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Sample records for two-dimensional mhd simulations

  1. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of poloidal flows in tokamaks and MHD pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.

    2011-09-15

    Poloidal rotation is routinely observed in present-day tokamak experiments, in particular near the plasma edge and in the high-confinement mode of operation. According to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium theory [R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2439 (2000)], radial discontinuities form when the poloidal velocity exceeds the poloidal sound speed (or rather, more correctly, the poloidal magneto-slow speed). Two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic simulations show that the transonic discontinuities develop on a time scale of a plasma poloidal revolution to form an edge density pedestal and a localized velocity shear layer at the pedestal location. While such an MHD pedestal surrounds the entire core, the outboard side of the pedestal is driven by the transonic discontinuity while the inboard side is caused by a poloidal redistribution of the mass. The MHD simulations use a smooth momentum source to drive the poloidal flow. Soon after the flow exceeds the poloidal sound speed, the density pedestal and the velocity shear layer form and persist into a quasi steady state. These results may be relevant to the L-H transition, the early stages of the pedestal and edge transport barrier formation.

  2. Two-dimensional Numerical Simulation on Performance of Liquid Metal MHD Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Katsunori; Maeda, Tetsuhiko; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    The performance of a liquid metal MHD generator is investigated with a two-dimensional numerical simulation. The effects of the electrode length, the position of current lead connection and the insertion of insulator on the performance are examined taking account of the current flow in the electrode. There exists an optimal electrode length for a given distribution of applied magnetic flux density. For a short electrode, the efficiency decreases because the power output becomes small. For a long electrode, on the other hand, the efficiency also decreases owing to the leakage current from the upstream and downstream edges of the electrode. An optimal current lead position was revealed. This fact is ascribed to the distributions of induced magnetic field and the current flow in the electrode. It was found that the insertion of insulator is effective for improving the performance, by which the eddy current can be reduced.

  3. Two-dimensional Simulation of Magnetohydrodynamic Flow in a Liquid Metal MHD Generator Taking the Induced Magnetic Field into Consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuya; Maeda, Tetsuhiko; Hasegawa, Yasuo

    The magnetohydrodynamic flow in a liquid metal MHD generator is investigated with two-dimensional numerical simulation, where the induced magnetic field is considered. Numerical results indicate that the power output becomes the highest at the loading parameter of 0.64, which is higher than the loading parameter of 0.5 giving the highest power output in the theoretical analysis without the induced magnetic field. This results from the strong negative induced magnetic field with the low loading parameter. It is shown that the eddy current exists in the upstream and downstream region of the generator channel. And the induced magnetic flux density is the strongest at the center of the eddy current. This is because x-direction electric field is generated near the upstream and downstream edge of the electrodes. It is observed that the distributions of the x-direction velocity become M-shaped in the generator channel. In the downstream region, the M-shaped Hartmann velocity profile is developed with the high loading parameter. With the low loading parameter, on the contrary, the velocity in the main flow is higher than that near the wall.

  4. Two-dimensional MHD generator model. [GEN code

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, H. K.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Doss, E. D.

    1980-09-01

    A steady state, two-dimensional MHD generator code, GEN, is presented. The code solves the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, using a Von Mises transformation and a local linearization of the equations. By splitting the source terms into a part proportional to the axial pressure gradient and a part independent of the gradient, the pressure distribution along the channel is easily obtained to satisfy various criteria. Thus, the code can run effectively in both design modes, where the channel geometry is determined, and analysis modes, where the geometry is previously known. The code also employs a mixing length concept for turbulent flows, Cebeci and Chang's wall roughness model, and an extension of that model to the effective thermal diffusities. Results on code validation, as well as comparisons of skin friction and Stanton number calculations with experimental results, are presented.

  5. Evolution of generalized two-dimensional magnetotail equilibria in ideal and resistive MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Sitnov, M. I.; Lyon, J. G.

    2015-03-01

    We present results of two-dimensional (2-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the terrestrial magnetotail. A regional adaptation of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model is used. As initial conditions, we employ a class of asymptotic magnetotail equilibria with and without an accumulation of magnetic flux at the tailward end (a Bz hump). The former have been recently shown by full particle simulations to be unstable to a kinetic mode with formal properties of ion tearing. Thus, our goal here is to investigate the evolution of the same equilibria in the MHD approximation and assist in the physical interpretation of the kinetic simulations. This is additionally motivated by the energy principle considerations which suggest that if the system is unstable kinetically, it may also be unstable ideally. To seek dynamical MHD regimes similar to those observed in kinetic simulations, we implement two sets of boundary conditions (velocity balanced, VB, and momentum balanced, MB), one allowing plasma flows through the boundaries and the other inhibiting such flows. The use of more reflecting MB boundary conditions results in suppression of any significant dynamics, and we see no substantial changes beyond initial equilibrium relaxation. On the other hand, VB boundary conditions allow a more efficient relaxation of initial equilibrium and absorb subsequently generated plasma flows. With these boundary conditions we find the equilibrium without a flux accumulation (i.e., with constant magnetic field component normal to the current sheet) to develop an apparently resistive mode accompanied by tailward plasma flows. At the same time, the equilibria with a Bz hump of sufficiently large amplitude develop a different, ideal, mode characterized by spontaneous generation of earthward plasma flows and an exponential growth of the corresponding electric field. This growth is qualitatively similar to the corresponding fully kinetic simulations although no explosive growth of

  6. Two-dimensional MHD model of the Jovian magnetodisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislov, R. A.; Malova, H. V.; Vasko, I. Y.

    2015-09-01

    A self-consistent stationary axially symmetric MHD model of the Jovian magnetodisk is constructed. This model is a generalization of the models of plane current sheets that have been proposed earlier in order to describe the structure of the current sheet in the magnetotail of the Earth [1, 2]. The model takes centrifugal force, which is induced by the corotation electric field, and the azimuthal magnetic field into account. The configurations of the magnetic field lines for the isothermic (plasma temperature assumed to be constant) and the isentropic (plasma entropy assumed to be constant) models of the magnetodisk are determined. The dependence of the thickness of the magnetodisk on the distance to Jupiter is obtained. The thickness of the magnetodisk and the magnetic field distribution in the isothermic and isentropic models are similar. The inclusion of a low background plasma pressure results in a considerable reduction in the thickness of the magnetodisk. This effect may be attributed to the fact that centrifugal force prevails over the pressure gradient at large distances from the planet. The mechanism of unipolar induction and the related large-scale current system are analyzed. The direct and return Birkeland currents are determined in the approximation of a weak azimuthal magnetic field. The modeling results agree with theoretical estimates from other studies and experimental data.

  7. Hall MHD Modeling of Two-dimensional Reconnection: Application to MRX Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Lukin; S.C. Jardin

    2003-01-09

    Two-dimensional resistive Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code is used to investigate the dynamical evolution of driven reconnection in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). The initial conditions and dimensionless parameters of the simulation are set to be similar to the experimental values. We successfully reproduce many features of the time evolution of magnetic configurations for both co- and counter-helicity reconnection in MRX. The Hall effect is shown to be important during the early dynamic X-phase of MRX reconnection, while effectively negligible during the late ''steady-state'' Y-phase, when plasma heating takes place. Based on simple symmetry considerations, an experiment to directly measure the Hall effect in MRX configuration is proposed and numerical evidence for the expected outcome is given.

  8. Numerical simulations of two-dimensional QED

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, S.R.; Kenway, R.D.

    1986-02-01

    We describe the computer simulation of two-dimensional QED on a 64 x 64 Euclidean space-time lattice using the Susskind lattice fermion action. Theorder parameter for chiral symmetry breaking and the low-lying meson masses are calculated for both the model with two continuum flavours, which arises naturally in this formulation, and the model with one continuum falvour obtained by including a nonsymmetric mass term and setting one fermion mass equal to the cut-off. Results are compared with those obtined using the quenched approximation, and with analytic predictions.

  9. Two-Dimensional Solutions of MHD Equations with AN Adapted ROE Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Necdet

    1996-12-01

    In this paper a higher-order Godunov method for two-dimensional solutions of the ideal MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) equations is presented. The method utilizes the finite volume approach with quadrilateral cells. In Section 2 the MHD equations (including flux and source terms) in conservat ive form are given. The momentum flux is rearranged such that while a source vector is produced, the eigenstructure of the Jacobian matrix does not change. This rearrangement allows a full Roe averaging of the density, velocity and pressure for any value of adiabatic index (contrary to Brio and Wus conclusion (J. Comput. Phys., 75, 400 (1988)). Full Roe averaging for the magnetic field is possible only when the normal gradient of the magnetic field is negligible; otherwise an arithmetic averaging can be used. This new procedure to get Roe-averaged MHD fields at the interfaces between left and right states has been presented by Aslan (Ph.D. Thesis, University of Michigan, 1993; Int. j. numer. methods fluids, 22, 569-580 (1996)). This section also includes the shock structure and an eigensystem for MHD problems. The eigenvalues, right eigenvectors and wave strengths for MHD are given in detail to provide the reader with a full description. The second-order, limited finite volume approach which utilizes quadrilateral cells is given in full detail in Section 3. Section 4 gives one- and two-dimensional numerical results obtained from this method. Finally, conclusions are given in Section 5.

  10. Two-dimensional non-reacting jet-gas mixing in an MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) second stage combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Berry, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    Computer simulation is used to aid in the design of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) second stage combustor. A two-dimensional steady state computer model, based on mass and momentum conservation laws for multiple gas species, is used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the combustor in which a jet of oxidizer is injected into a confined cross-stream gas flow. The model predicts jet-gas mixing patterns by computing the velocity and species concentration distributions in the combustor. In this paper the effects of parametric variation of jet angle and flow symmetry on the mixing patterns were evaluated. The modeling helps to determine better mixing patterns for the combustor design because improved mixing can increase combustion efficiency and enhance MHD generator performance. A parametric study reveals that (1) non-reacting jet-gas mixing strongly depends on jet angle for coflow injection (jet angle < 90 degrees), (2) counterflow jets have better jet-gas mixing, (3) asymmetry of the inlet gas flow affects the mixing pattern, and (4) exit flow characteristics from two-dimensional simulation can be matched reasonably well with experimental data when experimental jet and simulated slot jet Reynolds numbers are of the same order. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Numerical analysis of real gas MHD flow on two-dimensional self-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xisto, Carlos M.; Páscoa, José C.; Oliveira, Paulo J.

    2015-07-01

    A self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster is a low-thrust electric propulsion space-system that enables the usage of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles for accelerating a plasma flow towards high speed exhaust velocities. It can produce an high specific impulse, making it suitable for long duration interplanetary space missions. In this paper numerical results obtained with a new code, which is being developed at C-MAST (Centre for Mechanical and Aerospace Technologies), for a two-dimensional self-field MPD thruster are presented. The numerical model is based on the macroscopic MHD equations for compressible and electrically resistive flow and is able to predict the two most important thrust mechanisms that are associated with this kind of propulsion system, namely the thermal thrust and the electromagnetic thrust. Moreover, due to the range of very high temperatures that could occur during the operation of the MPD, it also includes a real gas model for argon.

  12. On the Transition from Two-Dimensional to Three-Dimensional MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thess, A.; Zikanov, Oleg

    2004-01-01

    We report a theoretical investigation of the robustness of two-dimensional inviscid MHD flows at low magnetic Reynolds numbers with respect to three-dimensional perturbations. We analyze three model problems, namely flow in the interior of a triaxial ellipsoid, an unbounded vortex with elliptical streamlines, and a vortex sheet parallel to the magnetic field. We demonstrate that motion perpendicular to the magnetic field with elliptical streamlines becomes unstable with respect to the elliptical instability once the velocity has reached a critical magnitude whose value tends to zero as the eccentricity of the streamlines becomes large. Furthermore, vortex sheets parallel to the magnetic field, which are unstable for any velocity and any magnetic field, are found to emit eddies with vorticity perpendicular to the magnetic field and with an aspect ratio proportional to N(sup 1/2). The results suggest that purely two-dimensional motion without Joule energy dissipation is a singular type of flow which does not represent the asymptotic behaviour of three-dimensional MHD turbulence in the limit of infinitely strong magnetic fields.

  13. Simulating solar MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüssler, M.

    1999-05-01

    Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse') are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.

  14. Simulating solar MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüssler, M.

    1999-05-01

    Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse') are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.Key words. Solar physics · astrophysics and astronomy (photosphere and chromosphere; stellar interiors and dynamo theory; numerical simulation studies).

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulation for forced two-dimensional turbulence.

    PubMed

    Xia, YuXian; Qian, YueHong

    2014-08-01

    The direct numerical simulations of forced two-dimensional turbulent flow are presented by using the lattice Boltzmann method. The development of an energy-enstrophy double cascade is investigated in the two cases of external force of two-dimensional turbulence, Gaussian force and Kolmogorov force. It is found that the friction force is a necessary condition of the occurrence of a double cascade. The energy spectrum k(-3) in the enstrophy inertial range is in accord with the classical Kraichnan theory for both external forces. The energy spectrum of the Gaussian force case in an inverse cascade is k(-2); however, the Kolmogorov force drives the k(-5/3) energy in a backscatter cascade. The result agrees with Scott's standpoint, which describes nonrobustness of the two-dimensional turbulent inverse cascade. Also, intermittency is found for the enstrophy cascade in two cases of the external force form. Intermittency refers to the nonuniform distribution of saddle points in the two-dimensional turbulent flow. PMID:25215817

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulation for forced two-dimensional turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, YuXian; Qian, YueHong

    2014-08-01

    The direct numerical simulations of forced two-dimensional turbulent flow are presented by using the lattice Boltzmann method. The development of an energy-enstrophy double cascade is investigated in the two cases of external force of two-dimensional turbulence, Gaussian force and Kolmogorov force. It is found that the friction force is a necessary condition of the occurrence of a double cascade. The energy spectrum k-3 in the enstrophy inertial range is in accord with the classical Kraichnan theory for both external forces. The energy spectrum of the Gaussian force case in an inverse cascade is k-2; however, the Kolmogorov force drives the k-5/3 energy in a backscatter cascade. The result agrees with Scott's standpoint, which describes nonrobustness of the two-dimensional turbulent inverse cascade. Also, intermittency is found for the enstrophy cascade in two cases of the external force form. Intermittency refers to the nonuniform distribution of saddle points in the two-dimensional turbulent flow.

  17. Toward the Accurate Simulation of Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giussani, Angelo; Nenov, Artur; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Dumont, Elise; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional pump-probe electronic spectroscopy is a powerful technique able to provide both high spectral and temporal resolution, allowing the analysis of ultrafast complex reactions occurring via complementary pathways by the identification of decay-specific fingerprints. [1-2] The understanding of the origin of the experimentally recorded signals in a two-dimensional electronic spectrum requires the characterization of the electronic states involved in the electronic transitions photoinduced by the pump/probe pulses in the experiment. Such a goal constitutes a considerable computational challenge, since up to 100 states need to be described, for which state-of-the-art methods as RASSCF and RASPT2 have to be wisely employed. [3] With the present contribution, the main features and potentialities of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy are presented, together with the machinery in continuous development in our groups in order to compute two-dimensional electronic spectra. The results obtained using different level of theory and simulations are shown, bringing as examples the computed two-dimensional electronic spectra for some specific cases studied. [2-4] [1] Rivalta I, Nenov A, Cerullo G, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Int. J. Quantum Chem., 2014, 114, 85 [2] Nenov A, Segarra-Martí J, Giussani A, Conti I, Rivalta I, Dumont E, Jaiswal V K, Altavilla S, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Faraday Discuss. 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C4FD00175C [3] Nenov A, Giussani A, Segarra-Martí J, Jaiswal V K, Rivalta I, Cerullo G, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, J. Chem. Phys. submitted [4] Nenov A, Giussani A, Fingerhut B P, Rivalta I, Dumont E, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. Submitted [5] Krebs N, Pugliesi I, Hauer J, Riedle E, New J. Phys., 2013,15, 08501

  18. Two dimensional liquid crystal devices and their computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin

    The main focus of the dissertation is design and optimization two dimensional liquid crystal devices, which means the liquid crystal director configurations vary in two dimensions. Several optimized and designed devices are discussed in the dissertation. They include long-term bistable twisted nematic liquid crystal display (BTN LCD), which is very low power consumption LCD and suitable for E-book application; wavelength tunable liquid crystal Fabry-Perot etalon filter, which is one of the key components in fiber optic telecommunications; high speed refractive index variable devices, which can be used in infrared beam steering and telecommunications; high density polymer wall diffractive liquid crystal on silicon (PWD-LCoS) light valve, which is a promising candidate for larger screen projection display and also can be used in other display applications. Two dimensional liquid crystal director simulation program (relaxation method) and two dimensional optical propagation simulation program (finite-difference time-domain, FDTD method) are developed. The algorithms of these programs are provided. It has been proved that they are the very efficient tools that used in design and optimization the devices described above.

  19. Two-dimensional Lagrangian simulation of suspended sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional laterally averaged model for suspended sediment transport in steady gradually varied flow that is based on the Lagrangian reference frame is presented. The layered Lagrangian transport model (LLTM) for suspended sediment performs laterally averaged concentration. The elevations of nearly horizontal streamlines and the simulation time step are selected to optimize model stability and efficiency. The computational elements are parcels of water that are moved along the streamlines in the Lagrangian sense and are mixed with neighboring parcels. Three applications show that the LLTM can accurately simulate theoretical and empirical nonequilibrium suspended sediment distributions and slug injections of suspended sediment in a laboratory flume.

  20. Two-dimensional Vlasov code simulation of magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togano, K.; Umeda, T.; Ogino, T.

    2009-12-01

    There are numerous types of self-consistent simulations that treat plasmas according to some approximations. The fluid codes are used to study global and macroscopic processes in space plasmas. Nonlinear microscopic processes in space plasmas are studied with kinetic simulation codes. Numerical methods for kinetic simulations fall into two groups. One is particle-in-cell (PIC) method which follows motions of individual particles in a self-consistent electromagnetic field. However, a limitation on the number of particles gives rise to numerical thermal fluctuations. Another approach is Vlasov method which follows spatial and temporal development of distribution functions in the position-velocity phase space. In contrast to PIC codes, numerical noise is substantially suppressed. However, Vlasov codes require huge computer resources to represent distribution functions and Vlasov simulation techniques are still developing. Owing to the rapid advancement of recent computer technology, Vlasov code simulation would be more essential in the near future. In the present study, a new two-and-half-dimensional and fully electromagnetic Vlasov simulation code is developed in which phase-space distribution functions are defined in five-dimensional position-velocity phase space (x,y,vx,vy,vz). The Vlasov equation in two-dimensional configuration and three-dimensional velocity spaces is solved with a non-oscillatory and conservative scheme, and the full set of Maxwell’s equations are self-consistently solved based on the implicit Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) magnetic reconnection challenge is chosen as a benchmark test of our two-dimensional Vlasov code. The result is compared with the past simulation results with Darwin-Vlasov, explicit PIC and implicit PIC codes. The present simulation with a very-low spatial resolution gives a high growth rate of magnetic flux, which is in agreement with the results of the GEM

  1. High order hybrid numerical simulations of two dimensional detonation waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Wei

    1993-01-01

    In order to study multi-dimensional unstable detonation waves, a high order numerical scheme suitable for calculating the detailed transverse wave structures of multidimensional detonation waves was developed. The numerical algorithm uses a multi-domain approach so different numerical techniques can be applied for different components of detonation waves. The detonation waves are assumed to undergo an irreversible, unimolecular reaction A yields B. Several cases of unstable two dimensional detonation waves are simulated and detailed transverse wave interactions are documented. The numerical results show the importance of resolving the detonation front without excessive numerical viscosity in order to obtain the correct cellular patterns.

  2. One- and two-dimensional simulations of imploding metal shells

    SciTech Connect

    Keinigs, R.K.; Atchison, W.L.; Faehl, R.J.; Thomas, V.A.; Mclenithan, K.D.; Trainor, R.J.

    1999-06-01

    We report results of one- and two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic simulations of imploding, cylindrical metal shells. One-dimensional simulations are used to calculate implosion velocities of heavy liners driven by 30 MA currents. Accelerated by the j{times}B force, 45 g aluminum/tungsten composite liners achieve velocities on the order of 13 km/s. Used to impact a tungsten target, the liner produces shock pressures of approximately 14 Mbar. The first 2D simulations of these liners are also described. These simulations have focused on two problems: (1) the interaction of the liner with the electrically conducting glide planes, and (2) the effect of realistic surface perturbations on the dynamics of the implosion. The former interaction is confined primarily to the region of the contact point between the liner and glide plane, and does not seriously affect the inner liner surface. However a 0.2 {mu}m surface perturbation has a significant effect on the implosion dynamics. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Onset of solar flares as predicted by two-dimensional MHD-models of quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindotrejo, J.

    1985-01-01

    The close connection between the sudden disapperance (disparition brusque) of the quiescent prominences and the two-ribbon flares are well known. During this dynamic phase the prominence ascends rapidly (typically with a velocity about 100 Km/sec) and disappears. In another later stage is observed material falling back into the chromosphere. The impact of this downfalling matter on the chromosphere produces the H brightening, which shows the symmetric double pattern. The occurence of the disparition brusque is thought to be a consequence of a plasma instability of magnetohydrostatic (MHD) structures. By means of the MHD-energy principle, the stability properties of four prominence models are analyzed. It is shown that all considered models undergo instabilities for parameters outside of the observed range at quiescent prominences. The possibility that such instabilities in the flare parameter range may indicate just the onset of a flare is considered.

  4. Two-Dimensional Dynamic Simulation of a Continuous Foil Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. Jack; Choy, F. K.; Dzodzo, Milorad; Hsu, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the two dimensional(radial and circumferential) transient Navier-Stokes equations are used to solve the hydrodynamic problem in conjunction with the time dependent motion of the journal, and the deformable, spring supported foil. The elastic deformation of the foil and its supports are simulated by a finite element model. The time-dependent Navier-Stokes formulation is used to solve for the interaction between the fluid lubricant, the motion of the journal and the deformable foil boundary. The steady state, the quasi-transient and the full transient dynamic simulation of the foil-fluid journal interaction are examined on a comparative basis. For the steady state simulation, the fluid lubricant pressures are evaluated for a particular journal position, by means of an iterative scheme until convergence is achieved in both the fluid pressures and the corresponding foil deformation. For the quasi-transient case, the transient motion of the journal is calculated using a numerical integration scheme for the velocity and displacement of the journal. The deformation of the foil is evaluated through numerical iteration in feedback mode with the fluid film pressure generated by the journal motion until convergence at every time step is achieved. For the full transient simulation, a parallel real-time integration scheme is used to evaluate simultaneously the new journal position and the new deformed shape of the foil at each time step. The pressure of the fluid lubricant is iterated jointly with the corresponding journal position and the deformed foil geometry until convergence is achieved. A variable time-stepping Newmark-Beta integration procedure is used to evaluate the transient dynamics at each time step of the bearing.

  5. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of supercritical accretion flows revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Hong; Yuan, Feng; Bu, De-Fu; Ohsuga, Ken E-mail: fyuan@shao.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamics of super-Eddington accretion flows by performing two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Compared with previous works, in this paper we include the T {sub θφ} component of the viscous stress and consider various values of the viscous parameter α. We find that when T {sub θφ} is included, the rotational speed of the high-latitude flow decreases, while the density increases and decreases at the high and low latitudes, respectively. We calculate the radial profiles of inflow and outflow rates. We find that the inflow rate decreases inward, following a power law form of M-dot {sub in}∝r{sup s}. The value of s depends on the magnitude of α and is within the range of ∼0.4-1.0. Correspondingly, the radial profile of density becomes flatter compared with the case of a constant M-dot (r). We find that the density profile can be described by ρ(r)∝r {sup –p} and the value of p is almost same for a wide range of α ranging from α = 0.1 to 0.005. The inward decrease of inflow accretion rate is very similar to hot accretion flows, which is attributed to the mass loss in outflows. To study the origin of outflow, we analyze the convective stability of the slim disk. We find that depending on the value of α, the flow is marginally stable (when α is small) or unstable (when α is large). This is different from the case of hydrodynamical hot accretion flow, where radiation is dynamically unimportant and the flow is always convectively unstable. We speculate that the reason for the difference is because radiation can stabilize convection. The origin of outflow is thus likely because of the joint function of convection and radiation, but further investigation is required.

  6. Microscale simulation of bimolecular reaction in two dimensional porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porta, G.; Chaynikov, S.; Thovert, J.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.; Adler, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Reactive transport in porous media is typically modeled approximating key processes occurring at the pore-scale through a set of continuum- (or Darcy-) scale partial differential equations, the advection dispersion reaction equation (ADRE) being a widely used model. Such formulations hold under a set of assumptions which are not always met in the context of laboratory and/or field scale applications. These hypotheses involve spatial scale separation and restrictions on the magnitude of dimensionless parameters, such as the Damköhler and the Péclet numbers, characterizing the process. In this context, direct measurements and micro-scale numerical simulations are key to (1) assess the validity of upscaled continuum formulations, and (2) quantify the ability of such models to capture the key features of the process dynamics. Here, we focus on the simulation of a homogeneous irreversible bimolecular reaction of the kind A + B → C. We analyze the evolution of the process in the presence of different pore scale geometrical settings, upon performing numerical pore-scale simulations in ordered and disordered two dimensional arrays of cylinders. The selected pore scale geometries are characterized by different porosities and by the presence of large cavities and regions with different relative importance of diffusive and advective processes. A particle tracking methodology is employed to study the system dynamics and simulations are performed for a wide range of the Péclet and Damköhler numbers. The evolution of the features of the reactive transport process is analyzed on different observation scales. Our results show that the reactive transport process attains an asymptotic regime for which the reaction is limited by (effective) dispersion. The influence of the pore scale geometry on the asymptotic and pre-asymptotic behavior of the reaction rate globally observed in the domain is quantitatively analyzed. Local mixing features and related characteristic scales are

  7. One-and-Two-Dimensional Simulations of Liner Performance at Atlas Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Keinigs, R.K.; Atchison, W.L.; Faehl, R.J.; Mclenithan, K.D.; Trainor, R.J.

    1998-10-18

    The authors report results of one-and-two-dimensional MHD simulations of an imploding heavy liner in Z-pinch geometry. The driving current has a pulse shape and peak current characteristic of the Atlas pulsed-power facility being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One-dimensional simulations of heavy composite liners driven by 30 MA currents can achieve velocities on the order of 14 km/sec. Used to impact a tungsten target, the liner produces shock pressures of approximately fourteen megabars. The first 2-D simulations of imploding liners driven at Atlas current parameters are also described. These simulations have focused on the interaction of the liner with the glide planes, and the effect of realistic surface perturbations on the dynamics of the pinch. It is found that the former interaction does not seriously affect the inner liner surface. Results from the second problem indicate that a surface perturbation having amplitude as small as 0.2 {micro}m can have a significant effect on the implosion dynamics.

  8. Seabed disposal project two-dimensional axisymmetric penetrometer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, P.F.; Dawson, P.R.; Schuler, K.W.

    1980-03-01

    Preliminary two-dimensional, one-constituent hole closure analyses of an experimental apparatus and the flow of in situ ocean sediments following a penetrometer explacement have been performed. Boundary conditions associated with the experimental apparatus were found to greatly affect cavity response. Difficulties were encountered in modelling penetrometer-sediment interfaces and in obtaining smooth stress histories. The use of a different computer code in later analyses led to more realistic penetrometer-sediment interface models and to improved success in obtaining stress histories. These results along with some recommendations for future work are presented.

  9. Examination of instability growth in solid liner surfaces using comparisons of two dimensional MHD calculations and measured data

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, W.L.; Faehl, R.J.; Morgan, D.V.; Reinovsky, R.E.

    1997-10-01

    Experiments being conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus facility are examining stability issues for driving an aluminum liner with a pulsed magnetic field. The Pegasus facility provides a current of 5 to 8 Megamperes to compress a cylindrical liner. Liners of various size and thickness are used, depending on the specific experimental objectives. In several of these experiments, the outer surface clearly develops perturbations in the mass distribution. These perturbations are strongest when the aluminum is suspected to have melted and in some cases partially vaporized. A series of specific experiments was designed to examine the growth rate of these instabilities. These experiments involved machining a sine wave onto the outer surface of the liner to seed a given wavelength. Two-dimensional MHD calculations, using the measured current profile, were performed to model the behavior of the liner under magnetic field compression. These predictions were made with a 2D Eulerian code complete with a Steinburg-Guinan strength model. The results of these calculations will be discussed in this paper. The density contours at specific times will be compared with the processed radiography.

  10. Extended MHD Simulations of Spheromaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear extended MHD simulations of a spheromak in a cylindrical flux conserver are performed using the NIMROD code (JCP 195, 2004). An idealized series of simulations starting from a Grad-Shafranov equilibrium and small non-axisymmetric perturbations are performed to model the sustained decay phase. The resulting confinement leads to steep resistivity gradients. Strong current gradients develop, driving tearing modes that dominate the evolution of the spheromak. Absent in these simulations are the remains of n=1 fluctuations created during the formation process. A second series of simulations start from vacuum fields and model the full spheromak evolution, including the formation process where the n=1 fluctuations dominate. To understand the role of pressure driven instabilities in the evolution of the spheromak, a numerical diagnostic is developed to calculate the Mercier stability criterion from the axisymmetric fields.

  11. Cusp geometry in MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George; Crooker, Nancy; Siebert, Keith; Maynard, Nelson; Weimer, Daniel; White, Willard

    2005-01-01

    The MHD simulations described here show that the latitude of the high-altitude cusp decreases as the IMF swings from North to South, that there is a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at high-altitude associated with a dawn dusk component of the IMF, and that at the same time there is also a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at low-altitude. The simulations generate a feature that represents what has been called the cleft. It appears as a tail (when the IMF has a By component) attached to the cusp, extending either toward the dawn flank or the dusk flank depending on the dawn dusk orientation of the IMF. This one-sided cleft connects the cusp to the magnetospheric sash. We compare cusp geometry predicted by MHD simulations against published observations based on Hawkeye and DMSP data. Regarding the high-altitude predictions, the comparisons are not definitive, mainly because the observations are incomplete or mutually inconsistent. Regarding the low-altitude prediction of a strong dawn dusk asymmetry, the observations are unambiguous and are in good qualitative agreement with the prediction.

  12. Simulation of deep one- and two-dimensional redshift surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. Richard, III

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that slice or pencil-beam redshift surveys of galaxies can be simulated in a box with nonequal sides. This method saves a lot of computer time and memory while providing essentially the same results as from whole-cube simulations. A 2457.6/h Mpc-long rod (out to a redshift z = 0.58 in two opposite directions) is simulated using the standard biased cold dark matter model as an example to mimic the recent deep pencil-beam surveys by Broadhurst et al. (1990). The structures (spikes) seen in these simulated samples occur when the narrow pencil-beam pierces walls, filaments, and clusters appearing randomly along the line-of-sight. A statistical test for goodness of fit to a periodic lattice has been applied to the observations and the simulations. It is found that the statistical significance level (P = 15.4 percent) is not strong enough to reject the null hypothesis that the observations and the simulations were drawn at random from the same set.

