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Sample records for typing identifies distinct

  1. DNA affinity labeling of adenovirus type 2 upstream promoter sequence-binding factors identifies two distinct proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Safer, B; Cohen, R B; Garfinkel, S; Thompson, J A

    1988-01-01

    A rapid affinity labeling procedure with enhanced specificity was developed to identify DNA-binding proteins. 32P was first introduced at unique phosphodiester bonds within the DNA recognition sequence. UV light-dependent cross-linking of pyrimidines to amino acid residues in direct contact at the binding site, followed by micrococcal nuclease digestion, resulted in the transfer of 32P to only those specific protein(s) which recognized the binding sequence. This method was applied to the detection and characterization of proteins that bound to the upstream promoter sequence (-50 to -66) of the human adenovirus type 2 major late promoter. We detected two distinct proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 116,000 that interacted with this promoter element. The two proteins differed significantly in their chromatographic and cross-linking behaviors. Images PMID:3336354

  2. Identifying distinct thermal components of a creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughton, David A.; Hatch, Christine; Mora, Ethan

    2012-09-01

    Statistical and heat budget methods for analyzing temperature dynamics of creeks are limited by the ability to resolve thermal processes and fine-grained thermal structures, respectively. Here we describe a hybrid method that identifies distinct thermal components in a stream's heat budget using only temperature data and an algorithm that employs mutual information to "unmix" signals in the temperature data. Spatial resolution is limited only by the number of temperature-logging sensors, which can be quite high for distributed-temperature sensors. Process resolution is at the level of thermal components, defined as distinct collections of heat flux elements sharing coordinated (nonindependent) dynamics. Inference can be used to relate thermal components to meteorological forcing and structural heterogeneity in the fluvial system and to suggest novel hypotheses for further testing with targeted heat budget studies. Applying the method to a small, arid-land creek produced two novel hypotheses: (1) lateral conduction of heat from adjacent dry land (bed, terraces) appeared to cause a substantial heating of the stream, augmented by off-channel flow paths, and (2) riparian vegetation was associated with a subtraction of heat from the stream at a rate proportionate to solar insolation, exceeding the maximum decoupling effect of shade by at least 2°C at midday, and suggesting upwelling heat flux from water to tree canopy proportional to sunlight. The method appears useful for generating new hypotheses, for selecting informative sites for detailed heat budgets, for determining the dimensionality of heat budgets in natural streams, and more broadly for associating thermal components to fluvial structure and processes.

  3. Neural Precursor Lineages Specify Distinct Neocortical Pyramidal Neuron Types

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William A.; Medalla, Maria; Guillamon-Vivancos, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Several neural precursor populations contemporaneously generate neurons in the developing neocortex. Specifically, radial glial stem cells of the dorsal telencephalon divide asymmetrically to produce excitatory neurons, but also indirectly to produce neurons via three types of intermediate progenitor cells. Why so many precursor types are needed to produce neurons has not been established; whether different intermediate progenitor cells merely expand the output of radial glia or instead generate distinct types of neurons is unknown. Here we use a novel genetic fate mapping technique to simultaneously track multiple precursor streams in the developing mouse brain and show that layer 2 and 3 pyramidal neurons exhibit distinctive electrophysiological and structural properties depending upon their precursor cell type of origin. These data indicate that individual precursor subclasses synchronously produce functionally different neurons, even within the same lamina, and identify a primary mechanism leading to cortical neuronal diversity. PMID:25878286

  4. Propionibacterium acnes Types I and II Represent Phylogenetically Distinct Groups

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Andrew; Valanne, Susanna; Ramage, Gordon; Tunney, Michael M.; Glenn, Josephine V.; McLorinan, Gregory C.; Bhatia, Ajay; Maisonneuve, Jean-Francois; Lodes, Michael; Persing, David H.; Patrick, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Although two phenotypes of the opportunistic pathogen Propionibacterium acnes (types I and II) have been described, epidemiological investigations of their roles in different infections have not been widely reported. Using immunofluorescence microscopy with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) QUBPa1 and QUBPa2, specific for types I and II, respectively, we investigated the prevalences of the two types among 132 P. acnes isolates. Analysis of isolates from failed prosthetic hip implants (n = 40) revealed approximately equal numbers of type I and II organisms. Isolates from failed prosthetic hip-associated bone (n = 6) and tissue (n = 38) samples, as well as isolates from acne (n = 22), dental infections (n = 8), and skin removed during surgical incision (n = 18) were predominately of type I. A total of 11 (8%) isolates showed atypical MAb labeling and could not be conclusively identified. Phylogenetic analysis of P. acnes by nucleotide sequencing revealed the 16S rRNA gene to be highly conserved between types I and II. In contrast, sequence analysis of recA and a putative hemolysin gene (tly) revealed significantly greater type-specific polymorphisms that corresponded to phylogenetically distinct cluster groups. All 11 isolates with atypical MAb labeling were identified as type I by sequencing. Within the recA and tly phylogenetic trees, nine of these isolates formed a cluster distinct from other type I organisms, suggesting a further phylogenetic subdivision within type I. Our study therefore demonstrates that the phenotypic differences between P. acnes types I and II reflect deeper differences in their phylogeny. Furthermore, nucleotide sequencing provides an accurate method for identifying the type status of P. acnes isolates. PMID:15634990

  5. Individual Distinctiveness in Call Types of Wild Western Female Gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Salmi, Roberta; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Doran-Sheehy, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Individually distinct vocalizations play an important role in animal communication, allowing call recipients to respond differentially based on caller identity. However, which of the many calls in a species' repertoire should have more acoustic variability and be more recognizable is less apparent. One proposed hypothesis is that calls used over long distances should be more distinct because visual cues are not available to identify the caller. An alternative hypothesis proposes that close calls should be more recognizable because of their importance in social interactions. To examine which hypothesis garners more support, the acoustic variation and individual distinctiveness of eight call types of six wild western gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) females were investigated. Acoustic recordings of gorilla calls were collected at the Mondika Research Center (Republic of Congo). Acoustic variability was high in all gorilla calls. Similar high inter-individual variation and potential for identity coding (PIC) was found for all call types. Discriminant function analyses confirmed that all call types were individually distinct (although for call types with lowest sample size - hum, grumble and scream - this result cannot be generalized), suggesting that neither the distance at which communication occurs nor the call social function alone can explain the evolution of identity signaling in western gorilla communication. PMID:25029238

  6. Constructing taxonomies to identify distinctive forms of primary healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Pineault, Raynald; Hamel, Marjolaine; Levesque, Jean-Frédéric; Roberge, Danièle; Lamarche, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background. Primary healthcare (PHC) renewal gives rise to important challenges for policy makers, managers, and researchers in most countries. Evaluating new emerging forms of organizations is therefore of prime importance in assessing the impact of these policies. This paper presents a set of methods related to the configurational approach and an organizational taxonomy derived from our analysis. Methods. In 2005, we carried out a study on PHC in two health and social services regions of Quebec that included urban, suburban, and rural areas. An organizational survey was conducted in 473 PHC practices. We used multidimensional nonparametric statistical methods, namely, multiple correspondence and principal component analyses, and an ascending hierarchical classification method to construct a taxonomy of organizations. Results. PHC organizations were classified into five distinct models: four professional and one community. Study findings indicate that the professional integrated coordination and the community model have great potential for organizational development since they are closest to the ideal type promoted by current reforms. Conclusion. Results showed that the configurational approach is useful to assess complex phenomena such as the organization of PHC. The analysis highlights the most promising organizational models. Our study enhances our understanding of organizational change in health services organizations. PMID:24959575

  7. Discovering Distinct Functional Modules of Specific Cancer Types Using Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ru; Wang, Xiaosheng; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Background. The molecular profiles exhibited in different cancer types are very different; hence, discovering distinct functional modules associated with specific cancer types is very important to understand the distinct functions associated with them. Protein-protein interaction networks carry vital information about molecular interactions in cellular systems, and identification of functional modules (subgraphs) in these networks is one of the most important applications of biological network analysis. Results. In this study, we developed a new graph theory based method to identify distinct functional modules from nine different cancer protein-protein interaction networks. The method is composed of three major steps: (i) extracting modules from protein-protein interaction networks using network clustering algorithms; (ii) identifying distinct subgraphs from the derived modules; and (iii) identifying distinct subgraph patterns from distinct subgraphs. The subgraph patterns were evaluated using experimentally determined cancer-specific protein-protein interaction data from the Ingenuity knowledgebase, to identify distinct functional modules that are specific to each cancer type. Conclusion. We identified cancer-type specific subgraph patterns that may represent the functional modules involved in the molecular pathogenesis of different cancer types. Our method can serve as an effective tool to discover cancer-type specific functional modules from large protein-protein interaction networks. PMID:26495282

  8. TCGA Identifies Distinct Subtypes of Deadly Brain Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The most common form of malignant brain cancer in adults, glioblastoma multiforme, is not a single disease but appears to be four distinct molecular subtypes, according to a study by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network. The researchers of thi

  9. BMP signalling differentially regulates distinct haematopoietic stem cell types

    PubMed Central

    Crisan, Mihaela; Kartalaei, Parham Solaimani; Vink, Chris; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Bollerot, Karine; van IJcken, Wilfred; van der Linden, Reinier; de Sousa Lopes, Susana M. Chuva; Monteiro, Rui; Mummery, Christine; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Adult haematopoiesis is the outcome of distinct haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subtypes with self-renewable repopulating ability, but with different haematopoietic cell lineage outputs. The molecular basis for this heterogeneity is largely unknown. BMP signalling regulates HSCs as they are first generated in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region, but at later developmental stages, its role in HSCs is controversial. Here we show that HSCs in murine fetal liver and the bone marrow are of two types that can be prospectively isolated—BMP activated and non-BMP activated. Clonal transplantation demonstrates that they have distinct haematopoietic lineage outputs. Moreover, the two HSC types differ in intrinsic genetic programs, thus supporting a role for the BMP signalling axis in the regulation of HSC heterogeneity and lineage output. Our findings provide insight into the molecular control mechanisms that define HSC types and have important implications for reprogramming cells to HSC fate and treatments targeting distinct HSC types. PMID:26282601

  10. Genome-Wide Association Identifies Regulatory Loci Associated with Distinct Local Histogram Emphysema Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Michael H.; San José Estépar, Raúl; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N.; Laird, Nan; Beaty, Terri H.; Washko, George; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Emphysema is a heritable trait that occurs in smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Emphysema occurs in distinct pathologic patterns, but the genetic determinants of these patterns are unknown. Objectives: To identify genetic loci associated with distinct patterns of emphysema in smokers and investigate the regulatory function of these loci. Methods: Quantitative measures of distinct emphysema patterns were generated from computed tomography scans from smokers in the COPDGene Study using the local histogram emphysema quantification method. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were performed in 9,614 subjects for five emphysema patterns, and the results were referenced against enhancer and DNase I hypersensitive regions from ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics cell lines. Measurements and Main Results: Genome-wide significant associations were identified for seven loci. Two are novel associations (top single-nucleotide polymorphism rs379123 in MYO1D and rs9590614 in VMA8) located within genes that function in cell-cell signaling and cell migration, and five are in loci previously associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility (HHIP, IREB2/CHRNA3, CYP2A6/ADCK, TGFB2, and MMP12). Five of these seven loci lay within enhancer or DNase I hypersensitivity regions in lung fibroblasts or small airway epithelial cells, respectively. Enhancer enrichment analysis for top GWAS associations (single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated at P < 5 × 10?6) identified multiple cell lines with significant enhancer enrichment among top GWAS loci, including lung fibroblasts. Conclusions: This study demonstrates for the first time genetic associations with distinct patterns of pulmonary emphysema quantified by computed tomography scan. Enhancer regions are significantly enriched among these GWAS results, with pulmonary fibroblasts among the cell types showing the strongest enrichment. PMID:25006744

  11. Identifying land cover variability distinct from land cover change: Cheatgrass in the Great Basin

    E-print Network

    Bradley, Bethany

    Identifying land cover variability distinct from land cover change: Cheatgrass in the Great Basin to rainfall distinct from native shrub/bunch grass in the Great Basin, US. This response is apparent in time in the Great Basin, 20,000 km2 , or 7% of land cover, are currently dominated by cheatgrass. Inter

  12. Ferroan anorthosite - A widespread and distinctive lunar rock type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, E.; Prinz, M.; Keil, K.

    1974-01-01

    Eight of eleven Apollo 16 rake-sample anorthosites are very similar to each other, to hand-specimen Apollo 16 anorthosites, and to Apollo 15 anorthosites. They have feldspar An-96.6, both high- and low-Ca pyroxene with a restricted range of (low-magnesium) composition, minor olivine, traces of ilmenite and chromite, and originally coarse-grained, but now cataclastic texture. Such ferroan anorthosite is evidently a coherent, distinctive and widespread lunar rock type of cumulate origin which may not necessarily be very closely related genetically to other highland rock types.

  13. The intestinal stem cell markers Bmi1 and Lgr5 identify two functionally distinct populations

    E-print Network

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    The intestinal stem cell markers Bmi1 and Lgr5 identify two functionally distinct populations (sent for review October 28, 2011) The small intestine epithelium undergoes rapid and continuous regeneration supported by crypt intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Bmi1 and Lgr5 have been independently identified

  14. p53 Status Identifies Two Subgroups of Triple-negative Breast Cancers with Distinct Biological Features

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    p53 Status Identifies Two Subgroups of Triple-negative Breast Cancers with Distinct Biological, 2011 Objective: Despite the clinical similarities triple-negative and basal-like breast cancer heterogeneously expressed in triple-negative breast cancers, suggesting that it may be associated with specific

  15. A distinctive oral phenotype points to FAM20A mutations not identified by Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Smith, Claire E L; Murrillo, Gina; Silva, Sandra; Feather, Sally; Howell, Marianella; Crinnion, Laura; Bonthron, David T; Carr, Ian M; Watson, Christopher M; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2015-11-01

    Biallelic FAM20A mutations cause two conditions where Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) is the presenting feature: Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Gingival Fibromatosis Syndrome; and Enamel Renal Syndrome. A distinctive oral phenotype is shared in both conditions. On Sanger sequencing of FAM20A in cases with that phenotype, we identified two probands with single, likely pathogenic heterozygous mutations. Given the recessive inheritance pattern seen in all previous FAM20A mutation-positive families and the potential for renal disease, further screening was carried out to look for a second pathogenic allele. Reverse transcriptase-PCR on cDNA was used to determine transcript levels. CNVseq was used to screen for genomic insertions and deletions. In one family, FAM20A cDNA screening revealed only a single mutated FAM20A allele with the wild-type allele not transcribed. In the second family, CNV detection by whole genome sequencing (CNVseq) revealed a heterozygous 54.7 kb duplication encompassing exons 1 to 4 of FAM20A. This study confirms the link between biallelic FAM20A mutations and the characteristic oral phenotype. It highlights for the first time examples of FAM20A mutations missed by the most commonly used mutation screening techniques. This information informed renal assessment and ongoing clinical care. PMID:26740946

  16. A Framework for Identifying Distinct Multipollutant Profiles in Air Pollution Data

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Elena; Coull, Brent; Thomas, Dylan; Koutrakis, Petros

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The importance of describing, understanding and regulating multi-pollutant mixtures has been highlighted by the US National Academy of Science and the Environmental Protection Agency. Furthering our understanding of the health effects associated with exposure to mixtures of pollutants will lead to the development of new multi-pollutant National Air Quality Standards. OBJECTIVES Introduce a framework within which diagnostic methods that are based on our understanding of air pollution mixtures are used to validate the distinct air pollutant mixtures identified using cluster analysis. METHODS: S ix years of daily gaseous and particulate air pollution data collected in Boston, MA were classified solely on their concentration profiles. Classification was performed using k-means partitioning and hierarchical clustering. Diagnostic strategies were developed to identify the most optimal clustering. RESULTS The optimal solution used k-means analysis and contained five distinct groups of days. Pollutant concentrations and elemental ratios were computed in order to characterize the differences between clusters. Time-series regression confirmed that the groups differed in their chemical compositions. The mean values of meteorological parameters were estimated for each group and air mass origin between clusters was examined using back-trajectory analysis. This allowed us to link the distinct physico-chemical characteristics of each cluster to characteristic weather patterns and show that different clusters were associated with distinct air mass origins. CONCLUSIONS This analysis yielded a solution that was robust to outlier points and interpretable based on chemical, physical and meteorological characteristics. This novel method provides an exciting tool with which to identify and further investigate multi-pollutant mixtures and link them directly to health effects studies. PMID:22584082

  17. Distinct trajectories of multimorbidity in primary care were identified using latent class growth analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Vicky Y.; Jones, Peter W.; Kadam, Umesh T.; Jordan, Kelvin P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the use of latent class growth analysis (LCGA) in understanding onset and changes in multimorbidity over time in older adults. Study Design and Setting This study used primary care consultations for 42 consensus-defined chronic morbidities over 3 years (2003–2005) by 24,615 people aged >50 years at 10 UK general practices, which contribute to the Consultations in Primary Care Archive database. Distinct groups of people who had similar progression of multimorbidity over time were identified using LCGA. These derived trajectories were tested in another primary care consultation data set with linked self-reported health status. Results Five clusters of people representing different trajectories were identified: those who had no recorded chronic problems (40%), those who developed a first chronic morbidity over 3 years (10%), a developing multimorbidity group (37%), a group with increasing number of chronic morbidities (12%), and a multi-chronic group with many chronic morbidities (1%). These trajectories were also identified using another consultation database and associated with self-reported physical and mental health. Conclusion There are distinct trajectories in the development of multimorbidity in primary care populations, which are associated with poor health. Future research needs to incorporate such trajectories when assessing progression of disease and deterioration of health. PMID:25063556

  18. Latent Class Analysis Identifies Distinct Phenotypes of Primary Graft Dysfunction After Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Joshua M.; Cantu, Edward; Lee, James C.; Lederer, David J.; Lama, Vibha N.; Orens, Jonathan; Weinacker, Ann; Wilkes, David S.; Bhorade, Sangeeta; Wille, Keith M.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Palmer, Scott M.; Crespo, Maria; Localio, A. Russell; Demissie, Ejigayehu; Kawut, Steven M.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Christie, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is significant heterogeneity within the primary graft dysfunction (PGD) syndrome. We aimed to identify distinct grade 3 PGD phenotypes based on severity of lung dysfunction and patterns of resolution. Methods: Subjects from the Lung Transplant Outcomes Group (LTOG) cohort study with grade 3 PGD within 72 h after transplantation were included. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to statistically identify classes based on changes in PGD International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation grade over time. Construct validity of the classes was assessed by testing for divergence of recipient, donor, and operative characteristics between classes. Predictive validity was assessed using time to death. Results: Of 1,255 subjects, 361 had grade 3 PGD within the first 72 h after transplantation. LCA identified three distinct phenotypes: (1) severe persistent dysfunction (class 1), (2) complete resolution of dysfunction within 72 h (class 2), and (3) attenuation, without complete resolution within 72 h (class 3). Increased use of cardiopulmonary bypass, greater RBC transfusion, and higher mean pulmonary artery pressure were associated with persistent PGD (class 1). Subjects in class 1 also had the greatest risk of death (hazard ratio, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.57-3.63; P < .001). Conclusions: There are distinct phenotypes of resolution of dysfunction within the severe PGD syndrome. Subjects with early resolution may represent a different mechanism of lung pathology, such as resolving pulmonary edema, whereas those with persistent PGD may represent a more severe phenotype. Future studies aimed at PGD mechanism or treatment may focus on phenotypes based on resolution of graft dysfunction. PMID:23429890

  19. Distinct type I and type II toxin-antitoxin modules control Salmonella lifestyle inside eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Moreno-Córdoba, Inmaculada; Figueroa, Virginia; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules contribute to the generation of non-growing cells in response to stress. These modules abound in bacterial pathogens although the bases for this profusion remain largely unknown. Using the intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model, here we show that a selected group of TA modules impact bacterial fitness inside eukaryotic cells. We characterized in this pathogen twenty-seven TA modules, including type I and type II TA modules encoding antisense RNA and proteinaceous antitoxins, respectively. Proteomic and gene expression analyses revealed that the pathogen produces numerous toxins of TA modules inside eukaryotic cells. Among these, the toxins HokST, LdrAST, and TisBST, encoded by type I TA modules and T4ST and VapC2ST, encoded by type II TA modules, promote bacterial survival inside fibroblasts. In contrast, only VapC2ST shows that positive effect in bacterial fitness when the pathogen infects epithelial cells. These results illustrate how S. Typhimurium uses distinct type I and type II TA modules to regulate its intracellular lifestyle in varied host cell types. This function specialization might explain why the number of TA modules increased in intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:25792384

  20. Online Discourse on Fibromyalgia: Text-Mining to Identify Clinical Distinction and Patient Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungsik; Ryu, Young Uk

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using text-mining to identify clinical distinctions and patient concerns in online memoires posted by patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Material/Methods A total of 399 memoirs were collected from an FM group website. The unstructured data of memoirs associated with FM were collected through a crawling process and converted into structured data with a concordance, parts of speech tagging, and word frequency. We also conducted a lexical analysis and phrase pattern identification. After examining the data, a set of FM-related keywords were obtained and phrase net relationships were set through a web-based visualization tool. Results The clinical distinction of FM was verified. Pain is the biggest issue to the FM patients. The pains were affecting body parts including ‘muscles,’ ‘leg,’ ‘neck,’ ‘back,’ ‘joints,’ and ‘shoulders’ with accompanying symptoms such as ‘spasms,’ ‘stiffness,’ and ‘aching,’ and were described as ‘sever,’ ‘chronic,’ and ‘constant.’ This study also demonstrated that it was possible to understand the interests and concerns of FM patients through text-mining. FM patients wanted to escape from the pain and symptoms, so they were interested in medical treatment and help. Also, they seemed to have interest in their work and occupation, and hope to continue to live life through the relationships with the people around them. Conclusions This research shows the potential for extracting keywords to confirm the clinical distinction of a certain disease, and text-mining can help objectively understand the concerns of patients by generalizing their large number of subjective illness experiences. However, it is believed that there are limitations to the processes and methods for organizing and classifying large amounts of text, so these limits have to be considered when analyzing the results. The development of research methodology to overcome these limitations is greatly needed. PMID:25287854

  1. Novel and Distinct Metabolites Identified Following a Single Oral Dose of ?- or ?-Hexabromocyclododecane in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, David T.; Huwe, Janice; Diliberto, Janet; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolism of ?- and ?-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was investigated in adult C57BL/6 female mice. ?- or ?-[14C]HBCD (3 mg/kg bw) was orally administered with subsequent urine and feces collection for 4 consecutive days; a separate group of mice were dosed and sacrificed 3 hours post-exposure to investigate tissue metabolite levels. Extractable and non-extractable HBCD metabolites were quantitated in liver, blood, fat, brain, bile, urine and feces and characterized by LC/MS (ESI-). Metabolites identified were distinct between the two stereoisomers. In mice exposed to ?-HBCD, four hydroxylated metabolites were detected in fecal extracts, and one of these metabolite isomers was consistently characterized in liver, brain, and adipose tissue extracts. In contrast, mice exposed to ?-HBCD contained multiple isomers of monohydroxy-pentabromocyclododecene, dihydroxy-pentabromocyclododecene, and dihydroxy-pentabromocyclododecadiene in the feces while only a single monohydroxy-pentabromocyclododecane metabolite was measured in liver and adipose tissue. Both stereoisomers were transformed to metabolites which formed covalent bonds to proteins and/or lipids in the gut as evidenced by high fecal non-extractables. Although the potential toxicity of these free and bound metabolites remains to be determined, the presence of distinct metabolic products from the two main HBCD stereoisomers should allow biomarkers to be selected that may aid in characterizing sources of HBCD exposure. PMID:23171393

  2. Burkholderia pseudomallei sequencing identifies genomic clades with distinct recombination, accessory, and epigenetic profiles

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Tannistha; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Didelot, Xavier; Mehershahi, Kurosh; Boddey, Justin A.; Beacham, Ifor; Peak, Ian; Harting, John; Baybayan, Primo; Guo, Yan; Wang, Susana; How, Lee Chee; Sim, Bernice; Essex-Lopresti, Angela; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Nelson, Michelle; Smither, Sophie; Ong, Catherine; Aw, Lay Tin; Hoon, Chua Hui; Michell, Stephen; Studholme, David J.; Titball, Richard; Chen, Swaine L.; Parkhill, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causative agent of the infectious disease melioidosis. To investigate population diversity, recombination, and horizontal gene transfer in closely related Bp isolates, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 106 clinical, animal, and environmental strains from a restricted Asian locale. Whole-genome phylogenies resolved multiple genomic clades of Bp, largely congruent with multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We discovered widespread recombination in the Bp core genome, involving hundreds of regions associated with multiple haplotypes. Highly recombinant regions exhibited functional enrichments that may contribute to virulence. We observed clade-specific patterns of recombination and accessory gene exchange, and provide evidence that this is likely due to ongoing recombination between clade members. Reciprocally, interclade exchanges were rarely observed, suggesting mechanisms restricting gene flow between clades. Interrogation of accessory elements revealed that each clade harbored a distinct complement of restriction-modification (RM) systems, predicted to cause clade-specific patterns of DNA methylation. Using methylome sequencing, we confirmed that representative strains from separate clades indeed exhibit distinct methylation profiles. Finally, using an E. coli system, we demonstrate that Bp RM systems can inhibit uptake of non-self DNA. Our data suggest that RM systems borne on mobile elements, besides preventing foreign DNA invasion, may also contribute to limiting exchanges of genetic material between individuals of the same species. Genomic clades may thus represent functional units of genetic isolation in Bp, modulating intraspecies genetic diversity. PMID:25236617

