling now feasible. It seems likely that the alpha viscosity parameter will be soon be supplanted by ab initio calculations of the accretion rate. Although the presence of interstellar turbulence has long been recognized, recent theoretical studies have significantly increased our understanding of its effects, particularly in the cold ISM where it plays a dominant role. Self-consistent dynamical studies will soon be able to identify how strong turbulence evolves and shapes the internal structure of magnetized interstellar clouds. Basic studies in MHD turbulence have made substantial recent progress in such longstanding problems as the nature of the turbulent cascade, dynamo generation of fields, and the process of magnetic reconnection. In all of these studies, a crucial new ingredient has been computational advances that now make possible direct hydrodynamic/MHD simulations of three-dimensional, time-dependent turbulence with inertial dynamic ranges of more than two orders of magnitude. These advances in numerical experimentation are inspiring new analytical work, new comparisons between models and observations, and advances in observations and data analysis themselves. The ITP program on Astrophysical Turbulence will provide a forum for intensive interaction among analytical theorists, computational physicists, and observers from all of the subspecialties, with prospects for major research progress through interdisciplinary discussions and collaborations.

  14. Astrophysical Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2000-04-01

    It is difficult to exaggerate the importance of turbulence in astrophysics, or the challenges which it poses. Turbulence is responsible for dynamical pressure support, energy transport, angular momentum transport, chemical mixing, and magnetic field generation and evolution in a host of astrophysical settings. Turbulent astrophysical flows differ from terrestrial forms of turbulence which have been studied traditionally by virtue of their inherent compressibility, strong radiative cooling, self-gravity, and the importance in many environments of magnetic fields. Recent years have seen important advances in several distinct areas of astrophysical turbulence theory -- including modeling of turbulence in stars, accretion disks, and the interstellar medium, as well basic studies of MHD turbulence which provide the framework for all these applications. In one star, the Sun, helioseismologic data are allowing increasingly sophisticated comparison of observations with the theory of turbulent stellar interiors. Attempts to model the solar differential rotation has shown clearly that turbulent angular momentum transport is an essential ingredient, and attempts to model it are improving. Solar dynamo calculations are only slightly behind. Models of turbulent accretion disks are becoming increasingly realistic, with the dynamical role of magnetic fields a crucial element, and global, time-dependent modeling now feasible. It seems likely that the alpha viscosity parameter will be soon be supplanted by ab initio calculations of the accretion rate. Although the presence of interstellar turbulence has long been recognized, recent theoretical studies have significantly increased our understanding of its effects, particularly in the cold ISM where it plays a dominant role. Self-consistent dynamical studies will soon be able to identify how strong turbulence evolves and shapes the internal structure of magnetized interstellar clouds. Basic studies in MHD turbulence have made substantial recent progress in such longstanding problems as the nature of the turbulent cascade, dynamo generation of fields, and the process of magnetic reconnection. In all of these studies, a crucial new ingredient has been computational advances that now make possible direct hydrodynamic/MHD simulations of three-dimensional, time-dependent turbulence with inertial dynamic ranges of more than two orders of magnitude. These advances in numerical experimentation are inspiring new analytical work, new comparisons between models and observations, and advances in observations and data analysis themselves. The ITP program on Astrophysical Turbulence will provide a forum for intensive interaction among analytical theorists, computational physicists, and observers from all of the subspecialties, with prospects for major research progress through interdisciplinary discussions and collaborations.

  15. Presentation of computer code SPIRALI for incompressible, turbulent, plane and spiral grooved cylindrical and face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walowit, Jed A.

    1994-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation is made showing the capabilities of the computer code SPIRALI. Overall capabilities of SPIRALI include: computes rotor dynamic coefficients, flow, and power loss for cylindrical and face seals; treats turbulent, laminar, Couette, and Poiseuille dominated flows; fluid inertia effects are included; rotor dynamic coefficients in three (face) or four (cylindrical) degrees of freedom; includes effects of spiral grooves; user definable transverse film geometry including circular steps and grooves; independent user definable friction factor models for rotor and stator; and user definable loss coefficients for sudden expansions and contractions.

  16. Friction causing unpredictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Joshua; Weigert, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We study the effect of friction on the dynamics of a classical point particle in a one-dimensional double-well potential. It turns out that finite uncertainty in the initial conditions of the particle may prevent us from reliably predicting the well in which the particle will come to rest. This difficulty—to make reliable long-term predictions—originates from the layered structure of phase-space regions sending the particle to the left and the right well, respectively. Similar structures are known to arise in models used, for example, to described the tossing of a coin where friction is, however, not the root cause of the phenomenon.

  17. Numerical study of turbulent nanofluid flow at the entrance region of a ribbed pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei-Rad, Masoud; Beigi, Maryam

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we perform a numerical study on the heat transfer and pressure drop in hydraulically and thermally developing turbulent flow of nanofluid through an internally ribbed pipe. The effects of volume fraction of nanoparticles and the distance between the ribs are investigated on the heat transfer and skin friction coefficients at the entrance region of the pipe. The set of governing equations followed by a two-layer zonal turbulence model are solved numerically by a velocity-pressure coupling algorithm based on finite-volume method. Moreover, available empirical relations are used to calculate the nanofluid properties in terms of the nanoparticles and the base fluid. The obtained results illustrate that increasing the volume fraction of nanoparticles makes the thermal entrance length decrease and consequently, the heat transfer increases. It reveals that 10% increase in the volume fraction of nanoparticles causes about 15% rise in average Nusselt number. In addition, it is found that the friction factor rises by increasing the volume fraction of nanoparticles compared with turbulent flow of the base-fluid. Also, the average Nusselt number in nanofluid flow increases with the interval between the ribs compared with pure-fluid flow.

  18. Active wall motions for skin-friction drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangmo; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-12-01

    In the present study we investigate a possibility of reducing skin-friction drag in a turbulent channel flow with active wall motions. The wall is locally deformed according to two successful control strategies [J. Fluid Mech. 262, 75 (1994); J. Fluid Mech. 358, 245 (1998)]. Results show that overall 13-17% drag reductions are obtained with the active wall motions, and turbulence intensities and near-wall streamwise vortices are significantly weakened. It is remarkable that instantaneous wall shapes are elongated in the streamwise direction and resemble riblets in appearance. However, the mechanism of the present drag reduction is essentially different from that of riblets.

  19. Large-Eddy Simulations of Fully Developed Turbulent Channel and Pipe Flows with Smooth and Rough Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Namiko

    Studies in turbulence often focus on two flow conditions, both of which occur frequently in real-world flows and are sought-after for their value in advancing turbulence theory. These are the high Reynolds number regime and the effect of wall surface roughness. In this dissertation, a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) recreates both conditions over a wide range of Reynolds numbers Retau = O(102) - O(108) and accounts for roughness by locally modeling the statistical effects of near-wall anisotropic fine scales in a thin layer immediately above the rough surface. A subgrid, roughness-corrected wall model is introduced to dynamically transmit this modeled information from the wall to the outer LES, which uses a stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model operating in the bulk of the flow. Of primary interest is the Reynolds number and roughness dependence of these flows in terms of first and second order statistics. The LES is first applied to a fully turbulent uniformly-smooth/rough channel flow to capture the flow dynamics over smooth, transitionally rough and fully rough regimes. Results include a Moody-like diagram for the wall averaged friction factor, believed to be the first of its kind obtained from LES. Confirmation is found for experimentally observed logarithmic behavior in the normalized stream-wise turbulent intensities. Tight logarithmic collapse, scaled on the wall friction velocity, is found for smooth-wall flows when Re tau ≥ O(106) and in fully rough cases. Since the wall model operates locally and dynamically, the framework is used to investigate non-uniform roughness distribution cases in a channel, where the flow adjustments to sudden surface changes are investigated. Recovery of mean quantities and turbulent statistics after transitions are discussed qualitatively and quantitatively at various roughness and Reynolds number levels. The internal boundary layer, which is defined as the border between the flow affected by the new surface condition and the unaffected part, is computed, and a collapse of the profiles on a length scale containing the logarithm of friction Reynolds number is presented. Finally, we turn to the possibility of expanding the present framework to accommodate more general geometries. As a first step, the whole LES framework is modified for use in the curvilinear geometry of a fully-developed turbulent pipe flow, with implementation carried out in a spectral element solver capable of handling complex wall profiles. The friction factors have shown favorable agreement with the superpipe data, and the LES estimates of the Karman constant and additive constant of the log-law closely match values obtained from experiment.

  20. Experimental measurements of unsteady turbulent boundary layers near separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations conducted to document the behavior of turbulent boundary layers on flat surfaces that separate due to adverse pressure gradients are reported. Laser and hot wire anemometers measured turbulence and flow structure of a steady free stream separating turbulent boundary layer produced on the flow of a wind tunnel section. The effects of sinusoidal and unsteadiness of the free stream velocity on this separating turbulent boundary layer at a reduced frequency were determined. A friction gage and a thermal tuft were developed and used to measure the surface skin friction and the near wall fraction of time the flow moves downstream for several cases. Abstracts are provided of several articles which discuss the effects of the periodic free stream unsteadiness on the structure or separating turbulent boundary layers.

  1. Effects of surface roughness on rolling friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2015-11-01

    Rolling friction is commonly associated with deformation of the rolling object or surface, particularly if the object or surface is soft. When a hard object rolls on a hard surface, surface roughness is also a significant factor. Several experiments are described where the effects of surface roughness on rolling resistance were investigated using very rough rolling objects (gear wheels), and smooth balls on very rough surfaces. In all cases it was found that the coefficient of rolling friction increased with rolling speed and surface roughness, and decreased as the ball diameter increased.

  2. Increase in friction force with sliding speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2005-09-01

    A block sliding down an inclined plane normally accelerates. However, if the friction force increases with speed, then the block can slide at a constant terminal speed in a manner similar to the fall of an object through a fluid. Measurements of the increase in the coefficient of friction for tennis ball cloth sliding on a smooth surface are described over speeds varying by a factor of 9000. For the low speed measurements, the ball cloth was attached to the bottom of a weighted box and pulled along a horizontal surface by a constant horizontal force. Results at higher speeds were obtained by bouncing a tennis ball off the surface.

  3. Estimation of SO{sub 2} dry deposition using turbulence parameters observed by sonic anemometer-thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chong Bum; Kim, Jeong, Sik; Kim, Yong Goog; Cho, Chang Rae; Byun, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The dry deposition of pollutants can be calculated from the concentration of pollutants in the atmosphere and deposition velocity. To calculate deposition velocity, turbulence parameters such as friction velocity and Monin-Obukhov length are used. However, due to the difficulties in observation of turbulence parameters, usually mean values of wind speed and temperature observed using conventional meteorological instruments are used to estimate the dry deposition. The dry deposition velocity is the function of aerodynamic resistance (R{sub a}), sublayer resistance (R{sub b}), surface resistance (R{sub c}). R{sub a} and R{sub b} are calculated from turbulence parameters and R{sub c} is related to surface characteristics. The purpose of the present study is to compare the dry deposition obtained using the data sets of mean values and turbulence parameters measured by sonic anemometer-thermometer. The field observation was performed for 30 days from October 27 to November 25, 1995. The turbulence parameters were measured by 3 dimensional sonic anemometer-thermometer and mean meteorological variables are obtained at two heights, 2.5 m and 10 m. The results show that the dry deposition velocity is large, in daytime and small in nighttime. The major factor of diurnal variation is Ra. In the daytime the dry deposition velocity calculated using mean meteorological data show relatively similar to the dry deposition velocity calculated using the turbulence data, however there are big differences at night.

  4. Turbulence-induced Relative Velocity of Dust Particles. IV. The Collision Kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, τp. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with τp corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, τp, h, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, τp, l, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at τp, l = τp, h, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For τp, h in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with τp, l and scales with τp, h roughly as {\\proptoτ} _p,h1/2. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  5. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, τ{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with τ{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, τ{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, τ{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at τ{sub p,} {sub l} = τ{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For τ{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with τ{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with τ{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ∝ τ{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  6. Plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Hu, G.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  7. Acting on Frictions: Learning Blocks and Flows in Knowledge Intensive Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bijlsma-Frankema, Katinka; Rosendaal, Bastiaan; Taminiau, Yvette

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: It is argued in this paper that opportunities for learning manifest themselves in the form of frictions between the structure-as-experienced by actors and the structure-as-preferred. These frictions are considered as potential triggers of learning processes. The concept of friction promises to contribute to our understanding of factors

  8. Effect of frictional heating on brake materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, T.-L.; Peterson, M. B.; Ling, F. F.

    1974-01-01

    An exploratory study of the properties of aircraft brake materials was made to determine ways of improving friction and wear behavior while minimizing surface temperatures. It is found that frictional variation at high temperature involves material softening and metal transfer, formation of oxides, and surface melting. The choice of proper materials to combat these effects is discussed. Minimum surface temperatures are found to result from use of materials with large density-specific heat and density-specific heat-conductivity factors, use of a higher load-lower friction system, and maximization of the contact area. Some useful trade-off criteria for the size of brake disks against weight considerations are suggested. Additional information on material behavior and peak braking temperatures was gathered from an inspection of used brake pads and rotor disks.

  9. Quantum theory of friction

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Cresser, James D.

    2005-08-15

    We present a Markovian quantum theory of friction. Our approach is based on the idea that collisions between a Brownian particle and single molecules of the surrounding medium constitute, as far as the particle is concerned, instantaneous simultaneous measurements of its position and momentum.

  10. Isolating Curvature Effects in Computing Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    2001-01-01

    The flow over the zero-pressure-gradient So-Mellor convex curved wall is simulated using the Navier-Stokes equations. An inviscid effective outer wall shape, undocumented in the experiment, is obtained by using an adjoint optimization method with the desired pressure distribution on the inner wall as the cost function. Using this wall shape with a Navier-Stokes method, the abilities of various turbulence models to simulate the effects of curvature without the complicating factor of streamwise pressure gradient can be evaluated. The one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model overpredicts eddy viscosity, and its boundary layer profiles are too full. A curvature-corrected version of this model improves results, which are sensitive to the choice of a particular constant. An explicit algebraic stress model does a reasonable job predicting this flow field. However, results can be slightly improved by modifying the assumption on anisotropy equilibrium in the model's derivation. The resulting curvature-corrected explicit algebraic stress model possesses no heuristic functions or additional constants. It lowers slightly the computed skin friction coefficient and the turbulent stress levels for this case (in better agreement with experiment), but the effect on computed velocity profiles is very small.

  11. Internal rotor friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  12. Simulation study of turbulent convective heat transfer enhancement in heated tube flow using TiO2-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Adnan M.; Bakar, R. A.; Kadirgama, K.; Sharma, K. V.

    2013-12-01

    Simulation by convenient software, the same as FLUENT, was used to predict the friction factor and Nusselt number for forced convection heat transfer of TiO2-water nanofluid. The range of Reynolds number is from 10000 to 100000 to be turbulent flow in a horizontal straight tube with heat flux 5000 w/m2 around it. The volume fraction of nanoparticle was (0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75% and 1%) and diameter of particle is 27 nm. The results show that the friction factor and Nusselt number are increasing with increasing of volume fraction. Results compared with the experimental data available in literature and there are good agreements.

  13. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  14. Micro Surface Texturing for Friction Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashwan, Ola

    Recently, surface texturing has gained momentum as a way to control the friction which is involved in various applications and systems, such as components of internal combustion engines, dies and punches of the metal forming processes and Micro-electrical-mechanical Systems (MEMS). This dissertation demonstrates that under dry sliding, there is a specific significant surface texturing parameter at which the coefficient of friction should be at a minimum. This dissertation met this objective through an extensive study of the relevant literature on surface texturing and friction, analysing the friction mechanisms involved in dry sliding, and highlighting the key factors that control friction as the real area of contact and material properties. An analytical proof is derived demonstrating that a minimum friction force exists if the two components of the friction force, adhesion and mechanical deformation, are differentiated with respect to the real contact area. In addition, numerical simulations and experimental work were performed to test this hypothesis. In the two and three dimensional finite element models, normal and sliding contact between a rigid indenter and elastic-plastic surfaces, which are textured by circular and hexagonal dimples of different sizes and densities, are simulated and analysed. Circular craters of different sizes and densities, are fabricated using laser ablation on hardened tool steel samples, while the hexagonal dimples are fabricated using photo-lithography. The dimples are arranged in adjacent equilateral triangles layout. Coefficients of friction were measured using a scratch tester under dry sliding conditions and constant load. In addition, adhesion forces were estimated using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The adhesion force is found to be exponentially decreasing with the increase of the spatial texture density. The dimensionless quantity, spatial texture density (D/L) was identified as the most significant texturing parameter. It is equal to the ratio of the size of the crater (D) to the distance between the centres of two consecutive craters (L). A minimum coefficient of friction exits at values of spatial texture densities that lie between 0.25 and 0.5.

  15. Structure in surface frictional layers on 36NKhTYu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Kolubaev, A. V.

    1991-08-01

    A study has been made on how heat treatment affects surface-layer formation and structure in unlubricated friction on steel 45 for high-tensile austenitic 36NKh-TYu alloy. The substructure formed in the friction zone has multiple continuous and discrete orientation deviations and is independent of the initial alloy state. However, the aged alloy differs from the quenched in that there is turbulence in the surface-layer structure.

  16. The effect of journal misalignment on the operation of a turbulent flow hydrostatic bearing

    SciTech Connect

    San Andres, L. )

    1993-07-01

    An analysis for calculation of the dynamic force and moment response in turbulent flow, orifice compensated hydrostatic journal bearings is presented. The fully developed flow of a barotropic liquid is described by variable properties, bulk-flow equations and local turbulent friction factors based on bearing surface condition. Bearing load and moments and, dynamic force and moment coefficients are calculated for perturbations in journal center displacements and misaligned journal axis rotations. Numerical results for the effect of static misalignment angles in the plane of the eccentricity vector are presented for a water lubricated hydrostatic bearing. The predictions show that journal axis misalignment causes a reduction in load capacity due to loss in film thickness, increases the flow rate and produces significant restoring moments (couples). Force and moment coefficients due to dynamic journal axis rotations are also discussed. 37 refs.

  17. Skin friction measurement on the NASA Common Research Model using global luminescent oil film skin friction meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Lalit Kishore

    Accurate skin friction measurements are indispensable in the design of more efficient aerodynamic vehicles, and is also the controlling variable in closed loop flow control systems. Spatially and temporally resolved skin friction data is required to calibrate turbulence models used in Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis, and can also provide insight into the nature of near-wall turbulence. Luminescent oil film based techniques offer the ability to make distributed wall shear stress measurements with a relatively simple setup. The Global Luminescent Oil Film Skin Friction Meter (GLOSFM) technique involves calculating the shear stress based on observing the thickness of an oil film, which in turn is directly proportional to its luminescent intensity, provided the oil film is sufficiently thin. This technique is briefly reviewed, with some emphasis on uncertainty quantification, and the formation and propagation of ripples/surface waves on the oil film, as well as their impact on the shear stress measurement. Finally, this technique is used to measure the skin friction field on the wing and fuselage of the NASA Common Research Model, a passenger jet configuration. The issue of repeatability and the effects of tripping the flow are investigated, and the effect of flow parameters like the angle of attack and the Reynolds number are studied.

  18. Friction-reducing device

    SciTech Connect

    Dollison, W.W.

    1990-04-24

    This patent describes a sucker rod coupling adapted to reduce friction within production tubing in a well bore. It comprises: a substantially cylindrical body member and roller assemblies; the body member comprising means at each end thereof for attaching the coupling to a sucker rod, and axially and circumferentially spaced recesses, each recess containing a roller guide connected to the body, and each recess being further adapted to receive and support a roller assembly around the roller guide in such manner that the roller assembly can revolve around the roller guide; the roller assemblies each comprising rollers rotatably mounted on and linked by a chain, the rollers being adapted to reduce frictional contact between the body member and the tubing by rotating between the roller guide and the tubing while the chain revolves around the roller guide.

  19. Friction at small displacement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. E.; Aronstein, J.

    1972-01-01

    Low contact resistance between metal surfaces is often observed in spite of interposed lubricant and/or oxide films. To study this effect an apparatus is used with which normal force and tangential microdisplacement are applied between a small lead rider and a gold flat with various surface film conditions. Under nonoxidized and nonlubricated conditions, and with either oxide or stearic acid lubricant film alone, friction is high and contact resistance is low. With oxide and lubricant together, friction is much lower and slide is smooth, but contact resistance remains low and Ohm's law is obeyed. The results are consistent with Greenwood's theory of contact resistance for a cluster of minute metallic contact spots within the load-supporting area. The contact resistance of such a cluster is indistinguishable, for practical purposes, from that given by complete metallic contact.

  20. Friction in rail guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of friction is included in the present equations describing the performance of an inductively driven rail gun. These equations, which have their basis in an empirical formulation, are applied to results from two different experiments. Only an approximate physical description of the problem is attempted, in view of the complexity of details in the interaction among forces of this magnitude over time periods of the order of milisecs.

  1. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  2. High Speed Ice Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Sammonds, Peter; Lishman, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Many different tribological experiments have been run to determine the frictional behaviour of ice at high speeds, ostensibly with the intention of applying results to everyday fields such as winter tyres and sports. However, experiments have only been conducted up to linear speeds of several metres a second, with few additional subject specific studies reaching speeds comparable to these applications. Experiments were conducted in the cold rooms of the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, UCL, on a custom built rotational tribometer based on previous literature designs. Preliminary results from experiments run at 2m/s for ice temperatures of 271 and 263K indicate that colder ice has a higher coefficient of friction, in accordance with the literature. These results will be presented, along with data from further experiments conducted at temperatures between 259-273K (in order to cover a wide range of the temperature dependent behaviour of ice) and speeds of 2-15m/s to produce a temperature-velocity-friction map for ice. The effect of temperature, speed and slider geometry on the deformation of ice will also be investigated. These speeds are approaching those exhibited by sports such as the luge (where athletes slide downhill on an icy track), placing the tribological work in context.

  3. A laboratory study of friction-velocity estimates from scatterometry - Low and high regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, L. F.; Giovanangeli, J.-P.; Wanninkhof, R. H.; Chapron, B.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements from scatterometers pointing at wind-waves in three large wave tanks are examined to study fetch effects and the correlation with wind friction velocity. Time-series measurements were made at 13, 35, and 95 m with a Ka-band scatterometer aimed upwind at 30 deg incidence angle and vertical polarization. Average normalized radar cross-section (sigma-0) values from all fetches follow a common trend for sigma-0 as a function of wind friction velocity, so the fetch dependence is negligible. An empirical power-law model yields a high correlation between sigma-0 and wind friction velocity, but, because systematic anomalies arise, we reexamine a turbulence approach that delineates low and high regimes with a transition at a wind friction velocity of approximately 25 cm/s. Using this criteria, the data are well represented by a two-section power-law relationship between sigma-0 and wind friction velocity.

  4. In-Flight Capability for Evaluating Skin-Friction Gages and Other Near-Wall Flow Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Pipitone, Brett J.; Krake, Keith L.; Richwine, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    An 8-in.-square boundary-layer sensor panel has been developed for in-flight evaluation of skin-friction gages and other near-wall flow sensors on the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center F-15B/Flight Test Fixture (FTF). Instrumentation on the sensor panel includes a boundary-layer rake, temperature sensors, static pressure taps, and a Preston tube. Space is also available for skin-friction gages or other near-wall flow sensors. Pretest analysis of previous F-15B/FTF flight data has identified flight conditions suitable for evaluating skin-friction gages. At subsonic Mach numbers, the boundary layer over the sensor panel closely approximates the two-dimensional (2D), law-of-the-wall turbulent boundary layer, and skin-friction estimates from the Preston tube and the rake (using the Clauser plot method) can be used to evaluate skin-friction gages. At supersonic Mach numbers, the boundary layer over the sensor panel becomes complex, and other means of measuring skin friction are needed to evaluate the accuracy of new skin-friction gages. Results from the flight test of a new rubber-damped skin-friction gage confirm that at subsonic Mach numbers, nearly 2D, law-of-the-wall turbulent boundary layers exist over the sensor panel. Sensor panel data also show that this new skin-friction gage prototype does not work in flight.

  5. Large-eddy breakup scheme for turbulent viscous drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Weinstein, L. M.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    A concept for reducing turbulent skin friction drag by altering/controlling the large coherent eddy structures within the turbulent boundary layer is proposed. Results of an ongoing experimental and numerical investigation to develop large-eddy breakup devices (LEBU devices) are presented and indicate that the average skin friction drag downstream of the LEBU devices is reduced by up to 24% compared to 'undisturbed' flat plate levels; device drag requires further reduction before net drag reductions can be realized. Future work is discussed and will focus on reducing device drag by taking advantage of the unsteady 'freestream' ahead of the LEBU devices.

  6. Friction laws for lubricated nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzio, R.; Boragno, C.; Valbusa, U.

    2006-09-01

    We have used friction force microscopy to probe friction laws for nanoasperities sliding on atomically flat substrates under controlled atmosphere and liquid environment, respectively. A power law relates friction force and normal load in dry air, whereas a linear relationship, i.e., Amontons' law, is observed for junctions fully immersed in model lubricants, namely, octamethylciclotetrasiloxane and squalane. Lubricated contacts display a remarkable friction reduction, with liquid and substrate specific friction coefficients. Comparison with molecular dynamics simulations suggests that load-bearing boundary layers at junction entrance cause the appearance of Amontons' law and impart atomic-scale character to the sliding process; continuum friction models are on the contrary of limited predictive power when applied to lubrication effects. An attempt is done to define general working conditions leading to the manifestation of nanoscale lubricity due to adsorbed boundary layers.

  7. Solid friction between soft filaments.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes's drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials. PMID:25730393

  8. Solid friction between soft filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  9. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  10. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.; Jackson, Howard E.

    1993-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments in humid air and in dry nitrogen and unidirectional sliding friction experiments in ultrahigh vacuum were conducted with a natural diamond pin in contact with microwave-plasma-deposited diamond films. Diamond films with a surface roughness (R rms) ranging from 15 to 160 nm were produced by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In humid air and in dry nitrogen, abrasion occurred when the diamond pin made grooves in the surfaces of diamond films, and thus the initial coefficients of friction increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. In vacuum the friction for diamond films contacting a diamond pin arose primarily from adhesion between the sliding surfaces. In these cases, the initial and equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were 0.02 to 0.04 in humid air and in dry nitrogen, but 1.5 to 1.8 in vacuum. The wear factor of the diamond films depended on the initial surface roughness, regardless of environment; it increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The wear factors were considerably higher in vacuum than in humid air and in dry nitrogen.

  11. The Friction of Piston Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischbein, Hans W

    1945-01-01

    The coefficient of friction between piston ring and cylinder liner was measured in relation to gliding acceleration, pressure, temperature, quantity of oil and quality of oil. Comparing former lubrication-technical tests, conclusions were drawn as to the state of friction. The coefficients of friction as figured out according to the hydrodynamic theory were compared with those measured by tests. Special tests were made on "oiliness." The highest permissible pressure was measured and the ratio of pressure discussed.

  12. Soliton turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  13. Friction of Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hamid; Müser, Martin H.

    2010-11-01

    Sufficiently thin elastic sheets wrinkle when they are in contact with a small adhesive counterbody. Despite significant progress on the dynamics of wrinkle formation and morphology, little is known about how wrinkles impede the relative sliding motion of the counterbody. Using molecular dynamics we demonstrate that instabilities are likely to occur during sliding when the wrinkle pattern has asymmetries not present in the counterbody. The instabilities then cause Coulomb’s friction law. The behavior can be rationalized in terms of simple models for multistable elastic manifolds.

  14. DPIV, LDV and SSS investigations of forced laminar-turbulent transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobba, Kumar; Gharib, Morteza; Doyle, John

    2004-11-01

    A systematical experimental study conducted to understand the role of external environment---free stream turbulence---on the boundary layer laminar-turbulent transition on a flat plate will be presented. The experiments are conducted in the GALCIT free surface water tunnel using flow visualization, DPIV, and MEMS based LDV and shear stress sensors (SSS). The results indicate that various transition parameters like shape factor, skin friction coefficient, mean profile, etc., are strong function of the external turbulence level. Neither T-S waves nor turbulent spots were found, but the flow is always embedded with stream wise vortical structures in the parametric range explored. An interesting observation is that the vortical structures are found even at such low Reynolds numbers as 289 (based on displacement thickness). A real time study of the structures in the flow shed more light on their dynamics and evolution. Space-time auto-correlation functions and probability density functions revealed that the wavelength of the span wise and stream wise structures in the boundary layer are independent of the Reynolds number in the parametric range explored. Finally, the experimental observations are compared with the results from our robust flow stability theory and the agreement is good.

  15. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Furno, A.; Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s-1. We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci ‘laws’ of friction.

  16. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, G; Ciaravola, V; Furno, A; Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J

    2015-05-01

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s(-1). We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci 'laws' of friction. PMID:25873527

  17. Analysis Method of Friction Torque and Weld Interface Temperature during Friction Process of Steel Friction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masaaki; Inoue, Haruo; Kusaka, Masahiro; Kaizu, Koichi; Fuji, Akiyoshi

    This paper describes an analysis method of the friction torque and weld interface temperature during the friction process for steel friction welding. The joining mechanism model of the friction welding for the wear and seizure stages was constructed from the actual joining phenomena that were obtained by the experiment. The non-steady two-dimensional heat transfer analysis for the friction process was carried out by calculation with FEM code ANSYS. The contact pressure, heat generation quantity, and friction torque during the wear stage were calculated using the coefficient of friction, which was considered as the constant value. The thermal stress was included in the contact pressure. On the other hand, those values during the seizure stage were calculated by introducing the coefficient of seizure, which depended on the seizure temperature. The relationship between the seizure temperature and the relative speed at the weld interface in the seizure stage was determined using the experimental results. In addition, the contact pressure and heat generation quantity, which depended on the relative speed of the weld interface, were solved by taking the friction pressure, the relative speed and the yield strength of the base material into the computational conditions. The calculated friction torque and weld interface temperatures of a low carbon steel joint were equal to the experimental results when friction pressures were 30 and 90 MPa, friction speed was 27.5 s-1, and weld interface diameter was 12 mm. The calculation results of the initial peak torque and the elapsed time for initial peak torque were also equal to the experimental results under the same conditions. Furthermore, the calculation results of the initial peak torque and the elapsed time for initial peak torque at various friction pressures were equal to the experimental results.

  18. A Turbulent Boundary Layer over Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunwook; Kim, John

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer (TBL) developing over superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) were performed in order to investigate the underlying physics of turbulent flow over SHS. SHS were modeled through the shear-free boundary condition, assuming that the gas-liquid interfaces remained as non-deformable. Pattern-averaged turbulence statistics were examined in order to determine the effects of SHS on turbulence in no-slip and slip regions separately. Near-wall turbulence over the slip region was significantly affected by SHS due to insufficient mean shear required to sustain near-wall turbulence. SHS also indirectly affected near-wall turbulence over the no-slip region. In addition to the effects of the spanwise width of SHS on skin-friction drag reduction reported previously, spatial effects in the streamwise direction were examined. A guideline for optimal design of SHS geometry will be discussed. This research was supported by the ONR (Grant No. N000141410291).