  13. Two-dimensional simulations of the inertial electrostatic confinement device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocchino, Alberto; Lapenta, Giovanni; Evstatiev, Evstati; Nebel, Richard; Park, Jaeyoung

    2006-04-01

    We discuss the application of the CELESTE simulation package to the simulation of the experiments conducted at the Los Alamos Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device. Recently considerable experimental advances have been made in understanding of the stability of the virtual cathode and in the physics of POPS. This momentous experimental advance requires a new simulation effort for explaining the new experimental findings, particularly in the area of stability of the configurations obtained experimentally. We have conducted a 2D stability study of the virtual cathode in the IEC device using the DEMOCRITUS package. DEMOCRITUS is a 2D general geometry electrostatic PIC code. In the present study we have done complete stability study and investigate the two-stream instability occuring in the IEC device.

  14. Two-dimensional lattice polymers: Adaptive windows simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Netto, A. G.; Dickman, Ronald; Caparica, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    We report a numerical study of self-avoiding polymers on the square lattice, including an attractive potential between nonconsecutive monomers occupying neighboring lattice sites. Using Wang-Landau sampling (WLS) with adaptive windows, we obtain the density of states for chains of up to N=300 monomers and associated thermodynamic quantities. Finite size scaling analysis yields a transition temperature of Θ=1.505(18). WLS with adaptive windows enables one to simulate accurately the low-temperature regime, which is virtually inaccessible using traditional methods. Instead of defining fixed energy windows, as in usual WLS, this method uses windows with boundaries that depend on the set of energy values on which the histogram is flat at a given stage of the simulation. Shifting the windows each time the modification factor f is reduced, we eliminate border effects that arise in simulations using fixed windows.

  15. Simulation of two-dimensional waterflooding using mixed finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chavent, G.; Jaffre, J.; Cohen, G.; Dupuy, M.; Dieste, I.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for the simulation of incompressible diphasic flows in two dimensions is presented, the distinctive features of which are: (1) reformation of the basic equation and specific choices of the finite element approximation of the same; (11) use of a mixed finite elements method, approximating both scalar and vector functions. Several test examples are shown, including gravity and capillary effects. The use of discontinuous basis functions proved successful for an accurate representation of sharp fronts. 16 refs.

  16. Quasi-two dimensional simulations of electron thermal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, B.; Horton, W.

    2003-10-01

    There exist two leading theoretical turbulent transport models which are driven by the electron temperature gradient and induce anomalous electron transport in tokamaks: (1) electron temperature gradient (ETG) and (2) trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence [1,2]. In ETG turbulence, the instability leads to the formation of small scale (on the order of q ρe R/L_Te and c / ω_pe) vortices which provide transport via the toroidal curvature analog of Rayleigh-Benard convection. In contrast, the larger scale (on the order of ρ_s) TEM/ITG turbulence has no clear critical electron temperature gradient and can be driven by the density gradient alone or the ion temperature gradient. Thus, we present 2D psuedo-spectral simulations of these two models and constrast their electron transport properties. Particular attention is given to the scaling of the anomalous heat flux with the electron temperature gradient, holding other parameters fixed. 1. G. G.Craddock, et al., Phys. Plasmas 1 (6), 1877 (1994). 2. D.A. Baver, P.W. Terry, and R. Gatto, Phys. Plasmas 9 (8), 3318 (2002).

  17. One- and two-dimensional STEALTH simulations of fuel-pin transient response. Final report. [BWR; PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Wahi, K.K.

    1980-08-01

    This report presents an assessment of the adaptability of EPRI's one- and two-dimensional STEALTH computer codes to perform transient fuel rod analysis. The ability of the STEALTH code to simulate transient mechanical or thermomechanical loss-of-coolant accident is described. Analytic models of one- and two-dimensional formulations and features included in the two-dimensional simulation are discussed.

  18. Arrays of individually controlled ions suitable for two-dimensional quantum simulations

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Manuel; Kalis, Henning; Wittemer, Matthias; Hakelberg, Frederick; Warring, Ulrich; Schmied, Roman; Blain, Matthew; Maunz, Peter; Moehring, David L.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Schaetz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    A precisely controlled quantum system may reveal a fundamental understanding of another, less accessible system of interest. A universal quantum computer is currently out of reach, but an analogue quantum simulator that makes relevant observables, interactions and states of a quantum model accessible could permit insight into complex dynamics. Several platforms have been suggested and proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted. Here, we operate two-dimensional arrays of three trapped ions in individually controlled harmonic wells forming equilateral triangles with side lengths 40 and 80 μm. In our approach, which is scalable to arbitrary two-dimensional lattices, we demonstrate individual control of the electronic and motional degrees of freedom, preparation of a fiducial initial state with ion motion close to the ground state, as well as a tuning of couplings between ions within experimental sequences. Our work paves the way towards a quantum simulator of two-dimensional systems designed at will. PMID:27291425

  19. Arrays of individually controlled ions suitable for two-dimensional quantum simulations.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, Manuel; Kalis, Henning; Wittemer, Matthias; Hakelberg, Frederick; Warring, Ulrich; Schmied, Roman; Blain, Matthew; Maunz, Peter; Moehring, David L; Leibfried, Dietrich; Schaetz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    A precisely controlled quantum system may reveal a fundamental understanding of another, less accessible system of interest. A universal quantum computer is currently out of reach, but an analogue quantum simulator that makes relevant observables, interactions and states of a quantum model accessible could permit insight into complex dynamics. Several platforms have been suggested and proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted. Here, we operate two-dimensional arrays of three trapped ions in individually controlled harmonic wells forming equilateral triangles with side lengths 40 and 80 μm. In our approach, which is scalable to arbitrary two-dimensional lattices, we demonstrate individual control of the electronic and motional degrees of freedom, preparation of a fiducial initial state with ion motion close to the ground state, as well as a tuning of couplings between ions within experimental sequences. Our work paves the way towards a quantum simulator of two-dimensional systems designed at will. PMID:27291425

  20. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional multimode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Thornber, B.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-03-15

    The two-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs as shock waves pass through a perturbed material interface, triggering transition to an inhomogeneous turbulence variable density flow. This paper presents a series of large-eddy-simulations of the two dimensional turbulent RM instability and compares the results to the fully three dimensional simulations. There are two aims for this paper, the first is to explore what numerical resolution is required for a statistically converged solution for a two dimensional inhomogeneous flow field. The second aim is to elucidate the key differences in flow physics between the two dimensional and three dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities, particularly their asymptotic self-similar regime. Convergence is achieved using 64 independent realisations and grid resolutions up to 4096{sup 2} in the plane. It is shown that for narrowband cases the growth rate θ = 0.48 which is substantially higher than the three-dimensional equivalent. Mix measures are consistently lower compared to three-dimensional, and the kinetic energy distribution is homogeneous at late time. The broadband case has a similar initial growth rate as the three-dimensional case, with a marginally lower θ = 0.63. Mix is similar in magnitude, but is reducing at late time. The spectra in both cases exhibit the dual-cascade expected from two-dimensional turbulence.

  1. Implicit Predictor-Corrector finite difference scheme for the ideal MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, T.; Yu, H.; Lai, S.

    2012-12-01

    A innovative simulation code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is developed. We present a multiple-dimensional MHD code based on high-order implicit predictor-corrector finite difference scheme (high-order IPCFD scheme). High-order IPCFD scheme adopts high-order predictor-corrector scheme for the time integration and high-order central difference method as the spatial derivative solver. We use Elimination-of-the-Runoff-Errors (ERE) technology to avoid the numerical oscillations and numerical instability in the simulation results. In one-dimensional MHD problem, our simulation results show good agreement with the Brio & Wu MHD shock tube problem. The divergent B constraint remains fully satisfied, that is the divergent B equals to zero throughout the simulation. When solving the two-dimensional (2D) linear wave in MHD plasma, we clearly obtain the group-velocity Friedrichs diagrams of the MHD waves. Here we demonstrate 2D simulation results of rotor problem, Orszag-Tang vortex system, vortex type K-H instability, and kink type K-H instability by using our IPCFD MHD code and discuss the advantage of our simulation code.

  2. Evidence of Active MHD Instability in EULAG-MHD Simulations of Solar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Nicolas; Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the possible development of magnetohydrodynamical instabilities in the EULAG-MHD “millennium simulation” of Passos & Charbonneau. This simulation sustains a large-scale magnetic cycle characterized by solar-like polarity reversals taking place on a regular multidecadal cadence, and in which zonally oriented bands of strong magnetic fields accumulate below the convective layers, in response to turbulent pumping from above in successive magnetic half-cycles. Key aspects of this simulation include low numerical dissipation and a strongly sub-adiabatic fluid layer underlying the convectively unstable layers corresponding to the modeled solar convection zone. These properties are conducive to the growth and development of two-dimensional instabilities that are otherwise suppressed by stronger dissipation. We find evidence for the action of a non-axisymmetric magnetoshear instability operating in the upper portions of the stably stratified fluid layers. We also investigate the possibility that the Tayler instability may be contributing to the destabilization of the large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component at high latitudes. On the basis of our analyses, we propose a global dynamo scenario whereby the magnetic cycle is driven primarily by turbulent dynamo action in the convecting layers, but MHD instabilities accelerate the dissipation of the magnetic field pumped down into the overshoot and stable layers, thus perhaps significantly influencing the magnetic cycle period. Support for this scenario is found in the distinct global dynamo behaviors observed in an otherwise identical EULAG-MHD simulations, using a different degree of sub-adiabaticity in the stable fluid layers underlying the convection zone.

  3. Simulations of the Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of the Photosystem II Reaction Center

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, K. L. M.; Fuller, F. D.; Myers, J. A.; Yocum, C. F.; Mukamel, S.; Abramavicius, D.; Ogilvie, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    We report simulations of the two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the Qy band of the D1-D2-Cyt b559 photosystem II reaction center at 77 K. We base the simulations on an existing Hamiltonian that was derived by simultaneous fitting to a wide range of linear spectroscopic measurements and described within modified Redfield theory. The model obtains reasonable agreement with most aspects of the two-dimensional spectra, including the overall peak shapes and excited state absorption features. It does not reproduce the rapid equilibration from high energy to low energy excitonic states evident by a strong cross-peak below the diagonal. We explore modifications to the model to incorporate new structural data and improve agreement with the two-dimensional spectra. We find that strengthening the system–bath coupling and lowering the degree of disorder significantly improves agreement with the cross-peak feature, while lessening agreement with the relative diagonal/antidiagonal width of the 2D spectra. We conclude that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy provides a sensitive test of excitonic models of the photosystem II reaction center and discuss avenues for further refinement of such models. PMID:23210463

  4. Quantitative analysis of voids in percolating structures in two-dimensional N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Patrick M.; Melott, Adrian L.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1993-01-01

    We present in this paper a quantitative method for defining void size in large-scale structure based on percolation threshold density. Beginning with two-dimensional gravitational clustering simulations smoothed to the threshold of nonlinearity, we perform percolation analysis to determine the large scale structure. The resulting objective definition of voids has a natural scaling property, is topologically interesting, and can be applied immediately to redshift surveys.

  5. A two-dimensional model simulation of the EL Chichon volcanic eruption cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, L. A.; Riegel, C. A.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Turco, R. P.; Santhanam, K.

    1983-01-01

    Using a two-dimensional model of sulfate photochemistry, transport, and aerosol microphysics, a 2-year period following the eruptions of El Chichon have been simulated. Present calculations suggest that the residence time of the cloud in the stratosphere exceeds 2 years. The model reproduces the observed optical depth, lidar backscatter, and infrared extinction coefficients, if about 10 megatonnes of SO2 are injected. The major deficiency of the model is a somewhat too rapid transport.

  6. MHD simulation studies of z-pinch shear flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, I.; Bauer, B. S.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Makhin, V.; Siemon, R. E.

    2003-10-01

    The development of the m=0 instability in a z-pinch in the presence of sheared plasma flows is investigated with the aid of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation code (MHRDR). The linear growth rates are compared to the results obtained by solving the ideal MHD linearized equations [1] and to the results obtained using a 3D hybrid simulation code [2]. The instability development is followed into the nonlinear regime where its growth and saturation are examined. [1] V.I. Sotnikov, I. Paraschiv, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, J.-N. Leboeuf, and J.M. Dawson, "Linear analysis of sheared flow stabilization of global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities based on the Hall fluid mode", Phys. Plasmas 9, 913 (2002). [2] V.I. Sotnikov, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, P. Hellinger, P. Travnicek, V. Fiala, J.-N. Leboeuf, "Hybrid Simulations of Current-Carrying Instabilities in Z-pinch Plasmas with Sheared Axial Flow", AIP Conference Proceedings, Volume 651, Dense Z-Pinches: 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, edited by J. Davis et al., page 396, June 2002.

  7. MHD Simulation of the Inverse Pinch Plasma Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Esaulov, A; Bauer, B; Lindemuth, I; Makhin, V; Presura, R; Ryutov, D

    2004-07-01

    A wall confined plasma in an inverse pinch configuration holds potential as a plasma target for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) as well as the simple geometry to study wall-confined plasma. An experiment is planned to study the inverse pinch configuration using the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). The dynamics of the discharge formation have been analyzed using analytic models and numerical methods. Strong heating occurs by thermalization of directed energy when an outward moving current sheet (the inverse pinch effect) collides with the outer wall of the experimental chamber. Two dimensional MHD simulations show Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov -like modes of instability, as expected because of the shock acceleration during plasma formation phase. The instabilities are not disruptive, but give rise to a mild level of turbulence. The conclusion from this work is that an interesting experiment relevant to wall confinement for MTF could be done using existing equipment at UNR.

  8. Simulations of Two-dimensional Infrared and Stimulated Resonance Raman Spectra of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Preketes, Nicholas K; Biggs, Jason D; Ren, Hao; Andricioaei, Ioan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    We present simulations of one and two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) and stimulated resonance Raman (SRR) spectra of the dark state (pG) and early red-shifted intermediate (pR) of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Shifts in the amide I and Glu46 COOH stretching bands distinguish between pG and pR in the IR absorption and 2DIR spectra. The one-dimensional SRR spectra are similar to the spontaneous RR spectra. The two-dimensional SRR spectra show large changes in cross peaks involving the C=O stretch of the two species and are more sensitive to the chromophore structure than 2DIR spectra. PMID:24244064

  9. Two-dimensional Green`s function Poisson solution appropriate for cylindrical-symmetry simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.

    1998-04-01

    This report describes the numerical procedure used to implement the Green`s function method for solving the Poisson equation in two-dimensional (r,z) cylindrical coordinates. The procedure can determine the solution to a problem with any or all of the applied voltage boundary conditions, dielectric media, floating (insulated) conducting media, dielectric surface charging, and volumetric space charge. The numerical solution is reasonably fast, and the dimension of the linear problem to be solved is that of the number of elements needed to represent the surfaces, not the whole computational volume. The method of solution is useful in the simulation of plasma particle motion in the vicinity of complex surface structures as found in microelectronics plasma processing applications. This report is a stand-alone supplement to the previous Sandia Technical Report SAND98-0537 presenting the two-dimensional Cartesian Poisson solver.

  10. An analytical model for simulating two-dimensional multispecies plume migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jui-Sheng; Liang, Ching-Ping; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Li, Loretta Y.

    2016-02-01

    The two-dimensional advection-dispersion equations coupled with sequential first-order decay reactions involving arbitrary number of species in groundwater system is considered to predict the two-dimensional plume behavior of decaying contaminant such as radionuclide and dissolved chlorinated solvent. Generalized analytical solutions in compact format are derived through the sequential application of the Laplace, finite Fourier cosine, and generalized integral transform to reduce the coupled partial differential equation system to a set of linear algebraic equations. The system of algebraic equations is next solved for each species in the transformed domain, and the solutions in the original domain are then obtained through consecutive integral transform inversions. Explicit form solutions for a special case are derived using the generalized analytical solutions and are compared with the numerical solutions. The analytical results indicate that the analytical solutions are robust, accurate and useful for simulation or screening tools to assess plume behaviors of decaying contaminants.

  11. Two-dimensional simulations of possible mesoscale effects of nuclear war fires: 1. Model description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Filippo

    1989-01-01

    In this paper and the companion paper by Giorgi and Visconti [this issue] a two-dimensional mesoscale meteorological model is coupled to an aerosol model to investigate possible mesoscale effects of nuclear war fires. The meteorological model used in this study is a two-dimensional analog of the Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model with enhancements in the areas of radiative transfer, surface physics, and moisture physics. The aerosol model solves equations for the hygroscopic and hydrophobic fractions of particulate material and includes particle transport, sedimentation, dry-deposition, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, and a first order term accounting for aerosol aging. In this paper the meteorological model and the aerosol model are first described and then applied, as an illustrative example, to a simulation of the development of sea-breezelike circulations induced by contrasts in soil moisture available for evaporation.

  12. Two-dimensional simulations of possible mesoscale effects of nuclear war fires 1. Model description

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, F.

    1989-01-20

    In this paper and the companion paper by Giorgi and Visconti (this issue) a two-dimensional mesoscale meteorological model is coupled to an aerosol model to investigate possible mesoscale effects of nuclear war fires. The meteorological model used in this study is a two-dimensional analog of the Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model with enhancements in the areas of radiative transfer, surface physics, and moisture physics. The aerosol model solves equations for the hygroscopic and hydrophobic fractions of particulate material and includes particle transport, sedimentation, dry-deposition, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, and a first order term accounting for aerosol aging. In this paper the meteorological model and the aerosol model are first described and then applied, as an illustrative example, to a simulation of the development of sea-breezelike circulations induced by contrasts in soil moisture available for evaporation. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  13. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  14. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of boron diffusion for pyramidally textured silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Fa-Jun Duttagupta, Shubham; Shetty, Kishan Devappa; Meng, Lei; Hoex, Bram; Peters, Ian Marius; Samudra, Ganesh S.

    2014-11-14

    Multidimensional numerical simulation of boron diffusion is of great relevance for the improvement of industrial n-type crystalline silicon wafer solar cells. However, surface passivation of boron diffused area is typically studied in one dimension on planar lifetime samples. This approach neglects the effects of the solar cell pyramidal texture on the boron doping process and resulting doping profile. In this work, we present a theoretical study using a two-dimensional surface morphology for pyramidally textured samples. The boron diffusivity and segregation coefficient between oxide and silicon in simulation are determined by reproducing measured one-dimensional boron depth profiles prepared using different boron diffusion recipes on planar samples. The established parameters are subsequently used to simulate the boron diffusion process on textured samples. The simulated junction depth is found to agree quantitatively well with electron beam induced current measurements. Finally, chemical passivation on planar and textured samples is compared in device simulation. Particularly, a two-dimensional approach is adopted for textured samples to evaluate chemical passivation. The intrinsic emitter saturation current density, which is only related to Auger and radiative recombination, is also simulated for both planar and textured samples. The differences between planar and textured samples are discussed.

  15. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of boron diffusion for pyramidally textured silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fa-Jun; Duttagupta, Shubham; Shetty, Kishan Devappa; Meng, Lei; Samudra, Ganesh S.; Hoex, Bram; Peters, Ian Marius

    2014-11-01

    Multidimensional numerical simulation of boron diffusion is of great relevance for the improvement of industrial n-type crystalline silicon wafer solar cells. However, surface passivation of boron diffused area is typically studied in one dimension on planar lifetime samples. This approach neglects the effects of the solar cell pyramidal texture on the boron doping process and resulting doping profile. In this work, we present a theoretical study using a two-dimensional surface morphology for pyramidally textured samples. The boron diffusivity and segregation coefficient between oxide and silicon in simulation are determined by reproducing measured one-dimensional boron depth profiles prepared using different boron diffusion recipes on planar samples. The established parameters are subsequently used to simulate the boron diffusion process on textured samples. The simulated junction depth is found to agree quantitatively well with electron beam induced current measurements. Finally, chemical passivation on planar and textured samples is compared in device simulation. Particularly, a two-dimensional approach is adopted for textured samples to evaluate chemical passivation. The intrinsic emitter saturation current density, which is only related to Auger and radiative recombination, is also simulated for both planar and textured samples. The differences between planar and textured samples are discussed.

  16. Simulation of two-dimensional propagation and scattering of ultrasonic waves on personal computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Hyunjune; Choi, Yongseok

    2001-04-01

    Several problems of two-dimensional propagation and scattering of ultrasonic waves are simulated and visualized by using a program based on the mass-spring lattice model. The problems are related to reflection, refraction, and diffraction of ultrasonic waves. It is found that all numerical results are in good qualitative agreement with the wave mechanics. Features incorporated into the updated program are explained. Though the present state is far from our ultimate goal to develop a complete simulator of ultrasonic testing, the developed software is useful for educational purposes even at the present stage of development.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of a strongly interacting two-dimensional Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Jasmine; Mendoza, Miller; Young, Ryan E.; Romatschke, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We present fully nonlinear dissipative fluid dynamics simulations of a strongly interacting trapped two-dimensional Fermi gas using a lattice Boltzmann algorithm. We are able to simulate nonharmonic trapping potentials, temperature-dependent viscosities, as well as a discretized version of the ballistic (noninteracting) behavior. Our approach lends itself to direct comparison with experimental data, opening up the possibility of a precision determination of transport coefficients in the strongly interacting Fermi gas. Furthermore, we predict the presence of a strongly damped ("nonhydrodynamic") component in the quadrupole mode, which should be observable experimentally.

  18. A bounded two dimensional PIC-MCC code for simulating processing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vahedi, V.; Birdsall, C.K.; Lieberman, M.A.

    1992-12-01

    The authors have developed a bounded two dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code with a Monte Carlo Collision (MCC) handler to study processing discharges. The MCC package models the collisions, between charged and neutral particles, which are needed to obtain a self sustained plasma and the proper electron and ion energy loss mechanisms. The simulations are aimed at determining uniformity of particle fluxes (magnitude and angle) across a typical target. Some early results are obtained from an x-y model with electrode area ratio of 6:1; a similar r-z model is in progress which can be used to study cylindrical chambers.

  19. One- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation using experimentally generated reversing flow turbuulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.F.

    1990-08-01

    The activities described in this report do not constitute a continuum but rather a series of linked smaller investigations in the general area of one- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation. The initial impetus for these investigations was the development and construction of the Mechanical Engineering Test Rig (METR) under a grant awarded by NASA to Dr. Terry Simon at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota. The purpose of the METR is to provide experimental data on oscillating turbulent flows in Stirling machine working fluid flow path components (heater, cooler, regenerator, etc.) with particular emphasis on laminar/turbulent flow transitions. Hence, the initial goals for the grant awarded by NASA were, broadly, to provide computer simulation backup for the design of the METR and to analyze the results produced. This was envisaged in two phases: First, to apply an existing one-dimensional Stirling machine simulation code to the METR and second, to adapt a two-dimensional fluid mechanics code which had been developed for simulating high Rayleigh number buoyant cavity flows to the METR. The key aspect of this latter component was the development of an appropriate turbulence model suitable for generalized application to Stirling simulation. A final-step was then to apply the two-dimensional code to an existing Stirling machine for which adequate experimental data exist. The work described herein was carried out over a period of three years on a part-time basis. Forty percent of the first year`s funding was provided as a match to the NASA funds by the Underground Space Center, University of Minnesota, which also made its computing facilities available to the project at no charge.

  20. 3D simulation studies of tokamak plasmas using MHD and extended-MHD models

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) tokamak simulation project aims at the simulation of tokamak plasmas using a multi-level tokamak code package. Several current applications using MHD and Extended-MHD models are presented; high-{beta} disruption studies in reversed shear plasmas using the MHD level MH3D code, {omega}{sub *i} stabilization and nonlinear island saturation of TAE mode using the hybrid particle/MHD level MH3D-K code, and unstructured mesh MH3D{sup ++} code studies. In particular, three internal mode disruption mechanisms are identified from simulation results which agree which agree well with experimental data.

  1. Solar Wind Prediction at Pluto During the New Horizons Flyby: Results From a Two-Dimensional Multi-fluid MHD Model of the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, B.; Toth, G.; Opher, M.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    We adapted the outer heliosphere (OH) component of the Space Weather Modeling Framework, which is a 3-D global multi-fluid MHD model of the outer heliosphere with one ion fluid and four neutral populations, for time-dependent 2-D multi-fluid MHD simulations of solar wind propagation from a heliocentric distance of 1 AU up to 50 AU. We used this model to predict the solar wind plasma parameters as well as the interplanetary magnetic field components at Pluto and along the New Horizons trajectory during the whole calendar year of 2015 including the closest approach on July 14. The simulation is run in the solar equatorial plane in the heliographic inertial frame (HGI). The inner boundary conditions along a circle of 1 AU radius are set by near-Earth solar wind observations (hourly OMNI data), assuming that the global solar wind distribution does not change much during a Carrington rotation (27.2753 days). Our 2-D multi-fluid MHD code evolves one ion fluid and two neutral fluids, which are the primary interstellar neutral atoms and the interstellar neutral atoms deflected in the outer heliosheath between the slow bow shock and the heliopause. Spherical expansion effects are properly taken into account for the ions and the solar magnetic field. The inflow parameters of the two neutral fluids (density, temperature, and velocity components) are set at the negative X (HGI) boundary at 50 AU distance, which are taken from previous 3-D global multi-fluid MHD simulations of the heliospheric interface in a much larger simulation box (1500x1500x1500 AU). The inflow velocity vectors of the two neutral fluids define the so-called hydrogen deflection plane. The solar wind ions and the interstellar neutrals interact through charge exchange source terms included in the multi-fluid MHD equations, so the two neutral populations are evolved self-consistently. We validate our model with the available plasma data from New Horizons as well as with Voyager 2 plasma and magnetic field

  2. Preliminary results for a two-dimensional simulation of the working process of a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Makhkamov, K.K.; Ingham, D.B.

    1998-07-01

    Stirling engines have several potential advantages over existing types of engines, in particular they can use renewable energy sources for power production and their performance meets the demands on the environmental security. In order to design Stirling Engines properly, and to put into effect their potential performance, it is important to more accurately mathematically simulate its working process. At present, a series of very important mathematical models are used for describing the working process of Stirling Engines and these are, in general, classified as models of three levels. All the models consider one-dimensional schemes for the engine and assume a uniform fluid velocity, temperature and pressure profiles at each plane of the internal gas circuit of the engine. The use of two-dimensional CFD models can significantly extend the capabilities for the detailed analysis of the complex heat transfer and gas dynamic processes which occur in the internal gas circuit, as well as in the external circuit of the engine. In this paper a two-dimensional simplified frame (no construction walls) calculation scheme for the Stirling Engine has been assumed and the standard {kappa}-{var{underscore}epsilon} turbulence model has been used for the analysis of the engine working process. The results obtained show that the use of two-dimensional CFD models gives the possibility of gaining a much greater insight into the fluid flow and heat transfer processes which occur in Stirling Engines.

  3. Two-dimensional numerical simulation of flow around three-stranded rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Wan, Rong; Huang, Liuyi; Zhao, Fenfang; Sun, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Three-stranded rope is widely used in fishing gear and mooring system. Results of numerical simulation are presented for flow around a three-stranded rope in uniform flow. The simulation was carried out to study the hydrodynamic characteristics of pressure and velocity fields of steady incompressible laminar and turbulent wakes behind a three-stranded rope. A three-cylinder configuration and single circular cylinder configuration are used to model the three-stranded rope in the two-dimensional simulation. The governing equations, Navier-Stokes equations, are solved by using two-dimensional finite volume method. The turbulence flow is simulated using Standard κ-ɛ model and Shear-Stress Transport κ-ω (SST) model. The drag of the three-cylinder model and single cylinder model is calculated for different Reynolds numbers by using control volume analysis method. The pressure coefficient is also calculated for the turbulent model and laminar model based on the control surface method. From the comparison of the drag coefficient and the pressure of the single cylinder and three-cylinder models, it is found that the drag coefficients of the three-cylinder model are generally 1.3-1.5 times those of the single circular cylinder for different Reynolds numbers. Comparing the numerical results with water tank test data, the results of the three-cylinder model are closer to the experiment results than the single cylinder model results.

  4. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  5. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaw, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W=4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. We also simulate jets with the more realistic initial conditions for injecting jets for helical mangetic field, perturbed density, velocity, and internal energy, which are supposed to be caused in the process of jet generation. Three possible explanations for the observed variability are (i) tidal disruption of a star falling into the black hole, (ii) instabilities in the relativistic accretion disk, and (iii) jet-related PRocesses. New results will be reported at the meeting.

  6. Thermal structure of the ionosphere of Mars - simulations with one- and two-dimensional models

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, R.P.; Whitten, R.C.

    1988-05-01

    Heat flux saturation effects are included in the present one- and two-dimensional models of the Martian upper ionosphere's thermal structure. The inclusion of small upper boundary and volume heat sources is found to yield satisfactory simulations of the dayside ion temperature observation results obtained by Viking 1's retarding potential analyzers. It is noted that the plasma flow-transport of heat from the dayside to the nightside makes no contribution to the ion and electron temperatures that have been calculated for the nightside. 22 references.

  7. Thermal structure of the ionosphere of Mars - Simulations with one- and two-dimensional models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Heat flux saturation effects are included in the present one- and two-dimensional models of the Martian upper ionosphere's thermal structure. The inclusion of small upper boundary and volume heat sources is found to yield satisfactory simulations of the dayside ion temperature observation results obtained by Viking 1's retarding potential analyzers. It is noted that the plasma flow-transport of heat from the dayside to the nightside makes no contribution to the ion and electron temperatures that have been calculated for the nightside.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of two-dimensional flux-line-lattice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Nagaosa, N. )

    1993-09-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of a two-dimensional flux-line-lattice (FLL) melting transition is presented. The internal energy, specific heat, Abrikosov ratio, and diffraction pattern of the magnitude [vert bar][psi]([ital x])[vert bar][sup 2] of the order-parameter field are calculated. By examining in detail the hysteresis, histogram, and relaxation profiles of the internal energy, the existence of a first-order phase transition is concluded. Below the transition temperature [ital t][sub [ital m

  9. Simulation of two-dimensional electronic spectra of phycoerythrin 545 at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xuan; Liang, Xian-Ting

    2014-10-30

    By using a hierarchical equations-of-motion approach, we reproduce the two-dimensional electronic spectra of phycoerythrin 545 from Rhodomonas CS24 at ambient temperature (294 K). The simulated spectra are in agreement with the experimental results reported in Wong et al. (Nat. Chem. 2012, 4, 396). The evolutions of cross peaks for rephasing spectra and diagonal peaks for nonrephasing spectra have also been plotted. The peaks oscillate with the population times, with frequencies, phases, and amplitudes of the oscillating curves also being qualitatively consistent with the experimental results. PMID:25299464

  10. Re-forming supercritical quasi-parallel shocks. I - One- and two-dimensional simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. A.; Winske, D.; Omidi, N.