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei sequencing identifies genomic clades with distinct recombination, accessory, and epigenetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Tannistha; Holden, Matthew T G; Holden, Mathew T G; Didelot, Xavier; Mehershahi, Kurosh; Boddey, Justin A; Beacham, Ifor; Peak, Ian; Harting, John; Baybayan, Primo; Guo, Yan; Wang, Susana; How, Lee Chee; Sim, Bernice; Essex-Lopresti, Angela; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Nelson, Michelle; Smither, Sophie; Ong, Catherine; Aw, Lay Tin; Hoon, Chua Hui; Michell, Stephen; Studholme, David J; Titball, Richard; Chen, Swaine L; Parkhill, Julian; Tan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causative agent of the infectious disease melioidosis. To investigate population diversity, recombination, and horizontal gene transfer in closely related Bp isolates, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 106 clinical, animal, and environmental strains from a restricted Asian locale. Whole-genome phylogenies resolved multiple genomic clades of Bp, largely congruent with multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We discovered widespread recombination in the Bp core genome, involving hundreds of regions associated with multiple haplotypes. Highly recombinant regions exhibited functional enrichments that may contribute to virulence. We observed clade-specific patterns of recombination and accessory gene exchange, and provide evidence that this is likely due to ongoing recombination between clade members. Reciprocally, interclade exchanges were rarely observed, suggesting mechanisms restricting gene flow between clades. Interrogation of accessory elements revealed that each clade harbored a distinct complement of restriction-modification (RM) systems, predicted to cause clade-specific patterns of DNA methylation. Using methylome sequencing, we confirmed that representative strains from separate clades indeed exhibit distinct methylation profiles. Finally, using an E. coli system, we demonstrate that Bp RM systems can inhibit uptake of non-self DNA. Our data suggest that RM systems borne on mobile elements, besides preventing foreign DNA invasion, may also contribute to limiting exchanges of genetic material between individuals of the same species. Genomic clades may thus represent functional units of genetic isolation in Bp, modulating intraspecies genetic diversity. PMID:25236617

  4. TGF-?1 activates two distinct type I receptors in neurons

    PubMed Central

    König, Hans-Georg; Kögel, Donat; Rami, Abdelhaq; Prehn, Jochen H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-?s (TGF-?s) are pleiotropic cytokines involved in development and maintenance of the nervous system. In several neural lesion paradigms, TGF-?1 exerts potent neuroprotective effects. Neurons treated with TGF-?1 activated the canonical TGF-? receptor I/activin-like kinase receptor 5 (ALK5) pathway. The transcription factor nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) plays a fundamental role in neuroprotection. Treatment with TGF-?1 enhanced NF-?B activity in gelshift and reporter gene analyses. However, ectopic expression of a constitutively active ALK5 failed to mimic these effects. ALK1 has been described as an alternative TGF-? receptor in endothelial cells. Interestingly, we detected significant basal expression of ALK1 and its injury-induced up-regulation in neurons. Treatment with TGF-?1 also induced a pronounced increase in downstream Smad1 phosphorylation. Overexpression of a constitutively active ALK1 mimicked the effect of TGF-?1 on NF-?B activation and neuroprotection. Our data suggest that TGF-?1 simultaneously activates two distinct receptor pathways in neurons and that the ALK1 pathway mediates TGF-?1–induced NF-?B survival signaling. PMID:15781474

  5. Magnetic resonance image features identify glioblastoma phenotypic subtypes with distinct molecular pathway activities.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Haruka; Achrol, Achal S; Mitchell, Lex A; Loya, Joshua J; Liu, Tiffany; Westbroek, Erick M; Feroze, Abdullah H; Rodriguez, Scott; Echegaray, Sebastian; Azad, Tej D; Yeom, Kristen W; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L; Chang, Steven D; Harsh, Griffith R; Gevaert, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly lethal primary malignant brain tumor in adults. There is a dire need for easily accessible, noninvasive biomarkers that can delineate underlying molecular activities and predict response to therapy. To this end, we sought to identify subtypes of GBM, differentiated solely by quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features, that could be used for better management of GBM patients. Quantitative image features capturing the shape, texture, and edge sharpness of each lesion were extracted from MR images of 121 single-institution patients with de novo, solitary, unilateral GBM. Three distinct phenotypic "clusters" emerged in the development cohort using consensus clustering with 10,000 iterations on these image features. These three clusters--pre-multifocal, spherical, and rim-enhancing, names reflecting their image features--were validated in an independent cohort consisting of 144 multi-institution patients with similar tumor characteristics from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Each cluster mapped to a unique set of molecular signaling pathways using pathway activity estimates derived from the analysis of TCGA tumor copy number and gene expression data with the PARADIGM (Pathway Recognition Algorithm Using Data Integration on Genomic Models) algorithm. Distinct pathways, such as c-Kit and FOXA, were enriched in each cluster, indicating differential molecular activities as determined by the image features. Each cluster also demonstrated differential probabilities of survival, indicating prognostic importance. Our imaging method offers a noninvasive approach to stratify GBM patients and also provides unique sets of molecular signatures to inform targeted therapy and personalized treatment of GBM. PMID:26333934

  6. Adenovirus vectors targeting distinct cell types in the retina.

    PubMed

    Sweigard, J Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5DeltaRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5DeltaRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors. PMID:19892875

  7. Evidence for two distinct populations of type Ia supernovae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Lifan; Filippenko, Alexei V; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhao, Xulin

    2013-04-12

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been used as excellent standardizable candles for measuring cosmic expansion, but their progenitors are still elusive. Here, we report that the spectral diversity of SNe Ia is tied to their birthplace environments. We found that those with high-velocity ejecta are substantially more concentrated in the inner and brighter regions of their host galaxies than are normal-velocity SNe Ia. Furthermore, the former tend to inhabit larger and more luminous hosts. These results suggest that high-velocity SNe Ia likely originate from relatively younger and more metal-rich progenitors than do normal-velocity SNe Ia and are restricted to galaxies with substantial chemical evolution. PMID:23470733

  8. SF3B1 mutation identifies a distinct subset of myelodysplastic syndrome with ring sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Malcovati, Luca; Karimi, Mohsen; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Jädersten, Martin; Jansson, Monika; Elena, Chiara; Gallì, Anna; Walldin, Gunilla; Della Porta, Matteo G; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas; Travaglino, Erica; Kallenbach, Klaus; Pietra, Daniela; Ljungström, Viktor; Conte, Simona; Boveri, Emanuela; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Rosenquist, Richard; Campbell, Peter J; Cazzola, Mario; Hellström Lindberg, Eva

    2015-07-01

    Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) characterized by isolated erythroid dysplasia and 15% or more bone marrow ring sideroblasts. Ring sideroblasts are found also in other MDS subtypes, such as refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts (RCMD-RS). A high prevalence of somatic mutations of SF3B1 was reported in these conditions. To identify mutation patterns that affect disease phenotype and clinical outcome, we performed a comprehensive mutation analysis in 293 patients with myeloid neoplasm and 1% or more ring sideroblasts. SF3B1 mutations were detected in 129 of 159 cases (81%) of RARS or RCMD-RS. Among other patients with ring sideroblasts, lower prevalence of SF3B1 mutations and higher prevalence of mutations in other splicing factor genes were observed (P < .001). In multivariable analyses, patients with SF3B1 mutations showed significantly better overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], .37; P = .003) and lower cumulative incidence of disease progression (HR = 0.31; P = .018) compared with SF3B1-unmutated cases. The independent prognostic value of SF3B1 mutation was retained in MDS without excess blasts, as well as in sideroblastic categories (RARS and RCMD-RS). Among SF3B1-mutated patients, coexisting mutations in DNA methylation genes were associated with multilineage dysplasia (P = .015) but had no effect on clinical outcome. TP53 mutations were frequently detected in patients without SF3B1 mutation, and were associated with poor outcome. Thus, SF3B1 mutation identifies a distinct MDS subtype that is unlikely to develop detrimental subclonal mutations and is characterized by indolent clinical course and favorable outcome. PMID:25957392

  9. Automated retinal fovea type distinction in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of retinal vein occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Langs, Georg; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high- resolution, three-dimensional (3D) cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment will require a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using multiple scanners, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, cross-vendor imaging and patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis or treatment analysis. The retinal fovea is the location of the highest visual acuity and is present in all patients, thus it is critical to vision and highly suitable for use as a primary landmark for cross-vendor/cross-patient registration for precise comparison of disease states. However, the location of the fovea in diseased eyes is extremely challenging to locate due to varying appearance and the presence of retinal layer destroying pathology. Thus categorising and detecting the fovea type is an important prior stage to automatically computing the fovea position. Presented here is an automated cross-vendor method for fovea distinction in 3D SD-OCT scans of patients suffering from RVO, categorising scans into three distinct types. OCT scans are preprocessed by motion correction and noise filing followed by segmentation using a kernel graph-cut approach. A statistically derived mask is applied to the resulting scan creating an ROI around the probable fovea location from which the uppermost retinal surface is delineated. For a normal appearance retina, minimisation to zero thickness is computed using the top two retinal surfaces. 3D local minima detection and layer thickness analysis are used to differentiate between the remaining two fovea types. Validation employs ground truth fovea types identified by clinical experts at the Vienna Reading Center (VRC). The results presented here are intended to show the feasibility of this method for the accurate and reproducible distinction of retinal fovea types from multiple vendor 3D SD-OCT scans of patients suffering from RVO, and for use in fovea position detection systems as a landmark for intra- and cross-vendor 3D OCT registration.

  10. Identified motor terminals in Drosophila larvae show distinct differences in morphology and physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lnenicka, G. A.; Keshishian, H.

    2000-01-01

    In Drosophila, the type I motor terminals innervating the larval ventral longitudinal muscle fibers 6 and 7 have been the most popular preparation for combining synaptic studies with genetics. We have further characterized the normal morphological and physiological properties of these motor terminals and the influence of muscle size on terminal morphology. Using dye-injection and physiological techniques, we show that the two axons supplying these terminals have different innervation patterns: axon 1 innervates only muscle fibers 6 and 7, whereas axon 2 innervates all of the ventral longitudinal muscle fibers. This difference in innervation pattern allows the two axons to be reliably identified. The terminals formed by axons 1 and 2 on muscle fibers 6 and 7 have the same number of branches; however, axon 2 terminals are approximately 30% longer than axon 1 terminals, resulting in a corresponding greater number of boutons for axon 2. The axon 1 boutons are approximately 30% wider than the axon 2 boutons. The excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) produced by axon 1 is generally smaller than that produced by axon 2, although the size distributions show considerable overlap. Consistent with vertebrate studies, there is a correlation between muscle fiber size and terminal size. For a single axon, terminal area and length, the number of terminal branches, and the number of boutons are all correlated with muscle fiber size, but bouton size is not. During prolonged repetitive stimulation, axon 2 motor terminals show synaptic depression, whereas axon 1 EPSPs facilitate. The response to repetitive stimulation appears to be similar at all motor terminals of an axon. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Two distinct CCR5 domains can mediate coreceptor usage by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Doranz, B J; Lu, Z H; Rucker, J; Zhang, T Y; Sharron, M; Cen, Y H; Wang, Z X; Guo, H H; Du, J G; Accavitti, M A; Doms, R W; Peiper, S C

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major fusion coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To define the structures of CCR5 that can support envelope (Env)-mediated membrane fusion, we analyzed the activity of homologs, chimeras, and mutants of human CCR5 in a sensitive gene reporter cell-cell fusion assay. Simian, but not murine, homologs of CCR5 were fully active as HIV-1 fusion coreceptors. Chimeras between CCR5 and divergent chemokine receptors demonstrated the existence of two distinct regions of CCR5 that could be utilized for Env-mediated fusion, the amino-terminal domain and the extracellular loops. Dual-tropic Env proteins were particularly sensitive to alterations in the CCR5 amino-terminal domain, suggesting that this domain may play a pivotal role in the evolution of coreceptor usage in vivo. We identified individual residues in both functional regions, Asp-11, Lys-197, and Asp-276, that contribute to coreceptor function. Deletion of a highly conserved cytoplasmic motif rendered CCR5 incapable of signaling but did not abrogate its ability to function as a coreceptor, implying the independence of fusion and G-protein-mediated chemokine receptor signaling. Finally, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody to CCR5 to assist in future studies of CCR5 expression. PMID:9261347

  12. A Bacterial Pathogen uses Distinct Type III Secretion Systems to Alternate between Host Kingdom

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of eukaryotes often secrete proteins directly into host cells via a needle-like protein channel called a ‘type III secretion system’ (T3SS). Bacteria that are adapted to either animal or plant hosts use phylogenetically distinct T3SSs for secreting proteins. Here, ...

  13. Plastidic phosphatidic acid phosphatases identified in a distinct subfamily of lipid phosphate phosphatases with prokaryotic origin.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Tsuchiya, Mami; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2007-09-28

    Plastidic phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) dephosphorylates phosphatidic acid to yield diacylglycerol, which is a precursor for galactolipids, a primary and indispensable component of photosynthetic membranes. Despite its functional importance, the molecular characteristics and phylogenetic origin of plastidic PAP were unknown because no potential homologs have been found. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of plastidic PAPs in Arabidopsis that belong to a distinct lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP) subfamily with prokaryotic origin. Because no homolog of mammalian LPP was found in cyanobacteria, we sought an LPP ortholog in a more primitive organism, Chlorobium tepidum, and its homologs in cyanobacteria. Arabidopsis had five homologs of cyanobacterial LPP, three of which (LPP gamma, LPP epsilon 1, and LPP epsilon 2) localized to chloroplasts. Complementation of yeast Delta dpp1 Delta lpp1 Delta pah1 by plastidic LPPs rescued the relevant phenotype in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that they function as PAPs. Of the three LPPs, LPP gamma activity best resembled the native activity. The three plastidic LPPs were differentially expressed both in green and nongreen tissues, with LPP gamma expressed the highest in shoots. A knock-out mutant for LPP gamma could not be obtained, although a lpp epsilon 1 lpp epsilon 2 double knock-out showed no significant changes in lipid composition. However, lpp gamma homozygous mutant was isolated only under ectopic overexpression of LPP gamma, suggesting that loss of LPP gamma may cause lethal effect on plant viability. Thus, in Arabidopsis, there are three isoforms of plastidic PAP that belong to a distinct subfamily of LPP, and LPP gamma may be the primary plastidic PAP. PMID:17652095

  14. Ube3a reinstatement identifies distinct developmental windows in a murine Angelman syndrome model

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Santos, Sara; van Woerden, Geeske M.; Bruinsma, Caroline F.; Mientjes, Edwin; Jolfaei, Mehrnoush Aghadavoud; Distel, Ben; Kushner, Steven A.; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that results from loss of function of the maternal ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) allele. Due to neuron-specific imprinting, the paternal UBE3A copy is silenced. Previous studies in murine models have demonstrated that strategies to activate the paternal Ube3a allele are feasible; however, a recent study showed that pharmacological Ube3a gene reactivation in adulthood failed to rescue the majority of neurocognitive phenotypes in a murine AS model. Here, we performed a systematic study to investigate the possibility that neurocognitive rescue can be achieved by reinstating Ube3a during earlier neurodevelopmental windows. We developed an AS model that allows for temporally controlled Cre-dependent induction of the maternal Ube3a allele and determined that there are distinct neurodevelopmental windows during which Ube3a restoration can rescue AS-relevant phenotypes. Motor deficits were rescued by Ube3a reinstatement in adolescent mice, whereas anxiety, repetitive behavior, and epilepsy were only rescued when Ube3a was reinstated during early development. In contrast, hippocampal synaptic plasticity could be restored at any age. Together, these findings suggest that Ube3a reinstatement early in development may be necessary to prevent or rescue most AS-associated phenotypes and should be considered in future clinical trial design. PMID:25866966

  15. Ube3a reinstatement identifies distinct developmental windows in a murine Angelman syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Silva-Santos, Sara; van Woerden, Geeske M; Bruinsma, Caroline F; Mientjes, Edwin; Jolfaei, Mehrnoush Aghadavoud; Distel, Ben; Kushner, Steven A; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-05-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that results from loss of function of the maternal ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) allele. Due to neuron-specific imprinting, the paternal UBE3A copy is silenced. Previous studies in murine models have demonstrated that strategies to activate the paternal Ube3a allele are feasible; however, a recent study showed that pharmacological Ube3a gene reactivation in adulthood failed to rescue the majority of neurocognitive phenotypes in a murine AS model. Here, we performed a systematic study to investigate the possibility that neurocognitive rescue can be achieved by reinstating Ube3a during earlier neurodevelopmental windows. We developed an AS model that allows for temporally controlled Cre-dependent induction of the maternal Ube3a allele and determined that there are distinct neurodevelopmental windows during which Ube3a restoration can rescue AS-relevant phenotypes. Motor deficits were rescued by Ube3a reinstatement in adolescent mice, whereas anxiety, repetitive behavior, and epilepsy were only rescued when Ube3a was reinstated during early development. In contrast, hippocampal synaptic plasticity could be restored at any age. Together, these findings suggest that Ube3a reinstatement early in development may be necessary to prevent or rescue most AS-associated phenotypes and should be considered in future clinical trial design. PMID:25866966

  16. Porcine Skin-Derived Progenitor (SKP) Spheres and Neurospheres: Distinct “Stemness” Identified by Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming-Tao; Whitworth, Kristin M.; Lin, Hui; Zhang, Xia; Isom, S. Clay; Dobbs, Kyle B.; Bauer, Bethany; Zhang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Skin-derived progenitors (SKP) are neural crest derived and can generate neural and mesodermal progeny in vitro, corresponding to the multipotency of neural crest stem cells. Likewise, neural stem/progenitor cells (displaying as neurospheres) have the capacity of self-renewing, and can produce most phenotypes in the nervous system. Both form spheres when cultured with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Although the “stemness” of neural stem/progenitor cells has been extensively investigated, the molecular comparison of SKP spheres and neurospheres has not been elucidated. Here, SKP spheres and neurospheres from the same individual porcine fetuses were isolated with the same culture medium, and the multipotency was tested by in vitro differentiation assays. Microarray analysis was used to illustrate the “stemness” of SKP spheres and neurospheres. The upregulated genes that were in common in the SKP spheres and neurospheres are involved in ribosome, tight junction, gap junction, cell communication, calcium signaling, ErbB signaling, JAK–STAT signaling, MAPK signaling, etc. The differentially expressed genes between SKP spheres and neurospheres are mainly involved in ECM–receptor interaction and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-?) signaling pathway. Finally, treatment with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) or MEK inhibitor results in a distinctive impact on the “stemness” and differentiation genes of SKP spheres and neurospheres. Thus, the cell-intrinsic genetic program may contribute to the innate “stemness” of SKP spheres and neurospheres in a similar local microenvironment. PMID:20694160

  17. Identifying the distinct phases of THz waves from K-valley electrons in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Irfan, Muhammad; Yim, Jong-Hyuk Jho, Young-Dahl; Kim, Changyoung

    2013-12-04

    The polarity change of THz electromagnetic waves radiated from single-crystalline graphite and polycrystalline graphite films has been studied to identify the main generation mechanism in conventional reflective THz time-domain spectroscopy scheme. The excitation wavelength variation around the K-valley produces no significant changes in THz field strength. We further found that THz waves become fully dispersed without polarity change in lateral detection geometry.

  18. In Silico Molecular Comparisons of C. elegans and Mammalian Pharmacology Identify Distinct Targets That Regulate Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, George A.; Keiser, Michael J.; Sassano, Maria F.; Laggner, Christian; Mayer, Fahima; Bainton, Roland J.; Werb, Zena; Roth, Bryan L.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Ashrafi, Kaveh

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic screens can identify molecules that are at once penetrant and active on the integrated circuitry of a whole cell or organism. These advantages are offset by the need to identify the targets underlying the phenotypes. Additionally, logistical considerations limit screening for certain physiological and behavioral phenotypes to organisms such as zebrafish and C. elegans. This further raises the challenge of elucidating whether compound-target relationships found in model organisms are preserved in humans. To address these challenges we searched for compounds that affect feeding behavior in C. elegans and sought to identify their molecular mechanisms of action. Here, we applied predictive chemoinformatics to small molecules previously identified in a C. elegans phenotypic screen likely to be enriched for feeding regulatory compounds. Based on the predictions, 16 of these compounds were tested in vitro against 20 mammalian targets. Of these, nine were active, with affinities ranging from 9 nM to 10 µM. Four of these nine compounds were found to alter feeding. We then verified the in vitro findings in vivo through genetic knockdowns, the use of previously characterized compounds with high affinity for the four targets, and chemical genetic epistasis, which is the effect of combined chemical and genetic perturbations on a phenotype relative to that of each perturbation in isolation. Our findings reveal four previously unrecognized pathways that regulate feeding in C. elegans with strong parallels in mammals. Together, our study addresses three inherent challenges in phenotypic screening: the identification of the molecular targets from a phenotypic screen, the confirmation of the in vivo relevance of these targets, and the evolutionary conservation and relevance of these targets to their human orthologs. PMID:24260022

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of Helicobacter pylori from Malaysia identifies three distinct lineages suggestive of differential evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narender; Mariappan, Vanitha; Baddam, Ramani; Lankapalli, Aditya K.; Shaik, Sabiha; Goh, Khean-Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Perkins, Tim; Benghezal, Mohammed; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Marshall, Barry J.; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2015-01-01

    The discordant prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and its related diseases, for a long time, fostered certain enigmatic situations observed in the countries of the southern world. Variation in H. pylori infection rates and disease outcomes among different populations in multi-ethnic Malaysia provides a unique opportunity to understand dynamics of host–pathogen interaction and genome evolution. In this study, we extensively analyzed and compared genomes of 27 Malaysian H. pylori isolates and identified three major phylogeographic lineages: hspEastAsia, hpEurope and hpSouthIndia. The analysis of the virulence genes within the core genome, however, revealed a comparable pathogenic potential of the strains. In addition, we identified four genes limited to strains of East-Asian lineage. Our analyses identified a few strain-specific genes encoding restriction modification systems and outlined 311 core genes possibly under differential evolutionary constraints, among the strains representing different ethnic groups. The cagA and vacA genes also showed variations in accordance with the host genetic background of the strains. Moreover, restriction modification genes were found to be significantly enriched in East-Asian strains. An understanding of these variations in the genome content would provide significant insights into various adaptive and host modulation strategies harnessed by H. pylori to effectively persist in a host-specific manner. PMID:25452339

  20. Topography of Distinct Staphylococcus aureus Types in Chronic Wounds of Patients with Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    van der Kooi-Pol, Magdalena M.; Sadaghian Sadabad, Mehdi; Duipmans, José C.; Sabat, Artur J.; Stobernack, Tim; Omansen, Till F.; Westerhout-Pluister, Gerlinde N.; Jonkman, Marcel F.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is known to interfere with wound healing and represents a significant risk factor for wound infections and invasive disease. It is generally assumed that one individual is predominantly colonized by one S. aureus type. Nevertheless, patients with the genetic blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa (EB) often carry multiple S. aureus types. We therefore investigated whether different S. aureus types are present in individual wounds of EB patients and, if so, how they are spatially distributed. The staphylococcal topography in chronic wounds was mapped by replica-plating of used bandages and subsequent typing of S. aureus isolates. Individual chronic wounds of five patients contained up to six different S. aureus types. Unexpectedly, distinct S. aureus types formed micro-colonies that were located in close proximity and sometimes even overlapped. While some adjacent S. aureus isolates were closely related, others belonged to distinct molecular complexes. We conclude that the general assumption that one individual is predominantly colonized by one type of S. aureus does not apply to chronic wounds of EB patients. We consider this observation important, not only for EB patients, but also for other patients with chronic wounds in view of the potential risk for severe staphylococcal infections. PMID:23825650

  1. Processing of different types of social threat in shyness: Preliminary findings of distinct functional neural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Alva; Beaton, Elliott A; Tatham, Erica; Schulkin, Jay; Hall, Geoffrey B; Schmidt, Louis A

    2016-02-01

    Current theory suggests that the processing of different types of threat is supported by distinct neural networks. Here we tested whether there are distinct neural correlates associated with different types of threat processing in shyness. Using fMRI and multivariate techniques, we compared neural responses and functional connectivity during the processing of imminent (i.e., congruent angry/angry face pairs) and ambiguous (i.e., incongruent angry/neutral face pairs) social threat in young adults selected for high and low shyness. To both types of threat processing, non-shy adults recruited a right medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) network encompassing nodes of the default mode network involved in automatic emotion regulation, whereas shy adults recruited a right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) network encompassing nodes of the frontoparietal network that instantiate active attentional and cognitive control. Furthermore, in shy adults, the mPFC interacted with the dACC network for ambiguous threat, but with a distinct network encompassing nodes of the salience network for imminent threat. These preliminary results expand our understanding of right mPFC function associated with temperamental shyness. They also provide initial evidence for differential neural networks associated with shy and non-shy profiles in the context of different types of social threat processing. PMID:25855888

  2. Array CGH analysis identifies two distinct subgroups of primary angiosarcoma of bone.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Sofie L J; de Jong, Danielle; Bertoni, Franco; Sciot, Raf; Antonescu, Cristina R; Szuhai, Karoly; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2015-02-01

    Molecular genetic studies on vascular tumors are rare. Recently, possible involvement of MYC and KDR has been documented in a subset of angiosarcomas of soft tissue. We performed a cytogenetic analysis of primary angiosarcomas of bone (n?=?13) and soft tissue (n?=?5) using high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). Regions of interest were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Antibodies for candidate genes (SKI, MYC, KDR, and MAPK9) were selected and immunohistochemistry was performed. Six angiosarcomas of bone and four angiosarcomas of soft tissue showed chromosomal losses, gains, and high level amplifications. Cluster analysis identified two groups: a group with a complex genetic profile and a group with only few genetic aberrations. Five regions of interest were selected, which were located at chromosome bands 1p36.23, 2q32-34, 5q35, 8q24, and 17q21.32-24.2. Interphase FISH confirmed the high-level amplifications. Immunohistochemical analysis showed high expression of MYC (16/60), MAPK9 (63/69), and SKI (52/62). There were no differences between the two groups with regards to location, immunohistochemical expression nor survival. In summary, we identified two subgroups of angiosarcoma: those with few or no gross aberrations and those which show numerous genetic aberrations consisting of chromosomal losses, gains and high level amplifications or complex aberrations. The most common finding was amplification of 2q and 17q in both angiosarcoma of bone and soft tissue, suggesting overlap in tumorigenesis irrespective of their location. We show MYC amplification in primary angiosarcoma indicating this is not entirely specific for radiation-induced angiosarcoma. PMID:25231439

  3. Identifying Essential Cell Types and Circuits in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Susan E.; Rieger, Michael A.; Dougherty, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is highly genetic in its etiology, with potentially hundreds of genes contributing to risk. Despite this heterogeneity, these disparate genetic lesions may result in the disruption of a limited number of key cell types or circuits –information which could be leveraged for the design of therapeutic interventions. While hypotheses for cellular disruptions can be identified by postmortem anatomical analysis and expression studies of ASD risk genes, testing these hypotheses requires the use of animal models. In this review, we explore the existing evidence supporting the contribution of different cell types to ASD, specifically focusing on rodent studies disrupting serotonergic, GABAergic, cerebellar and striatal cell types, with particular attention to studies of the sufficiency of specific cellular disruptions to generate ASD-related behavioral abnormalities. This evidence suggests multiple cellular routes can create features of the disorder, though it is currently unclear if these cell types converge on a final common circuit. We hope that in the future, systematic studies of cellular sufficiency and genetic interaction will help to classify patients into groups by type of cellular disruptions which suggest tractable therapeutic targets. PMID:24290383

  4. ON IDENTIFYING THE PROGENITORS OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Livio, Mario; Pringle, J. E.

    2011-10-10

    We propose two new means of identifying the main class of progenitors of Type Ia supernovae-single or double degenerate: (1) if the range of supernova properties is significantly determined by the range of viewing angles of non-spherically symmetric explosions, then the nature of the correlation between polarization and another property (for example, the velocity gradient) can be used to determine the geometry of the asymmetry and hence the nature of the progenitor, and (2) in the double- but not in the single-degenerate case, the range in the observed properties (e.g., velocity gradients) is likely to increase with the amount of carbon seen in the ejecta.