  19. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  20. Holographic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allan; Chesler, Paul M; Liu, Hong

    2014-04-18

    We construct turbulent black holes in asymptotically AdS4 spacetime by numerically solving Einstein's equations. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence we find that both the dual holographic fluid and bulk geometry display signatures of an inverse cascade with the bulk geometry being well approximated by the fluid-gravity gradient expansion. We argue that statistically steady-state black holes dual to d dimensional turbulent flows have horizons whose area growth has a fractal-like structure with fractal dimension D=d+4/3. PMID:24785028

  1. Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  2. Slow frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  3. Kolmogorov Behavior of Near-Wall Turbulence and Its Application in Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1992-01-01

    The near-wall behavior of turbulence is re-examined in a way different from that proposed by Hanjalic and Launder and followers. It is shown that at a certain distance from the wall, all energetic large eddies will reduce to Kolmogorov eddies (the smallest eddies in turbulence). All the important wall parameters, such as friction velocity, viscous length scale, and mean strain rate at the wall, are characterized by Kolmogorov microscales. According to this Kolmogorov behavior of near-wall turbulence, the turbulence quantities, such as turbulent kinetic energy, dissipation rate, etc. at the location where the large eddies become Kolmogorov eddies, can be estimated by using both direct numerical simulation (DNS) data and asymptotic analysis of near-wall turbulence. This information will provide useful boundary conditions for the turbulent transport equations. As an example, the concept is incorporated in the standard k-epsilon model which is then applied to channel and boundary flows. Using appropriate boundary conditions (based on Kolmogorov behavior of near-wall turbulence), there is no need for any wall-modification to the k-epsilon equations (including model constants). Results compare very well with the DNS and experimental data.

  4. Orbital friction stir weld system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor); Carter, Robert W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention is an apparatus for joining the ends of two cylindrical (i.e., pipe-shaped) sections together with a friction stir weld. The apparatus holds the two cylindrical sections together and provides back-side weld support as it makes a friction stir weld around the circumference of the joined ends.

  5. Elastic model of dry friction

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E.

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  6. Friction in a Moving Car

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Fred M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an out-of-doors, partially unstructured experiment to determine the coefficient of friction for a moving car. Presents the equation which relates the coefficient of friction to initial velocity, distance, and time and gives sample computed values as a function of initial speed and tire pressure. (GS)

  7. Aqueous turbulence structure immediately adjacent to the air - water interface and interfacial gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binbin

    Air-sea interaction and the interfacial exchange of gas across the air-water interface are of great importance in coupled atmospheric-oceanic environmental systems. Aqueous turbulence structure immediately adjacent to the air-water interface is the combined result of wind, surface waves, currents and other environmental forces and plays a key role in energy budgets, gas fluxes and hence the global climate system. However, the quantification of turbulence structure sufficiently close to the air-water interface is extremely difficult. The physical relationship between interfacial gas exchange and near surface turbulence remains insufficiently investigated. This dissertation aims to measure turbulence in situ in a complex environmental forcing system on Lake Michigan and to reveal the relationship between turbulent statistics and the CO2 flux across the air-water interface. The major objective of this dissertation is to investigate the physical control of the interfacial gas exchange and to provide a universal parameterization of gas transfer velocity from environmental factors, as well as to propose a mechanistic model for the global CO2 flux that can be applied in three dimensional climate-ocean models. Firstly, this dissertation presents an advanced measurement instrument, an in situ free floating Particle Image Velocimetry (FPIV) system, designed and developed to investigate the small scale turbulence structure immediately below the air-water interface. Description of hardware components, design of the system, measurement theory, data analysis procedure and estimation of measurement error were provided. Secondly, with the FPIV system, statistics of small scale turbulence immediately below the air-water interface were investigated under a variety of environmental conditions. One dimensional wave-number spectrum and structure function sufficiently close to the water surface were examined. The vertical profiles of turbulent dissipation rate were intensively studied. Comparison between the turbulence structures measured during the wind wave initiation period and those obtained during the growing period was presented. Significant wave effects on near surface turbulence were found. A universal scaling law was proposed to parameterize turbulent dissipation rate immediately below the air-water interface with friction velocity, significant wave height and wave age. Finally, the gas transfer velocity was measured with a floating chamber (FC) system, along with simultaneously FPIV measurements. Turbulent dissipation rate both at the interface and at a short distance away from the interface (~ 10 cm) were analyzed and used to examine the small scale eddy model. The model coefficient was found to be dependent on the level of turbulence, instead of being a constant. An empirical relationship between the model coefficient and turbulent dissipation rate was provided, which improved the accuracy of the gas transfer velocity estimation by more than 100% for data acquired. Other data from the literature also supported this empirical relation. Furthermore, the relationship between model coefficient and turbulent Reynolds number was also investigated. In addition to physical control of gas exchange, the disturbance on near surface hydrodynamics by the FC was also discussed. Turbulent dissipation rates are enhanced at the short distance away from the interface, while the surface dissipation rates do not change significantly.

  8. Skin Friction following BLADE manipulation in a turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, B. C.; Chew, Y. T.; Mah, Y. A.

    1993-09-01

    This study attempts to analyze the measured wall shear stress distribution downstream of single and tandem BLADEs in fully developed pipe flow. Previous works have indicated the adverse effect of overall drag increase with the single BLADE in both channel and pipe flows, and an even larger drag increase with the tandem BLADES. This is contrary to that observed for external boundary layer flow. Extensive comparisons are then made to the wall shear stress distribution following BLADEs in boundary layer flow, leading to the conclusion of little or no potential in the application of BLADEs alone to pipe flow.

  9. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  10. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  11. Coulomb's law for rolling friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2016-03-01

    Measurements are presented on the coefficient of rolling friction for steel balls rolling on hard surfaces. Two simple techniques are described, both suitable for use in a student laboratory, and both capable of measuring friction coefficients as small as 0.0001. The coefficient of rolling friction depends strongly on ball radius, an effect first observed by Coulomb in 1785. In this work, the dependence on ball radius is found to be similar to that observed by Tabor in 1955 using steel balls on rubber and on soft metal surfaces. However, it is found that rolling friction on a hard surface is due primarily to surface roughness rather than the hysteresis losses commonly associated with soft balls or soft surfaces. It is also found that the coefficient of rolling friction is approximately proportional to rolling speed.

  12. Friction in surface micromachined microengines

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; LaVigne, G.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding the frictional properties of advanced Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is essential in order to develop optimized designs and fabrication processes, as well as to qualify devices for commercial applications. We develop and demonstrate a method to experimentally measure the forces associated with sliding friction of devices rotating on a hub. The method is demonstrated on the rotating output gear of the microengine recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In-situ measurements of an engine running at 18300 rpm give a coefficient of friction of 0.5 for radial (normal) forces less than 4 {mu}N. For larger forces the effective coefficient of friction abruptly increases, suggesting a fundamental change in the basic nature of the interaction between the gear and hub. The experimental approach we have developed to measure the frictional forces associated with the microengine is generically applicable to other MEMS devices.

  13. Intermittent of Atmospheric Turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrt, L.

    1989-01-01

    Dimensionless structure functions such as kurtosis of the velocity gradients are computed from aircraft data for a variety of atmospheric situations in order to characterize the intermittency of the turbulence. It is necessary to distinguish between small scale intermittency of the velocity gradients organized by the individual main eddies and global intermittency associated with patchiness of turbulence on scales larger than the main eddies. Failure to make such a distinction can lead to ambiguity and inability to recognize contamination of statistics by sampling problems.The sharp edges of the main eddies contribute to the small scale intermittency as measured by the kurtosis of the velocity gradients and other intermittency statistics. However, for some of the strongly stratified cases, global intermittency increases the kurtosis by a factor of 2 or 3 in which case the statistics reflect the global spatial variability of the turbulence (patchiness) more than the local characteristics of the turbulence itself. As a result, the kurtosis increases with record length as more of the larger scale spatial variability is incorporated. in such case record partitioning is employed to construct more useful estimates of the small scale intermittency.The variation of the structure kurtosis with separation distance is normally found to obey the Kolmogorov similarity theory which has been modified to include the influence of small scale intermittency. However, the modified theory does not describe decaying turbulence nor turbulence with strong global intermittency.The dimensionless structure function for artificial turbulence and mixtures of distributions are studied analytically. The usual dimensional structure function responds to the scale of the main building blocks (simulated eddies) while the structure kurtosis and other dimensionless moments respond to the spatial scale of the edges of the building blocks where gradients are particularly large and contribute to the tails of the frequency distribution. The dimensionless structure function of the artificial turbulence is also augmented by global intermittency posed in terms of mixtures of frequency distributions. This analytical analysis appears to explain the observed enhancement of the dimensionless structure kurtosis by the sharp edges of the main eddies and by the global intermittency of those records with strong thermal stratification.

  14. Influences of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer and thermal performance characteristics in laminar and turbulent tube flows

    SciTech Connect

    Eiamsa-ard, Smith; Seemawute, Panida; Wongcharee, Khwanchit

    2010-09-15

    Effects of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer, friction loss and thermal performance factor characteristics in a round tube were investigated. Nine different peripherally-cut twisted tapes with constant twist ratio (y/W = 3.0) and different three tape depth ratios (DR = d/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33), each with three different tape width ratios (WR = w/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33) were tested. Besides, one typical twisted tape was also tested for comparison. The measurement of heat transfer rate was conducted under uniform heat flux condition while that of friction factor was performed under isothermal condition. Tests were performed with Reynolds number in a range from 1000 to 20,000, using water as a working fluid. The experimental results revealed that both heat transfer rate and friction factor in the tube equipped with the peripherally-cut twisted tapes were significantly higher than those in the tube fitted with the typical twisted tape and plain tube, especially in the laminar flow regime. The higher turbulence intensity of fluid in the vicinity of the tube wall generated by the peripherally-cut twisted tape compared to that induced by the typical twisted tape is referred as the main reason for achieved results. The obtained results also demonstrated that as the depth ratio increased and width ratio decreased, the heat transfer enhancement increased. Over the range investigated, the peripherally-cut twisted tape enhanced heat transfer rates in term of Nusselt numbers up to 2.6 times (turbulent regime) and 12.8 times (laminar regime) of that in the plain tube. These corresponded to the maximum performance factors of 1.29 (turbulent regime) and 4.88 (laminar regime). (author)

  15. Rolling friction robot fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1992-06-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  16. Rolling friction robot fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  17. Effects of unsteady free stream velocity and free stream turbulence on stagnation point heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, R. S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The combined effects of transient free stream velocity and free stream turbulence on heat transfer at a stagnation point over a cylinder situated in a crossflow are studied. An eddy diffusivity model was formulated and the governing momentum and energy equations are integrated by means of the steepest descent method. The numerical results for the wall shear stress and heat transfer rate are correlated by a turbulence parameter. The wall friction and heat transfer rate increase with increasing free stream turbulence intensity.

  18. A mathematical model of turbulence in flows with uniform stationary velocity gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Certain cases of turbulence as a postinstability state of a fluid in motion modeled by the introduction of multivalued velocity fields are examined. The turbulence is regarded as occurring in the form of random pulsations which grow until the external energy input in the average flow is balanced by the dissipated energy of pulsations by means of turbulent friction. Closed form analytic solutions are shown to be possible when the considered velocity fields, the pulsation velocity and the fluid velocity, are decoupled.

  19. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael J; Johnson, Simon A; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-03-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick-slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  20. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  1. Eliminating Friction with Friction: 2D Janssen Effect in a Friction-Driven System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, M. Yasinul; Corwin, Eric I.

    2014-05-01

    The Janssen effect is a unique property of confined granular materials experiencing gravitational compaction in which the pressure at the bottom saturates with an increasing filling height due to frictional interactions with side walls. In this Letter, we replace gravitational compaction with frictional compaction. We study friction-compacted 2D granular materials confined within fixed boundaries on a horizontal conveyor belt. We find that even with high-friction side walls the Janssen effect completely vanishes. Our results demonstrate that gravity-compacted granular systems are inherently different from friction-compacted systems in at least one important way: vibrations induced by sliding friction with the driving surface relax away tangential forces on the walls. Remarkably, we find that the Janssen effect can be recovered by replacing the straight side walls with a sawtooth pattern. The mechanical force introduced by varying the sawtooth angle θ can be viewed as equivalent to a tunable friction force. By construction, this mechanical friction force cannot be relaxed away by vibrations in the system.

  2. Eliminating friction with friction: 2D Janssen effect in a friction-driven system.

    PubMed

    Karim, M Yasinul; Corwin, Eric I

    2014-05-01

    The Janssen effect is a unique property of confined granular materials experiencing gravitational compaction in which the pressure at the bottom saturates with an increasing filling height due to frictional interactions with side walls. In this Letter, we replace gravitational compaction with frictional compaction. We study friction-compacted 2D granular materials confined within fixed boundaries on a horizontal conveyor belt. We find that even with high-friction side walls the Janssen effect completely vanishes. Our results demonstrate that gravity-compacted granular systems are inherently different from friction-compacted systems in at least one important way: vibrations induced by sliding friction with the driving surface relax away tangential forces on the walls. Remarkably, we find that the Janssen effect can be recovered by replacing the straight side walls with a sawtooth pattern. The mechanical force introduced by varying the sawtooth angle θ can be viewed as equivalent to a tunable friction force. By construction, this mechanical friction force cannot be relaxed away by vibrations in the system. PMID:24856724

  3. Inflow length and tripping effects in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2011-12-01

    A recent assessment of available direct numerical simulation (DNS) data from turbulent boundary layer flows [Schlatter & Örlü, J. Fluid Mech. 659, 116 (2010)] showed surprisingly large differences not only in the skin friction coefficient or shape factor, but also in their predictions of mean and fluctuation profiles far into the sublayer. For the present paper the DNS of a zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer flow by Schlatter et al. [Phys. Fluids 21, 051702 (2009)] serving as the baseline simulation, was re-simulated, however with physically different inflow conditions and tripping effects. The downstream evolution of integral and global quantities as well as mean and fluctuation profiles are presented and results indicate that different inflow conditions and tripping effects explain most of the differences observed when comparing available DNS. It is also found, that if transition is initiated at a low enough Reynolds number (based on the momentum-loss thickness) Reθ < 300, all data agree well for both inner and outer layer for Reθ > 2000; a result that gives a lower limit for meaningful comparisons between numerical and/or wind tunnel experiments.

  4. Mass transfer from smooth alabaster surfaces in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opdyke, Bradley N.; Gust, Giselher; Ledwell, James R.

    1987-11-01

    The mass transfer velocity for alabaster plates in smooth-wall turbulent flow is found to vary with the friction velocity according to an analytic solution of the advective diffusion equation. Deployment of alabaster plates on the sea floor can perhaps be used to estimate the viscous stress, and transfer velocities for other species.

  5. Turbulence-induced Relative Velocity of Dust Particles V. Testing Previous Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Coagulation models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks usually adopt the prediction of Vlk et al. or its later developments (hereafter Vlk-type models) for the collision velocity of dust particles induced by turbulent motions. We review the formulation and the underlying physical picture of these models, test their predictions against a numerical simulation, and examine the accuracy of the commonly used prescription for dust particle collisions. We show that Vlk-type models typically overestimate the rms of the particle relative velocity by a factor of two, if the particle friction times lie in the inertial range of the flow. The commonly used prescription for the collision kernel has several inaccuracies, and, in particular, it neglects the effect of turbulent clustering. Interestingly, for particles of equal sizes, the inaccuracies happen to cancel out, and by coincidence, the commonly used kernel prescription based on Vlk-type models is in good agreement with our simulation result. For particles of different sizes, the prescription shows a larger discrepancy from the measured kernel, and may overestimate the collision rate by up to a factor of 2.5. We find that the predicted rms relative velocity by Vlk-type models provides reasonable estimates for the average collision velocity per collision. We also make an effort to improve the accuracy of Vlk-type models for the rms relative velocity by tuning the correlation time of turbulent eddies and modifying the criterion for eddy classification.

  6. Skin Friction and Transition Location Measurement on Supersonic Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Goodsell, Aga M.; Olsen, Lawrence E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques were used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative skin friction and transition location data in wind tunnel tests performed on two supersonic transport models at Mach 2.40. Oil-film interferometry was useful for verifying boundary layer transition, but careful monitoring of model surface temperatures and systematic examination of the effects of tunnel start-up and shutdown transients will be required to achieve high levels of accuracy for skin friction measurements. A more common technique, use of a subliming solid to reveal transition location, was employed to correct drag measurements to a standard condition of all-turbulent flow on the wing. These corrected data were then analyzed to determine the additional correction required to account for the effect of the boundary layer trip devices.

  7. Bi-directional, buried-wire skin-friction gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuchi, H.; Peake, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A compact, nonobtrusive, bi-directional, skin-friction gage was developed to measure the mean shear stress beneath a three-dimensional boundary layer. The gage works by measuring the heat flux from two orthogonal wires embedded in the surface. Such a gage was constructed and its characteristics were determined for different angles of yaw in a calibration experiment in subsonic flow with a Preston tube used as a standard. Sample gages were then used in a fully three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer on a circular cone at high relative incidence, where there were regimes of favorable and adverse pressure gradients and three-dimensional separation. Both the direction and magnitude of skin friction were then obtained on the cone surface.

  8. Direct measurements of skin friction in a scramjet combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deturris, D. J.; Schetz, J. A.; Hellbaum, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    A direction experimental measurement was made of the skin friction in the turbulent boundary layer of three-dimensional supersonic combustor flows. A floating element configuration was designed to detect two components of the small tangential shear forces due to the flow passing over a nonobtrusive instrument. A cantilevered sensing head extending from a very sensitive piezoresistive displacement transducer simultaneously measured displacement in the axial and transverse directions to the flow. The small overall deflection means that no self-nulling is required. Consistently repeatable output from the gage during testing show the skin friction with supersonic combustion is higher than for a corresponding noncombusting flow. The results are probably accurate to within 10 percent for the mean streamwise component.

  9. Turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Liberman, M.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-11-01

    We study turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures in a developed turbulence. In our previous study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 69 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.80.69] using a path-integral approach for a delta-correlated in a time random velocity field, we demonstrated a strong modification of turbulent transport in fluid flows with chemical reactions or phase transitions. In the present study we use the spectral τ approximation that is valid for large Reynolds and Peclet numbers and show that turbulent diffusion of the reacting species can be strongly depleted by a large factor that is the ratio of turbulent and chemical times (turbulent Damköhler number). We have demonstrated that the derived theoretical dependence of a turbulent diffusion coefficient versus the turbulent Damköhler number is in good agreement with that obtained previously in the numerical modeling of a reactive front propagating in a turbulent flow and described by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov-Fisher equation. We have found that turbulent cross-effects, e.g., turbulent mutual diffusion of gaseous admixtures and turbulent Dufour effect of the chemically reacting gaseous admixtures, are less sensitive to the values of stoichiometric coefficients. The mechanisms of the turbulent cross-effects differ from the molecular cross-effects known in irreversible thermodynamics. In a fully developed turbulence and at large Peclet numbers the turbulent cross-effects are much larger than the molecular ones. The obtained results are applicable also to heterogeneous phase transitions.

  10. Turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures.

    PubMed

    Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Liberman, M; Rogachevskii, I

    2014-11-01

    We study turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures in a developed turbulence. In our previous study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 69 (1998)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.80.69] using a path-integral approach for a delta-correlated in a time random velocity field, we demonstrated a strong modification of turbulent transport in fluid flows with chemical reactions or phase transitions. In the present study we use the spectral τ approximation that is valid for large Reynolds and Peclet numbers and show that turbulent diffusion of the reacting species can be strongly depleted by a large factor that is the ratio of turbulent and chemical times (turbulent Damköhler number). We have demonstrated that the derived theoretical dependence of a turbulent diffusion coefficient versus the turbulent Damköhler number is in good agreement with that obtained previously in the numerical modeling of a reactive front propagating in a turbulent flow and described by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov-Fisher equation. We have found that turbulent cross-effects, e.g., turbulent mutual diffusion of gaseous admixtures and turbulent Dufour effect of the chemically reacting gaseous admixtures, are less sensitive to the values of stoichiometric coefficients. The mechanisms of the turbulent cross-effects differ from the molecular cross-effects known in irreversible thermodynamics. In a fully developed turbulence and at large Peclet numbers the turbulent cross-effects are much larger than the molecular ones. The obtained results are applicable also to heterogeneous phase transitions. PMID:25493875

  11. Onset of turbulent mean dynamics in boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamman, Curtis; Sayadi, Taraneh; Moin, Parviz

    2012-11-01

    Statistical properties of turbulence in low Reynolds number boundary layers are compared. Certain properties are shown to approach an asymptotic state resembling higher Reynolds number flow much earlier during transition than previously thought. This incipient turbulence is less stochastic and more organized than developed turbulence farther downstream, but the mean dynamics and production mechanisms are remarkably similar. The onset of turbulence in our recent simulations is also similar to that observed in the bypass transition of Wu & Moin where continuous freestream turbulence, rather than small-amplitude linear waves, triggers transition. For these inflow disturbances, self-sustaining turbulence occurs rapidly after laminar flow breakdown without requiring a significant development length nor significant randomization. Slight disagreements with FST-induced bypass transition are observed that correlate with the extra strain a turbulent freestream would impose upon the near-wall dynamics. Nevertheless, the turbulence statistics are similar shortly after the skin-friction overshoot independent of upstream receptivity. This early onset of deterministic turbulence provides support for reduced-order modeling of turbulent boundary layers based on non-linear stability mechanisms.

  12. Correlations of velocity and temperature fluctuations in the stagnation-point flow of circular cylinder in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    1988-01-01

    Boundary layer flow and turbulence transport analyses to study the influence of the free-stream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction around the stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a turbulent flow are presented. The analyses are formulated with the turbulent boundary layer equations, the Reynolds stress transport equations and the k - epsilon two-equation turbulence modeling. The analyses are used to calculate the time-averaged turbulence double correlations, the mean flow properties, the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction with an isotropic turbulence in the freestream. The analytical results are described and compared with the existing experimental measurements. Depending on the free-stream turbulence properties, the turbulence kinetic energy can increase or decrease as the flow moves toward the surface. However, the turbulence kinetic energy induces large Reynolds normal stresses at the boundary layer edge. The Reynolds normal stresses change the boundary layer profiles of the time-averaged double correlations of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction. The free-stream turbulence dissipation rate can affect the stagnation-point heat transfer rate but the influence of the free-stream temperature fluctuation on the heat transfer rate is insignificant.

  13. Modeling rain-driven overland flow: Empirical versus analytical friction terms in the shallow water approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, G.; Hu, J.; Delestre, O.; Darboux, F.; Lagrée, P.-Y.; Popinet, S.; Fullana, J. M.; Josserand, C.

    2016-05-01

    Modeling and simulating overland flow fed by rainfall is a common issue in watershed surface hydrology. Modelers have to choose among various friction models when defining their simulation framework. The purpose of this work is to compare the simulation quality for the Manning, Darcy-Weisbach, and Poiseuille friction models on the simple case of a constant rain on a thin experimental flume. Results show that the usual friction law of Manning is not suitable for this type of flow. The Poiseuille friction model gave the best results both on the flux at the outlet and the velocity and depth profile along the flume. The Darcy-Weisbach model shows good results for laminar flow. Additional testing should be carried out for turbulent cases.

  14. Skin-Friction Measurements in a 3-D, Supersonic Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wideman, J. K.; Brown, J. L.; Miles, J. B.; Ozcan, O.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental documentation of a three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction in a nominal Mach 3 cylinder, aligned with the free-stream flow, and 20 deg. half-angle conical flare offset 1.27 cm from the cylinder centerline. Surface oil flow, laser light sheet illumination, and schlieren were used to document the flow topology. The data includes surface-pressure and skin-friction measurements. A laser interferometric skin friction data. Included in the skin-friction data are measurements within separated regions and three-dimensional measurements in highly-swept regions. The skin-friction data will be particularly valuable in turbulence modeling and computational fluid dynamics validation.

  15. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, Morris W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments at several levels of statistical turbulence modeling applicable to aerodynamics are briefly surveyed. Emphasis is on examples of model improvements for transonic, two-dimensional flows. Experience with the development of these improved models is cited to suggest methods of accelerating the modeling process necessary to keep abreast of the rapid movement of computational fluid dynamics into the computation of complex three-dimensional flows.

  16. Flexure Bearing Reduces Startup Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, W. Dean

    1991-01-01

    Design concept for ball bearing incorporates small pieces of shim stock, wire spokes like those in bicycle wheels, or other flexing elements to reduce both stiction and friction slope. In flexure bearing, flexing elements placed between outer race of ball bearing and outer ring. Elements flex when ball bearings encounter small frictional-torque "bumps" or even larger ones when bearing balls encounter buildups of grease on inner or outer race. Flexure of elements reduce high friction slopes of "bumps", helping to keep torque between outer ring and inner race low and more nearly constant. Concept intended for bearings in gimbals on laser and/or antenna mirrors.

  17. Flow Friction or Spontaneous Ignition?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Gallus, Timothy D.; Sparks, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    "Flow friction," a proposed ignition mechanism in oxygen systems, has proved elusive in attempts at experimental verification. In this paper, the literature regarding flow friction is reviewed and the experimental verification attempts are briefly discussed. Another ignition mechanism, a form of spontaneous combustion, is proposed as an explanation for at least some of the fire events that have been attributed to flow friction in the literature. In addition, the results of a failure analysis performed at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility are presented, and the observations indicate that spontaneous combustion was the most likely cause of the fire in this 2000 psig (14 MPa) oxygen-enriched system.

  18. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston assembly in an engine. The model appears to produce the correct behavior, but we cannot quantify its strengths or weaknesses until our crank-angle-resolved measurements have been completed. Finally, we proposed and implemented a model for the effects of liner rotation on piston assembly friction. Here, we propose that the rotating liner design is analogous to the shaft-bushing mechanism. Therefore, we used the side-slip rolling friction model to simulate the effects of liner rotation. This model appears to be promising, but final analysis of its strengths and/or weaknesses must await our crank-angle-resolved measurements.

  19. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal motion can be chosen to be random with a flat spectrum over the frequency range of 10 Hz to 1 kHz, or to be sinusoidal at any peak-to-peak amplitude up to 0.8 in. (.2 cm) and fixed or varying frequency up to 1 kHz. The temperatures of the specimen and of the vessel are measured by thermocouples. A digital video camera mounted outside the pressure vessel is aimed into the vessel through a sapphire window, with its focus fixed on the interface between the two specimens. A position transducer monitors the displacement of the pneumatic-cylinder shaft. The pressure in the vessel is also monitored. During a test, the output of the video camera, the temperatures, and the pneumatic-shaft displacement are monitored and recorded. The test is continued for a predetermined amount of time (typically, 10 minutes) or until either (1) the output of the position transducer shows a sudden change indicative of degradation of either or both specimens, (2) ignition or another significant reaction is observed, or (3) pressure in the vessel increases beyond a pre-set level that triggers an automatic shutdown.

  20. Effects of viscoelasticity on the probability density functions in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Gaurab; Housiadas, Kostas D.; Handler, Robert A.; Beris, Antony N.

    2009-11-01

    The probability density functions (PDFs) of the velocity fluctuations and their derivatives of a viscoelastic turbulent channel flow are calculated and compared against those for a Newtonian fluid at a friction Reynolds number 180. The velocity fields in both cases are provided from previous and new direct numerical simulations. In the viscoelastic case, the Giesekus model is used at a friction Weissenberg number 50, a mobility parameter 1/900, and viscosity ratio 0.9, corresponding to 37.4% drag reduction. The skewness and the flatness factors, which are also calculated and presented as functions of the distance from the wall, further reveal and quantify the non-Gaussian characteristics of the turbulent structures and how they are distributed in the flow domain. With the presence of viscoelasticity the non-Gaussian character of the PDFs is typically further enhanced. In particular, larger asymmetries and much longer tails are typically observed in the viscoelastic PDFs. This indicates higher intermittency in the viscoelastic turbulent flow versus the Newtonian one, along with strong correlations between all scales of turbulence. Furthermore, we have also seen significant qualitative changes regarding the distribution of the non-Gaussian characteristics of the PDFs as a function of the distance from the wall. The most notable differences are seen in the PDFs of the shear and spanwise velocity components in the buffer and log-law regions, as well as in most of the components of the first and second order velocity derivatives. It is also found that in the log-law layer the PDFs of the logarithm of the dissipation and the pseudodissipation rate, as well as of the enstrophy, are almost Gaussian. In contrast, in the viscous sublayer and the buffer layer, significant deviations from the Gaussian shape are observed. Whereas the deviations from Gaussianity are more enhanced with viscoelasticity next to the wall, with the PDFs even more negatively skewed, away from the wall sometimes (i.e., for the logarithm of the enstrophy) they are decreased. All these findings are pointing out to a fairly complex picture for the interaction of viscoelasticity with turbulence that makes the task of developing turbulent viscoelastic models even more challenging.

  1. Friction microprobe investigation of particle layer effects on sliding friction

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Interfacial particles (third-bodies), resulting from wear or external contamination, can alter and even dominate the frictional behavior of solid-solid sliding in the absence of effective particle removal processes (e.g., lubricant flow). A unique friction microprobe, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was used to conduct fine- scale friction studies using 1.0 mm diameter stainless steel spheres sliding on several sizes of loose layers of fine aluminum oxide powders on both aluminum and alumina surfaces. Conventional, pin-on-disk experiments were conducted to compare behavior with the friction microprobe results. The behavior of the relatively thick particle layers was found to be independent of the nature of underlying substrate, substantiating previous work by other investigators. The time-dependent behavior of friction, for a spherical macrocontact starting from rest, could generally be represented by a series of five rather distinct phases involving static compression, slider breakaway, transition to steady state, and dynamic layer instability. A friction model for the steady state condition, which incorporates lamellar powder layer behavior, is described.

  2. Friction microprobe investigation of particle layer effects on sliding friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, P. J.

    Interfacial particles (third-bodies), resulting from wear or external contamination, can alter and even dominate the frictional behavior of solid-solid sliding in the absence of effective particle removal processes (e.g., lubricant flow). A unique friction microprobe, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was used to conduct fine-scale friction studies using 1.0 mm diameter stainless steel spheres sliding on several sizes of loose layers of fine aluminum oxide powders on both aluminum and alumina surfaces. Conventional pin-on-disk experiments were conducted to compare behavior with the friction microprobe results. The behavior of the relatively thick particle layers was found to be independent of the nature of underlying substrate, substantiating previous work by other investigators. The time-dependent behavior of friction, for a spherical macrocontact starting from rest, could generally be represented by a series of five rather distinct phases involving static compression, slider breakaway, transition to steady state, and dynamic layer instability. A friction model for the steady state condition, which incorporates lamellar powder layer behavior, is described.

  3. An experimental study of changes in the structure of a turbulent boundary layer due to surface geometry changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This investigation attempts to observe changes in the flow structure of a nominally zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer by altering the surface of a smooth plate with small triangular riblets oriented in the direction of flow and protruding just above the viscous sublayer. Hot-wire measurements show a reduction in the local skin friction over the riblet valleys by about 40% compared to the smooth surface near the end of the plate. Local skin friction increases by about 10% over the riblet peaks. Results showing the effects of the riblets on the mean, root-mean-square and skewness factor distributions of the streamwise velocity are presented. The mean profile displays characteristics similar to those of drag reducing additives; the streamwise turbulence intensity is reduced by approximately 10-15% near the surface by the riblets; the skewness factor distribution is virtually unchanged. A comparison of results from an application of the VITA 'burst' detection technique to smooth and riblet surface data is also presented although the results are rather inconclusive. Flow visualization of 'bursting' over both surfaces, while dramatically revealing the structure, reveals little difference resulting from the presence of the riblet.