    1990-01-01

    The process of reforming supercritical quasi-parallel shocks is investigated using one-dimensional and two-dimensional hybrid (particle ion, massless fluid electron) simulations both of shocks and of simpler two-stream interactions. It is found that the supercritical quasi-parallel shock is not steady. Instread of a well-defined shock ramp between upstream and downstream states that remains at a fixed position in the flow, the ramp periodically steepens, broadens, and then reforms upstream of its former position. It is concluded that the wave generation process is localized at the shock ramp and that the reformation process proceeds in the absence of upstream perturbations intersecting the shock.

  11. The ideal tearing mode: theory and resistive MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Landi, S.; Papini, E.; Pucci, F.; Velli, M.

    2016-05-01

    Classical MHD reconnection theories, both the stationary Sweet-Parker model and the tearing instability, are known to provide rates which are too slow to explain the observations. However, a recent analysis has shown that there exists a critical threshold on current sheet's thickness, namely a/L ∼ S -1/3, beyond which the tearing modes evolve on fast macroscopic Alfvénic timescales, provided the Lunquist number S is high enough, as invariably found in solar and astrophysical plasmas. Therefore, the classical Sweet-Parker scenario, for which the diffusive region scales as a/L ∼ S -1/2 and thus can be up to ∼ 100 times thinner than the critical value, is likely to be never realized in nature, as the current sheet itself disrupts in the elongation process. We present here two-dimensional, compressible, resistive MHD simulations, with S ranging from 105 to 107, that fully confirm the linear analysis. Moreover, we show that a secondary plasmoid instability always occurs when the same critical scaling is reached on the local, smaller scale, leading to a cascading explosive process, reminiscent of the flaring activity.

  12. Simulation of sheet-shaped lithium beam probe performance for two-dimensional edge plasma measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, H.; Morisaki, T.; Komori, A.; Motojima, O.

    2006-10-15

    A sheet-shaped thermal lithium beam probe has been developed for two-dimensional density measurements in the edge region of the torus plasma. A numerical simulation was carried out to confirm the validity of the diagnostics for fast and transient phenomena such as edge localized modes or blobs, etc., where the velocity of blobs is faster than that of the probe beam. It was found in the simulation that the density of the blob itself is reconstructed to be low and unexpected ghosts appear in the reconstructed density profile near the blob, if the conventional reconstruction method is employed. These results invite our attention to the numerical errors in the density reconstruction process. On the other hand, the errors can be corrected by using the simulation results.

  13. Particle dynamics in two-dimensional random-energy landscapes: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, Florian; Zunke, Christoph; Hanes, Richard D. L.; Bewerunge, Jörg; Ladadwa, Imad; Heuer, Andreas; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2013-08-01

    The dynamics of individual colloidal particles in random potential energy landscapes was investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo simulations. The value of the potential at each point in the two-dimensional energy landscape follows a Gaussian distribution. The width of the distribution, and hence the degree of roughness of the energy landscape, was varied and its effect on the particle dynamics studied. This situation represents an example of Brownian dynamics in the presence of disorder. In the experiments, the energy landscapes were generated optically using a holographic setup with a spatial light modulator, and the particle trajectories were followed by video microscopy. The dynamics is characterized using, e.g., the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, the mean squared displacement, the van Hove function, and the non-Gaussian parameter. In both experiments and simulations the dynamics is initially diffusive, showing an extended subdiffusive regime at intermediate times before diffusive motion is recovered at very long times. The dependence of the long-time diffusion coefficient on the width of the Gaussian distribution agrees with theoretical predictions. Compared to the dynamics in a one-dimensional potential energy landscape, the localization at intermediate times is weaker and the diffusive regime at long times reached earlier, which is due to the possibility to avoid local maxima in two-dimensional energy landscapes.

  14. MHD simulation of the Bastille day event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Jon; Torok, Tibor; Downs, Cooper; Lionello, Roberto; Titov, Viacheslav; Caplan, Ronald M.; Mikić, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2016-03-01

    We describe a time-dependent, thermodynamic, three-dimensional MHD simulation of the July 14, 2000 coronal mass ejection (CME) and flare. The simulation starts with a background corona developed using an MDI-derived magnetic map for the boundary condition. Flux ropes using the modified Titov-Demoulin (TDm) model are used to energize the pre-event active region, which is then destabilized by photospheric flows that cancel flux near the polarity inversion line. More than 1033 ergs are impulsively released in the simulated eruption, driving a CME at 1500 km/s, close to the observed speed of 1700km/s. The post-flare emission in the simulation is morphologically similar to the observed post-flare loops. The resulting flux rope that propagates to 1 AU is similar in character to the flux rope observed at 1 AU, but the simulated ICME center passes 15° north of Earth.

  15. TWO-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE IMPORTANCE OF PARTIAL IONIZATION IN THE CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2012-07-10

    The bulk of the solar chromosphere is weakly ionized and interactions between ionized particles and neutral particles likely have significant consequences for the thermodynamics of the chromospheric plasma. We investigate the importance of introducing neutral particles into the MHD equations using numerical 2.5D radiative MHD simulations obtained with the Bifrost code. The models span the solar atmosphere from the upper layers of the convection zone to the low corona, and solve the full MHD equations with non-gray and non-LTE radiative transfer, and thermal conduction along the magnetic field. The effects of partial ionization are implemented using the generalized Ohm's law, i.e., we consider the effects of the Hall term and ambipolar diffusion in the induction equation. The approximations required in going from three fluids to the generalized Ohm's law are tested in our simulations. The Ohmic diffusion, Hall term, and ambipolar diffusion show strong variations in the chromosphere. These strong variations of the various magnetic diffusivities are absent or significantly underestimated when, as has been common for these types of studies, using the semi-empirical VAL-C model as a basis for estimates. In addition, we find that differences in estimating the magnitude of ambipolar diffusion arise depending on which method is used to calculate the ion-neutral collision frequency. These differences cause uncertainties in the different magnetic diffusivity terms. In the chromosphere, we find that the ambipolar diffusion is of the same order of magnitude or even larger than the numerical diffusion used to stabilize our code. As a consequence, ambipolar diffusion produces a strong impact on the modeled atmosphere. Perhaps more importantly, it suggests that at least in the chromospheric domain, self-consistent simulations of the solar atmosphere driven by magnetoconvection can accurately describe the impact of the dominant form of resistivity, i.e., ambipolar diffusion. This

  16. HYBRID AND HALL-MHD SIMULATIONS OF COLLISIONLESS RECONNECTION: EFFECTS OF PLASMA PRESSURE TENSOR

    SciTech Connect

    L. YIN; D. WINSKE; ET AL

    2001-05-01

    In this study we performed two-dimensional hybrid (particle ions, massless fluid electrons) and Hall-MHD simulations of collisionless reconnection in a thin current sheet. Both calculations include the full electron pressure tensor (instead of a localized resistivity) in the generalized Ohm's law to initiate reconnection, and in both an initial perturbation to the Harris equilibrium is applied. First, electron dynamics from the two calculations are compared, and we find overall agreement between the two calculations in both the reconnection rate and the global configuration. To address the issue of how kinetic treatment for the ions affects the reconnection dynamics, we compared the fluid-ion dynamics from the Hall-MHD calculation to the particle-ion dynamics obtained from the hybrid simulation. The comparison demonstrates that off-diagonal elements of the ion pressure tensor are important in correctly modeling the ion out-of-plane momentum transport from the X point. It is that these effects can be modeled efficiently using a particle Hall-MHD simulation method in which particle ions used in a predictor/corrector to implement the ion gyro-radius corrections. We also investigate the micro- macro-scale coupling in the magnetotail dynamics by using a new integrated approach in which particle Hall-MHD calculations are embedded inside a MHD simulation. Initial results of the simulation concerning current sheet thinning and reconnection dynamics are discussed.

  17. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms 2. MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Winglee, R. M.

    1993-05-01

    The effects of temporal and spatial variations in the plasma resistivity on the evolution of the magnetosphere during substorms are examined with numerical solutions of the two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The global MHD simulations self-consistently consider the interaction of the solar wind with the dayside magnetosphere as well as the evolution of the tail region. These solutions are used to study how various solar wind states generate conditions in the tail, such as pressure gradients and cross-tail currents, that have the potential of leading to a substorm. Although the MHD formalism does provide information on the large-scale evolution, the essential mechanism for substorm development may involve microscopic or particle processes not present in an MHD approach. As a result, this MHD study is carried out in association with particle simulations (Winglee and Steinolfson, this issue). Since one connection between the MHD and particle approaches is through the resistivity, the effects of various resistivity distributions on the global MHD configuration are examined. The resistivity distributions considered here are (1) a temporally constant and spatially uniform resistivity, (2) a resistivity proportional to the square of the local current density, and (3) a resistivity proportional to the square of the local magnetic field strength. The latter distribution is suggested by the above particle simulations and represents effects produced by the increased magnetization of particles and the differential motion between electrons and ions. For all three cases a plasmoid is formed and ejected tailward. However, when the resistivity depends on the field strength, considerably more energy is stored in the tail prior to plasmoid formation, and plasmoid formation is delayed relative to the results for the other two resistivity distributions. Furthermore, when the plasmoid is eventually ejected, it moves down the tail with a higher speed. The MHD results

  18. Simulation of alluvial channel migration processes with a two-dimensional numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Guohong

    An improved two dimensional numerical model for simulating the complicated meandering initiation, migration and widening processes of alluvial channels is presented in this research. The flow field simulation is obtained initially by the CCHE2D hydrodynamic model, which is obviously inadequate to predict the three-dimensional flow field in a channel bend. A set of empirical functions is proposed to convert the depth-averaged, two-dimensional flow field into an approximated three-dimensional one. As a result, a more realistic bed shear stress is predicted. Applying this enhanced model, the simulations of morphological processes in a channel bend are found to be more realistic than those produced by a traditional two-dimensional model. Due to the limitation of existing physical data, the CCHE3D after having been verified by physical models is employed as a computational experimentation flume to generate sufficient amount of data for establishing the empirical functions, so that the improved two-dimensional model can be nearly as accurate as three-dimensional models without having to solve three-dimensional numerical equations. In this study, the flow field of a meander channel is initially predicted by CCHE2D hydrodynamic model. By applying empirical functions to the flow field and bed shear stress field, the results of CCHE2D model are very close to those of CCHE3D. The predicted bed shear stress and velocity profiles of this enhanced CCHE2D are also in good agreements with the experimental data. Therefore, the hypothesis that an improved two-dimensional computational model can be applied to simulate three-dimensional physical processes adequately and cost-effectively is proved. In the sediment transport model, both bed load and suspended load are considered. The sediment incipient motion is affected by both the longitudinal and the transversal bed slope. In addition to the bed load transport due to bed shear stress, bed load transport in the transversal direction

  19. Two-dimensional simulation of holographic data storage medium for multiplexed recording.

    PubMed

    Toishi, Mitsuru; Takeda, Takahiro; Tanaka, Kenji; Tanaka, Tomiji; Fukumoto, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kenjiro

    2008-02-18

    In this paper, we propose a new analysis model for photopolymer recording processes that calculate the two-dimensional refractive index distribution of multiplexed holograms. For the simulation of the photopolymer medium, time evolution of monomer diffusion and polymerization need to be calculated simultaneously. The distribution of the refractive index inside the medium is induced by these processes. By evaluating the refractive index pattern on each layer, the diffraction beams from the multiplexed hologram can be read out by beam propagation method (BPM). This is the first paper to determine the diffraction beam from a multiplexed hologram in a simulated photopolymer medium process. We analyze the time response of the multiplexed hologram recording processes in the photopolymer, and estimate the degradation of diffraction efficiency with multiplexed recording. This work can greatly contribute to understanding the process of hologram recording. PMID:18542367

  20. Reformation at a low-Mach-number perpendicular shock: Two-dimensional full particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, T.; Kidani, Y.; Matsukiyo, S.; Yamazaki, R.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale two-dimensional full particle-in-cell simulations are carried out for studying periodic self-reformation of supercritical perpendicular shocks. It is confirmed that the shock reformation becomes absent with specific parameters. When electromagnetic whistler mode waves are strongly excited by the modified two-stream instability, both incoming and reflected ions are strongly scattered and the shock reformation becomes absent. On the other hand, when electrostatic waves are weakly excited or there is no microinstabilities, reflected ions show a coherent behavior and the shock reformation is persistent. In this case, however, the reformation period is modified essentially due to the shock-front ripples. The present simulation result suggests that the persistence and absence of the shock reformation are controlled by the cross-scale coupling between electron-scale microinstabilities and ion-scale shock-front ripples.

  1. A two-dimensional simulation of plasma leakage due to dengue infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraini, N.; Windarto, Jayanti, Swarna; Soewono, Edy

    2014-03-01

    Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is a disease caused by Dengue virus infection. One major characteristic in a patient with DHF is the occurrence of plasma leakage. Plasma leakage is a consequence of the immune system mechanism which activates cytokine. As a result, permeability of vascular will increase. Another characteristic in a DHF patient is hypoalbuminea (decreasing of albumin concentration). Plasma leakage can be modelled by constructing mathematical model of albumin concentration in plasma blood due to increasing of cytokine. In this paper, decreasing of albumin concentration in blood plasma is modelled using diffusion equation. In addition, two-dimensional numerical simulations of albumin concentration are also presented. From the simulation, it is found that the greater leakage rate or the wider leakage area, the greater decreasing albumin concentration will be. Furthermore, when time t increases, the albumin concentration decreases to zero.

  2. Scaling relations of two-dimensional athermal multichain systems by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kazuya; Araki, Takabumi

    1983-01-01

    The statistical mechanical properties of the systems of athermal multichain (n-mers) in two-dimensional lattices are investigated by the computer simulation. The mean dimensions of the chains follow a scaling relation with a scaling variable (n-1)2νn-1φ, where 2ν is the mean square end to end distance exponent and φ is the concentration. The logarithm of the state sum per chain and the osmotic pressure thereof can be described by the same variable in a way which is slightly lattice structure dependent. Because the application of the available theories to our short chain lattice systems may have some controversies, the current coarse graining procedure is appropriately reformulated. The simulation data including the mentioned ones and the chain element distributions around a mass center are well understood by the proposition.

  3. Verification of frequency scaling laws for capacitive radio-frequency discharges using two-dimensional simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vahedi, V.; Birdsall, C.K.; Lieberman, M.A. ); DiPeso, G.; Rognlien, T.D. )

    1993-07-01

    Weakly ionized processing plasmas are studied in two dimensions using a bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code with a Monte Carlo collision (MCC) package. The MCC package models the collisions between charged and neutral particles, which are needed to obtain a self-sustained plasma and the proper electron and ion energy loss mechanisms. A two-dimensional capacitive radio-frequency (rf) discharge is investigated in detail. Simple frequency scaling laws for predicting the behavior of some plasma parameters are derived and then compared with simulation results, finding good agreements. It is found that as the drive frequency increases, the sheath width decreases, and the bulk plasma becomes more uniform, leading to a reduction of the ion angular spread at the target and an improvement of ion dose uniformity at the driven electrode.

  4. Verification of frequency scaling laws for capacitive rf discharges using two-dimensional simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vahedi, V.; Birdsall, C.K.; Lieberman, M.A.; DiPeso, G.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1992-12-15

    Weakly ionized processing plasmas are studied in two-dimensions using a bounded particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code with a Monte Carlo Collision (MCC) package. The MCC package models the collisions between charged and neutral particles, which are needed to obtain a self-sustained plasma and the proper electron and ion energy loss mechanisms. A two-dimensional capacitive RF discharge is investigated in detail. Simple frequency scaling laws for predicting the behavior of some plasma parameters are derived and then compared with simulation results, finding good agreements. We find that as the drive frequency increases, the sheath width decreases, and the bulk plasma becomes more uniform, leading to a reduction of the ion angular spread at the target and an improvement of ion dose uniformity at the driven electrode.

  5. Two-dimensional full-wave code for reflectometry simulations in TJ-II

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, E.; Heuraux, S.; Estrada, T.; Sanchez, J.; Cupido, L.

    2004-10-01

    A two-dimensional full-wave code in the extraordinary mode has been developed to simulate reflectometry in TJ-II. The code allows us to study the measurement capabilities of the future correlation reflectometer that is being installed in TJ-II. The code uses the finite-difference-time-domain technique to solve Maxwell's equations in the presence of density fluctuations. Boundary conditions are implemented by a perfectly matched layer to simulate free propagation. To assure the stability of the code, the current equations are solved by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Density fluctuation parameters such as fluctuation level, wave numbers, and correlation lengths are extrapolated from those measured at the plasma edge using Langmuir probes. In addition, realistic plasma shape, density profile, magnetic configuration, and experimental setup of TJ-II are included to determine the plasma regimes in which accurate information may be obtained.

  6. Two-dimensional modeling of sodium boiling in a simulated LMFBR loss-of-flow test

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    Loss-of-flow (LOF) accidents are of major importance in LMFBR safety. Tests have been performed to simulate the simultaneous failure of all primary pumps and reactor shutdown systems in a 37-pin electrically heated test bundle installed in the KNS sodium boiling loop at the Institute of Reactor Development, Karlsruhe. The tests simulated LOF conditions of the German prototype LMFBR, the SNR 300. The main objectives of these tests were to characterize the transient boiling development to cladding dryout and to provide data for validation of sodium boiling codes. One particular LOF test, designated L22, at full power was selected as a benchmark exercise for comparison of several codes at the Eleventh Meeting of the Liquid Metal Boiling Working Group (LMBWG) held in Grenoble, France, in October 1984. In this paper, the results of the calculations performed at ORNL with the two-dimensional (2-D) boiling code THORAX are presented.

  7. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities - Comparison of oneand two-dimensional simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Quest, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical simulations of electromagnetic instabilities, driven by a cool tenuous ion beam propagating along an ambient magnetic field, have been conducted in one and two spatial dimensions. The calculations employ particle ions, fluid electrons, and a predictor corrector scheme for solving the electromagnetic field in two dimensions that is described in some detail. While the principal features of the one-dimensional calculations (which reproduce previous work) are retained, the two-dimensional simulations show some reduction of the overall level of the magnetic field fluctuations. Enhancement of the heating of the beam ions at the expense of the core ions also occurs in the case where the beam density is sufficiently large that the right-hand nonresonant instability dominates. Implications of the results for modeling of the ion foreshock and quasi-parallel shocks are discussed.

  8. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  9. Nonlinear response of vibrational excitons: Simulating the two-dimensional infrared spectrum of liquid water

    PubMed Central

    Paarmann, A.; Hayashi, T.; Mukamel, S.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2009-01-01

    A simulation formalism for the nonlinear response of vibrational excitons is presented and applied to the OH stretching vibrations of neat liquid H2O. The method employs numerical integration of the Schrödinger equation and allows explicit treatment of fluctuating transition frequencies, vibrational couplings, dipole moments, and the anharmonicities of all these quantities, as well as nonadiabatic effects. The split operator technique greatly increases computational feasibility and performance. The electrostatic map for the OH stretching vibrations in liquid water employed in our previous study [A. Paarmann et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 191103 (2008)] is presented. The two-dimensional spectra are in close agreement with experiment. The fast 100 fs dynamics are primarily attributed to intramolecular mixing between states in the two-dimensional OH stretching potential. Small intermolecular couplings are sufficient to reproduce the experimental energy transfer time scales. Interference effects between Liouville pathways in excitonic systems and their impact on the analysis of the nonlinear response are discussed. PMID:19485440

  10. Topological events in two-dimensional grain growth: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkov, V.E.; Glicksman, M.E.; Palmer, M.; Rajan, K. . Materials Engineering Dept.)

    1994-08-01

    Grain growth in polycrystals is a process that occurs as a result of the vanishing of small grains. The mean topological class of vanishing two-dimensional (2-D) grains was found experimentally to be about 4.5. This result suggests that most vanishing grains are either 4- or 5-sided. A recent theory of 2-D grain growth is explicitly based on this fact, treating the switching as random events. The process of shrinking of 4- and 5-sided two-dimensional grains was observed experimentally on polycrystalline films of transparent, pure succinonitrile (SCN). Grain shrinking was studied theoretically and simulated by computer (both dynamic and Monte Carlo). It was found that most shrinking grains are topologically stable and remain within their topological class until they are much smaller than their neighbors. They discuss differences which were found with respect to the behavior of 2-D polycrystals, a 2-D ideal soap froth, and a 2-D section of a 3-D grain structure.

  11. Shocked Magnetotail: ARTEMIS Observations and MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2015-04-01

    Interplanetary shocks can cause magnetospheric disturbances on various scales including kinetic and MHD processes. In this paper we study a shock event using ARTEMIS in situ observations and OpenGGCM MHD simulations, which shows how significant effect of interplanetary shocks could be on the magnetotail. The two ARTEMIS spacecraft were located near the tail current sheet and lobe center at (-60, 1, -5Re_GSM) when the shock arrived and recorded an abrupt tail compression leading to significant enhancements in the plasma density, temperature, magnetic field strength, and cross-tail current density, as well as to tailward flows and current sheet crossings. About 10 min later, the spacecraft entered the sheath solar wind unexpectedly. Two hypotheses are considered: either the tail was cut off by the high solar wind ram pressure (~25-30 nPa), or the compressed tail was pushed aside by the appreciable dawnward solar wind flow imposed by the shock. OpenGGMC simulation results confirmed the second hypothesis and revealed that during this 10 min interval, the lobe center moved dawnward by ~12 Re and the tail width in Y was reduced from ~40 to 26 Re, which eventually exposed ARTEMIS to the sheath solar wind. Comparisons of plasma and magnetic parameters between ARTEMIS in situ observations and simulations showed a satisfied consistence.

  12. Two Dimensional Numerical Simulations of the Turbulence Characteristics Over Rattlesnake Mountain during Stable and Unstable Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilman, Warren Emanuel

    A two-dimensional second-order turbulence-closure model based on level three of the Mellor-Yamada turbulence hierarchy has been developed and used to examine the nocturnal and early morning turbulence characteristics over Rattlesnake Mountain in Washington. The model includes radiation, soil, canopy, and slope parameterizations for calculating mean and turbulence variables over two-dimensional terrain features. Simulations of mean horizontal velocities and potential temperatures show good agreement with data obtained over Rattlesnake Mountain during nocturnal drainage-flow conditions. Qualitative analysis of simulated turbulence fields during these conditions indicates significant variations over the windward and leeward slopes. Turbulence anisotropy develops in the drainage-flow region where vertical wind shears and atmospheric stability are large. The buoyant portion of the turbulent heat flux enhances the vertical component of turbulent kinetic energy, especially over the leeward slope. Derived turbulent diffusivities reflect the developed anisotropic turbulence conditions. Simulations of the atmospheric conditions over Rattlesnake Mountain during the early morning hours indicate significant growth of the convective boundary layer when the initial stability over the entire depth of the modeled region is very weak. Upslope flow develops when no ambient wind is present. The buoyancy-generated turbulence inhibits the formation of large upslope velocity maxima when ambient winds are present. Spatial variations in the turbulent kinetic energy develop over the mountain, but they are less than the variations during nocturnal drainage-flow conditions. Turbulence anisotropy is significant in the convective boundary layer. However, the developed anisotropy plays a minor role in affecting turbulent diffusivity magnitudes. The transition from nocturnal drainage-flow conditions to convective conditions is characterized by a redistribution of energy among the turbulent

  13. Numerical Simulation of MHD Effect in Liquid Metal Blankets with Flow Channel Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Pan, H. C.

    2011-09-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic effect in liquid metal blankets with flow channel insert and pressure equalization slot for fusion liquid metal blanket is studied by numerical simulation based on two dimensional fully developed flow model. The code is verified by comparing analytical solution and numerical solution of Hunt Case II. The velocity field and MHD pressure drop varying with electric conductivity of the FCI is analyzed. The result shows that the average velocity in central area of the cross section decreases with the increase of the electric conductivity of FCI. While the average velocity in gap zone is reverse. Comparing with MHD duct flow without FCI, MHD pressure drop is reduced significantly when the FCI material is electrically insulating.

  14. Two-dimensional simulations of the neutron yield in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2010-10-01

    Maximizing the neutron yield to obtain energy gain is the ultimate goal for inertial confinement fusion. Nonuniformities seeded by target and laser perturbations can disrupt neutron production via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. To understand the effects of perturbations on the neutron yield of cryogenic DT implosions on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], two-dimensional DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] simulations have been performed to systematically investigate each perturbation source and their combined effects on the neutron-yield performance. Two sources of nonuniformity accounted for the neutron-yield reduction in DRACO simulations: target offset from the target chamber center and laser imprinting. The integrated simulations for individual shots reproduce the experimental yield-over-clean (YOC) ratio within a factor of 2 or better. The simulated neutron-averaged ion temperatures ⟨Ti⟩ is only about 10%-15% higher than measurements. By defining the temperature-over-clean, its relationship to YOC provides an indication of how much the hot-spot volume and density are perturbed with respect to the uniform situation. Typically, the YOC in OMEGA experiments is of the order of ˜5%. The simulation results suggest that YOC can be increased to the ignition hydroequivalent level of 15%-20% (with ⟨ρR⟩=200-300 mg/cm2) by maintaining a target offset of less than 10 μm and employing beam smoothing by spectral dispersion.

  15. One- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation using experimentally generated flow turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Louis F.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of one- and two-dimensional (1- or 2-D) simulations of Stirling machines centered around experimental data generated by the U. of Minnesota Mechanical Engineering Test Rig (METR) are covered. This rig was used to investigate oscillating flows about a zero mean with emphasis on laminar/turbulent flow transitions in tubes. The Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) and in particular, its heater, were the subjects of the simulations. The heater was treated as a 1- or 2-D entity in an otherwise 1-D system. The 2-D flow effects impacted the transient flow predictions in the heater itself but did not have a major impact on overall system performance. Information propagation effects may be a significant issue in the simulation (if not the performance) of high-frequency, high-pressure Stirling machines. This was investigated further by comparing a simulation against an experimentally validated analytic solution for the fluid dynamics of a transmission line. The applicability of the pressure-linking algorithm for compressible flows may be limited by characteristic number (defined as flow path information traverses per cycle); this warrants further study. Lastly the METR was simulated in 1- and 2-D. A two-parameter k-w foldback function turbulence model was developed and tested against a limited set of METR experimental data.

  16. Percolation analysis of nonlinear structures in scale-free two-dimensional simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominik, Kurt G.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of applying percolation analysis to several two-dimensional N-body models which simulate the formation of large-scale structure. Three parameters are estimated: total area (a(c)), total mass (M(C)), and percolation density (rho(c)) of the percolating structure at the percolation threshold for both unsmoothed and smoothed (with different scales L(s)) nonlinear with filamentary structures, confirming early speculations that this type of model has several features of filamentary-type distributions. Also, it is shown that, by properly applying smoothing techniques, many problems previously considered detrimental can be dealt with and overcome. Possible difficulties and prospects with the use of this method are discussed, specifically relating to techniques and methods already applied to CfA deep sky surveys. The success of this test in two dimensions and the potential for extrapolation to three dimensions is also discussed.

  17. A two-dimensional thermomechanical simulation of a gas metal arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, A.R.

    1990-08-01

    A low heat input gas metal arc (GMA) weld overlay process is being investigated as a possible means to repair Savannah River nuclear reactor tanks in the event cracks are detected in the reactor walls. Two-dimensional thermomechanical simulations of a GMA welding process were performed using the finite element code ABAQUS to assist in the design of the upcoming weld experiments on helium-charged specimens. The thermal model correlated well with existing test data, i.e., fusion zone depth and thermocouple data. In addition, numerical results revealed that after cool-down the final deformation of the workpiece was qualitatively similar to the shape observed experimentally. Based on these analyses, conservative recommendations were made for the workpiece dimensions, weld pass spacing, and thermomechanical boundary conditions to ensure the experiments would be as representative as possible of welding on the reactor walls. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Simulation of femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectra of conical intersections.

    PubMed

    Krčmář, Jindřich; Gelin, Maxim F; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2015-08-21

    We have simulated femtosecond two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra for an excited-state conical intersection using the wave-function version of the equation-of-motion phase-matching approach. We show that 2D spectra at fixed values of the waiting time provide information on the structure of the vibronic eigenstates of the conical intersection, while the evolution of the spectra with the waiting time reveals predominantly ground-state wave-packet dynamics. The results show that 2D spectra of conical intersection systems differ significantly from those obtained for chromophores with well separated excited-state potential-energy surfaces. The spectral signatures which can be attributed to conical intersections are discussed. PMID:26298135

  19. Two-dimensional simulation of discharge channels in atmospheric-pressure single dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiao; Wang, Yanhui Wang, Dezhen

    2015-11-15

    A two-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the filaments (or discharge channels) in atmospheric-pressure discharge with one plate electrode covered by a dielectric layer. Under certain discharge parameters, one or more stable filaments with wide radii could be regularly arranged in the discharge space. Different from the short-lived randomly distributed microdischarges, this stable and thick filament can carry more current and have longer lifetime. Because only one electrode is covered by a dielectric layer in the simulation, the formed discharge channel extends outwards near the dielectric layer and shrinks inwards near the naked electrode, agreeing with the experimental results. In this paper, the evolution of channel is studied, and its behavior is like a streamer or an ionization wave, but the propagation distance is short. The discharge parameters such as voltage amplitude, electrode width, and N{sub 2} impurities content could significantly influence the number of discharge channel, which is discussed in the paper.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow with a surface-mounted two-dimensional obstacle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Kyung-Soo; Ferziger, Joel H.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we perform a large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow in a channel containing a two-dimensional obstacle on one wall using a dynamic subgrid-scale model (DSGSM) at Re = 3210, based on bulk velocity above the obstacle and obstacle height; the wall layers are fully resolved. The low Re enables us to perform a DNS (Case 1) against which to validate the LES results. The LES with the DSGSM is designated Case 2. In addition, an LES with the conventional fixed model constant (Case 3) is conducted to allow identification of improvements due to the DSGSM. We also include LES at Re = 82,000 (Case 4) using conventional Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model and a wall-layer model. The results will be compared with the experiment of Dimaczek et al.

  1. Two-dimensional computational modeling of sodium boiling in simulated LMFBR fuel-pin bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Dearing, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Extensive sodium boiling tests have been carried out in two simulated LMFBR fuel pin bundles in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Experimental results from a 19-pin bundle (THORS Bundle 6A) have been previously reported, and experimental results from a 61-pin bundle (THORS Bundle 9) will be reported soon. The results discussed here are from the 19-pin bundle. Preliminary analysis has shown that the computational methods used and conclusions reached are equally valid for the 61-pin bundle, as well as the 19-pin in-reactor Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-1 experiment. The main result of THORS sodium boiling experimentation is that boiling behavior is determined by two-dimensional effects, i.e., the rates of mass, momentum and energy transfer in the direction perpendicular to the axes of the fuel pins.