  5. Identifying patients at risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Savill, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At present there are nearly 3 million people with diabetes in the UK. It is predicted that this number will almost double by 2025. Nine out of ten of these individuals will have type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that one in seven adults have impaired glucose regulation and up to 12% of these will develop type 2 diabetes each year. The impact of obesity on the development of type 2 diabetes cannot be overemphasised, with a 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI raising the risk of impaired fasting glycaemia by 9.5% and of developing new-onset type 2 diabetes by 8.4%. A 1 cm increase in waist circumference increases the risks by 3.2% and 3.5% respectively. NICE advises using a validated risk assessment tool to identify patients at risk of diabetes. Risk factors used by such tools include: age; ethnicity; weight; first-degree relative with type 2 diabetes; low birthweight and sedentary lifestyle. Certain comorbidities increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, these include: cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease; polycystic ovary syndrome; a history of gestational diabetes; and mental health problems. The initial screening blood test could be a fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or an oral glucose tolerance test, according to WHO criteria. NICE recommends that high-risk patients should be offered a programme encouraging them to undertake a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week, gradually lose weight to reach and maintain a BMI within the healthy range, increase consumption of whole grains, vegetables, and other foods that are high in dietary fibre, reduce the total amount of fat in their diet and eat less saturated fat. PMID:22988703

  6. Anti-MDA5 autoantibodies in juvenile dermatomyositis identify a distinct clinical phenotype: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to define the frequency and associated clinical phenotype of anti-MDA5 autoantibodies in a large UK based, predominantly Caucasian, cohort of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Methods Serum samples and clinical data were obtained from 285 patients with JDM recruited to the UK Juvenile Dermatomyositis Cohort and Biomarker Study. The presence of anti-MDA5 antibodies was determined by immunoprecipitation and confirmed by ELISA using recombinant MDA5 protein. Results were compared with matched clinical data, muscle biopsies (scored by an experienced paediatric neuropathologist) and chest imaging (reviewed by an experienced paediatric radiologist). Results Anti-MDA5 antibodies were identified in 7.4% of JDM patients and were associated with a distinct clinical phenotype including skin ulceration (P?=?0.03) oral ulceration (P?=?0.01), arthritis (P <0.01) and milder muscle disease both clinically (as determined by Childhood Myositis Assessment Score (P?=?0.03)) and histologically (as determined by a lower JDM muscle biopsy score (P <0.01)) than patients who did not have anti-MDA5 antibodies. A greater proportion of children with anti-MDA5 autoantibodies achieved disease inactivity at two years post-diagnosis according to PRINTO criteria (P?=?0.02). A total of 4 out of 21 children with anti-MDA5 had interstitial lung disease; none had rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. Conclusions Anti-MDA5 antibodies can be identified in a small but significant proportion of patients with JDM and identify a distinctive clinical sub-group. Screening for anti-MDA5 autoantibodies at diagnosis would be useful to guide further investigation for lung disease, inform on prognosis and potentially confirm the diagnosis, as subtle biopsy changes could otherwise be missed. PMID:24989778

  7. Improvement of the Owner Distinction Method for Healing-Type Pet Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambo, Hidetaka; Kimura, Haruhiko; Hara, Mirai; Abe, Koji; Tajima, Takuya

    In order to decrease human stress, Animal Assisted Therapy which applies pets to heal humans is attracted. However, since animals are insanitary and unsafe, it is difficult to practically apply animal pets in hospitals. For the reason, on behalf of animal pets, pet robots have been attracted. Since pet robots would have no problems in sanitation and safety, they are able to be applied as a substitute for animal pets in the therapy. In our previous study where pet robots distinguish their owners like an animal pet, we used a puppet type pet robot which has pressure type touch sensors. However, the accuracy of our method was not sufficient to practical use. In this paper, we propose a method to improve the accuracy of the distinction. The proposed method can be applied for capacitive touch sensors such as installed in AIBO in addition to pressure type touch sensors. Besides, this paper shows performance of the proposed method from experimental results and confirms the proposed method has improved performance of the distinction in the conventional method.

  8. Complexity analyses show two distinct types of nonlinear dynamics in short heart period variability recordings.

    PubMed

    Porta, Alberto; Bari, Vlasta; Marchi, Andrea; De Maria, Beatrice; Cysarz, Dirk; Van Leeuwen, Peter; Takahashi, Anielle C M; Catai, Aparecida M; Gnecchi-Ruscone, Tomaso

    2015-01-01

    Two diverse complexity metrics quantifying time irreversibility and local prediction, in connection with a surrogate data approach, were utilized to detect nonlinear dynamics in short heart period (HP) variability series recorded in fetuses, as a function of the gestational period, and in healthy humans, as a function of the magnitude of the orthostatic challenge. The metrics indicated the presence of two distinct types of nonlinear HP dynamics characterized by diverse ranges of time scales. These findings stress the need to render more specific the analysis of nonlinear components of HP dynamics by accounting for different temporal scales. PMID:25806002

  9. Complexity analyses show two distinct types of nonlinear dynamics in short heart period variability recordings

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Alberto; Bari, Vlasta; Marchi, Andrea; De Maria, Beatrice; Cysarz, Dirk; Van Leeuwen, Peter; Takahashi, Anielle C. M.; Catai, Aparecida M.; Gnecchi-Ruscone, Tomaso

    2015-01-01

    Two diverse complexity metrics quantifying time irreversibility and local prediction, in connection with a surrogate data approach, were utilized to detect nonlinear dynamics in short heart period (HP) variability series recorded in fetuses, as a function of the gestational period, and in healthy humans, as a function of the magnitude of the orthostatic challenge. The metrics indicated the presence of two distinct types of nonlinear HP dynamics characterized by diverse ranges of time scales. These findings stress the need to render more specific the analysis of nonlinear components of HP dynamics by accounting for different temporal scales. PMID:25806002

  10. A formal method for identifying distinct states of variability in time-varying sources: SGR A* as an example

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.; Witzel, G.; Ghez, A. M.; Longstaff, F. A.

    2014-08-10

    Continuously time variable sources are often characterized by their power spectral density and flux distribution. These quantities can undergo dramatic changes over time if the underlying physical processes change. However, some changes can be subtle and not distinguishable using standard statistical approaches. Here, we report a methodology that aims to identify distinct but similar states of time variability. We apply this method to the Galactic supermassive black hole, where 2.2 ?m flux is observed from a source associated with Sgr A* and where two distinct states have recently been suggested. Our approach is taken from mathematical finance and works with conditional flux density distributions that depend on the previous flux value. The discrete, unobserved (hidden) state variable is modeled as a stochastic process and the transition probabilities are inferred from the flux density time series. Using the most comprehensive data set to date, in which all Keck and a majority of the publicly available Very Large Telescope data have been merged, we show that Sgr A* is sufficiently described by a single intrinsic state. However, the observed flux densities exhibit two states: noise dominated and source dominated. Our methodology reported here will prove extremely useful to assess the effects of the putative gas cloud G2 that is on its way toward the black hole and might create a new state of variability.

  11. GATA-3 expression identifies a high-risk subset of PTCL, NOS with distinct molecular and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianjiao; Feldman, Andrew L.; Wada, David A.; Lu, Ye; Polk, Avery; Briski, Robert; Ristow, Kay; Habermann, Thomas M.; Thomas, Dafydd; Ziesmer, Steven C.; Wellik, Linda E.; Lanigan, Thomas M.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Bailey, Nathanael G.; Hristov, Alexandra C.; Lim, Megan S.; Ansell, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The cell of origin and the tumor microenvironment’s role remain elusive for the most common peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). As macrophages promote the growth and survival of malignant T cells and are abundant constituents of the tumor microenvironment, their functional polarization was examined in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Cytokines that are abundant within the tumor microenvironment, particularly interleukin (IL)-10, were observed to promote alternative macrophage polarization. Macrophage polarization was signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 dependent and was impaired by the Janus kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib. In conventional T cells, the production of T helper (Th)2-associated cytokines and IL-10, both of which promote alternative macrophage polarization, is regulated by the T-cell transcription factor GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3). Therefore, its role in the T-cell lymphomas was examined. GATA-3 expression was observed in 45% of PTCLs, not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS) and was associated with distinct molecular features, including the production of Th2-associated cytokines. In addition, GATA-3 expression identified a subset of PTCL, NOS with distinct clinical features, including inferior progression-free and overall survival. Collectively, these data suggest that further understanding the cell of origin and lymphocyte ontogeny among the T-cell lymphomas may improve our understanding of the tumor microenvironment’s pathogenic role in these aggressive lymphomas. PMID:24497534

  12. GATA-3 expression identifies a high-risk subset of PTCL, NOS with distinct molecular and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjiao; Feldman, Andrew L; Wada, David A; Lu, Ye; Polk, Avery; Briski, Robert; Ristow, Kay; Habermann, Thomas M; Thomas, Dafydd; Ziesmer, Steven C; Wellik, Linda E; Lanigan, Thomas M; Witzig, Thomas E; Pittelkow, Mark R; Bailey, Nathanael G; Hristov, Alexandra C; Lim, Megan S; Ansell, Stephen M; Wilcox, Ryan A

    2014-05-01

    The cell of origin and the tumor microenvironment's role remain elusive for the most common peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). As macrophages promote the growth and survival of malignant T cells and are abundant constituents of the tumor microenvironment, their functional polarization was examined in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Cytokines that are abundant within the tumor microenvironment, particularly interleukin (IL)-10, were observed to promote alternative macrophage polarization. Macrophage polarization was signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 dependent and was impaired by the Janus kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib. In conventional T cells, the production of T helper (Th)2-associated cytokines and IL-10, both of which promote alternative macrophage polarization, is regulated by the T-cell transcription factor GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3). Therefore, its role in the T-cell lymphomas was examined. GATA-3 expression was observed in 45% of PTCLs, not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS) and was associated with distinct molecular features, including the production of Th2-associated cytokines. In addition, GATA-3 expression identified a subset of PTCL, NOS with distinct clinical features, including inferior progression-free and overall survival. Collectively, these data suggest that further understanding the cell of origin and lymphocyte ontogeny among the T-cell lymphomas may improve our understanding of the tumor microenvironment's pathogenic role in these aggressive lymphomas. PMID:24497534

  13. Rectal cancer profiling identifies distinct subtypes in India based on age at onset, genetic, epigenetic and clinicopathological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Ruhina Shirin; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Talukdar, Fazlur Rahman

    2015-12-01

    Rectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that develops through multiple pathways characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. India has a comparatively higher proportion of rectal cancers and early-onset cases. We analyzed genetic (KRAS, TP53 and BRAF mutations, and MSI), epigenetic alterations (CpG island methylation detection of 10 tumor-related genes/loci), the associated clinicopathological features and survival trend in 80 primary rectal cancer patients from India. MSI was detected using BAT 25 and BAT 26 mononucleotide markers and mutation of KRAS, TP53, and BRAF V600E was detected by direct sequencing. Methyl specific polymerase chain reaction was used to determine promoter methylation status of the classic CIMP panel markers (P16, hMLH1, MINT1, MINT2, and MINT31) as well as other tumor specific genes (DAPK, RASSF1, BRCA1, and GSTP1). MSI and BRAF mutations were uncommon but high frequencies of overall KRAS mutations (67.5%); low KRAS codon 12 and a novel KRAS G15S mutation with concomitant RASSF1 methylation in early onset cases were remarkable. Hierarchical clustering as well as principal component analysis identified three distinct subgroups of patients having discrete age at onset, clinicopathological, molecular and survival characteristics: (i) a KRAS associated CIMP-high subgroup; (ii) a significantly younger MSS, CIMP low, TP53 mutant group having differential KRAS mutation patterns, and (iii) a CIMP-negative, TP53 mutated group. The early onset subgroup exhibited the most unfavorable disease characteristics with advanced stage, poorly differentiated tumors and had the poorest survival compared to the other subgroups. Genetic and epigenetic profiling of rectal cancer patients identified distinct subtypes in Indian population. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25418895

  14. Distinct electrophysiological properties in subtypes of nonspiking olfactory local interneurons correlate with their cell type-specific Ca2+ current profiles.

    PubMed

    Husch, Andreas; Paehler, Moritz; Fusca, Debora; Paeger, Lars; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2009-11-01

    A diverse population of local interneurons (LNs) helps to process, structure, and spatially represent olfactory information in the insect antennal lobe. In Periplaneta americana, we identified two subtypes of nonspiking local interneurons (type II LNs) by their distinct morphological and intrinsic electrophysiological properties. As an important step toward a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms that mediate odor information processing, we present a detailed analysis of their distinct voltage-activated Ca(2+) currents, which clearly correlated with their distinct intrinsic electrophysiological properties. Both type II LNs did not posses voltage-activated Na(+) currents and apparently innervated all glomeruli including the macroglomerulus. Type IIa LNs had significant longer and thicker low-order neurites and innervated each glomerulus entirely and homogeneously, whereas type IIb LNs innervated only parts of each glomerulus. All type II LNs were broadly tuned and responded to odorants of many chemical classes with graded changes in the membrane potential. Type IIa LNs responded with odor-specific elaborate patterns of excitation that could also include "spikelets" riding on the depolarizations and periods of inhibition. In contrast, type IIb LNs responded mostly with sustained, relatively smooth depolarizations. Consistent with the strong active membrane properties of type IIa LNs versus type IIb LNs, the voltage-activated Ca(2+) current of type IIa LNs activated at more hyperpolarized membrane potentials and had a larger transient component. PMID:19759323

  15. Distinct Pseudomonas type-III effectors use a cleavable transit peptide to target chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangyong; Froehlich, John E; Elowsky, Christian; Msanne, Joseph; Ostosh, Andrew C; Zhang, Chi; Awada, Tala; Alfano, James R

    2014-01-01

    The pathogen Pseudomonas syringae requires a type-III protein secretion system and the effector proteins it injects into plant cells for pathogenesis. The primary role for P. syringae type-III effectors is the suppression of plant immunity. The P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopK1 type-III effector was known to suppress the hypersensitive response (HR), a programmed cell death response associated with effector-triggered immunity. Here we show that DC3000 hopK1 mutants are reduced in their ability to grow in Arabidopsis, and produce reduced disease symptoms. Arabidopsis transgenically expressing HopK1 are reduced in PAMP-triggered immune responses compared with wild-type plants. An N-terminal region of HopK1 shares similarity with the corresponding region in the well-studied type-III effector AvrRps4; however, their C-terminal regions are dissimilar, indicating that they have different effector activities. HopK1 is processed in planta at the same processing site found in AvrRps4. The processed forms of HopK1 and AvrRps4 are chloroplast localized, indicating that the shared N-terminal regions of these type-III effectors represent a chloroplast transit peptide. The HopK1 contribution to virulence and the ability of HopK1 and AvrRps4 to suppress immunity required their respective transit peptides, but the AvrRps4-induced HR did not. Our results suggest that a primary virulence target of these type-III effectors resides in chloroplasts, and that the recognition of AvrRps4 by the plant immune system occurs elsewhere. Moreover, our results reveal that distinct type-III effectors use a cleavable transit peptide to localize to chloroplasts, and that targets within this organelle are important for immunity. PMID:24299018

  16. Identifying Fracture Types and Relative Ages Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Dilley, Lorie M.; Norman, David; Owens, Lara

    2008-06-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Understanding the life cycle of a fracture in a geothermal system is fundamental to the development of techniques for creating fractures. Recognizing the stage of a fracture, whether it is currently open and transmitting fluids; if it recently has closed; or if it is an ancient fracture would assist in targeting areas for further fracture stimulation. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will also assist in fracture stimulation selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures, and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. Our hypothesis is that fractures over their life cycle have different chemical signatures that we can see in fluid inclusion gas analysis and by using the new method of fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) the different stages of fractures, along with an estimate of fracture size can be identified during the well drilling process. We have shown with this study that it is possible to identify fracture locations using FIS and that different fractures have different chemical signatures however that signature is somewhat dependent upon rock type. Open, active fractures correlate with increase concentrations of CO2, N2, Ar, and to a lesser extent H2O. These fractures would be targets for further enhancement. The usefulness of this method is that it is low cost alternative to current well logging techniques and can be done as a well is being drilled.

  17. Perlecan Diversely Regulates the Migration and Proliferation of Distinct Cell Types in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Fumio; Fukunaga, Shigeharu

    2015-12-01

    Perlecan is a multifunctional component of the extracellular matrix. It shows different effects on distinct cell types, and therefore it is thought to show potential for therapies targeting multiple cell types. However, the full range of multifunctionality of perlecan remains to be elucidated. We cultured various cell types, which were derived from epithelial/endothelial, connective and muscle tissues, in the presence of either antiserum against perlecan or exogenous perlecan, and examined the effects of perlecan on cell migration and proliferation. Cell migration was determined using a scratch assay. Blocking of perlecan by anti-perlecan antiserum inhibited the migration of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, and exogenous perlecan added to the culture medium promoted the migration of these cell types. The migration of other cell types was inhibited or was not promoted by exogenous perlecan. Cell proliferation was measured using a water-soluble tetrazolium dye. When cells were cultured at low densities, perlecan blocking inhibited the proliferation of VECs, and exogenous perlecan promoted the proliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, the proliferation of fibroblasts, pre-adipocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells cultured at low densities was inhibited by exogenous perlecan. When cells were cultured at high densities, perlecan blocking promoted the proliferation of most cell types, with the exception of skeletal system-derived cells (chondrocytes and osteoblasts), which were inhibited by exogenous perlecan. Our results provide an overview of the multiple functions of perlecan in various cell types, and implicate a potential role of perlecan to inhibit undesirable activities, such as fibrosis, obesity and intimal hyperplasia. PMID:26562025

  18. Differential Progression of Structural and Functional Alterations in Distinct Retinal Ganglion Cell Types in a Mouse Model of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Della Santina, Luca; Inman, Denise M.; Lupien, Caroline B.; Horner, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation is a principal risk factor for glaucoma. Using a microbead injection technique to chronically raise IOP for 15 or 30 d in mice, we identified the early changes in visual response properties of different types of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and correlated these changes with neuronal morphology before cell death. Microbead-injected eyes showed reduced optokinetic tracking as well as cell death. In such eyes, multielectrode array recordings revealed that four RGC types show diverse alterations in their light responses upon IOP elevation. OFF-transient RGCs exhibited a more rapid decline in both structural and functional organizations compared with other RGCs. In contrast, although the light-evoked responses of OFF-sustained RGCs were perturbed, the dendritic arbor of this cell type remained intact. ON-transient and ON-sustained RGCs had normal functional receptive field sizes but their spontaneous and light-evoked firing rates were reduced. ON- and OFF-sustained RGCs lost excitatory synapses across an otherwise structurally normal dendritic arbor. Together, our observations indicate that there are changes in spontaneous activity and light-evoked responses in RGCs before detectable dendritic loss. However, when dendrites retract, we found corresponding changes in receptive field center size. Importantly, the effects of IOP elevation are not uniformly manifested in the structure and function of diverse RGC populations, nor are distinct RGC types perturbed within the same time-frame by such a challenge. PMID:24174678

  19. Subtypes of Batterers in Treatment: Empirical Support for a Distinction between Type I, Type II and Type III

    PubMed Central

    Graña, José Luis; Redondo, Natalia; Muñoz-Rivas, Marina J.; Cantos, Arthur L.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the existence of different types of batterers in a sample of 266 men who had been court referred for intimate partner violence. The data collected in the assessment that have been used to perform a hierarchical and a two-step cluster analysis fall into three areas: aggression towards the partner, general aggression and presence of psychopathology and personality traits, more specifically, alcohol use, borderline and antisocial personality traits, psychopathy traits, state anger and trait anger, anger expression and control, anger, hostility, and, finally, impulsivity. The results show a typology consisting of 3 types of batterers on the basis of violence level and psychopathology: low (65%), moderate (27.8%) and high (7.1%). This study provides empirical support for the development of batterer typologies. These typologies will help achieve early detection of different types of batterers, allowing us to tailor interventions on the basis of the needs of each of the types. PMID:25329828

  20. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identifies Variants Associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease That Have Distinct Effects on Metabolic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Cameron D.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Garcia, Melissa E.; Launer, Lenore J.; Nalls, Michael A.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Butler, Johannah L.; Tomas, Marta; Hoffmann, Udo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Massaro, Joseph M.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric E.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Feitosa, Mary F.; Harris, Tamara B.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of computed tomography (CT) measured hepatic steatosis, a non-invasive measure of NAFLD, in large population based samples. Using variance components methods, we show that CT hepatic steatosis is heritable (?26%–27%) in family-based Amish, Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies (n?=?880 to 3,070). By carrying out a fixed-effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results between CT hepatic steatosis and ?2.4 million imputed or genotyped SNPs in 7,176 individuals from the Old Order Amish, Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study (AGES), Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies, we identify variants associated at genome-wide significant levels (p<5×10?8) in or near PNPLA3, NCAN, and PPP1R3B. We genotype these and 42 other top CT hepatic steatosis-associated SNPs in 592 subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD from the NASH Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN). In comparisons with 1,405 healthy controls from the Myocardial Genetics Consortium (MIGen), we observe significant associations with histologic NAFLD at variants in or near NCAN, GCKR, LYPLAL1, and PNPLA3, but not PPP1R3B. Variants at these five loci exhibit distinct patterns of association with serum lipids, as well as glycemic and anthropometric traits. We identify common genetic variants influencing CT–assessed steatosis and risk of NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis associated variants are not uniformly associated with NASH/fibrosis or result in abnormalities in serum lipids or glycemic and anthropometric traits, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in the pathways influencing these traits. PMID:21423719

  1. Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) based sequence typing reveals phylogenetically distinct Ascaris population

    PubMed Central

    Das, Koushik; Chowdhury, Punam; Ganguly, Sandipan

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic differentiation among morphologically identical Ascaris species is a debatable scientific issue in the context of Ascariasis epidemiology. To explain the disease epidemiology and also the taxonomic position of different Ascaris species, genome information of infecting strains from endemic areas throughout the world is certainly crucial. Ascaris population from human has been genetically characterized based on the widely used genetic marker, internal transcribed spacer1 (ITS1). Along with previously reported and prevalent genotype G1, 8 new sequence variants of ITS1 have been identified. Genotype G1 was significantly present among female patients aged between 10 to 15 years. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis at target locus within our study population has identified an incomplete LD value with potential recombination events. A separate cluster of Indian isolates with high bootstrap value indicate their distinct phylogenetic position in comparison to the global Ascaris population. Genetic shuffling through recombination could be a possible reason for high population diversity and frequent emergence of new sequence variants, identified in present and other previous studies. This study explores the genetic organization of Indian Ascaris population for the first time which certainly includes some fundamental information on the molecular epidemiology of Ascariasis. PMID:26504510

  2. Mapping bundles of ecosystem services reveals distinct types of multifunctionality within a Swedish landscape.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Cibele; Meacham, Megan; Richter, Kristina; Norström, Albert V; Andersson, Erik; Norberg, Jon; Peterson, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystem services (ES) is a valuable concept to be used in the planning and management of social-ecological landscapes. However, the understanding of the determinant factors affecting the interaction between services in the form of synergies or trade-offs is still limited. We assessed the production of 16 ES across 62 municipalities in the Norrström drainage basin in Sweden. We combined GIS data with publically available information for quantifying and mapping the distribution of services. Additionally, we calculated the diversity of ES for each municipality and used correlations and k-means clustering analyses to assess the existence of ES bundles. We found five distinct types of bundles of ES spatially agglomerated in the landscape that could be explained by regional social and ecological gradients. Human-dominated landscapes were highly multifunctional in our study area and urban densely populated areas were hotspots of cultural services. PMID:25576284

  3. Two Types of Identified Ascending Interneurons With Distinct GABA Receptors in the Crayfish Terminal Abdominal Ganglion

    E-print Network

    Nagayama, Toshiki

    -aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its agonist muscimol sends an axon anteriorly through the opposite connective by the sensory stimula- axon projection, and receive excitatory inputs from the hairtion and GABA injection by the bath application of GABAA and GABAB antag- onists, although bath application of low-chloride saline

  4. Distinct circular single-stranded DNA viruses exist in different soil types.

    PubMed

    Reavy, Brian; Swanson, Maud M; Cock, Peter J A; Dawson, Lorna; Freitag, Thomas E; Singh, Brajesh K; Torrance, Lesley; Mushegian, Arcady R; Taliansky, Michael

    2015-06-15

    The potential dependence of virus populations on soil types was examined by electron microscopy, and the total abundance of virus particles in four soil types was similar to that previously observed in soil samples. The four soil types examined differed in the relative abundances of four morphological groups of viruses. Machair, a unique type of coastal soil in western Scotland and Ireland, differed from the others tested in having a higher proportion of tailed bacteriophages. The other soils examined contained predominantly spherical and thin filamentous virus particles, but the Machair soil had a more even distribution of the virus types. As the first step in looking at differences in populations in detail, virus sequences from Machair and brown earth (agricultural pasture) soils were examined by metagenomic sequencing after enriching for circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) virus genomes. Sequences from the family Microviridae (icosahedral viruses mainly infecting bacteria) of CRESS-DNA viruses were predominant in both soils. Phylogenetic analysis of Microviridae major coat protein sequences from the Machair viruses showed that they spanned most of the diversity of the subfamily Gokushovirinae, whose members mainly infect obligate intracellular parasites. The brown earth soil had a higher proportion of sequences that matched the morphologically similar family Circoviridae in BLAST searches. However, analysis of putative replicase proteins that were similar to those of viruses in the Circoviridae showed that they are a novel clade of Circoviridae-related CRESS-DNA viruses distinct from known Circoviridae genera. Different soils have substantially different taxonomic biodiversities even within ssDNA viruses, which may be driven by physicochemical factors. PMID:25841004

  5. Distinct Circular Single-Stranded DNA Viruses Exist in Different Soil Types

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Maud M.; Cock, Peter J. A.; Dawson, Lorna; Freitag, Thomas E.; Singh, Brajesh K.; Torrance, Lesley; Mushegian, Arcady R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential dependence of virus populations on soil types was examined by electron microscopy, and the total abundance of virus particles in four soil types was similar to that previously observed in soil samples. The four soil types examined differed in the relative abundances of four morphological groups of viruses. Machair, a unique type of coastal soil in western Scotland and Ireland, differed from the others tested in having a higher proportion of tailed bacteriophages. The other soils examined contained predominantly spherical and thin filamentous virus particles, but the Machair soil had a more even distribution of the virus types. As the first step in looking at differences in populations in detail, virus sequences from Machair and brown earth (agricultural pasture) soils were examined by metagenomic sequencing after enriching for circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) virus genomes. Sequences from the family Microviridae (icosahedral viruses mainly infecting bacteria) of CRESS-DNA viruses were predominant in both soils. Phylogenetic analysis of Microviridae major coat protein sequences from the Machair viruses showed that they spanned most of the diversity of the subfamily Gokushovirinae, whose members mainly infect obligate intracellular parasites. The brown earth soil had a higher proportion of sequences that matched the morphologically similar family Circoviridae in BLAST searches. However, analysis of putative replicase proteins that were similar to those of viruses in the Circoviridae showed that they are a novel clade of Circoviridae-related CRESS-DNA viruses distinct from known Circoviridae genera. Different soils have substantially different taxonomic biodiversities even within ssDNA viruses, which may be driven by physicochemical factors. PMID:25841004

  6. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed improved definition in the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting due to the increased absorption in the near-infrared wavelengths, while the 440nm wavelength provided better definition when black carbon mixed with dust. Utilization of this particle type scheme provides necessary information for remote sensing applications, which needs a priori knowledge of aerosol type to model the retrieved properties especially over semi-bright surfaces. In fact, this analysis reveals that the aerosol types occurred in mixtures with varying magnitudes of absorption and requires the use of more than one assumed aerosol mixture model. Furthermore, this technique will provide the aerosol transport model community a data set for validating aerosol type.