  4. Active control of boundary layer transition and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1990-06-01

    The invention is a system and method for controlling boundary layer flow such that flow separation can be delayed and skin friction drag can be reduced. The invention consists of heater elements used to trigger turbulent flow and audio speakers used to suppress turbulent oscillations. By inducing turbulent oscillations into the flow in a region of positive pressure gradient, pressure patterns became more regular. The suppression of these patterns can be accomplished by imposing an out-of-phase suppressing wave. This wave is the audio output generated by a feedback amplifier using inputs from a hot-wire anemometer reading downstream turbulence. The novel features of the present invention are the tripping of boundary layer flow in a region of positive pressure gradient and the cooperative use of the feedback means to control turbulence. The result is a significant reduction in drag and separation problems.

  5. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  6. Reducing Friction by Quenched Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiman, Y.; Family, F.; Hentschel, H. G. E.

    1998-03-01

    We present numerical and theoretical evidence that quenched disorder can reduce dry friction in array of coupled particles moving on periodic and rough surfaces. We discuss possible mechanisms of such behavior in three different dynamical regimes : (a) in a limit when the nonlinear substrate potential dominates the dynamics, and therefore attractor hopping and the interplay between the basins of attraction leads to decrease in friction by disorder; (b) in a limit when thermal noise and dissipation is large, and stick-slip motion controls the dynamics; (c) in the limit where dissipation is small, and friction is reduced by disorder at short times, leading to a transition from the pinned state to sliding, though friction will be increased by disorder for long times. We will discuss possible experimental setups to observe this behavior.

  7. Rubber friction and tire dynamics.

    PubMed

    Persson, B N J

    2011-01-12

    We propose a simple rubber friction law, which can be used, for example, in models of tire (and vehicle) dynamics. The friction law is tested by comparing numerical results to the full rubber friction theory (Persson 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 7789). Good agreement is found between the two theories. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) tire model which combines the rubber friction model with a simple mass-spring description of the tire body. The tire model is very flexible and can be used to accurately calculate μ-slip curves (and the self-aligning torque) for braking and cornering or combined motion (e.g. braking during cornering). We present numerical results which illustrate the theory. Simulations of anti-blocking system (ABS) braking are performed using two simple control algorithms. PMID:21406818

  8. Rubber friction and tire dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple rubber friction law, which can be used, for example, in models of tire (and vehicle) dynamics. The friction law is tested by comparing numerical results to the full rubber friction theory (Persson 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 7789). Good agreement is found between the two theories. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) tire model which combines the rubber friction model with a simple mass-spring description of the tire body. The tire model is very flexible and can be used to accurately calculate μ-slip curves (and the self-aligning torque) for braking and cornering or combined motion (e.g. braking during cornering). We present numerical results which illustrate the theory. Simulations of anti-blocking system (ABS) braking are performed using two simple control algorithms.

  9. Frictional slip of granite at hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanpied, M.L.; Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    To measure the strength, sliding behavior, and friction constitutive properties of faults at hydrothermal conditions, laboratory granite faults containing a layer of granite powder (simulated gouge) were slid. The mechanical results define two regimes. The first regime includes dry granite up to at least 845?? and wet granite below 250??C. In this regime the coefficient of friction is high (?? = 0.7 to 0.8) and depends only modestly on temperature, slip rate, and PH2O. The second regime includes wet granite above ~350??C. In this regime friction decreases considerably with increasing temperature (temperature weakening) and with decreasing slip rate (velocity strengthening). These regimes correspond well to those identified in sliding tests on ultrafine quartz. The results highlight the importance of fluid-assisted deformation processes active in faults at depth and the need for laboratory studies on the roles of additional factors such as fluid chemistry, large displacements, higher concentrations of phyllosilicates, and time-dependent fault healing. -from Authors

  10. Heat transfer to the transpired turbulent boundary layer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kays, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper contains a summarization of five years work on an investigation on heat transfer to the transpired turbulent boundary layer. Experimental results are presented for friction coefficient and Stanton number over a wide range of blowing and suction for the case of constant free-stream velocity, holding certain blowing parameters constant. The problem of the accelerated turbulent boundary layer with transpiration is considered, experimental data are presented and discussed, and theoretical models for solution of the momentum equation under these conditions are presented. Data on turbulent Prandtl number are presented so that solutions to the energy equation may be obtained. Some examples of boundary layer heat transfer and friction coefficient predictions are presented using one of the models discussed, employing a finite difference solution method.

  11. Tire/runway friction interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  12. Rubber friction: comparison of theory with experiment.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J; Dieluweit, S; Tada, T

    2011-12-01

    We have measured the friction force acting on a rubber block slid on a concrete surface. We used both unfilled and filled (with carbon black) styrene butadiene (SB) rubber and have varied the temperature from -10 °C to 100 °C and the sliding velocity from 1 μm/s to 1000 μm/s. We find that the experimental data at different temperatures can be shifted into a smooth master-curve, using the temperature-frequency shifting factors obtained from measurements of the bulk viscoelastic modulus. The experimental data has been analyzed using a theory which takes into account the contributions to the friction from both the substrate asperity-induced viscoelastic deformations of the rubber, and from shearing the area of real contact. For filled SB rubber the frictional shear stress σ(f) in the area of real contact results mainly from the energy dissipation at the opening crack on the exit side of the rubber-asperity contact regions. For unfilled rubber we instead attribute σ(f) to shearing of a thin rubber smear film, which is deposited on the concrete surface during run in. We observe very different rubber wear processes for filled and unfilled SB rubber, which is consistent with the different frictional processes. Thus, the wear of filled SB rubber results in micrometer-sized rubber particles which accumulate as dry dust, which is easily removed by blowing air on the concrete surface. This wear process seams to occur at a steady rate. For unfilled rubber a smear film forms on the concrete surface, which cannot be removed even using a high-pressure air stream. In this case the wear rate appears to slow down after some run in time period. PMID:22139094

  13. Experiment study on friction drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guomin; Ma, Lisheng; Yao, Zhengqiu; Li, Guoping

    2004-09-01

    In the past years, friction drive was developed to overcome the inherent deficiencies in both worm drive and gear drive. No periodical error and free of backlash are the main advantages of friction drive. With the trend towards bigger and bigger aperture of the optical telescopes, there are some reports about friction drive employed to drive the telescopes. However friction drive has its own deficiencies, such as slippage and creepage. This report here describes the study on the friction drive finished in an experiment arranged by LAMOST project. It comprises three main parts. First, it introduces the experiment apparatus and proposes a new kind of measurement and adjustment mechanisms. Secondly, the report gives the analysis of friction drive characteristics theoretically, such as slippage, creepage and gives the results of corresponding experiments. The experiment shows that the lowest stable speed reaches 0.05″/s with precision of 0.009″(RMS), the preload has little influence on the drive precision in the case of constant velocity and the variable velocity when the angle acceleration is less than 5″/s2 with close loop control and the creepage velocity of this experiment system is 1.47″/s. Lastly, the analysis in the second section lists some measures to improve the precision and stability further. These measures have been actually conducted in the testing system and proved to be reliable.

  14. Friction and wear of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.

    1986-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, wear, and lubricated behaviors of both oxide and non-oxide ceramics are reviewed. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials, and metals. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as with metals. Grit size effects in two and three body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both the free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide and chlorine on aluminum oxide reduce friction while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics increases friction. Lubrication increases the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics both in indentation and with sliding or rubbing.

  15. Friction and wear of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, wear and lubricated behaviors of both oxide and non-oxide ceramics are reviewed. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials and metals. Elastic, plastic and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as with metals. Grit size effects in two- and three-body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide and chlorine on aluminum oxide reduce friction while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics increases friction. Lubrication increases the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics both in indentation and with sliding or rubbing.

  16. Frictional resistance to accelerating slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J. C.

    1984-09-01

    General analytical expressions for the friction stress and state variable, based on a rate and state-dependent constitutive friction law proposed by Dieterich and Ruina, have been obtained as an explicit function of slip rate V or slip time t or slip displacement δ under the assumption that slip acceleration a is constant or piecewise constant. Properties of the solutions have been discussed, and reviewed, for uniformly accelerating (or decelerating) slip, the following. 1. Frictional stress increases (or decreases) with increasing time, or slip rate, or slippage at the beginning of motion, until a maximum (or a minimum) value (when it exists) has been reached, then decreases (or increases), and finally approaches a special frictional state, namely a steady state, for which stress depends on instantaneous slip rate. 2. The maximal value of frictional stress is dependent on acceleration a; the larger the a, the larger the magnitude of the maximum. The energy expense ɛ needed to overcome the frictional stress has been estimated. And therefore the optimal value of acceleration for saving energy for a slipping mechanical system has been obtained. The energy release rate G for an abrupt rupture process of a crack or fault has been estimated.

  17. The Effect of Friction on Penetration in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Steve

    2002-01-01

    "Friction stir butt welding," as it was originally termed by Wayne Thomas and Christopher Dawes, in the early 1990s, but now commonly called "friction stir welding," has made great progress as a new welding technique. Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating the use of FSW for assembly of the Shuttle's external fuel tank since the late 1990s and hopes to have the process in use by the summer of 2002. In FSW, a cylindrical pin tool of hardened steel, is rotated and plunged into the abutting edges of the parts to be joined. The tool is plunged into the weldment to within about .050 in of the bottom to assure full penetration. As the tool moves along the joint, the tool shoulder helps produce frictional heating, causing the material to plasticize. The metal of the two abutting plates flows from the front of the tool to the back where it cools and coalesces to form a weld in the solid phase. One quarter inch thick plates of aluminum alloy 2219 were used in this study. Two samples, each consisting of two 4 in x 12 in plates, were friction stir welded. The anvil for one sample was coated with molybdenum sulfide, while for the other sample a sheet of roughened stainless steel was placed between the anvil and the sample. The retractable pin tool was used so that the depth of the pin tool penetration could be varied. As welding proceeded, the length of the pin tool was gradually increased from the starting point. The purpose of this investigation is to find out at what point, in the down ramp, penetration occurs. Differences in root structure of the friction stir weld due to differences in anvil friction will be observed. These observations will be analyzed using friction stir weld theory.

  18. Nanotribology fundamentals: Predicting the viscous coefficient of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Tonya S.

    In this work, I have used the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) to study nanoscale friction of monolayer adsorbates on (111) metals. The friction of these systems is viscous friction, defined as Ff = etanu = ( mt )nu. Here, eta is the viscous coefficient of friction, nu is the velocity of the adsorbate, m is adsorbate mass, and tau is the slip time, which is the time required for the film's speed to fall to 1/e of its original value. The main focus of this dissertation is to determine the factors that control eta, the viscous coefficient of friction. I have examined three different parameters in order to determine their effect on eta. An equation for predicting the viscous coefficient of friction has been proposed: eta = etasubs + aU2o . Here, etasubs is the damping of adsorbate sliding energy within the substrate, a is a constant depending on mainly temperature and adsorbate film coverage, and Uo is the atomic-scale surface corrugation. I have examined the sliding friction of n-octane on Cu(111) vs. Pb(11I) surfaces, which have gamma = 0.45 meV and gamma = 0.26 meV, respectively. I have observed that the slip time for a monolayer of n-octane/Cu(111) is 0.94 ns +/- 0.36 ns, and the slip time of noctane/Pb(111) is 0.59 ns +/- 0.13 ns. I therefore observe no direct evidence of a link between the damping of perpendicular FT modes and sliding friction. It is still possible, however, that the damping of the parallel FT phonon mode affects sliding friction. Finally, I studied the slippage of monolayer methanol films at room temperature on rotating, rigid, and slowly ratcheting C60 substrates, to examine the effect that the molecular rotation of the substrate surface has on the sliding friction of an adsorbate. I found that at all coverages, the slip time for methanol on rigid and slowly ratcheting C60 was longer (hence lower friction) than the slip time for methanol on rotating C 60, defying the ball bearing analogy. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  19. The ultra-low speed research on friction drive of large telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fujia; Wang, Daxing

    2006-06-01

    No periodical error and free of backlash are the main advantages of friction drive. So friction drive is applied in many ultra-low speed systems in the past years. With the trend that the aperture of optical telescope becomes bigger and bigger, there are some reports about friction drive employed to drive the telescopes. However friction drive also brings up challenge to control system because the inherent nonlinear characteristics of friction drive. This report describes the study on the friction drive finished in an experiment arranged by LAMOST project. It comprises three main parts. First, it introduces the experiment apparatus and presents a friction nonlinear curve to indicate the nonlinear characteristics of friction drive. Subsequently, this report illuminates the negative result that influenced by the nonlinear characteristic. Secondly, this report use nonlinear PID control algorithm to control friction drive. It achieves ultra-low speed and high precision position control. The ultra-low velocity is 0.2"/S and error is 0.032"(RMS). This report also lists some factors that influence the precision of speed. Lastly, this report gives the analysis fluctuating speed of friction drive and applies acceleration feedback to diminish this fluctuating.

  20. Role of critical points of the skin friction field in formation of plumes in thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaru, Vinodh; Kolchinskaya, Anastasiya; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Schumacher, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics in the thin boundary layers of temperature and velocity is the key to a deeper understanding of turbulent transport of heat and momentum in thermal convection. The velocity gradient at the hot and cold plates of a Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell forms the two-dimensional skin friction field and is related to the formation of thermal plumes in the respective boundary layers. Our analysis is based on a direct numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a closed cylindrical cell of aspect ratio Γ =1 and focused on the critical points of the skin friction field. We identify triplets of critical points, which are composed of two unstable nodes and a saddle between them, as the characteristic building block of the skin friction field. Isolated triplets as well as networks of triplets are detected. The majority of the ridges of linelike thermal plumes coincide with the unstable manifolds of the saddles. From a dynamical Lagrangian perspective, thermal plumes are formed together with an attractive hyperbolic Lagrangian coherent structure of the skin friction field. We also discuss the differences from the skin friction field in turbulent channel flows from the perspective of the Poincaré-Hopf index theorem for two-dimensional vector fields.

  1. Role of critical points of the skin friction field in formation of plumes in thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Vinodh; Kolchinskaya, Anastasiya; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Schumacher, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics in the thin boundary layers of temperature and velocity is the key to a deeper understanding of turbulent transport of heat and momentum in thermal convection. The velocity gradient at the hot and cold plates of a Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell forms the two-dimensional skin friction field and is related to the formation of thermal plumes in the respective boundary layers. Our analysis is based on a direct numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a closed cylindrical cell of aspect ratio Γ=1 and focused on the critical points of the skin friction field. We identify triplets of critical points, which are composed of two unstable nodes and a saddle between them, as the characteristic building block of the skin friction field. Isolated triplets as well as networks of triplets are detected. The majority of the ridges of linelike thermal plumes coincide with the unstable manifolds of the saddles. From a dynamical Lagrangian perspective, thermal plumes are formed together with an attractive hyperbolic Lagrangian coherent structure of the skin friction field. We also discuss the differences from the skin friction field in turbulent channel flows from the perspective of the Poincaré-Hopf index theorem for two-dimensional vector fields. PMID:26565331

  2. Frictional Heterogeneities Along Carbonate Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, C.; Carpenter, B. M.; Scuderi, M.; Tesei, T.

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of fault-slip behaviour in carbonates has an important societal impact as a) a significant number of earthquakes nucleate within or propagate through these rocks, and b) half of the known petroleum reserves occur within carbonate reservoirs, which likely contain faults that experience fluid pressure fluctuations. Field studies on carbonate-bearing faults that are exhumed analogues of currently active structures of the seismogenic crust, show that fault rock types are systematically controlled by the lithology of the faulted protolith: localization associated with cataclasis, thermal decomposition and plastic deformation commonly affect fault rocks in massive limestone, whereas distributed deformation, pressure-solution and frictional sliding along phyllosilicates are observed in marly rocks. In addition, hydraulic fractures, indicating cyclic fluid pressure build-ups during the fault activity, are widespread. Standard double direct friction experiments on fault rocks from massive limestones show high friction, velocity neutral/weakening behaviour and significant re-strengthening during hold periods, on the contrary, phyllosilicate-rich shear zones are characterized by low friction, significant velocity strengthening behavior and no healing. We are currently running friction experiments on large rock samples (20x20 cm) in order to reproduce and characterize the interaction of fault rock frictional heterogeneities observed in the field. In addition we have been performing experiments at near lithostatic fluid pressure in the double direct shear configuration within a pressure vessel to test the Rate and State friction stability under these conditions. Our combination of structural observations and mechanical data have been revealing the processes and structures that are at the base of the broad spectrum of fault slip behaviors recently documented by high-resolution geodetic and seismological data.

  3. Dynamical friction in pairs of elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prugniel, Philippe; Combes, Francoise

    1990-01-01

    The authors present numerical experiments on dynamical friction in pairs of elliptical galaxies of unequal mass. They confirm that the self-gravity of the response is not important and show the drastic effect of the deformability of the companion which reduces the decay time by more than a factor of 2. Almost the same amount of orbital energy is dissipated within the satellite as within the large galaxy. Finally, the authors discuss the importance of distant encounters for the dynamical evolution of systems of galaxies.

  4. Friction-induced skin injuries-are they pressure ulcers? An updated NPUAP white paper.

    PubMed

    Brienza, David; Antokal, Steven; Herbe, Laura; Logan, Susan; Maguire, Jeanine; Van Ranst, Jennifer; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    Friction injuries are often misdiagnosed as pressure ulcers. The reason for the misdiagnosis may be a misinterpretation of classic pressure ulcer literature that reported friction increased the susceptibility of the skin to pressure damage. This analysis assesses the classic literature that led to the inclusion of friction as a causative factor in the development of pressure ulcers in light of more recent research on the effects of shear. The analysis in this article suggests that friction can contribute to pressure ulcers by creating shear strain in deeper tissues, but friction does not appear to contribute to pressure ulcers in the superficial layers of the skin. Injuries to the superficial layers of the skin caused by friction are not pressure ulcers and should not be classified or treated as such. PMID:25549310

  5. Understanding the frictional response of organic monolayer coatings using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flater, Erin E.; Corwin, Alex D.; Carpick, Robert W.

    2005-03-01

    Friction and wear are yet to be fundamentally understood, yet they can be major limiting factors for applications including microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). We use atomic force microscopy to determine frictional constitutive relations for nanoscale contacts designed to represent the asperities in MEMS. Quantitative measurements of friction and contact stiffness are performed using SiO2- and organic monolayer-functionalized tips on organic monolayer-functionalized silicon. Using octadecyltrichrolosilane, octadecene, and perfluorinated monolayers, we find that friction depends on the type of molecule, its packing density, and the surface attachment chemistry. We also find that fluorination increases friction, as in MEMS, and that molecular transfer to the SiO2 tip causes large variation in the measurements. With monolayer-coated tips, this variation, as well as the overall friction and adhesion, are significantly reduced.

  6. Turbulence, Chondrules, and Planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey; Hogan, Robert C.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; Paque, Julie M.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown both numerically and experimentally that 3-D turbulence concentrates aerodynamically size-selected particles by orders of magnitude. In a previous review chapter, in "Chondrules and the protoplanetary disk" we illustrated the initial predictions of Turbulent Concentration (TC) as applied to the solar nebula. We predicted the particle size which will be most effectively concentrated by turbulence; it is the particle which has a gas drag stopping time equal to the overturn time of the smallest (Kolmogorov scale) eddy. The primary uncertainty is the level of nebula turbulence, or Reynolds number Re, which can be expressed in terms of the standard nebula eddy viscosity parameter alpha = Re(nu)(sub m)/cH, where nu(sub m) is molecular viscosity, c is sound speed, and H is vertical scale height. Several studies, and observed lifetimes of circumstellar disks, have suggested that the level of nebula turbulence can be described by alpha = 10(exp -2) - 10(exp -4). There is some recent concern about how energy is provided to maintain this turbulence, but the issue remains open. We adopt a canonical minimum mass nebula with a range of alpha > 0. We originally showed that chondrule-sized particles are selected for concentration in the terrestrial planet region if alpha = 10(exp -3) - 10(exp -4). In addition, Paque and Cuzzi found that the size distribution of chondrules is an excellent match for theoretical predictions. One then asks by what concentration factor C these particles can be concentrated; our early numerical results indicated an increase of C with alpha, and were supported by simple scaling arguments, but the extrapolation range was quite large and the predictions (C 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 6) not unlikely) uncertain. The work presented here, which makes use of our recent demonstration that the particle density field is a multifractal with flow-independent properties provides a far more secure ground for such predictions. We also indicate how fine-grained dust rims on chondrules might enter into constraining the situation.

  7. Identification of maximum road friction coefficient and optimal slip ratio based on road type recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Hsin; Wang, Bo; Lu, Pingping; Xu, Liang

    2014-09-01

    The identification of maximum road friction coefficient and optimal slip ratio is crucial to vehicle dynamics and control. However, it is always not easy to identify the maximum road friction coefficient with high robustness and good adaptability to various vehicle operating conditions. The existing investigations on robust identification of maximum road friction coefficient are unsatisfactory. In this paper, an identification approach based on road type recognition is proposed for the robust identification of maximum road friction coefficient and optimal slip ratio. The instantaneous road friction coefficient is estimated through the recursive least square with a forgetting factor method based on the single wheel model, and the estimated road friction coefficient and slip ratio are grouped in a set of samples in a small time interval before the current time, which are updated with time progressing. The current road type is recognized by comparing the samples of the estimated road friction coefficient with the standard road friction coefficient of each typical road, and the minimum statistical error is used as the recognition principle to improve identification robustness. Once the road type is recognized, the maximum road friction coefficient and optimal slip ratio are determined. The numerical simulation tests are conducted on two typical road friction conditions(single-friction and joint-friction) by using CarSim software. The test results show that there is little identification error between the identified maximum road friction coefficient and the pre-set value in CarSim. The proposed identification method has good robustness performance to external disturbances and good adaptability to various vehicle operating conditions and road variations, and the identification results can be used for the adjustment of vehicle active safety control strategies.

  8. Effects of Turbulence on the Critical Conditions of Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabanta, Quintin; Murphy, Jeremiah Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence is an important factor to consider in the supernova problem; computer simulations show that turbulence reduces the critical conditions necessary for a successful explosion. We propose a global turbulence model that captures the effects of previous simulations, and we use this turbulence model to derive the reduced critical conditions. Enthalpy flux, turbulent dissipation, and Reynolds stress are all potentially impactful components in reducing the threshold for explosion. To examine the weight of these effects, we isolate each element's contribution and compare their respective magnitudes to the neutrino heating. By exploring these reduced critical curves, we hope to further understand how turbulence aids explosion.

  9. Characteristics of turbulence in boundary layer with zero pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebanoff, P S

    1955-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are presented. Measurements with the hot-wire anemometer were made of turbulent energy and turbulent shear stress, probability density and flattening factor of u-fluctuation (fluctuation in x-direction), spectra of turbulent energy and shear stress, and turbulent dissipation. The importance of the region near the wall and the inadequacy of the concept of local isotropy are demonstrated. Attention is given to the energy balance and the intermittent character of the outer region of the boundary layer. Also several interesting features of the spectral distribution of the turbulent motions are discussed.

  10. Analytical skin friction and heat transfer formula for compressible internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechant, Lawrence J.; Tattar, Marc J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytic, closed-form friction formula for turbulent, internal, compressible, fully developed flow was derived by extending the incompressible law-of-the-wall relation to compressible cases. The model is capable of analyzing heat transfer as a function of constant surface temperatures and surface roughness as well as analyzing adiabatic conditions. The formula reduces to Prandtl's law of friction for adiabatic, smooth, axisymmetric flow. In addition, the formula reduces to the Colebrook equation for incompressible, adiabatic, axisymmetric flow with various roughnesses. Comparisons with available experiments show that the model averages roughly 12.5 percent error for adiabatic flow and 18.5 percent error for flow involving heat transfer.

  11. Friction measurement in zero and adverse pressure gradient boundary layer using oil droplet interferometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pailhas, Guy; Barricau, P.; Touvet, Y.; Perret, L.

    2009-08-01

    The oil droplet interferometric technique has been used to investigate the skin friction distribution along a zero and adverse pressure gradient boundary layer developing in the Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille wind tunnel. This experimental task was a part of the WALLTURB project, funded by the European Community, in order to bring significant progress in the understanding of near wall turbulence in boundary layers. Skin friction values close to 0.01 Pa have been measured with this optical method. A comparison with the results obtained with hot-wire anemometry and macro-PIV demonstrates the great potential of the oil droplet technique.

  12. Frictional Melting of Peridotite and Seismic Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, G.; Del Gaudio, P.; Han, R.; Hirose, T.; Nielsen, S.; Shimamoto, T.; Cavallo, A.

    2008-12-01

    The evolution of the frictional strength along a fault at seismic slip rates (about 1 m/s) is one of the main factors controlling earthquake mechanics. In particular, friction-induced rock melting and melt lubrication during seismic slip may be typical at mantle depths, based on field studies, seismological evidence, torsion experiments and theoretical studies. To investigate the (1) dynamic strength of faults and (2) the frictional melting processes in mantle rocks, we performed 20 experiments with the Balmuccia peridotite in a high- velocity rotary shear apparatus. Experiments were conducted on cylindrical samples (21.8 mm in diameter) over a wide range of normal stresses (5.4 to 16.1 MPa), slip rates (0.23 to 1.14 m/s) and displacements (1.5 to 71 m). The dynamic strength of experimental faults evolved with displacement: after a peak (first strengthening) at the initiation of slip, fault strength abruptly decreased (first weakening), then increased (second strengthening) and eventually decreased (second weakening) towards a steady-state value. The microstructural and geochemical (FE-SEM, EPMA and EDS) investigation of the slipping zone from experiments interrupted at different displacements, revealed that second strengthening was associated with the production of a grain-supported melt-poor layer, while second weakening and steady-state with the formation of a continuous melt-rich layer. The temperature of the frictional melt was up to 1780 Celsius. Microstructures formed during the experiments were identical to those found in natural ultramafic pseudotachylytes. By performing experiments for increasing normal stresses and slip rates, steady-state shear stress slightly increased with increasing normal stress (friction coefficient of 0.15) and, for a given normal stress, decreased with increasing slip rate. The dependence of steady-state shear stress with normal stress and slip rate is described by a constitutive equation for melt lubrication. The presence of microstructures similar to those found in natural pseudotachylytes and the determination of a constitutive equation that describes the experimental data, might allow to extrapolate the experimental observations to natural conditions and to the study of rupture dynamics in mantle rocks.

  13. Instantaneous engine frictional torque, its components and piston assembly friction

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A. ); Henein, N.A. . Center for Automotive Research)

    1992-05-01

    The overall goal of this report is to document the work done to determine the instantaneous frictional torque of internal combustion engine by using a new approach known as (P-[omega]) method developed at Wayne State University. The emphasis has been to improve the accuracy of the method, and apply it to both diesel and gasoline engines under different operating conditions. Also work included an investigation to determine the effect of using advanced materials and techniques to coat the piston rings on the instantaneous engine frictional torque and the piston assembly friction. The errors in measuring the angular velocity, [omega], have been determined and found to be caused by variations in the divisions within one encoder, encoder-to-encoder variations, misalignment within the encoder itself and misalignment between the encoder and crankshaft. The errors in measuring the cylinder gas pressure, P, have been determined and found to be caused by transducer-to-transducer variations, zero drift, thermal stresses and lack of linearity. The ability of the (P-[omega]) method in determining the frictional torque of many engine components has been demonstrated. These components include valve train, fuel injection pump with and without fuel injection, and piston with and without different ring combinations. The emphasis in this part of the research program has been on the piston-ring assembly friction. The effects of load and other operating variables on IFT have been determined. The motoring test, which is widely used in industry to measure engine friction has been found to be inaccurate. The errors have been determined at different loads.

  14. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  15. Superradiance-tidal friction correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glampedakis, Kostas; Kapadia, Shasvath J.; Kennefick, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Since the work of Hartle in the 1970s, and the subsequent development of the membrane paradigm approach to black hole physics it has been widely accepted that superradiant scattering of gravitational waves bears strong similarities with the phenomenon of "tidal friction" (well known from Newtonian gravity) operating in binary systems of viscous material bodies. In this paper we revisit the superradiance-tidal friction analogy within the context of ultracompact relativistic bodies. We advocate that as long as these bodies have nonzero viscosity they should undergo tidal friction that can be construed as a kind of superradiant scattering from the point of view of the dynamics of an orbiting test body. In addition we consider the presence of anisotropic matter, which is required for at least some ultracompact bodies, if they are to sustain a radius very close to the gravitational radius. We find that the tidal friction/superradiance output is enhanced with increasing anisotropy and that strongly anisotropic systems exhibit an unconventional response to tidal and centrifugal forces. Finally, we make contact with the artificial system comprising a black hole with its horizon replaced by a mirror (sometimes used as a proxy for ultracompact material bodies) and discuss superradiance and tidal friction in relation to it.

  16. Friction between ring polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Erbaş, Aykut; Paturej, Jarosław

    2015-04-28

    Friction between ring polymer brush bilayers sliding past each other at melt densities is studied using extensive coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and scaling arguments, and the results are compared to the friction between bilayers of linear polymer brushes. We show that for a velocity range spanning over three decades, the frictional forces measured for ring polymer brushes are half of the corresponding friction in the case of linear brushes. In the linear-force regime, the weak inter-digitation between ring brush layers as compared to linear brushes leads also to a lower number of binary collisions between the monomers from opposing brushes. At high velocities, where the thickness of the inter-digitation between bilayers is on the order of monomer size regardless of brush topology, stretched segments of ring polymers adopt the double-stranded conformation. As a result, monomers of the double-stranded segments collide on average less with the monomers of the opposing ring brush even though a similar number of monomers occupies the inter-digitation layer for ring and linear brush bilayers. The numerical data obtained from our simulations are consistent with the proposed scaling analysis. Conformation-dependent friction reduction observed in ring brushes can have important consequences in non-equilibrium bulk systems. PMID:25747253

  17. Mesh Size Control of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitenis, Angela; Uruena, Juan Manuel; Schulze, Kyle D.; Cooper, Andrew C.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Sawyer, W. Gregory

    Soft, permeable sliding interfaces in aqueous environments are ubiquitous in nature but their ability to maintain high lubricity in a poor lubricant (water) has not been well understood. Hydrogels are excellent materials for fundamental soft matter and biotribology studies due to their high water content. While mesh size controls the material and transport properties of a hydrogel, its effects on friction were only recently explored. Polyacrylamide hydrogels slid in a Gemini (self-mated) interface produced low friction under low speeds, low pressures, macroscopic contact areas, and room temperature aqueous environments. The friction coefficients at these interfaces are lowest at low speeds and are speed-independent. This behavior is due to thermal fluctuations at the interface separating the surfaces, with water shearing in this region being the main source of dissipation. We found that mesh size had an inverse correlation with friction. We further investigated a transition from this behavior at higher speeds, and found that the transition speed correlated with the mesh size and relaxation time of the polymer network. Very soft and correspondingly large mesh size Gemini hydrogels show superlubricity under specific conditions with friction being less than 0.005.