  2. Two-dimensional Green`s function Poisson solution appropriate for feature-scale microelectronics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the numerical procedure used to implement the Green`s function method for solving the Poisson equation in two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates. The procedure can determine the solution to a problem with any or all of applied voltage boundary conditions, dielectric media, floating (insulated) conducting media, dielectric surface charging, periodic (reflective) boundary conditions, and volumetric space charge. The numerical solution is reasonably fast, and the dimension of the linear problem to be solved is that of the number of elements needed to represent the surfaces, not the whole computational volume. The method of solution is useful in the simulation of plasma particle motion in the vicinity of complex surface structures as found in microelectronics plasma processing applications. A FORTRAN implementation of this procedure is available from the author.

  3. Two-dimensional simulation of discharge channels in atmospheric-pressure single dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiao; Wang, Yanhui; Wang, Dezhen

    2015-11-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the filaments (or discharge channels) in atmospheric-pressure discharge with one plate electrode covered by a dielectric layer. Under certain discharge parameters, one or more stable filaments with wide radii could be regularly arranged in the discharge space. Different from the short-lived randomly distributed microdischarges, this stable and thick filament can carry more current and have longer lifetime. Because only one electrode is covered by a dielectric layer in the simulation, the formed discharge channel extends outwards near the dielectric layer and shrinks inwards near the naked electrode, agreeing with the experimental results. In this paper, the evolution of channel is studied, and its behavior is like a streamer or an ionization wave, but the propagation distance is short. The discharge parameters such as voltage amplitude, electrode width, and N2 impurities content could significantly influence the number of discharge channel, which is discussed in the paper.

  4. Simulation of femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectra of conical intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Krčmář, Jindřich; Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2015-08-21

    We have simulated femtosecond two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra for an excited-state conical intersection using the wave-function version of the equation-of-motion phase-matching approach. We show that 2D spectra at fixed values of the waiting time provide information on the structure of the vibronic eigenstates of the conical intersection, while the evolution of the spectra with the waiting time reveals predominantly ground-state wave-packet dynamics. The results show that 2D spectra of conical intersection systems differ significantly from those obtained for chromophores with well separated excited-state potential-energy surfaces. The spectral signatures which can be attributed to conical intersections are discussed.

  5. Two Dimensional Particle-In-Cell Code for Simulation of Quantum Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decyk, V. K.; Tonge, J.; Dauger, D. E.

    2002-11-01

    We have developed a two dimensional code for simulating quantum plasmas (1). This unique code propagates many quantum particles forward in time self-consistently using the semi-classical approximation. Because of this it can model the statistical properties of interacting quantum particles. We are currently testing this code using small numbers of particles with model problems which we can use to verify the accuracy of the code. The goal is to model from first principles the statistical properties of plasmas where quantum mechanics plays a role such as hot high density plasmas found in stellar interiors (2). (1) D. Dauger, Semiclassical Modeling of Quantum-Mechanical Multiparticle Systems using Parallel Particle-In-Cell Methods, PHD Thesis (2) M. Opher et. al. , Nuclear reaction rates and energy in stellar plasmas: The effect of highly damped modes, Physics of Plasma, 8, No. 5, p. 2454 Sponsored by NSF

  6. Ramifications of intermediate-scale ionospheric structure for tomographic reconstruction using two-dimensional simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rino, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Global observation of the GPS satellite constellation for ionospheric diagnostics is now a worldwide activity driven by both practical and scientific objectives. Diagnostic methods exploit an induced frequency-dependent phase change, which is proportional to the path-integrated electron density (TEC). However, intermediate-scale structure causes a stochastic modulation of the GPS signals (scintillation), which is a nuisance for data assimilation. Indeed, sufficiently strong propagation disturbances degrade TEC and ultimately disrupt GPS operations altogether. However, the physical processes that generate intermediate-scale structure are intimately part of ionospheric physics. In the best of all possible worlds irregularity identification and classification would be an integral part of ionospheric diagnostics. A two-dimensional propagation model has been used to explore the ramifications of intermediate scale structure on TEC data assimilation and, particularly tomographic reconstruction. Although two-dimensional models confine structure to a planar region, the results are relevant, with caveats, to propagation through highly anisotropic ionospheric structures. In-plane propagation from a source to an array of receivers is amenable to reconstruction with tomographic filtered back-projection algorithms. The angle-dependent Fourier decomposition of the array signal phase identifies a spectral slice. The signals from which the phase is derived are generated with an oblique forward propagation procedure developed by Costa and Basu Costa:02. Under weak-scatter conditions the signal phase is proportional to the ray path integral. The primary challenge for simulation is realistic simulation of the structure environment. Large scale ESF structure can be constructed with physics-based models, but populating the intermediate scale requires untested structure hypotheses. In particular, there is no clear demarcation between quasi-deterministic variation and

  7. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gheisari, R.; Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H.

    2014-01-15

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D{sub 2}O and solid D{sub 2} (sD{sub 2}). The D{sub 2}O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD{sub 2} as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (ρ − z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD{sub 2}. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD{sub 2} volume) equal to 6.79 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} and 2.20 ×10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}s{sup −1}, respectively.

  8. Optimization of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cells by two-dimensional numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Meijun; Das, Ujjwal; Bowden, Stuart; Hegedus, Steven; Birmire, Robert

    2009-06-09

    In this paper, two-dimensional (2D) simulation of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cells is presented using Sentaurus Device, a software package of Synopsys TCAD. A model is established incorporating a distribution of trap states of amorphous-silicon material and thermionic emission across the amorphous-silicon / crystalline-silicon heterointerface. The 2D nature of IBC-SHJ device is evaluated and current density-voltage (J-V) curves are generated. Optimization of IBC-SHJ solar cells is then discussed through simulation. It is shown that the open circuit voltage (VOC) and short circuit current density (JSC) of IBC-SHJ solar cells increase with decreasing front surface recombination velocity. The JSC improves further with the increase of relative coverage of p-type emitter contacts, which is explained by the simulated and measured position dependent laser beam induced current (LBIC) line scan. The S-shaped J-V curves with low fill factor (FF) observed in experiments are also simulated, and three methods to improve FF by modifying the intrinsic a-Si buffer layer are suggested: (i) decreased thickness, (ii) increased conductivity, and (iii) reduced band gap. With all these optimizations, an efficiency of 26% for IBC-SHJ solar cells is potentially achievable.

  9. Riemann solvers and boundary conditions for two-dimensional shallow water simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinot, Vincent

    2003-04-01

    Most existing algorithms for two-dimensional shallow water simulations treat multi-dimensional waves using wave splitting or time splitting. This often results in anisotropy of the computed flow. Both wave splitting and time splitting are based on a local decomposition of the multi-dimensional problem into one-dimensional, orthogonal problems. Therefore, these algorithms handle boundary conditions in a very similar way to classical one-dimensional algorithms. This should be expected to trigger a dependence of the number of boundary conditions on the direction of the flow at the boundaries. However, most computational codes based on alternate directions do not exhibit such sensitivity, which seems to contradict the theory of existence and uniqueness of the solution. The present paper addresses these issues. A Riemann solver is presented that aims to convert two-dimensional Riemann problems into a one-dimensional equivalent Riemann problem (ERP) at the interfaces between the computational cells. The ERP is derived by applying the theory of bicharacteristics at each end of the interface and by performing a linear averaging along the interface. The proposed approach is tested against the traditional one-dimensional approach on the classical circular dambreak problem. The results show that the proposed solver allows the isotropy of the solution to be better preserved. Use of the two-dimensional solver with a first-order scheme may give better results than use of a second-order scheme with a one-dimensional solver. The theory of bicharacteristics is also used to discuss the issue of boundary conditions. It is shown that, when the flow is subcritical, the number of boundary conditions affects the accuracy of the solution, but not its existence and uniqueness. When only one boundary condition is to be prescribed, it should not be the velocity in the direction parallel to the boundary. When two boundary conditions are to be prescribed, at least one of them should involve

  10. Forced Reconnection in the Near Magnetotail: Onset and Energy Conversion in PIC and MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) together with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Q1 simulations of magnetotail dynamics, we investigate the evolution toward onset of reconnection and the subsequent energy transfer and conversion. In either case, reconnection onset is preceded by a driven phase, during which magnetic flux is added to the tail at the high-latitude boundaries, followed by a relaxation phase, during which the configuration continues to respond to the driving. The boundary deformation leads to the formation of thin embedded current sheets, which are bifurcated in the near tail, converging to a single sheet farther out in the MHD simulations. The thin current sheets in the PIC simulation are carried by electrons and are associated with a strong perpendicular electrostatic field, which may provide a connection to parallel potentials and auroral arcs and an ionospheric signal even prior to the onset of reconnection. The PIC simulation very well satisfies integral entropy conservation (intrinsic to ideal MHD) during this phase, supporting ideal ballooning stability. Eventually, the current intensification leads to the onset of reconnection, the formation and ejection of a plasmoid, and a collapse of the inner tail. The earthward flow shows the characteristics of a dipolarization front: enhancement of Bz, associated with a thin vertical electron current sheet in the PIC simulation. Both MHD and PIC simulations show a dominance of energy conversion from incoming Poynting flux to outgoing enthalpy flux, resulting in heating of the inner tail. Localized Joule dissipation plays only a minor role.

  11. Simulation and Experimental Studies of Jamming for Model Two-Dimensional Particles Under Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guariguata, A.; Wu, D. T.; Koh, C. A.; Sum, A. K.; Sloan, E. D.

    2009-06-01

    Jamming and plugging of flowlines with gas hydrates is the most critical issue in the flow assurance of oil and gas production lines. Because solid hydrate particles are often suspended in a fluid, the pipeline jamming and flow constriction formed by hydrates depend not only on particle/wall properties, such as friction, binding forces and mechanical characteristics, but also on the concentration of particles upstream of the restriction, flow velocity, fluid viscosity, and forces between the particles. Therefore, to gain insight into the jamming phenomena, both experiments and computer simulations on two-dimensional model systems have been carried out to characterize the flow of particles in a channel, with the eventual goal of applying that knowledge to gas hydrates jamming. Using the simulation software PFC2d®, we studied the effect of restriction geometry and flow velocity on the jamming process of particles. Results from the simulations were compared to experimental measurements on polyethylene discs floating on water flowing in an open channel.

  12. Two-dimensional simulation of inductive-capacitive transition instability in an electronegative plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Graves, D. B.

    2012-08-01

    Plasma instabilities are observed in low-pressure inductive discharges in the transition between low density capacitively driven and high density inductively driven discharges when attaching gases are used. A two-dimensional hybrid fluid-analytic simulation is used to determine the space- and time-varying densities of electrons, positive and negative ions, and neutral species, and electron and neutral gas temperatures. The simulation includes both the capacitive and inductive coupling of the source coils to the plasma and the neutral gas dissociation and heating. The plasma is described using the time-dependent fluid equations, along with an analytical sheath model. The simulation is applied to an experiment in Cl2, in which gaps in the electron and positive ion densities versus power curves were observed, with our numerical results indicating the existence of an inductive-capacitive transition instability, corresponding approximately to the observed gaps. The fluid calculation captures various features that are not included in previous global instability models. A method is developed to match the numerical results to the global model formalism, which predicts the existence of the unstable mode, as numerically found. The time and space variations can be used to improve the global model formalism.

  13. Two Dimensional Simulations of Core-Collapse Supernovae with Neutrino Transport in FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Evan; Couch, Sean

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are the end stage of massive star evolution and are central to many aspects of astrophysics. They are the birth site of both neutron stars and black holes and their shocks are responsible for spreading the products of stellar evolution throughout the Galaxy and regulating star formation. Despite their importance and decades of research, the precise mechanism that converts the initial implosion of the collapsing iron core to an explosion that unbinds the majority of the star is unknown. However, we know that the majority of the energy released is ultimately radiated in neutrinos and that the physics of neutrino transport and neutrino heating-among many other aspects-must be treated carefully when modelling the core-collapse supernova central engine. In this talk, I will present recent simulations of core-collapse supernovae from the FLASH hydrodynamics code. We perform two dimensional, neutrino transport simulations using several progenitors. We test the influence of general relativity by using a pseudorelativistic potential that effectively models GR. We show that the more compact protoneutron star predicted from GR increases the neutrino heating and can lead to explosions where the corresponding Newtonian simulations fail.

  14. Simulation of Ozone and Long Lived Tracers in the GSFC Two-Dimensional Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Considine, David B.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    The GSFC two-dimensional transport and chemistry model has been used for a wide variety of scientific and assessment studies of stratospheric ozone. Transport is a key element in the ozone simulations, and we have recently upgraded our model transport formulation to include much of the information about atmospheric transport processes available from existing data sets. To properly evaluate the model transport, it is desirable to examine the effects of transport and photochemistry separately. Recently, high quality observations of several long lived stratospheric tracers have become available from aircraft, balloon, and satellite measurement systems. This data provides a means to do a detailed model transport evaluation, as has been done in the recent Models and Measurements Intercomparison Project II. In this paper, we will discuss the GSFC 2D model simulations of ozone together with model-data comparisons of long lived tracers such as methane and the age of air transport diagnostic. We will show that the model can reproduce many of the transport-sensitive features observed in the stratosphere, and can compare reasonably well with measurements of both total ozone and long lived tracers simultaneously. We will also discuss the model deficiencies in simulating some of the detailed aspects of the observations.

  15. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional spatially-developing mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. V.; Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional, incompressible, spatially developing mixing layer simulations are performed at Re = 10(exp 2) and 10(exp 4) with two classes of perturbations applied at the inlet boundary; combinations of discrete modes from linear stability theory, and a broad spectrum of modes derived from experimentally measured velocity spectra. The effect of the type and strength of inlet perturbations on vortex dynamics and time-averaged properties are explored. Two-point spatial velocity and autocorrelations are used to estimate the size and lifetime of the resulting coherent structures and to explore possible feedback effects. The computed time-averaged properties such as mean velocity profiles, turbulent statistics, and spread rates show good agreement with experimentally measured values. It is shown that by forcing with a broad spectrum of modes derived from an experimental energy spectrum many experimentally observed phenomena can be reproduced by a 2-D simulation. The strength of the forcing merely affected the length required for the dominant coherent structures to become fully-developed. Thus intensities comparable to those of the background turbulence in many wind tunnel experiments produced the same results, given sufficient simulation length.

  16. Two-dimensional simulations of the neutron yield in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2010-10-15

    Maximizing the neutron yield to obtain energy gain is the ultimate goal for inertial confinement fusion. Nonuniformities seeded by target and laser perturbations can disrupt neutron production via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. To understand the effects of perturbations on the neutron yield of cryogenic DT implosions on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], two-dimensional DRACO[P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] simulations have been performed to systematically investigate each perturbation source and their combined effects on the neutron-yield performance. Two sources of nonuniformity accounted for the neutron-yield reduction in DRACO simulations: target offset from the target chamber center and laser imprinting. The integrated simulations for individual shots reproduce the experimental yield-over-clean (YOC) ratio within a factor of 2 or better. The simulated neutron-averaged ion temperatures is only about 10%-15% higher than measurements. By defining the temperature-over-clean, its relationship to YOC provides an indication of how much the hot-spot volume and density are perturbed with respect to the uniform situation. Typically, the YOC in OMEGA experiments is of the order of {approx}5%. The simulation results suggest that YOC can be increased to the ignition hydroequivalent level of 15%-20% (with <{rho}R>=200-300 mg/cm{sup 2}) by maintaining a target offset of less than 10 {mu}m and employing beam smoothing by spectral dispersion.

  17. Simulation of Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy of Peptides Using Localized Normal Modes.

    PubMed

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W D; Husseini, Fouad S; Hirst, Jonathan D; Besley, Nicholas A

    2016-04-12

    Nonlinear two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR) is most commonly simulated within the framework of the exciton method. The key parameters for these calculations include the frequency of the oscillators within their molecular environments and coupling constants that describe the strength of coupling between the oscillators. It is shown that these quantities can be obtained directly from harmonic frequency calculations by exploiting a procedure that localizes the normal modes. This approach is demonstrated using the amide I modes of polypeptides. For linear and cyclic diamides and hexapeptide Z-Aib-L-Leu-(Aib)2-Gly-Aib-OtBu, the computed parameters are compared with those from existing schemes, and the resulting 2DIR spectra are consistent with experimental observations. The incorporation of conformational averaging of structures from molecular dynamics simulations is discussed, and a hybrid scheme wherein the Hamiltonian matrix from the quantum chemical local-mode approach is combined with fluctuations from empirical schemes is shown to be consistent with experiment. The work demonstrates that localized vibrational modes can provide a foundation for the calculation of 2DIR spectra that does not rely on extensive parametrization and can be applied to a wide range of systems. For systems that are too large for quantum chemical harmonic frequency calculations, the local-mode approach provides a convenient platform for the development of site frequency and coupling maps. PMID:26913672

  18. GPU-based simulation of the two-dimensional unstable structure of gaseous oblique detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, H.H.; Kiyanda, C.B.; Ng, H.D.; Morgan, G.H.; Nikiforakis, N.

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, the two-dimensional structure of unstable oblique detonations induced by the wedge from a supersonic combustible gas flow is simulated using the reactive Euler equations with a one-step Arrhenius chemistry model. A wide range of activation energy of the combustible mixture is considered. Computations are performed on the Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) to reduce the simulation runtimes. A large computational domain covered by a uniform mesh with high grid resolution is used to properly capture the development of instabilities and the formation of different transverse wave structures. After the initiation point, where the oblique shock transits into a detonation, an instability begins to manifest and in all cases, the left-running transverse waves first appear, followed by the subsequent emergence of right-running transverse waves forming the dual-head triple point structure. This study shows that for low activation energies, a long computational length must be carefully considered to reveal the unstable surface due to the slow growth rate of the instability. For high activation energies, the flow behind the unstable oblique detonation features the formation of unburnt gas pockets and strong vortex-pressure wave interaction resulting in a chaotic-like vortical structure.

  19. Miscible fluid displacement stability in unconfined porous media:. Two-dimensional flow experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawitz, James W.; Annable, Michael D.; Rao, P. S. C.

    1998-06-01

    In situ flushing groundwater remediation technologies, such as cosolvent flushing, rely on the stability of the interface between the resident and displacing fluids for efficient removal of contaminants. Contrasts in density and viscosity between the resident and displacing fluids can adversely affect the stability of the displacement front. Petroleum engineers have developed techniques to describe these types of processes; however, their findings do not necessarily translate directly to aquifer remediation. The purpose of this laboratory study was to investigate how density and viscosity contrasts affected cosolvent displacements in unconfined porous media characterized by the presence of a capillary fringe. Two-dimensional flow laboratory experiments, which were partially scaled to a cosolvent flushing field experiment, were conducted to determine potential implications of flow instabilities in homogeneous sand packs. Numerical simulations were also conducted to investigate the differential impact of fluid property contrasts in unconfined and confined systems. The results from these experiments and simulations indicated that the presence of a capillary fringe was an important factor in the displacement efficiency. Buoyant forces can act to carry a lighter-than-water cosolvent preferentially into the capillary fringe during displacement of the resident groundwater. During subsequent water flooding, buoyancy forces can act to effectively trap the cosolvent in the capillary fringe, contributing to the inefficient removal of cosolvent from the aquifer.

  20. MHD Simulation Heliospheric Magnetic Fields and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2005-01-01

    This talk will present a summary of our results on simulations of heliospheric structure and dynamics. We use a three-dimensional MHD code in spherical coordinates to produce a solar wind containing a rotating, tilted heliospheric current sheet, fast-slow stream and microstream shear layers, waves, 2-D turbulence, and pressure balanced structures that are input to the inner (superAlfvenic) boundary. The evolution of various combinations of these has led to a deeper understanding of sector structure, magnetic holes, fluctuation anisotropies, and general turbulent evolution. We show how the sectors are likely to be connected, how spiral fields can arise, and how field line diffusion can be caused by waves with transverse structure and microstream shears.

  1. Two-dimensional simulations of explosive eruptions of Kick-em Jenny and other submarine volcanos

    SciTech Connect

    Gisler, Galen R.; Weaver, R. P.; Mader, Charles L.; Gittings, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    Kick-em Jenny, in the Eastern Caribbean, is a submerged volcanic cone that has erupted a dozen or more times since its discovery in 1939. The most likely hazard posed by this volcano is to shipping in the immediate vicinity (through volcanic missiles or loss-of-buoyancy), but it is of interest to estimate upper limits on tsunamis that might be produced by a catastrophic explosive eruption. To this end, we have performed two-dimensional simulations of such an event in a geometry resembling that of Kick-em Jenny with our SAGE adaptive mesh Eulerian multifluid compressible hydrocode. We use realistic equations of state for air, water, and basalt, and follow the event from the initial explosive eruption, through the generation of a transient water cavity and the propagation of waves away from the site. We find that even for extremely catastrophic explosive eruptions, tsunamis from Kick-em Jenny are unlikely to pose significant danger to nearby islands. For comparison, we have also performed simulations of explosive eruptions at the much larger shield volcano Vailuluu in the Samoan chain, where the greater energy available can produce a more impressive wave. In general, however, we conclude that explosive eruptions do not couple well to water waves. The waves that are produced from such events are turbulent and highly dissipative, and don't propagate well. This is consistent with what we have found previously in simulations of asteroid-impact generated tsunamis. Non-explosive events, however, such as landslides or gas hydrate releases, do couple well to waves, and our simulations of tsunamis generated by subaerial and sub-aqueous landslides demonstrate this.

  2. Notes on simulating two-dimensional Raman and terahertz-Raman signals with a full molecular dynamics simulation approach

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hironobu; Jo, Ju-Yeon; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in two-dimensional (2D) THz-Raman and 2D Raman spectroscopies have created the possibility for quantitatively investigating the role of many dynamic and structural aspects of the molecular system. We explain the significant points for properly simulating 2D vibrational spectroscopic studies of intermolecular modes using the full molecular dynamics approach, in particular, regarding the system size, the treatment of the thermostat, and inclusion of an Ewald summation for the induced polarizability. Moreover, using the simulation results for water employing various polarization functions, we elucidate the roles of permanent and induced optical properties in determining the 2D profiles of the signal. PMID:26798823

  3. Simulation of a two-dimensional dipolar system on a APE100/quadrics SIMD architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, A.; Pisacane, F.; Rosato, V.

    1997-06-01

    The temperature behavior of a system of dipoles with long-range interactions has been simulated via a two-dimensional lattice Monte Carlo on a massively (SIMD) platform (Quadrics/APE100). Thermodynamic quantities have been evaluated in order to locate and to characterize the phase transition in absence of applied field. Emphasis is given to the code implementation on the SIMD architecture and to the relevant features which have been used to improve code capabilities and performances. The probability of simultaneous occurrence of at least k spanning clusters has been studied by Monte Carlo simulations on the 2D square lattice with free boundaries at the bond percolation threshold p{sub c} = {1/2}. It is found that the probability of k and more Incipient Spanning Clusters (ISC) have the values P(k > 1) {approx} 0.00658(3) and P(k > 2) {approx} 0.00000148(21) provided that the limit of these probabilities for infinite lattices exists. The probability P(k > 3) of more than three ISC could be estimated to be of the order of 10{sup -11} and is beyond the possibility to compute such a value by nowadays computers. So, it is impossible to check in simulations the Aizenman law for the probabilities when k {much_gt} 1. We have detected a single sample with four ISC in a total number of about 1010 samples investigated. The probability of this single event is 1/10 for that number of samples. The influence of boundary conditions is discussed in the last section.

  4. Thermal and Magnetorotational Instability in the Interstellar Medium: Two-dimensional Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piontek, Robert A.; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2004-02-01

    The structure and dynamics of diffuse gas in the Milky Way and other disk galaxies may be strongly influenced by thermal and magnetorotational instabilities (TI and MRI, respectively) on scales ~1-100 pc. We initiate a study of these processes, using two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations with conditions appropriate for the atomic interstellar medium (ISM). Our simulations incorporate thermal conduction and adopt local ``shearing-periodic'' equations of motion and boundary conditions to study dynamics of a (100 pc) 2 radial-vertical section of the disk. We demonstrate, consistent with previous work, that nonlinear development of ``pure TI'' produces a network of filaments that condense into cold clouds at their intersections, yielding a distinct two-phase warm/cold medium within ~20 Myr. TI-driven turbulent motions of the clouds and warm intercloud medium are present but saturate at quite subsonic amplitudes for uniform initial P/k=2000 K cm -3. MRI has previously been studied in near-uniform media; our simulations include both TI+MRI models, which begin from uniform-density conditions, and cloud+MRI models, which begin with a two-phase cloudy medium. Both the TI+MRI and cloud+MRI models show that MRI develops within a few galactic orbital times, just as for a uniform medium. The mean separation between clouds can affect which MRI mode dominates the evolution. Provided intercloud separations do not exceed half the MRI wavelength, we find the MRI growth rates are similar to those for the corresponding uniform medium. This opens the possibility that if low cloud volume filling factors increase MRI dissipation times compared to those in a uniform medium, then MRI-driven motions in the ISM could reach amplitudes comparable to observed H I turbulent line widths.

  5. Modeling and simulation of multiple bubble entrainment and interactions with two dimensional vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Justin; Shams, Ehsan; Apte, Sourabh V.

    2011-02-01

    Simulations of bubble entrainment and interactions with two dimensional vortical flows are preformed using a discrete element model. In this Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, solution to the carrier phase is obtained using direct numerical simulation whereas motion of subgrid bubbles is modeled using Lagrangian tracking. The volumetric displacement of the fluid by the finite size of the bubbles is modeled along with interphase momentum-exchange for a realistic coupling of the bubbles to the carrier phase. In order to assess the importance of this volumetric coupling effect, even at low overall volume loading, simulations of a small number of microbubbles entrained in a traveling vortex tube are studied in detail. The test case resembles the experiments conducted by Sridhar and Katz [JFM, 1999] on bubble entrainment in vortex rings. It is shown that under some conditions, the entrainment of eight small bubbles, 1100 μm or less in diameter, result in significant levels of vortex distortion when modeled using the volumetric coupling effect. Neglecting these effects, however, does not result in any vortex distortion due to entrained bubbles. The nondimensionalized vortex strength versus bubble settling locations are compared with experimental data to show collapse of the data along the trends observed in experiments only when the volumetric effects are modeled. Qualitative and quantitative assessments of this distortion observed with volumetric coupling are made using three methods; bubble induced vortex asymmetry, relative change in the decay of angular momentum, and relative change in the peak vorticity. It is found that in all cases the volumetric effects result in a relative increase of the vortex decay rate. The concept of a relative reaction force, defined as the ratio of net bubble to fluid reaction to the local driving force of the vortex, is introduced to analyze this effect. It is shown that the global increases in vortex decay rate are directly proportional to

  6. Numerical simulation of unstable two-dimensional motions of a circumstellar shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, G. Yu.; Krasnobaev, K. V.

    2010-07-01

    The growth of two-dimensional axisymmetric perturbations in the motion of a neutral shell formed in the interstellar medium when an ionization-shock front exits at the surface of a cloud is simulated numerically. The perturbations are assumed to emerge when the shock ahead of the ionization front reaches the cloud boundary. For long-wavelength perturbations, the accumulation of mass has been found to take place in radially oriented condensations in the shape of a rod pointed toward the star and widened at the opposite end as a result of instability. The shell fragmentation is accompanied by supersonic spouting of a hot plasma into a low-density medium. Flow nonstationarity is shown to affect significantly the gas density and velocity distributions both inside and in the immediate vicinity of the condensation. As one recedes from the ionization front, the density of charged particles changes only slightly, which is inconsistent with the power law of density decrease with increasing distance from the condensation center commonly used in interpreting observations.

  7. Electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities associated with electrostatic shocks: Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.; Takabe, Hideaki

    2010-03-15

    A two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation with the realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio of 1836 is carried out to investigate the electrostatic collisionless shocks in relatively high-speed (approx3000 km s{sup -1}) plasma flows and also the influence of both electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities, which can develop around the shocks, on the shock dynamics. It is shown that the electrostatic ion-ion instability can develop in front of the shocks, where the plasma is under counterstreaming condition, with highly oblique wave vectors as was shown previously. The electrostatic potential generated by the electrostatic ion-ion instability propagating obliquely to the shock surface becomes comparable with the shock potential and finally the shock structure is destroyed. It is also shown that in front of the shock the beam-Weibel instability gradually grows as well, consequently suggesting that the magnetic field generated by the beam-Weibel instability becomes important in long-term evolution of the shock and the Weibel-mediated shock forms long after the electrostatic shock vanished. It is also observed that the secondary electrostatic shock forms in the reflected ions in front of the primary electrostatic shock.

  8. Simulation of a two-dimensional model for colloids in a uniaxial electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almudallal, Ahmad M.; Saika-Voivod, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified two-dimensional model for colloidal hard spheres in an external uniaxial ac electric field. Experimentally, the external field induces dipole moments in the colloidal particles, which in turn form chains. We therefore approximate the system as composed of well-formed chains of dipolar hard spheres of a uniform length. The dipolar interaction between colloidal spheres gives rise to an effective interaction between the chains, which we treat as disks in a plane, that includes a short-range attraction and long-range repulsion. Hence, the system favors finite clustering over bulk phase separation, and indeed we observe at low temperature and density that the system does form a cluster phase. As the density increases, percolation is accompanied by a pressure anomaly. The percolated phase, despite being composed of connected, locally crystalline domains, does not bear the typical signatures of a hexatic phase. At very low densities, we find no indication of a “void phase” with a cellular structure seen recently in experiments.

  9. Two-dimensional simulation of spatiotemporal generation of dielectric barrier columnar discharges in atmospheric helium

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhiming; Hao, Yanpeng; Yang, Lin; Han, Yongxia; Li, Licheng

    2015-12-15

    A two-dimensional (2D) fluid model is presented to investigate the spatiotemporal generation and dynamic mechanics of dielectric barrier columnar discharges in atmospheric helium. The model was examined with discharge currents measured in experiments and images taken by an intensified charge couple device camera. Based on the model, a columnar discharge was simulated for several cycles after being ignited. The discharge could be regarded as an initial unstable stage for the first three and a half cycles, then a steady state for the following cycles. In the initial stage, the discharge evolves from a uniform pattern into a columnar one. The calculated equipotential lines, 2D radial electric field, and electron density distributions at the edge of uniform discharges show the radial electric field accounts for the shrinking discharge area and the formation of discharge columns in the end. The columnar glow discharges and the Townsend discharges beyond the columns could coexist in the initial stage, and a Townsend discharge might develop into a new glow column in the next half-cycle. The radial electric field surrounding a glow discharge column has an inhibiting effect on the ionization in the peripheral area.

  10. Simulation of Anderson localization in two-dimensional ultracold gases for pointlike disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morong, W.; DeMarco, B.