  7. Wild-Type NRas and KRas Perform Distinct Functions during Transformation?

    PubMed Central

    Fotiadou, Poppy P.; Takahashi, Chiaki; Rajabi, Hasan N.; Ewen, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    The ras proto-oncogenes, of which there are four isoforms, are molecular switches that function in signal transduction pathways to control cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. How the Ras isoforms orchestrate cellular processes that affect behavior is poorly understood. Further, why cells express two or more Ras isoforms is unknown. Here, using a genetically defined system, we show that the presence of both wild-type KRas and NRas isoforms is required for transformation because they perform distinct nonoverlapping functions: wild-type NRas regulates adhesion, and KRas coordinates motility. Remarkably, we find that Ras isoforms achieve functional specificity by engaging different signaling pathways to affect the same cellular processes, thereby coordinating cellular outcome. Although we find that signaling from both isoforms intersects in actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, our results suggest that KRas signals through Akt and Cdc42 while NRas signals through Raf and RhoA. Our analyses suggest a previously unappreciated convergence of different Ras isoforms on the dynamics of the processes involved in transformation. PMID:17636015

  8. Alternatively spliced type II procollagen mRNAs define distinct populations of cells during vertebral development: differential expression of the amino-propeptide

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Type II collagen is a major component of cartilage providing structural integrity to the tissue. Type II procollagen can be expressed in two forms by differential splicing of the primary gene transcript. The two mRNAs either include (type IIA) or exclude (type IIB) an exon (exon 2) encoding the major portion of the amino (NH2)-propeptide (Ryan, M. C., and L. J. Sandell. 1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265:10334-10339). The expression of the two procollagens was examined in order to establish a potential functional significance for the two type II procollagen mRNAs. First, to establish whether the two mRNAs are functional, we showed that both mRNAs can be translated and the proteins secreted into the extracellular environment. Both proteins were identified as type II procollagens. Secondly, to test the hypothesis that differential expression of type II procollagens may be a marker for a distinct population of cells, specific procollagen mRNAs were localized in tissue by in situ hybridization to oligonucleotides spanning the exon junctions. Embryonic vertebral column was chosen as a source of tissue undergoing rapid chondrogenesis, allowing the examination of a variety of cell types related to cartilage. In this issue, each procollagen mRNA had a distinct tissue distribution during chondrogenesis with type IIB expressed in chondrocytes and type IIA expressed in cells surrounding cartilage in prechondrocytes. The morphology of the cells expressing the two collagen types was distinct: the cells expressing type IIA are narrow, elongated, and "fibroblastic" in appearance while the cells expressing type IIB are large and round. The expression of type IIB appears to be correlated with abundant synthesis and accumulation of cartilagenous extracellular matrix. The expression of type IIB is spatially correlated with the high level expression of the cartilage proteoglycan, aggrecan, establishing type IIB procollagen and aggrecan as markers for the chondrocyte phenotype. Transcripts of type II collagen, primarily type IIA, are also expressed in embryonic spinal ganglion. While small amounts of type II collagen have been previously detected in noncartilagenous tissues, the detection of this new form of the collagen in relatively high abundance in embryonic nerve tissue is unique. Taken together, these findings imply a potential functional difference between type IIA and type IIB procollagens and indicate that the removal of exon 2 from the pre-mRNA, and consequently the NH2- propeptide from the collagen molecule, may be an important step in chondrogenesis. In addition, type II procollagen, specifically type IIA, may function in noncartilage tissues, particularly during development. PMID:1894696

  9. Signaling profiling at the single-cell level identifies a distinct signaling signature in murine hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Wang, Jinyong; Kong, Guangyao; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Jingfang; Liu, Yangang; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function is tightly regulated by cytokine signaling. Although phospho-flow cytometry allows us to study signaling in defined populations of cells, there has been tremendous hurdle to carry out this study in rare HSCs due to unrecoverable critical HSC markers, low HSC number, and poor cell recovery rate. Here, we overcame these difficulties and developed a “HSC phospho-flow” method to analyze cytokine signaling in murine HSCs at the single-cell level and compare HSC signaling profile to that of multipotent progenitors (MPPs), a cell type immediately downstream of HSCs, and commonly used Lin? cKit+ cells (LK cells, enriched for myeloid progenitors). We chose to study signaling evoked from three representative cytokines, stem cell factor (SCF) and thrombopoietin (TPO) that are essential for HSC function, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) that is dispensable for HSCs. HSCs display a distinct TPO and GM-CSF signaling signature from MPPs and LK cells, which highly correlates with receptor surface expression. In contrast, although majority of LK cells express lower levels of cKit than HSCs and MPPs, SCF-evoked ERK1/2 activation in LK cells shows a significantly increased magnitude for a prolonged period. These results suggest that specific cellular context plays a more important role than receptor surface expression in SCF signaling. Our study of HSC signaling at the homeostasis stage paves the way to investigate signaling changes in HSCs under conditions of stress, aging, and hematopoietic diseases. PMID:22628264

  10. Modeling autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C in mice reveals distinct functions for Ltbp-4 isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Bultmann-Mellin, Insa; Conradi, Anne; Maul, Alexandra C.; Dinger, Katharina; Wempe, Frank; Wohl, Alexander P.; Imhof, Thomas; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Bunck, Alexander C.; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Koli, Katri; Bloch, Wilhelm; Ghanem, Alexander; Heinz, Andrea; von Melchner, Harald; Sengle, Gerhard; Sterner-Kock, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed an important role for LTBP-4 in elastogenesis. Its mutational inactivation in humans causes autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C (ARCL1C), which is a severe disorder caused by defects of the elastic fiber network. Although the human gene involved in ARCL1C has been discovered based on similar elastic fiber abnormalities exhibited by mice lacking the short Ltbp-4 isoform (Ltbp4S?/?), the murine phenotype does not replicate ARCL1C. We therefore inactivated both Ltbp-4 isoforms in the mouse germline to model ARCL1C. Comparative analysis of Ltbp4S?/? and Ltbp4-null (Ltbp4?/?) mice identified Ltbp-4L as an important factor for elastogenesis and postnatal survival, and showed that it has distinct tissue expression patterns and specific molecular functions. We identified fibulin-4 as a previously unknown interaction partner of both Ltbp-4 isoforms and demonstrated that at least Ltbp-4L expression is essential for incorporation of fibulin-4 into the extracellular matrix (ECM). Overall, our results contribute to the current understanding of elastogenesis and provide an animal model of ARCL1C. PMID:25713297

  11. Distinctive and pervasive alterations in aqueous humor protein composition following different types of glaucoma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Cyril; Lai, Xianyin; Witzmann, Frank A.; Price, Francis W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether specific glaucoma surgeries are associated with differences in aqueous humor protein concentrations compared to eyes without filters. Methods In this cross-sectional study, aqueous humor samples were prospectively collected from control subjects who underwent routine cataract surgery (n=14) and from patients who had different glaucoma filters: Baerveldt aqueous shunt (n=6), Ahmed aqueous shunt (n=6), trabeculectomy (n=5), and Ex-Press trabeculectomy (n=3). Total protein concentrations were determined with Bradford assay. Tryptic digests were analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Proteins were identified with high confidence using stringent criteria and were quantitatively compared with a label-free platform. Relative protein quantities were compared across groups with ANOVA. Post hoc pair-wise comparisons were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Results Compared to the control eyes, the aqueous humor protein concentration was increased approximately tenfold in the Ahmed and Baerveldt eyes and fivefold in the trabeculectomy and Ex-Press eyes. Overall, 718 unique proteins, splice variants, or isoforms were identified. No differences in the protein concentrations were detected between the Baerveldt and Ahmed groups. Likewise, the trabeculectomy and Ex-Press groups were remarkably similar. Therefore, the aqueous shunt groups were pooled, and the trabeculectomy groups were pooled for a three-way comparison with the controls. More than 500 proteins differed significantly in relative abundance (ANOVA p<0.01) among the control, aqueous shunt, and trabeculectomy groups. Functional analyses suggested these alterations in relative protein abundance affected dozens of signaling pathways. Conclusions Different glaucoma surgical procedures were associated with marked increases in the aqueous humor protein concentration and distinctive changes in the relative abundance of numerous proteins involved in multiple signaling pathways. PMID:26321865

  12. Discovery of a Distinct Superfamily of Kunitz-Type Toxin (KTT) from Tarantulas

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Li-Ping; Tang, Xing; Liang, Song-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Background Kuntiz-type toxins (KTTs) have been found in the venom of animals such as snake, cone snail and sea anemone. The main ancestral function of Kunitz-type proteins was the inhibition of a diverse array of serine proteases, while toxic activities (such as ion-channel blocking) were developed under a variety of Darwinian selection pressures. How new functions were grafted onto an old protein scaffold and what effect Darwinian selection pressures had on KTT evolution remains a puzzle. Principal Findings Here we report the presence of a new superfamily of KTTs in spiders (Tarantulas: Ornithoctonus huwena and Ornithoctonus hainana), which share low sequence similarity to known KTTs and is clustered in a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree of KTT evolution. The representative molecule of spider KTTs, HWTX-XI, purified from the venom of O. huwena, is a bi-functional protein which is a very potent trypsin inhibitor (about 30-fold more strong than BPTI) as well as a weak Kv1.1 potassium channel blocker. Structural analysis of HWTX-XI in 3-D by NMR together with comparative function analysis of 18 expressed mutants of this toxin revealed two separate sites, corresponding to these two activities, located on the two ends of the cone-shape molecule of HWTX-XI. Comparison of non-synonymous/synonymous mutation ratios (?) for each site in spider and snake KTTs, as well as PBTI like body Kunitz proteins revealed high Darwinian selection pressure on the binding sites for Kv channels and serine proteases in snake, while only on the proteases in spider and none detected in body proteins, suggesting different rates and patterns of evolution among them. The results also revealed a series of key events in the history of spider KTT evolution, including the formation of a novel KTT family (named sub-Kuntiz-type toxins) derived from the ancestral native KTTs with the loss of the second disulfide bridge accompanied by several dramatic sequence modifications. Conclusions/Significance These finding illustrate that the two activity sites of Kunitz-type toxins are functionally and evolutionally independent and provide new insights into effects of Darwinian selection pressures on KTT evolution, and mechanisms by which new functions can be grafted onto old protein scaffolds. PMID:18923708

  13. On the possible cause of distinct El Niño types in the recent decades.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Jyoti; Panickal, Swapna; Marathe, Shamal; Ashok, K

    2015-01-01

    Distinct El Niño types have been observed in the recent decades with warm anomalies in the eastern Pacific (Canonical El Niño, EL) and central Pacific (El Niño Modoki, EM). Among these, a basinwide tropical Pacific (TP) warming is seen during 2009 and recently during 2014. We carried out data analysis and numerical simulation experiments to understand the possible cause for different El Niño flavours. The results reveal that the co-evolution of ocean-atmospheric conditions are critically important. Stronger boreal spring (Mar-May) through summer (June-September) westerly wind anomalies (WWA), with relatively stronger ocean pre-conditioning can lead to EL, weaker ocean pre-conditioning and weaker WWA can generate EM, while stronger ocean preconditioning and weaker WWA can lead to basinwide warming pattern. The strength of the WWA is crucial in determining the strength of the ocean dynamic response and the thermocline displacements in the Pacific. The study has important implications for understanding the nature of El Niño in advance. PMID:26598274

  14. On the possible cause of distinct El Niño types in the recent decades

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Jyoti; Panickal, Swapna; Marathe, Shamal; Ashok, K.

    2015-01-01

    Distinct El Niño types have been observed in the recent decades with warm anomalies in the eastern Pacific (Canonical El Niño, EL) and central Pacific (El Niño Modoki, EM). Among these, a basinwide tropical Pacific (TP) warming is seen during 2009 and recently during 2014. We carried out data analysis and numerical simulation experiments to understand the possible cause for different El Niño flavours. The results reveal that the co-evolution of ocean-atmospheric conditions are critically important. Stronger boreal spring (Mar-May) through summer (June-September) westerly wind anomalies (WWA), with relatively stronger ocean pre-conditioning can lead to EL, weaker ocean pre-conditioning and weaker WWA can generate EM, while stronger ocean preconditioning and weaker WWA can lead to basinwide warming pattern. The strength of the WWA is crucial in determining the strength of the ocean dynamic response and the thermocline displacements in the Pacific. The study has important implications for understanding the nature of El Niño in advance. PMID:26598274

  15. Variability in soil CO2 efflux across distinct urban land cover types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissert, Lena F.; Salmond, Jennifer A.; Schwendenmann, Luitgard

    2015-04-01

    As a main source of greenhouse gases urban areas play an important role in the global carbon cycle. To assess the potential role of urban vegetation in mitigating carbon emissions we need information on the magnitude of biogenic CO2 emissions and its driving factors. We examined how urban land use types (urban forest, parklands, sportsfields) vary in their soil CO2 efflux. We measured soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic signature, soil temperature and soil moisture over a complete growing season in Auckland, New Zealand. Soil physical and chemical properties and vegetation characteristics were also measured. Mean soil CO2 efflux ranged from 4.15 to 12 ?mol m-2 s-1. We did not find significant differences in soil CO2 efflux among land cover types due to high spatial variability in soil CO2 efflux among plots. Soil (soil carbon and nitrogen density, texture, soil carbon:nitrogen ratio) and vegetation characteristics (basal area, litter carbon density, grass biomass) were not significantly correlated with soil CO2 efflux. We found a distinct seasonal pattern with significantly higher soil CO2 efflux in autumn (Apr/May) and spring (Oct). In urban forests and sportsfields over 80% of the temporal variation was explained by soil temperature and soil water content. The ?13C signature of CO2 respired from parklands and sportsfields (-20 permil - -25 permil) were more positive compared to forest plots (-29 permil) indicating that parkland and sportsfields had a considerable proportion of C4 grasses. Despite the large intra-urban variability, our results compare to values reported from other, often climatically different cities, supporting the hypothesis of homogenization across urban areas as a result of human management practices.

  16. Multiple types of GABAA responses identified from zebrafish Mauthner cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Birbickram; Ali, Declan W

    2014-10-22

    ?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) binds to ionotropic GABAA receptors to mediate fast inhibitory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). GABAA receptors are pentameric structures composed of receptor subunits (?1-6, ?1-3, ?1-3, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?1-3) with various stoichiometries. They play important roles in the control of neural networks and are the pharmacological targets for the treatment of diseases such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. Thus far, there has been no report on GABA synaptic transmission in developing zebrafish. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to record GABAA-mediated miniature postsynaptic currents from the Mauthner cells of embryonic zebrafish. Spontaneous GABAA currents occurred infrequently and were low in amplitude (27.2 ± 0.9 pA). Analysis of their kinetics suggested the existence of three main types of events: the first (group I) is mediated by a single type of receptor with decay kinetics of 54 ± 1.6 ms; the second (group II) is also mediated by a single receptor type, but exhibits significantly longer decay kinetics (151 ± 7.2 ms); and the third type of synapse (group III) contains multiple receptor types with fast (?1=28.7 ± 2.5 ms) and slow (?2=153 ± 11 ms) kinetics. Thus, for the first time, we report the properties of GABA synaptic currents associated with the Mauthner cells of zebrafish. PMID:25162782

  17. Prostate Adenocarcinomas Aberrantly Expressing p63 Are Molecularly Distinct from Usual-Type Prostatic Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hsueh-Li; Haffner, Michael C.; Esopi, David M.; Vaghasia, Ajay M.; Giannico, Giovanna A.; Ross, Hillary M.; Ghosh, Susmita; Hicks, Jessica; Zheng, Qizhi; Sangoi, Ankur R.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Lotan, Tamara L.

    2014-01-01

    We have described a rare group of prostate adenocarcinomas that show aberrant expression of p63, a protein strongly expressed in prostatic basal cells and absent from usual-type acinar prostate cancers. The partial basal-like immunophenotype of these tumors is intriguing in light of the persistent debate surrounding the cell-of-origin for prostate cancer, however their molecular phenotype is unknown. We collected 37 of these tumors on radical prostatectomy and biopsy and assessed subsets for a diverse panel of molecular markers. The majority of p63-expressing tumors were positive for the ?Np63 isoform (6/7) by immunofluorescence and p63 mRNA (7/8) by chromogenic in situ hybridization. Despite p63 positivity, these tumors uniformly expressed luminal-type cytokeratin proteins such as CK18 (13/13), CK8 (8/8) and markers of androgen axis signaling commonly seen in luminal cells, including androgen receptor (10/11), NKX3.1 (8/8) and prostein (12/13). Conversely, basal cytokeratins such as CK14 and CK15 were negative in all cases (0/8) and CK5/6 was weakly and focally positive in 36% (4/11) of cases. Pluripotency markers including ?-catenin, Oct4 and c-kit were negative in p63-expressing tumors (0/11). Despite nearly universal expression of androgen receptor and downstream androgen signaling targets, p63-expressing tumors lacked ERG rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization (0/14) and ERG protein expression (0/37). No tumors expressed SPINK1 or showed PTEN protein loss (0/19). Surprisingly, 74% (14/19) of p63-expressing tumors expressed GSTP1 protein at least focally, and 33% (2/6) entirely lacked GSTP1 CpG island hypermethylation by bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to usual prostatic adenocarcinomas, prostate tumors with p63-expression show a mixed luminal/basal immunophenotype, uniformly lack ERG gene rearrangement and frequently express GSTP1. These data strongly suggest that p63-expressing prostate tumors represent a molecularly distinct subclass and further study of this rare tumor type may yield important insights into the role of p63 in prostatic biology and the prostate cancer cell-of-origin. PMID:25216229

  18. Chromatin Signature Identifies Monoallelic Gene Expression Across Mammalian Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Anwesha; Vigneau, Sébastien; Savova, Virginia; Zwemer, Lillian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Monoallelic expression of autosomal genes (MAE) is a widespread epigenetic phenomenon which is poorly understood, due in part to current limitations of genome-wide approaches for assessing it. Recently, we reported that a specific histone modification signature is strongly associated with MAE and demonstrated that it can serve as a proxy of MAE in human lymphoblastoid cells. Here, we use murine cells to establish that this chromatin signature is conserved between mouse and human and is associated with MAE in multiple cell types. Our analyses reveal extensive conservation in the identity of MAE genes between the two species. By analyzing MAE chromatin signature in a large number of cell and tissue types, we show that it remains consistent during terminal cell differentiation and is predominant among cell-type specific genes, suggesting a link between MAE and specification of cell identity. PMID:26092837

  19. Method for identifying type I diabetes mellitus in humans

    DOEpatents

    Metz, Thomas O [Kennewick, WA; Qian, Weijun [Richland, WA; Jacobs, Jon M [Pasco, WA

    2011-04-12

    A method and system for classifying subject populations utilizing predictive and diagnostic biomarkers for type I diabetes mellitus. The method including determining the levels of a variety of markers within the serum or plasma of a target organism and correlating this level to general populations as a screen for predisposition or progressive monitoring of disease presence or predisposition.

  20. Distinct behavioural and network correlates of two interneuron types in prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kvitsiani, D.; Ranade, S.; Hangya, B.; Taniguchi, H.; Huang, JZ.; Kepecs, A.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons in prefrontal cortex exhibit diverse behavioural correlates1–4, an observation that has been attributed to cell-type diversity. To link identified neuron types with network and behavioural functions, we recorded from the two largest genetically-defined inhibitory interneuron classes, the perisomatically-targeting parvalbumin (Pv) and the dendritically-targeting somatostatin (Som) neurons5–8 in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of mice performing a reward foraging task. Here we show that Pv and a subtype of Som neurons form functionally homogeneous populations showing a double dissociation between both their inhibitory impact and behavioural correlates. Out of a number of events pertaining to behaviour, a subtype of Som neurons selectively responded at reward approach, while Pv neurons responded at reward leaving encoding preceding stay duration. These behavioural correlates of Pv and Som neurons defined a behavioural epoch and a decision variable important for foraging (whether to stay or to leave), a crucial function attributed to ACC9–11. Furthermore, Pv neurons could fire in millisecond synchrony exerting fast and powerful inhibition on principal cell firing, while the inhibitory impact of Som neurons on firing output was weak and more variable, consistent with the idea that they respectively control the outputs of and inputs to principal neurons12–16. These results suggest a connection between the circuit-level function of different interneuron-types in regulating the flow of information, and the behavioural functions served by the cortical circuits. Moreover these observations bolster the hope that functional response diversity during behaviour can in part be explained by cell-type diversity. PMID:23708967

  1. Comparative Analysis of Type III Secreted Effector Genes Reflects Divergence of Acidovorax citrulli Strains into Three Distinct Lineages.

    PubMed

    Eckshtain-Levi, Noam; Munitz, Tamar; Zivanovi?, Marija; Traore, Sy M; Spröer, Cathrin; Zhao, Bingyu; Welbaum, Gregory; Walcott, Ron; Sikorski, Johannes; Burdman, Saul

    2014-11-01

    ABSTRACT Acidovorax citrulli causes bacterial fruit blotch of cucurbits, a serious economic threat to watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and melon (Cucumis melo) production worldwide. Based on genetic and biochemical traits, A. citrulli strains have been divided into two distinct groups: group I strains have been mainly isolated from various non-watermelon hosts, while group II strains have been generally isolated from and are highly virulent on watermelon. The pathogen depends on a functional type III secretion system for pathogenicity. Annotation of the genome of the group II strain AAC00-1 revealed 11 genes encoding putative type III secreted (T3S) effectors. Due to the crucial role of type III secretion for A. citrulli pathogenicity, we hypothesized that group I and II strains differ in their T3S effector repertoire. Comparative analysis of the 11 effector genes from a collection of 22 A. citrulli strains confirmed this hypothesis. Moreover, this analysis led to the identification of a third A. citrulli group, which was supported by DNA:DNA hybridization, DNA fingerprinting, multilocus sequence analysis of conserved genes, and virulence assays. The effector genes assessed in this study are homologous to effectors from other plant-pathogenic bacteria, mainly belonging to Xanthomonas spp. and Ralstonia solanacearum. Analyses of the effective number of codons and gas chromatography content of effector genes relative to a representative set of housekeeping genes support the idea that these effector genes were acquired by lateral gene transfer. Further investigation is required to identify new T3S effectors of A. citrulli and to determine their contribution to virulence and host preferential association. PMID:24848275

  2. Distinct neural patterns enable grasp types decoding in monkey dorsal premotor cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yaoyao; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Controzzi, Marco; Cipriani, Christian; Li, Yue; Li, Juncheng; Zhang, Shaomin; Wang, Yiwen; Chen, Weidong; Chiara Carrozza, Maria; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Recent studies have shown that dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), a cortical area in the dorsomedial grasp pathway, is involved in grasp movements. However, the neural ensemble firing property of PMd during grasp movements and the extent to which it can be used for grasp decoding are still unclear. Approach. To address these issues, we used multielectrode arrays to record both spike and local field potential (LFP) signals in PMd in macaque monkeys performing reaching and grasping of one of four differently shaped objects. Main results. Single and population neuronal activity showed distinct patterns during execution of different grip types. Cluster analysis of neural ensemble signals indicated that the grasp related patterns emerged soon (200-300 ms) after the go cue signal, and faded away during the hold period. The timing and duration of the patterns varied depending on the behaviors of individual monkey. Application of support vector machine model to stable activity patterns revealed classification accuracies of 94% and 89% for each of the two monkeys, indicating a robust, decodable grasp pattern encoded in the PMd. Grasp decoding using LFPs, especially the high-frequency bands, also produced high decoding accuracies. Significance. This study is the first to specify the neuronal population encoding of grasp during the time course of grasp. We demonstrate high grasp decoding performance in PMd. These findings, combined with previous evidence for reach related modulation studies, suggest that PMd may play an important role in generation and maintenance of grasp action and may be a suitable locus for brain-machine interface applications.