  18. Optimal Shape Design of a Plane Diffuser in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokhyun; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-11-01

    Stratford (1959) experimentally designed an optimal shape of plane diffuser for maximum pressure recovery by having zero skin friction throughout the region of pressure rise. In the present study, we apply an algorithm of optimal shape design developed by Pironneau (1973, 1974) and Cabuk & Modi (1992) to a diffuser in turbulent flow, and show that maintaining zero skin friction in the pressure-rise region is an optimal condition for maximum pressure recovery at the diffuser exit. For turbulence model, we use the k-ɛ-v^2-f model by Durbin (1995) which is known to accurately predict flow with separation. Our results with this model agree well with the previous experimental and LES results for a diffuser shape tested by Obi et al. (1993). From this initial shape, an optimal diffuser shape for maximum pressure recovery is obtained through an iterative procedure. The optimal diffuser has indeed zero skin friction throughout the pressure-rise region, and thus there is no separation in the flow. For the optimal diffuser shape obtained, an LES is being conducted to investigate the turbulence characteristics near the zero-skin-friction wall. A preliminary result of LES will also be presented.

  19. Occurrence of turbulent flow conditions in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2014-09-26

    Having similar densities as liquids but with viscosities up to 20 times lower (higher diffusion coefficients), supercritical CO2 is the ideal (co-)solvent for fast and/or highly efficient separations without mass-transfer limitations or excessive column pressure drops. Whereas in liquid chromatography the flow remains laminar in both the packed bed and tubing, except in extreme cases (e.g. in a 75 μm tubing, pure acetonitrile at 5 ml/min), a supercritical fluid can experience a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in more typical operation modes. Due to the significant lower viscosity, this transition for example already occurs at 1.3 ml/min for neat CO2 when using connection tubing with an ID of 127 μm. By calculating the Darcy friction factor, which can be plotted versus the Reynolds number in a so-called Moody chart, typically used in fluid dynamics, higher values are found for stainless steel than PEEK tubing, in agreement with their expected higher surface roughness. As a result turbulent effects are more pronounced when using stainless steel tubing. The higher than expected extra-column pressure drop limits the kinetic performance of supercritical fluid chromatography and complicates the optimization of tubing ID, which is based on a trade-off between extra-column band broadening and pressure drop. One of the most important practical consequences is the non-linear increase in extra-column pressure drop over the tubing downstream of the column which leads to an unexpected increase in average column pressure and mobile phase density, and thus decrease in retention. For close eluting components with a significantly different dependence of retention on density, the selectivity can significantly be affected by this increase in average pressure. In addition, the occurrence of turbulent flow is also observed in the detector cell and connection tubing. This results in a noise-increase by a factor of four when going from laminar to turbulent flow (e.g. going from 0.5 to 2.5 ml/min for neat CO2). PMID:25145564

  20. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  1. Perception and Haptic Rendering of Friction Moments.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, H; Ohtuka, Y; Koide, S; Mouri, T

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers moments due to friction forces on the human fingertip. A computational technique called the friction moment arc method is presented. The method computes the static and/or dynamic friction moment independent of a friction force calculation. In addition, a new finger holder to display friction moment is presented. This device incorporates a small brushless motor and disk, and connects the human's finger to an interface finger of the five-fingered haptic interface robot HIRO II. Subjects' perception of friction moment while wearing the finger holder, as well as perceptions during object manipulation in a virtual reality environment, were evaluated experimentally. PMID:26962953

  2. Numerical approach to frictional fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Jon Alm; Toussaint, Renaud; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik; Sandnes, Bjørnar

    2015-09-01

    Experiments on confined two-phase flow systems, involving air and a dense suspension, have revealed a diverse set of flow morphologies. As the air displaces the suspension, the beads that make up the suspension can accumulate along the interface. The dynamics can generate "frictional fingers" of air coated by densely packed grains. We present here a simplified model for the dynamics together with a new numerical strategy for simulating the frictional finger behavior. The model is based on the yield stress criterion of the interface. The discretization scheme allows for simulating a larger range of structures than previous approaches. We further make theoretical predictions for the characteristic width associated with the frictional fingers, based on the yield stress criterion, and compare these to experimental results. The agreement between theory and experiments validates our model and allows us to estimate the unknown parameter in the yield stress criterion, which we use in the simulations.

  3. Numerical approach to frictional fingers.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jon Alm; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik; Sandnes, Bjørnar

    2015-09-01

    Experiments on confined two-phase flow systems, involving air and a dense suspension, have revealed a diverse set of flow morphologies. As the air displaces the suspension, the beads that make up the suspension can accumulate along the interface. The dynamics can generate "frictional fingers" of air coated by densely packed grains. We present here a simplified model for the dynamics together with a new numerical strategy for simulating the frictional finger behavior. The model is based on the yield stress criterion of the interface. The discretization scheme allows for simulating a larger range of structures than previous approaches. We further make theoretical predictions for the characteristic width associated with the frictional fingers, based on the yield stress criterion, and compare these to experimental results. The agreement between theory and experiments validates our model and allows us to estimate the unknown parameter in the yield stress criterion, which we use in the simulations. PMID:26465465

  4. Frictional melting of peridotite and seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gaudio, P.; di Toro, G.; Han, R.; Hirose, T.; Nielsen, S.; Shimamoto, T.; Cavallo, A.

    2009-06-01

    The evolution of the frictional strength along a fault at seismic slip rates (about 1 m/s) is a key factor controlling earthquake mechanics. At mantle depths, friction-induced melting and melt lubrication may influence earthquake slip and seismological data. We report on laboratory experiments designed to investigate dynamic fault strength and frictional melting processes in mantle rocks. We performed 20 experiments with Balmuccia peridotite in a high-velocity rotary shear apparatus and cylindrical samples (21.8 mm in diameter) over a wide range of normal stresses (5.4-16.1 MPa), slip rates (0.23-1.14 m/s), and displacements (1.5-71 m). During the experiments, shear stress evolved with cumulative displacement in five main stages (stages 1-5). In stage 1 (first strengthening), the coefficient of friction μ increased up to 0.4-0.7 (first peak in friction). In stage 2 (abrupt first weakening), μ decreased to about 0.25-0.40. In stage 3 (gradual second strengthening), shear stress increased toward a second peak in friction (μ = 0.30-0.40). In stage 4 (gradual second weakening), the shear stress decreased toward a steady state value (stage 5) with μ = 0.15. Stages 1 and 2 are of too short duration to be investigated in detail with the current experimental configuration. By interrupting the experiments during stages 3, 4, and 5, microstructural (Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope) and geochemical (Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy) analysis of the slipping zone suggest that second strengthening (stage 3) is associated with the production of a grain-supported melt-poor layer, while second weakening (stage 4) and steady state (stage 5) are associated with the formation of a continuous melt-rich layer with an estimated temperature up to 1780°C. Microstructures formed during the experiments were very similar to those found in natural ultramafic pseudotachylytes. By performing experiments at different normal stresses and slip rates, (1) the "thermal" (as it includes the thermally activated first and second weakening) slip distance to achieve steady state from the first peak in strength decreased with increasing normal stress and slip rate and (2) the steady state shear stress slightly increased with increasing normal stress and, for a given normal stress, decreased with increasing slip rate. The ratio of shear stress versus normal stress was about 0.15, well below the typical friction coefficient of rocks (0.6-0.8). The dependence of steady state shear stress with normal stress was described by means of a constitutive equation for melt lubrication. The presence of microstructures similar to those found in natural pseudotachylytes and the determination of a constitutive equation that describes the experimental data allows extrapolation of the experimental observations to natural conditions and to the study of rupture dynamics in mantle rocks.

  5. Rheological chaos of frictional grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grob, Matthias; Zippelius, Annette; Heussinger, Claus

    2016-03-01

    A two-dimensional dense fluid of frictional grains is shown to exhibit time-chaotic, spatially heterogeneous flow in a range of stress values, σ , chosen in the unstable region of s -shaped flow curves. Stress-controlled simulations reveal a phase diagram with reentrant stationary flow for small and large stress σ . In between, no steady flow state can be reached, instead the system either jams or displays time-dependent heterogeneous strain rates γ ˙(r ,t ) . The results of simulations are in agreement with the stability analysis of a simple hydrodynamic model, coupling stress and microstructure which we tentatively associate with the frictional contact network.

  6. Frictional Properties of Single Crystalline and Quasicrystalline Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellman, Andrew

    2000-03-01

    The use of ultra-high vacuum surface science methods has been aplied to the problem of studying friction between single srystalline and quasicrystalline metal surfaces. A experimental apparatus has been developed that combines the ability to perform surface preparation and analysis with the ability to make measurements of macroscopic friction forces between surfaces in sliding contact. This UHV chamber allows simultaneous preparation and characterization of two sample surfaces. These are usually single crystalline samples of the same metal and can be either perfectly clean or modified by adsorbed species such as atoms or molecules. Once prepared these two surfaces can be brought into contact under an applied normal load (Fn = 0.001 0.1 N) and sheared relative to one another at constant velocity (vs = 1 100 mm/s). Both normal and shear forces are measured simultaneously enabling one to determine a coefficient of friction. This unique apparatus has been used to study a number of problems in tribology. Adsorbed species on metal surfaces serve as a lubricants and prevent direct metal-metal contact. We have addressed the issue of surface coverage effects on interfacial friction. Surfaces have been prepared with adsorbed species ranging continuously in coverage from zero monolayers to many ( 100) monolayers. These experiments have been performed with pairs of both Ni(100) and Cu(111) surfaces. The interesting observation has been that adsorbed layers of atoms have little or no influence on friction coefficients between the two surfaces at coverages below one monolayer. Adsorbed molecules such as ethanol or trifluoroethanol are more interesting in this regard. They also have little influence on friction when adsorbed at coverages of < 1 monolayer, however, once the coverage exceeds 1 monolayer the coefficient of friction drops substantially. Friction reaches its limit at coverages of 5 10 monolayer. It is quite interesting to note that these metal single crystal surface undergo plastic deformation when brought into contact and yet it is possible for these ultra-thin layers of adsorbed molecules to reduce friction and lubricate the interface. There are a number of measurements which show that friction and adhesion between crystalline materials can be anisotropic in the sense that they depend on the relative crystallographic orientations of the two surfaces. For the most part these have been made between surfaces in elastic contact and the understanding of the source of the anisotropy is based on the commensurability of the overlapping crystal surface lattices. In the case of metal surfaces which undergo plastic deformation when brought into contact it is not so clear that the commensurability of the surface lattices is the determining factor in friction anisotropy. Three sets of experiments have been performed in which pairs of Ni(100) surfaces have been brought onto contact and sheared with different orientations of the surface lattices. In the first experiment the Ni(100) surfaces were clean. In the second they were modified by adsorption of 1/2 monolayer of sulfur atoms ordered into a c(2x2) lattice. In this case the two surface lattices are rotated by 45o with respect to the original Ni(100) lattice. Finally, in the third set of experiments the surfaces were modified by adsorption of 2 monolayers of ethanol. Adsorbed ethanol forms an overlayer with no long range order. The basic point of these surface modifications is that they either rotate or eliminate the surface lattice periodicity while leaving the bulk lattices of the Ni(100) crystals in the same relative orientations. In all three cases friction anisotropy is observed as the two bulk crystal lattices are rotated with respect to one another. The interesting thing is that a minimum in the friction is observed when the two are rotated by 45^o with respect to one another. The fact that this is observed for all three modifications of the surface lattice suggests that it is the relative orientations of the bulk lattices that dictates this anisotropy. The cases cited for friction anisotropy between mica surfaces are all experiments performed with elastic contact between the surfaces and hence it is quite reasonable in those cases that surface lattice commensurability should dictate the friction anisotropy. The fact that bulk lattice orientation is important in sliding of Ni(100) surfaces is not surprising since it is known that under the loads at which these experiments were performed (Fn = 40 mN) there is plastic contact and irreversible deformation of the near surface regions during sliding. The frictional properties of quasicrystalline surfaces have been reported to be quite low in a number of measurements. It has been possible to perform an extensive set of measurements of the friction between two single grain Al70Pd21Mn9(000001) surface under UHV conditions. When first introduced into UHV the nominally clean surfaces exhibit fairly low coefficients of ~0.11 for dry sliding friction. However, Auger electron spectroscopy reveals that they are heavily contaminated with adsorbed films of C, O, S, and Cl. Removal of these films by ion sputtering and annealing has enabled us to produce truly clean well ordered quasicrystalline surfaces. These have allowed measurement of the intrinsic frictional properties of clean quasicrystal surfaces sliding over one another and reveal a coefficient of friction of 0.60 ± 0.08. Once clean the quasicrystal surfaces can be oxidized under controlled conditions and it has been possible to study the effects of oxidation of these surfaces on their frictional properties. Not surprisingly the friction coefficient is reduced, falling to a value of 0.35 ± 0.05 due to the formation of a thin film (< 10 Å) of aluminum oxide. This study highlights the fact that without careful control of surface cleanliness it is not possible to study the frictional properties of surfaces without observing effects of adsorbed species.

  7. Finite Element Analysis of the Amontons-Coulomb's Model using Local and Global Friction Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, M. C.; Menezes, L. F.; Ramalho, A.; Alves, J. L.

    2011-05-04

    In spite of the abundant number of experimental friction tests that have been reported, the contact with friction modeling persists to be one of the factors that determine the effectiveness of sheet metal forming simulation. This difficulty can be understood due to the nature of the friction phenomena, which comprises the interaction of different factors connected to both sheet and tools' surfaces. Although in finite element numerical simulations friction models are commonly applied at the local level, they normally rely on parameters identified based on global experimental tests results. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the Amontons-Coulomb's friction coefficient identified using complementary tests: (i) load-scanning, at the local level and (ii) draw-bead, at the global level; to the numerical simulation of sheet metal forming processes.

  8. Joint Winter Runway Friction Program Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Wambold, James C.; Henry, John J.; Andresen, Arild; Bastian, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    The major program objectives are: (1) harmonize ground vehicle friction measurements to report consistent friction value or index for similar contaminated runway conditions, for example, compacted snow, and (2) establish reliable correlation between ground vehicle friction measurements and aircraft braking performance. Accomplishing these objectives would give airport operators better procedures for evaluating runway friction and maintaining acceptable operating conditions, providing pilots information to base go/no go decisions, and would contribute to reducing traction-related aircraft accidents.

  9. Apparatus for measurement of coefficient of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slifka, A. J.; Siegwarth, J. D.; Sparks, L. L.; Chaudhuri, Dilip K.

    An apparatus designed to measure the coefficient of friction in certain controlled atmospheres is described. The coefficient of friction observed during high-load tests was nearly constant, with an average value of 0.56. This value is in general agreement with that found in the literature and also with the initial friction coefficient value of 0.67 measured during self-mated friction of 440C steel in an oxygen environment.

  10. Showing Area Matters: A Work of Friction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Domelen, David

    2010-01-01

    Typically, we teach the simplified friction equation of the form F[subscript s] = [mu][subscript s]N for static friction, where F[subscript s] is the maximum static friction, [mu][subscript s] is the coefficient of static friction, and "N" is the normal force pressing the surfaces together. However, this is a bit too simplified, and doesn't work…

  11. Critical Length Limiting Superlow Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  12. Friction-formed liquid droplets.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, A J; Anantheshwara, K; Bobji, M S; Inkson, B J

    2011-03-11

    The formation of nanoscale liquid droplets by friction of a solid is observed in real-time. This is achieved using a newly developed in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) triboprobe capable of applying multiple reciprocating wear cycles to a nanoscale surface. Dynamical imaging of the nanoscale cyclic rubbing of a focused-ion-beam (FIB) processed Al alloy by diamond shows that the generation of nanoscale wear particles is followed by a phase separation to form liquid Ga nanodroplets and liquid bridges. The transformation of a two-body system to a four-body solid-liquid system within the reciprocating wear track significantly alters the local dynamical friction and wear processes. Moving liquid bridges are observed in situ to play a key role at the sliding nanocontact, interacting strongly with the highly mobile nanoparticle debris. In situ imaging demonstrates that both static and moving liquid droplets exhibit asymmetric menisci due to nanoscale surface roughness. Nanodroplet kinetics are furthermore dependent on local frictional temperature, with solid-like surface nanofilaments forming on cooling. TEM nanotribology opens up new avenues for the real-time quantification of cyclic friction, wear and dynamic solid-liquid nanomechanics, which will have widespread applications in many areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology. PMID:21289398

  13. Dynamical friction in cuspy galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Arca-Sedda, M.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we treat the problem of the dynamical friction decay of a massive object moving in an elliptical galaxy with a cuspidal inner distribution of the mass density. We present results obtained by both self-consistent, direct summation, N-body simulations, as well as by a new semi-analytical treatment of dynamical friction valid in such cuspy central regions of galaxies. A comparison of these results indicates that the proposed semi-analytical approximation is the only reliable one in cuspy galactic central regions, where the standard Chandrasekhar's local approximation fails and also gives estimates of decay times that are correct at 1% with respect to those given by N-body simulations. The efficiency of dynamical friction in cuspy galaxies is found definitively higher than in core galaxies, especially on more radially elongated satellite orbits. As another relevant result, we find a proportionality of the dynamical friction decay time to the –0.67 power of the satellite mass, M, shallower than the standardly adopted M {sup –1} dependence.

  14. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  15. From measurements to quantum friction.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Stephen M; Jeffers, John; Cresser, James D

    2006-04-26

    We present a quantum theory of friction in which interactions with the surrounding medium are described by generalized measurements of the particle's position and momentum. The theory predicts intrinsically quantum contributions to the particle's steady-state energy and to the associated diffusion in position. We discuss the physical significance of these and demonstrate their significance in ensuring a well behaved theory. PMID:21690742

  16. Critical length limiting superlow friction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes. PMID:25699452

  17. A One-Dimensional Global-Scaling Erosive Burning Model Informed by Blowing Wall Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibbey, Timothy P.

    2014-01-01

    A derivation of turbulent flow parameters, combined with data from erosive burning test motors and blowing wall tests results in erosive burning model candidates useful in one-dimensional internal ballistics analysis capable of scaling across wide ranges of motor size. The real-time burn rate data comes from three test campaigns of subscale segmented solid rocket motors tested at two facilities. The flow theory admits the important effect of the blowing wall on the turbulent friction coefficient by using blowing wall data to determine the blowing wall friction coefficient. The erosive burning behavior of full-scale motors is now predicted more closely than with other recent models.

  18. Counterflow-induced decoupling in superfluid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, Dmytro; L'vov, Victor S.; Pomyalov, Anna; Procaccia, Itamar

    2016-01-01

    In mechanically driven superfluid turbulence, the mean velocities of the normal- and superfluid components are known to coincide: Un=Us . Numerous laboratory, numerical, and analytical studies showed that under these conditions, the mutual friction between the normal- and superfluid velocity components also couples their fluctuations: un'(r,t) ≈ us'(r,t), almost at all scales. We show that this is not the case in thermally driven superfluid turbulence; here the counterflow velocity Uns≡Un-Us≠0 . We suggest a simple analytic model for the cross-correlation function and its dependence on Uns. We demonstrate that un'(r,t ) and us'(r,t) are decoupled almost in the entire range of separations |r - r'| between the energy-containing scale and intervortex distance.

  19. Mixing and bottom friction: parametrization and application to the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennis, A.-C.; Dumas, F.; Ardhuin, F.; Blanke, B.; Lepesqueur, J.

    2012-04-01

    Wave breaking has been observed to impact the bottom boundary layer in surf zones, with potential impacts on bottom friction. Observations in the inner surf zone have also shown a tendency to an underestimation of the wave-induced set-up when using usual model parameterizations. The present study investigates the possible impact of wave breaking on bottom friction and set-up using a recently proposed parameterization of the wave-induced turbulent kinetic energy in the vertical mixing parameterization of the wave-averaged flow. This parametrization proposed by Mellor (2002) allows us to take account the oscillations of the bottom boundary layer with the wave phases thanks to some additional turbulent source terms. First, the behavior of this parameterization, is investigated by comparing phase-resolving and phase-averaged solutions. The hydrodynamical model MARS (Lazure et Dumas, 2008) is used for this, using a modified k-epsilon model to take account the Mellor (2002) parametrization. It is shown that the phase averaged solution strongly overestimates the turbulent kinetic energy, which is similar to the situation of the air flow over waves (Miles 1996). The waves inhibits the turbulence and the wave-averaged parametrization is not able to reproduce correctly this phenomenom. Cases with wave breaking at the surface are simulated in order to study the influence of surface wave breaking on the bottom boundary layer. This parametrization is applied in the surf zone for two differents cases, one for a planar beach and one other for a barred beach with rip currents. The coupled model MARS-WAVEWATCH III is used for this (Bennis et al, 2011) and for a realistic planar beach, the mixing parameterization has only a limited impact on the bottom friction and the wave set-up, unless the bottom roughness is greatly enhanced in very shallow water, or for a spatially varying roughness. The use of the mixing parametrization requires an adjustement of the bottom roughness to fit the observations probably due to the expression of the additional source of turbulent kinetic energy. For an idealized barred beach, the results given by the mixing parametrization are compared with others from parametrizations that take account the wave effects on the bottom friction via the wave orbital velocity, and no via the turbulent kinetic energy as in Mellor (2002). The vertical profile of the rip current is significantly modified by the bottom friction parametrization, while the feedback of the waves on the flow (ie. two-way mode) changes the pattern of the rip currents in comparison with the one-way mode.

  20. Experimental study of error sources in skin-friction balance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed to determine potential error sources in skin-friction balance measurements. A floating-element balance, large enough to contain the instrumentation needed to systematically investigate these error sources has been constructed and tested in the thick turbulent boundary layer on the sidewall of a large supersonic wind tunnel. Test variables include element-to-case misalignment, gap size, and Reynolds number. The effects of these variables on the friction, lip, and normal forces have been analyzed. It was found that larger gap sizes were preferable to smaller ones; that small element recession below the surrounding test surface produced errors comparable to the same amount of protrusion above the test surface; and that normal forces on the element were, in some cases, large compared to the friction force.

  1. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing. PMID:26274279

  2. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing.

  3. Atmospheric turbulence MTF for optical waves' propagation through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang; Cao, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Fugen

    2014-11-01

    The conventional investigations for atmospheric turbulence have assumed that the refractive-index fluctuations of atmosphere are statistically homogeneous and isotropic. Developments of experimental and theoretical investigations have shown that the isotropic turbulence generally exists near the ground, and in the free atmosphere layer above the ground the anisotropic turbulence appears. Hence, deviations from the previously published results obtained with the isotropic turbulence assumption are possible. In this study, new analytic expressions for the anisotropic atmospheric turbulence modulation transfer function (MTF) are derived for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. They consider both an anisotropic coefficient and a general spectral power law value in the range 3 to 4. When the anisotropic coefficient equals one (corresponding to the isotropic turbulence), the new results obtained in this work can reduce correctly to the previously published analytic expressions under isotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. The derived MTF models physically describe the turbulence anisotropic property of high atmospheric layer. Numerical calculations show that with the increase of anisotropic factor which is proportional to the atmospheric layer altitude, the atmospheric turbulence produces less effect on the imaging system.

  4. Prediction of dynamic friction forces in spur gears using alternate sliding friction formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Song; Cho, Sungmin; Singh, Rajendra

    2008-01-01

    In this communication, several sliding friction formulations used in spur gear dynamics are examined and compared in terms of the predictions of interfacial friction forces and off-line-of-action motions. Competing friction formulations include Coulomb models with time-varying friction coefficients and empirical expressions based on elasto-hydrodynamic and/or boundary lubrication regime principles. Predicted results compare well with friction force measurements.

  5. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  6. Turbulence structure of open channel flows over permeable and impermeable beds: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manes, Costantino; Pokrajac, Dubravka; McEwan, Ian; Nikora, Vladimir

    2009-12-01

    The behavior of turbulent open channel flows over permeable surfaces is not well understood. In particular, it is not clear how the surface and the subsurface flow within the permeable bed interact and influence each other. In order to clarify this issue we carried out two sets of experiments, one involving velocity measurements in open channel flows over an impermeable bed composed of a single layer of spheres, and another one where velocities were measured over and within a permeable bed made of five such layers. Comparison of surface flow velocity statistics between the two sets of experiments confirmed that bed permeability can significantly affect flow resistance. It was also confirmed that even in the hydraulically rough regime, the friction factors for the permeable bed increase with increasing Reynolds number. Such an increase in flow resistance implies a different distribution of normal form-induced stress between the permeable and impermeable bed cases. Subsurface flow measurements performed within the permeable bed revealed that there is an intense transport of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) occurring from the surface to the subsurface flow. We provide evidence that the transport of TKE toward the lower bed levels is driven mainly by pressure fluctuations, whereas TKE transport due to turbulent velocity fluctuations is limited to a thinner layer placed in the upper part of the bed. It was also confirmed that the turbulence imposed by the surface flow gradually dissipates while penetrating within the porous medium. Dissipation occurs faster for the small scales than for the large ones, which instead are persistent, although weak, even at the lowest bed levels.

  7. Turbulent boundary-layer control with plasma spanwise travelling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Choi, Kwing-So

    2014-08-01

    Arrays of dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma actuators have been designed to generate spanwise travelling waves in the turbulent boundary layer for possible skin-friction drag reductions. Particle image velocimetry was used to elucidate the modifications to turbulence structures created by the plasma spanwise travelling waves. It has been observed that the plasma spanwise travelling waves amalgamated streamwise vortices, lifting low-speed fluid from the near-wall region up and around the peripheries of their cores to form wide ribbons of low-speed streamwise velocity within the viscous sublayer.

  8. Effects of transverse oscillatory waves on turbulent boundary waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matulevich, Jonathan; Jacobs, Harold R.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the interaction of unsteady (oscillatory) flows with the growth of a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate have primarily dealt with an oscillatory component in the primary flow direction. Past studies of the 2-D flow have shown little or no increase in the time averaged heat transfer. The present paper deals with a steady axial and an oscillatory transverse flow. It is shown that for such flows the temporal variation for both the turbulent skin friction and heat transfer are such as to yield increased time averaged values.

  9. Skin friction measurements by a new nonintrusive double-laser-beam oil viscosity balance technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.; Higuchi, H.

    1980-01-01

    A portable dual-laser-beam interferometer that nonintrusively measures skin friction by monitoring the thickness change of an oil film subject to shear stress is described. The method is an advance over past versions in that the troublesome and error-introducing need to measure the distance to the oil leading edge and the starting time for the oil flow has been eliminated. The validity of the method was verified by measuring oil viscosity in the laboratory, and then using those results to measure skin friction beneath the turbulent boundary layer in a low-speed wind tunnel. The dual-laser-beam skin friction measurements are compared with Preston tube measurements, with mean velocity profile data in a 'law-of-the-wall' coordinate system, and with computations based on turbulent boundary-layer theory. Excellent agreement is found in all cases. This validation and the aforementioned improvements appear to make the present form of the instrument usable to measure skin friction reliably and nonintrusively in a wide range of flow situations in which previous methods are not practical.

  10. Skin Friction Measurements by a Dual-Laser-Beam Interferometer Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.; Higuchi, H.

    1981-01-01

    A portable dual-laser-beam interferometer that nonintrusively measures skin friction by monitoring the thickness change of an oil film subject to shear stress is described. The method is an advance over past versions in that the troublesome and error-introducing need to measure the distance to the oil leading edge and the starting time for the oil flow has been eliminated. The validity of the method was verified by measuring oil viscosity in the laboratory, and then using those results to measure skin friction beneath the turbulent boundary layer in a low speed wind tunnel. The dual-laser-beam skin friction measurements are compared with Preston tube measurements, with mean velocity profile data in a "law-of-the-well" coordinate system, and with computations based on turbulent boundary-layer theory. Excellent agreement is found in all cases. (This validation and the aforementioned improvements appear to make the present form of the instrument usable to measure skin friction reliably and nonintrusively in a wide range of flow situations in which previous methods are not practical.)

  11. Skin-friction measurements in a 3-D, supersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wideman, Jeffrey Kenneth

    An experimental study has been conducted in a three-dimensional, supersonic shockwave/boundary-layer interaction (3-D SW/BLI) with the intent of providing accurate experimental data for turbulence modeling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation. The experiment was performed in the High Reynolds Channel 1 (HRCI) wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The test was conducted at a Mach number of M(sub infinity) = 2.89 and at a Reynolds number of Re = 15 x 106/m. The model consisted of a sting-supported cylinder aligned with the tunnel axis and a 20 deg half-angle conical flare offset 1.27 cm from the cylinder centerline. The generated shock system was verified to be steady by schlieren visualization. The highlight of the study was the acquisition of 3-D skin-friction data by a laser interferometric skin friction (LISF) meter. Surface pressure measurements were obtained in 15 deg intervals around the cylinder and flare. Additional measurements included surface oil flow and laser light sheet illumination which were used to document the flow topology. Skin-friction measurements are proving to be a very challenging test of a CFD code predictive capability. However, at the present time there is a very limited amount of accurate skin-friction data in complex flows such as in 3-D SW/BLI. The LISF technique is advantageous as compared to other skin-friction measurement techniques for application in complex flows like the present since it is non-intrusive and is capable of performing measurements in flows with large shear and pressure gradients where the reliability of other techniques is questionable. Thus, the prevent skin-friction data will prove valuable to turbulence modeling and CFD code validation efforts.

  12. Influence of particle characteristics on granular friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Jennifer L.; Marone, Chris

    2005-08-01

    We report on laboratory experiments designed to illuminate grain-scale deformation mechanisms within fault gouge. We vary particle size distribution, grain and surface roughness, and gouge layer thickness to better understand how grain sliding, rolling, dilation, and compaction affect the strength and stability of granular fault gouge. The experiments employed the double direct shear testing geometry and were run at room temperature, controlled humidity, and shearing rates from 0.1 to 3000 μm/s. Experiments were carried out under constant normal stress of 5 and 10 MPa and thus within a nonfracture loading regime where sliding friction for smooth, spherical particles is measurably lower than for rough, angular particles. We compare results from shear between smooth boundaries, where we hypothesize that grain boundary sliding is the dominant deformation mechanism, and roughened surfaces, where rolling and granular dilation contribute to shear deformation. We find that particle angularity and bounding surface roughness increase the frictional strength within sheared layers, indicating differences in particle reorganization due to these factors. In gouge material composed of <30% angular grains we observe repetitive stick-slip sliding where stress drop decreases while preinstability creep increases with increasing gouge layer thickness. Our data show significant differences in stick-slip characteristics as a function of gouge layer thickness and particle size, which we interpret in terms of the mechanics of grain bridges that support forces on the layers. We suggest that force chains exhibit qualitative differences as a function of grain angularity and bounding surface roughness.