    2015-08-01

    Anderson localization has been observed for a variety of media, including ultracold atomic gases with speckle disorder in one and three dimensions. However, observation of Anderson localization in a two-dimensional geometry for ultracold gases has been elusive. We show that a cause of this difficulty is the relatively high percolation threshold of a speckle potential in two dimensions, resulting in strong classical localization. We propose a realistic pointlike disorder potential that circumvents this percolation limit with localization lengths that are experimentally observable. The percolation threshold is evaluated for experimentally realistic parameters, and a regime of negligible classical trapping is identified. Localization lengths are determined via scaling theory, using both exact scattering cross sections and the Born approximation, and by direct simulation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We show that the Born approximation can underestimate the localization length by four orders of magnitude at low energies, while exact cross sections and scaling theory provide an upper bound. Achievable experimental parameters for observing localization in this system are proposed.

  11. Molecular self-assembly on two-dimensional atomic crystals: insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinghe; Wu, Qisheng; Chen, Qian; Wang, Jinlan

    2015-11-19

    van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy of ultrathin organic films on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has become a sovereign area because of their unique advantages in organic electronic devices. However, the dynamic mechanism of the self-assembly remains elusive. Here, we visualize the nanoscale self-assembly of organic molecules on graphene and boron nitride monolayer from a disordered state to a 2D lattice via molecular dynamics simulation for the first time. It is revealed that the assembly toward 2D ordered structures is essentially the minimization of the molecule-molecule interaction, that is, the vdW interaction in nonpolar systems and the vdW and Coulomb interactions in polar systems that are the decisive factors for the formation of the 2D ordering. The role of the substrate is mainly governing the array orientation of the adsorbates. The mechanisms unveiled here are generally applicable to a broad class of organic thin films via vdW epitaxy. PMID:26523464

  12. Simulated two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the eight-bacteriochlorophyll FMO complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Shu-Hao; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-21

    The Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein-pigment complex acts as a molecular wire conducting energy between the outer antenna system and the reaction center; it is an important photosynthetic system to study the transfer of excitonic energy. Recent crystallographic studies report the existence of an additional (eighth) bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) in some of the FMO monomers. To understand the functionality of this eighth BChl, we simulated the two-dimensional electronic spectra of both the 7-site (apo form) and the 8-site (holo form) variant of the FMO complex from green sulfur bacteria, Prosthecochloris aestuarii. By comparing the spectrum, it was found that the eighth BChl can affect two different excitonic energy transfer pathways: (1) it is directly involved in the first apo form pathway (6 → 3 → 1) by passing the excitonic energy to exciton 6; and (2) it facilitates an increase in the excitonic wave function overlap between excitons 4 and 5 in the second pathway (7 → 4,5 → 2 → 1) and thus increases the possible downward sampling routes across the BChls.

  13. Simulation of Two Dimensional Ultraviolet (2DUV) Spectroscopy of Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun; Abramavicius, Darius; Falvo, Cyril; Bulheller, Benjamin M.; Hirst, Jonathan D.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-01-01

    Revealing the structure and aggregation mechanism of amyloid fibrils is essential for the treatment of over 20 diseases related to protein misfolding. Coherent two dimensional (2D) infrared spectroscopy is a novel tool that provides a wealth of new insight into the structure and dynamics of biomolecular systems. Recently developed ultrafast laser sources are extending multidimensional spectroscopy into the ultraviolet (UV) region, and this opens up new opportunities for probing fibrils. In a simulation study, we show that 2DUV spectra of the backbone of a 32-residue β-amyloid (Aβ9–40) fibril associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and two intermediate prefibrillar structures carry characteristic signatures of fibril size and geometry that could be used to monitor its formation kinetics. The dependence of these signals on the fibril size and geometry is explored. We demonstrate that the dominant features of the β-amyloid fibril spectra are determined by intramolecular interactions within a single Aβ9–40, while intermolecular interactions at the “external interface” have clear signatures in the fine details of these signals. PMID:20795695

  14. Evolution of the stimulated Raman scattering instability in two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Casanova, M.; Loiseau, P.; Rozmus, W.; Peng, Z.; Pesme, D.; Hueller, S.; Chapman, T.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2010-09-15

    In the following work, we analyze one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) full particle-in-cell simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and study the evolution of Langmuir waves (LWs) in the kinetic regime. It is found that SRS reflectivity becomes random due to a nonlinear frequency shift and that the transverse modulations of LWs are induced by (i) the Weibel instability due to the current of trapped particles and (ii) the trapped particle modulational instability (TPMI) [H. Rose, Phys. Plasmas 12, 12318 (2005)]. Comparisons between 1D and 2D cases indicate that the nonlinear frequency shift is responsible for the first saturation of SRS. After this transient interval of first saturation, 2D effects become important: a strong side-scattering of the light, caused by these transverse modulations of the LW and the presence of a nonlinear frequency shift, is observed together with a strong transverse diffusion. This leads to an increase of the Landau damping rate of the LW, contributing to the limiting of Raman backscattering. A model is developed that reproduces the transverse evolution of the magnetic field due to trapped particles. Based on a simple 1D hydrodynamic model, the growth rate for the Weibel instability of the transverse electrostatic mode and magnetic field is estimated and found to be close to the TPMI growth rate [H. Rose et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 042311 (2008)].

  15. Two-dimensional simulation of spatiotemporal generation of dielectric barrier columnar discharges in atmospheric helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiming; Hao, Yanpeng; Yang, Lin; Han, Yongxia; Li, Licheng

    2015-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) fluid model is presented to investigate the spatiotemporal generation and dynamic mechanics of dielectric barrier columnar discharges in atmospheric helium. The model was examined with discharge currents measured in experiments and images taken by an intensified charge couple device camera. Based on the model, a columnar discharge was simulated for several cycles after being ignited. The discharge could be regarded as an initial unstable stage for the first three and a half cycles, then a steady state for the following cycles. In the initial stage, the discharge evolves from a uniform pattern into a columnar one. The calculated equipotential lines, 2D radial electric field, and electron density distributions at the edge of uniform discharges show the radial electric field accounts for the shrinking discharge area and the formation of discharge columns in the end. The columnar glow discharges and the Townsend discharges beyond the columns could coexist in the initial stage, and a Townsend discharge might develop into a new glow column in the next half-cycle. The radial electric field surrounding a glow discharge column has an inhibiting effect on the ionization in the peripheral area.

  16. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanovic, J.; Frandsen, C.; Beleggia, M.; Schiøtz, J.

    2015-07-28

    We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices. As the particles are small enough to consist of a single magnetic domain each, their magnetic interactions can be described by a spin model in which each particle is assigned a macroscopic “superspin.” Thus, the magnetic behaviour of these lattices may be compared to magnetic crystals with nanoparticle superspins taking the role of the atomic spins. The coupling is, however, different. The superspins interact only by dipolar interactions as exchange coupling between individual nanoparticles may be neglected due to interparticle spacing. We observe that it is energetically favorable to introduce domain walls oriented along the long dimension of nanoparticle assemblies rather than along the short dimension. This is unlike what is typically observed in continuous magnetic materials, where the exchange interaction introduces an energetic cost proportional to the area of the domain walls. Structural disorder, which will always be present in realistic assemblies, pins longitudinal domain walls when the external field is reversed, and makes a gradual reversal of the magnetization by migration of longitudinal domain walls possible, in agreement with previous experimental results.

  17. Spinodal decomposition of polymer solutions: molecular dynamics simulations of the two-dimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reith, Daniel; Bucior, Katarzyna; Yelash, Leonid; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    As a generic model system for phase separation in polymer solutions, a coarse-grained model for hexadecane/carbon dioxide mixtures has been studied in two-dimensional geometry. Both the phase diagram in equilibrium (obtained from a finite size scaling analysis of Monte Carlo data) and the kinetics of state changes caused by pressure jumps (studied by large scale molecular dynamics simulations) are presented. The results are compared to previous work where the same model was studied in three-dimensional geometry and under confinement in slit geometry. For deep quenches the characteristic length scale ℓ(t) of the formed domains grows with time t according to a power law close to \\ell (t)\\propto \\sqrt{t}. Since in this problem both the polymer density ρp and the solvent density ρs matter, the time evolution of the density distribution PL(ρp,ρs,t) in L × L subboxes of the system is also analyzed. It is found that in the first stage of phase separation the system separates locally into low density carbon dioxide regions that contain no polymers and regions of high density polymer melt that are supersaturated with this solvent. The further coarsening proceeds via the growth of domains of rather irregular shapes. A brief comparison of our findings with results of other models is given.

  18. TWO-DIMENSIONAL BLAST-WAVE-DRIVEN RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY: EXPERIMENT AND SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Harding, E. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Edwards, M. J.; Miles, A. R.; Perry, T. S.; Blue, B. E.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N. C.; Arnett, D.; Leibrandt, D. R.

    2009-05-01

    This paper shows results from experiments diagnosing the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with two-dimensional initial conditions at an embedded, decelerating interface. Experiments are performed at the Omega Laser and use {approx}5 kJ of energy to create a planar blast wave in a dense, plastic layer that is followed by a lower density foam layer. The single-mode interface has a wavelength of 50 {mu}m and amplitude of 2.5 {mu}m. Some targets are supplemented with additional modes. The interface is shocked then decelerated by the foam layer. This initially produces the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability followed and then dominated by Rayleigh-Taylor growth that quickly evolves into the nonlinear regime. The experimental conditions are scaled to be hydrodynamically similar to SN1987A in order to study the instabilities that are believed to occur at the He/H interface during the blast-wave-driven explosion phase of the star. Simulations of the experiment were performed using the FLASH hydrodynamics code.

  19. Two dimensional mesoscale simulations of projectile instability during penetration in dry sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, S. K.; Teeter, R. D.; Felice, C. W.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2008-10-01

    To gain insight into the instability and trajectory change in projectiles penetrating dry sand at high velocities, two dimensional plane strain mesoscale simulations were carried out using representative models of a particulate system and of a small projectile. A program, ISP-SAND, was developed and used to generate the representative particulate system with mean grain sizes of 60 and 120 μm as well as ±30% uniform size distribution from the mean. Target porosities ranged from 30% to 40%. The penetration of ogive nose steel projectiles with caliber radius head of 3.5 and length-to-diameter (l /d) ratio of 3.85 was simulated using the updated Lagrangian explicit parallel finite element code ISP-TROTP. Deformation of the projectile and individual sand grains was analyzed using a nonlinear elastic-inelastic model for these materials. Grain-grain and grain-projectile interactions were analyzed using a contact algorithm with and without friction. Projectile instability was quantified and compared using the lateral displacement of the center of mass, lateral force acting on the projectile, and its rotational momentum about the center of mass. The main source of projectile instability and the ensuing trajectory change in the penetration simulations was found to be the inhomogeneous loading of the projectile due to the heterogeneities and randomness inherent in a particulate media like sand. The granularity of the media has not been considered explicitly in previous work. Projectile instability increased with impact velocity, as expected. However, it also increased for the case of elastic impactor that preserved the nose shape, with an increase in grain size, and for uniform grain sizes. Moreover, friction, inherently present in geologic materials, was found to be a major contributor to instability. Conclusions derived from one projectile depth simulations were confirmed by two deeper penetration simulations considering up to three full lengths of penetration (requiring

  20. Electrostatics on the sphere with applications to Monte Carlo simulations of two dimensional polar fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Caillol, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-21

    We present two methods for solving the electrostatics of point charges and multipoles on the surface of a sphere, i.e., in the space S{sub 2}, with applications to numerical simulations of two-dimensional (2D) polar fluids. In the first approach, point charges are associated with uniform neutralizing backgrounds to form neutral pseudo-charges, while in the second, one instead considers bi-charges, i.e., dumbells of antipodal point charges of opposite signs. We establish the expressions of the electric potentials of pseudo- and bi-charges as isotropic solutions of the Laplace-Beltrami equation in S{sub 2}. A multipolar expansion of pseudo- and bi-charge potentials leads to the electric potentials of mono- and bi-multipoles, respectively. These potentials constitute non-isotropic solutions of the Laplace-Beltrami equation, the general solution of which in spherical coordinates is recast under a new appealing form. We then focus on the case of mono- and bi-dipoles and build the theory of dielectric media in S{sub 2}. We notably obtain the expression of the static dielectric constant of a uniform isotropic polar fluid living in S{sub 2} in terms of the polarization fluctuations of subdomains of S{sub 2}. We also derive the long range behavior of the equilibrium pair correlation function under the assumption that it is governed by macroscopic electrostatics. These theoretical developments find their application in Monte Carlo simulations of the 2D fluid of dipolar hard spheres. Some preliminary numerical experiments are discussed with a special emphasis on finite size effects, a careful study of the thermodynamic limit, and a check of the theoretical predictions for the asymptotic behavior of the pair correlation function.

  1. Electrostatics on the sphere with applications to Monte Carlo simulations of two dimensional polar fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillol, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-01

    We present two methods for solving the electrostatics of point charges and multipoles on the surface of a sphere, i.e., in the space S 2 , with applications to numerical simulations of two-dimensional (2D) polar fluids. In the first approach, point charges are associated with uniform neutralizing backgrounds to form neutral pseudo-charges, while in the second, one instead considers bi-charges, i.e., dumbells of antipodal point charges of opposite signs. We establish the expressions of the electric potentials of pseudo- and bi-charges as isotropic solutions of the Laplace-Beltrami equation in S 2 . A multipolar expansion of pseudo- and bi-charge potentials leads to the electric potentials of mono- and bi-multipoles, respectively. These potentials constitute non-isotropic solutions of the Laplace-Beltrami equation, the general solution of which in spherical coordinates is recast under a new appealing form. We then focus on the case of mono- and bi-dipoles and build the theory of dielectric media in S 2 . We notably obtain the expression of the static dielectric constant of a uniform isotropic polar fluid living in S 2 in terms of the polarization fluctuations of subdomains of S 2 . We also derive the long range behavior of the equilibrium pair correlation function under the assumption that it is governed by macroscopic electrostatics. These theoretical developments find their application in Monte Carlo simulations of the 2D fluid of dipolar hard spheres. Some preliminary numerical experiments are discussed with a special emphasis on finite size effects, a careful study of the thermodynamic limit, and a check of the theoretical predictions for the asymptotic behavior of the pair correlation function.

  2. Simulation of Long Lived Tracers Using an Improved Empirically Based Two-Dimensional Model Transport Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.; Stolarski, R. S.; Considine, D. B.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a new empirically-based transport algorithm for use in our GSFC two-dimensional transport and chemistry model. The new algorithm contains planetary wave statistics, and parameterizations to account for the effects due to gravity waves and equatorial Kelvin waves. As such, this scheme utilizes significantly more information compared to our previous algorithm which was based only on zonal mean temperatures and heating rates. The new model transport captures much of the qualitative structure and seasonal variability observed in long lived tracers, such as: isolation of the tropics and the southern hemisphere winter polar vortex; the well mixed surf-zone region of the winter sub-tropics and mid-latitudes; the latitudinal and seasonal variations of total ozone; and the seasonal variations of mesospheric H2O. The model also indicates a double peaked structure in methane associated with the semiannual oscillation in the tropical upper stratosphere. This feature is similar in phase but is significantly weaker in amplitude compared to the observations. The model simulations of carbon-14 and strontium-90 are in good agreement with observations, both in simulating the peak in mixing ratio at 20-25 km, and the decrease with altitude in mixing ratio above 25 km. We also find mostly good agreement between modeled and observed age of air determined from SF6 outside of the northern hemisphere polar vortex. However, observations inside the vortex reveal significantly older air compared to the model. This is consistent with the model deficiencies in simulating CH4 in the northern hemisphere winter high latitudes and illustrates the limitations of the current climatological zonal mean model formulation. The propagation of seasonal signals in water vapor and CO2 in the lower stratosphere showed general agreement in phase, and the model qualitatively captured the observed amplitude decrease in CO2 from the tropics to midlatitudes. However, the simulated seasonal

  3. Solar Wind Turbulence from MHD to Sub-ion Scales: High-resolution Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franci, Luca; Verdini, Andrea; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-05-01

    We present results from a high-resolution and large-scale hybrid (fluid electrons and particle-in-cell protons) two-dimensional numerical simulation of decaying turbulence. Two distinct spectral regions (separated by a smooth break at proton scales) develop with clear power-law scaling, each one occupying about a decade in wavenumbers. The simulation results simultaneously exhibit several properties of the observed solar wind fluctuations: spectral indices of the magnetic, kinetic, and residual energy spectra in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) inertial range along with a flattening of the electric field spectrum, an increase in magnetic compressibility, and a strong coupling of the cascade with the density and the parallel component of the magnetic fluctuations at sub-proton scales. Our findings support the interpretation that in the solar wind, large-scale MHD fluctuations naturally evolve beyond proton scales into a turbulent regime that is governed by the generalized Ohm’s law.

  4. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional single- and multiple-material flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Baty, R.S. ); Kashiwa, B.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Over the last several years, Sandia National Laboratories has had an interest in developing capabilities to predict the flow fields around vehicles entering or exiting the water at a wide range of speeds. Such prediction schemes have numerous engineering applications in the design of weapon systems. For example, such a scheme could be used to predict the forces and moments experienced by an air-launched anti-submarine weapon on water-entry. Furthermore, a water-exit prediction capability could be used to model the complicated surface closure jet resulting from a missile being shot out of the water. The CCICE (Cell-Centered Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was chosen to provide the fluid dynamics solver for high speed water-entry and water-exit problems. This implicit time-marching, two-dimensional, conservative, finite-volume code solves the multi-material, compressible, inviscid fluid dynamics equations. The incompressible version of the CCICE code, CCMAC (cell-Centered Marker and Cell), was chosen for low speed water- entry and water-exit problems in order to reduce the computational expense. These codes were chosen to take advantage of certain advances in numerical methods for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that have taken place at LANL. Notable among these advances is the ability to perform implicit, multi-material, compressible flow simulations, with a fully cell-centered data structure. This means that a single set of control volumes are used, on which a discrete form of the conservation laws is satisfied. This is in control to the more classical staggered mesh methods, in which separate control volumes are defined for mass and momentum. 12 refs.

  5. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional single- and multiple-material flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Baty, R.S.; Kashiwa, B.A.

    1992-03-01

    Over the last several years, Sandia National Laboratories has had an interest in developing capabilities to predict the flow fields around vehicles entering or exiting the water at a wide range of speeds. Such prediction schemes have numerous engineering applications in the design of weapon systems. For example, such a scheme could be used to predict the forces and moments experienced by an air-launched anti-submarine weapon on water-entry. Furthermore, a water-exit prediction capability could be used to model the complicated surface closure jet resulting from a missile being shot out of the water. The CCICE (Cell-Centered Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was chosen to provide the fluid dynamics solver for high speed water-entry and water-exit problems. This implicit time-marching, two-dimensional, conservative, finite-volume code solves the multi-material, compressible, inviscid fluid dynamics equations. The incompressible version of the CCICE code, CCMAC (cell-Centered Marker and Cell), was chosen for low speed water- entry and water-exit problems in order to reduce the computational expense. These codes were chosen to take advantage of certain advances in numerical methods for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that have taken place at LANL. Notable among these advances is the ability to perform implicit, multi-material, compressible flow simulations, with a fully cell-centered data structure. This means that a single set of control volumes are used, on which a discrete form of the conservation laws is satisfied. This is in control to the more classical staggered mesh methods, in which separate control volumes are defined for mass and momentum. 12 refs.

  6. Two-dimensional simulation of Pinatubo aerosol and its effect on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tie, Xuexi; Brasseur, Guy P.; Briegleb, Bruce; Granier, Claire

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents time-dependent simulations of the response of the stratosphere to the injection into the atmosphere of massive amounts of sulfur during the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (The Philippines) in June 1991. The study is based on a coupled two-dimensional chemical-dynamical-radiative model to which a microphysical model for sulfate aerosol formation and fate has been added. The study suggests that, during the first year (July 1991 to June 1992) following the volcanic eruption, the observed changes in the ozone amount integrated between 65 deg S and 65 deg N were caused primarily by changes in the meridional circulation (associated with heating by the volcanic cloud in the tropics) and in the photolysis rate of molecules such as ozone (associated with backscattering of light by the cloud). During the second year after the eruption, as the aerosol was dispersed at all latitudes and, in particular, reached the polar region, the largest contribution to ozone reduction resulted from the heterogeneous chemical conversion of N2O5 and ClONO2 on the surface of the aerosol particles. The conversion of the latter compound, and hence the magnitude of the calculated ozone depletion, is highly dependent on the temperature in the lower stratosphere. Despite the fact that the surface area provided by aerosol particles decreased during the second year following the eruption, the calculated ozone depletion remained significant because the conversion of N2O5 is insensitive to the aerosol surface area density for values larger than 1-10 sq microns/cu cm (depending on latitude). The predicted reduction in ozone at 20 km in March during the third year (July 1993 to June 1994) of the model integration is smaller by a factor of 2 than it was during the second year.

  7. Computation and validation of two-dimensional PSF simulation based on physical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayabaly, K.; Spiga, D.; Sironi, G.; Canestrari, R.; Lavagna, M.; Pareschi, G.

    2015-09-01

    The Point Spread Function (PSF) is a key figure of merit for specifying the angular resolution of optical systems and, as the demand for higher and higher angular resolution increases, the problem of surface finishing must be taken seriously even in optical telescopes. From the optical design of the instrument, reliable ray-tracing routines allow computing and display of the PSF based on geometrical optics. However, such an approach does not directly account for the scattering caused by surface micro-roughness, which is interferential in nature. Although the scattering effect can be separately modeled, its inclusion in the ray-tracing routine requires assumptions that are difficult to verify. In that context, a purely physical optics approach is more appropriate as it remains valid regardless of the shape and size of the defects appearing on the optical surface. Such a computation, when performed in two-dimensional consideration, is memory and time consuming because it requires one to process a surface map with a few micron resolution, and the situation becomes even more complicated in case of optical systems characterized by more than one reflection. Fortunately, the computation is significantly simplified in far-field configuration, since the computation involves only a sequence of Fourier Transforms. In this paper, we provide validation of the PSF simulation with Physical Optics approach through comparison with real PSF measurement data in the case of ASTRI-SST M1 hexagonal segments. These results represent a first foundation stone for future development in a more advanced computation taking into account micro-roughness and multiple reflection in optical systems.

  8. Two-dimensional simulation of red blood cell motion near a wall under a lateral force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariprasad, Daniel S.; Secomb, Timothy W.

    2014-11-01

    The motion of a red blood cell suspended in a linear shear flow adjacent to a fixed boundary subject to an applied lateral force directed toward the boundary is simulated. A two-dimensional model is used that represents the viscous and elastic properties of normal red blood cells. Shear rates in the range of 100 to 600 s-1 are considered, and the suspending medium viscosity is 1 cP. In the absence of a lateral force, the cell executes a tumbling motion. With increasing lateral force, a transition from tumbling to tank-treading is predicted. The minimum force required to ensure tank-treading increases nonlinearly with the shear rate. Transient swinging motions occur when the force is slightly larger than the transition value. The applied lateral force is balanced by a hydrodynamic lift force resulting from the positive orientation of the long axis of the cell with respect to the wall. In the case of cyclic tumbling motions, the orientation angle takes positive values through most of the cycle, resulting in lift generation. These results are used to predict the motion of a cell close to the outer edge of the cell-rich core region that is generated when blood flows in a narrow tube. In this case, the lateral force is generated by shear-induced dispersion, resulting from cell-cell interactions in a region with a concentration gradient. This force is estimated using previous data on shear-induced dispersion. The cell is predicted to execute tank-treading motions at normal physiological hematocrit levels, with the possibility of tumbling at lower hematocrit levels.

  9. Two-dimensional network simulation of diffusion driven coarsening of foam inside a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, D.; Patzek, T.W.; Radke, C.J.

    1996-04-01

    In order to use foams in subsurface applications, it is necessary to understand their stability in porous media. Diffusion driven coarsening of a stationary or nonflowing foam in a porous medium results in changing gas pressures and a coarsening of the foam texture. A two-dimensional network simulation has been created that predicts the behavior of foam in a porous medium by physically specifying the locations of all the lamellae in the system and by solving the complete set of Young-Laplace and diffusion equations. An hourglass approximates the shape of the pores, and the pore walls are considered to be highly water wet. A singularity arises in the system of differential algebraic equations due to the curvature of the pore walls. This singularity is a signal that the system must undergo oscillations or sudden lamellar rearrangements before the diffusion process can continue. Newton-Raphson iteration is used along with Keller`s method of arc-length continuation and a new jump resolution technique to locate and resolve bifurcations in the system of coupled lamellae. Gas bubbles in pore throats are regions of encapsulated pressure. As gas is released from these bubbles during diffusion, the pressure of the bubbles in the pore bodies increases. When the pressure increase is scaled by the characteristic Young-Laplace pressure, the equilibrium time for the diffusion process is scaled by the ratio of the square of the characteristic length to the gas diffusivity and two dimensionless groups. One describes the ease with which gas can diffuse through a lamella, the second represents the amount of gas encapsulated within the pore throats initially. Given this scaling, the resulting plots of pressure versus time and normalized lamellae positions versus time are universal for all system sizes and characteristics. This is true as long as the initial lamella distribution is the same in each case.

  10. Two-dimensional depth-averaged model simulation of suspended sediment concentration distribution in a groyne field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jennifer G.; Nanda, S. K.

    2006-08-01

    SummaryRiver-training structures, such as spur dikes, are effective engineered methods used to protect banks and improve aquatic habitat. This paper reports the development and application of a two-dimensional depth-averaged hydrodynamic model to simulate suspended sediment concentration distribution in a groyne field. The governing equations of flow hydrodynamic model are depth-averaged two-dimensional Reynold's averaged momentum equations and continuity equation in which the density of sediment laden-flow varies with the concentration of suspended sediment. The depth-averaged two-dimensional convection and diffusion equation was solved to obtain the depth-averaged suspended sediment concentration. The source term is the difference between suspended sediment entrainment and deposition from bed surface. One laboratory experiment was chosen to verify the simulated flow field around a groyne, and the other to verify the suspended sediment concentration distribution in a meandering channel. Then, the model utility was demonstrated in a field case study focusing on the confluence of the Kankakee and Iroquois Rivers in Illinois, United States, to simulate the distribution of suspended sediment concentration around spur dikes. Results demonstrated that the depth-averaged, two-dimensional model can approximately simulate the flow hydrodynamic field and concentration of suspended sediment. Spur dikes can be used to effectively relocate suspended sediment in alluvial channels.

  11. Global MHD simulations of plasmaspheric plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J.; Ouellette, J.; Merkin, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    The plasmasphere represents a separate population from the rest of themagnetosphere, generally high density but cold. When the solar windturns strongly southward this plasma is convected toward the daysidemagnetopause and affects the interaction of the solar wind with themagnetosphere. We have used multi-fluid simulations using the LFMglobal MHD code to model this interaction. The plasmasphere isinitialized as a cold (~1eV) hydrogen plasma in a quiet northward IMFstate with a density distribution appropriate for K_p = 1. Thecorotation potential from the ionosphere spins up the plasmasphereinto rough corotation. After a initialization period of hours, asouthward IMF is introduced and the enhanced convection initiates asurge of plasmaspheric density to the dayside. We discuss two aspectsof this interaction, the effects on dayside reconnection and on theKelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). We find that the mass loading ofmagnetospheric flux tubes slows local reconnection rates, though notas much as predicted by Borovsky et al. [2013]. We findthat the total reconnection rate is reduced, although not as much aswould be predicted by just the sub-solar reconnection rate. The KHIis somewhat reduced by the plasmaspheric loading of density in the lowlatitude boundary layer. It has been suggested that the presence ofthe plasmasphere may lead to enhanced ULF wave power in the interiorof the magnetosphere from the KHI waves. We find only a minimal effect during northward IMF. For southward IMF, the situation is complicated by the interaction of KHI with non-steady reconnection.

  12. A two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid produced by an atomic simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model

    PubMed Central

    Po, Hoi Chun; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Bosons have a natural instinct to condense at zero temperature. It is a long-standing challenge to create a high-dimensional quantum liquid that does not exhibit long-range order at the ground state, as either extreme experimental parameters or sophisticated designs of microscopic Hamiltonians are required for suppressing the condensation. Here we show that synthetic gauge fields for ultracold atoms, using either the Raman scheme or shaken lattices, provide physicists a simple and practical scheme to produce a two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid at the ground state. This quantum liquid arises at a critical Lifshitz point, where a two-dimensional quartic dispersion emerges in the momentum space, and many fundamental properties of two-dimensional bosons are changed in its proximity. Such an ideal simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model allows experimentalists to directly visualize and explore the deconfinement transition of topological excitations, an intriguing phenomenon that is difficult to access in other systems. PMID:26268154

  13. Identification of standing MHD modes in MHD simulations of planetary magnetospheres. Application to Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griton, Léa; Pantellini, Filippo; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    We present 3D simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury's magnetosphere using the magnetohydrodynamic code AMRVAC. A procedure for the identification of standing MHD modes has been applied to these simulations showing that large scale standing slow mode structures may exist in Mercury's magnetosheath. The identification is mostly based on relatively simple approximate analytical solutions to the old problem of determining the family of all standing linear plane MHD waves in a flowing plasma. The question of the identification of standing slow mode structures using in situ measurements such as the future BepiColombo MMO mission to Mercury will be discussed as well.

  14. Two-Dimensional Simulation of Left-Handed Metamaterial Flat Lens Using Remcon XFDTD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Reinert, Jason M.

    2006-01-01

    Remcom's XFDTD software was used to model the properties of a two-dimensional left-handed metamaterial (LHM) flat lens. The focusing capability and attenuation of the material were examined. The results showed strong agreement with experimental results and theoretical predictions of focusing effects and focal length. The inherent attenuation in the model corresponds well with the experimental results and implies that the code does a reasonably accurate job of modeling the actual metamaterial.

  15. Spatial correlation of high-energy grain boundaries in two-dimensional simulated polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton DeW. Van Siclen

    2007-02-01

    A polycrystal undergoes microstructural changes to reach a lower energy state. In particular, the system evolves so as to reduce the total grain boundary energy. A simple two-dimensional model of a polycrystal comprised of randomly oriented crystalline grains suggests that energy minimization reduces or eliminates any spatial correlation among high-energy grain boundaries. Thus grain boundary engineering not only reduces the density of high-energy boundaries, but it prevents their organization into a coarse, albeit discontinuous, network.