  3. Tectonically Undulating Terrestrial Geospheres and Concordant Development of Two Distinct Somatic Types of Man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    The human organisms in microgravity conditions loss Ca or become less dense. But variously dense men also develop on Earth due to varying tectonics. As any celestial body, Earth is not a billiard-ball but is complexly warped by a number of standing waves imprinted in the geoid shape. The fundamental wave (long 2? R, R- planet radius) makes tectonic dichotomy (an opposition of the eastern and western oceanic hemispheres), the first overtone (? R) makes sectoring: on the continental eastern hemisphere, for example, around the Pamirs-Hindukush converge 4 sectors. They are 2 opposed differently uplifted (African ++, Asian +) separated by 2 opposed differently subsided (Eurasian -, Indoceanic - -). In rotating Earth the alternating uplifts (++, +) and subsidences (- -, -) require materials of different densities: less dense for uplifts and denser for subsidences. This requirement concerns all geospheres including anthroposphere. The long development of Homo sapiens adapting to graviconditions of uplifting and subsiding blocks produced two distinct somatic types of man: long and narrow (slim) leptosomes and short and broad eirisomes. As shows F. Weidenreich [1], this fundamental division appeared very early in the human history and is observed in all great human races and even in apes. A block uplifting (an increase of the planetary radius) requires diminishing density. This is achieved by distributing the man's weight by the longer stature. Thus appears long and slim leptosome. On the contrary, a block subsidence (diminishing radius) requires increasing density: man is shorter and broader (eirisome). A long existence on intensively moving (up or down) blocks makes these somatic types characteristic of races. Thus, many African tribes developing on intensively moving up continent (more than one kilometer in a few mln. y. ) are leptosomatic; on the contrary, Indians of subsiding western hemisphere are typically eirisomatic with high Rohrer's index; Polynesians of Pacific are high but corpulent, the Rohrer' index is also high. Short in time cosmic experiments (abrupt uplifting) with a sharp drop in gravity produce noticeable effect of Ca leaching out of organism making it less dense. Sure, changing gravity influences not only bones but also flesh, blood, hairs and eventually genes. The frequencies of genetic markers of Rh-system in blood of inhabitants of 4 variously leveled sectors and subsided western hemisphere are clearly different. References: [1] F. Weidenreich. Rasse und Körperbau (in Russian translation, State Publishing House, Moscow-Leningrad, 1929, 271 pp.).

  4. The Cancer Genome Atlas Identifies Distinct Subtypes of Deadly Brain Cancer That May Lead to New Treatment Strategies

    Cancer.gov

    The most common form of malignant brain cancer in adults, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is not a single disease but appears to be four distinct molecular subtypes, according to a study by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network. The researchers of this study also found that response to aggressive chemotherapy and radiation differed by subtype.

  5. Neurobiology of Disease Cell Type-Specific Expression Analysis to Identify Putative

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    in narco- lepsy. Clearly, distinct cell types in the nervous system contribute to different behaviors. There is a remarkable diversity of gene expression across cell types in the nervous system (Lein et al., 2007; Cahoy et Mechanisms for Neurogenetic Disorders Xiaoxiao Xu,1 Alan B. Wells,2,3 David R. O'Brien,2,3 Arye Nehorai,1

  6. Integrating Diverse Types of Genomic Data to Identify Genes that Underlie Adverse Pregnancy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hirbo, Jibril; Eidem, Haley; Rokas, Antonis; Abbot, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Progress in understanding complex genetic diseases has been bolstered by synthetic approaches that overlay diverse data types and analyses to identify functionally important genes. Pre-term birth (PTB), a major complication of pregnancy, is a leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. A major obstacle in addressing PTB is that the mechanisms controlling parturition and birth timing remain poorly understood. Integrative approaches that overlay datasets derived from comparative genomics with function-derived ones have potential to advance our understanding of the genetics of birth timing, and thus provide insights into the genes that may contribute to PTB. We intersected data from fast evolving coding and non-coding gene regions in the human and primate lineage with data from genes expressed in the placenta, from genes that show enriched expression only in the placenta, as well as from genes that are differentially expressed in four distinct PTB clinical subtypes. A large fraction of genes that are expressed in placenta, and differentially expressed in PTB clinical subtypes (23–34%) are fast evolving, and are associated with functions that include adhesion neurodevelopmental and immune processes. Functional categories of genes that express fast evolution in coding regions differ from those linked to fast evolution in non-coding regions. Finally, there is a surprising lack of overlap between fast evolving genes that are differentially expressed in four PTB clinical subtypes. Integrative approaches, especially those that incorporate evolutionary perspectives, can be successful in identifying potential genetic contributions to complex genetic diseases, such as PTB. PMID:26641094

  7. Steady state or non-steady state? Identifying driving mechanisms of oxygen isotope signatures of leaf transpiration in functionally distinct plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Cuntz, Matthias; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Isotope techniques are widely applied in ecosystem studies. For example, isoflux models are used to separate soil evaporation from transpiration in ecosystems. These models often assume that plant transpiration occurs at isotopic steady state, i.e. that the transpired water shows the same isotopic signature as the source water. Yet, several studies found that transpiration did not occur at isotopic steady state, under both controlled and field conditions. Here we focused on identifying the internal and external factors which drive the isotopic signature of leaf transpiration. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the effect of both environmental variables and leaf physiological traits on ?18OT was investigated under controlled conditions. Six plant species with distinct leaf physiological traits were exposed to step changes in relative air humidity (RH), their response in ?18OT and gas exchange parameters and their leaf physiological traits were assessed. Moreover, two functionally distinct plant types (tree, i.e. Quercus suber, and grassland) of a semi-arid Mediterranean oak-woodland where observed under natural conditions throughout an entire growth period in the field. The species differed substantially in their leaf physiological traits and their turn-over times of leaf water. They could be grouped in species with fast (<60 min.), intermediate (ca. 120 min.) and slow (>240 min.) turn-over times, mostly due to differences in stomatal conductance, leaf water content or a combination of both. Changes in RH caused an immediate response in ?18OT, which were similarly strong in all species, while leaf physiological traits affected the subsequent response in ?18OT. The turn-over time of leaf water determined the speed of return to the isotopic steady or a stable ?18OT value (Dubbert & Kübert et al., in prep.). Under natural conditions, changes in environmental conditions over the diurnal cycle had a huge impact on the diurnal development of ?18OT in both observed plant functional types. However, in accordance with our findings in the lab, species specific differences in the leaf water turn over time, significantly influenced the amount of time plants transpired at non-steady state during the day (Dubbert et al., 2013, 2014). Our results emphasize the significance of considering isotopic non-steady state of transpiration and specifically to account for the specific differences of plant species resulting from distinct physiological traits of their leaves when applying isoflux models in ecosystem studies. Dubbert, M; Cuntz, M; Piayda, A; Maguas, C; Werner, C: Partitioning evapotranspiration - Testing the Craig and Gordon model with field measurements of oxygen isotope ratios of evaporative fluxes. J Hydrol (2013) Dubbert, M; Piayda, A; Cuntz, M; Correia, AC; Costa e Silva, F; Pereira, JS; Werner, C: Stable oxygen isotope and flux partitioning demonstrates understory of an oak savanna contributes up to half of ecosystem carbon and water exchange, Frontiers in Plant Science (2014a)

  8. Researchers Say They've Identified 3 Type 2 Diabetes Subtypes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Researchers Say They've Identified 3 Type 2 Diabetes Subtypes For data miners, routinely provided patient information ... patterns in chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. As a result, researchers ...

  9. Distinct role of T helper Type 17 immune response for Graves' hyperthyroidism in mice with different genetic backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Horie, Ichiro; Abiru, Norio; Saitoh, Ohki; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Eguchi, Katsumi; Nagayama, Yuji

    2011-03-01

    T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, a newly identified effector T-cell subset, have recently been shown to play a role in numerous autoimmune diseases, including iodine-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic (NOD)-H2(h4) mice, which had previously been thought Th1-dominant. We here studied the role of Th17 in Graves' hyperthyroidism, another thyroid-specific autoimmune disease, in a mouse model. Two genetically distinct BALB/c and NOD-H2(h4) strains with intact or disrupted IL-17 genes (IL-17(+/+) or IL-17(-/-)) were immunized with adenovirus (Ad) expressing the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) A-subunit (Ad-TSHR289). Both IL-17(+/+) and IL-17(-/-) mice developed anti-TSHR antibodies and hyperthyroidism at equally high frequencies on the BALB/c genetic background. In contrast, some IL-17(+/+), but none of IL-17(-/-), mice became hyperthyroid on the NOD-H2(h4) genetic background, indicating the crucial role of IL-17 for development of Graves' hyperthyroidism in non-susceptible NOD-H2(h4), but not in susceptible BALB/c mice. In the T-cell recall assay, splenocytes and lymphocytes from the draining lymph nodes from either mouse strains, irrespective of IL-17 gene status, produced IFN-? and IL-10 but not other cytokines including IL-17 in response to TSHR antigen. Thus, the functional significance of Th17 may not necessarily be predictable from cytokine expression patterns in splenocytes or inflammatory lesions. In conclusion, this is, to our knowledge, the first report showing that the role of Th17 cells for the pathogenesis of a certain autoimmune disease depends on the mouse genetic backgrounds. PMID:20670120

  10. Proteomic profiling identifies distinct protein patterns in acute myelogenous leukemia CD34+CD38- stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kornblau, Steven M; Qutub, Amina; Yao, Hui; York, Heather; Qiu, Yi Hua; Graber, David; Ravandi, Farhad; Cortes, Jorge; Andreeff, Michael; Zhang, Nianxiang; Coombes, Kevin R

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is believed to arise from leukemic stem-like cells (LSC) making understanding the biological differences between LSC and normal stem cells (HSC) or common myeloid progenitors (CMP) crucial to understanding AML biology. To determine if protein expression patterns were different in LSC compared to other AML and CD34+ populations, we measured the expression of 121 proteins by Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA) in 5 purified fractions from AML marrow and blood samples: Bulk (CD3/CD19 depleted), CD34-, CD34+(CMP), CD34+CD38+ and CD34+CD38-(LSC). LSC protein expression differed markedly from Bulk (n =31 cases, 93/121 proteins) and CD34+ cells (n = 30 cases, 88/121 proteins) with 54 proteins being significantly different (31 higher, 23 lower) in LSC than in either Bulk or CD34+ cells. Sixty-seven proteins differed significantly between CD34+ and Bulk blasts (n = 69 cases). Protein expression patterns in LSC and CD34+ differed markedly from normal CD34+ cells. LSC were distinct from CD34+ and Bulk cells by principal component and by protein signaling network analysis which confirmed individual protein analysis. Potential targetable submodules in LSC included the proteins PU.1(SP1), P27, Mcl1, HIF1?, cMET, P53, Yap, and phospho-Stats 1, 5 and 6. Protein expression and activation in LSC differs markedly from other blast populations suggesting that studies of AML biology should be performed in LSC. PMID:24223100

  11. Integrated Genotypic Analysis of Hedgehog-Related Genes Identifies Subgroups of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor with Distinct Clinicopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yasuyuki; Katsube, Ken-ichi; Kabasawa, Yuji; Morita, Kei-ichi; Omura, Ken; Yamaguchi, Akira; Sakamoto, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) arises as part of Gorlin syndrome (GS) or as a sporadic lesion. Gene mutations and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the hedgehog receptor PTCH1 plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of KCOT. However, some KCOT cases lack evidence for gene alteration of PTCH1, suggesting that other genes in the hedgehog pathway may be affected. PTCH2 and SUFU participate in the occurrence of GS-associated tumors, but their roles in KCOT development are unknown. To elucidate the roles of these genes, we enrolled 36 KCOT patients in a study to sequence their entire coding regions of PTCH1, PTCH2 and SUFU. LOH and immunohistochemical expression of these genes, as well as the downstream targets of hedgehog signaling, were examined using surgically-excised KCOT tissues. PTCH1 mutations, including four novel ones, were found in 9 hereditary KCOT patients, but not in sporadic KCOT patients. A pathogenic mutation of PTCH2 or SUFU was not found in any patients. LOH at PTCH1 and SUFU loci correlated with the presence of epithelial budding. KCOT harboring a germline mutation (Type 1) showed nuclear localization of GLI2 and frequent histological findings such as budding and epithelial islands, as well as the highest recurrence rate. KCOT with LOH but without a germline mutation (Type 2) less frequently showed these histological features, and the recurrence rate was lower. KCOT with neither germline mutation nor LOH (Type 3) consisted of two subgroups, Type 3A and 3B, which were characterized by nuclear and cytoplasmic GLI2 localization, respectively. Type 3B rarely exhibited budding and recurrence, behaving as the most amicable entity. The expression patterns of CCND1 and BCL2 tended to correlate with these subgroups. Our data indicates a significant role of PTCH1 and SUFU in the pathogenesis of KCOT, and the genotype-oriented subgroups constitute entities with different potential aggressiveness. PMID:23951062

  12. Multilocus Sequence Typing Identifies Epidemic Clones of Flavobacterium psychrophilum in Nordic Countries

    PubMed Central

    Duchaud, Eric; Nicolas, Pierre; Dalsgaard, Inger; Madsen, Lone; Aspán, Anna; Jansson, Eva; Colquhoun, Duncan J.; Wiklund, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD), which affects a variety of freshwater-reared salmonid species. A large-scale study was performed to investigate the genetic diversity of F. psychrophilum in the four Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Multilocus sequence typing of 560 geographically and temporally disparate F. psychrophilum isolates collected from various sources between 1983 and 2012 revealed 81 different sequence types (STs) belonging to 12 clonal complexes (CCs) and 30 singleton STs. The largest CC, CC-ST10, which represented almost exclusively isolates from rainbow trout and included the most predominant genotype, ST2, comprised 65% of all isolates examined. In Norway, with a shorter history (<10 years) of BCWD in rainbow trout, ST2 was the only isolated CC-ST10 genotype, suggesting a recent introduction of an epidemic clone. The study identified five additional CCs shared between countries and five country-specific CCs, some with apparent host specificity. Almost 80% of the singleton STs were isolated from non-rainbow trout species or the environment. The present study reveals a simultaneous presence of genetically distinct CCs in the Nordic countries and points out specific F. psychrophilum STs posing a threat to the salmonid production. The study provides a significant contribution toward mapping the genetic diversity of F. psychrophilum globally and support for the existence of an epidemic population structure where recombination is a significant driver in F. psychrophilum evolution. Evidence indicating dissemination of a putatively virulent clonal complex (CC-ST10) with commercial movement of fish or fish products is strengthened. PMID:24561585

  13. Cluster Analysis in the COPDGene Study Identifies Subtypes of Smokers with Distinct Patterns of Airway Disease and Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, Peter J; Dy, Jennifer; Ross, James; Chang, Yale; Washko, George R; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Williams, Andre; Lynch, David A; Make, Barry J; Crapo, James D; Bowler, Russ P; Regan, Elizabeth A; Hokanson, John E; Kinney, Greg L; Han, Meilan K; Soler, Xavier; Ramsdell, Joseph W; Barr, R Graham; Foreman, Marilyn; van Beek, Edwin; Casaburi, Richard; Criner, Gerald J; Lutz, Sharon M; Rennard, Steven I; Santorico, Stephanie; Sciurba, Frank C; DeMeo, Dawn L; Hersh, Craig P; Silverman, Edwin K; Cho, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Background There is notable heterogeneity in the clinical presentation of patients with COPD. To characterize this heterogeneity, we sought to identify subgroups of smokers by applying cluster analysis to data from the COPDGene Study. Methods We applied a clustering method, k-means, to data from 10,192 smokers in the COPDGene Study. After splitting the sample into a training and validation set, we evaluated three sets of input features across a range of k (user-specified number of clusters). Stable solutions were tested for association with four COPD-related measures and five genetic variants previously associated with COPD at genome-wide significance. The results were confirmed in the validation set. Findings We identified four clusters that can be characterized as 1) relatively resistant smokers (i.e. no/mild obstruction and minimal emphysema despite heavy smoking), 2) mild upper zone emphysema predominant, 3) airway disease predominant, and 4) severe emphysema. All clusters are strongly associated with COPD-related clinical characteristics, including exacerbations and dyspnea (p<0.001). We found strong genetic associations between the mild upper zone emphysema group and rs1980057 near HHIP, and between the severe emphysema group and rs8034191 in the chromosome 15q region (p<0.001). All significant associations were replicated at p<0.05 in the validation sample (12/12 associations with clinical measures and 2/2 genetic associations). Interpretation Cluster analysis identifies four subgroups of smokers that show robust associations with clinical characteristics of COPD and known COPD-associated genetic variants. PMID:24563194

  14. The two types of 3-dehydroquinase have distinct structures but catalyze the same overall reaction 

    E-print Network

    Gourley, David G; Shrive, Annette K; Polikarpov, Igor; Krell, Tino; Coggins, John R; Hawkins, Alastair R; Isaacs, Neil W; Sawyer, Lindsay

    The structures of enzymes catalyzing the reactions in central metabolic pathways are generally well conserved as are their catalytic mechanisms. The two types of 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQase) are therefore most ...

  15. Distinct Pseudomonas type-III effectors use a cleavable transit peptide to target chloroplasts

    E-print Network

    -III effectors is the suppres- sion of plant immunity. The P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopK1 type-III effector with effector-triggered immunity. Here we show that DC3000 hopK1 mutants are reduced in their ability to grow and the effector proteins it injects into plant cells for pathogenesis. The primary role for P. syringae type

  16. Distinct AMPA-Type Glutamatergic Synapses in Developing Rat CA1 Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed synaptic ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptor (AMPAR) properties during synaptogenesis to describe the development of individual glutamatergic synapses on rat hippocampal CA1 principal neurons. Pharmacologically isolated AMPAR-mediated glutamatergic synaptic currents [evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer Collateral pathway, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs)], had significantly greater inward-rectification at ages P5–7 compared with P8–18. These inward rectifying EPSCs demonstrated paired-pulse dependent unblocking at positive holding potentials, consistent with voltage-dependent internal polyamine block. Measurements of paired-pulse facilitation did not support altered presynaptic properties associated with inward rectification. Using asynchronous EPSCs (aEPSCs) to analyze populations of individual synapses, we found that quantal amplitudes (Q) increased across early postnatal development (P5-P18) and were directly modulated by increases in the number of activated receptors. Quantal AMPAR decay kinetics (aEPSC ?decays) exhibited the highest coefficient of variation (CV) from P5 to 7 and became markedly less variable at P8–18. At P5–7, faster quantal kinetics coexisted with much slower kinetics; only slower quantal kinetics were found at P8–18. This supports diverse quantal synaptic properties limited to P5–7. Multivariate cluster analysis of Q, CV?decay, and median ?decay supported a segregation of neurons into two distinct age groups of P5–7 and P8–18, similar to the age-related segregation suggested by inward rectification. Taken together, these findings support synaptic, calcium permeable AMPARs at a subset of synapses onto CA1 pyramidal neurons exclusively at P5–7. These distinct synapses coexist with those sharing the properties of more mature synapses. These synapses disappear after P7 as activated receptor numbers increase with age. PMID:20685930

  17. The Impact of Age and Sex in DLBCL: Systems Biology Analyses Identify Distinct Molecular Changes and Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, Afshin; Neuberg, Donna; McDonald, J. Tyson; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Evens, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Potential molecular alterations based on age and sex are not well defined in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We examined global transcriptome DLBCL data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) via a systems biology approach to determine the molecular differences associated with age and sex. Collectively, sex and age revealed striking transcriptional differences with older age associated with decreased metabolism and telomere functions and female sex was associated with decreased interferon signaling, transcription, cell cycle, and PD-1 signaling. We discovered that the key genes for most groups strongly regulated immune function activity. Furthermore, older females were predicted to have less DLBCL progression versus older males and young females. Finally, analyses in systems biology revealed that JUN and CYCS signaling were the most critical factors associated with tumor progression in older and male patients. We identified important molecular perturbations in DLBCL that were strongly associated with age and sex and were predicted to strongly influence tumor progression. PMID:26691437

  18. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Timothy M.; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Macey, Tara A.; Korkola, James E.; Koppie, Theresa M.; Corless, Christopher L.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient’s resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  19. An EST-based analysis identifies new genes and reveals distinctive gene expression features of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coffee is one of the world's most important crops; it is consumed worldwide and plays a significant role in the economy of producing countries. Coffea arabica and C. canephora are responsible for 70 and 30% of commercial production, respectively. C. arabica is an allotetraploid from a recent hybridization of the diploid species, C. canephora and C. eugenioides. C. arabica has lower genetic diversity and results in a higher quality beverage than C. canephora. Research initiatives have been launched to produce genomic and transcriptomic data about Coffea spp. as a strategy to improve breeding efficiency. Results Assembling the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of C. arabica and C. canephora produced by the Brazilian Coffee Genome Project and the Nestlé-Cornell Consortium revealed 32,007 clusters of C. arabica and 16,665 clusters of C. canephora. We detected different GC3 profiles between these species that are related to their genome structure and mating system. BLAST analysis revealed similarities between coffee and grape (Vitis vinifera) genes. Using KA/KS analysis, we identified coffee genes under purifying and positive selection. Protein domain and gene ontology analyses suggested differences between Coffea spp. data, mainly in relation to complex sugar synthases and nucleotide binding proteins. OrthoMCL was used to identify specific and prevalent coffee protein families when compared to five other plant species. Among the interesting families annotated are new cystatins, glycine-rich proteins and RALF-like peptides. Hierarchical clustering was used to independently group C. arabica and C. canephora expression clusters according to expression data extracted from EST libraries, resulting in the identification of differentially expressed genes. Based on these results, we emphasize gene annotation and discuss plant defenses, abiotic stress and cup quality-related functional categories. Conclusion We present the first comprehensive genome-wide transcript profile study of C. arabica and C. canephora, which can be freely assessed by the scientific community at http://www.lge.ibi.unicamp.br/coffea. Our data reveal the presence of species-specific/prevalent genes in coffee that may help to explain particular characteristics of these two crops. The identification of differentially expressed transcripts offers a starting point for the correlation between gene expression profiles and Coffea spp. developmental traits, providing valuable insights for coffee breeding and biotechnology, especially concerning sugar metabolism and stress tolerance. PMID:21303543

  20. Two distinct types of the inhibition of vasculogenesis by different species of charged particles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Charged particle radiation is known to be more biologically effective than photon radiation. One example of this is the inhibition of the formation of human blood vessels. This effect is an important factor influencing human health and is relevant to space travel as well as to cancer radiotherapy. We have previously shown that ion particles with a high energy deposition, or linear energy transfer (LET) are more than four times more effective at disrupting mature vessel tissue models than particles with a lower LET. For vasculogenesis however, the relative biological effectiveness between particles is the same. This unexpected result prompted us to investigate whether the inhibition of vasculogenesis was occurring by distinct mechanisms. Methods Using 3-Dimensional human vessel models, we developed assays that determine at what stage angiogenesis is inhibited. Vessel morphology, the presence of motile tip structures, and changes in the matrix architecture were assessed. To confirm that the mechanisms are distinct, stimulation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) with phorbol ester (PMA) was employed to selectively restore vessel formation in cultures where early motile tip activity was inhibited. Results Endothelial cells in 3-D culture exposed to low LET protons failed to make connections with other cells but eventually developed a central lumen. Conversely, cells exposed to high LET Fe charged particles extended cellular processes and made connections to other cells but did not develop a central lumen. The microtubule and actin cytoskeletons indicated that motility at the extending tips of endothelial cells is inhibited by low LET but not high LET particles. Actin-rich protrusive structures that contain bundled microtubules showed a 65% decrease when exposed to low LET particles but not high LET particles, with commensurate changes in the matrix architecture. Stimulation of PKC with PMA restored tip motility and capillary formation in low but not high LET particle treated cultures. Conclusion Low LET charged particles inhibit the early stages of vasculogenesis when tip cells have motile protrusive structures and are creating pioneer guidance tunnels through the matrix. High LET charged particles do not affect the early stages of vasculogenesis but they do affect the later stages when the endothelial cells migrate to form tubes. PMID:24044765

  1. Invasion of Epithelial Cells and Proteolysis of Cellular Focal Adhesion Components by Distinct Types of Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Ichiro; Inaba, Hiroaki; Yamamura, Taihei; Kato, Takahiro; Kawai, Shinji; Ooshima, Takashi; Amano, Atsuo

    2006-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae are classified into six types (types I to V and Ib) based on the fimA genes encoding FimA (a subunit of fimbriae), and they play a critical role in bacterial interactions with host tissues. In this study, we compared the efficiencies of P. gingivalis strains with distinct types of fimbriae for invasion of epithelial cells and for degradation of cellular focal adhesion components, paxillin, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Six representative strains with the different types of fimbriae were tested, and P. gingivalis with type II fimbriae (type II P. gingivalis) adhered to and invaded epithelial cells at significantly greater levels than the other strains. There were negligible differences in gingipain activities among the six strains; however, type II P. gingivalis apparently degraded intracellular paxillin in association with a loss of phosphorylation 30 min after infection. Degradation was blocked with cytochalasin D or in mutants with fimA disrupted. Paxillin was degraded by the mutant with Lys-gingipain disrupted, and this degradation was prevented by inhibition of Arg-gingipain activity by N?-p-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone. FAK was also degraded by type II P. gingivalis. Cellular focal adhesions with green fluorescent protein-paxillin macroaggregates were clearly destroyed, and this was associated with cellular morphological changes and microtubule disassembly. In an in vitro wound closure assay, type II P. gingivalis significantly inhibited cellular migration and proliferation compared to the cellular migration and proliferation observed with the other types. These results suggest that type II P. gingivalis efficiently invades epithelial cells and degrades focal adhesion components with Arg-gingipain, which results in cellular impairment during wound healing and periodontal tissue regeneration. PMID:16790749