  13. Pressure and Friction Injuries in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Shawn; Seiverling, Elizabeth; Silvis, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Pressure and friction injuries are common throughout the lifespan. A detailed history of the onset and progression of friction and pressure injuries is key to aiding clinicians in determining the underlying mechanism behind the development of the injury. Modifying or removing the forces that are creating pressure or friction is the key to both prevention and healing of these injuries. Proper care of pressure and friction injuries to the skin is important to prevent the development of infection. Patient education on positioning and ergonomics can help to prevent recurrence of pressure and friction injuries. PMID:26612376

  14. Frictional constraints on crustal faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Cocco, M.

    1996-01-01

    We consider how variations in fault frictional properties affect the phenomenology of earthquake faulting. In particular, we propose that lateral variations in fault friction produce the marked heterogeneity of slip observed in large earthquakes. We model these variations using a rate- and state-dependent friction law, where we differentiate velocity-weakening behavior into two fields: the strong seismic field is very velocity weakening and the weak seismic field is slightly velocity weakening. Similarly, we differentiate velocity-strengthening behavior into two fields: the compliant field is slightly velocity strengthening and the viscous field is very velocity strengthening. The strong seismic field comprises the seismic slip concentrations, or asperities. The two "intermediate" fields, weak seismic and compliant, have frictional velocity dependences that are close to velocity neutral: these fields modulate both the tectonic loading and the dynamic rupture process. During the interseismic period, the weak seismic and compliant regions slip aseismically, while the strong seismic regions remain locked, evolving into stress concentrations that fail only in main shocks. The weak seismic areas exhibit most of the interseismic activity and aftershocks but can also creep seismically. This "mixed" frictional behavior can be obtained from a sufficiently heterogenous distribution of the critical slip distance. The model also provides a mechanism for rupture arrest: dynamic rupture fronts decelerate as they penetrate into unloaded complaint or weak seismic areas, producing broad areas of accelerated afterslip. Aftershocks occur on both the weak seismic and compliant areas around a fault, but most of the stress is diffused through aseismic slip. Rapid afterslip on these peripheral areas can also produce aftershocks within the main shock rupture area by reloading weak fault areas that slipped in the main shock and then healed. We test this frictional model by comparing the seismicity and the coseismic slip for the 1966 Parkfield, 1979 Coyote Lake, and 1984 Morgan Hill earthquakes. The interevent seismicity and aftershocks appear to occur on fault areas outside the regions of significant slip: these regions are interpreted as either weak seismic or compliant, depending on whether or not they manifest interevent seismicity.

  15. Wall Cooling Effects on Hypersonic Transitional/Turbulent Boundary Layers at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Ralph D.

    1975-01-01

    A 4 degree wedge was used to produce a thick turbulent boundary layer with an edge Mach number of 11. By using a two-dimensional model, the boundary layer was nearly free from upstream history effects associated with nozzle wall turbulent boundary layers. Heat-transfer distributions were used to define regions of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow at several values of T(sub w)/T(sub t) for an edge unit Reynolds number of 0.47 x lot per cm. Pitot and total temperature profiles and skin-friction measurements were obtained at selected stations along the model. Turbulence parameters (mixing length/sigma and epsilon) were derived from the fully turbulent profiles and used to more completely define the "low Reynolds number" effect. Turbulent Prandtl number distributions are also presented.

  16. Turbulent mix experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, G.; Schneider, M.; Frerking, E.

    1995-10-01

    This report is a reproduction of a set of viewgraphs that describes experimental work done to test mathematical models of turbulent mixing and computer codes for simulating it, to quantify turbulent mix scaling laws.

  17. Two-equation turbulence modeling for 3-D hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, J. E.; Coakley, T. J.; Marvin, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation to verify, incorporate and develop two-equation turbulence models for three-dimensional high speed flows is presented. The current design effort of hypersonic vehicles has led to an intensive study of turbulence models for compressible hypersonic flows. This research complements an extensive review of experimental data and the current development of 2D turbulence models. The review of experimental data on 2D and 3D flows includes complex hypersonic flows with pressure profiles, skin friction, wall heat transfer, and turbulence statistics data. In a parallel effort, turbulence models for high speed flows have been tested against flat plate boundary layers, and are being tested against the 2D database. In the present paper, we present the results of 3D Navier-Stokes numerical simulations with an improved k-omega two-equation turbulence model against experimental data and empirical correlations of an adiabatic flat plate boundary layer, a cold wall flat plate boundary layer, and a 3D database flow, the interaction of an oblique shock wave and a thick turbulent boundary layer with a free stream Mach number = 8.18 and Reynolds number = 5 x 10 to the 6th.

  18. Gravito-turbulent disks in three dimensions: Turbulent velocities versus depth

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Ji-Ming; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-07-01

    Characterizing turbulence in protoplanetary disks is crucial for understanding how they accrete and spawn planets. Recent measurements of spectral line broadening promise to diagnose turbulence, with different lines probing different depths. We use three-dimensional local hydrodynamic simulations of cooling, self-gravitating disks to resolve how motions driven by 'gravito-turbulence' vary with height. We find that gravito-turbulence is practically as vigorous at altitude as at depth. Even though gas at altitude is much too rarefied to be itself self-gravitating, it is strongly forced by self-gravitating overdensities at the midplane. The long-range nature of gravity means that turbulent velocities are nearly uniform vertically, increasing by just a factor of two from midplane to surface, even as the density ranges over nearly three orders of magnitude. The insensitivity of gravito-turbulence to height contrasts with the behavior of disks afflicted by the magnetorotational instability (MRI); in the latter case, non-circular velocities increase by at least a factor of 15 from midplane to surface, with various non-ideal effects only magnifying this factor. The distinct vertical profiles of gravito-turbulence versus MRI turbulence may be used in conjunction with measurements of non-thermal linewidths at various depths to identify the source of transport in protoplanetary disks.

  19. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or “pseudotachylytes.” It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  20. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  1. Friction Stir Process Mapping Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kooney, Alex; Bjorkman, Gerry; Russell, Carolyn; Smelser, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In FSW (friction stir welding), the weld process performance for a given weld joint configuration and tool setup is summarized on a 2-D plot of RPM vs. IPM. A process envelope is drawn within the map to identify the range of acceptable welds. The sweet spot is selected as the nominal weld schedule. The nominal weld schedule is characterized in the expected manufacturing environment. The nominal weld schedule in conjunction with process control ensures a consistent and predictable weld performance.

  2. Large-eddy simulations of mean and turbulence dynamics in unsteady Ekman boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momen, Mostafa; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2015-11-01

    Unsteady geostrophic forcing in the atmosphere or ocean not only influences the mean wind, but also affects the turbulent statistics. In order to see when turbulence is in quasi-equilibrium with the mean, one needs to understand how the turbulence decays or develops, and how do the turbulent production, transport and dissipation respond to changes in the imposed forcing. This helps us understand the underlying dynamics of the unsteady boundary layers and develop better turbulence closures for weather/climate models and engineering applications. The present study focuses on the unsteady Ekman boundary layer where pressure gradient, Coriolis, and friction forces interact but are not necessarily in equilibrium. Several cases are simulated using LES to examine how the turbulence and resolved TKE budget terms are modulated by the variability of the mean pressure gradient. We also examine the influence of the forcing variability time-scale on the turbulence equilibrium and TKE budget. It is shown that when the forcing time-scale is in the order of the turbulence characteristic time-scale, the turbulence is no longer in quasi-equilibrium due to highly nonlinear mean-turbulence interactions and hence the conventional log-law and turbulence closures are no longer valid. NSF-PDM under AGS-10266362. Simulations performed at NCAR, and Della server at Princeton University. Cooperative Institute for Climate Science, NOAA-Princeton University under NA08OAR4320752.

  3. Characterization of Turbulent Flows for Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, W. C.; Haire, S. L.

    1998-11-01

    A diagram for the characterization of turbulent flows using the invariants of the mean velocity gradient tensor is introduced. All mean flows, from irrotationally strained flows to shearing flows, to purely rotational flows, can be identified on this diagram. Different flow fields which occupy the same region on the diagram are said to be comprised of the same topological features. The current state of turbulence modeling can be identified on the diagram based on the type of mean flow fields which can be accurately computed. Regions on the diagram can be shown for which current capabilities in turbulence modeling fail to accurately resolve the turbulent structures. Relevant mean field topology is identified for future work in turbulence modeling. Using this analysis, we suggest a number of flows to be computed by DNS or LES and used as testing cases for new models.

  4. Large eddy simulation of controlled transition to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Moin, Parviz

    2012-11-01

    Large eddy simulation of H- and K-type transitions in a spatially developing zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer at Ma∞ = 0.2 is investigated using several subgrid scale (SGS) models including constant coefficient Smagorinsky and Vreman models and their dynamic extensions, dynamic mixed scale-similarity, dynamic one-equation kinetic energy model, and global coefficient Vreman models. A key objective of this study is to assess the capability of SGS models to predict the location of transition and the skin friction throughout the transition process. The constant coefficient models fail to detect transition, but the dynamic procedure allows for a negligible turbulent viscosity in the early transition region. As a result, the "point" of transition is estimated correctly. However, after secondary instabilities set in and result in the overshoot in the skin friction profile, all models fail to produce sufficient subgrid scale shear stress required for the correct prediction of skin friction and the mean velocity profile. The same underprediction of skin friction persists into the turbulent region. Spatially filtered direct numerical simulation data in the same boundary layers are used to provide guidelines for SGS model development and validation.

  5. Hurricane Formation in Diabatic Ekman Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schecter, David; Dunkerton, Timothy

    2008-11-01

    This study numerically examines the evolution of Diabatic Ekman Turbulence (DET) under various conditions. DET is quasi 2D turbulence that is modified by surface friction and parameterized cumulus convection. The self-organization of DET is here simulated in a 3-layer troposphere. In our primary model, winds over the ocean elevate the moist entropy of boundary layer air, whose convergence may then generate deep convection. After an incubation period, the influence of deep convection can supercede ideal 2D processes such as vortex merger. A strong cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry can develop, with relatively intense cyclones dominating the system. ``Hurricanes'' form at sufficiently high values of the sea-surface temperature (SST), the Coriolis parameter, and the surface-exchange coefficient for moist entropy CE. Increasing the momentum exchange coefficient CD shortens the incubation period, but decelerates the subsequent intensification of an emerging hurricane. Increasing CE or the SST accelerates all stages of hurricane genesis. As in more complex models, DET hurricanes can exhibit mesovortices and eyewall cycles. Moreover, their intensities increase with the SST and the ratio CE/CD. In some regions of parameter space, low-level noise can evolve into a hurricane or a synoptic scale circulation. The effects of using different representations of cumulus convection or surface friction will be discussed. Supported by NSF-ATM-0750660.

  6. The effect of surface friction on the development of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Juan; Tang, Jianping; Wu, Rongsheng

    2009-11-01

    When tropical cyclones (hereafter referred as TCs) are over the ocean, surface friction plays a dual role in the development of TCs. From the viewpoint of water vapor supply, frictional convergence and Ekman pumping provide a source of moisture for organized cumulus convection and is propitious to the spin-up of TCs. On the other hand, surface friction leads to a dissipation of kinetic energy that impedes the intensification of TCs. Which role is dominant in the developing stage of TCs is a controversial issue. In the present work, the influence of surface friction on the growth of TCs is re-examined in detail by conducting two sets of numerical experiments initialized with different cyclonic disturbances. Results indicate that, because of the inherent complexities of TCs, the impact of surface friction on the evolution of TCs can not be simply boiled down to being positive or negative. In the case that a TC starts from a low-level vortex with a warm core, surface friction and the resultant vertical motion makes an important contribution to the convection in the early developing stage of the TC by accelerating the build-up of convective available potential energy (CAPE) and ensuring moisture supply and the lifting of air parcels. This effect is so prominent that it dominates the friction-induced dissipation and makes surface friction a facilitative factor in the spin-up of the TC. However, for a TC formed from a mesoscale convective vortex (MCV) spawned in a long-lasting mesoscale convective system (MCS), the initial fields, and especially the low-level humidity and cold core, enable the prerequisites of convection (i.e., conditional instability, moisture, and lifting), to be easily achieved even without the help of boundary-layer pumping induced by surface friction. Accordingly, the reliance of the development of TCs on surface friction is not as heavy as that derived from a lowlevel vortex. The positive effect of surface friction on the development of TCs realized through facilitating favorable conditions for convection is nearly cancelled out by the friction-induced dissipation. However, as SST is enhanced in the latter case, the situation may be changed, and different development speeds may emerge between model TCs with and without surface friction considered. In short, owing to the fact that TC development is a complicated process affected by many factors such as initial perturbations, SST, etc., the importance of surface friction to the intensification of TCs may vary enormously from case to case.

  7. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Bares, Jonathan; Dijksman, Joshua; Ren, Jie; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient μ ~ 0 . 6. Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how changing friction affects shear jamming. By applying a homogeneous simple shear, we study the effect of friction by using photoelastic disks either wrapped with Teflon to reduce friction or with fine teeth on the edge to increase friction. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger fluctuations due to initial configurations both at the lowest and the highest friction systems studied. Ongoing work is to characterize response from different friction systems under shear with information at local scale. We acknowledge support from NSF-DMR1206351, NASA NNX15AD38G and W.M. Keck Foundation.

  8. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Bares, Jonathan; Dijksman, Joshua; Ren, Jie; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient μ ~ 0 . 6 (Bi et al. Nature (2011)). Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how changing friction affects shear jamming. By applying a homogeneous simple shear, we study the effect of friction by using photoelastic disks either wrapped with Teflon to reduce friction or with fine teeth on the edge to increase friction. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger fluctuations due to initial configurations both at the lowest and the highest friction systems studied. Ongoing work is to use particles made of gelatin to reduce the friction coefficient to the order of 0.01. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant DMR1206351, NASA Grant NNX15AD38G and the William M. Keck Foundation.

  9. Turbulent drag reduction by the seal fur surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Motoyuki; Tamano, Shinji; Iguchi, Ryo; Yokota, Kazuhiko; Akino, Norio; Hino, Ryutaro; Kubo, Shinji

    2006-06-01

    The drag-reducing ability of the seal fur surface was tested in a rectangular channel flow using water and a glycerol-water mixture to measure the pressure drop along the channel in order to evaluate friction factors in a wide range of Reynolds number conditions, and the drag reduction effect was confirmed quantitatively. The maximum reduction ratio was evaluated to be 12% for the glycerol-water mixture. The effective range of the Reynolds number, where the drag reduction was remarkable, was wider for the seal fur surface compared to that of a riblet surface measured in this channel and in previous studies. It was also found that for the seal fur surface, unlike riblets, any drag increase due to the effect of surface roughness was not found up to the highest Reynolds number tested. Measurements of the seal fur surface using a 3D laser microscope revealed that there were riblet-like grooves, composed of arranged fibers, of which spacings were comparable to that of effective riblets and were distributed in various wavelengths. Using LDV measurements, it was found that the difference in the mean velocity scaled by the outer variable among the smooth, riblet, and seal fur surfaces did not appear at any spanwise locations. Streamwise turbulence intensity for the seal fur surface was found to be about 5% smaller than those for smooth and riblet surfaces.

  10. Turbulent-Laminar Patterns in Pipes and Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkley, Dwight

    2010-03-01

    When fluid flows through a channel, pipe, or duct, there are two basic forms of motion: smooth laminar motion and complex turbulent motion. The discontinuous transition between these states is a fundamental problem that has been studied for more than 100 years. What has received far less attention is the large-scale nature of the turbulent flows near transition once they are established. We have carried out extensive numerical computations in pipes and channels to investigate the nature of transitional turbulence in these flow. We show the existence of three fundamentally different turbulent states separated by two distinct Reynolds numbers. In the case of pipe flow for example, below Re approximately 2200, turbulence takes the form of familiar equilibrium (or long-time transient) puffs. The turbulence is intensive -- puffs are localized and the ratio of turbulent to laminar flow is not dictated by system size but by factors such as initial conditions. At Re=2200 the flow makes a striking transition to extensive turbulence where the amount of turbulent flow scales with pipe length. The asymptotic state is an irregular (intermittent) alternation of turbulent and laminar flow whose complexity is inherent and does not result from random initial disturbances. Intermittency continues until Re=2500 where the intermittency factor, and other measures, reveal a continuous transition to a state of uniform turbulence along the pipe. We argue that these states are a manifestation of universal large-scale structures in transitional shear flows.

  11. Introduction to quantum turbulence.

    PubMed

    Barenghi, Carlo F; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2014-03-25

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  12. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2012-07-13

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  13. Astrophysical Hydromagnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, A.; Lazarian, A.

    Recent progress in astrophysical hydromagnetic turbulence is being reviewed. The physical ideas behind the now widely accepted Goldreich-Sridhar model and its extension to compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are introduced. Implications for cosmic ray diffusion and acceleration is being discussed. Dynamo-generated magnetic fields with and without helicity are contrasted against each other. Certain turbulent transport processes are being modified and often suppressed by anisotropy and inhomogeneities of the turbulence, while others are being produced by such properties, which can lead to new large-scale instabilities of the turbulent medium. Applications of various such processes to astrophysical systems are being considered.

  14. Astrophysical Hydromagnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, A.; Lazarian, A.

    2013-10-01

    Recent progress in astrophysical hydromagnetic turbulence is being reviewed. The physical ideas behind the now widely accepted Goldreich-Sridhar model and its extension to compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are introduced. Implications for cosmic ray diffusion and acceleration is being discussed. Dynamo-generated magnetic fields with and without helicity are contrasted against each other. Certain turbulent transport processes are being modified and often suppressed by anisotropy and inhomogeneities of the turbulence, while others are being produced by such properties, which can lead to new large-scale instabilities of the turbulent medium. Applications of various such processes to astrophysical systems are being considered.

  15. Introduction to quantum turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  16. Application of Navier-Stokes code PAB3D with kappa-epsilon turbulence model to attached and separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Lakshmanan, B.; Carlson, John R.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver was used to determine how accurately computations can predict local and average skin friction coefficients for attached and separated flows for simple experimental geometries. Algebraic and transport equation closures were used to model turbulence. To simulate anisotropic turbulence, the standard two-equation turbulence model was modified by adding nonlinear terms. The effects of both grid density and the turbulence model on the computed flow fields were also investigated and compared with available experimental data for subsonic and supersonic free-stream conditions.

  17. An Assessment of Oil Film Interferometry to Measure Skin Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkewitz, Peter A.; Segalini, Antonio; Rüedi, Jean-Daniel

    2010-11-01

    In recent years, the independent measurement of wall shear stress with oil film interferometry has led to a step increase in the understanding of turbulent boundary layers. However, while many arguments depend critically on a precise knowledge of the skin friction, the systematic errors of the oil film technique are not well known. In particular the basic theory underlying the technique has essentially not evolved since it was first proposed by Tanner & Blows (J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum., vol. 9, 1976, p. 194). The purpose of this study is to elucidate the dominant systematic error of the classical oil film method. We derive the corrections to the basic Tanner & Blows similarity solution for the film development in zero pressure gradient boundary layers and validate the analysis experimentally. This allows to formulate "best practice guidelines" for the oil film technique that help push uncertainties below 1%.

  18. Education in an Age of Social Turbulence (A Roundtable)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The latest scheduled Sorokin Readings on "Global Social Turbulence and Russia," a topic whose relevance has been confirmed by events of the past 10 years, were held on 6-7 December at Moscow State University. One key factor that keeps such turbulence in check is the education level as a factor of a high standard of living. The array of problems in…

  19. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A. H.; Flores-Johnson, E. A.; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  20. Friction Anisotropy with Respect to Topographic Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chengjiao; Wang, Q. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Friction characteristics with respect to surface topographic orientation were investigated using surfaces of different materials and fabricated with grooves of different scales. Scratching friction tests were conducted using a nano-indentation-scratching system with the tip motion parallel or perpendicular to the groove orientation. Similar friction anisotropy trends were observed for all the surfaces studied, which are (1) under a light load and for surfaces with narrow grooves, the tip motion parallel to the grooves offers higher friction coefficients than does that perpendicular to them, (2) otherwise, equal or lower friction coefficients are found under this motion. The influences of groove size relative to the diameter of the mating tip (as a representative asperity), surface contact stiffness, contact area, and the characteristic stiction length are discussed. The appearance of this friction anisotropy is independent of material; however, the boundary and the point of trend transition depend on material properties. PMID:23248751

  1. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    PubMed Central

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers. PMID:23934227

  2. Friction Forces during Sliding of Various Brackets for Malaligned Teeth: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Balsamo, Antonio; Serpico, Vitaliano; Chiatante, Francesco; Pappalettere, Carmine; Boccaccio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To measure the friction force generated during sliding mechanics with conventional, self-ligating (Damon 3 mx, Smart Clip, and Time 3) and low-friction (Synergy) brackets using different archwire diameters and ligating systems in the presence of apical and buccal malalignments of the canine. Methods. An experimental setup reproducing the right buccal segment of the maxillary arch was designed to measure the friction force generated at the bracket/wire and wire/ligature interfaces of different brackets. A complete factorial plan was drawn up and a three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate whether the following factors affect the values of friction force: (i) degree of malalignment, (ii) diameter of the orthodontic wire, and (iii) bracket/ligature combination. Tukey post hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant differences between the bracket/ligature combinations analyzed. Results. ANOVA showed that all the above factors affect the friction force values. The friction force released during sliding mechanics with conventional brackets is about 5-6times higher than that released with the other investigated brackets. A quasilinear increase of the frictional forces was observed for increasing amounts of apical and buccal malalignments. Conclusion. The Synergy bracket with silicone ligature placed around the inner tie-wings appears to yield the best performance. PMID:23533364

  3. Skin friction fields on delta wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodiga, S. A.; Liu, Tianshu

    2009-12-01

    The normalized skin friction fields on a 65° delta wing and a 76°/40° double-delta wing are measured by using a global luminescent oil-film skin friction meter. The detailed topological structures of skin friction fields on the wings are revealed for different angles of attack and the important features are detected such as reattachment lines, secondary separation lines, vortex bursting and vortex interaction. The comparisons with the existing flow visualization results are discussed.

  4. Investigation of squeal noise under positive friction characteristics condition provided by friction modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaogang; Meehan, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Field application of friction modifiers on the top of rail has been shown to effectively curb squeal and reduce lateral forces, but performance can be variable, according to other relevant research. Up to now, most investigations of friction modifiers were conducted in the field, where it is difficult to control or measure important parameters such as angle of attack, rolling speed, adhesion ratio etc. In the present investigation, the effect of different friction modifiers on the occurrence of squeal was investigated on a rolling contact two disk test rig. In particular, friction-creep curves and squeal sound pressure levels were measured under different rolling speeds and friction modifiers. The results show friction modifiers can eliminate or reduce the negative slope of friction-creep curves, but squeal noise still exists. Theoretical modelling of instantaneous creep behaviours reveals a possible reason why wheel squeal still exists after the application of friction modifiers.

  5. Turbulent boundary layers: Inflow effects and cross-validation of simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerlue, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2011-11-01

    A recent assessment of available direct numerical simulation (DNS) data from turbulent boundary layer flows [Schlatter & Örlü, J. Fluid Mech. 659, 116 (2010)] showed surprisingly large differences not only in the skin friction coefficient or shape factor, but also in their predictions of mean and fluctuation profiles far into the sublayer. Several DNS of a zero pressure-gradient (ZPG) turbulent boundary layer (TBL) à la Schlatter et al. [Phys. Fluids 21, 051702 (2009)] with physically different inflow conditions and tripping effects were performed. Most of the differences observed when comparing available DNS could thereby be traced back to different initial conditions. It was also found, that if transition is initiated at a low enough Reynolds number (based on the momentum-loss thickness) Reθ < 300, all data agree well for both inner and outer layer for Reθ > 2000 a result that gives a lower limit for meaningful comparisons between numerical and/or wind tunnel experiments. Based on these results a detailed comparison between DNS and experiment of a ZPG TBL flow at Reθ = 2500 and 4000 is presented. Good agreement is obtained for integral quantities, mean and fluctuating streamwise velocity profiles, but also for the probability distribution and spectral map throughout the boundary layer.

  6. Computer modeling of granular and two-phase turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianfa

    This thesis focuses on developing a computational model for analyzing rapid granular and turbulent two-phase flows in various regions. In this work, a computational scheme for simulating dry frictional granular chute flows is developed. A kinetic-based model which includes the frictional energy loss effects is used, and the boundary conditions for a bumpy wall with small friction are derived by ensuring the balance of momentum and energy. At the free surface, the condition of vanishing solid volume fraction is used. The mean velocity, the fluctuation kinetic energy and the solid volume fraction profiles are evaluated. It is shown that steady granular gravity flow down a bumpy frictional chute could be achieved at arbitrary inclination angles. The computational results also show that the slip velocity may vary considerably depending on the granular layer height, the surface boundary roughness, the friction coefficient and the inclination angles. A small friction coefficient and a smooth wall lead to a region of low density and high fluctuation energy in the neighborhood of the wall. For high friction coefficients and rough walls, the solid volume fraction increases monotonically up to the wall, while a region of low fluctuation energy is formed near the solid surface. The model predictions are compared with the existing experimental and simulation data, and good agreement is observed. In particular, the model can well predictate the features of the variation of solid volume fraction and fluctuation energy profiles for different particle-wall friction and restitution coefficients and wall roughness. Two-phase gas-particle turbulent flows at various loadings in vertical, horizontal and inclined channels and in a vertical pipe are also analyzed. Thermodynamically consistent two- phase turbulent flow models that account for the particle-particle collisions and the phasic fluctuation kinetic energy interactions are used, and a computational model for analyzing dilute and dense turbulent flows in ducts is developed. The governing equations for the gas-phase turbulence are upgraded to a two-equation low Reynolds number turbulence closure model that can be integrated directly to the wall. Two specific models are used in the analysis. The first model is isotropic and the equations governing the phasic fluctuation kinetic energy and dissipation rates resemble the extended k-ɛ type turbulence model. The second model is rate-dependent and anisotropic that allows capturing the anisotropy of particulate and fluid phase turbulent stresses. A no-slip boundary condition for the fluid phase and slip velocity boundary condition for the particle phase are used in both cases. The computational model is first applied to dilute gas- particle turbulent flows. The predicted mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles are compared with various experimental data, and good agreement is observed. Examples of additional flow properties such as the phasic fluctuation energy, phasic fluctuation energy production and dissipation, as well as interaction momentum and energy supply terms are also presented and discussed. Application of the model to relatively dense gas-particle turbulent flows are also described. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data of Miller and Gidaspow and reasonable agreement is observed. It is shown that flow behavior is strongly affected by the phasic fluctuation energy, and the momentum and energy transfer between the particulate and the fluid constituents. For aerosol particles, a new two-fluid model for evaluating the particle deposition velocity in turbulent channel flows is described. The rate-dependent model is first used to calculate the components of particle turbulence intensities for gas-particle turbulent flows in a vertical channel. Then the model of Reeks (1983) and Guha (1997) is used for evaluating the particle wall deposition rates. Variations of particle deposition velocity with particle relaxation time are evaluated and the results are compared with the available experimental data and earlier Lagrangian simulation results. Finally, a generalized thermodynamics for chemically active multiphase solid-fluid mixtures in a turbulent state of motion is formulated. The global equations of balance for each phase are ensemble averaged and the local conservation laws for the mean motions are derived. The thermodynamics of chemically active turbulent mixture flows is studied. Based on the averaged entropy inequality, constitutive equations for the stresses, energy, heat and mass fluxes of various species are developed. The explicit governing equations of motion are derived and discussed.

  7. Coupling between roughness and freestream acceleration in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Junlin; Piomelli, Ugo

    2015-11-01

    To explain various rough-wall flow responses to different types of free-stream conditions previously observed, we carried out a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer with freestream acceleration. Unlike the equilibrium (self-similar) accelerating scenario, where a strong acceleration leads to complete laminarization and lower friction, in the present non-equilibrium case the friction coefficient increases with acceleration, due to the faster near-wall acceleration than that of the freestream. At the same time, roughness reduces the near-wall time scale of the turbulence, preventing the acceleration from linearly stretching the near-wall eddies and freezing the turbulence intensity as in the smooth case. In addition, acceleration leads to similar decrease of mean-velocity logarithmic slope on rough and smooth walls; this allows a clear definition of the roughness function in a local sense. Interestingly, this roughness function correlates with the roughness Reynolds number in the same way as in self-similar or non-accelerating flows. This study may also help develop benchmark cases for evaluating rough-wall treatments for industrial turbulence models.

  8. Friction, Wear, and Surface Damage of Metals as Affected by Solid Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Edmond E; Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Godfrey, Douglas

    1956-01-01

    As predicted by friction theory, experiments showed that friction and surface damage of metals can be reduced by solid surface films. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding was a very important factor in wear of dry and boundary lubricated surfaces. Films of graphitic carbon on cast irons, nio on nickel alloys, and feo and fe sub 3 o sub 4 on ferrous materials were found to be beneficial. Abrasive films such as fe sub 2 o sub 3 or moo sub 3 were definitely detrimental. It appears that the importance of oxide films to friction and wear processes has not been fully appreciated.

  9. Measurement of Gear Tooth Dynamic Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic friction forces at the gear tooth contact were undertaken using strain gages at the root fillets of two successive teeth. Results are presented from two gear sets over a range of speeds and loads. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient does not appear to be significantly influenced by the sliding reversal at the pitch point, and that the friction coefficient values found are in accord with those in general use. The friction coefficient was found to increase at low sliding speeds. This agrees with the results of disc machine testing.

  10. Rolling friction on a wheeled laboratory cart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-05-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of rolling friction is contrasted with the static or kinetic friction that in general is also present, such as for a cylinder or ball rolling along a horizontal or inclined surface.

  11. Friction compensation strategies in large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David R.; Souccar, Kamal

    2010-07-01

    For large telescopes, management of axis friction presents a significant challenge. In some cases, this is avoided or minimized in the design stage by employing hydrostatic bearings. However, the main axis servo systems of many large telescopes must cope with bearing or wheel friction. This friction affects or limits servo control performance in several ways. The most obvious is the stick-slip limit cycle that is characteristic of trying to hold position with an integrating control system in the presence of friction. If it is not taken into account, friction also introduces effects into the state estimation in model-based controllers. There are several standard approaches to friction compensation. These include dithering (introducing a noise signal to the drive motors), direct Coulomb friction compensation (sending an additional torque based on the rate command), and adaptive techniques based on monitoring of the final drive velocities. In this work, we experimentally compare different friction compensation approaches on the static positioning performance of the Large Millimeter Telescope/Gran Telescopio Milimetrico (LMT). Single and double integrator systems are investigated, as well as direct Coulomb friction compensation.

  12. Friction Forces in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, D.; Gregoris, D.; Rosquist, K.

    2015-01-01

    Friction forces play an important role in a wide class of phenomena both in the contexts of classical mechanics and general relativity. This paper discusses the Poynting-Robertson approach to the description of the motion of a massive test particle inside a perfect fluid undergoing dissipative effects in curved space. Specific cases of motions 1) inside a photon gas near a Schwarzschild black hole; 2) inside a photon gas in the Tolman metric are then discussed with applications to models of accretion disks of a black hole and to motion inside a static radiation dominated Universe.

  13. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  14. Friction and wear characteristics of polymer-matrix friction materials reinforced by brass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Jia; Xiaomei, Ling

    2004-10-01

    This study is an investigation of friction materials reinforced by brass fibers, and the influence of the organic adhesion agent, cast-iron debris, brass fiber, and graphite powder on the friction-wear characteristics. Friction and wear testing was performed on a block-on-ring tribometer (MM200). The friction pair consisted of the friction materials and gray cast iron (HT200). The worn surface layers formed by sliding dry friction were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray energy-dispersive analysis (EDX), and differential thermal analysis-thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TAG). The experimental results showed that the friction coefficient and the wear loss of the friction materials increased with the increase of cast-iron debris, but decreased with the increase of graphite powder content. The friction coefficient and wear loss also increased slightly when the mass fraction of brass fibers was over 19%. When the mass fraction of organic adhesion agent was about 10 11%, the friction materials had excellent friction-wear performance. Surface heating from friction pyrolyzes the organic ingredient in the worn surface layer of the friction materials, with the pyrolysis depth being about 0.5 mm. The surface layers were rich in iron but poor in copper, and they were formed on the worn surface of the friction material. When the mass fraction of brass fibers was about 16 20%, the friction materials possessed better wear resistance and a copper transfer film formed on the friction surface of counterpart. Fatigue cracks were also found in the worn surface of the gray cast-iron counterpart, with fatigue wear being the prevailing wear mechanism.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of friction and wear in hip simulators.