  16. MHD simulations of supernova driven ISM turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressel, Oliver; Ziegler, Udo

    The dynamic evolution of the (stratified) turbulent interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated utilizing a three-dimensional MHD model including various physical effects. The computational domain covers a box of 0.5x0.5x2.0 kpc at a resolution of typically 128x128x1024 grid cells. The model includes (constant kinematic) viscosity and magnetic diffusivity. The adiabatic equation of state is supplemented by a parameterized heating- and cooling-function allowing for thermal instability (TI). The update due to heating and cooling is implemented implicitly using a Patankar-type discretization. Turbulence is driven by supernova explosions which are modelled as local injections of thermal energy, smeared over three standard-deviations of a Gaussian support with FWHM of 20pc. Supernova rates are adopted for typical cited values. Within our model we make a distinction between Type I and Type II SNe. Latter are statistically clustered by the (artificial) constraint that the density at the explosion site be above average (with respect to a horizontal slab) - former are spatially uncorrelated. The dual-energy feature of the conservative NIRVANA-code is used to tackle the extreme ratio of kinetic to internal energy that arises from the violent energy input. We stress the importance of using a conservative scheme to properly transfer the injected energy to kinetic motion. The model also includes a differentially rotating background (with shearing boundary conditions in radial direction) as well as vertical stratification. The initial density and pressure profiles are in hydrostatic equilibrium with respect to the equation of state given by the radiative equilibrium. Including z-dependent heating rates this leads to a considerable deviation from usual isothermal initial models. The primary focus of this work is on the galactic dynamo and the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. As a secondary target we are also interested in general properties of the ISM that are of importance

  17. Effects of inflow velocity profile on two-dimensional hemodynamic analysis by ordinary and ultrasonic-measurement-integrated simulations.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takaumi; Sone, Shusaku; Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Kadowaki, Hiroko; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasonic-measurement-integrated (2D-UMI) simulation correctly reproduces hemodynamics even with an inexact inflow velocity distribution. This study aimed to investigate which is superior, a two-dimensional ordinary (2D-O) simulation with an accurate inflow velocity distribution or a 2D-UMI simulation with an inaccurate one. 2D-O and 2D-UMI simulations were performed for blood flow in a carotid artery with four upstream velocity boundary conditions: a velocity profile with backprojected measured Doppler velocities (condition A), and velocity profiles with a measured Doppler velocity distribution, a parabolic one, and a uniform one, magnitude being obtained by inflow velocity estimation (conditions B, C, and D, respectively). The error of Doppler velocity against the measurement data was sensitive to the inflow velocity distribution in the 2D-O simulation, but not in the 2D-UMI simulation with the inflow velocity estimation. Among the results in conditions B, C, and D, the error in the worst 2D-UMI simulation with condition D was 31 % of that in the best 2D-O simulation with condition B, implying the superiority of the 2D-UMI simulation with an inaccurate inflow velocity distribution over the 2D-O simulation with an exact one. Condition A resulted in a larger error than the other conditions in both the 2D-O and 2D-UMI simulations. PMID:26307203

  18. Simulation and study of Fresnel diffraction for arbitrary two-dimensional apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Dauger, D.E.

    1996-11-01

    A stable, efficient algorithm to calculate numerically a Fresnel diffraction image, given any two-dimensional aperture or obstacle, is introduced. The algorithm predicts both the intensity and relative phase of the image. An alternate faster algorithm is presented for a limited class of apertures. Also examined are images formed from a variety of aperture shapes. Using this computational technique, plots on the complex plane are shown to give insight into Fresnel diffraction. With additional modifications to accept parameters from an experimental apparatus, the algorithms model Fresnel diffraction for laboratory situations. In addition, the algorithms are suitable for numerical implementation on personal computers. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Heat transfer coefficients in two-dimensional Yukawa systems (numerical simulations)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrustalyov, Yu. V.; Vaulina, O. S.

    2013-05-01

    New data on heat transfer in two-dimensional Yukawa systems have been obtained. The results of a numerical study of the thermal conductivity for equilibrium systems with parameters close to the conditions of laboratory experiments in dusty plasma are presented. The Green-Kubo relations are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients. The influence of dissipation (internal friction) on the heat transfer processes in nonideal systems is studied. New approximations are proposed for the thermal conductivity and diffusivity for nonideal dissipative systems. The results obtained are compared with the existing experimental and numerical data.

  20. Numerical simulations of thermal conductivity in dissipative two-dimensional Yukawa systems.

    PubMed

    Khrustalyov, Yu V; Vaulina, O S

    2012-04-01

    Numerical data on the heat transfer constants in two-dimensional Yukawa systems were obtained. Numerical study of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity was carried out for the equilibrium systems with parameters close to conditions of laboratory experiments with dusty plasma. For calculations of heat transfer constants the Green-Kubo formulas were used. The influence of dissipation (friction) on the heat transfer processes in nonideal systems was investigated. The approximation of the coefficient of thermal conductivity is proposed. Comparison of the obtained results to the existing experimental and numerical data is discussed. PMID:22680584

  1. Three Dimensional Simulations of Compressible Hall MHD Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    We have developed three dimensional, time dependent, compressible, non-adiabatic, driven and massively parallelized Hall magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate turbulent spectral cascades in a regime where characteristic lengthscales associated with plasma fluctuations are smaller than ion gyro radii. Such regime is ubiquitously present in solar wind and many other collisionless space plasmas. Particularly in the solar wind, the high time resolution databases identify a spectral break at the end of MHD inertial range spectrum that corresponds to a high frequency regime. In the regime, turbulent cascades cannot be explained by the usual MHD models. With the help of our 3D Hall MHD code, we find that characteristic turbulent interactions in the high frequency regime evolve typically on kinetic Alfven time scales. The turbulent fluctuation associated with kinetic Alfven interactions are compressive and anisotropic and possess equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies.

  2. Kinetic MHD simulation of large 'circ; tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott; Uzdensky, Dmitri

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a second-order accurate semi-implicit δ method for kinetic MHD simulation with Lorentz force ions and fluid electrons. The model has been used to study the resistive tearing mode instability, which involves multiple spatial scales. In small 'circ; cases, the linear growth rate and eigenmode structure are consistent with resistive MHD analysis. The Rutherford stage and saturation are demonstrated, but the simulation exhibits different saturation island widths compared with previous MHD simulations. In large 'circ; cases, nonlinear simulations show multiple islands forming, followed by the islands coalescing at later times. The competition between these two processes strongly influences the reconnection rates and eventually leads to a steady state reconnection. We will present various parameter studies and show that our hybrid results agree with fluid analysis in certain limits (e.g., relatively large resisitivities).

  3. Two-dimensional laboratory simulation of LNAPL infiltration and redistribution in the vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Kechavarzi, C; Soga, K; Illangasekare, T H

    2005-02-01

    A quantitative two-dimensional laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the immiscible flow of a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) in the vadose zone. An image analysis technique was used to determine the two-dimensional saturation distribution of LNAPL, water and air during LNAPL infiltration and redistribution. Vertical water saturation variations were also continuously monitored with miniature resistivity probes. LNAPL and water pressures were measured using hydrophobic and hydrophilic tensiometers. This study is limited to homogeneous geological conditions, but the unique experimental methods developed will be used to examine more complex systems. The pressure measurements and the quantification of the saturation distribution of all the fluids in the entire flow domain under transient conditions provide quantitative data essential for testing the predictive capability of numerical models. The data are used to examine the adequacy of the constitutive pressure-saturation relations that are used in multiphase flow models. The results indicate that refinement of these commonly used hydraulic relations is needed for accurate model prediction. It is noted in particular that, in three-fluid phase systems, models should account for the existence of a residual NAPL saturation occurring after NAPL drainage. This is of notable importance because residual NAPL can act as a non negligible persistent source of contamination. PMID:15683881

  4. Numerical simulation of the flow around two-dimensional partially cavitating hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Fahri; Ozden, Yasemin Arikan; Bal, Sakir

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, a new approach is applied to the cavity prediction for two-dimensional (2D) hydrofoils by the potential based boundary element method (BEM). The boundary element method is treated with the source and doublet distributions on the panel surface and cavity surface by the use of the Dirichlet type boundary conditions. An iterative solution approach is used to determine the cavity shape on partially cavitating hydrofoils. In the case of a specified cavitation number and cavity length, the iterative solution method proceeds by addition or subtraction of a displacement thickness on the cavity surface of the hydrofoil. The appropriate cavity shape is obtained by the dynamic boundary condition of the cavity surface and the kinematic boundary condition of the whole foil surface including the cavity. For a given cavitation number the cavity length of the 2D hydrofoil is determined according to the minimum error criterion among different cavity lengths, which satisfies the dynamic boundary condition on the cavity surface. The NACA 16006, NACA 16012 and NACA 16015 hydrofoil sections are investigated for two angles of attack. The results are compared with other potential based boundary element codes, the PCPAN and a commercial CFD code (FLUENT). Consequently, it has been shown that the results obtained from the two dimensional approach are consistent with those obtained from the others.

  5. Two-Dimensional Numerical Simulation of Boiling Two-Phase Flow of Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Oike, Mamoru; Kamijo, Kenjiro

    Two-dimensional characteristics of the boiling two-phase flow of liquid nitrogen in a duct flow are numerically investigated to contribute to the further development of new high-performance cryogenic engineering applications. First, the governing equations of the boiling two-phase flow of liquid nitrogen based on the unsteady drift-flux model are presented and several flow characteristics are numerically calculated taking account the effect of cryogenic flow states. Based on the numerical results, a two-dimensional structure of the boiling two-phase flow of liquid nitrogen is shown in detail, and it is found that the phase change of liquid nitrogen occurs in quite a short time interval compared with that of two-phase pressurized water at high temperature. Next, it is clarified that the distributions of pressure and the void fraction in a two-phase flow show a tendency different from those of fluids at room temperature because of the decrease in sound velocity due to large compressibility and the rapid phase change velocity in a cryogenic two-phase mixture flow. According to these numerical results, the fundamental characteristics of the cryogenic two-phase flow are predicted. The numerical results obtained will contribute to advanced cryogenic industrial applications.

  6. MHD-Epic: Embedded Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Reconnection in Global 3D Extended MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daldorff, L. K. S.; Toth, G.; Borovikov, D.; Gombosi, T. I.; Lapenta, G.

    2014-12-01

    With the new modeling capability in the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) of embedding an implicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the BATS-R-US magnetohydrodynamics model (Daldorff et al. 2014, JCP, 268, 236) we are ready to locally handle the full physics of the reconnection and its implications on the full system where globally, away from the reconnection region, a magnetohydrodynamic description is satisfactory. As magnetic reconnection is one of the main drivers in magnetospheric and heliospheric plasma dynamics, the self-consistent description of the electron dynamics in the coupled MHD-EPIC model is well suited for investigating the nature of these systems. We will compare the new embedded MHD-EPIC model with pure MHD and Hall MHD simulations of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  7. Global and Kinetic MHD Simulation by the Gpic-MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroshi, Naitou; Yusuke, Yamada; Kenji, Kajiwara; Wei-li, Lee; Shinji, Tokuda; Masatoshi, Yagi

    2011-10-01

    In order to implement large-scale and high-beta tokamak simulation, a new algorithm of the electromagnetic gyrokinetic PIC (particle-in-cell) code was proposed and installed on the Gpic-MHD code [Gyrokinetic PIC code for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation]. In the new algorithm, the vorticity equation and the generalized Ohm's law along the magnetic field are derived from the basic equations of the gyrokinetic Vlasov, Poisson, and Ampere system and are used to describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the field quantities of the electrostatic potential varphi and the longitudinal component of the vector potential Az. The basic algorithm is equivalent to solving the reduced-MHD-type equations with kinetic corrections, in which MHD physics related to Alfven modes are well described. The estimation of perturbed electron pressure from particle dynamics is dominant, while the effects of other moments are negligible. Another advantage of the algorithm is that the longitudinal induced electric field, ETz = -∂Az/∂t, is explicitly estimated by the generalized Ohm's law and used in the equations of motion. Furthermore, the particle velocities along the magnetic field are used (vz-formulation) instead of generalized momentums (pz-formulation), hence there is no problem of ‘cancellation', which would otherwise appear when Az is estimated from the Ampere's law in the pz-formulation. The successful simulation of the collisionless internal kink mode by the new Gpic-MHD with realistic values of the large-scale and high-beta tokamaks revealed the usefulness of the new algorithm.

  8. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Longcope, D.W.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  9. MHD Simulations of Thermal Plasma Jets in Coaxial Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    The development of a magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) numerical tool to study high energy density thermal plasma in coaxial plasma accelerators is presented. The coaxial plasma accelerator is a device used simulate the conditions created at the confining wall of a thermonuclear fusion reactor during an edge localized mode (ELM) disruption event. This is achieved by creating magnetized thermal plasma in a coaxial volume which is then accelerated by the Lorentz force to form a high velocity plasma jet. The simulation tool developed solves the resistive MHD equation using a finite volume method (FVM) framework. The acceleration and subsequent demagnetization of the plasma as it travels down the length of the accelerator is simulated and shows good agreement with experiments. Additionally, a model to study the thermalization of the plasma at the inlet is being developed in order to give self-consistent initial conditions to the MHD solver.

  10. Two-Dimensional Coupled Distributed Hydrologic-Hydraulic Model Simulation on Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, Miguel; Rodriguez, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a coupled distributed model that enables to analyze water movement in watershed as well as analyze the rainfall-runoff. More specifically, it allows to estimate the various hydrologic water cycle variables at each point of the watershed. In this paper, we have carried out a coupled model of a distributed hydrological and two-dimensional hydraulic models. We have incorporated a hydrological rainfall-runoff model calculated by cell based on the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) method to the hydraulic model, leaving it for the hydraulic model (GUAD2D) to conduct the transmission to downstream cells. The goal of the work is demonstrate the improved predictive capability of the coupled Hydrological-Hydraulic models in a watershed.

  11. High adsorption capacity of heavy metals on two-dimensional MXenes: an ab initio study with molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xun; Zhang, Xitong; Zhao, Shijun; Huang, Qing; Xue, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculation is employed to study the adsorption properties of Pb and Cu on recently synthesized two-dimensional materials MXenes, including Ti3C2, V2C1 and Ti2C1. The influence of surface decoration with functional groups such as H, OH and F have also been investigated. Most of these studied MXenes exhibit excellent capability to adsorb Pb and Cu, especially the adsorption capacity of Pb on Ti2C1 is as high as 2560 mg g(-1). Both the binding energies and the adsorption capacities are sensitive to the functional groups attached to the MXenes' surface. Ab initio molecular dynamics (ab-init MD) simulation confirms that Ti2C1 remains stable at room temperature after adsorbing Pb atoms. Our calculations imply that these newly emerging two-dimensional MXenes are promising candidates for wastewater treatment and ion separation. PMID:26602974

  12. Generation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the near-Earth magnetotail during dipolarization: Two-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhifang; Wu, Mingyu; Du, Aimin

    2016-04-01

    We employ two-dimensional global hybrid simulations to study the generation, propagation, and polarization of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the near-Earth magnetotail (around x = - 10 R E ) during dipolarization. In our simulation, EMIC waves with left-hand polarized signals originate in the low-latitude magnetotail as a result of the ion temperature anisotropy which is due to ion heating by Alfvén waves. Subsequently, EMIC waves can propagate along the ambient magnetic field toward high-latitudes. Our work provides one possible mechanism for the generation of EMIC waves observed in the near-Earth magnetotail.

  13. Enhanced job control language procedures for the SIMSYS2D two-dimensional water-quality simulation system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karavitis, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    The SIMSYS2D two-dimensional water-quality simulation system is a large-scale digital modeling software system used to simulate flow and transport of solutes in freshwater and estuarine environments. Due to the size, processing requirements, and complexity of the system, there is a need to easily move the system and its associated files between computer sites when required. A series of job control language (JCL) procedures was written to allow transferability between IBM and IBM-compatible computers. (USGS)

  14. Two-dimensional self-consistent radio frequency plasma simulations relevant to the Gaseous Electronics Conference RF Reference Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lymberopoulos, D.P.; Economou, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    Over the pst few years multidimensional self-consistent plasma simulations including complex chemistry have been developed which are promising tools for furthering the understanding of reactive gas plasmas and for reactor design and optimization. These simulations must be benchmarked against experimental data obtained in well-characterized systems such as the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell. Two-dimensional simulations relevant to the GEC Cell are reviewed in this paper with emphasis on fluid simulations. Important features observed experimentally, such as off-axis maxima in the charge density and hot spots of metastable species density near the electrode edges in capacitively-coupled GEC cells, have been captured by these simulations. Glow discharge plasmas are used extensively in the processing of electronic materials especially for etching and deposition of thin films.

  15. Droplets pinned at chemically inhomogenous substrates: A simulation study of the two-dimensional Ising case.

    PubMed

    Trobo, Marta L; Albano, Ezequiel V; Binder, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    As a simplified model of a liquid nanostripe adsorbed on a chemically structured substrate surface, a two-dimensional Ising system with two boundaries at which surface fields act is studied. At the upper boundary, the surface field is uniformly negative, while at the lower boundary (a distance L apart), the surface field is negative only outside a range of extension b, where a positive surface stabilizes a droplet of the phase with positive magnetization for temperatures T exceeding the critical temperature T_{w} of the wetting transition of this model. We investigate the local order parameter profiles across the droplet, both in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the substrate, varying both b and T. Also, precursor effects to droplet formation as T approaches T_{w} from below are studied. In accord with theoretical predictions, for T>T_{w} the droplet is found to have the shape of a semiellipse, where the width (distance of the interface from the substrate) scale is proportional to b (b^{1/2}). So, the area of the droplet is proportional to b^{3/2}, and the temperature dependence of the corresponding prefactor, which also involves the interfacial stiffness, is studied. PMID:27300962

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of two-dimensional Hubbard models with string bond tensor-network states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jeong-Pil; Wee, Daehyun; Clay, R. T.

    2015-03-01

    We study charge- and spin-ordered states in the two-dimensional extended Hubbard model on a triangular lattice at 1/3 filling. While the nearest-neighbor Coulomb repulsion V induces charge-ordered states, the competition between on-site U and nearest-neighbor V interactions lead to quantum phase transitions to an antiferromagnetic spin-ordered phase with honeycomb charge order. In order to avoid the fermion sign problem and handle frustrations here we use quantum Monte Carlo methods with the string-bond tensor network ansatz for fermionic systems in two dimensions. We determine the phase boundaries of the several spin- and charge-ordered states and show a phase diagram in the on-site U and the nearest-neighbor V plane. The numerical accuracy of the method is compared with exact diagonalization results in terms of the size of matrices D. We also test the use of lattice symmetries to improve the string-bond ansatz. Work at Mississippi State University was supported by the US Department of Energy grant DE-FG02-06ER46315.

  17. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of transport in a magnetized electronegative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, E.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Lieberman, M. A.

    2010-11-15

    Particle transport in a uniformly magnetized electronegative plasma is studied in two-dimensional (2D) geometry with insulating (dielectric) boundaries. A 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) code is employed, with the results compared to analytic one-dimensional models that approximate the end losses as volume losses. A modified oxygen reaction set is used to scale to the low densities used in PIC codes and also to approximately model other gases. The principal study is the limiting of the transverse electron flow due to strong electron magnetization. The plasma in the PIC calculation is maintained by axial currents that vary across the transverse dimension. For a cosine current profile nearly uniform electron temperature is obtained, which at the B-fields studied (600-1200 G) give a small but significant fraction (0.25 or less) of electron to negative ion transverse loss. For a more transverse-confined current, and approximating the higher mass and attachment reaction rate of iodine, the fraction of electron to negative ion transverse loss can be made very small. The models which have been constructed reasonably approximate the PIC results and indicate that the cross-field transport is nearly classical.

  18. Two dimensional self-consistent fluid simulation of rf inductive sources

    SciTech Connect

    DiPeso, G.; Vahedi, V.; Hewett, D.W.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1993-11-17

    The two-dimensional (R - Z) electromagnetic code FMRZ has been written to model inductive sources self-consistently in time. The code models an argon plasma with momentum-transfer, excitation and ionization as electron-neutral reactions and scattering and charge-exchange for the ion-neutral reactions. The electrons and ions are treated as Maxwellian fluid species and a reduced set of Maxwell`s equations is used to advance the electromagnetic fields. The set of equations used in FMRZ is not subject to typical numerical constraints present in many time dynamic codes allowing one to choose appropriate the and space scales to resolve only the frequencies and scale lengths of interest. The model retains nonlinear driving terms which give rise to a pondermotive force that distorts the density profile. Density and power profiles will be used to illustrate the physical effects of various terms in the equations. Trends in average density and temperature compare well with an analytic model.

  19. Droplets pinned at chemically inhomogenous substrates: A simulation study of the two-dimensional Ising case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trobo, Marta L.; Albano, Ezequiel V.; Binder, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    As a simplified model of a liquid nanostripe adsorbed on a chemically structured substrate surface, a two-dimensional Ising system with two boundaries at which surface fields act is studied. At the upper boundary, the surface field is uniformly negative, while at the lower boundary (a distance L apart), the surface field is negative only outside a range of extension b , where a positive surface stabilizes a droplet of the phase with positive magnetization for temperatures T exceeding the critical temperature Tw of the wetting transition of this model. We investigate the local order parameter profiles across the droplet, both in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the substrate, varying both b and T . Also, precursor effects to droplet formation as T approaches Tw from below are studied. In accord with theoretical predictions, for T >Tw the droplet is found to have the shape of a semiellipse, where the width (distance of the interface from the substrate) scale is proportional to b (b1 /2). So, the area of the droplet is proportional to b3 /2, and the temperature dependence of the corresponding prefactor, which also involves the interfacial stiffness, is studied.

  20. Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations of two-dimensional turbulence in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Servidio, S.; Veltri, P.; Perrone, D.; Califano, F.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2014-08-15

    Turbulence in plasmas is a very challenging problem since it involves wave-particle interactions, which are responsible for phenomena such as plasma dissipation, acceleration mechanisms, heating, temperature anisotropy, and so on. In this work, a hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical code is employed to study local kinetic processes in a two-dimensional turbulent regime. In the present model, ions are treated as a kinetic species, while electrons are considered as a fluid. As recently reported in [S. Servidio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045001 (2012)], nearby regions of strong magnetic activity, kinetic effects manifest through a deformation of the ion velocity distribution function that consequently departs from the equilibrium Maxwellian configuration. Here, the structure of turbulence is investigated in detail in phase space, by evaluating the high-order moments of the particle velocity distribution, i.e., temperature, skewness, and kurtosis. This analysis provides quantitative information about the non-Maxwellian character of the system dynamics. This departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium triggers several processes commonly observed in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  1. A new model for two-dimensional numerical simulation of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Zhang, Yongmin

    2013-10-11

    Pseudo-two dimensional (pseudo-2D) fluidized beds, for which the thickness of the system is much smaller than the other two dimensions, is widely used to perform fundamental studies on bubble behavior, solids mixing, or clustering phenomenon in different gas-solids fluidization systems. The abundant data from such experimental systems are very useful for numerical model development and validation. However, it has been reported that two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds usually predict poor quantitative agreement with the experimental data, especially for the solids velocity field. In this paper, a new model is proposed to improve the 2D numerical simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds by properly accounting for the frictional effect of the front and back walls. Two previously reported pseudo-2D experimental systems were simulated with this model. Compared to the traditional 2D simulations, significant improvements in the numerical predictions have been observed and the predicted results are in better agreement with the available experimental data.

  2. Two-dimensional model simulation of Martian atmospheric convection with condensation of the major component under fixed thermal forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, T.; Odaka, M.; Sugiyama, K.; Nakajima, K.; Ishiwatari, M.; Takahashi, Y. O.; Nishizawa, S.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.

    2011-10-01

    We perform a numerical simulation of cloud convection by using two-dimensional nonhydrostatic model for the purpose of investigating the structure of cloud convection with condensation of the major component when significant high supersaturation is not allowed. In quasi-equilibrium state, horizontally uniform cloud layer is formed above the condensation level, and the dry adiabatic layer is formed below the level. The updraft and downdraft associated with convection extends from near the surface to the top of the model atmosphere. The updraft and downdraft in the cloud layer seem to be maintained by buoyancy in the dry adiabatic layer.

  3. The role of condensation and heat conduction in the formation of prominences - An MHD simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Bao, J. J.; An, C. H.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of condensation and thermal conduction on the formation of Kippenhahn-Schlueter (K-S) type prominences in quiet regions (QP) due to symmetric mass injection are investigated. To implement this investigation a self-consistent, two-dimensional, nonplanar, time-dependent MHD simulation model is developed. In the model, various values of the injection velocity, density, and magnetic field strength are used to determine the most favorable conditions for the QP formation. Based on these simulation results, it is found that the formation of a K-S type field configuration should be considered as a dynamic process which needs both condensation amd mass injection to supply enough mass to maintain such a configuration to complete the quiescent prominence formation process.

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of a model two-dimensional, two-patch colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RŻysko, W.; Sokołowski, S.; Staszewski, T.

    2015-08-01

    We carried out Monte Carlo simulations of the two-patch colloids in two-dimensions. Similar model investigated theoretically in three-dimensions exhibited a re-entrant phase transition. Our simulations indicate that no re-entrant transition exists and the phase diagram for the system is of a swan-neck type and corresponds solely to the fluid-solid transition.

  5. Ultrafast Dynamics of Carboxy-Hemoglobin: Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy Experiments and Simulations.

    PubMed

    Falvo, Cyril; Daniault, Louis; Vieille, Thibault; Kemlin, Vincent; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Meier, Christoph; Vos, Marten H; Bonvalet, Adeline; Joffre, Manuel

    2015-06-18

    This Letter presents a comparison between experimental and simulated 2D mid-infrared spectra of carboxy-hemoglobin in the spectral region of the carbon monoxide stretching mode. The simulations rely on a fluctuating potential energy surface that includes both the effect of heme and the protein surroundings computed from molecular dynamics simulations. A very good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained with no adjustable parameters. The simulations show that the effect of the distal histidine through the hydrogen bond is strong and is directly responsible for the slow decay of the frequency-frequency correlation function on a 10 ps time scale. This study confirms that fluctuations in carboxy-hemoglobin are more inhomogeneous than those in the more frequently studied carboxy-myoglobin. The comparison between simulations and experiments brings valuable information on the complex relation between protein structure and spectral diffusion. PMID:26266594

  6. Neural field simulator: two-dimensional spatio-temporal dynamics involving finite transmission speed

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Eric J.; Hutt, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Neural Field models (NFM) play an important role in the understanding of neural population dynamics on a mesoscopic spatial and temporal scale. Their numerical simulation is an essential element in the analysis of their spatio-temporal dynamics. The simulation tool described in this work considers scalar spatially homogeneous neural fields taking into account a finite axonal transmission speed and synaptic temporal derivatives of first and second order. A text-based interface offers complete control of field parameters and several approaches are used to accelerate simulations. A graphical output utilizes video hardware acceleration to display running output with reduced computational hindrance compared to simulators that are exclusively software-based. Diverse applications of the tool demonstrate breather oscillations, static and dynamic Turing patterns and activity spreading with finite propagation speed. The simulator is open source to allow tailoring of code and this is presented with an extension use case. PMID:26539105

  7. Radiative Transfer Simulations of the Two-Dimensional Ocean Glint Reflectance and Determination of the Sea Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zhenyi; Li, Wei; Gatebe, Charles; Poudyal, Rajesh; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-01-01

    An optimized discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model (DISORT3) with a pseudo-two-dimensional bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is used to simulate and validate ocean glint reflectances at an infrared wavelength (1036 nm) by matching model results with a complete set of BRDF measurements obtained from the NASA cloud absorption radiometer (CAR) deployed on an aircraft. The surface roughness is then obtained through a retrieval algorithm and is used to extend the simulation into the visible spectral range where diffuse reflectance becomes important. In general, the simulated reflectances and surface roughness information are in good agreement with the measurements, and the diffuse reflectance in the visible, ignored in current glint algorithms, is shown to be important. The successful implementation of this new treatment of ocean glint reflectance and surface roughness in DISORT3 will help improve glint correction algorithms in current and future ocean color remote sensing applications.

  8. Radiative transfer simulations of the two-dimensional ocean glint reflectance and determination of the sea surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenyi; Li, Wei; Gatebe, Charles; Poudyal, Rajesh; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-02-20

    An optimized discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model (DISORT3) with a pseudo-two-dimensional bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is used to simulate and validate ocean glint reflectances at an infrared wavelength (1036 nm) by matching model results with a complete set of BRDF measurements obtained from the NASA cloud absorption radiometer (CAR) deployed on an aircraft. The surface roughness is then obtained through a retrieval algorithm and is used to extend the simulation into the visible spectral range where diffuse reflectance becomes important. In general, the simulated reflectances and surface roughness information are in good agreement with the measurements, and the diffuse reflectance in the visible, ignored in current glint algorithms, is shown to be important. The successful implementation of this new treatment of ocean glint reflectance and surface roughness in DISORT3 will help improve glint correction algorithms in current and future ocean color remote sensing applications. PMID:26906570

  9. Two dimensional Unite element method simulation to determine the brain capacitance based on ECVT measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirait, S. H.; Taruno, W. P.; Khotimah, S. N.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    A simulation to determine capacitance of brain's electrical activity based on two electrodes ECVT was conducted in this study. This study began with construction of 2D coronal head geometry with five different layers and ECVT sensor design, and then both of these designs were merged. After that, boundary conditions were applied on two electrodes in the ECVT sensor. The first electrode was defined as a Dirichlet boundary condition with 20 V in potential and another electrode was defined as a Dirichlet boundary condition with 0 V in potential. Simulated Hodgkin-Huxley -based action potentials were applied as electrical activity of the brain and sequentially were put on 3 different cross-sectional positions. As the governing equation, the Poisson equation was implemented in the geometry. Poisson equation was solved by finite element method. The simulation showed that the simulated capacitance values were affected by action potentials and cross-sectional action potential positions.

  10. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-01

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data.

  11. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-15

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data.

  12. Simulation of Two Dimensional Electrophoresis and Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Teaching Proteomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Amanda; Sekera, Emily; Payne, Jill; Craig, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In proteomics, complex mixtures of proteins are separated (usually by chromatography or electrophoresis) and identified by mass spectrometry. We have created 2DE Tandem MS, a computer program designed for use in the biochemistry, proteomics, or bioinformatics classroom. It contains two simulations--2D electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry.…

  13. Integrated Two-Dimensional DRACO Simulations of Cryogenic DT Target Performance on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated simulations of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) target implosions on OMEGA have been performed using the radiation-hydrodynamic code DRACO. Taking into account the known nonuniformities of target and laser irradiation, 2-D simulations examine the target performance of a variety of ignition-relevant implosions. The effects of cross-beam energy transfer and nonlocal heat transport are mimicked by a time-dependent flux limiter. DRACO simulations show good agreement with experiments in ρR , neutron yield, Ti, neutron rate, and x-ray images for the mid-adiabat (α ~ 4 ) implosions. For low-adiabat (α ~ 2) and high in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR > 24) implosions, the integrated simulations with the known nonuniformity sources cannot fully explain the reduction in target performance. Examinations of other possible nonuniformity sources and the thermal conductivity model will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Hall MHD Simulations of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Y.; Combi, M. R.; Rubin, M.; Hansen, K. C.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2012-12-01

    Comets have highly eccentric orbits and a wide range of gas production rates and thus they are ideal subjects to study the interaction between the solar wind and nonmagnetized bodies. Hansen et al. (2007, Space Sci. Rev. 128, 133) used a fluid-based MHD model and a semi-kinetic hybrid particle model to study the plasma environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), the Rosetta mission target comet, at different heliocentric distances. They showed that for such a weak comet at a large heliocentric distance, the length scales of the cometosheath and the bow shock are comparable to or smaller than the ion gyroradius, which violates the underlying assumption for a valid fluid description of the plasma. As a result, the classical ideal MHD model is not able to always give physical results, while the hybrid model, which accounts for the kinetic effects of ions with both cometary and solar wind origin, is more reliable. However, hybrid models are computationally expensive and the results can be noisy. A compromise approach is Hall MHD [Toth et al., 2008], which includes the Hall term in the MHD equations and allows for the decoupling of the ion and electron fluids. We use a single ion species Hall MHD model to simulate the plasma environment of comet 67P/CG and compare the results with the two models mentioned above. We find that the Hall effect is capable of reproducing some features of the hybrid model and thus extends the applicability of MHD. In addition, this study helps to identify the conditions and regions in the cometary plasma where the Hall effect is not negligible. This work is supported by NSF Planetary Astronomy grant AST0707283 and JPL subcontract 1266313 under NASA grant NMO710889.