  2. Distinct Neural Correlates for Two Types of Inhibition in Bilinguals: Response Inhibition versus Interference Suppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luk, Gigi; Anderson, John A. E.; Craik, Fergus I. M.; Grady, Cheryl; Bialystok, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effects of bilingualism on cognitive control, we studied monolingual and bilingual young adults performing a flanker task with functional MRI. The trial types of primary interest for this report were incongruent and no-go trials, representing interference suppression and response inhibition, respectively. Response times were similar…

  3. The Shaping of Two Distinct Dendritic Spikes by A-Type Voltage-Gated K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sungchil; Tang, Cha-Min; Yang, Sunggu

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic ion channels have been a subject of intense research in neuroscience because active ion channels in dendrites shape input signals. Ca2+-permeable channels including NMDA receptors (NMDARs) have been implicated in supralinear dendritic integration, and the IA conductance in sublinear integration. Despite their essential roles in dendritic integration, it has remained uncertain whether these conductance coordinate with, or counteract, each other in the process of dendritic integration. To address this question, experiments were designed in hippocampal CA1 neurons with a recent 3D digital holography system that has shown excellent performance for spatial photoactivation. The results demonstrated a role of IA as a key modulator for two distinct dendritic spikes, low- and high-threshold Ca2+ spikes, through a preferential action of IA on Ca2+-permeable channel-mediated currents, over fast AMPAR-mediated currents. It is likely that the rapid kinetics of IA provides feed-forward inhibition to counteract the regenerative Ca2+ channel-mediated dendritic excitability. This research reveals one dynamic ionic mechanism of dendritic integration, and may contribute to a new understanding of neuronal hyperexcitability embedded in several neural diseases such as epilepsy, fragile X syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26696828

  4. Promoter Hypermethylation Profiling Identifies Subtypes of Head and Neck Cancer with Distinct Viral, Environmental, Genetic and Survival Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Javed Hussain; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic and genetic alteration plays a major role to the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Consumption of tobacco (smoking/chewing) and human papilloma virus (HPV) are also associated with an increase the risk of HNSCC. Promoter hypermethylation of the tumor suppression genes is related with transcriptional inactivation and loss of gene expression. We investigated epigenetic alteration (promoter methylation of tumor-related genes/loci) in tumor tissues in the context of genetic alteration, viral infection, and tobacco exposure and survival status. Methodology The study included 116 tissue samples (71 tumor and 45 normal tissues) from the Northeast Indian population. Methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) was used to determine the methylation status of 10 tumor-related genes/loci (p16, DAPK, RASSF1, BRAC1, GSTP1, ECAD, MLH1, MINT1, MINT2 and MINT31). Polymorphisms of CYP1A1, GST (M1 & T1), XRCC1and XRCC2 genes were studied by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and multiplex-PCR respectively. Principal Findings Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis based on methylation pattern had identified two tumor clusters, which significantly differ by CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), tobacco, GSTM1, CYP1A1, HPV and survival status. Analyzing methylation of genes/loci individually, we have found significant higher methylation of DAPK, RASSF1, p16 and MINT31genes (P = 0.031, 0.013, 0.031 and 0.015 respectively) in HPV (+) cases compared to HPV (-). Furthermore, a CIMP-high and Cluster-1 characteristic was also associated with poor survival. Conclusions Promoter methylation profiles reflecting a correlation with tobacco, HPV, survival status and genetic alteration and may act as a marker to determine subtypes and patient outcome in HNSCC. PMID:26098903

  5. CALTECH CORE-COLLAPSE PROJECT (CCCP) OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: EVIDENCE FOR THREE DISTINCT PHOTOMETRIC SUBTYPES

    SciTech Connect

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Cenko, S. Bradley; Becker, Adam B.; Fox, Derek B.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Sand, David J.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Kiewe, Michael; Scheps, Raphael; Birenbaum, Gali; Chamudot, Daniel; Zhou, Jonathan

    2012-09-10

    We present R-band light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe) from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). With the exception of interacting (Type IIn) SNe and rare events with long rise times, we find that most light curve shapes belong to one of three apparently distinct classes: plateau, slowly declining, and rapidly declining events. The last class is composed solely of Type IIb SNe which present similar light curve shapes to those of SNe Ib, suggesting, perhaps, similar progenitor channels. We do not find any intermediate light curves, implying that these subclasses are unlikely to reflect variance of continuous parameters, but rather might result from physically distinct progenitor systems, strengthening the suggestion of a binary origin for at least some stripped SNe. We find a large plateau luminosity range for SNe IIP, while the plateau lengths seem rather uniform at approximately 100 days. As analysis of additional CCCP data goes on and larger samples are collected, demographic studies of core-collapse SNe will likely continue to provide new constraints on progenitor scenarios.

  6. Different types of laughter modulate connectivity within distinct parts of the laughter perception network.

    PubMed

    Wildgruber, Dirk; Szameitat, Diana P; Ethofer, Thomas; Brück, Carolin; Alter, Kai; Grodd, Wolfgang; Kreifelts, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Laughter is an ancient signal of social communication among humans and non-human primates. Laughter types with complex social functions (e.g., taunt and joy) presumably evolved from the unequivocal and reflex-like social bonding signal of tickling laughter already present in non-human primates. Here, we investigated the modulations of cerebral connectivity associated with different laughter types as well as the effects of attention shifts between implicit and explicit processing of social information conveyed by laughter using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Complex social laughter types and tickling laughter were found to modulate connectivity in two distinguishable but partially overlapping parts of the laughter perception network irrespective of task instructions. Connectivity changes, presumably related to the higher acoustic complexity of tickling laughter, occurred between areas in the prefrontal cortex and the auditory association cortex, potentially reflecting higher demands on acoustic analysis associated with increased information load on auditory attention, working memory, evaluation and response selection processes. In contrast, the higher degree of socio-relational information in complex social laughter types was linked to increases of connectivity between auditory association cortices, the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and brain areas associated with mentalizing as well as areas in the visual associative cortex. These modulations might reflect automatic analysis of acoustic features, attention direction to informative aspects of the laughter signal and the retention of those in working memory during evaluation processes. These processes may be associated with visual imagery supporting the formation of inferences on the intentions of our social counterparts. Here, the right dorsolateral precentral cortex appears as a network node potentially linking the functions of auditory and visual associative sensory cortices with those of the mentalizing-associated anterior mediofrontal cortex during the decoding of social information in laughter. PMID:23667619

  7. Distinct Microbial Communities within the Endosphere and Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides Roots across Contrasting Soil Types.

    SciTech Connect

    Gottel, Neil R; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F; Kerley, Marilyn K; Yang, Zamin; Pelletier, Dale A; Podar, Mircea; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Uberbacher, Edward C; Tuskan, Gerald A; Vilgalys, Rytas; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2011-01-01

    The root-rhizosphere interface of Populus is the nexus of a variety of associations between bacteria, fungi, and the host plant and an ideal model for studying interactions between plants and microorganisms. However, such studies have generally been confined to greenhouse and plantation systems. Here we analyze microbial communities from the root endophytic and rhizospheric habitats of Populus deltoides in mature natural trees from both upland and bottomland sites in central Tennessee. Community profiling utilized 454 pyrosequencing with separate primers targeting the V4 region for bacterial 16S rRNA and the D1/D2 region for fungal 28S rRNA genes. Rhizosphere bacteria were dominated by Acidobacteria (31%) and Alphaproteobacteria (30%), whereas most endophytes were from the Gammaproteobacteria (54%) as well as Alphaproteobacteria (23%). A single Pseudomonas-like operational taxonomic unit (OTU) accounted for 34% of endophytic bacterial sequences. Endophytic bacterial richness was also highly variable and 10-fold lower than in rhizosphere samples originating from the same roots. Fungal rhizosphere and endophyte samples had approximately equal amounts of the Pezizomycotina (40%), while the Agaricomycotina were more abundant in the rhizosphere (34%) than endosphere (17%). Both fungal and bacterial rhizosphere samples were highly clustered compared to the more variable endophyte samples in a UniFrac principal coordinates analysis, regardless of upland or bottomland site origin. Hierarchical clustering of OTU relative abundance patterns also showed that the most abundant bacterial and fungal OTUs tended to be dominant in either the endophyte or rhizosphere samples but not both. Together, these findings demonstrate that root endophytic communities are distinct assemblages rather than opportunistic subsets of the rhizosphere.

  8. Teleost leukocyte immune-type receptors activate distinct phagocytic modes for target acquisition and engulfment.

    PubMed

    Lillico, Dustin M E; Zwozdesky, Myron A; Pemberton, Joshua G; Deutscher, Julianna M; Jones, Lena O; Chang, John P; Stafford, James L

    2015-08-01

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) IpLITRs belong to the Ig superfamily and regulate innate immune cell effector responses. This study tested the hypothesis that ITAM-dependent and ITAM-independent phagocytic pathways are engaged by different subtypes of the IpLITR family. When stably expressed in RBL-2H3 cells, the ITAM-containing fusion-construct IpLITR 2.6b/IpFcR?-L stimulated phagocytic responses that were abrogated at suboptimal incubation temperatures and by pharmacological inhibitors of the classic signaling components of the mammalian FcR-dependent phagocytic pathway. Interestingly, the ITIM-containing receptor IpLITR 1.1b also induced phagocytosis through an actin-dependent mechanism, but this process was insensitive to the pharmacological inhibitors tested and remained functional at temperatures as low as 22°C. The IpLITR 1.1b also displayed a unique target-acquisition phenotype that consisted of complex, membranous protrusions, which captured targets in phagocytic cup-like structures but often failed to completely engulf targets. Taken together, these findings suggest that teleost immunoregulatory receptors that associate with ITAM-containing adaptors can engage conserved components of the phagocytic machinery to engulf extracellular targets akin to the classic FcR-mediated response in mammals. Alternatively, IpLITR 1.1b displays a stalled phagocytic phenotype that is likely dependent on the selective recruitment of the minimal molecular machinery required for target capture but results in incomplete target engulfment. Overall, this study demonstrates that IpLITRs can selectively engage distinct components of the phagocytic process and provides important new information regarding the target acquisition as well as internalization mechanisms involved in controlling phagocytic responses across vertebrates. PMID:25977286

  9. Functional Proteomics Screen Enables Enrichment of Distinct Cell Types from Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sharivkin, Revital; Walker, Michael D.; Soen, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+), glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9- /CD56+) and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9- /CD56-). This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples. PMID:25706282

  10. Functional proteomics screen enables enrichment of distinct cell types from human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Sharivkin, Revital; Walker, Michael D; Soen, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+), glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9-/CD56+) and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9-/CD56-). This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples. PMID:25706282

  11. Allocation of Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Isolates into Four Distinct Groups by ompK36 Typing in a Taiwanese University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Jou; Zheng, Po-Xing; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Wang, Li-Rong; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2015-10-01

    The OmpK36 porin plays a role in carbapenem resistance and may contribute to bacterial virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of different groups of K. pneumoniae separated by ompK36 typing. Among 226 nonduplicate K. pneumoniae bloodstream isolates collected at a Taiwanese hospital in 2011, four ompK36 types, designated types A, B, C, and D, were identified by PCR in 61, 28, 100, and 36 isolates, respectively; 1 isolate was untypeable. Statistical analysis showed significantly higher rates of antimicrobial resistance (all tested antibiotics except meropenem), extended-spectrum ?-lactamases or DHA-1 (47.5% together), Qnr-type quinolone resistance determinants (50.8%), and IncFIIA-type plasmids (49.2%) in group A than in others. Seventeen isolates were identified as belonging to 3 international high-risk clones (4 sequence type 11 [ST11], 10 ST15, and 3 ST147 isolates); all isolates but 1 ST15 isolate were classified in group A. The significant characteristics of group C were hypermucoviscosity (62.0%) and a higher virulence gene content. This group included all serotype K1 (n = 30), K2 (n = 25), and K5 (n = 3) isolates, 6 of 7 K57 isolates, all isolates of major clones associated with pyogenic liver abscesses (29 ST23, 11 ST65, 5 ST86, 7 ST373, and 1 ST375 isolates), and 16 (94.1%) of 17 isolates causing bacteremic liver abscesses. Twelve (42.9%) of the group B isolates were responsible for bacteremic biliary tract infections. Group D was predominant (83.3%) among 12 K20 isolates. This study suggests that most clinical K. pneumoniae isolates can be allocated into four groups with distinct characteristics based on ompK36 types. PMID:26224840

  12. Distinct Functional Properties of Isoamylase-Type Starch Debranching Enzymes in Monocot and Dicot Leaves1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Facon, Maud; Lin, Qiaohui; Azzaz, Abdelhamid M.; Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A.; Myers, Alan M.; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Roussel, Xavier; D’Hulst, Christophe; Wattebled, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Isoamylase-type starch debranching enzymes (ISA) play important roles in starch biosynthesis in chloroplast-containing organisms, as shown by the strict conservation of both catalytically active ISA1 and the noncatalytic homolog ISA2. Functional distinctions exist between species, although they are not understood yet. Numerous plant tissues require both ISA1 and ISA2 for normal starch biosynthesis, whereas monocot endosperm and leaf exhibit nearly normal starch metabolism without ISA2. This study took in vivo and in vitro approaches to determine whether organism-specific physiology or evolutionary divergence between monocots and dicots is responsible for distinctions in ISA function. Maize (Zea mays) ISA1 was expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lacking endogenous ISA1 or lacking both native ISA1 and ISA2. The maize protein functioned in Arabidopsis leaves to support nearly normal starch metabolism in the absence of any native ISA1 or ISA2. Analysis of recombinant enzymes showed that Arabidopsis ISA1 requires ISA2 as a partner for enzymatic function, whereas maize ISA1 was active by itself. The electrophoretic mobility of recombinant and native maize ISA differed, suggestive of posttranslational modifications in vivo. Sedimentation equilibrium measurements showed recombinant maize ISA1 to be a dimer, in contrast to previous gel permeation data that estimated the molecular mass as a tetramer. These data demonstrate that evolutionary divergence between monocots and dicots is responsible for the distinctions in ISA1 function. PMID:24027240

  13. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms Detected with Novel DNA Probes Differentiate among Diverse Lineages of Serogroup 4 Listeria monocytogenes and Identify Four Distinct Lineages in Serotype 4b

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Huyen L.; Kathariou, Sophia

    2002-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes of serotype 4b has been implicated in numerous outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis and in ca. 40% of sporadic cases. Strains of this serotype appear to be relatively homogeneous genetically, and molecular markers specific for distinct serotype 4b lineages have not been frequently identified. Here we show that DNA fragments derived from the putative mannitol permease locus of Listeria monocytogenes had an unexpectedly high potential to differentiate among different strains of serotype 4b when used as probes in Southern blotting of EcoRI-digested genomic DNA, yielding four distinct restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns. Strains of two epidemic-associated lineages, including the major epidemic clone implicated in several outbreaks in Europe and North America, had distinct RFLPs which differed from those of all other serotype 4b strains that we screened but which were encountered among strains of serotypes 1/2b and 3b. In addition, three serogroup 4 lineages were found to have unique RFLPs that were not encountered among any other L. monocytogenes strains. One was an unusual lineage of serotype 4b, and the other two were members of the serotype 4a and 4c group. The observed polymorphisms may reflect evolutionary relationships among lineages of L. monocytogenes and may facilitate detection and population genetic analysis of specific lineages. PMID:11772609

  14. 38 CFR 74.25 - What types of personally identifiable information will VA collect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VETERANS SMALL BUSINESS REGULATIONS Records Management § 74.25 What types of personally identifiable...ownership and control interests in a specific business seeking to obtain verified...

  15. 38 CFR 74.25 - What types of personally identifiable information will VA collect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VETERANS SMALL BUSINESS REGULATIONS Records Management § 74.25 What types of personally identifiable...ownership and control interests in a specific business seeking to obtain verified...

  16. 38 CFR 74.25 - What types of personally identifiable information will VA collect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VETERANS SMALL BUSINESS REGULATIONS Records Management § 74.25 What types of personally identifiable...ownership and control interests in a specific business seeking to obtain verified...

  17. 38 CFR 74.25 - What types of personally identifiable information will VA collect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VETERANS SMALL BUSINESS REGULATIONS Records Management § 74.25 What types of personally identifiable...ownership and control interests in a specific business seeking to obtain verified...

  18. 38 CFR 74.25 - What types of personally identifiable information will VA collect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VETERANS SMALL BUSINESS REGULATIONS Records Management § 74.25 What types of personally identifiable...ownership and control interests in a specific business seeking to obtain verified...

  19. Desorption of water from distinct step types on a curved silver crystal.

    PubMed

    Janlamool, Jakrapan; Bashlakov, Dima; Berg, Otto; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd; Juurlink, Ludo B F

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of H2O onto the A and B type steps on an Ag single crystal by temperature programmed desorption. For this study, we have used a curved crystal exposing a continuous range of surface structures ranging from [5(111) × (100)] via (111) to [5(111) × (110)]. LEED and STM studies verify that the curvature of our sample results predominantly from monoatomic steps. The sample thus provides a continuous array of step densities for both step types. Desorption probed by spatially-resolved TPD of multilayers of H2O shows no dependence on the exact substrate structure and thus confirms the absence of thermal gradients during temperature ramps. In the submonolayer regime, we observe a small and linear dependence of the desorption temperature on the A and B step density. We argue that such small differences are only observable by means of a single curved crystal, which thus establishes new experimental benchmarks for theoretical calculation of chemically accurate binding energies. We propose an origin of the observed behavior based on a "two state" desorption model. PMID:25068782

  20. Turtle Dorsal Cortex Pyramidal Neurons Comprise Two Distinct Cell Types with Indistinguishable Visual Responses

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Thomas; Wright, Nathaniel; Thornquist, Stephen; Ariel, Michael; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    A detailed inventory of the constituent pieces in cerebral cortex is considered essential to understand the principles underlying cortical signal processing. Specifically, the search for pyramidal neuron subtypes is partly motivated by the hypothesis that a subtype-specific division of labor could create a rich substrate for computation. On the other hand, the extreme integration of individual neurons into the collective cortical circuit promotes the hypothesis that cellular individuality represents a smaller computational role within the context of the larger network. These competing hypotheses raise the important question to what extent the computational function of a neuron is determined by its individual type or by its circuit connections. We created electrophysiological profiles from pyramidal neurons within the sole cellular layer of turtle visual cortex by measuring responses to current injection using whole-cell recordings. A blind clustering algorithm applied to these data revealed the presence of two principle types of pyramidal neurons. Brief diffuse light flashes triggered membrane potential fluctuations in those same cortical neurons. The apparently network driven variability of the visual responses concealed the existence of subtypes. In conclusion, our results support the notion that the importance of diverse intrinsic physiological properties is minimized when neurons are embedded in a synaptic recurrent network. PMID:26633877

  1. A patient presenting with spinal cord compression who had two distinct follicular cell type thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Koca, E; Sokmensuer, C; Yildiz, B O; Engin, H; Bozkurt, M F; Aras, T; Barista, I; Gurlek, A

    2004-06-01

    A 61-yr-old woman presented with complaints of weakness and pain in her legs. A magnetic resonance imaging showed a 3 x 5.6 x 7.8 cm mass lesion destructing the T1 and T2 vertebral bodies and compressing the spinal cord. The mass was excised surgically. It was follicular carcinoma metastasis of the cervicodorsal region. Then, she underwent a total thyroidectomy. Pathological examination showed two different types of carcinomas in two different focuses; follicular carcinoma in the left lobe and follicular variant papillary carcinoma in the isthmic lobe. After the operation she was given 100 mCi 131I. This is the first report of a patient who had both metastatic follicular carcinoma and follicular variant papillary carcinoma together. PMID:15717654

  2. Functional genomics identifies neural stem cell sub-type expression profiles and genes regulating neuroblast homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Travis D.; Miller, Michael R.; Robinson, Kristin J.; Bayraktar, Omer A.; Osterhout, Jessica A.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila larval central brain contains about 10,000 differentiated neurons and 200 scattered neural progenitors (neuroblasts), which can be further subdivided into ~95 type I neuroblasts and eight type II neuroblasts per brain lobe. Only type II neuroblasts generate self-renewing intermediate neural progenitors (INPs), and consequently each contributes more neurons to the brain, including much of the central complex. We characterized six different mutant genotypes that lead to expansion of neuroblast numbers; some preferentially expand type II or type I neuroblasts. Transcriptional profiling of larval brains from these mutant genotypes versus wild-type allowed us to identify small clusters of transcripts enriched in type II or type I neuroblasts, and we validated these clusters by gene expression analysis. Unexpectedly, only a few genes were found to be differentially expressed between type I/II neuroblasts, suggesting that these genes play a large role in establishing the different cell types. We also identified a large group of genes predicted to be expressed in all neuroblasts but not neurons. We performed a neuroblast-specific, RNAi-based functional screen and identified 84 genes that are required to maintain proper neuroblast numbers; all have conserved mammalian orthologs. These genes are excellent candidates for regulating neural progenitor self-renewal in Drosophila and mammals. PMID:22061480

  3. Discovering Massive Runaway Stars with Infrared Bowshock Nebulae: Identifying Twelve New Early-Type Stars using SMOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chick, William T.; Andrews, Julian E.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Povich, Matthew S.; Dale, Daniel A.; Munari, Stephan; Olivier, Grace M.; Schurhammer, Danielle; Sorber, Rebecca L.; Wernke, Heather N.

    2016-01-01

    Massive O and B type stars are crucial to the evolution of the interstellar medium, dominating the production of ionizing radiation, mechanical energy, and heavy elements. However, due to their short lives and relative scarcity, these stars are some of the least well understood and are difficult to locate outside of large star forming regions. A small but significant fraction of these massive stars have been observed to be high-velocity runaway stars moving rapidly away from their origin. When these stars encounter nebular gas they create characteristic arc-shaped bowshocks of heated compressed dust and gas. Using the distinct infrared emission morphology of the hot dust, these bowshock nebulae are predicted to give the location of the massive early type stars.Visual inspection of 24-micron band images from the Spitzer Mapping of the Outer Galaxy (SMOG) revealed 12 new bowshock nebula candidates. Follow up optical spectroscopy from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory confirmed that all 12 of the associated stellar sources are early-type stars. Combined with related results from visual searches for bowshock nebulae using WISE and Spitzer surveys in the inner Galaxy, we have identified over 85 new early type bowshock supporting stellar sources, a 95% success rate. We conclude that morphological selection of arc-shared infrared nebulae with a symmetrically placed star is an efficient way to discover early type stars.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1063146 (REU), AST-1411851 (RUI), and AST-1412845.

  4. Mercury dynamics in groundwater across three distinct riparian zone types of the US Midwest.

    PubMed

    Vidon, Philippe G; Mitchell, Carl P J; Jacinthe, Pierre-André; Baker, Matthew E; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Fisher, Katelin R

    2013-10-01

    Although the intense biogeochemical gradients present in riparian zones have the potential to affect mercury (Hg) cycling, Hg dynamics in riparian zones has received relatively little attention in the literature. Our study investigated groundwater filtered total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in three riparian zones with contrasting hydrogeomorphic (HGM) characteristics (till, alluvium, outwash) in the US Midwest. Despite high Hg deposition rates (>16 ?g m(-2)) in the region, median THg (<1.05 ng L(-1)) and MeHg (<0.05 ng L(-1)) concentrations were low at the study sites. Methylmercury concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to THg (R = 0.82), temperature (R = 0.55), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (R = 0.62). THg also correlated with groundwater DOC (R = 0.59). The proportion of MeHg in THg (%MeHg) was significantly correlated to temperature (R = 0.58) and MeHg (R = 0.50). Results suggest that HGM characteristics, the presence of tile drains, and the propensity for overbank flooding at a riparian site determined the extent to which stream water Hg concentrations influenced riparian groundwater Hg levels or vice versa. Differences in hydrogeomorphic characteristics between sites did not translate however in significant differences in groundwater MeHg or %MeHg. Overall, widespread Hg contamination in the most common riparian hydrogeomorphic types of the US Midwest is unlikely to be a major concern. However, for frequently flooded riparian zones located downstream from a potentially large source of Hg (e.g., concentrated urban development), Hg concentrations are likely to be higher than at other sites. PMID:24113840

  5. Four cell types with distinctive membrane properties and morphologies in lamina I of the spinal dorsal horn of the adult rat

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Steven A; Koninck, Yves De

    2002-01-01

    Lamina I of the spinal dorsal horn plays an important role in the processing and relay of nociceptive information. Signal processing depends, in part, on neuronal membrane properties. Intrinsic membrane properties of lamina I neurons were therefore investigated using whole cell patch clamp recordings in a slice preparation of adult rat spinal cord. Based on responses to somatic current injection, four cell types were identified: tonic, which fire comparatively slowly but continuously throughout stimulation; phasic, which fire a high frequency burst of variable duration; delayed onset, which fire irregularly and with a marked delay to the first spike; and single spike, which typically fire only one action potential even when strongly depolarised. Classification by spiking pattern was further refined by identification of characteristic stimulus-response curves and quantification of several response parameters. Objectivity of the classification was confirmed by cluster analysis. Responses to stimulus trains and synaptic input as well as the kinetics of spontaneous synaptic events revealed differences in the signal processing characteristics of the cell types: tonic and delayed onset cells appeared to act predominantly as integrators whereas phasic and single spike cells acted as coincidence detectors. Intracellular labelling revealed a significant correlation between morphological and physiological cell types: tonic cells were typically fusiform, phasic cells were pyramidal, and delayed onset and single spike cells were multipolar. Thus, there are multiple physiological cells types in lamina I with specific morphological correlates and distinctive signal processing characteristics that confer significant differences in the transduction of input into spike trains. PMID:11897852

  6. IFN-?-inducing, unusual viral RNA species produced by paramyxovirus infection accumulated into distinct cytoplasmic structures in an RNA-type-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Asuka; Kawabata, Ryoko; Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Irie, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) system is one of the most important defensive responses of mammals against viruses, and is rapidly evoked when the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of viruses are sensed. Non-self, virus-derived RNA species have been identified as the PAMPs of RNA viruses. In the present study, we compared different types of IFN-?-inducing and -non-inducing viruses in the context of Sendai virus infection. We found that some types of unusual viral RNA species were produced by infections with IFN-?-inducing viruses and accumulated into distinct cytoplasmic structures in an RNA-type-dependent manner. One of these structures was similar to the so-called antiviral stress granules (avSGs) formed by an infection with IFN-inducing viruses whose C proteins were knocked-out or mutated. Non-encapsidated, unusual viral RNA harboring the 5?-terminal region of the viral genome as well as RIG-I and typical SG markers accumulated in these granules. Another was a non-SG-like inclusion formed by an infection with the Cantell strain; a copyback-type DI genome, but not an authentic viral genome, specifically accumulated in the inclusion, whereas RIG-I and SG markers did not. The induction of IFN-? was closely associated with the production of these unusual RNAs as well as the formation of the cytoplasmic structures. PMID:26300870