    PubMed

    Haider, Hani; Weisenburger, Joel N; Garvin, Kevin L

    2016-05-01

    We propose and have evaluated a method to measure hip friction during wear testing on a popular multi-station hip simulator. A 6-degree-of-freedom load cell underneath the specimen sensed forces and torques during implant wear testing of simulated walking. This included internal-external and adduction-abduction rotations which are often neglected during friction testing on pendulum-type machines. Robust mathematical analysis and data processing provided friction estimates in three simultaneous orthogonal rotations, over extended multi-million cycle wear tests. We tested various bearing couples including metal-on-plastic, ceramic-on-plastic, and metal-on-metal material couples. In one test series, new and intentionally scratched CoCrMo 40-mm-diameter femoral heads were tested against conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, highly cross-linked, and highly cross-linked with vitamin E versions. The scratching significantly increased friction and doubled the wear of all groups. Before scratching, friction levels for the aforementioned plastic groups were 0.056 ± 0.0060, 0.062 ± 0.0080, and 0.070 ± 0.0045, respectively, but after scratching increased to 0.088 ± 0.018, 0.076 ± 0.0066, and 0.082 ± 0.0049, respectively, all statistically significant increases (p = 0.00059, 0.00005, 0.0115, respectively). In another test series of 44-mm femoral head diameter hips, metal-on-plastic hips with conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene showed the lowest friction at 0.045 ± 0.0085, followed by highly cross-linked with 0.046 ± 0.0035 (not significantly different). In a ceramic-on-plastic design with conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, higher friction 0.079 ± 0.0070 was measured likely due to that ceramic surface being rougher than usual. Metal-on-metal hips were compared without and with a TiN coating, resulting in 0.049 ± 0.014 and 0.097 ± 0.020 friction factors, respectively (statistically significant, p < 0.001), and the coating wore away on all coated hips eventually. Higher friction mostly correlated with higher wear or damage to femoral heads or implant coatings, except for the highly cross-linked wear resistant ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene which had slightly higher friction, confirming the same finding in other independent studies. This type of friction measurements can help screen for clamping and elevated wear of metal-on-metal and resurfacing total hip replacements, surgical malpositioning, and abraded and otherwise damaged surfaces. PMID:27160558

  16. Response of wind shear warning systems to turbulence with implication of nuisance alerts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Roland L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to predict the inherent turbulence response characteristics of candidate wind shear warning system concepts and to assess the potential for nuisance alerts. Information on the detection system and associated signal processing, physical and mathematical models, wind shear factor root mean square turbulence response and the standard deviation of the wind shear factor due to turbulence is given in vugraph form.

  17. Turbulence in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannou, Petros; Farrell, Brian

    2013-04-01

    A survey of the solar system reveals a variety of turbulent regimes in the large scale circulation of planetary atmospheres. These regimes include convectively forced turbulence in Jupiter's atmosphere and self maintained baroclinic turbulence in the Earth's midlatitude atmosphere. A general theory of turbulent equilibria, Stochastic Structural Stability Theory (SSST), and its expression in mechanistic models for the maintenance of statistically steady turbulent states in planetary atmospheres will be described and applied to obtain the turbulent equilibria that determine the general circulation of Jupiter's atmosphere and of the Earth's midlatitude atmosphere. Among the phenomena explained by the statistically steady fixed points of the SSST system are spontaneous self organization of turbulent flows into large spatial scale jets; geophysical examples of which include the Jovian banded winds and the Earth's polar front jet. The theory reveals the existence of a manifold of nonlinear equilibria in planetary turbulence corresponding to different climate regimes. Also explained is emergence of marginally stable, highly non-normal equilibria in baroclinic turbulence. These states characterize both observations and simulations of strongly turbulent baroclinic flows and are referred to generically as baroclinically adjusted states. The baroclinically adjusted state is revealed to be not simply a marginally stable state but to have the structure of a specific fixed point equilibrium. In addition it will be shown that these equilibria naturally imply power law relations such as that between heat flux and temperature gradient.

  18. Prediction of High-Lift Flows using Turbulent Closure Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Gatski, Thomas B.; Ying, Susan X.; Bertelrud, Arild

    1997-01-01

    The flow over two different multi-element airfoil configurations is computed using linear eddy viscosity turbulence models and a nonlinear explicit algebraic stress model. A subset of recently-measured transition locations using hot film on a McDonnell Douglas configuration is presented, and the effect of transition location on the computed solutions is explored. Deficiencies in wake profile computations are found to be attributable in large part to poor boundary layer prediction on the generating element, and not necessarily inadequate turbulence modeling in the wake. Using measured transition locations for the main element improves the prediction of its boundary layer thickness, skin friction, and wake profile shape. However, using measured transition locations on the slat still yields poor slat wake predictions. The computation of the slat flow field represents a key roadblock to successful predictions of multi-element flows. In general, the nonlinear explicit algebraic stress turbulence model gives very similar results to the linear eddy viscosity models.

  19. Large scale motions of thermal transport in a turbulent channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmarathne, Suranga; Tutkun, Murat; Araya, Guillermo; Leonardi, Stefano; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    The importance of large scale motions (LSMs) on thermal transport in a turbulent channel flow at friction number of 394 is investigated. Two-point correlation analysis reveals that LSM which significantly contribute to turbulence kinetic energy and scalar transport is a reminiscent of a hairpin packet. Low-order mode representation of the original fields using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) unveils that the most dominant mode that transports is 3-4 channel half-heights long and such structure which contribute to scalar transport is 2-4 channel half-heights long. Consequently, the study discloses that LSMs are effective in transporting both streamwise component of turbulence kinetic energy and scalar variances.

  20. Turbulent drag reduction over air- and liquid- impregnated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Brian J.; Van Buren, Tyler; Fu, Matthew K.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    Results on turbulent skin friction reduction over air- and liquid-impregnated surfaces are presented for aqueous Taylor-Couette flow. The surfaces are fabricated by mechanically texturing the inner cylinder and chemically modifying the features to make them either non-wetting with respect to water (air-infused, or superhydrophobic case), or wetting with respect to an oil that is immiscible with water (liquid-infused case). The drag reduction, which remains fairly constant over the Reynolds number range tested (100 ≤ Reτ ≤ 140), is approximately 10% for the superhydrophobic surface and 14% for the best liquid-infused surface. Our results suggest that liquid-infused surfaces may enable robust drag reduction in high Reynolds number turbulent flows without the shortcomings associated with conventional superhydrophobic surfaces, namely, failure under conditions of high hydrodynamic pressure and turbulent flow fluctuations.

  1. Turbulent boundary-layer control with spanwise travelling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Choi, Kwing-So

    2011-12-01

    It has been demonstrated through numerical simulations using Lorentz forcing that spanwise travelling waves on turbulent wall flows can lead to a skin-friction drag reduction on the order of 30%. As an aeronautical application of this innovative flow control technique, we have investigated into the use of Dielectric-Barrier-Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to generate spanwise travelling waves in air. The near-wall structures modified by the spanwise travelling waves were studied using the PIV technique in a wind tunnel, while the associated turbulence statistics were carefully documented using hot-wire anemometry. We observed the spreading of low-speed fluid by the spanwise travelling streamwise vortices, which seems to have greatly attenuated the turbulence production process. This is very much in line with the finding of DNS studies, where wide low-speed ribbons replaced the low-speed streaks.

  2. Scaling properties of turbulence driven shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Muller, S. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-01-15

    The characteristics and scaling properties of the turbulence driven shear flow are investigated in a cylindrical laboratory plasma device. For a given plasma pressure, the density fluctuation amplitude and radial particle flux increase with the applied magnetic field. Strong flow shear is found to coexist at high magnetic fields (>700 G) with approx10 kHz drift wave turbulence, but not at low magnetic fields (<700 G). The absolute value of the divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress at the shear layer is shown to increase with the magnetic field as well. For a fixed magnetic field, the shear flow is found to decrease as the discharge gas pressure is increased. The density fluctuation amplitude and divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress also decrease with the plasma pressure. For both situations the cross phase between the radial and azimuthal components of the velocity is found to be a key factor to determine variations in the turbulent Reynolds stress at different magnetic fields and discharge pressures. The results show that the generation of the shear flow is related to the development of specific frequency components of the drift wave turbulence for a variety of plasma conditions. The linear stability analysis shows that the observed variation in the turbulence and shear flow with magnetic field is also consistent with a critical gradient behavior.

  3. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2001-12-14

    In this paper we study the behavior of a premixed turbulent methane flame in three dimensions using numerical simulation. The simulations are performed using an adaptive time-dependent low Mach number combustion algorithm based on a second-order projection formulation that conserves both species mass and total enthalpy. The species and enthalpy equations are treated using an operator-split approach that incorporates stiff integration techniques for modeling detailed chemical kinetics. The methodology also incorporates a mixture model for differential diffusion. For the simulations presented here, methane chemistry and transport are modeled using the DRM-19 (19-species, 84-reaction) mechanism derived from the GRIMech-1.2 mechanism along with its associated thermodynamics and transport databases. We consider a lean flame with equivalence ratio 0.8 for two different levels of turbulent intensity. For each case we examine the basic structure of the flame including turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The results indicate that flame wrinkling is the dominant factor leading to the increased turbulent flame speed. Joint probability distributions are computed to establish a correlation between heat release and curvature. We also investigate the effect of turbulent flame interaction on the flame chemistry. We identify specific flame intermediates that are sensitive to turbulence and explore various correlations between these species and local flame curvature. We identify different mechanisms by which turbulence modulates the chemistry of the flame.

  4. TURBULENCE EFFECTS ON THE CHARGE CAPTURE PROCESS IN WEAK TURBULENT PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Sang-Chul; Jung, Young-Dae

    2009-12-10

    The turbulence effects on the charge capture process are investigated in weak turbulent plasmas. The effective interaction potential taking into account the correction factor to the nonlinear dielectric function due to the fluctuation of the electric fields and Bohr-Lindhard model are employed in order to obtain the electron capture radius and electron capture cross section in turbulent plasmas. It is shown that the influence of the fluctuating electric fields in the plasma considerably decreases the electron charge capture radius and electron capture probability. Hence, we have found that the turbulence effect strongly suppresses the electron capture cross section in weak turbulent plasmas. In addition, it is found that the electron capture radius and electron cross section decrease with an increase of the projectile energy.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seonghyeon; Je, Jongdoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this study are to suggest a proper boundary condition at the interface between a permeable block and turbulent channel flow and to investigate the characteristics of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls. The boundary condition suggested is an extended version of that applied to laminar channel flow by Beavers & Joseph (1967) and describes the behaviour of slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the permeable block and turbulent channel flow. With the proposed boundary condition, direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow that is bounded by the permeable wall are performed and significant skin-friction reductions at the permeable wall are obtained with modification of overall flow structures. The viscous sublayer thickness is decreased and the near-wall vortical structures are significantly weakened by the permeable wall. The permeable wall also reduces the turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress, and pressure and vorticity fluctuations throughout the channel except very near the wall. The increase of some turbulence quantities there is due to the slip-velocity fluctuations at the wall. The boundary condition proposed for the permeable wall is validated by comparing solutions with those obtained from a separate direct numerical simulation using both the Brinkman equation for the interior of a permeable block and the Navier Stokes equation for the main channel bounded by a permeable block.

  6. Turbulence Structure in Rough and Smooth Wall Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen

    2006-11-01

    The outer region structure of turbulent boundary layers on smooth and rough walls was studied experimentally. Turbulence spectra were computed from LDV data. Velocity fields were computed from PIV data. Instantaneous swirl strength fields were computed from the velocity fields. The heads of hairpin vortices grouped as packets were visible in the streamwise wall normal plane, and the legs of these vortices were visible along the length of low speed streaks in streamwise spanwise planes at y/δ=0.1 and 0.4. These structures, observed previously in smooth wall boundary layers, were qualitatively similar in the rough and smooth wall cases. Two point correlations of the velocity and swirl strength were quantitatively similar for the smooth and rough walls. The turbulence spectra and probability density functions of the turbulence and swirl strength also showed quantitative similarity between the rough and smooth wall cases when the results were normalized using the friction velocity and the boundary layer thickness. This similarity in turbulence structure is in agreement with the similarity in turbulence statistics reported previously.

  7. Quantum Friction in Different Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, Juliane; Buhmann, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Quantum friction is the velocity-dependent force between two polarizable objects in relative motion, resulting from field-fluctuation mediated transfer of energy and momentum between them. Due to its short-ranged nature it has proven difficult to observe experimentally. Theoretical attempts to determine the precise velocity-dependence of the quantum drag experienced by a polarizable atom moving parallel to a surface arrive at contradicting results. Scheel and Barton predict a force linear in relative velocity v - the former using the quantum regression theorem and the latter employing time-dependent perturbation theory. Intravaia, however, predicts a v3 power-law starting from a non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In order to learn where exactly the above approaches part, we set out to perform all three calculations within one and the same framework: macroscopic QED. In addition, we include contributions to quantum friction from Doppler shift and Röntgen interaction, which play a role for perpendicular motion and retarded distances, respectively, and consider non-stationary states of atom and field. DFG Emmy-Noether Program.

  8. Comparison of Frictional Heating Models

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Nicholas R; Blau, Peter Julian

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the predicted temperature rises using four well-known models for frictional heating under a few selected conditions in which similar variable inputs are provided to each model. Classic papers by Archard, Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, Lim and Ashby, and Rabinowicz have been examined, and a spreadsheet (Excel ) was developed to facilitate the calculations. This report may be used in conjunction with that spreadsheet. It explains the background, assumptions, and rationale used for the calculations. Calculated flash temperatures for selected material combinations, under a range of applied loads and sliding speeds, are tabulated. The materials include AISI 52100 bearing steel, CDA 932 bronze, NBD 200 silicon nitride, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and carbon-graphite material. Due to the assumptions made by the different models, and the direct way in which certain assumed quantities, like heat sink distances or asperity dimensions, enter into the calculations, frictional hearing results may differ significantly; however, they can be similar in certain cases in light of certain assumptions that are shared between the models.

  9. Kozai Cycles and Tidal Friction

    SciTech Connect

    L, K; P.P., E

    2009-07-17

    Several studies in the last three years indicate that close binaries, i.e. those with periods of {approx}< 3 d, are very commonly found to have a third body in attendance. We argue that this proves that the third body is necessary in order to make the inner period so short, and further argue that the only reasonable explanation is that the third body causes shrinkage of the inner period, from perhaps a week or more to the current short period, by means of the combination of Kozai cycles and tidal friction (KCTF). In addition, once KCTF has produced a rather close binary, magnetic braking also combined with tidal friction (MBTF) can decrease the inner orbit further, to the formation of a contact binary or even a merged single star. Some of the products of KCTF that have been suggested, either by others or by us, are W UMa binaries, Blue Stragglers, X-ray active BY Dra stars, and short-period Algols. We also argue that some components of wide binaries are actually merged remnants of former close inner pairs. This may include such objects as rapidly rotating dwarfs (AB Dor, BO Mic) and some (but not all) Be stars.

  10. Frictional behavior of large displacement experimental faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Blanpied, M.L.; Weeks, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The coefficient of friction and velocity dependence of friction of initially bare surfaces and 1-mm-thick simulated fault gouges (400 mm at 25??C and 25 MPa normal stress. Steady state negative friction velocity dependence and a steady state fault zone microstructure are achieved after ???18 mm displacement, and an approximately constant strength is reached after a few tens of millimeters of sliding on initially bare surfaces. Simulated fault gouges show a large but systematic variation of friction, velocity dependence of friction, dilatancy, and degree of localization with displacement. At short displacement (<10 mm), simulated gouge is strong, velocity strengthening and changes in sliding velocity are accompanied by relatively large changes in dilatancy rate. With continued displacement, simulated gouges become progressively weaker and less velocity strengthening, the velocity dependence of dilatancy rate decreases, and deformation becomes localized into a narrow basal shear which at its most localized is observed to be velocity weakening. With subsequent displacement, the fault restrengthens, returns to velocity strengthening, or to velocity neutral, the velocity dependence of dilatancy rate becomes larger, and deformation becomes distributed. Correlation of friction, velocity dependence of friction and of dilatancy rate, and degree of localization at all displacements in simulated gouge suggest that all quantities are interrelated. The observations do not distinguish the independent variables but suggest that the degree of localization is controlled by the fault strength, not by the friction velocity dependence. The friction velocity dependence and velocity dependence of dilatancy rate can be used as qualitative measures of the degree of localization in simulated gouge, in agreement with previous studies. Theory equating the friction velocity dependence of simulated gouge to the sum of the friction velocity dependence of bare surfaces and the velocity dependence of dilatancy rate of simulated gouge fails to quantitatively account for the experimental observations.

  11. Turbulence in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Bruno, R.; Telloni, D.; Marino, R.

    2016-03-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind is ubiquitous. To understand the transport of low-frequency turbulence in the sub- and super-Alfvénic solar wind flow, Zank et al. 2012 developed an extensive turbulence transport model that describes the evolution of the energy in forward and backward propagating modes, the total turbulent energy, the cross-helicity, the residual energy, the correlation lengths corresponding to forward and backward propagating modes, and the correlation length of the residual energy. Adhikari et. al. 2015 presented the first detailed solution of Zank et al., and found good agreement between the Zank et al. model and observations. Here, we solve the 1D steady-state turbulence transport equations with and without sources of turbulence, and show that all the identified sources are required to reproduce the theoretical results to be consistent with the observations.

  12. Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Jungk, John Michael; Cordill, Megan J.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moody, Neville Reid; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institure of Mining and Technology)

    2006-12-01

    Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in the worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the mechanical response of wear surfaces. Coatings are often required to mitigate friction and wear. Amongst other factors, plastic deformation of the substrate determines the coating-substrate interface reliability. Finite element modeling has been applied to predict the plastic deformation for the specific case of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated Ni alloy substrates.

  13. Active Wall Motion for the Skin-Friction Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangmo; Choi, Haecheon

    1999-11-01

    In this study, we investigate a possibility of reducing the skin-friction drag in a turbulent channel flow with active wall motion using direct numerical simulation at Re_? = 140. The strategy of moving the wall is based on the successful active control strategy used by Choi, Moin & Kim (1994, JFM). They prescribed the blowing/suction at the wall to be exactly opposite to the wall-normal velocity at y^+ ~= 10 and obtained about 25% drag reduction. In the present study, the wall is locally deformed such that the induced velocity by the wall motion matches the wall-normal velocity at y^+ ~= 10 with an opposite sign, while the amount of maximum wall deformation is limited to be 5 in wall units. In order to effectively address the small amplitude of wall deformation, the Navier-Stokes equations are coordinate-transformed with an approximation of Taylor-series truncation. Results show that overall 17% drag reduction is obtained with active wall motion, and turbulence intensities and near-wall streamwise vortices are significantly weakened. It is also remarkable that instantaneous wall shapes are elongated in the streamwise direction and resemble riblets in appearance. However, the spanwise spacing of the wall peak-to-peak is about 80 - 90 in wall units, indicating that the mechanism of present drag reduction is essentially different from that of riblets. Wall motions based on open-loop control strategies are underway and the results will be also presented.

  14. Comparison between kinetic-ballooning-mode-driven turbulence and ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Maeyama, S. Nakata, M.; Miyato, N.; Yagi, M.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Idomura, Y.

    2014-05-15

    Electromagnetic turbulence driven by kinetic ballooning modes (KBMs) in high-β plasma is investigated based on the local gyrokinetic model. Analysis of turbulent fluxes, norms, and phases of fluctuations shows that KBM turbulence gives narrower spectra and smaller phase factors than those in ion-temperature-gradient (ITG)-driven turbulence. This leads to the smaller transport fluxes in KBM turbulence than those in ITG turbulence even when they have similar linear growth rates. From the analysis of the entropy balance relation, it is found that the entropy transfer from ions to electrons through the field-particle interactions mainly drives electron perturbations, which creates radial twisted modes by rapid parallel motions of electrons in a sheared magnetic geometry. The nonlinear coupling between the dominant unstable mode and its twisted modes is important for the saturation of KBM turbulence, in contrast to the importance of zonal flow shearing in ITG turbulence. The coupling depends on the flux-tube domain with the one-poloidal-turn parallel length and on the torus periodicity constraint.

  15. Invariant turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihlo, Alexander; Dos Santos Cardoso-Bihlo, Elsa Maria; Nave, Jean-Christophe; Popovych, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Various subgrid-scale closure models break the invariance of the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations and thus violate the geometric structure of these equations. A method is shown which allows one to systematically derive invariant turbulence models starting from non-invariant turbulence models and thus to correct artificial symmetry-breaking. The method is illustrated by finding invariant hyperdiffusion schemes to be applied in the two-dimensional turbulence problem.

  16. Development of FDR-AF (Frictional Drag Reduction Anti-Fouling) Marine Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inwon; Park, Hyun; Chun, Ho Hwan; GCRC-SOP Team

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a novel skin-friction reducing marine paint has been developed by mixing fine powder of PEO(PolyEthyleneOxide) with SPC (Self-Polishing Copolymer) AF (Anti-Fouling) paint. The PEO is well known as one of drag reducing agent to exhibit Toms effect, the attenuation of turbulent flows by long chain polymer molecules in the near wall region. The frictional drag reduction has been implemented by injecting such polymer solutions to liquid flows. However, the injection holes have been a significant obstacle to marine application. The present PEO-containing marine paint is proposed as an alternative to realize Toms effect without any hole on the ship surface. The erosion mechanism of SPC paint resin and the subsequent dissolution of PEO enable the controlled release of PEO solution from the coating. Various tests such as towing tank drag measurement of flat plate and turbulence measurement in circulating water tunnel demonstrated over 10% frictional drag reduction compared with conventional AF paint. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) through GCRC-SOP(No. 2011-0030013).

  17. Skin friction measurement in complex flows using thin oil film techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Grant NAG2-261 was initiated to support a program of research to study complex flows that occur in flight and laboratory experiments by building, testing and optimizing an on-board technique for direct measurement of surface shear stress using thin oil film techniques. The program of research has proceeded under the supervision of the NASA Ames Research Center and with further cooperation from the NASA Ames-Dryden and NASA Langley Research Centers. In accordance with the original statement of work, the following research milestones were accomplished: (1) design and testing of an internally mounted one-directional skin friction meter to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept; (2) design and construction of a compact instrument capable of measuring skin friction in two directions; (3) study of transitional and fully turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with and without longitudinal pressure gradients utilizing the compact two-directional skin friction meter; (4) study of the interaction between a turbulent boundary layer and a shock wave generated by a compression corner using the two-directional meter; and (5) flight qualification of the compact meter and accompanying electronic and pneumatic systems, preliminary installation into flight test fixture.

  18. Estimation of the friction coefficient between wheel and rail surface using traction motor behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Liang, B.; Iwnicki, S.

    2012-05-01

    The friction coefficient between a railway wheel and rail surface is a crucial factor in maintaining high acceleration and braking performance of railway vehicles thus monitoring this friction coefficient is important. Restricted by the difficulty in directly measuring the friction coefficient, the creep force or creepage, indirect methods using state observers are used more frequently. This paper presents an approach using a Kalman filter to estimate the creep force and creepage between the wheel and rail and then to identify the friction coefficient using the estimated creep force-creepage relationship. A mathematic model including an AC motor, wheel and roller is built to simulate the driving system. The parameters are based on a test rig at Manchester Metropolitan University. The Kalman filter is designed to estimate the friction coefficient based on the measurements of the simulation model. Series of residuals are calculated through the comparison between the estimated creep force and theoretical values of different friction coefficient. Root mean square values of the residuals are used in the friction coefficient identification.

  19. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. C.; Brockett, C.; Williams, S.; Udofia, I.; Fisher, J.; Jin, Z. M.

    2008-03-01

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  20. High-velocity frictional strength across the Tohoku-Oki megathrust determined from surface drilling torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, Kohtaro; Inoue, Tomoya; Ishiwata, Junya

    2016-03-01

    High-velocity frictional strength is one of the primary factors controlling earthquake faulting. The Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project drilled through the shallow plate boundary fault, where displacement was ~50 m during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. To determine downhole frictional strength, we analyzed the surface drilling torque data acquired at rotation rates equivalent to seismic slip rates (0.8-1.3 m/s). The results show a clear contrast in high-velocity frictional strength across the plate boundary fault: the apparent friction coefficient of frontal prism sediments (hemipelagic mudstones) in the hanging wall is 0.1-0.3, while that of the underthrust sediments (mudstone, laminar pelagic claystone, and chert) in the footwall increases to 0.2-0.4. The apparent friction coefficient of the smectite-rich pelagic clay in the plate boundary fault is 0.08-0.19, which is consistent with that determined from high-velocity (1.1-1.3 m/s) friction experiments. This suggests that surface drilling torque is useful in obtaining downhole frictional strength.

  1. Intraoral corrosion of self-ligating metallic brackets and archwires and the effect on friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tima, Lori Lynn

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the frictional coefficient was affected due to intraoral use. A secondary aim of this study was to determine whether or not there was a relationship between corrosion of orthodontic alloys and friction via scanning electron microscopic qualitative analysis. Orthodontic brackets and 0.019 x 0.025 inch stainless steel archwires were collected and divided into three groups of n=10: used bracket and used wires (UBUW), used brackets and new wires (UBNW), and new brackets and new wires (NBNW). New materials were as-received from the manufacturer, and used materials were clinically used bracket and wires collected from patients following orthodontic treatment. Archwires were pulled through bracket slots at a rate of 0.5mm/min while friction forces were measured. Following a cleaning process, the surface topography of the bracket slots was examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Based on a 1-factor MANOVA, there was no significant group effect (all p>0.05) on frictional forces. Partial eta squared values indicated that intraoral exposure had only a small effect on frictional forces (≤ 3%). Qualitative analysis of SEM images did not show an association between surface characteristics of the bracket slots and magnitude of frictional force. Results suggest that surface corrosion from intraoral use does not significantly affect friction at the bracket wire interface.

  2. Internally architectured materials with directionally asymmetric friction.

    PubMed

    Bafekrpour, Ehsan; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Molotnikov, Andrey; Estrin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Internally Architectured Materials (IAMs) that exhibit different friction forces for sliding in the opposite directions are proposed. This is achieved by translating deformation normal to the sliding plane into a tangential force in a manner that is akin to a toothbrush with inclined bristles. Friction asymmetry is attained by employing a layered material or a structure with parallel 'ribs' inclined to the direction of sliding. A theory of directionally asymmetric friction is presented, along with prototype IAMs designed, fabricated and tested. The friction anisotropy (the ξ-coefficient) is characterised by the ratio of the friction forces for two opposite directions of sliding. It is further demonstrated that IAM can possess very high levels of friction anisotropy, with ξ of the order of 10. Further increase in ξ is attained by modifying the shape of the ribs to provide them with directionally dependent bending stiffness. Prototype IAMs produced by 3D printing exhibit truly giant friction asymmetry, with ξ in excess of 20. A novel mechanical rectifier, which can convert oscillatory movement into unidirectional movement by virtue of directionally asymmetric friction, is proposed. Possible applications include locomotion in a constrained environment and energy harvesting from oscillatory noise and vibrations. PMID:26040634

  3. Shaft Coupler With Friction and Spline Clutches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thebert, Glenn W.

    1987-01-01

    Coupling, developed for rotor of lift/cruise aircraft, employs two clutches for smooth transmission of power from gas-turbine engine to rotor. Prior to ascent, coupling applies friction-type transition clutch that accelerates rotor shaft to speeds matching those of engine shaft. Once shafts synchronized, spline coupling engaged and friction clutch released to provide positive mechanical drive.

  4. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of

  5. Studying the Frictional Force Directions via Bristles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasitpong, S.; Chitaree, R.; Rakkapao, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present simple apparatus designed to help Thai high school students visualize the directions of frictional forces. Bristles of toothbrushes, paintbrushes and scrubbing brushes are used to demonstrate the frictional forces acting in a variety of situations. These demonstrations, when followed by discussion of free-body diagrams, were found to be

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2006-05-29

    A comprehensive examination of theoretical models for the friction force, in use by the electron cooling community, was performed. Here, they present their insights about the models gained as a result of comparison between the friction force formulas and direct numerical simulations, as well as studies of the cooling process as a whole.

  7. Studying the Frictional Force Directions via Bristles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasitpong, S.; Chitaree, R.; Rakkapao, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present simple apparatus designed to help Thai high school students visualize the directions of frictional forces. Bristles of toothbrushes, paintbrushes and scrubbing brushes are used to demonstrate the frictional forces acting in a variety of situations. These demonstrations, when followed by discussion of free-body diagrams, were found to be…

  8. Effect of Friction on Shear Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient ? ~ 0 . 6 (Bi et al. Nature (2011)). Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ? between ?J (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ?S for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how reducing friction affects shear jamming. We put the Teflon-wrapped photoelastic disks, lowering the friction substantially from previous experiments, in a well-studied 2D shear apparatus (Ren et al. PRL (2013)), which provides a uniform simple shear. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ?J -?S is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger anisotropies in fragile states compared to experiments with higher friction particles at the same density. In ongoing work we are studying systems using photoelastic disks with fine gears on the edge to generate very large effective friction. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant DMR1206351, NSF Grant DMS-1248071, NASA Grant NNX10AU01G and William M. Keck Foundation.

  9. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  10. Friction brake cushions acceleration and vibration loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, G. F.; Zawadski, G. Z.

    1966-01-01

    Friction brake cushions an object in a vehicle from axially applied vibration and steady-state acceleration forces. The brake incorporates a doubly tapered piston that applies a controlled radial force to friction brake segments bearing against the walls of a cylinder.

  11. Internally architectured materials with directionally asymmetric friction

    PubMed Central

    Bafekrpour, Ehsan; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Molotnikov, Andrey; Estrin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Internally Architectured Materials (IAMs) that exhibit different friction forces for sliding in the opposite directions are proposed. This is achieved by translating deformation normal to the sliding plane into a tangential force in a manner that is akin to a toothbrush with inclined bristles. Friction asymmetry is attained by employing a layered material or a structure with parallel ‘ribs’ inclined to the direction of sliding. A theory of directionally asymmetric friction is presented, along with prototype IAMs designed, fabricated and tested. The friction anisotropy (the ξ-coefficient) is characterised by the ratio of the friction forces for two opposite directions of sliding. It is further demonstrated that IAM can possess very high levels of friction anisotropy, with ξ of the order of 10. Further increase in ξ is attained by modifying the shape of the ribs to provide them with directionally dependent bending stiffness. Prototype IAMs produced by 3D printing exhibit truly giant friction asymmetry, with ξ in excess of 20. A novel mechanical rectifier, which can convert oscillatory movement into unidirectional movement by virtue of directionally asymmetric friction, is proposed. Possible applications include locomotion in a constrained environment and energy harvesting from oscillatory noise and vibrations. PMID:26040634

  12. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of…

  13. Environmental effects on friction and wear of diamond and diamondlike carbon coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural diamond flat, diamond film, and low and high density diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in contact with pin specimens of natural diamond and silicon nitride (Si3N4) both in humid air and dry air nitrogen. The results indicated that for natural diamond pin contacts the diamond films and the natural diamond flat were not susceptible to moisture but that moisture could increase both the coefficient of friction and the wear factors of the DLC films. The coefficients of friction and wear factors of the diamond films were generally similar to those of the natural diamond flat both in humid air and dry air nitrogen. In dry nitrogen the coefficients of friction of the high density DLC films in contact with pin specimens of both diamond and Si3N4 were generally low (about 0.02) and similar to those of the natural diamond flat and the diamond films. The wear factors of the materials in contact with both natural diamond and Si3N4 were generally in the ascending order of natural diamond flat, diamond film, high density DLC film, and low density DLC film. The moisture in the environment increased the coefficients of friction for Si3N4 pins in contact with all the materials. This increase in friction is due to the silicon oxide film produced on the surface of Si3N4 pins in humid air.