  15. A zero-equation turbulence model for two-dimensional hybrid Hall thruster simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.; Young, Christopher V.; Cha, Eunsun; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    We present a model for electron transport across the magnetic field of a Hall thruster and integrate this model into 2-D hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. The model is based on a simple scaling of the turbulent electron energy dissipation rate and the assumption that this dissipation results in Ohmic heating. Implementing the model into 2-D hybrid simulations is straightforward and leverages the existing framework for solving the electron fluid equations. The model recovers the axial variation in the mobility seen in experiments, predicting the generation of a transport barrier which anchors the region of plasma acceleration. The predicted xenon neutral and ion velocities are found to be in good agreement with laser-induced fluorescence measurements.

  16. A zero-equation turbulence model for two-dimensional hybrid Hall thruster simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelli, Mark A. Young, Christopher V.; Cha, Eunsun; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2015-11-15

    We present a model for electron transport across the magnetic field of a Hall thruster and integrate this model into 2-D hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. The model is based on a simple scaling of the turbulent electron energy dissipation rate and the assumption that this dissipation results in Ohmic heating. Implementing the model into 2-D hybrid simulations is straightforward and leverages the existing framework for solving the electron fluid equations. The model recovers the axial variation in the mobility seen in experiments, predicting the generation of a transport barrier which anchors the region of plasma acceleration. The predicted xenon neutral and ion velocities are found to be in good agreement with laser-induced fluorescence measurements.

  17. Two-dimensional simulations of the ion/ion acoustic instability and electrostatic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Omidi, N.; Quest, K. B.

    1991-01-01

    A newly developed 2D electrostatic code with particle ions and Boltzmann electrons is used to investigate the details of the ion/ion acoustic instability and the structure of electrostatic shocks. The simulation results show that, for the parameters relevant to the plasma sheet boundary layer, the saturation mechanism of the ion/ion acoustic instability is ion trapping. It is also shown that the 2D structure of electrostatic shocks is considerably different from that suggested by previous 1D simulations. The main reason for this difference is the presence of shock reflected ions, which through the ion/ion acoustic instability lead to the generation of large amplitude waves in the upstream region propagating obliquely to the shock normal. These waves play an important role in the shock dissipation process.

  18. Two-Dimensional Distribution of Volatiles in the Lunar Regolith from Space Weathering Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, Dana M.; Lawrence, David J.; Bussey, D. Benjamin J.; Vondrak, Richard R.; Elphic, Richard C.; Gladstone, G. Randall

    2012-01-01

    We present simulations of space weathering effects on ice deposits in regions of permanent shadow on the Moon. These Monte Carlo simulations follow the effects of space weathering processes on the distribution of the volatiles over time. The model output constrains the coherence of volatile deposits with depth, lateral separation, and time. The results suggest that ice sheets become broken and buried with time. As impacts begin to puncture an initially coherent surficial ice sheet, small areas with a deficit of ice compared to surrounding areas are formed first. As time progresses, holes become prevalent and the anomalous regions are local enhancements of ice concentration in a volume. The 3-D distribution is also heterogeneous because the ice is buried to varying depths in different locations. Analysis of the coherence of ice on 10 cm scales predicts that putative ice sheets in anomalous radar craters are < 100 Myr old. Surface frost becomes homogenized within 20 Myr. The simulations show the data from the LCROSS impact and surrounding region are consistent with the ice deposit in Cabeus being >1000 Myr old. For future in situ analysis of cold trap volatiles, a horizontal range of 10 m is sufficient to acquire surface-based measurements of heterogeneously distributed ice. These results also support previous analyses that Mercury's cold traps are young.

  19. TWO-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF THE NONRESONANT, COSMIC-RAY-DRIVEN INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio; Reville, Brian; Kirk, John G.

    2009-06-10

    In supernova remnants, the nonlinear amplification of magnetic fields upstream of collisionless shocks is essential for the acceleration of cosmic rays to the energy of the 'knee' at 10{sup 15.5} eV. A nonresonant instability driven by the cosmic ray current is thought to be responsible for this effect. We perform two-dimensional, particle-in-cell simulations of this instability. We observe an initial growth of circularly polarized nonpropagating magnetic waves as predicted in linear theory. It is demonstrated that in some cases the magnetic energy density in the growing waves can grow to at least 10 times its initial value. We find no evidence of competing modes, nor of significant modification by thermal effects. At late times, we observe saturation of the instability in the simulation, but the mechanism responsible is an artifact of the periodic boundary conditions and has no counterpart in the supernova-shock scenario.

  20. Structure of Penta-Alanine Investigated by Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Huang, Jing; Kim, Seongheun; Shim, Ji Hyun; MacKerell, Alexander D; Ge, Nien-Hui

    2016-06-23

    We have studied the structure of (Ala)5, a model unfolded peptide, using a combination of 2D IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Two different isotopomers, each bis-labeled with (13)C═O and (13)C═(18)O, were strategically designed to shift individual site frequencies and uncouple neighboring amide-I' modes. 2D IR spectra taken under the double-crossed ⟨π/4, -π/4, Y, Z⟩ polarization show that the labeled four-oscillator systems can be approximated by three two-oscillator systems. By utilizing the different polarization dependence of diagonal and cross peaks, we extracted the coupling constants and angles between three pairs of amide-I' transition dipoles through spectral fitting. These parameters were related to the peptide backbone dihedral angles through DFT calculated maps. The derived dihedral angles are all located in the polyproline-II (ppII) region of the Ramachandran plot. These results were compared to the conformations sampled by Hamiltonian replica-exchange MD simulations with three different CHARMM force fields. The C36 force field predicted that ppII is the dominant conformation, consistent with the experimental findings, whereas C22/CMAP predicted similar population for α+, β, and ppII, and the polarizable Drude-2013 predicted dominating β structure. Spectral simulation based on MD representative conformations and structure ensembles demonstrated the need to include multiple 2D spectral features, especially the cross-peak intensity ratio and shape, in structure determination. Using 2D reference spectra defined by the C36 structure ensemble, the best spectral simulation is achieved with nearly 100% ppII population, although the agreement with the experimental cross-peak intensity ratio is still insufficient. The dependence of population determination on the choice of reference structures/spectra and the current limitations on theoretical modeling relating peptide structures to spectral parameters are discussed. Compared

  1. Effects of Ion-Ion Collisions and Inhomogeneity in Two-Dimensional Kinetic Ion Simulations of Stimulated Brillouin Backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Divol, L; Langdon, A B; Williams, E A

    2005-10-17

    Two-dimensional simulations with the BZOHAR [B.I. Cohen, B.F. Lasinski, A.B. Langdon, and E.A. Williams, Phys. Plasmas 4, 956 (1997)] hybrid code (kinetic particle ions and Boltzmann fluid electrons) have been used to investigate the saturation of stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBBS) instability including the effects of ion-ion collisions and inhomogeneity. Ion-ion collisions tend to increase ion-wave dissipation, which decreases the gain exponent for stimulated Brillouin backscattering; and the peak Brillouin backscatter reflectivities tend to decrease with increasing collisionality in the simulations. Two types of Langevin-operator, ion-ion collision models were implemented in the simulations. In both models used the collisions are functions of the local ion temperature and density, but the collisions have no velocity dependence in the first model. In the second model, the collisions are also functions of the energy of the ion that is being scattered so as to represent a Fokker-Planck collision operator. Collisions decorrelate the ions from the acoustic waves in SBS, which disrupts ion trapping in the acoustic wave. Nevertheless, ion trapping leading to a hot ion tail and two-dimensional physics that allows the SBS ion waves to nonlinearly scatter remain robust saturation mechanisms for SBBS in a high-gain limit over a range of ion collisionality. SBS backscatter in the presence of a spatially nonuniform plasma flow is also investigated. Simulations show that depending on the sign of the spatial gradient of the flow relative to the backscatter, ion trapping effects that produce a nonlinear frequency shift can enhance (auto-resonance) or decrease (anti-auto-resonance) reflectivities in agreement with theoretical arguments.

  2. Two-dimensional solar cell simulations by means of circuit modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kerschaver, E. van; Nijs, J.; Mertens, R.; Ghannam, M.

    1997-12-31

    In this work, the authors present a circuit model to perform multidimensional solar cell simulations. This model allows for incorporating effects of lateral current flows in solar cells, keeping the required time and computer resources relatively low. The use and sensitivity of the model will be described based on its application towards the design of metallization patterns for locally passivated back surface structures. As a second application the authors present the usage of the model to study the influence of different cell parameters such as surface recombination velocities and cell thickness on its performance.

  3. Two-dimensional copolymers and multifractality: comparing perturbative expansions, Monte Carlo simulations, and exact results.

    PubMed

    von Ferber, C; Holovatch, Yu

    2002-04-01

    We analyze the scaling laws for a set of two different species of long flexible polymer chains joined together at one of their extremities (copolymer stars) in space dimension D=2. We use a formerly constructed field-theoretic description and compare our perturbative results for the scaling exponents with recent conjectures for exact conformal scaling dimensions derived by a conformal invariance technique in the context of D=2 quantum gravity. A simple Monte Carlo simulation brings about reasonable agreement with both approaches. We analyze the remarkable multifractal properties of the spectrum of scaling exponents. PMID:12005898

  4. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  5. Two Dimensional Simulations of Plastic-Shell, Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, P B; Goncharov, V N; Collins, T B; Delettrez, J A; Elbaz, Y; Glebov, V Y; Keck, R L; Keller, D E; Knauer, J P; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Shvarts, D; Skupsky, S; Srebro, Y; Town, R J; Stoeckl, C

    2004-09-27

    Multidimensional hydrodynamic properties of high-adiabat direct-drive plastic-shell implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are investigated using the multidimensional hydrodynamic code, DRACO. Multimode simulations including the effects of nonuniform illumination and target roughness indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining target performance. For thick shells that remain integral during the acceleration phase, target yields are significantly reduced by the combination of the long-wavelength ({ell} < 10) modes due to surface roughness and beam imbalance and the intermediate modes (20 {le} {ell} {le} 50) due to single-beam nonuniformities. The neutron-production rate for these thick shells truncates relative to one-dimensional (1-D) predictions. The yield degradation in the thin shells is mainly due to shell breakup at short wavelengths ({lambda} {approx} {Delta}, where {Delta} is the in-flight shell thickness). The neutron-rate curves for the thinner shells have significantly lower amplitudes and a fall-off that is less steep than 1-D rates. DRACO simulation results are consistent with experimental observations.

  6. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  7. AQMAN; linear and quadratic programming matrix generator using two-dimensional ground-water flow simulation for aquifer management modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefkoff, L.J.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A FORTRAN-77 computer program code that helps solve a variety of aquifer management problems involving the control of groundwater hydraulics. It is intended for use with any standard mathematical programming package that uses Mathematical Programming System input format. The computer program creates the input files to be used by the optimization program. These files contain all the hydrologic information and management objectives needed to solve the management problem. Used in conjunction with a mathematical programming code, the computer program identifies the pumping or recharge strategy that achieves a user 's management objective while maintaining groundwater hydraulic conditions within desired limits. The objective may be linear or quadratic, and may involve the minimization of pumping and recharge rates or of variable pumping costs. The problem may contain constraints on groundwater heads, gradients, and velocities for a complex, transient hydrologic system. Linear superposition of solutions to the transient, two-dimensional groundwater flow equation is used by the computer program in conjunction with the response matrix optimization method. A unit stress is applied at each decision well and transient responses at all control locations are computed using a modified version of the U.S. Geological Survey two dimensional aquifer simulation model. The program also computes discounted cost coefficients for the objective function and accounts for transient aquifer conditions. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Two-dimensional slope wind simulations in the finite element approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Tuerpe, D.R.

    1980-06-01

    The hydrostatic fluid dynamics model developed at LLL has been used to simulate the development of katabatic winds. This model solves the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation by the finite element method. Preliminary results indicate that to obtain physically reasonable results one has to choose unequal diffusion parameters in the horizontal (K/sub x/) and vertical (K/sub z/). The maximum velocities obtained with K/sub z/ = 1 m/sup 2//sec and K/sub x/ = 100 m/sup 2//sec are of the order of 2.5 m/sec for a slope of .2. Profiles of the downslope velocities will be presented at different points in the flow. As expected, the magnitude of the vertical diffusion coefficient K/sub z/ controls the depth of the flow which seems to increase only slightly with downhill distance, and the magnitude of the flow increases with cooling rate and slope.

  9. Two Dimensional Wake Vortex Simulations in the Atmosphere: Preliminary Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, F. H.; Hinton, D. A.; Han, J.; Schowalter, D. G.; Lin, Y.-L.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical large-eddy simulation model is currently being used to quantify aircraft wake vortex behavior with meteorological observables. The model, having a meteorological framework, permits the interaction of wake vortices with environments characterized by crosswind shear, stratification, and humidity. The addition of grid-scale turbulence as an initial condition appeared to have little consequence. Results show that conventional nondimensionalizations work very well for vortex pairs embedded in stably stratified flows. However, this result is based on simple environments with constant Brunt-Vaisala frequency. Results presented here also show that crosswind profiles exert important and complex interactions on the trajectories of wake vortices. Nonlinear crosswind profiles tended to arrest the descent of wake vortex pairs. The member of the vortex pair with vorticity of same sign as the vertical change in the ambient along-track vorticity may be deflected upwards.

  10. Two-dimensional hybrid simulations of kinetic plasma turbulence: Current and vorticity vs proton temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franci, Luca; Hellinger, Petr; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Landi, Simone

    2016-03-01

    Proton temperature anisotropies between the directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field are usually observed in the solar wind plasma. Here, we employ a high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulation in order to investigate the relation between spatial properties of the proton temperature and the peaks in the current density and in the flow vorticity. Our results indicate that, although regions where the proton temperature is enhanced and temperature anisotropies are larger correspond approximately to regions where many thin current sheets form, no firm quantitative evidence supports the idea of a direct causality between the two phenomena. On the other hand, quite a clear correlation between the behavior of the proton temperature and the out-of-plane vorticity is obtained.

  11. Simulation of two-dimensional waterflooding by using mixed finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chavent, G.; Cohen, G.; Dieste, I.; Dupuy, M.; Jaffre, J.

    1984-08-01

    A new method to simulate incompressible diphasic flow in two dimensions (2D) is presented. Its distinctive features include (1) a reformulation of the basic equation using the premise of a global pressure and (2) approximation of convective terms by an upwind scheme for discontinuous finite elements. A mixed finite-element method approximates both the scalar functions (pressure and saturation) and the vector functions (total velocity field and capillary diffusion vector). The pressure (resp. the saturation) is approximated by a discontinuous function piecewise constant (resp. linear) on the elements of the mesh. A basis of divergence-free vectors is used in the pressure equation, which accelerates computation. Several test examples, which include gravity and capillary effects, are presented.

  12. FRANC2D: A two-dimensional crack propagation simulator. Version 2.7: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawrzynek, Paul; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    FRANC 2D (FRacture ANalysis Code, 2 Dimensions) is a menu driven, interactive finite element computer code that performs fracture mechanics analyses of 2-D structures. The code has an automatic mesh generator for triangular and quadrilateral elements. FRANC2D calculates the stress intensity factor using linear elastic fracture mechanics and evaluates crack extension using several methods that may be selected by the user. The code features a mesh refinement and adaptive mesh generation capability that is automatically developed according to the predicted crack extension direction and length. The code also has unique features that permit the analysis of layered structure with load transfer through simulated mechanical fasteners or bonded joints. The code was written for UNIX workstations with X-windows graphics and may be executed on the following computers: DEC DecStation 3000 and 5000 series, IBM RS/6000 series, Hewlitt-Packard 9000/700 series, SUN Sparc stations, and most Silicon Graphics models.

  13. A two-dimensional particle simulation of the magnetopause current layer

    SciTech Connect

    Berchem, J.; Okuda, H.

    1988-11-01

    We have developed a 2/1/2/-D (x, y, v/sub x/, v/sub y/, v/sub z/) electromagnetic code to study the formation and the stability of the magnetopause current layer. This code computes the trajectories of ion and electron particles in their self-consistently generated electromagnetic field and an externally imposed 2-D vacuum dipolar magnetic field. The results presented here are obtained for the simulation of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction in the subsolar region of the equatorial plane. We observe the self-consistent establishment of a current layer resulting from both diamagnetic drift and E /times/ B drift due to the charge separation. The simulation results show that during the establishment of the current layer, its thickness is of the order of the hybrid gyroradius /rho//sub H/ = ..sqrt../rho//sub i//rho//sub e/ predicted by the Ferraro-Rosenbluth model. However, diagnostics indicate that the current sheet is subject to an instability which broadens the width of the current layer. Ripples with amplitudes of the order of the ion gyroradius appear at the interface between the field and the particles. These pertubations are observed both on the electrostatic field and on the compressional component of the magnetic field. This instability has a frequency of the order of the local ion cyclotron frequency. However, the modulation propagates in the same direction as the electron diamagnetic drift which indicates that the instability is not a classical gradient-driven instability, such as the lower hybrid or ion drift cyclotron instabilities. The nonlinear phase of the instability is characterized by the filamentation of the current layer which causes anomalous diffusion inside the central current sheet. 79 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the rise and dissolution of two-dimensional immiscible droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2009-10-01

    We used a coupled multiphase lattice Boltzmann (LB) model to simulate the dissolution of immiscible liquid droplets in another liquid during the rising process resulting from buoyancy. It was found that there existed a terminal rise velocity for each droplet, and there was a power law relationship between the Eötvös (Eo) number and the terminal Reynolds (Re) number. Our simulation results were in agreement with the empirical correlation derived for predicting bubble rise. When more than two identical droplets rose simultaneously in a close proximity, the average terminal rise velocity was lower than that of a single droplet with the same size because of the mutual resistant interactions. The droplet trajectories at the noncentral positions were not straight because of the nonzero net horizontal forces acting on the droplets. The Damkohler (Da) and Peclet (Pe) numbers were varied to investigate the coupling between droplet size, flow field, dissolution at the interface, and solute transport. For a given Pe, increasing Da led to a higher dissolution rate. For a given Da, increasing Pe led to a higher dissolution rate. For a large Da and a small Pe, the process near the interface was diffusion limited, and the advective flow relative to the droplet resulting from droplet rise was unable to move the accumulated solute away from the interface quickly. In this case, it was favorable to split the single droplet into as many small ones as possible in order to increase the interface area per unit mass and consequently enhance the whole dissolution process. For a small Da and a large Pe, the process was dissolution limited near the interface. The mass of accumulated solute near the interface was little, so the advective flow at the top side of the droplet was able to clean the solute quickly. In this case it was favorable to keep the droplet as a single one in order to obtain a high rise velocity and consequently enhance the whole dissolution process. By studying the

  15. Two-Dimensional Optical Measurement of Waves on Liquid Lithium Jet Simulating IFMIF Target Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kazuhiro Itoh; Hiroyuki Koterazawa; Taro Itoh; Yutaka Kukita; Hiroo Kondo; Nobuo Yamaoka; Hiroshi Horiike; Mizuho Ida; Hideo Nakamura; Hiroo Nakamura; Takeo Muroga

    2006-07-01

    Waves on a liquid-lithium jet flow, simulating a proposed high-energy beam target design, have been measured using an optical technique based on specular reflection of a single laser beam on the jet surface. The stream-wise and spanwise fluctuations of the local free-surface slope were least-square fitted with a sinusoidal curve to makeup the signals lost due to the constriction in the optical arrangement. The waveform was estimated with an assumption that wave phase speed can be calculated using the dispersion relation for linear capillary-gravity waves. The direction of propagation on the jet surface was also evaluated so that the wave amplitudes, calculated by integral of slope angle signal, agree consistently in stream-wise and spanwise direction. These measurements and analyses show that the waves at the measurement location for a jet velocity of 1.2 m/s can best be represented by oblique waves with an inclination of 1.23 rad, a wavelength of 3.8 mm and a wave amplitude of about 0.05 mm. (authors)

  16. A two-dimensional model of water: Theory and computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbič, T.; Vlachy, V.; Kalyuzhnyi, Yu. V.; Southall, N. T.; Dill, K. A.

    2000-02-01

    We develop an analytical theory for a simple model of liquid water. We apply Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) and integral equation theory (IET) for associative liquids to the MB model, which is among the simplest models of water. Water molecules are modeled as 2-dimensional Lennard-Jones disks with three hydrogen bonding arms arranged symmetrically, resembling the Mercedes-Benz (MB) logo. The MB model qualitatively predicts both the anomalous properties of pure water and the anomalous solvation thermodynamics of nonpolar molecules. IET is based on the orientationally averaged version of the Ornstein-Zernike equation. This is one of the main approximations in the present work. IET correctly predicts the pair correlation function of the model water at high temperatures. Both TPT and IET are in semi-quantitative agreement with the Monte Carlo values of the molar volume, isothermal compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient, and heat capacity. A major advantage of these theories is that they require orders of magnitude less computer time than the Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Two-Dimensional Model Simulations of Interannual Variability in the Tropical Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Considine, David B.; Rosenfeld, Joan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Meteorological data from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) and constituent data from the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) are used to construct yearly zonal mean dynamical fields for the 1990s for use in the GSFC 2-D chemistry and transport model. This allows for interannual dynamical variability to be included in the model constituent simulations. In this study, we focus on the tropical stratosphere. We find that the phase of quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) signals in equatorial CH4, and profile and total column 03 data is resolved quite well using this empirically- based 2-D model transport framework. However. the QBO amplitudes in the model constituents are systematically underestimated relative to the observations at most levels. This deficiency is probably due in part to the limited vertical resolutions of the 2-D model and the UKMO and UARS input data sets. We find that using different heating rate calculations in the model affects the interannual and QBO amplitudes in the constituent fields, but has little impact on the phase. Sensitivity tests reveal that the QBO in transport dominates the ozone interannual variability in the lower stratosphere. with the effect of the temperature QBO being dominant in the tipper stratosphere via the strong temperature dependence of the ozone loss reaction rates. We also find that the QBO in odd nitrogen radicals, which is caused by the QBO modulated transport of NOy, plays a significant but not dominant role in determining the ozone QBO variability in the middle stratosphere. The model mean age of air is in good overall agreement with that determined from tropical lower,middle stratospheric OMS balloon observations of SF6 and CO2. The interannual variability of tile equatorial mean age in the model increases with altitude and maximizes near 40 km, with a range, of 4-5 years over the 1993-2000 time period.

  18. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of superluminous interacting supernovae of Type IIn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasis, Alkiviadis; Dessart, Luc; Audit, Edouard

    2016-05-01

    Some interacting supernovae (SNe) of Type IIn show a sizeable continuum polarization suggestive of a large-scale asymmetry in the circumstellar medium (CSM) and/or the SN ejecta. Here, we extend the recent work of Dessart et al. on superluminous SNe IIn and perform axially-symmetric (i.e. 2D) multigroup radiation hydrodynamics simulations to explore the impact of an imposed large-scale density asymmetry. When the CSM is asymmetric, the latitudinal variation of the radial optical depth τ introduces a strong flux redistribution from the higher density CSM regions, where the shock luminosity is larger, towards the lower density CSM regions where photons escape more freely - this redistribution ceases when τ ≲ 1. Along directions where the CSM density is larger, the shock deceleration is stronger and its progression slower, producing a non-spherical cold-dense shell (CDS). For an oblate CSM density distribution, the photosphere (CDS) has an oblate (prolate) morphology when τ ≳ 1. When the CSM is symmetric and the ejecta asymmetric, the flux redistribution within the CSM now tends to damp the latitudinal variation of the luminosity at the shock. It then requires a larger ejecta asymmetry to produce a sizeable latitudinal variation in the emergent flux. When the interaction is between a SN ejecta and a relic disc, the luminosity boost at early times scales with the disc opening angle - forming a superluminous SN IIn this way requires an unrealistically thick disc. In contrast, interaction with a disc of modest thickness/mass can yield a power that rivals radioactive decay of a standard SN II at nebular times.

  19. Coupling MHD Simulations of CMEs to SEP Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torok, T.; Gorby, M.; Linker, J.; Schwadron, N.

    2015-12-01

    Large Solar Energetic Particle events (SEPs) are a main space weather hazard and extremely dangerous to astronauts and electronic equipmentin space. They are typically associated with fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Recent results indicate that SEPs can be generated already inthe early phase of CME expansion low in the corona, but the underlyingphysical mechanisms are not yet well understood. State-of-the-artmagnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of CME initiation and evolution,combined with numerical models of particle acceleration and propagation,provide a powerful tool to investigate these mechanisms. In this talk, we present recent developments in the coupling of CORHEL/MAS thermodynamicMHD simulations of fast CMEs to the EPREM particle code, and we discuss the insights that can be gained from such a combined modeling approach.

  20. Two-dimensional simulations of a VHF H2 plasma for different discharge gaps and gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Chen; Ogiwara, Kohei; Chiu, Kuo-Feng; Su, Li-Wen; Uchino, Kiichiro; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    2016-07-01

    A two-dimensional simulation on a VHF H2 plasma (60 MHz) was performed using the plasma hybrid code, and plasma parameters were examined as a function of pressure for different discharge gaps. It was found that as the pressure increased, the H3 + and H+ densities as well as the electron density had a maximum at a certain pressure, and the maximum shifted to high pressures as the discharge gap decreased. On the other hand, the H2 + density decreased with the increase in pressure, independent of the discharge gap. The axial profiles of the H+, H2 +, and H3 + densities showed that dominant ions were H3 + in our pressure range.

  1. Accurate simulation of two-dimensional optical microcavities with uniquely solvable boundary integral equations and trigonometric Galerkin discretization.

    PubMed

    Boriskina, Svetlana V; Sewell, Phillip; Benson, Trevor M; Nosich, Alexander I

    2004-03-01

    A fast and accurate method is developed to compute the natural frequencies and scattering characteristics of arbitrary-shape two-dimensional dielectric resonators. The problem is formulated in terms of a uniquely solvable set of second-kind boundary integral equations and discretized by the Galerkin method with angular exponents as global test and trial functions. The log-singular term is extracted from one of the kernels, and closed-form expressions are derived for the main parts of all the integral operators. The resulting discrete scheme has a very high convergence rate. The method is used in the simulation of several optical microcavities for modern dense wavelength-division-multiplexed systems. PMID:15005404

  2. A two-dimensional simulation of tritium transport in the vadose zone at the Nevada Test site

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.C.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    1994-09-01

    The site of a 0.75-kiloton underground nuclear explosion, the Cambric event, was selected for the study of radionuclide transport in the hydrologic environment. Water samples from RNM-2S, a well located 91 m from Cambric, have been analyzed for tritium and other radionuclides since the initiation of pumping. Water from RNM-2S flows to Frenchman Lake via an unlined canal. Flume data indicate canal transmission losses of approximately 2m{sup 3}/day/meter of canal. To determine if infiltrating canal water might be recirculated by RNM-2S, and therefore provide an additional radionuclide input to water samples collected at RNM-2S, a two-dimensional variably saturated solute transport computer model (SATURN, Huyakorn et al., 1983) was used to simulate the movement of tritium from the canal to the water table. Results indicate that recirculated canal water has not had a significant effect on the breakthrough of tritium at RNM-2S.

  3. Discriminating trpzip2 and trpzip4 peptides’ folding landscape using the two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tianmin; Zhang, Ruiting; Li, Huanhuan; Zhuang, Wei E-mail: lijiangy@pku.edu.cn; Yang, Lijiang E-mail: lijiangy@pku.edu.cn

    2014-02-07

    We analyzed, based on the theoretical spectroscopic modeling, how the differences in the folding landscapes of two β-hairpin peptides trpzip2 and trpzip4 are reflected in their thermal unfolding infrared measurements. The isotope-edited equilibrium FTIR and two dimensional infrared spectra of the two peptides were calculated, using the nonlinear exciton propagation method, at a series of temperatures. The spectra calculations were based on the configuration distributions generated using the GB{sup OBC} implicit solvent MD simulation and the integrated tempering sampling technique. Conformational analysis revealed the different local thermal stabilities for these two peptides, which suggested the different folding landscapes. Our study further suggested that the ellipticities of the isotope peaks in the coherent IR signals are more sensitive to these local stability differences compared with other spectral features such as the peak intensities. Our technique can thus be combined with the relevant experimental measurements to achieve a better understanding of the peptide folding behaviors.

  4. Development of an aerosol microphysical module: Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, H.; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Fast, Jerome D.; Takigawa, M.

    2014-09-30

    Number concentrations, size distributions, and mixing states of aerosols are essential parameters for accurate estimation of aerosol direct and indirect effects. In this study, we developed an aerosol module, designated Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS), that can represent these parameters explicitly by considering new particle formation (NPF), black carbon (BC) aging, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) processes. A two-dimensional bin representation is used for particles with dry diameters from 40 nm to 10 µm to resolve both aerosol size (12 bins) and BC mixing state (10 bins) for a total of 120 bins. The particles with diameters from 1 to 40 nm are resolved using an additional 8 size bins to calculate NPF. The ATRAS module was implemented in the WRF-chem model and applied to examine the sensitivity of simulated mass, number, size distributions, and optical and radiative parameters of aerosols to NPF, BC aging and SOA processes over East Asia during the spring of 2009. BC absorption enhancement by coating materials was about 50% over East Asia during the spring, and the contribution of SOA processes to the absorption enhancement was estimated to be 10 – 20% over northern East Asia and 20 – 35% over southern East Asia. A clear north-south contrast was also found between the impacts of NPF and SOA processes on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations: NPF increased CCN concentrations at higher supersaturations (smaller particles) over northern East Asia, whereas SOA increased CCN concentrations at lower supersaturations (larger particles) over southern East Asia. Application of ATRAS to East Asia also showed that the impact of each process on each optical and radiative parameter depended strongly on the process and the parameter in question. The module can be used in the future as a benchmark model to evaluate the accuracy of simpler aerosol models and examine interactions between NPF, BC aging, and SOA

  5. Application of High-resolution Aerial LiDAR Data in Calibration of a Two-dimensional Urban Flood Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, J.; Goska, R.; Chen, B.; Krajewski, W. F.; Young, N.; Weber, L.