  7. Analysis of the type II-A CRISPR-Cas system of Streptococcus agalactiae reveals distinctive features according to genetic lineages

    PubMed Central

    Lier, Clément; Baticle, Elodie; Horvath, Philippe; Haguenoer, Eve; Valentin, Anne-Sophie; Glaser, Philippe; Mereghetti, Laurent; Lanotte, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) are found in 90% of archaea and about 40% of bacteria. In this original system, CRISPR arrays comprise short, almost unique sequences called spacers that are interspersed with conserved palindromic repeats. These systems play a role in adaptive immunity and participate to fight non-self DNA such as integrative and conjugative elements, plasmids, and phages. In Streptococcus agalactiae, a bacterium implicated in colonization and infections in humans since the 1960s, two CRISPR-Cas systems have been described. A type II-A system, characterized by proteins Cas9, Cas1, Cas2, and Csn2, is ubiquitous, and a type I–C system, with the Cas8c signature protein, is present in about 20% of the isolates. Unlike type I–C, which appears to be non-functional, type II-A appears fully functional. Here we studied type II-A CRISPR-cas loci from 126 human isolates of S. agalactiae belonging to different clonal complexes that represent the diversity of the species and that have been implicated in colonization or infection. The CRISPR-cas locus was analyzed both at spacer and repeat levels. Major distinctive features were identified according to the phylogenetic lineages previously defined by multilocus sequence typing, especially for the sequence type (ST) 17, which is considered hypervirulent. Among other idiosyncrasies, ST-17 shows a significantly lower number of spacers in comparison with other lineages. This characteristic could reflect the peculiar virulence or colonization specificities of this lineage. PMID:26124774

  8. Linking structural features from mitochondrial and bacterial F-type ATP synthases to their distinct mechanisms of ATPase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    ATP synthases are molecular motors, which synthesize ATP, the ubiquitous energy source in all living cells. They use an electrochemical gradient to drive a rotation in the membrane embedded Fo domain, namely the c-ring, causing a conformational change in the soluble F1 domain which leads to the catalytic event. In the opposite fashion, they can also hydrolyse ATP to maintain the ion gradient across the membrane. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, bacteria and mammals have developed peculiar mechanistic features in addition to a common one, namely MgADP inhibition. Here I discuss the distinct ATPase inhibition mechanism in mitochondrial (IF1) and bacterial (subunits ? and ?) F-type ATP synthases, based on available structural, biophysical and biochemical data. PMID:26140992

  9. Comparative analysis of Edwardsiella isolates from fish in the eastern United States identifies two distinct genetic taxa amongst organisms phenotypically classified as E. tarda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Matt J.; Quiniou, Sylvie M.; Cody, Theresa; Tabuchi, Maki; Ware, Cynthia; Cipriano, Rocco C.; Mauel, Michael J.; Soto, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, has been implicated in significant losses in aquaculture facilities worldwide. Here, we assessed the intra-specific variability of E. tarda isolates from 4 different fish species in the eastern United States. Repetitive sequence mediated PCR (rep-PCR) using 4 different primer sets (ERIC I & II, ERIC II, BOX, and GTG5) and multi-locus sequence analysis of 16S SSU rDNA, groEl, gyrA, gyrB, pho, pgi, pgm, and rpoA gene fragments identified two distinct genotypes of E. tarda (DNA group I; DNA group II). Isolates that fell into DNA group II demonstrated more similarity to E. ictaluri than DNA group I, which contained the reference E. tarda strain (ATCC #15947). Conventional PCR analysis using published E. tarda-specific primer sets yielded variable results, with several primer sets producing no observable amplification of target DNA from some isolates. Fluorometric determination of G + C content demonstrated 56.4% G + C content for DNA group I, 60.2% for DNA group II, and 58.4% for E. ictaluri. Surprisingly, these isolates were indistinguishable using conventional biochemical techniques, with all isolates demonstrating phenotypic characteristics consistent with E. tarda. Analysis using two commercial test kits identified multiple phenotypes, although no single metabolic characteristic could reliably discriminate between genetic groups. Additionally, anti-microbial susceptibility and fatty acid profiles did not demonstrate remarkable differences between groups. The significant genetic variation (<90% similarity at gyrA, gyrB, pho, phi and pgm; <40% similarity by rep-PCR) between these groups suggests organisms from DNA group II may represent an unrecognized, genetically distinct taxa of Edwardsiella that is phenotypically indistinguishable from E. tarda.

  10. Toward a theory of distinct types of "impulsive" behaviors: A meta-analysis of self-report and behavioral measures.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Leigh; Markon, Kristian E; Clark, Lee Anna

    2014-03-01

    Impulsivity is considered a personality trait affecting behavior in many life domains, from recreational activities to important decision making. When extreme, it is associated with mental health problems, such as substance use disorders, as well as with interpersonal and social difficulties, including juvenile delinquency and criminality. Yet, trait impulsivity may not be a unitary construct. We review commonly used self-report measures of personality trait impulsivity and related constructs (e.g., sensation seeking), plus the opposite pole, control or constraint. A meta-analytic principal-components factor analysis demonstrated that these scales comprise 3 distinct factors, each of which aligns with a broad, higher order personality factor-Neuroticism/Negative Emotionality, Disinhibition versus Constraint/Conscientiousness, and Extraversion/Positive Emotionality/Sensation Seeking. Moreover, Disinhibition versus Constraint/Conscientiousness comprise 2 correlated but distinct subfactors: Disinhibition versus Constraint and Conscientiousness/Will versus Resourcelessness. We also review laboratory tasks that purport to measure a construct similar to trait impulsivity. A meta-analytic principal-components factor analysis demonstrated that these tasks constitute 4 factors (Inattention, Inhibition, Impulsive Decision-Making, and Shifting). Although relations between these 2 measurement models are consistently low to very low, relations between both trait scales and laboratory behavioral tasks and daily-life impulsive behaviors are moderate. That is, both independently predict problematic daily-life impulsive behaviors, such as substance use, gambling, and delinquency; their joint use has incremental predictive power over the use of either type of measure alone and furthers our understanding of these important, problematic behaviors. Future use of confirmatory methods should help to ascertain with greater precision the number of and relations between impulsivity-related components. PMID:24099400

  11. Use of Genomic DNA as an Indirect Reference for Identifying Gender-Associated Transcripts in Morphologically Identical, but Chromosomally Distinct, Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Jennifer M.; Protasio, Anna V.; McArdle, Andrew J.; Williams, Gary A.; Johnston, David A.; Hoffmann, Karl F.

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of DNA microarray technology to study global Schistosoma gene expression has led to the rapid identification of novel biological processes, pathways or associations. Implementation of standardized DNA microarray protocols across laboratories would assist maximal interpretation of generated datasets and extend productive application of this technology. Methodology/Principal Findings Utilizing a new Schistosoma mansoni oligonucleotide DNA microarray composed of 37,632 elements, we show that schistosome genomic DNA (gDNA) hybridizes with less variation compared to complex mixed pools of S. mansoni cDNA material (R?=?0.993 for gDNA compared to R?=?0.956 for cDNA during ‘self versus self’ hybridizations). Furthermore, these effects are species-specific, with S. japonicum or Mus musculus gDNA failing to bind significantly to S. mansoni oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (e.g R?=?0.350 when S. mansoni gDNA is co-hybridized with S. japonicum gDNA). Increased median fluorescent intensities (209.9) were also observed for DNA microarray elements hybridized with S. mansoni gDNA compared to complex mixed pools of S. mansoni cDNA (112.2). Exploiting these valuable characteristics, S. mansoni gDNA was used in two-channel DNA microarray hybridization experiments as a common reference for indirect identification of gender-associated transcripts in cercariae, a schistosome life-stage in which there is no overt sexual dimorphism. This led to the identification of 2,648 gender-associated transcripts. When compared to the 780 gender-associated transcripts identified by hybridization experiments utilizing a two-channel direct method (co-hybridization of male and female cercariae cDNA), indirect methods using gDNA were far superior in identifying greater quantities of differentially expressed transcripts. Interestingly, both methods identified a concordant subset of 188 male-associated and 156 female-associated cercarial transcripts, respectively. Gene ontology classification of these differentially expressed transcripts revealed a greater diversity of categories in male cercariae. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed the DNA microarray results and supported the reliability of this platform for identifying gender-associated transcripts. Conclusions/Significance Schistosome gDNA displays characteristics highly suitable for the comparison of two-channel DNA microarray results obtained from experiments conducted independently across laboratories. The schistosome transcripts identified here demonstrate, for the first time, that gender-associated patterns of expression are already well established in the morphologically identical, but chromosomally distinct, cercariae stage. PMID:18941520

  12. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Infrared Fiber Optic Probe Spectroscopy Identify Collagen Type in Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hanifi, Arash; McCarthy, Helen; Roberts, Sally; Pleshko, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types) to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in connective tissues, using both imaging and fiber optic methodology. This has great potential for clinical in situ applications for monitoring tissue repair. PMID:23717662

  13. Targeting N-Glycan Cryptic Sugar Moieties for Broad-Spectrum Virus Neutralization: Progress in Identifying Conserved Molecular Targets in Viruses of Distinct Phylogenetic Origins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Denong; Tang, Jin; Tang, Jiulai; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Identifying molecular targets for eliciting broadly virus-neutralizing antibodies is one of the key steps toward development of vaccines against emerging viral pathogens. Owing to genomic and somatic diversities among viral species, identifying protein targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization is highly challenging even for the same virus, such as HIV-1. However, viruses rely on host glycosylation machineries to synthesize and express glycans and, thereby, may display common carbohydrate moieties. Thus, exploring glycan-binding profiles of broad-spectrum virus-neutralizing agents may provide key information to uncover the carbohydrate-based virus-neutralizing epitopes. In this study, we characterized two broadly HIV-neutralizing agents, human monoclonal antibody 2G12 and Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA), for their viral targeting activities. Although these agents were known to be specific for oligomannosyl antigens, they differ strikingly in virus-binding activities. The former is HIV-1 specific; the latter is broadly reactive and is able to neutralize viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins, such as HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In carbohydrate microarray analyses, we explored the molecular basis underlying the striking differences in the spectrum of anti-virus activities of the two probes. Unlike 2G12, which is strictly specific for the high-density Man9GlcNAc2Asn (Man9)-clusters, GNA recognizes a number of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties. These include not only the known oligomannosyl antigens but also previously unrecognized tri-antennary or multi-valent GlcNAc-terminating N-glycan epitopes (Tri/m-Gn). These findings highlight the potential of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties as conserved targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization and suggest the GNA-model of glycan-binding warrants focused investigation. PMID:25774492

  14. p.L18P: a novel IDUA mutation that causes a distinct attenuated phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis type I patients.

    PubMed

    Pasqualim, G; Ribeiro, M G; da Fonseca, G G G; Szlago, M; Schenone, A; Lemes, A; Rojas, M V M; Matte, U; Giugliani, R

    2015-10-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of ?-l-iduronidase (IDUA) which leads to a wide spectrum of clinical severity. Here, we describe the case of four male patients who present the previously undescribed p.L18P mutation. Patient 1 (p.L18P/p.L18P) presents, despite multiple joint contractures, an attenuated phenotype. Patient 2 (p.L18P/p.W402X) was diagnosed at 4?years of age with bone dysplasia, coarse facies, limited mobility, claw hands and underwent bilateral carpal tunnel surgery at 6?years of age. Patients 3 and 4 (both p.L18P/p.L18P) are brothers. Patient 3 was diagnosed at 4?years of age, when presented claw hands, lower limb and shoulder pain, restricted articular movement and bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient 4 was diagnosed at 17?months of age when presented lower limb pain at night, respiratory allergy and repeated upper airways infections. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that p.L18P mutation reduces the signal peptide to 25 amino acids and alters its secondary structure. In conclusion, we report a new IDUA variant that alters the structure of the signal peptide, which likely impairs transport to lysosomes. Moreover, it leads to a distinct attenuated phenotype with mainly bone and cartilage symptoms, without visceromegalies, heart disease, or cognitive impairment. PMID:25256405

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the two distinct types of zebrafish ?2-microglobulin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaosan; Zhang, Nianzhi; Lu, Shuangshuang; Tariq, Mansoor; Wang, Junya; Xia, Chun

    2015-06-01

    ?(2)-Microglobulin (?(2)m) noncovalently associates with the heavy chain of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules, which bind foreign antigen peptides to control the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immune response. In contrast to mammals, there are distinct types of ?(2)ms derived from two loci in a number of teleost species. In order to clarify the structures of the ?(2)ms, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) ?(2)ms Dare-?(2)m-I and Dare-?(2)m-II were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized, and diffraction data were collected to 1.6 and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. Both crystals belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). The unit-cell parameters were determined to be a = 38.2, b = 50.4, c = 50.9 Å for Dare-?(2)m-I and a = 38.9, b = 52.7, c = 65.8 Å for Dare-?(2)m-II. Each asymmetric unit was constituted of one molecule, with Matthews coefficients of 2.22 and 3.01 Å(3) Da(-1) and solvent contents of 45 and 59% for Dare-?(2)m-I and Dare-?(2)m-II, respectively. These two ?(2)m structures will provide relevant information for further studies of the structures of the MHC I complex. PMID:26057815

  16. Four new type I restriction enzymes identified in Escherichia coli clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kasarjian, Julie K. A.; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Iida, Masatake; Matsuda, Katsura; Ryu, Junichi

    2005-01-01

    Using a plasmid transformation method and the RM search computer program, four type I restriction enzymes with new recognition sites and two isoschizomers (EcoBI and Eco377I) were identified in a collection of clinical Escherichia coli isolates. These new enzymes were designated Eco394I, Eco826I, Eco851I and Eco912I. Their recognition sequences were determined to be GAC(5N)RTAAY, GCA(6N)CTGA, GTCA(6N)TGAY and CAC(5N)TGGC, respectively. A methylation sensitivity assay, using various synthetic oligonucleotides, was used to identify the adenines that prevent cleavage when methylated (underlined). These results suggest that type I enzymes are abundant in E.coli and many other bacteria, as has been inferred from bacterial genome sequencing projects. PMID:16040596

  17. The use of four band multispectral photography to identify forest cover types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, S. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Four-band multispectral aerial photography and a color additive viewer were employed to identify forest cover types in Northern Alabama. The multispectral photography utilized the blue, green, red and near-infrared spectral regions and was made with black and white infrared film. On the basis of color differences alone, a differentiation between conifers and hardwoods was possible; however, supplementary information related to forest ecology proved necessary for the differentiation of various species of pines and hardwoods.

  18. Unique functions of the type II interleukin 4 receptor identified in mice lacking the interleukin 13 receptor ?1 chain

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Pesce, John T; Sheikh, Faruk; Cheever, Allen W; Mentink-Kane, Margaret M; Wilson, Mark S; Stevens, Sean; Valenzuela, David M; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Urban, Joseph F; Donnelly, Raymond P; Wynn, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    The interleukin 4 receptor (IL-4R) is a central mediator of T helper type 2 (TH2)–mediated disease and associates with either the common ?-chain to form the type I IL-4R or with the IL-13R ?1 chain (IL-13R?1) to form the type II IL-4R. Here we used Il13ra1?/? mice to characterize the distinct functions of type I and type II IL-4 receptors in vivo. In contrast to Il4ra?/? mice, which have weak TH2 responses, Il13ra1?/? mice had exacerbated TH2 responses. Il13ra1?/? mice showed much less mortality after infection with Schistosoma mansoni and much more susceptibility to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. IL-13R?1 was essential for allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity and mucus hypersecretion but not for fibroblast or alternative macrophage activation. Thus, type I and II IL-4 receptors exert distinct effects on immune responses. PMID:18066066

  19. DETECTION OF A DISTINCT METAL-POOR STELLAR HALO IN THE EARLY-TYPE GALAXY NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, Mark B.; Strader, Jay; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.

    2015-02-10

    We present the resolved stellar populations in the inner and outer halo of the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3115. Using deep Hubble Space Telescope observations, we analyze stars 2 mag fainter than the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We study three fields along the minor axis of this galaxy, 19, 37, and 54 kpc from its center—corresponding to 7, 14, and 21 effective radii (r{sub e} ). Even at these large galactocentric distances, all of the fields are dominated by a relatively enriched population, with the main peak in the metallicity distribution decreasing with radius from [Z/H] ? –0.5 to –0.65. The fraction of metal-poor stars ([Z/H] < –0.95) increases from 17% at 16-37 kpc to 28% at ?54 kpc. We observe a distinct low-metallicity population (peaked at [Z/H] ? –1.3 and with total mass 2 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ?} ? 14% of the galaxy's stellar mass) and argue that this represents the detection of an underlying low-metallicity stellar halo. Such halos are generally predicted by galaxy formation theories and have been observed in several late-type galaxies, including the Milky Way and M31. The metallicity and spatial distribution of the stellar halo of NGC 3115 are consistent with the galaxy's globular cluster system, which has a similar low-metallicity population that becomes dominant at these large radii. This finding supports the use of globular clusters as bright chemodynamical tracers of galaxy halos. These data also allow us to make a precise measurement of the magnitude of the TRGB, from which we derive a distance modulus of NGC 3115 of 30.05 ± 0.05 ± 0.10{sub sys} (10.2 ± 0.2 ± 0.5{sub sys} Mpc)

  20. MicroRNA-Target Network Inference and Local Network Enrichment Analysis Identify Two microRNA Clusters with Distinct Functions in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sass, Steffen; Pitea, Adriana; Unger, Kristian; Hess, Julia; Mueller, Nikola S.; Theis, Fabian J.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs represent ~22 nt long endogenous small RNA molecules that have been experimentally shown to regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. One main interest in miRNA research is the investigation of their functional roles, which can typically be accomplished by identification of mi-/mRNA interactions and functional annotation of target gene sets. We here present a novel method “miRlastic”, which infers miRNA-target interactions using transcriptomic data as well as prior knowledge and performs functional annotation of target genes by exploiting the local structure of the inferred network. For the network inference, we applied linear regression modeling with elastic net regularization on matched microRNA and messenger RNA expression profiling data to perform feature selection on prior knowledge from sequence-based target prediction resources. The novelty of miRlastic inference originates in predicting data-driven intra-transcriptome regulatory relationships through feature selection. With synthetic data, we showed that miRlastic outperformed commonly used methods and was suitable even for low sample sizes. To gain insight into the functional role of miRNAs and to determine joint functional properties of miRNA clusters, we introduced a local enrichment analysis procedure. The principle of this procedure lies in identifying regions of high functional similarity by evaluating the shortest paths between genes in the network. We can finally assign functional roles to the miRNAs by taking their regulatory relationships into account. We thoroughly evaluated miRlastic on a cohort of head and neck cancer (HNSCC) patients provided by The Cancer Genome Atlas. We inferred an mi-/mRNA regulatory network for human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated miRNAs in HNSCC. The resulting network best enriched for experimentally validated miRNA-target interaction, when compared to common methods. Finally, the local enrichment step identified two functional clusters of miRNAs that were predicted to mediate HPV-associated dysregulation in HNSCC. Our novel approach was able to characterize distinct pathway regulations from matched miRNA and mRNA data. An R package of miRlastic was made available through: http://icb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/mirlastic. PMID:26694379

  1. MicroRNA-Target Network Inference and Local Network Enrichment Analysis Identify Two microRNA Clusters with Distinct Functions in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sass, Steffen; Pitea, Adriana; Unger, Kristian; Hess, Julia; Mueller, Nikola S; Theis, Fabian J

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs represent ~22 nt long endogenous small RNA molecules that have been experimentally shown to regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. One main interest in miRNA research is the investigation of their functional roles, which can typically be accomplished by identification of mi-/mRNA interactions and functional annotation of target gene sets. We here present a novel method "miRlastic", which infers miRNA-target interactions using transcriptomic data as well as prior knowledge and performs functional annotation of target genes by exploiting the local structure of the inferred network. For the network inference, we applied linear regression modeling with elastic net regularization on matched microRNA and messenger RNA expression profiling data to perform feature selection on prior knowledge from sequence-based target prediction resources. The novelty of miRlastic inference originates in predicting data-driven intra-transcriptome regulatory relationships through feature selection. With synthetic data, we showed that miRlastic outperformed commonly used methods and was suitable even for low sample sizes. To gain insight into the functional role of miRNAs and to determine joint functional properties of miRNA clusters, we introduced a local enrichment analysis procedure. The principle of this procedure lies in identifying regions of high functional similarity by evaluating the shortest paths between genes in the network. We can finally assign functional roles to the miRNAs by taking their regulatory relationships into account. We thoroughly evaluated miRlastic on a cohort of head and neck cancer (HNSCC) patients provided by The Cancer Genome Atlas. We inferred an mi-/mRNA regulatory network for human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated miRNAs in HNSCC. The resulting network best enriched for experimentally validated miRNA-target interaction, when compared to common methods. Finally, the local enrichment step identified two functional clusters of miRNAs that were predicted to mediate HPV-associated dysregulation in HNSCC. Our novel approach was able to characterize distinct pathway regulations from matched miRNA and mRNA data. An R package of miRlastic was made available through: http://icb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/mirlastic. PMID:26694379

  2. Ampelomyces mycoparasites from apple powdery mildew identified as a distinct group based on single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis of the rDNA ITS region.

    PubMed

    Szentiványi, Orsolya; Kiss, Levente; Russell, John C; Kovács, Gábor M; Varga, Krisztina; Jankovics, Tünde; Lesemann, Silke; Xu, Xiang-Ming; Jeffries, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Pycnidial fungi belonging to the genus Ampelomyces are the most common natural antagonists of powdery mildews worldwide. During a study of the interactions between apple powdery mildew (Podosphaera leucotricha) and Ampelomyces mycoparasites, 52 new Ampelomyces isolates were obtained from P. leucotricha and, in addition, 13 new isolates from other species of the Erysiphaceae in four European countries. Their genetic diversity was screened using single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). For comparison, 24 isolates obtained from genetic resource collections or other sources were included in this study. Based on the ITS-SSCP patterns, the isolates were placed in eight groups. The isolates belonged to two types based on their growth in culture. The faster-growing and the slower-growing isolates were included in different SSCP groups. A phylogenetic analysis of the ITS sequences of representatives of these groups confirmed the results obtained with the SSCP method, and showed that the faster-growing isolates do not belong to Ampelomyces as suggested by earlier studies. All the isolates from P. leucotricha fell into a distinct SSCP group of genetically homogeneous isolates. This suggests that Ampelomyces mycoparasites which occur in apple powdery mildew are slightly different from the other Ampelomyces groups which contain mycoparasites from various powdery mildew species. This may be because the main growth period of Ampelomyces mycoparasites in apple powdery mildew is isolated in time from that of Ampelomyces isolates that occur in other species of the Erysiphaceae. P. leucotricha starts its life-cycle early in the season, usually in March-April, while most powdery mildews are active in the same environments only late in the year. PMID:15912930

  3. Why HalleyTypes Resonate but LongPeriod Comets Don't: A Dynamical Distinction between Short and LongPeriod Comets

    E-print Network

    Chambers, John

    Why Halley­Types Resonate but Long­Period Comets Don't: A Dynamical Distinction between Short and Long­Period Comets J. E. Chambers Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution 02138. Abstract Several recent studies have noted that the orbital evolution of many comets

  4. Network Cluster Analysis of Protein–Protein Interaction Network–Identified Biomarker for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhonghui; Qiao, Zijun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex disease that is caused by an impairment in the secretion of ?-cell insulin and by a peripheral resistance to insulin. Most patients suffering from T2DM and from obesity exhibit insulin resistance in the muscles, liver, and fat, resulting in a reduced response of these tissues to insulin. In healthy individuals, pancreatic islet ?-cells secrete insulin to regulate the increase in blood glucose levels. Once these ?-cells fail to function, T2DM develops. Despite the progress achieved in this field in recent years, the genetic causes for insulin resistance and for T2DM have not yet been fully discovered. The present study aims to characterize T2DM by comparing its gene expression with that of normal controls, as well as to identify biomarkers for early T2DM. Gene expression profiles were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified for type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, functional analyses were conducted for the gene ontology and for the pathway enrichment. In total, 781 DEGs were identified in the T2DM samples relative to healthy controls. These genes were found to be involved in several biological processes, including cell communication, cell proliferation, cell shape, and apoptosis. We constructed a protein–protein interaction (PPI) network, and the clusters in the PPI were analyzed by using ClusterONE. Six functional genes that may play important roles in the initiation of T2DM were identified within the network. PMID:25879401

  5. Identifying Mobility Types in Cognitively Heterogeneous Older Adults Based on GPS-Tracking: What Discriminates Best?

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Markus; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Shoval, Noam; Auslander, Gail; Oswald, Frank; Heinik, Jeremia

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneity in older adults' mobility and its correlates have rarely been investigated based on objective mobility data and in samples including cognitively impaired individuals. We analyzed mobility profiles within a cognitively heterogeneous sample of N = 257 older adults from Israel and Germany based on GPS tracking technology. Participants were aged between 59 and 91 years (M = 72.9; SD = 6.4) and were either cognitively healthy (CH, n = 146), mildly cognitively impaired (MCI, n = 76), or diagnosed with an early-stage dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT, n = 35). Based on cluster analysis, we identified three mobility types ("Mobility restricted," "Outdoor oriented," "Walkers"), which could be predicted based on socio-demographic indicators, activity, health, and cognitive impairment status using discriminant analysis. Particularly demented individuals and persons with worse health exhibited restrictions in mobility. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of heterogeneity in mobility in old age. PMID:24652916

  6. DISTINCT COPY NUMBER ALTERATIONS AND INCIDENCE OF CHROMOTHRIPSIS ASSOCIATED WITH GRADE AND PROGNOSIS IN IDH MUTANT AND WILD-TYPE GLIOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Howard; Cohen, Adam; Aldape, Ken; Sato, Mariko; Mason, Clint; Diefes, Kristin; Heathcock, Lindsey; Abegglen, Lisa; Shrieve, Dennis; Couldwell, William; Schiffman, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both IDH mutated (IDHmut) and wild-type (IDHwt) lower grade gliomas can progress to GBM. However, a detailed study of alterations associated with progression of these molecularly distinct tumor types has not been described. Here we perform an analysis of copy number alterations (CNA) across all grades (Grade II-II and Grade IV) IDHmut vs IDHwt infiltrating gliomas. METHODS: DNA was extracted from 94 patient FFPE glioma samples from 4 clinical and molecular groups: Grade II-III IDHwt (n = 17), Grade II-III IDHmut (n = 28), Grade IV IDHwt (n = 25), and Grade IV IDHmut (n = 24). CNA were detected by molecular inversion probes (OncoScan FFPE Express, Affymetrix) and analyzed with Nexus Copy Number Software (BioDiscovery). GISTIC was used to define deletions and amplifications. Chromothripsis (“chromosomal shattering”) was defined using stringent criteria of at least ten switches of CNA in individual chromosomes. RESULTS: Unsupervised clustering of CNAs demonstrated distinct clusters within IDHmut gliomas that correlated with grade. However, within IDHwt gliomas all grades clustered together regardless of grade, with Chr7 amplification (including EGFR) and loss of Chr10 (including PTEN) seen in most tumors. IDHwt Grade II-III and Grade IV tumors both displayed relatively poor prognosis (median survivals of 65.4 and 37.4 weeks). However, IDHmut gliomas had better survival for all grades (604.3 weeks for Grade II-III and 270.3 weeks for Grade IV). Grade IV IDHmut gliomas were more likely to have gains of 1q25.3 (SMG7, NCF2), 1q32.1 (KIF14, DDX59, BTG2), 6p21.1 (HSP90AB1 and other genes) and loss of 3p21 compared with Grade II-III. Functional analyses showed that IDHwt tumors had more amplifications in receptor tyrosine kinases and their downstream pathways. In terms of novel prognostic markers within IDHmut Grade II-III tumors, multivariate analysis identified loss of estrogen receptor B and loss of 10q26.3 containing part of GLRX3 as poor prognostic factors, and CDKN1C loss as a good prognostic factor. Finally, significantly higher incidence of chromothripsis events were observed in grade IV IDHmut compared to IDHwt. CONCLUSIONS: CNA analysis demonstrated significant differences in molecular ontogeny, progression, and prognosis between IDHwt and IDHmut gliomas, which may serve to further elucidate pathogenesis of these distinct tumor types. Significant CNA increases and increased chromothripsis in grade IV IDHmut support malignant transformation of IDHmut low grade gliomas through accumulation of genomic instability, that results later in partial overlap of CNA alterations that are seen earlier in the development of IDHwt tumors. SECONDARY CATEGORY: Tumor Biology.