  14. Tactical missile turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Of particular interest is atmospheric turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, since this affects both the launch and terminal phase of flight, and the total flight for direct fire systems. Brief discussions are presented on rocket artillery boost wind problems, mean wind correction, turbulent boost wind correction, the Dynamically Aimed Free Flight Rocket (DAFFR) wind filter, the DAFFR test, and rocket wake turbulence problems. It is concluded that many of the turbulence problems of rockets and missiles are common to those of aircraft, such as structural loading and control system design. However, these problems have not been solved at this time.

  15. String Theory and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Minic, Djordje; Ng, Y. Jack; Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    We propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. This string theory of turbulence should be understood in light of the AdS/CFT dictionary. Our argument is crucially based on the use of Migdal's loop variables and the self-consistent solutions of Migdal's loop equations for turbulence. In particular, there is an area law for turbulence in 2+1 dimensions related to the Kraichnan scaling.

  16. Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei

    Turbulence is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, and it is well known that turbulence couples energy input to dissipation by cascade processes. Plasma turbulence play a critical role in tokamak confinement. Magnetized plasma turbulence is quasi 2D, anisotropic, wave like and two fluid (i.e. electrons and ions) in structure. Thus, weakly collisional plasma turbulence can mediate electron and ion energy transfer. The issue of anomalous electron and ion energy coupling is particularly important for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER. In this work, we reconsider the classic problem of turbulent heating and energy transfer pathways in drift wave turbulence. The total turbulent heating, composed of quasilinear electron cooling, quasilinear ion heating, nonlinear ion heating and zonal flow frictional heating, is analyzed. In Chapter 2, the electron and ion energy exchange via linear wave and particle resonance will be computed. To address net heating, we show the turbulent heating in an annulus arises due to a wave energy flux differential across this region. We show this net heating is proportional to the Reynolds work on the zonal flow. Zonal flow friction heats ions, thus the turbulence and zonal flow interaction enters as an important energy transfer channel. Since zonal flows are nonlinearly generated, it follows that we should apply weak turbulence theory to calculate the nonlinear ion turbulent heating via the virtual mode resonance in the electron drift wave turbulence, which will be discussed in Chapter 3. We defines a new collisionless turbulent energy transfer channel through nonlinear Landau damping in the electron and ion energy coupling process. The result shows that nonlinear ion heating can exceed quasilinear ion heating, so that nonlinear heating becomes the principal collisionless wave energy dissipation channel in electron drift wave turbulence. This follows since the beat mode resonates with the bulk of the ion distribution, in contrast to the linear resonance which is located on the tail. This result also suggests that zonal flow shearing is not necessarily the only saturation mechanism of importance, especially for very low collisionality. This observation brings a new perspective on electron heat transport where ions, play a role as an energy "sink" in a collisionless plasma, such as ITER. In addition, it is shown that the electron turbulent energy transfer to ions in a collisionless plasma can be the same order as electron heat transport losses. Thus, it is necessary to consider the influence of collisionless energy transfer to determine the total energy budget in ITER.

  17. Frictional ageing from interfacial bonding and the origins of rate and state friction.

    PubMed

    Li, Qunyang; Tullis, Terry E; Goldsby, David; Carpick, Robert W

    2011-12-01

    Earthquakes have long been recognized as being the result of stick-slip frictional instabilities. Over the past few decades, laboratory studies of rock friction have elucidated many aspects of tectonic fault zone processes and earthquake phenomena. Typically, the static friction of rocks grows logarithmically with time when they are held in stationary contact, but the mechanism responsible for this strengthening is not understood. This time-dependent increase of frictional strength, or frictional ageing, is one manifestation of the 'evolution effect' in rate and state friction theory. A prevailing view is that the time dependence of rock friction results from increases in contact area caused by creep of contacting asperities. Here we present the results of atomic force microscopy experiments that instead show that frictional ageing arises from the formation of interfacial chemical bonds, and the large magnitude of ageing at the nanometre scale is quantitatively consistent with what is required to explain observations in macroscopic rock friction experiments. The relative magnitude of the evolution effect compared with that of the 'direct effect'--the dependence of friction on instantaneous changes in slip velocity--determine whether unstable slip, leading to earthquakes, is possible. Understanding the mechanism underlying the evolution effect would enable us to formulate physically based frictional constitutive laws, rather than the current empirically based 'laws', allowing more confident extrapolation to natural faults. PMID:22139421

  18. Osborne Reynolds pipe flow: Direct simulation from laminar through gradual transition to fully developed turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Adrian, Ronald J.; Baltzer, Jon R.

    2015-01-01

    The precise dynamics of breakdown in pipe transition is a century-old unresolved problem in fluid mechanics. We demonstrate that the abruptness and mysteriousness attributed to the Osborne Reynolds pipe transition can be partially resolved with a spatially developing direct simulation that carries weakly but finitely perturbed laminar inflow through gradual rather than abrupt transition arriving at the fully developed turbulent state. Our results with this approach show during transition the energy norms of such inlet perturbations grow exponentially rather than algebraically with axial distance. When inlet disturbance is located in the core region, helical vortex filaments evolve into large-scale reverse hairpin vortices. The interaction of these reverse hairpins among themselves or with the near-wall flow when they descend to the surface from the core produces small-scale hairpin packets, which leads to breakdown. When inlet disturbance is near the wall, certain quasi-spanwise structure is stretched into a Lambda vortex, and develops into a large-scale hairpin vortex. Small-scale hairpin packets emerge near the tip region of the large-scale hairpin vortex, and subsequently grow into a turbulent spot, which is itself a local concentration of small-scale hairpin vortices. This vortex dynamics is broadly analogous to that in the boundary layer bypass transition and in the secondary instability and breakdown stage of natural transition, suggesting the possibility of a partial unification. Under parabolic base flow the friction factor overshoots Moody’s correlation. Plug base flow requires stronger inlet disturbance for transition. Accuracy of the results is demonstrated by comparing with analytical solutions before breakdown, and with fully developed turbulence measurements after the completion of transition. PMID:26080447

  19. Osborne Reynolds pipe flow: Direct simulation from laminar through gradual transition to fully developed turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Adrian, Ronald J; Baltzer, Jon R

    2015-06-30

    The precise dynamics of breakdown in pipe transition is a century-old unresolved problem in fluid mechanics. We demonstrate that the abruptness and mysteriousness attributed to the Osborne Reynolds pipe transition can be partially resolved with a spatially developing direct simulation that carries weakly but finitely perturbed laminar inflow through gradual rather than abrupt transition arriving at the fully developed turbulent state. Our results with this approach show during transition the energy norms of such inlet perturbations grow exponentially rather than algebraically with axial distance. When inlet disturbance is located in the core region, helical vortex filaments evolve into large-scale reverse hairpin vortices. The interaction of these reverse hairpins among themselves or with the near-wall flow when they descend to the surface from the core produces small-scale hairpin packets, which leads to breakdown. When inlet disturbance is near the wall, certain quasi-spanwise structure is stretched into a Lambda vortex, and develops into a large-scale hairpin vortex. Small-scale hairpin packets emerge near the tip region of the large-scale hairpin vortex, and subsequently grow into a turbulent spot, which is itself a local concentration of small-scale hairpin vortices. This vortex dynamics is broadly analogous to that in the boundary layer bypass transition and in the secondary instability and breakdown stage of natural transition, suggesting the possibility of a partial unification. Under parabolic base flow the friction factor overshoots Moody's correlation. Plug base flow requires stronger inlet disturbance for transition. Accuracy of the results is demonstrated by comparing with analytical solutions before breakdown, and with fully developed turbulence measurements after the completion of transition. PMID:26080447

  20. Large Friction Anisotropy of a Polydiacetylene Monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, A.R.; Carpick, R.W.; Sasaki, D.Y.

    1999-05-11

    Friction force microscopy measurements of a polydiacetylene monolayer film reveal a 300% friction anisotropy that is correlated with the film structure. The film consists of a monolayer of the red form of N-(2-ethanol)- 10,12 pentacosadiynamide, prepared on a Langmuir trough and deposited on a mica substrate. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, the monolayer consists of domains of linearly oriented conjugated backbones with pendant hydrocarbon side chains above and below the backbones. Maximum friction occurs when the sliding direction is perpendicular to the backbone. We propose that the backbones impose anisotropic packing of the hydrocarbon side chains which leads to the observed friction anisotropy. Friction anisotropy is therefore a sensitive, optically-independent indicator of polymer backbone direction and monolayer structural properties.

  1. A liquid-crystal model for friction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C. H. A.; Kellogg, L. H.; Shkoller, S.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2008-01-01

    Rate-and-state friction is an empirical approach to the behavior of a frictional surface. We use a nematic liquid crystal in a channel between two parallel planes to model frictional sliding. Nematic liquid crystals model a wide variety of physical phenomena in systems that rapidly switch between states; they are well studied and interesting examples of anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids, characterized by the orientational order of a director field d⃗(x⃗,t) interacting with the the velocity field u⃗(x⃗,t). To model frictional sliding, we introduce a nonlinear viscosity that changes as a function of the director field orientation; the specific choice of viscosity function determines the behavior of the system. In response to sliding of the top moving plane, the fluid undergoes a rapid increase in resistance followed by relaxation. Strain is localized within the channel. The director field plays a role analogous to the state variable in rate-and-state friction. PMID:18417449

  2. Friction forces on phase transition fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Mégevand, Ariel

    2013-07-01

    In cosmological first-order phase transitions, the microscopic interaction of the phase transition fronts with non-equilibrium plasma particles manifests itself macroscopically as friction forces. In general, it is a nontrivial problem to compute these forces, and only two limits have been studied, namely, that of very slow walls and, more recently, ultra-relativistic walls which run away. In this paper we consider ultra-relativistic velocities and show that stationary solutions still exist when the parameters allow the existence of runaway walls. Hence, we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions for the fronts to actually run away. We also propose a phenomenological model for the friction, which interpolates between the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic values. Thus, the friction depends on two friction coefficients which can be calculated for specific models. We then study the velocity of phase transition fronts as a function of the friction parameters, the thermodynamic parameters, and the amount of supercooling.

  3. Collisionless inter-species energy transfer and turbulent heating in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-08-15

    We reconsider the classic problems of calculating 'turbulent heating' and collisionless inter-species transfer of energy in drift wave turbulence. These issues are of interest for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER, where collisionless energy transfer from electrons to ions is likely to be significant. From the wave Poynting theorem at steady state, a volume integral over an annulus r{sub 1}=-S{sub r}|{sub r{sub 1}{sup r{sub 2}}}{ne}0. Here S{sub r} is the wave energy density flux in the radial direction. Thus, a wave energy flux differential across an annular region indeed gives rise to a net heating, in contrast to previous predictions. This heating is related to the Reynolds work by the zonal flow, since S{sub r} is directly linked to the zonal flow drive. In addition to net heating, there is inter-species heat transfer. For collisionless electron drift waves, the total turbulent energy source for collisionless heat transfer is due to quasilinear electron cooling. Subsequent quasilinear ion heating occurs through linear ion Landau damping. In addition, perpendicular heating via ion polarization currents contributes to ion heating. Since at steady state, Reynolds work of the turbulence on the zonal flow must balance zonal flow frictional damping ({approx}{nu}{sub ii}{sup 2}{approx}|(e{phi}(tilde sign)/T)|{sup 4}), it is no surprise that zonal flow friction appears as an important channel for ion heating. This process of energy transfer via zonal flow has not previously been accounted for in analyses of energy transfer. As an application, we compare the rate of turbulent energy transfer in a low collisionality plasma with the rate of the energy transfer by collisions. The result shows that the collisionless turbulent energy transfer is a significant energy coupling process for ITER plasma.

  4. Evaluation of analytical procedures for prediction of turbulent boundary layers on a porous wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical study has been made to determine how well current boundary layer prediction techniques work when there is mass transfer normal to the wall. The data that were considered in this investigation were for two-dimensional, incompressible, turbulent boundary layers with suction and blowing. Some of the bleed data were taken in an adverse pressure gradient. An integral prediction method was used three different porous wall skin friction relations, in addition to a solid-surface relation for the suction cases. A numerical prediction method was also used. Comparisons were made between theoretical and experimental skin friction coefficients, displacement and momentum thicknesses, and velocity profiles. The integral method with one of the porous wall skin friction laws gave very good agreement with data for most of the cases considered. The use of the solid-surface skin friction law caused the integral to overpredict the effectiveness of the bleed. The numerical techniques also worked well for most of the cases.

  5. Tidal Friction in the Earth and Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    "Tidal Friction" is a classic subject in geophysics, with ties to some of the great scientists of the Victorian era. The subject has been reinvigorated over the past decade by space geodesy, and particularly by the Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter mission. In fact, the topic has now taken on some significance in oceanography, with potential implications for problems of mixing, thermocline maintenance, and the thermohaline circulation. Likewise, tidal measurements have become sufficiently precise to reveal new information about the solid earth. In this respect, the tidal force is an invaluable "probe" of the earth, at frequencies well outside the seismic band. This talk will "follow the energy" of tides while noting some important geophysical implications at each stage. In the present earth-moon-sun configuration, energy for tides is extracted from the earth's rotation. Ancient eclipses bear witness to this, and the discrepancy between Babylonian (and other) observations and tidal predictions yields unique information about the mantle and the overlying fluid envelope. Complementary information comes from tidal anelasticity estimates, which are now available at frequencies ranging from semidiurnal to fortnightly, monthly, and 18.6 years. These data, when combined with various kinds of gravity measurements, are relevant to the present-day sea-level problem. Solid-earth tidal dissipation represents less than 5% of the system total. As has long been realized, the largest energy sink is the ocean. About 70% of the oceanic dissipation occurs in shallow seas (the traditional sink) and 30% in the deep ocean, generally near rugged bottom topography. The latter represents a substantial amount of power, roughly 1 gigawatt, available for generation of internal tides and other baroclinic motions. Experiments like HOME are helping unravel the links between barotropic tides, internal tides, turbulence, and mixing. The latter opens possible linkages to climate, and recent work involving 18.6-year oscillations adds intriguing (although not completely convincing) evidence of climate connections from the nodal modulations of diurnal-band tides. Connections at longer periods are quite conceivable, since tides are critically sensitive to sea level, but most ideas along these lines are still speculative and in need of further development.

  6. Macrostructure of Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aloor, S.; Nowak, B.; Vargas, R.; McClure, J. C.; Murr, L. E.; Nunes, A. C.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper will discuss two of the well know large scale features of friction stir welds: the "onion rings" seen in transverse sections, and the striations on the surface of the work piece. It will be shown that the surface features (sometimes called "tool marks") are the result of irregularities on the rotating shoulder of the pin tool and disappear when the shoulder is polished. The "onion ring" structure seen in transverse cross sections is formed by parts of the "carousel", the zone of material adjacent to and rotating with the pin tool, that are shed off in each rotation. The relation between the carousel and the "ring vortex", a rotational flow extending both in and out of the carousel and resembling a smoke-ring with the hole centered on the pin tool, will be discussed.

  7. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  8. Reflection type skin friction meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R. (Inventor); Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A housing block is provided having an upper surface conforming to the test surface of a model or aircraft. An oil film is supplied upstream of a transparent wedge window located in this upper surface by an oil pump system located external to the housing block. A light source located within the housing block supplies a light beam which passes through this transparent window and is reflected back through the transparent window by the upper surface of the oil film to a photo-sensitive position sensor located within the housing. This position sensor allows the slope history of the oil film caused by and aerodynamic flow to be determined. The skin friction is determined from this slope history. Internally located mirrors augment and sensitize the reflected beam as necessary before reaching the position sensor. In addition, a filter may be provided before this sensor to filter the beam.

  9. Characterizing deformability and surface friction of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sangwon; Son, Sungmin; Amodei, Dario; Cermak, Nathan; Shaw, Josephine; Kang, Joon Ho; Hecht, Vivian C.; Winslow, Monte M.; Jacks, Tyler; Mallick, Parag; Manalis, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis requires the penetration of cancer cells through tight spaces, which is mediated by the physical properties of the cells as well as their interactions with the confined environment. Various microfluidic approaches have been devised to mimic traversal in vitro by measuring the time required for cells to pass through a constriction. Although a cells passage time is expected to depend on its deformability, measurements from existing approaches are confounded by a cell's size and its frictional properties with the channel wall. Here, we introduce a device that enables the precise measurement of (i) the size of a single cell, given by its buoyant mass, (ii) the velocity of the cell entering a constricted microchannel (entry velocity), and (iii) the velocity of the cell as it transits through the constriction (transit velocity). Changing the deformability of the cell by perturbing its cytoskeleton primarily alters the entry velocity, whereas changing the surface friction by immobilizing positive charges on the constriction's walls primarily alters the transit velocity, indicating that these parameters can give insight into the factors affecting the passage of each cell. When accounting for cell buoyant mass, we find that cells possessing higher metastatic potential exhibit faster entry velocities than cells with lower metastatic potential. We additionally find that some cell types with higher metastatic potential exhibit greater than expected changes in transit velocities, suggesting that not only the increased deformability but reduced friction may be a factor in enabling invasive cancer cells to efficiently squeeze through tight spaces. PMID:23610435

  10. Characterizing deformability and surface friction of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sangwon; Son, Sungmin; Amodei, Dario; Cermak, Nathan; Shaw, Josephine; Kang, Joon Ho; Hecht, Vivian C; Winslow, Monte M; Jacks, Tyler; Mallick, Parag; Manalis, Scott R

    2013-05-01

    Metastasis requires the penetration of cancer cells through tight spaces, which is mediated by the physical properties of the cells as well as their interactions with the confined environment. Various microfluidic approaches have been devised to mimic traversal in vitro by measuring the time required for cells to pass through a constriction. Although a cell's passage time is expected to depend on its deformability, measurements from existing approaches are confounded by a cell's size and its frictional properties with the channel wall. Here, we introduce a device that enables the precise measurement of (i) the size of a single cell, given by its buoyant mass, (ii) the velocity of the cell entering a constricted microchannel (entry velocity), and (iii) the velocity of the cell as it transits through the constriction (transit velocity). Changing the deformability of the cell by perturbing its cytoskeleton primarily alters the entry velocity, whereas changing the surface friction by immobilizing positive charges on the constriction's walls primarily alters the transit velocity, indicating that these parameters can give insight into the factors affecting the passage of each cell. When accounting for cell buoyant mass, we find that cells possessing higher metastatic potential exhibit faster entry velocities than cells with lower metastatic potential. We additionally find that some cell types with higher metastatic potential exhibit greater than expected changes in transit velocities, suggesting that not only the increased deformability but reduced friction may be a factor in enabling invasive cancer cells to efficiently squeeze through tight spaces. PMID:23610435

  11. Rolling friction and energy dissipation in a spinning disc

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Daolin; Liu, Caishan; Zhao, Zhen; Zhang, Hongjian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of both experimental and theoretical investigations for the dynamics of a steel disc spinning on a horizontal rough surface. With a pair of high-speed cameras, a stereoscopic vision method is adopted to perform omnidirectional measurements for the temporal evolution of the disc's motion. The experiment data allow us to detail the dynamics of the disc, and consequently to quantify its energy. From our experimental observations, it is confirmed that rolling friction is a primary factor responsible for the dissipation of the energy. Furthermore, a mathematical model, in which the rolling friction is characterized by a resistance torque proportional to the square of precession rate, is also proposed. By employing the model, we perform qualitative analysis and numerical simulations. Both of them provide results that precisely agree with our experimental findings. PMID:25197246

  12. Frictional wave dissipation on a remarkably rough reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monismith, Stephen G.; Rogers, Justin S.; Koweek, David; Dunbar, Robert B.

    2015-05-01

    We present a week of observations of wave dissipation on the south forereef of Palmyra Atoll. Using wave measurements made in 6.2 m and 11.2 m of water offshore of the surf zone, we computed energy fluxes and near-bottom velocity. Equating the divergence of the shoreward energy flux to its dissipation by bottom friction and parameterizating dissipation in terms of the root-mean-square velocity cubed, we find that the wave friction factor, fw, for this reef is 1.80 ± 0.07, nearly an order of magnitude larger than values previously found for reefs. We attribute this remarkably high value of fw to the complex canopy structure of the reef, which we believe may be characteristic of healthy reefs. This suggests that healthy reefs with high coral cover may provide greater coastal protection than do degraded reefs with low coral cover.

  13. Implementation of tactile feedback by modifying the perceived friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biet, M.; Giraud, F.; Lemaire-Semail, B.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes implementation and initial evaluation of variable friction displays. We first analyse a device that comprises a stator of an ultrasonic motor supplied by only one channel. In this way, the stator does not induce any rotative movement but creates a slippery feeling on the stator's surface. Considering the range of frequency and amplitude needed to obtain this phenomenon, we interpret it as the squeeze film effect, which may be the dominant factor causing an impression of lubrication. This effect is thus able to decrease the friction coefficient between the fingertip and the stator as a function of the vibration amplitude. Moreover, if we add a position sensor, we can create a textured surface by generating alternatively sliding and braking sensations by tuning the vibration amplitude of the wave. Then, based on the principle of the first device, another device is proposed in order to enable a free exploration of the surface, according to ergonomic requirements.

  14. Three measuring techniques for assessing the mean wall skin friction in wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoun, E.-S.; Jehring, L.; Egbers, C.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper aims at evaluating the mean wall skin friction data in laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows obtained from two optical and one thermal measuring techniques, namely, laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA), oil-film interferometry (OFI), and surface hot-film anemometry (SHFA), respectively. A comparison among the three techniques is presented, indicating close agreement in the mean wall skin friction data obtained, directly, from both the OFI and the LDA near-wall mean velocity profiles. On the other hand, the SHFA, markedly, over estimates the mean wall skin friction by 3.5-11.7% when compared with both the LDA and the OFI data, depending on the thermal conductivity of the substrate and glue material, probe calibration, probe contamination, temperature drift and Reynolds number. Satisfactory agreement, however, is observed among all three measuring techniques at higher Reynolds numbers, Re x >106, and within ±5% with empirical relations extracted from the literature. In addition, accurate velocity data within the inertial sublayer obtained using the LDA supports the applicability of the Clauser method to evaluate the wall skin friction when appropriate values for the constants of the logarithmic line are utilized.

  15. CHEMICALLY REACTING TURBULENT JETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports additional experimental evidence supporting a new description of the mechanism of turbulent entrainment, mixing, and chemical reactions that is emerging from experiments in the last few years which reveal the presence of large scale structures in turbulent shear...

  16. Superstatistics and atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, S.; Rapisarda, A.

    2005-08-01

    In this very short contribution we summarize some recent results on wind velocity data recorded at Florence airport. In particular we show that one can describe this example of atmospheric turbulence by means of the superstatistics approach proposed by Beck and Cohen (2003). The latter justifies the successful application of Tsallis generalized statistics in different fields, and more specifically in turbulence experiments.

  17. Turbulent Soret Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Haugen, Nils Erland L.; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2015-11-01

    We study, turbophoresis-the clustering properties of heavy inertial passive particles in a inhomogeneous turbulent flow-by direct numerical simulation of inhomogeneously forced turbulence in a periodic box without walls. The forcing is a periodic function of one coordinate direction. The inertial particles cluster near the minima of the turbulent kinetic energy. Draw- ing analogy with Soret effect in near-equilibrium thermodynamics, we can describe the flux of particles as a sum of two fluxes, described by two turbulent transport coefficients, turbulent diffusion of particles and turbophoretic coefficient. The second (turbophoretic) flux is assumed to be proportional to the gradient of turbulent intensity. The ratio of these two coefficients would be analogous to Soret coefficient, hence we call this the turbulent Soret coefficient. Our numerical calculation show that such a description is a good description of our data. Furthermore, we find that the turbulent Soret coefficient is a non-monotonic function of the particle inertia (described the the Stokes number); i.e. beyond a critical Stokes number the clustering of the particles decreases, but in a smooth manner. Swedish Research Council, Wallenberg Foundations.

  18. Wear and friction of oxidation-resistant mechanical carbon graphites at 650 C in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisnader, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the friction and wear properties of experimental carbon-graphites. Hemispherically tipped carbon-graphite rider specimens were tested in sliding contact with rotating Inconel X-750 disks in air. A surface speed of 1.33 m/sec, a load of 500 g, and a specimen temperature of 650 C were used. Results indicate: (1) hardness is not a major factor in determining friction and wear under the conditions of these studies. (2) Friction and wear as low as or lower than those observed for a good commercial seal material were attained with some of the experimental materials studied. (3) The inclusion of boron carbide (as an oxidation inhibitor) has a strong influence on wear rate. (4) Phosphate treatment reduces the friction coefficient when boron carbide is not present in the base material.

  19. A review of the physics of ice surface friction and the development of ice skating.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Our walking and running movement patterns require friction between shoes and ground. The surface of ice is characterised by low friction in several naturally occurring conditions, and compromises our typical locomotion pattern. Ice skates take advantage of this slippery nature of ice; the first ice skates were made more than 4000 years ago, and afforded the development of a very efficient form of human locomotion. This review presents an overview of the physics of ice surface friction, and discusses the most relevant factors that can influence ice skates' dynamic friction coefficient. It also presents the main stages in the development of ice skating, describes the associated implications for exercise physiology, and shows the extent to which ice skating performance improved through history. This article illustrates how technical and materials' development, together with empirical understanding of muscle biomechanics and energetics, led to one of the fastest forms of human powered locomotion. PMID:24950115

  20. Euler's friction of fluids theory and the estimation of fountain jet heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistafa, Sylvio R.

    2015-09-01

    In 1761, Leonhard Euler (1707-1783) published a treatise with the title "Attempt at a Theory of the Friction of Fluids", in which he assumed that, as is the case for solid friction, fluid friction is proportional to pressure. Several experiments were proposed by Euler to derive a friction factor, which were intended to experimentally confirm his equations. Detailed developments of five different problems of discharge were presented in his treatise, taking into account the loss of head in the conduits. In the Appendix, an example is given of the calculation of the jet heights of a particular fountain, fed with conduits of different cross-sectional areas. Application of the current method for the calculation of head losses in pipes reveals that Euler grossly overestimated the fountain jet heights.

  1. Effect of friction stir processing on the tribological performance of high carbon steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Aldajah, S. H.; Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G. R.; David, S.

    2009-06-15

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied to 1080 carbon steel as a means to enhance the near-surface material properties. The process transformed the original pearlite microstructure to martensite, resulting in significant increase in surface hardness. This surface hardening produced a significant benefit for friction and wear behavior of the steel as measured by unidirectional sliding ball-on-flat testing. Under dry sliding, FSP reduced friction coefficient by approximately 25% and wear rate by an order of magnitude. Under oil lubrication, FSP had only a marginal effect on friction, but it reduced wear rates by a factor of 4. The improvement in tribological performance of 1080 steel by FSP technique is attributed to reduced plasticity of the near-surface material during sliding contact

  2. The influence of stem design on critical squeaking friction with ceramic bearings.

    PubMed

    Fan, Na; Morlock, Michael M; Bishop, Nicholas E; Huber, Gerd; Hoffmann, Norbert; Ciavarella, Michele; Chen, Guang X; Hothan, Arne; Witt, Florian

    2013-10-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic hip joints have been reported to squeak, a phenomenon that may occur in compromised lubrication conditions. One factor related to the incidence of in vivo squeaking is the stem design. However, it has not yet been possible to relate stem design to squeaking in deteriorating lubrication conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine critical friction factors for different stem designs. A hip simulator was used to measure the friction factor of a ceramic bearing with different stem designs and gradually deteriorating lubrication represented by evaporation of a volatile fluid lubricant. The critical squeaking friction factor was measured at the onset of squeaking for each stem. Critical friction was higher for the long cobalt chrome (0.32 ± 0.02) and short titanium stems (0.39 ± 0.02) in comparison with a long titanium stem (0.29 ± 0.02). The onset of squeaking occurred at a friction factor lower than that measured for dry conditions, in which squeaking is usually investigated experimentally. The results suggest that shorter or heavier stems might limit the possibility of squeaking as lubrication deteriorates. The method developed can be used to investigate the influence of design parameters on squeaking probability. PMID:23813771

  3. Market Assessment of Forward-Looking Turbulence Sensing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Sousa-Poza, Andres

    2001-01-01

    In recognition of the importance of turbulence mitigation as a tool to improve aviation safety, NASA's Aviation Safety Program developed a Turbulence Detection and Mitigation Sub-element. The objective of this effort is to develop highly reliable turbulence detection technologies for commercial transport aircraft to sense dangerous turbulence with sufficient time warning so that defensive measures can be implemented and prevent passenger and crew injuries. Current research involves three forward sensing products to improve the cockpit awareness of possible turbulence hazards. X-band radar enhancements will improve the capabilities of current weather radar to detect turbulence associated with convective activity. LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) is a laser-based technology that is capable of detecting turbulence in clear air. Finally, a possible Radar-LIDAR hybrid sensor is envisioned to detect the full range of convective and clear air turbulence. To support decisions relating to the development of these three forward-looking turbulence sensor technologies, the objective of this study was defined as examination of cost and implementation metrics. Tasks performed included the identification of cost factors and certification issues, the development and application of an implementation model, and the development of cost budget/targets for installing the turbulence sensor and associated software devices into the commercial transport fleet.

  4. Generalized similarity in finite range solar wind magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chapman, S C; Nicol, R M

    2009-12-11

    Extended or generalized similarity is a ubiquitous but not well understood feature of turbulence that is realized over a finite range of scales. The ULYSSES spacecraft solar polar passes at solar minimum provide in situ observations of evolving anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind under ideal conditions of fast quiet flow. We find a single generalized scaling function characterizes this finite range turbulence and is insensitive to plasma conditions. The recent unusually inactive solar minimum--with turbulent fluctuations down by a factor of approximately 2 in power--provides a test of this invariance. PMID:20366193

  5. Generalized Similarity in Finite Range Solar Wind Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S. C.; Nicol, R. M.

    2009-12-11

    Extended or generalized similarity is a ubiquitous but not well understood feature of turbulence that is realized over a finite range of scales. The ULYSSES spacecraft solar polar passes at solar minimum provide in situ observations of evolving anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind under ideal conditions of fast quiet flow. We find a single generalized scaling function characterizes this finite range turbulence and is insensitive to plasma conditions. The recent unusually inactive solar minimum - with turbulent fluctuations down by a factor of approx2 in power - provides a test of this invariance.

  6. A molecular dynamics study of dielectric friction

    SciTech Connect

    Kurnikova, M.G.; Waldeck, D.H.; Coalson, R.D.