    2009-12-01

    the Iowa River corridor was developed using the United States Bureau of Reclamation SRH-2D hydraulic modeling software. The numerical model uses an unstructured numerical mesh and variable surface roughness, assigned according to observed land use and cover. The numerical model was calibrated using inundation extents and water surface elevations derived from the LiDAR data. It was also calibrated using high water marks and land survey data collected daily during the 2008 flood. The investigators compared the two calibrations to evaluate the benefit of high-resolution LiDAR data in improving the accuracy of a two-dimensional urban flood simulation.

  6. Simulation study on slant-to-vertical deviation in two dimensional TEC mapping over the ionosphere equatorial anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tao; Mao, Tian; Wang, Yungang; Zeng, Zhongcao; Xia, Chunliang; Wu, Fenglei; Wang, Le

    2014-08-01

    With the rapid increase of GPS/GNSS receivers being deployed and operated in China, real-time GPS data from nearly a thousand sites are available at the National Center for Space Weather, China Meteorology Administration. However, it is challenging to generate a high-quality regional total electron content (TEC) map with the traditional two-dimensional (2-D) retrieval scheme because a large horizontal gradient has been reported over east-south Asia due to the northern equatorial ionization anomaly. We developed an Ionosphere Data Assimilation Analysis System (IDAAS), which is described in this study, using an International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model as the background and applying a Kalman filter for updated observations. The IDAAS can reconstruct a three-dimensional ionosphere with the GPS slant TEC. The inverse slant TEC correlates well with observations both for GPS sites involved in the reconstruction and sites that are not involved. Based on the IDAAS, simulations were performed to investigate the deviation relative to the slant-to-vertical conversion (STV). The results indicate that the relative deviation induced by slant-to-vertical conversion may be significant in certain instances, and the deviation varies from 0% to 40% when the elevation decreases from 90° to 15°, while the relative IDAAS deviation is much smaller and varies from -5% to 15% without an elevation dependence. Compared with ‘true TEC’ map derived from the model, there is large difference in STV TEC map but no obvious discrepancy in IDAAS map. Generally, the IDAAS TEC map is much closer to the “true TEC” than is STV TEC map is. It is suggested that three-dimensional inversion technique is necessary for GPS observations of low elevation at an equatorial anomaly region, wherein the high horizontal electron density gradient may produce significant slant-to-vertical deviations using the two-dimensional STV inversion method.

  7. A two-dimensional simulation of the GEC RF reference cell using a hybrid fluid-Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, H.; Riley, M.E.

    1992-12-01

    A two-dimensional fluid-Monte Carlo hybrid model is used to simulate the GEC reference cell. The 2-D model assumes azimuthal symmetry and accounts for the ground shield about the electrodes as well as the grounded chamber walls. The hybrid model consists of a Monte Carlo method for generating rates and a fluid model for transporting electrons and ions. In the fluid model, the electrons are transported using the continuity equation; and the electric fields are solved self-consistently using Poisson`s equation. The Monte Carlo model transports electrons using the fluid-generated periodic electric field. The ionization rates are then obtained using the electron energy distribution function. An averaging method is used to speed the solution by transporting the ions in a time-averaged electric field with a corrected ambipolar-type diffusion. The simulation switches between the conventional and the averaging fluid model. Typically, the simulation runs from 10`s to 100`s of averaging fluid cycles before reentering the conventional fluid model for 10`s of cycles. Speed increases of a factor of 100 are possible.

  8. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of plasma cavitation and bursty Brillouin backscattering for nonrelativistic laser intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Riconda, C.; Weber, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Adam, J.-C.; Heron, A.

    2006-08-15

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of laser-plasma interaction using a plane-wave geometry show strong bursty stimulated Brillouin backscattering, rapid filamentation, and subsequent plasma cavitation. It is shown that the cavitation is not induced by self-focusing. The electromagnetic fields below the plasma frequency that are excited are related to transient soliton-like structures. At the origin of these solitons is a three-wave decay process exciting new modes in the plasma. The cavitation is responsible for a strong local reduction of the reflectivity and goes along with an efficient but transient heating of the electrons. Once heating ceases, transmission starts to increase. Local as well as global average reflectivities attain a very low value due to strong plasma density variations brought about by the cavitation process. On the one hand, the simulations confirm the existence of a new mechanism of cavity and soliton formation in nonrelativistic laser-plasma interaction in two dimensions, which was shown to exist in one-dimensional simulations [S. Weber, C. Riconda, and V. T. Tikhonchuk, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 055005 (2005)]. On the other hand, new aspects are introduced inherently related to the additional degree of freedom.

  9. Quick Time-dependent Ionization Calculations Depending on MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengcai; Raymond, John C.; Murphy, Nicholas Arnold

    2014-06-01

    Time-dependent ionization is important in astrophysical environments where the thermodynamic time scale is shorter than ionization time scale. In this work, we report a FORTRAN program that performs fast non-equilibrium ionization calculations based on parallel computing. Using MHD simulation results, we trace the movements of plasma in a Lagrangian framework, and obtain evolutionary history of temperature and electron density. Then the time-dependent ionization equations are solved using the eigenvalue method. For any complex temperature and density histories, we introduce a advanced time-step strategy to improve the computational efficiency. Our tests show that this program has advantages of high numerical stability and high accuracy. In addition, it is also easy to integrate this solver with the other MHD routines.

  10. Study of Estimation Method for Unsteady Inflow Velocity in Two-Dimensional Ultrasonic-Measurement-Integrated Blood Flow Simulation.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Hiroko; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Funamoto, Kenichi; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Information on hemodynamics is essential for elucidation of mechanisms and development of novel diagnostic methods for circulatory diseases. Two-dimensional ultrasonic-measurement-integrated (2D-UMI) simulation can correctly reproduce an intravascular blood flow field and hemodynamics by feeding back an ultrasonic measurement to the numerical blood flow simulation. In this method, it is critically important to give the correct cross-sectional average inflow velocity (inflow velocity) as the boundary condition. However, systematic study has not been done on the relative validity and effectiveness of existing inflow velocity estimation methods for various target flow fields. The aim of this study was to examine the existing methods systematically and to establish a method to accurately estimate inflow velocities for various vessel geometries and flow conditions in 2D-UMI simulations. A numerical experiment was performed for 2D-UMI simulation of blood flow models in a straight vessel with inflow velocity profiles symmetric and asymmetric to the vessel axis using existing evaluation functions based on Doppler velocity error for the inflow velocity estimation. As a result, it was clarified that a significantly large estimation error occurs in the asymmetric flow due to a nonfeedback domain near the downstream end of the calculation domain. Hence, a new inflow velocity estimation method of 2D-UMI simulation is proposed in which the feedback and evaluation domains are extended to the downstream end. Further numerical experiments of 2D-UMI simulation for two realistic vessel geometries of a healthy blood vessel and a stenosed one confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26241967

  11. Injection-attachment of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b in a two-dimensional miniature sand-filled aquifer simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Shonnard, D.R.; Taylor, R.T.; Hanna, M.L.; Boro, C.O.; Duba, A.G. )

    1994-01-01

    For some potentially useful and emerging in situ bioremediation technologies it is important to control bacterial attachment to subsurface materials during the injection of microbial cell suspensions. In this study the attachment patterns of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were measured after horizontal injections into a two-dimensional miniature aquifer simulator containing a wet homogeneous sand. In preliminary sand column assays, bacterial attachment to the sand was increased nearly 2 orders of magnitude compared to attachment in the presence of distilled water by raising the concentration of a pH 7.0 sodium-potassium phosphate buffer to 10 mM. The maximal concentration of attached cells was [approximately]4 [times] 10[sup 8] cells/g dry sand with both sand minicolumns and the wet sand aquifer simulator. For the latter this occurred on streamlines directly between the horizontal injector and withdrawal ports, where injection-withdrawal velocities were the highest. The effects of a simulated groundwater cross flow during suspension injection on bacterial attachment to the aquifer simulator sands were also studied, and a peristaltic pumping method to counteract these groundwater flow effects resulted in a more localized pattern, i.e., without extensive downstream skewing of the bacterial attachment zone. Phenol red was utilized as a nonbinding, red-colored tracer compound. It proved to be very convenient for quantitatively measuring the earlier breakthroughs of cells versus an inert tracer during the aquifer simulator and subsequent capillary tube cell injection experiments and also for visualizing the anticipated boundaries of cell attachment in the aquifer simulator. The effect of injection velocity on the observed bacterial attachment patterns in these experiments appears to be accounted for by colloid filtration theory. 45 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Spectral Methods in General Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, David

    2012-03-01

    In this talk I discuss the use of spectral methods in improving the accuracy of a General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) computer code. I introduce SpecCosmo, a GRMHD code developed as a Cactus arrangement at UHCL, and show simulation results using both Fourier spectral methods and finite differencing. This work demonstrates the use of spectral methods with the FFTW 3.3 Fast Fourier Transform package integrated with the Cactus Framework to perform spectral differencing using MPI.

  13. Numerical simulation of the operation of a MHD generator in transient regimes in MHD power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Bityurin, V.A.; Ivanov, P.P.; Koryagina, G.M.; Lyubimov, G.A.; Medin, S.A.; Morozov, G.N.; Prokop, A.S.

    1982-09-01

    Transient regimes of a MHD generator operating in combination with equipment in a MHD power station are analzyed with the help of a numerical model. The MHD generator, whose flow-through part consists of a nozzle, a channel, and a diffuser, is regulated by changing the flow rate and the load. Three types of MHD channels are studied: Faraday supersonic and subsonic, and diagonal supersonic. Their characteristics are presented and the efficiency of the MHD power station under nonrated regimes is determined. It is established that a MHD generator and the MHD power station as a whole admit quite efficient and deep regulation of the change in the flow rate of the working body.

  14. A two-dimensional model with coupled dynamics, radiation, and photochemistry. 1: Simulation of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Schneider, Hans R.; Shia, Run-Lie; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Sze, Nien-Dak

    1993-01-01

    Spatial and seasonal distribution of ozone and other trace gases are simulated using a interactive two-dimensional model of the stratosphere updated to include full gas phase chemistry. The model consists of a primitive equation dynamics module, a full radiative transfer scheme, and a comprehensive gas phase chemistry module. The circulation is derived from heating rates in the stratosphere that are calculated using model-generated ozone. In the troposphere, parameterized heating rates are adopted. The eddy momentum flux divergence in the zonal mean momentum equation is given by the eddy fluxes of potential vorticity. Eddy fluxes of potential vorticity and tracers are parameterized using a set of predetermined diffusion coefficients. The adopted values for K(sub yy), show a hemispherical asymmetry in that the values in the lower stratosphere are consistently smaller in the southern hemisphere. The asymmetry in K(sub yy) and in the parameterization of the tropospheric heating rate results in an asymmetry in the circulation giving rise to unique signatures in the trace gas distributions. The model successfully simulates the observed asymmetry in the column abundance of the springtime ozone maxima between northern and southern hemisphere. Results for other trace gases are in agreement with the gross observed features although specific differences exist.

  15. OFF-AXIS GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW MODELING BASED ON A TWO-DIMENSIONAL AXISYMMETRIC HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eerten, Hendrik; Zhang Weiqun; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2010-10-10

    Starting as highly relativistic collimated jets, gamma-ray burst outflows gradually slow down and become nonrelativistic spherical blast waves. Although detailed analytical solutions describing the afterglow emission received by an on-axis observer during both the early and late phases of the outflow evolution exist, a calculation of the received flux during the intermediate phase and for an off-axis observer requires either a more simplified analytical model or direct numerical simulations of the outflow dynamics. In this paper, we present light curves for off-axis observers covering the long-term evolution of the blast wave, calculated from a high-resolution two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics simulation using a synchrotron radiation model. We compare our results to earlier analytical work and calculate the consequence of the observer angle with respect to the jet axis both for the detection of orphan afterglows and for jet break fits to the observational data. We confirm earlier results in the literature finding that only a very small number of local type Ibc supernovae can harbor an orphan afterglow. For off-axis observers, the observable jet break can be delayed up to several weeks, potentially leading to overestimation of the beaming-corrected total energy. In addition we find that, when using our off-axis light curves to create synthetic Swift X-ray data, jet breaks are likely to remain hidden in the data.

  16. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of Benzene, Phenol, and Their Dimer: An Efficient First-Principles Simulation Protocol.

    PubMed

    Nenov, Artur; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco; Rivalta, Ivan

    2015-08-11

    First-principles simulations of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy in the ultraviolet region (2DUV) require computationally demanding multiconfigurational approaches that can resolve doubly excited and charge transfer states, the spectroscopic fingerprints of coupled UV-active chromophores. Here, we propose an efficient approach to reduce the computational cost of accurate simulations of 2DUV spectra of benzene, phenol, and their dimer (i.e., the minimal models for studying electronic coupling of UV-chromophores in proteins). We first establish the multiconfigurational recipe with the highest accuracy by comparison with experimental data, providing reference gas-phase transition energies and dipole moments that can be used to construct exciton Hamiltonians involving high-lying excited states. We show that by reducing the active spaces and the number of configuration state functions within restricted active space schemes, the computational cost can be significantly decreased without loss of accuracy in predicting 2DUV spectra. The proposed recipe has been successfully tested on a realistic model proteic system in water. Accounting for line broadening due to thermal and solvent-induced fluctuations allows for direct comparison with experiments. PMID:26574458

  17. Simulation tools for two-dimensional experiments in x-ray computed tomography using the FORBILD head phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhicong; Noo, Frédéric; Dennerlein, Frank; Wunderlich, Adam; Lauritsch, Günter; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    Mathematical phantoms are essential for the development and early stage evaluation of image reconstruction algorithms in x-ray computed tomography (CT). This note offers tools for computer simulations using a two-dimensional (2D) phantom that models the central axial slice through the FORBILD head phantom. Introduced in 1999, in response to a need for a more robust test, the FORBILD head phantom is now seen by many as the gold standard. However, the simple Shepp-Logan phantom is still heavily used by researchers working on 2D image reconstruction. Universal acceptance of the FORBILD head phantom may have been prevented by its significantly higher complexity: software that allows computer simulations with the Shepp-Logan phantom is not readily applicable to the FORBILD head phantom. The tools offered here address this problem. They are designed for use with Matlab®, as well as open-source variants, such as FreeMat and Octave, which are all widely used in both academia and industry. To get started, the interested user can simply copy and paste the codes from this PDF document into Matlab® M-files.

  18. Simulation tools for two-dimensional experiments in x-ray computed tomography using the FORBILD head phantom.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhicong; Noo, Frédéric; Dennerlein, Frank; Wunderlich, Adam; Lauritsch, Günter; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    Mathematical phantoms are essential for the development and early stage evaluation of image reconstruction algorithms in x-ray computed tomography (CT). This note offers tools for computer simulations using a two-dimensional (2D) phantom that models the central axial slice through the FORBILD head phantom. Introduced in 1999, in response to a need for a more robust test, the FORBILD head phantom is now seen by many as the gold standard. However, the simple Shepp-Logan phantom is still heavily used by researchers working on 2D image reconstruction. Universal acceptance of the FORBILD head phantom may have been prevented by its significantly higher complexity: software that allows computer simulations with the Shepp-Logan phantom is not readily applicable to the FORBILD head phantom. The tools offered here address this problem. They are designed for use with Matlab®, as well as open-source variants, such as FreeMat and Octave, which are all widely used in both academia and industry. To get started, the interested user can simply copy and paste the codes from this PDF document into Matlab® M-files. PMID:22713335

  19. 3D MHD Simulations of Spheromak Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuber, James E.; Woodruff, Simon; O'Bryan, John; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; Darpa Spheromak Team

    2015-11-01

    The adiabatic compression of compact tori could lead to a compact and hence low cost fusion energy system. The critical scientific issues in spheromak compression relate both to confinement properties and to the stability of the configuration undergoing compression. We present results from the NIMROD code modified with the addition of magnetic field coils that allow us to examine the role of rotation on the stability and confinement of the spheromak (extending prior work for the FRC). We present results from a scan in initial rotation, from 0 to 100km/s. We show that strong rotational shear (10km/s over 1cm) occurs. We compare the simulation results with analytic scaling relations for adiabatic compression. Work performed under DARPA grant N66001-14-1-4044.

  20. MHD Simulations of Plasma Dynamics with Non-Axisymmetric Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Chris; Levesque, Jeffrey; Morgan, Kyle; Jarboe, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The arbitrary geometry, 3D extended MHD code PSI-TET is applied to linear and non-linear simulations of MCF plasmas with non-axisymmetric boundaries. Progress and results from simulations on two experiments will be presented: 1) Detailed validation studies of the HIT-SI experiment with self-consistent modeling of plasma dynamics in the helicity injectors. Results will be compared to experimental data and NIMROD simulations that model the effect of the helicity injectors through boundary conditions on an axisymmetric domain. 2) Linear studies of HBT-EP with different wall configurations focusing on toroidal asymmetries in the adjustable conducting wall. HBT-EP studies the effect of active/passive stabilization with an adjustable ferritic wall. Results from linear verification and benchmark studies of ideal mode growth with and without toroidal asymmetries will be presented and compared to DCON predictions. Simulations of detailed experimental geometries are enabled by use of the PSI-TET code, which employs a high order finite element method on unstructured tetrahedral grids that are generated directly from CAD models. Further development of PSI-TET will also be presented including work to support resistive wall regions within extended MHD simulations. Work supported by DoE.

  1. Relativistic MHD simulations of extragalactic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leismann, T.; Antón, L.; Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.; Martí, J. M.; Miralles, J. A.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2005-06-01

    We have performed a comprehensive parameter study of the morphology and dynamics of axisymmetric, magnetized, relativistic jets by means of numerical simulations. The simulations have been performed with an upgraded version of the GENESIS code which is based on a second-order accurate finite volume method involving an approximate Riemann solver suitable for relativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamic flows, and a method of lines. Starting from pure hydrodynamic models we consider the effect of a magnetic field of increasing strength (up to β ≡ |b|2/2p ≈ 3.3 times the equipartition value) and different topology (purely toroidal or poloidal). We computed several series of models investigating the dependence of the dynamics on the magnetic field in jets of different beam Lorentz factor and adiabatic index. We find that the inclusion of the magnetic field leads to diverse effects which contrary to Newtonian magnetohydrodynamics models do not always scale linearly with the (relative) strength of the magnetic field. The relativistic models show, however, some clear trends. Axisymmetric jets with toroidal magnetic fields produce a cavity which consists of two parts: an inner one surrounding the beam which is compressed by magnetic forces, and an adjacent outer part which is inflated due to the action of the magnetic field. The outer border of the outer part of the cavity is given by the bow-shock where its interaction with the external medium takes place. Toroidal magnetic fields well below equipartition (β = 0.05) combined with a value of the adiabatic index of 4/3 yield extremely smooth jet cavities and stable beams. Prominent nose cones form when jets are confined by toroidal fields and carry a high Poynting flux (σ≡ |b|2/ρ>0.01 and β≥ 1). In contrast, none of our models possessing a poloidal field develops such a nose cone. The size of the nose cone is correlated with the propagation speed of the Mach disc (the smaller the speed the larger is the size). If two

  2. Layerwise decomposition of water dynamics in reverse micelles: A simulation study of two-dimensional infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rajib; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman

    2013-10-01

    We present computer simulation study of two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) of water confined in reverse micelles (RMs) of various sizes. The present study is motivated by the need to understand the altered dynamics of confined water by performing layerwise decomposition of water, with an aim to quantify the relative contributions of different layers water molecules to the calculated 2D-IR spectrum. The 0-1 transition spectra clearly show substantial elongation, due to inhomogeneous broadening and incomplete spectral diffusion, along the diagonal in the surface water layer of different sized RMs. Fitting of the frequency fluctuation correlation functions reveal that the motion of the surface water molecules is sub-diffusive and indicate the constrained nature of their dynamics. This is further supported by two peak nature of the angular analogue of van Hove correlation function. With increasing system size, the water molecules become more diffusive in nature and spectral diffusion almost completes in the central layer of the larger size RMs. Comparisons between experiments and simulations establish the correspondence between the spectral decomposition available in experiments with the spatial decomposition available in simulations. Simulations also allow a quantitative exploration of the relative role of water, sodium ions, and sulfonate head groups in vibrational dephasing. Interestingly, the negative cross correlation between force on oxygen and hydrogen of O-H bond in bulk water significantly decreases in the surface layer of each RM. This negative cross correlation gradually increases in the central water pool with increasing RMs size and this is found to be partly responsible for the faster relaxation rate of water in the central pool.

  3. Analysis and gyrokinetic simulation of MHD Alfven wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kevin Derek

    The study of low-frequency turbulence in magnetized plasmas is a difficult problem due to both the enormous range of scales involved and the variety of physics encompassed over this range. Much of the progress that has been made in turbulence theory is based upon a result from incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), in which energy is only transferred from large scales to small via the collision of Alfven waves propagating oppositely along the mean magnetic field. Improvements in laboratory devices and satellite measurements have demonstrated that, while theories based on this premise are useful over inertial ranges, describing turbulence at scales that approach particle gyroscales requires new theory. In this thesis, we examine the limits of incompressible MHD theory in describing collisions between pairs of Alfven waves. This interaction represents the fundamental unit of plasma turbulence. To study this interaction, we develop an analytic theory describing the nonlinear evolution of interacting Alfven waves and compare this theory to simulations performed using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. Gyrokinetics captures a much richer set of physics than that described by incompressible MHD, and is well-suited to describing Alfvenic turbulence around the ion gyroscale. We demonstrate that AstroGK is well suited to the study of physical Alfven waves by reproducing laboratory Alfven dispersion data collected using the LAPD. Additionally, we have developed an initialization alogrithm for use with AstroGK that allows exact Alfven eigenmodes to be initialized with user specified amplitudes and phases. We demonstrate that our analytic theory based upon incompressible MHD gives excellent agreement with gyrokinetic simulations for weakly turbulent collisions in the limit that k⊥rho i << 1. In this limit, agreement is observed in the time evolution of nonlinear products, and in the strength of nonlinear interaction with respect to polarization and scale. We also examine the

  4. Two-dimensional Core-collapse Supernova Simulations with the Isotropic Diffusion Source Approximation for Neutrino Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Hempel, Matthias; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino mechanism of core-collapse supernova is investigated via non-relativistic, two-dimensional (2D), neutrino radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. For the transport of electron flavor neutrinos, we use the interaction rates defined by Bruenn and the isotropic diffusion source approximation (IDSA) scheme, which decomposes the transported particles into trapped-particle and streaming-particle components. Heavy neutrinos are described by a leakage scheme. Unlike the “ray-by-ray” approach in some other multidimensional supernova models, we use cylindrical coordinates and solve the trapped-particle component in multiple dimensions, improving the proto-neutron star resolution and the neutrino transport in angular and temporal directions. We provide an IDSA verification by performing one-dimensional (1D) and 2D simulations with 15 and 20 M⊙ progenitors from Woosley et al. and discuss the difference between our IDSA results and those existing in the literature. Additionally, we perform Newtonian 1D and 2D simulations from prebounce core collapse to several hundred milliseconds postbounce with 11, 15, 21, and 27 M⊙ progenitors from Woosley et al. with the HS(DD2) equation of state. General-relativistic effects are neglected. We obtain robust explosions with diagnostic energies Edia ≳ 0.1-0.5 B (1 B ≡ 1051 erg) for all considered 2D models within approximately 100-300 ms after bounce and find that explosions are mostly dominated by the neutrino-driven convection, although standing accretion shock instabilities are observed as well. We also find that the level of electron deleptonization during collapse dramatically affects the postbounce evolution, e.g., the neglect of neutrino-electron scattering during collapse will lead to a stronger explosion.

  5. Simulating two-dimensional infrared-Raman and Raman spectroscopies for intermolecular and intramolecular modes of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hironobu; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-21

    Full classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two-dimensional (2D) infrared-Raman and 2D Raman spectroscopies of liquid water were carried out to elucidate a mode-mode coupling mechanism using a polarizable water model for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational spectroscopy (POLI2VS). This model is capable of describing both infrared and Raman spectra. Second-order response functions, which consist of one molecular polarizability and two molecular dipole moments for 2D IR-Raman and three molecular polarizabilities for 2D Raman spectroscopies, were calculated using an equilibrium-non-equilibrium hybrid MD approach. The obtained signals were analyzed using a multi-mode Brownian oscillator (BO) model with nonlinear system-bath interactions representing the intramolecular OH stretching, intramolecular HOH bending, hydrogen bonded (HB)-intermolecular librational motion and HB-intermolecular vibrational (translational) motion of liquid water. This model was applied through use of hierarchal Fokker-Planck equations. The qualitative features of the peak profiles in the 2D spectra obtained from the MD simulations are accurately reproduced with the BO model. This indicates that this model captures the essential features of the intermolecular and intramolecular motion. We elucidate the mechanisms governing the 2D signal profiles involving anharmonic mode-mode coupling, the nonlinearities of the polarizability and dipole moment, and the vibrational dephasing processes of liquid water even in the case that the 2D spectral peaks obtained from the MD simulation overlap or are unclear. The mode coupling peaks caused by electrical anharmonic coupling (EAHC) and mechanical anharmonic coupling (MAHC) are observed in all of the 2D spectra. We find that the strength of the MAHC between the OH-stretching and HB-intermolecular vibrational modes is comparable to that between the OH-stretching and HOH bending modes. Moreover, we find that this OH-stretching and HB

  6. Direct reconstruction in CT-analogous pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography: two-dimensional simulative and experimental validations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-04-01

    We present a generalized strategy for direct reconstruction in pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) with CT-analogous scanning mode, which can accomplish one-step reconstruction of the indocyanine-green pharmacokinetic-rate images within in vivo small animals by incorporating the compartmental kinetic model into an adaptive extended Kalman filtering scheme and using an instantaneous sampling dataset. This scheme, compared with the established indirect and direct methods, eliminates the interim error of the DFT inversion and relaxes the expensive requirement of the instrument for obtaining highly time-resolved date-sets of complete 360 deg projections. The scheme is validated by two-dimensional simulations for the two-compartment model and pilot phantom experiments for the one-compartment model, suggesting that the proposed method can estimate the compartmental concentrations and the pharmacokinetic-rates simultaneously with a fair quantitative and localization accuracy, and is well suitable for cost-effective and dense-sampling instrumentation based on the highly-sensitive photon counting technique.

  7. Simulation study of earthquakes based on the two-dimensional Burridge-Knopoff model with long-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takahiro; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2008-05-01

    Spatiotemporal correlations of the two-dimensional (2D) spring-block (Burridge-Knopoff) models of earthquakes with the long-range interblock interactions are extensively studied by means of numerical computer simulations. The long-range interaction derived from an elastic theory, which takes account of the effect of the elastic body adjacent to the fault plane, falls off with distance r as 1r;{3} . Comparison is made with the properties of the corresponding short-range models studied earlier. Seismic spatiotemporal correlations of the long-range models generally tend to be weaker than those of the short-range models. The magnitude distribution exhibits a "near-critical" behavior, i.e., a power-law-like behavior close to the Gutenberg-Richter law, for a wide parameter range with its B -value, B approximately 0.55 , insensitive to the model parameters, in sharp contrast to that of the 2D short-range model and those of the 1D short-range and long-range models where such a near-critical behavior is realized only by fine tuning the model parameters. In contrast to the short-range case, the mean stress drop at a seismic event of the long-range model is nearly independent of its magnitude, consistent with the observation. Large events often accompany foreshocks together with a doughnutlike quiescence as their precursors, while they hardly accompany aftershocks with almost negligible seismic correlations observed after the main shock. PMID:18643042

  8. FireStem2D – A Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model for Simulating Tree Stem Injury in Fires

    PubMed Central

    Chatziefstratiou, Efthalia K.; Bohrer, Gil; Bova, Anthony S.; Subramanian, Ravishankar; Frasson, Renato P. M.; Scherzer, Amy; Butler, Bret W.; Dickinson, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    FireStem2D, a software tool for predicting tree stem heating and injury in forest fires, is a physically-based, two-dimensional model of stem thermodynamics that results from heating at the bark surface. It builds on an earlier one-dimensional model (FireStem) and provides improved capabilities for predicting fire-induced mortality and injury before a fire occurs by resolving stem moisture loss, temperatures through the stem, degree of bark charring, and necrotic depth around the stem. We present the results of numerical parameterization and model evaluation experiments for FireStem2D that simulate laboratory stem-heating experiments of 52 tree sections from 25 trees. We also conducted a set of virtual sensitivity analysis experiments to test the effects of unevenness of heating around the stem and with aboveground height using data from two studies: a low-intensity surface fire and a more intense crown fire. The model allows for improved understanding and prediction of the effects of wildland fire on injury and mortality of trees of different species and sizes. PMID:23894599

  9. One-dimensional GIS-based model compared with a two-dimensional model in urban floods simulation.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, J; Bouvier, C; Mignot, E; Paquier, A

    2006-01-01

    A GIS-based one-dimensional flood simulation model is presented and applied to the centre of the city of Nîmes (Gard, France), for mapping flow depths or velocities in the streets network. The geometry of the one-dimensional elements is derived from the Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The flow is routed from one element to the next using the kinematic wave approximation. At the crossroads, the flows in the downstream branches are computed using a conceptual scheme. This scheme was previously designed to fit Y-shaped pipes junctions, and has been modified here to fit X-shaped crossroads. The results were compared with the results of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model based on the full shallow water equations. The comparison shows that good agreements can be found in the steepest streets of the study zone, but differences may be important in the other streets. Some reasons that can explain the differences between the two models are given and some research possibilities are proposed. PMID:17120637

  10. Development of a discrete gas-kinetic scheme for simulation of two-dimensional viscous incompressible and compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Yang, L M; Shu, C; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a discrete gas-kinetic scheme (DGKS) is presented for simulation of two-dimensional viscous incompressible and compressible flows. This scheme is developed from the circular function-based GKS, which was recently proposed by Shu and his co-workers [L. M. Yang, C. Shu, and J. Wu, J. Comput. Phys. 274, 611 (2014)]. For the circular function-based GKS, the integrals for conservation forms of moments in the infinity domain for the Maxwellian function-based GKS are simplified to those integrals along the circle. As a result, the explicit formulations of conservative variables and fluxes are derived. However, these explicit formulations of circular function-based GKS for viscous flows are still complicated, which may not be easy for the application by new users. By using certain discrete points to represent the circle in the phase velocity space, the complicated formulations can be replaced by a simple solution process. The basic requirement is that the conservation forms of moments for the circular function-based GKS can be accurately satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. In this work, it is shown that integral quadrature by four discrete points on the circle, which forms the D2Q4 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integrals. Numerical results showed that the present scheme can provide accurate numerical results for incompressible and compressible viscous flows with roughly the same computational cost as that needed by the Roe scheme. PMID:27078488