    1996-07-01

    A molecular dynamics study of the friction experienced by the dye molecule resorufamine rotating in a polar solvent is performed. The validity of simple continuum theories of dielectric friction is tested. It is found that the Alavi{endash}Waldeck theory gives reasonable results for the zero frequency dielectric friction coefficient while the Nee{endash}Zwanzig theory requires an unphysically small cavity radius. A procedure for evaluating the time dependent friction kernel from torques and angular velocities, which enables the contributions to the friction from the van der Waals and Coulomb forces to be evaluated separately, is suggested. This study of a realistic system shows that electrostatic interactions can enhance friction by at least two physical mechanisms. First is a contribution to the friction which arises solely from retardation of the solvent reaction field. Second is a contribution arising from local structural changes of the solvent which are driven by the electrostatic field, i.e., a change in the local viscosity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Friction of Compression-ignition Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Charles S; Collins, John H , Jr

    1936-01-01

    The cost in mean effective pressure of generating air flow in the combustion chambers of single-cylinder compression-ignition engines was determined for the prechamber and the displaced-piston types of combustion chamber. For each type a wide range of air-flow quantities, speeds, and boost pressures was investigated. Supplementary tests were made to determine the effect of lubricating-oil temperature, cooling-water temperature, and compression ratio on the friction mean effective pressure of the single-cylinder test engine. Friction curves are included for two 9-cylinder, radial, compression-ignition aircraft engines. The results indicate that generating the optimum forced air flow increased the motoring losses approximately 5 pounds per square inch mean effective pressure regardless of chamber type or engine speed. With a given type of chamber, the rate of increase in friction mean effective pressure with engine speed is independent of the air-flow speed. The effect of boost pressure on the friction cannot be predicted because the friction was decreased, unchanged, or increased depending on the combustion-chamber type and design details. High compression ratio accounts for approximately 5 pounds per square inch mean effective pressure of the friction of these single-cylinder compression-ignition engines. The single-cylinder test engines used in this investigation had a much higher friction mean effective pressure than conventional aircraft engines or than the 9-cylinder, radial, compression-ignition engines tested so that performance should be compared on an indicated basis.

  8. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading. PMID:27110836

  9. Semi-local scaling and turbulence modulation in variable property turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashish; Peeters, Jurriaan W. R.; Boersma, Bendiks J.; Pecnik, Rene

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the effect of temperature dependent density and viscosity on turbulence in channel flows. First, a mathematical framework is developed to support the validity of the semi-local scaling as proposed based on heuristic arguments by Huang, Coleman, and Bradshaw ["Compressible turbulent channel flows: DNS results and modelling," J. Fluid Mech. 305, 185-218 (1995)]. Second, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent channel flows with different constitutive relations for density and viscosity are performed to assess and validate the semi-local scaling for turbulent statistics. The DNS database is obtained by solving the low-Mach number approximation of the Navier-Stokes equation. Finally, we quantify the modulation of turbulence due to changes in fluid properties. In the simulations, the fluid is internally heated and the temperature at both channel walls is fixed, such that the friction Reynolds number based on wall quantities is Reτ = 395 for all cases investigated. We show that for a case with variable density ρ and viscosity μ, but constant semi-local Reynolds number R eτ ∗ ≡ √{ ( ρ ¯ / ρ w ) } / ( μ ¯ / μ w ) R e τ (where bar and subscript w, denote Reynolds averaging and averaged wall quantity, respectively), across the whole channel height, the turbulent statistics exhibit quasi-similarity with constant property turbulent flows. For cases where R eτ ∗ ≠ R e τ across the channel, we found that quasi-similarity is maintained for cases with similar R eτ ∗ distributions, even if their individual mean density and viscosity profiles substantially differ. With a decrease of R eτ ∗ towards the channel center ( R eτ ∗ < R e τ ), we show that the anisotropy increases and the pre-multiplied stream-wise spectra reveal that this increase is associated with strengthening of the large scale streaks in the buffer layer. The opposite effect is observed when R eτ ∗ increases towards the channel center. The present results provide an effective framework for categorizing turbulence modulation in wall-bounded flows with variable property effects, and can be applied to any Newtonian fluid that is heated or cooled.

  10. Thermo-fluid-dynamics of turbulent boundary layer over a moving continuous flat sheet in a parallel free stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Bushra; Noor Afzal Team; Bushra Afzal Team

    2014-11-01

    The momentum and thermal turbulent boundary layers over a continuous moving sheet subjected to a free stream have been analyzed in two layers (inner wall and outer wake) theory at large Reynolds number. The present work is based on open Reynolds equations of momentum and heat transfer without any closure model say, like eddy viscosity or mixing length etc. The matching of inner and outer layers has been carried out by Izakson-Millikan-Kolmogorov hypothesis. The matching for velocity and temperature profiles yields the logarithmic laws and power laws in overlap region of inner and outer layers, along with friction factor and heat transfer laws. The uniformly valid solution for velocity, Reynolds shear stress, temperature and thermal Reynolds heat flux have been proposed by introducing the outer wake functions due to momentum and thermal boundary layers. The comparison with experimental data for velocity profile, temperature profile, skin friction and heat transfer are presented. In outer non-linear layers, the lowest order momentum and thermal boundary layer equations have also been analyses by using eddy viscosity closure model, and results are compared with experimental data. Retired Professor, Embassy Hotel, Rasal Ganj, Aligarh 202001 India.

  11. Turbulence and heat exchange in condensing vapor-liquid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakehal, Djamel; Fulgosi, Marco; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Yadigaroglu, George

    2008-06-01

    Turbulence and heat exchange during condensation of a vapor stream countercurrently flowing to a subcooled liquid stream in a slightly inclined channel has been investigated by direct numerical simulation (DNS). Condensation rates and imposed pressure gradients have been varied, and capillary-gravity waves have been allowed to develop at the (deformable) vapor-liquid interface. These simulations extend our previous DNS of turbulence and scalar exchange in stratified gas-liquid flows without condensation. The previous studies indicated that for conditions in which the gas-liquid interface remained continuous, i.e., did not "break," scalar exchange rates on both the gas and liquid sides were largely determined by sweeps which brought high momentum fluid from the bulk flow to the interface. As sweep frequencies were found to scale with interfacial friction velocities, scalar exchange coefficients could be parametrized with a surface renewal theory. The issue addressed in the current work is how these findings are altered by condensation which acts somewhat like suction through a wall on the vapor side and injection through a wall on the liquid side. Both suction and injection have been found to affect shear stresses, turbulence characteristics, and scalar exchange rates, and hence similar effects might be expected during condensation. The present simulations indicate that the turbulence characteristics in both phases are affected, with turbulence intensities and Reynolds stresses being enhanced on the vapor side and attenuated on the liquid side. For a given imposed pressure gradient, the interfacial shear stress decreases as a result of the interfacial momentum exchange due to condensation. Interfacial waves are also found to be damped by condensation and the streamwise vortical structures on the liquid side are attenuated. The frequencies of sweeps and ejections, however, do scale with the interfacial friction velocity, reduced due to condensation, as does the liquid-side heat transfer coefficient. The simulations indicate that the scaling relationship between the interfacial friction velocity and the liquid-side heat transfer coefficient is similar to that in the absence of condensation, although the interfacial friction velocity itself is different, being dependent on condensation rates. As condensation rates depend in turn on the liquid-side heat transfer, their prediction becomes a coupled problem. A procedure for determining condensation rates as a function of imposed pressure gradient and liquid subcooling is derived from the simulations.

  12. Optimal Length Scale for a Turbulent Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadek, Mira; Alexakis, Alexandros; Fauve, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that there is an optimal forcing length scale for low Prandtl number dynamo flows that can significantly reduce the required energy injection rate. The investigation is based on simulations of the induction equation in a periodic box of size 2 π L . The flows considered are the laminar and turbulent A B C flows forced at different forcing wave numbers kf, where the turbulent case is simulated using a subgrid turbulence model. At the smallest allowed forcing wave number kf=kmin=1 /L the laminar critical magnetic Reynolds number R mclam is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the turbulent critical magnetic Reynolds number Rmc turb due to the hindering effect of turbulent fluctuations. We show that this hindering effect is almost suppressed when the forcing wave number kf is increased above an optimum wave number kfL ≃4 for which Rmc turb is minimum. At this optimal wave number, Rmc turb is smaller by more than a factor of 10 than the case forced in kf=1 . This leads to a reduction of the energy injection rate by 3 orders of magnitude when compared to the case where the system is forced at the largest scales and thus provides a new strategy for the design of a fully turbulent experimental dynamo.

  13. Optimal Length Scale for a Turbulent Dynamo.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Mira; Alexakis, Alexandros; Fauve, Stephan

    2016-02-19

    We demonstrate that there is an optimal forcing length scale for low Prandtl number dynamo flows that can significantly reduce the required energy injection rate. The investigation is based on simulations of the induction equation in a periodic box of size 2πL. The flows considered are the laminar and turbulent ABC flows forced at different forcing wave numbers k_{f}, where the turbulent case is simulated using a subgrid turbulence model. At the smallest allowed forcing wave number k_{f}=k_{min}=1/L the laminar critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{c}^{lam} is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the turbulent critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{c}^{turb} due to the hindering effect of turbulent fluctuations. We show that this hindering effect is almost suppressed when the forcing wave number k_{f} is increased above an optimum wave number k_{f}L≃4 for which Rm_{c}^{turb} is minimum. At this optimal wave number, Rm_{c}^{turb} is smaller by more than a factor of 10 than the case forced in k_{f}=1. This leads to a reduction of the energy injection rate by 3 orders of magnitude when compared to the case where the system is forced at the largest scales and thus provides a new strategy for the design of a fully turbulent experimental dynamo. PMID:26943538

  14. Turbulence structures in wind turbine wake: Effects of atmospheric stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganagar, Kiran

    2014-11-01

    Turbulence structure in the wake behind full-scale horizontal-axis WT under the influence of realistic atmospheric turbulent flow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of turbine wake. Turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the WT, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer. NSF CBET Energy for Sustainability.

  15. Characteristics of turbulence in a boundary layer with zero pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebanoff, P S

    1954-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are presented. Measurements with the hot-wire anemometer were made of turbulent energy and turbulent shear stress, probability density and flattening factor of u-fluctuation, spectra of turbulent energy and shear stress, and turbulent dissipation. The importance of the region near the wall and the inadequacy of the concept of local isotropy are demonstrated. Attention is given to the energy balance and the intermittent character of the outer region of the boundary layer. Also several interesting features of the spectral distribution of the turbulent motions are discussed.

  16. The Twente turbulent Taylor-Couette (T3C) facility: Strongly turbulent (multiphase) flow between two independently rotating cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gils, Dennis P. M.; Bruggert, Gert-Wim; Lathrop, Daniel P.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-02-01

    A new turbulent Taylor-Couette system consisting of two independently rotating cylinders has been constructed. The gap between the cylinders has a height of 0.927 m, an inner radius of 0.200 m, and a variable outer radius (from 0.279 to 0.220 m). The maximum angular rotation rates of the inner and outer cylinder are 20 and 10 Hz, respectively, resulting in Reynolds numbers up to 3.4 × 106 with water as working fluid. With this Taylor-Couette system, the parameter space (Rei, Reo, η) extends to (2.0 × 106, ±1.4 × 106, 0.716-0.909). The system is equipped with bubble injectors, temperature control, skin-friction drag sensors, and several local sensors for studying turbulent single-phase and two-phase flows. Inner cylinder load cells detect skin-friction drag via torque measurements. The clear acrylic outer cylinder allows the dynamics of the liquid flow and the dispersed phase (bubbles, particles, fibers, etc.) inside the gap to be investigated with specialized local sensors and nonintrusive optical imaging techniques. The system allows study of both Taylor-Couette flow in a high-Reynolds-number regime, and the mechanisms behind skin-friction drag alterations due to bubble injection, polymer injection, and surface hydrophobicity and roughness.

  17. NASA tire/runway friction projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reviews several aspects of NASA Langley Research Center's tire/runway friction evaluations directed towards improving the safety and economy of aircraft ground operations. The facilities and test equipment used in implementing different aircraft tire friction studies and other related aircraft ground performance investigations are described together with recent workshop activities at NASA Wallops Flight Facility. An overview of the pending Joint NASA/Transport Canada/FM Winter Runway Friction Program is given. Other NASA ongoing studies and on-site field tests are discussed including tire wear performance and new surface treatments. The paper concludes with a description of future research plans.

  18. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  19. Internal Friction And Instabilities Of Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of effects of internal friction on dynamics of rotors prompted by concern over instabilities in rotors of turbomachines. Theoretical and experimental studies described. Theoretical involved development of nonlinear mathematical models of internal friction in three joints found in turbomachinery - axial splines, Curvic(TM) splines, and interference fits between smooth cylindrical surfaces. Experimental included traction tests to determine the coefficients of friction of rotor alloys at various temperatures, bending-mode-vibration tests of shafts equipped with various joints and rotordynamic tests of shafts with axial-spline and interference-fit joints.

  20. Skin friction measuring device for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Bellman, D. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A skin friction measuring device for measuring the resistance of an aerodynamic surface to an airstream is described. It was adapted to be mounted on an aircraft and is characterized by a friction plate adapted to be disposed in a flush relationship with the external surface of the aircraft and be displaced in response to skin friction drag. As an airstream is caused to flow over the surface, a potentiometer connected to the plate for providing an electrical output indicates the magnitude of the drag.

  1. Comments on Static vs Kinetic Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Gabriel

    2009-09-01

    I'm writing to comment on the article published in the March edition of The Physics Teacher titled "Choose Wisely: Static or Kinetic FrictionThe Power of Dimensionless Plots." As I was reading the article, something caught my eye that I couldn't reconcile with. It was the phrase on page 160 in the first column near the bottom. The statement was that the experimental value for the coefficient of kinetic friction was "unexpectedly greater than the coefficient of static friction!"

  2. Entropy production in irreversible processes with friction.

    PubMed

    Bizarro, Joo P S

    2008-08-01

    Established expressions for entropy production in irreversible processes are generalized to include friction explicitly, as a source of irreversibility in the interaction between a system and its surroundings. The net amount of heat delivered to the system does not come now only from the reservoir, but may have an additional component coming from the work done against friction forces and dissipated as heat. To avoid ambiguities in interpreting the different contributions to entropy increase, the latter is also written in terms of the heat directly exchanged between the system and surroundings and of the fraction of frictional work that is lost in the system. PMID:18850816

  3. Laminar, turbulent, and inertial shear-thickening regimes in channel flow of neutrally buoyant particle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lashgari, Iman; Picano, Francesco; Breugem, Wim-Paul; Brandt, Luca

    2014-12-19

    The aim of this Letter is to characterize the flow regimes of suspensions of finite-size rigid particles in a viscous fluid at finite inertia. We explore the system behavior as a function of the particle volume fraction and the Reynolds number (the ratio of flow and particle inertia to viscous forces). Unlike single-phase flows, where a clear distinction exists between the laminar and the turbulent states, three different regimes can be identified in the presence of a particulate phase, with smooth transitions between them. At low volume fractions, the flow becomes turbulent when increasing the Reynolds number, transitioning from the laminar regime dominated by viscous forces to the turbulent regime characterized by enhanced momentum transport by turbulent eddies. At larger volume fractions, we identify a new regime characterized by an even larger increase of the wall friction. The wall friction increases with the Reynolds number (inertial effects) while the turbulent transport is weakly affected, as in a state of intense inertial shear thickening. This state may prevent the transition to a fully turbulent regime at arbitrary high speed of the flow. PMID:25554885

  4. Simulation of Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow with Large Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erika; Subramanian, Chelakara

    2006-11-01

    Several studies indicate that in situations where surface roughness is very strong, the friction velocity scaling for the mean and turbulent velocities are not satisfactory. Subramanian et al showed a dramatic effect of a strong irregular roughened surface on the turbulent properties. The log-law relation in the overlap region was distorted. A significant pressure gradient normal to the surface was observed with a concomitant increase in normal turbulent stress, v^'2 . The pressure gradient velocity scale, uP, was suggested as a better alternative for capturing the effects of this roughness induced pressure gradient. Here, we performed a numerical simulation of a roughened boundary layer to gain more insight on the correlation between the wall normal pressure gradient and normal turbulent stress, v^'2 and further validate this new pressure gradient velocity scale, uP for different types of roughness. A two-dimensional flat plate computational model with strong regular (k-type) roughness, was constructed in GAMBIT and a CFD analysis performed using FLUENT, version 6.2. The roughness elements cause the pressure near the wall to increase suddenly at the first element and then decrease gradually similar to experiments. The variation of this normal pressure gradient is well correlated with the normal turbulent stress v^'2 variation. Application of the uP as scaling parameter for other non-equilibrium flows such as with suction and blowing is also investigated.

  5. Modeling of Instabilities and Self-organization at the Frictional Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Vahid

    The field of friction-induced self-organization and its practical importance remains unknown territory to many tribologists. Friction is usually thought of as irreversible dissipation of energy and deterioration; however, under certain conditions, friction can lead to the formation of new structures at the interface, including in-situ tribofilms and various patterns at the interface. This thesis studies self-organization and instabilities at the frictional interface, including the instability due to the temperature-dependency of the coefficient of friction, the transient process of frictional running-in, frictional Turing systems, the stick-and-slip phenomenon, and, finally, contact angle (CA) hysteresis as an example of solid-liquid friction and dissipation. All these problems are chosen to bridge the gap between fundamental interest in understanding the conditions leading to self-organization and practical motivation. We study the relationship between friction-induced instabilities and friction-induced self-organization. Friction is usually thought of as a stabilizing factor; however, sometimes it leads to the instability of sliding, in particular when friction is coupled with another process. Instabilities constitute the main mechanism for pattern formation. At first, a stationary structure loses its stability; after that, vibrations with increasing amplitude occur, leading to a limit cycle corresponding to a periodic pattern. The self-organization is usually beneficial for friction and wear reduction because the tribological systems tend to enter a state with the lowest energy dissipation. The introductory chapter starts with basic definitions related to self-organization, instabilities and friction, literature review, and objectives. We discuss fundamental concepts that provide a methodological tool to investigate, understand and enhance beneficial processes in tribosystems which might lead to self-organization. These processes could result in the ability of a frictional surface to exhibit "self-protection" and "self-healing" properties. Hence, this research is dealing with the fundamental concepts that allow the possibility of the development of a new generation of tribosystem and materials that reinforce such properties. In chapter 2, we investigate instabilities due to the temperature-dependency of the coefficient of friction. The temperature-dependency of the coefficient of friction can have a significant effect on the frictional sliding stability, by leading to the formation of "hot" and "cold" spots on the contacting surfaces. We formulate a stability criterion and perform a case study of a brake disk. In chapter 3, we study frictional running-in. Running-in is a transient period on the onset of the frictional sliding, in which friction and wear decrease to their stationary values. In this research, running-in is interpreted as friction-induced self-organization process. We introduce a theoretical model of running-in and investigate rough profile evolution assuming that its kinetics is driven by two opposite processes or events, i.e., smoothening which is typical for the deformation-driven friction and wear, and roughening which is typical for the adhesion-driven friction and wear. In chapter 4, we investigate the possibility of the so-called Turing-type pattern formation during friction. Turing or reaction-diffusion systems describe variations of spatial concentrations of chemical components with time due to local chemical reactions coupled with diffusion. During friction, the patterns can form at the sliding interface due to the mass transfer (diffusion), heat transfer, various tribochemical reactions, and wear. In chapter 5, we investigate how interfacial patterns including propagating trains of stick and slip zones form due to dynamic sliding instabilities. These can be categorized as self-organized patterns. We treat stick and slip as two phases at the interface, and study the effects related to phase transitions. Our results show how interfacial patterns form, how the transition between stick and slip zones occurs, and which parameters affect them. In chapter 6, we use Cellular Potts Model to study contact angle (CA) hysteresis as a measure of solid-liquid energy dissipation. We simulate CA hysteresis for a droplet over the tilted patterned surface, and a bubble placed under the surface immersed in liquid. We discuss the dependency of CA hysteresis on the surface structure and other parameters. This analysis allows decoupling of the 1D (pinning of the triple line) and 2D effects (adhesion hysteresis in the contact area) and obtain new insights on the nature of CA hysteresis. To summarize, we examine different cases in frictional interface and observe similar trends. We investigate and discus how these trends could be beneficial in design, synthesis and characterization of different materials and tribosystems. Furthermore, we describe how to utilize fundamental concepts for specific engineering applications. Finally, the main theme of this research is to find new applications of concept of self-organization to tribology and the role played by different physical and chemical interactions in modifying and controlling friction and wear. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Effects of turbulence on the Thomson scattering process in turbulent plasmas by the scattering of electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Young-Dae

    2013-05-01

    The effects of turbulence on the Thomson scattering process are investigated in turbulent plasmas. The Thomson scattering cross section in turbulent plasmas is obtained by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and plasma dielectric function as a function of the diffusion coefficient, wave number, and Debye length. It is demonstrated that the turbulence effect suppresses the Thomson scattering cross section. It is also shown that the turbulence effect on the Thomson scattering process decreases with increasing thermal energy. The dependence of the wave number on the total Thomson scattering cross section including the turbulent structure factor is also discussed. This paper is dedicated to the late Prof. P. K. Shukla in memory of exciting and stimulating collaborations on effective interaction potentials in various astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  7. Surface roughness and friction coefficient in peened friction stir welded 2195 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Smith, James; Cohen, Donald; Bradley, Robert

    2009-05-01

    The tribological properties of friction stir welded 2195 aluminum alloy joints were investigated for several laser- and shot-peened specimens. The first portion of this study assessed the surface roughness changes at different regions of the weld resulting from the various peening processes and included an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study to reveal fine structures. The second portion investigated the friction characteristics for various conditions when slid against a 440C ball slider. Shot peening resulted in significant surface roughness when compared to the unpeened and laser-peened samples. The initial friction for all types of specimens was highly variable. However, long-term friction was shown to be lowest for samples with no peening treatment. Laser peening caused the friction to increase slightly. The shot peening process on the other hand resulted in an increase of the long-term friction effects on both sides of the weld.

  8. Turbulence in the intergalactic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evoli, Carmelo; Ferrara, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    We study supernova-driven galactic outflows as a mechanism for injecting turbulence in the intergalactic medium (IGM) far from galaxies. To this aim, we follow the evolution of a 1013-M⊙ galaxy along its merger tree, with carefully calibrated prescriptions for star formation and wind efficiencies. At z ≈ 3, the majority of the bubbles around galaxies are old (ages > 1 Gyr), that is, they contain metals expelled by their progenitors at earlier times; their filling factor increases with time, reaching about 10 per cent at z < 2. The energy deposited by these expanding shocks in the IGM is predominantly in kinetic form (mean energy density of 1 μeV cm-3, about two to three times the thermal one), which is rapidly converted in disordered motions by instabilities, finally resulting in a fully developed turbulent spectrum whose evolution is followed through a spectral transfer function approach. The derived mean IGM turbulent Doppler parameter, bt, peaks at z ≈ 1 at about 1.5 km s-1 with the maximum bt= 25 km s-1. The shape of the bt distribution does not significantly evolve with redshift but undergoes a continuous shift towards lower bt values with time, as a result of bubble ageing. We also find a clear trend of decreasing bt with ? and a more complex dependence on Rs resulting from the age spread of the bubbles. We have attempted a preliminary comparison with the data, hampered by the scarcity of the latter and by the challenge provided by the subtraction of peculiar and thermal motions. Finally, we comment on the implications of turbulence for various cosmological studies.

  9. Magnetic Properties of Friction Stir Processed Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-03-01

    Of the many existing inspection or monitoring systems, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. These systems are usually comprised of semi-remote sensors that frequently cause difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites, so that embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and periodically can be interrogated by a reading device. The "reinforcement rich" processed areas can then be used to record properties such as strain, temperature, and stress state, to name a few, depending on the reinforcement material. Friction stir processing was used to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum matrix. The aim was to develop a composite that produces strain in response to a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. A simple and cost-effective setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and the processing route was modified to improve the magnetic response.

  10. Turbulent scaling in fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, R.; Li, Ning; Chen, Shiyi; Liu, Yuanming

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project was a study of turbulence in fluids that are subject to different body forces and to external temperature gradients. Our focus was on the recent theoretical prediction that the Kolomogorov picture of turbulence may need to be modified for turbulent flows driven by buoyancy and subject to body forces such as rotational accelerations. Models arising from this research are important in global climate modeling, in turbulent transport problems, and in the fundamental understanding of fluid turbulence. Experimentally, we use (1) precision measurements of heat transport and local temperature; (2) flow visualization using digitally- enhanced optical shadowgraphs, particle-image velocimetry, thermochromic liquid-crystal imaging, laser-doppler velocimetry, and photochromic dye imaging; and (3) advanced image- processing techniques. Our numerical simulations employ standard spectral and novel lattice Boltzmann algorithms implemented on parallel Connection Machine computers to simulate turbulent fluid flow. In laboratory experiments on incompressible fluids, we measure probability distribution functions and two-point spatial correlations of temperature T and velocity V (both T-T and V-T correlations) and determine scaling relations for global heat transport with Rayleigh number. We also explore the mechanism for turbulence in thermal convection and the stability of the thermal boundary layer.

  11. Anatomy of plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takuma; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Maruta, Takashi; Kasuya, Naohiro; Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Shinohara, Shunjiro; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Yagi, Masatoshi; Inagaki, Shigeru; Kawai, Yoshinobu; Fujisawa, Akihide; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2008-09-01

    Turbulence is a state of fluids and plasma where nonlinear interactions including cascades to finer scales take place to generate chaotic structure and dynamics. However, turbulence could generate global structures, such as dynamo magnetic field, zonal flows, transport barriers, enhanced transport and quenching transport. Therefore, in turbulence, multiscale phenomena coevolve in space and time, and the character of plasma turbulence has been investigated in the laboratory as a modern and historical scientific mystery. Here, we report anatomical features of the plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain by using nonlinear spectral analysis including the bi-spectrum. First, the formation of the plasma turbulence can be regarded as a result of nonlinear interaction of a small number of irreducible parent modes that satisfy the linear dispersion relation. Second, the highlighted finding here, is the first identification of a streamer (state of bunching of drift waves) that should degrade the quality of plasmas for magnetic confinement fusion. The streamer is a poloidally localized, radially elongated global structure that lives longer than the characteristic turbulence correlation time, and our results reveal that the streamer is produced as the result of the nonlinear condensation, or nonlinear phase locking of the major triplet modes.

  12. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  13. PV dynamics: The role of small-scale turbulence, submesoscales and mesoscales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    2015-10-01

    The diabatic and frictional components of the PV fluxes J in the Haynes-McIntyre conservation law have been studied with physical arguments, scaling laws and numerical simulations. We suggest a procedure that expresses J in terms of buoyancy and momentum fluxes by small-scale turbulence SS, submesoscales SM and mesoscales M. We employ the latest parameterizations of these processes and derive analytic expressions of the diabatic and frictional J fluxes for arbitrary wind stresses; we then consider the case of an Ekman flow. Small-scale turbulence: at z=0, down and up-front winds contribute equally to the frictional component of J while the diabatic component is much larger than that of mesoscales. Submesoscales: the geostrophic contributions to both diabatic and frictional J have the same sign while the wind contributions have opposite signs. Their magnitude depends on the SM kinetic energy which is derived in terms of large-scale parameters. Comparison with numerical simulations is limited since the ones available resolve M but not SM. They concluded that the field patterns of the J fluxes are very similar to those obtained without resolving M, in agreement with the present analysis; a second conclusion that the diabatic component of J is an order of magnitude larger than the frictional one, is also in accordance with present results. When wind stresses are accounted for, down-front winds lower PV and up-front winds increase it. The changes in Hoskins' criterion for the onset of symmetric instabilities are discussed.

  14. An Improved Modeling of Friction for Extrusion Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Karadogan, Celalettin; Tong, Longchang; Hora, Pavel

    2007-04-07

    Realistic representation of friction is important in extrusion simulations. Purposefully designed multi-hole die aluminum extrusion experiments showed that the conventional friction models, like the Coulomb and the shear friction models, are deficient to represent the boundary phenomena that occur during aluminum extrusion. Based on the observations, phenomenological and implementational improvements are made in the friction modeling.

  15. Shell Galaxies, Dynamical Friction, and Dwarf Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrová, I.; Jungwiert, B.; Canalizo, G.; Bennert, N.; Jílková, L.

    2010-10-01

    Using N-body simulations of shell galaxies created in nearly radial minor mergers, we investigate the error of collision dating, resulting from the neglect of dynamical friction and of gradual disruption of the cannibalized dwarf.

  16. Tuning friction with noise and disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiman, Y.; Hentschel, H. G. E.; Family, F.; Mak, C.; Krim, J.

    1999-05-01

    We present numerical and experimental evidence which demonstrates that under certain conditions friction can be reduced by spatial disorder and/or thermal noise. We discuss possible mechanisms for this behavior.

  17. Rheological effects on friction in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachman, E. G.; Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation is presented of the friction in a rolling and sliding elastohydrodynamic lubricated contact. The rheological behavior of the lubricant is described in terms of two viscoelastic models. These models represent the separate effects of non-Newtonian behavior and the transient response of the fluid. A unified description of the non-Newtonian shear rate dependence of the viscosity is presented as a new hyperbolic liquid model. The transient response of viscosity, following the rapid pressure rise encountered in the contact, is described by a compressional viscoelastic model of the volume response of a liquid to an applied pressure step. The resulting momentum and energy equations are solved by an iterative numerical technique, and a friction coefficient is calculated. The experimental study was performed, with two synthetic paraffinic lubricants, to verify the friction predictions of the analysis. The values of friction coefficient from theory and experiment are in close agreement.

  18. Sliding friction on wet and dry sand.

    PubMed

    Fall, A; Weber, B; Pakpour, M; Lenoir, N; Shahidzadeh, N; Fiscina, J; Wagner, C; Bonn, D

    2014-05-01

    We show experimentally that the sliding friction on sand is greatly reduced by the addition of some-but not too much-water. The formation of capillary water bridges increases the shear modulus of the sand, which facilitates the sliding. Too much water, on the other hand, makes the capillary bridges coalesce, resulting in a decrease of the modulus; in this case, we observe that the friction coefficient increases again. Our results, therefore, show that the friction coefficient is directly related to the shear modulus; this has important repercussions for the transport of granular materials. In addition, the polydispersity of the sand is shown to also have a large effect on the friction coefficient. PMID:24836256

  19. Nuclear Fuel Plate Fabrication Employing Friction Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas E. Burkes; Neil P. Hallinan; Curtis R. Clark

    2008-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the friction bonding process, a novel modification of the more conventional friction stir welding process. The process has been modified to enable the fabrication of plate-type nuclear fuels for the conversion of research and test reactors currently operating using highly enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium. Discussions related to the specific modifications of the friction bonding process have been provided, in addition to challenges associated with these modifications. Progression of the process and solutions to the challenges are provided so that users of the friction stir welding process and those investigating fabrication of other laminar composites, where joining of one or more layers is essential, might draw from the authors’ experiences discussed in this paper.

  20. Frictional properties of a polycationic brush.

    PubMed

    Raftari, Maryam; Zhang, Zhenyu; Carter, Steven R; Leggett, Graham J; Geoghegan, Mark

    2014-04-28

    The frictional behaviour of end-grafted poly[2-(dimethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate] films (brushes) has been shown by friction force microscopy to be a strong function of pH in aqueous solution. Data were acquired using bare silicon nitride and gold-coated tips, and gold coated probes that were functionalized by the deposition of self-assembled monolayers. At the extremes of pH (pH = 1, 2, and 12), the friction-load relationship was found to be linear, in agreement with Amontons' law of macroscopic friction. However, at intermediate pH values, the data were fitted by single asperity contact mechanics models; both Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) and Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov models were observed, with JKR behaviour fitting the data better at relatively neutral pH. PMID:24668347