  7. Detection of a Distinct Metal-poor Stellar Halo in the Early-type Galaxy NGC 3115†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Strader, Jay; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.

    2015-02-01

    We present the resolved stellar populations in the inner and outer halo of the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3115. Using deep Hubble Space Telescope observations, we analyze stars 2 mag fainter than the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We study three fields along the minor axis of this galaxy, 19, 37, and 54 kpc from its center—corresponding to 7, 14, and 21 effective radii (re ). Even at these large galactocentric distances, all of the fields are dominated by a relatively enriched population, with the main peak in the metallicity distribution decreasing with radius from [Z/H] ~ -0.5 to -0.65. The fraction of metal-poor stars ([Z/H] < -0.95) increases from 17% at 16-37 kpc to 28% at ~54 kpc. We observe a distinct low-metallicity population (peaked at [Z/H] ~ -1.3 and with total mass 2 × 1010 M ? ~ 14% of the galaxy's stellar mass) and argue that this represents the detection of an underlying low-metallicity stellar halo. Such halos are generally predicted by galaxy formation theories and have been observed in several late-type galaxies, including the Milky Way and M31. The metallicity and spatial distribution of the stellar halo of NGC 3115 are consistent with the galaxy's globular cluster system, which has a similar low-metallicity population that becomes dominant at these large radii. This finding supports the use of globular clusters as bright chemodynamical tracers of galaxy halos. These data also allow us to make a precise measurement of the magnitude of the TRGB, from which we derive a distance modulus of NGC 3115 of 30.05 ± 0.05 ± 0.10sys (10.2 ± 0.2 ± 0.5sys Mpc). Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #13048.

  8. Different types of interaction between PCNA and PIP boxes contribute to distinct cellular functions of Y-family DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Yuji; Kanao, Rie; Kaji, Kentaro; Ohmori, Haruo; Hanaoka, Fumio; Masutani, Chikahide

    2015-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) by the Y-family DNA polymerases Pol?, Pol? and Pol?, mediated via interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), is a crucial pathway that protects human cells against DNA damage. We report that Pol? has three PCNA-interacting protein (PIP) boxes (PIP1, 2, 3) that contribute differentially to two distinct functions, stimulation of DNA synthesis and promotion of PCNA ubiquitination. The latter function is strongly associated with formation of nuclear Pol? foci, which co-localize with PCNA. We also show that Pol? has two functionally distinct PIP boxes, like Pol?, whereas Pol? has a single PIP box involved in stimulation of DNA synthesis. All three polymerases were additionally stimulated by mono-ubiquitinated PCNA in vitro. The three PIP boxes and a ubiquitin-binding zinc-finger of Pol? exert redundant and additive effects in vivo via distinct molecular mechanisms. These findings provide an integrated picture of the orchestration of TLS polymerases. PMID:26170230

  9. The goya mouse mutant reveals distinct newly identified roles for MAP3K1 in the development and survival of cochlear sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew; Cross, Sally H; Jackson, Ian J; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel; Morse, Susan; Nicholson, George; Coghill, Emma; Bowl, Michael R; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAP3K1, plays an important role in a number of cellular processes, including epithelial migration during eye organogenesis. In addition, studies in keratinocytes indicate that MAP3K1 signalling through JNK is important for actin stress fibre formation and cell migration. However, MAP3K1 can also act independently of JNK in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. We have identified a mouse mutant, goya, which exhibits the eyes-open-at-birth and microphthalmia phenotypes. In addition, these mice also have hearing loss. The goya mice carry a splice site mutation in the Map3k1 gene. We show that goya and kinase-deficient Map3k1 homozygotes initially develop supernumerary cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) that subsequently degenerate, and a progressive profound hearing loss is observed by 9 weeks of age. Heterozygote mice also develop supernumerary OHCs, but no cellular degeneration or hearing loss is observed. MAP3K1 is expressed in a number of inner-ear cell types, including outer and inner hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. Investigation of targets downstream of MAP3K1 identified an increase in p38 phosphorylation (Thr180/Tyr182) in multiple cochlear tissues. We also show that the extra OHCs do not arise from aberrant control of proliferation via p27KIP1. The identification of the goya mutant reveals a signalling molecule involved with hair-cell development and survival. Mammalian hair cells do not have the ability to regenerate after damage, which can lead to irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. Given the observed goya phenotype, and the many diverse cellular processes that MAP3K1 is known to act upon, further investigation of this model might help to elaborate upon the mechanisms underlying sensory hair cell specification, and pathways important for their survival. In addition, MAP3K1 is revealed as a new candidate gene for human sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26542706

  10. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Compound Heterozygosity for Ethnically Distinct PEX7 Mutations Responsible for Rhizomelic Chondrodysplasia Punctata, Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Jessie C.; Glamuzina, Emma; Taylor, Juliet; Swan, Brendan; Handisides, Shona; Wilson, Callum; Fietz, Michael; van Dijk, Tessa; Appelhof, Bart; Hill, Rosamund; Marks, Rosemary; Love, Donald R.; Robertson, Stephen P.; Snell, Russell G.; Lehnert, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We describe two brothers who presented at birth with bone growth abnormalities, followed by development of increasingly severe intellectual and physical disability, growth restriction, epilepsy, and cerebellar and brain stem atrophy, but normal ocular phenotypes. Case 1 died at 19 years of age due to chronic respiratory illnesses without a unifying diagnosis. The brother remains alive but severely disabled at 19 years of age. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous stop mutations in the peroxisome biogenesis factor 7 gene in both individuals. Mutations in this gene cause rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, type 1 (RCDP1). One mutation, p.Arg232?, has only been documented once before in a Japanese family, which is of interest given these two boys are of European descent. The other mutation, p.Leu292?, is found in approximately 50% of RCDP1 patients. These are the first cases of RCDP1 that describe the coinheritance of the p.Arg232? and p.Leu292? mutations and demonstrate the utility of WES in cases with unclear diagnoses. PMID:26587300

  11. Virus Isolates during Acute and Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection Show Distinct Patterns of Sensitivity to Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rusert, Peter; Kuster, Herbert; Joos, Beda; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Gujer, Cornelia; Leemann, Christine; Fischer, Marek; Stiegler, Gabriela; Katinger, Hermann; Olson, William C.; Weber, Rainer; Aceto, Leonardo; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Trkola, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effect of entry inhibitors on 58 virus isolates derived during acute and chronic infection to validate these inhibitors in vitro and to probe whether viruses at early and chronic disease stages exhibit general differences in the interaction with entry receptors. We included members of all types of inhibitors currently identified: (i) agents that block gp120 binding to CD4 (CD4-IgG2 and monoclonal antibody [MAb] IgG1b12), (ii) compounds that block the interaction with CCR5 (the chemokine RANTES/CCL5, the small-molecule inhibitor AD101, and the anti-CCR5 antibody PRO 140), (iii) the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide (T-20), and (iv) neutralizing antibodies directed against gp120 (MAb 2G12) and gp41 (MAbs 2F5 and 4E10). No differences between viruses from acute and chronic infections in the susceptibility to inhibitors targeting the CD4 binding site, CCR5, or fusion or to MAb 2G12 were apparent, rendering treatment with entry inhibitors feasible across disease stages. The notable exceptions were antibodies 2F5 and 4E10, which were more potent in inhibiting viruses from acute infection (P = 0.0088 and 0.0005, respectively), although epitopes of these MAbs were equally well preserved in both groups. Activities of these MAbs correlated significantly with each other, suggesting that common features of the viral envelope modulate their potencies. PMID:15956589

  12. Identifying New Positives and Linkage to HIV Medical Care--23 Testing Site Types, United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Seth, Puja; Wang, Guoshen; Collins, Nicoline T; Belcher, Lisa

    2015-06-26

    Among the estimated 1.2 million persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States, approximately 14% have not had their HIV diagnosed. Certain populations, such as African Americans/blacks (in this report referred to as blacks), men who have sex with men (MSM), and Hispanics/Latinos (in this report referred to as Hispanics), are disproportionately affected by HIV. In areas where HIV prevalence is ?0.1%, CDC recommends routine HIV screening in health care settings for persons aged 13-64 years. Implementation of HIV screening as part of routine care can increase the number of HIV diagnoses, destigmatize HIV testing, and improve access to care for persons with new HIV infections. Additionally, targeted testing in non-health care settings might facilitate access to persons in at-risk populations (e.g., MSM, blacks, and Hispanics) who are unaware of their status and do not routinely seek care. CDC analyzed data for 23 testing site types submitted by 61 health departments and 151 CDC-funded community-based organizations to determine 1) the number of HIV tests conducted, 2) the percentage of persons with new diagnoses of HIV infection (in this report referred to as new positives), and 3) the percentage of persons who were linked to HIV medical care within 90 days after receiving diagnoses at specific site types within health care and non-health care settings. The results indicated that, in health care settings, primary care and sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics accounted for substantially more HIV tests than did other sites, and STD clinics identified more new positives. In non-health care settings, HIV counseling and testing sites accounted for the most tests and identified the highest number of new positives. Examining program data by site type shows which sites performed better in diagnosing new positives and informs decisions about program planning and allocation of CDC HIV testing resources among and within settings. PMID:26110836

  13. Microarray analysis identifies a death-from-cancer signature predicting therapy failure in patients with multiple types of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glinsky, Gennadi V.; Berezovska, Olga; Glinskii, Anna B.

    2005-01-01

    Activation in transformed cells of normal stem cells’ self-renewal pathways might contribute to the survival life cycle of cancer stem cells and promote tumor progression. The BMI-1 oncogene–driven gene expression pathway is essential for the self-renewal of hematopoietic and neural stem cells. We applied a mouse/human comparative translational genomics approach to identify an 11-gene signature that consistently displays a stem cell–resembling expression profile in distant metastatic lesions as revealed by the analysis of metastases and primary tumors from a transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer and cancer patients. To further validate these results, we examined the prognostic power of the 11-gene signature in several independent therapy-outcome sets of clinical samples obtained from 1,153 cancer patients diagnosed with 11 different types of cancer, including 5 epithelial malignancies (prostate, breast, lung, ovarian, and bladder cancers) and 5 nonepithelial malignancies (lymphoma, mesothelioma, medulloblastoma, glioma, and acute myeloid leukemia). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that a stem cell–like expression profile of the 11-gene signature in primary tumors is a consistent powerful predictor of a short interval to disease recurrence, distant metastasis, and death after therapy in cancer patients diagnosed with 11 distinct types of cancer. These data suggest the presence of a conserved BMI-1–driven pathway, which is similarly engaged in both normal stem cells and a highly malignant subset of human cancers diagnosed in a wide range of organs and uniformly exhibiting a marked propensity toward metastatic dissemination as well as a high probability of unfavorable therapy outcome. PMID:15931389

  14. Multiple Propofol-binding Sites in a ?-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptor (GABAAR) Identified Using a Photoreactive Propofol Analog*?

    PubMed Central

    Jayakar, Selwyn S.; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Chiara, David C.; Dostalova, Zuzana; Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Bruzik, Karol S.; Dailey, William P.; Miller, Keith W.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Propofol acts as a positive allosteric modulator of ?-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs), an interaction necessary for its anesthetic potency in vivo as a general anesthetic. Identifying the location of propofol-binding sites is necessary to understand its mechanism of GABAAR modulation. [3H]2-(3-Methyl-3H-diaziren-3-yl)ethyl 1-(phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (azietomidate) and R-[3H]5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (mTFD-MPAB), photoreactive analogs of 2-ethyl 1-(phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (etomidate) and mephobarbital, respectively, have identified two homologous but pharmacologically distinct classes of intersubunit-binding sites for general anesthetics in the GABAAR transmembrane domain. Here, we use a photoreactive analog of propofol (2-isopropyl-5-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]phenol ([3H]AziPm)) to identify propofol-binding sites in heterologously expressed human ?1?3 GABAARs. Propofol, AziPm, etomidate, and R-mTFD-MPAB each inhibited [3H]AziPm photoincorporation into GABAAR subunits maximally by ?50%. When the amino acids photolabeled by [3H]AziPm were identified by protein microsequencing, we found propofol-inhibitable photolabeling of amino acids in the ?3-?1 subunit interface (?3Met-286 in ?3M3 and ?1Met-236 in ?1M1), previously photolabeled by [3H]azietomidate, and ?1Ile-239, located one helical turn below ?1Met-236. There was also propofol-inhibitable [3H]AziPm photolabeling of ?3Met-227 in ?M1, the amino acid in the ?1-?3 subunit interface photolabeled by R-[3H]mTFD-MPAB. The propofol-inhibitable [3H]AziPm photolabeling in the GABAAR ?3 subunit in conjunction with the concentration dependence of inhibition of that photolabeling by etomidate or R-mTFD-MPAB also establish that each anesthetic binds to the homologous site at the ?3-?3 subunit interface. These results establish that AziPm as well as propofol bind to the homologous intersubunit sites in the GABAAR transmembrane domain that binds etomidate or R-mTFD-MPAB with high affinity. PMID:25086038

  15. Production of a unique antibody specific for membrane ruffles and its use to characterize the behavior of two distinct types of ruffles

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    I have produced a new monoclonal antibody, YF-169, against membrane ruffle specific 55-kD protein. YF-169 stained membrane ruffles of chick embryo fibroblasts so definitely that it enabled clear and reliable analyses of membrane ruffles. Fibroblasts organized two distinct types of membrane ruffles. One type of the ruffles were transiently formed in serum-starved cells (Type I) when stimulated by serum or platelet- derived growth factor. After spontaneous degradation of Type I ruffles, the other type of ruffles containing many microspikes were gradually organized at leading edges (Type II). The formation of Type I ruffles was not affected by either nocodazole, a microtubule-disrupting drug, or taxol, a microtubule-stabilizing reagent. However, Type II ruffles were entirely destroyed not only by nocodazole but also by taxol, suggesting that regulated organization of microtubule network is important to maintain Type II ruffles. H8, a protein kinase inhibitor prevented the spontaneous degradation of Type I ruffles and also reduced the destructive effect of nocodazole on Type II ruffles without affecting microtubule-disrupting activity. Protein kinases may be involved in the degradation processes of both types of ruffles. W7, a calmodulin antagonist, strongly inhibited Type I ruffle formation and completely destroyed Type II ruffles. W7 was also found to induce a remarkable change of 55-kD protein localization. After degradation of Type II ruffles, most of 55-kD protein was incorporated into newly formed unusual thick fibers. These results suggest that regulated organization of microtubule network is not necessary to form Type I ruffles but is important to maintain Type II ruffles, while calmodulin function is essential for both types of membrane ruffles. PMID:8095502

  16. Two Types of Functionally Distinct Fiber Containing Structural Protein Complexes Are Produced during Infection of Adenovirus Serotype 5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Yan, Yuhua; Jin, Jie; Lin, Hongyu; Li, Zongyi; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jin; Xi, Chao; Lieber, Andre; Fan, Xiaolong; Ran, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are common pathogens. The localization of their receptors coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, and desmoglein-2 in cell-cell junction complexes between polarized epithelial cells represents a major challenge for adenovirus infection from the apical surface. Structural proteins including hexon, penton base and fiber are excessively produced in serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5)-infected cells. We have characterized the composition of structural protein complexes released from Ad5 infected cells and their capacity in remodeling cell-cell junction complexes. Using T84 cells as a model for polarized epithelium, we have studied the effect of Ad5 structural protein complexes in remodeling cell-cell junctions in polarized epithelium. The initial Ad5 infection in T84 cell culture was inefficient. However, progressive distortion of cell-cell junction in association with fiber release was evident during progression of Ad5 infection. Incubation of T84 cell cultures with virion-free supernatant from Ad5 infected culture resulted in distortion of cell-cell junctions and decreased infectivity of Ad5-GFP vector. We used gel filtration chromatography to fractionate fiber containing virion–free supernatant from Ad5 infected culture supernatant. Fiber containing fractions were further characterized for their capacity to inhibit the infection of Ad5-GFP vector, their composition in adenovirus structural proteins using western blot and LC-MS/MS and their capacity in remolding cell-cell junctions. Fiber molecules in complexes containing penton base and hexon, or mainly hexon were identified. Only the fiber complexes with relatively high content of penton base, but not the fiber-hexon complexes with low penton base, were able to penetrate into T84 cells and cause distortion of cell-cell junctions. Our findings suggest that these two types of fiber complexes may play different roles in adenoviral infection. PMID:25723153

  17. Genogeography and Immune Epitope Characteristics of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype C Reveals Two Distinct Types: Asian and Papua-Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Thedja, Meta Dewi; Muljono, David Handojo; Ie, Susan Irawati; Sidarta, Erick; Turyadi; Verhoef, Jan; Marzuki, Sangkot

    2015-01-01

    Distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes/subgenotypes is geographically and ethnologically specific. In the Indonesian archipelago, HBV genotype C (HBV/C) is prevalent with high genome variability, reflected by the presence of 13 of currently existing 16 subgenotypes. We investigated the association between HBV/C molecular characteristics with host ethnicity and geographical distribution by examining various subgenotypes of HBV/C isolates from the Asia and Pacific region, with further analysis on the immune epitope characteristics of the core and surface proteins. Phylogenetic tree was constructed based on complete HBV/C genome sequences from Asia and Pacific region, and genetic distance between isolates was also examined. HBV/C surface and core immune epitopes were analyzed and grouped by comparing the amino acid residue characteristics and geographical origins. Based on phylogenetic tree and geographical origins of isolates, two major groups of HBV/C isolates—East-Southeast Asia and Papua-Pacific—were identified. Analysis of core and surface immune epitopes supported these findings with several amino acid substitutions distinguishing the East-Southeast Asia isolates from the Papua-Pacific isolates. A west-to-east gradient of HBsAg subtype distribution was observed with adrq+ prominent in the East and Southeast Asia and adrq- in the Pacific, with several adrq-indeterminate subtypes observed in Papua and Papua New Guinea (PNG). This study indicates that HBV/C isolates can be classified into two types, the Asian and the Papua-Pacific, based on the virus genome diversity, immune epitope characteristics, and geographical distribution, with Papua and PNG as the molecular evolutionary admixture region in the switching from adrq+ to adrq-. PMID:26162099

  18. VIPoma with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 identified as an atypical gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Fujiya, Atsushi; Kato, Makoto; Shibata, Taiga; Sobajima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old man presented with persistent diarrhoea and hypokalaemia. CT revealed 4 pancreatic tumours that appeared to be VIPomas, because the patient had an elevated plasma vasoactive intestinal polypeptide level. MRI showed a low-intensity area in the pituitary suggestive of a pituitary tumour, and a parathyroid tumour was detected by ultrasonography and 99Tc-MIBI scintigraphy. Given these results, the patient was diagnosed with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and scheduled for surgery. MEN1 is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with MEN1 mutations. Genetic testing indicated that the patient had a MEN1 gene mutation; his 2 sons had the same mutations. Most MEN1 tumours are benign, but some pancreatic and thymic tumours could become malignant. Without treatment, such tumours would result in earlier mortality. Despite its rarity, we should perform genetic testing for family members of patients with MEN1 to identify mutation carriers and improve the patients' prognosis. PMID:26564120

  19. Meta-Analysis Approach identifies Candidate Genes and associated Molecular Networks for Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Axel; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Herwig, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Background Multiple functional genomics data for complex human diseases have been published and made available by researchers worldwide. The main goal of these studies is the detailed analysis of a particular aspect of the disease. Complementary, meta-analysis approaches try to extract supersets of disease genes and interaction networks by integrating and combining these individual studies using statistical approaches. Results Here we report on a meta-analysis approach that integrates data of heterogeneous origin in the domain of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Different data sources such as DNA microarrays and, complementing, qualitative data covering several human and mouse tissues are integrated and analyzed with a Bootstrap scoring approach in order to extract disease relevance of the genes. The purpose of the meta-analysis is two-fold: on the one hand it identifies a group of genes with overall disease relevance indicating common, tissue-independent processes related to the disease; on the other hand it identifies genes showing specific alterations with respect to a single study. Using a random sampling approach we computed a core set of 213 T2DM genes across multiple tissues in human and mouse, including well-known genes such as Pdk4, Adipoq, Scd, Pik3r1, Socs2 that monitor important hallmarks of T2DM, for example the strong relationship between obesity and insulin resistance, as well as a large fraction (128) of yet barely characterized novel candidate genes. Furthermore, we explored functional information and identified cellular networks associated with this core set of genes such as pathway information, protein-protein interactions and gene regulatory networks. Additionally, we set up a web interface in order to allow users to screen T2DM relevance for any – yet non-associated – gene. Conclusion In our paper we have identified a core set of 213 T2DM candidate genes by a meta-analysis of existing data sources. We have explored the relation of these genes to disease relevant information and – using enrichment analysis – we have identified biological networks on different layers of cellular information such as signaling and metabolic pathways, gene regulatory networks and protein-protein interactions. The web interface is accessible via . PMID:18590522

  20. Multiple Structurally Distinct ER? mRNA Variants in Zebrafish are Differentially Expressed by Tissue Type, Stage of Development and Estrogen Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Kellie A.; Yershov, Anya; Novillo, Apolonia; Callard, Gloria V.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that estrogen-like environmental chemicals interact with the ligand-binding site of estrogen receptors (ER) to disrupt transcriptional control of estrogen responsive targets. Here we investigate the possibility that estrogens also impact splicing decisions on estrogen responsive genes, such as that encoding ER? itself. Targeted PCR cloning was applied to identify six ER? mRNA variants in zebrafish. Sequencing revealed alternate use of transcription and translation start sites, multiple exon deletions, intron retention and alternate polyadenylation. As determined by quantitative (q)PCR, N-terminal mRNA variants predicting long (ER?L) and short (ER?S) isoforms were differentially expressed by tissue-type, sex, stage of development and estrogen exposure. Whereas ER?L mRNA was diffusely distributed in liver, brain, heart, eye, and gonads, ER?S mRNA was preferentially expressed in liver (female > male) and ovary. Neither ER?L nor ER?S transcripts varied significantly during development, but 17?-estradiol selectively increased accumulation of ER?S mRNA (~170-fold by 120 hpf), an effect mimicked by bisphenol-A and diethylstilbestrol. Significantly, a C-truncated variant (ER?S-Cx) lacking most of the ligand binding and AF-2 domains was transcribed exclusively from the short isoform promoter and was similar to ER?S in its tissue-, stage- and estrogen inducible expression. These results support the idea that promoter choice and alternative splicing of the esr1 gene of zebrafish are part of the autoregulatory mechanism by which estrogen modulates subsequent ER? expression, and further suggest that environmental estrogens could exert some of their toxic effects by altering the relative abundance of structurally and functionally distinct ER? isoforms. PMID:24090614

  1. Preferences for Pink and Blue: The Development of Color Preferences as a Distinct Gender-Typed Behavior in Toddlers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wang I; Hines, Melissa

    2015-07-01

    Many gender differences are thought to result from interactions between inborn factors and sociocognitive processes that occur after birth. There is controversy, however, over the causes of gender-typed preferences for the colors pink and blue, with some viewing these preferences as arising solely from sociocognitive processes of gender development. We evaluated preferences for gender-typed colors, and compared them to gender-typed toy and activity preferences in 126 toddlers on two occasions separated by 6-8 months (at Time 1, M = 29 months; range 20-40). Color preferences were assessed using color cards and neutral toys in gender-typed colors. Gender-typed toy and activity preferences were assessed using a parent-report questionnaire, the Preschool Activities Inventory. Color preferences were also assessed for the toddlers' parents using color cards. A gender difference in color preferences was present between 2 and 3 years of age and strengthened near the third birthday, at which time it was large (d > 1). In contrast to their parents, toddlers' gender-typed color preferences were stronger and unstable. Gender-typed color preferences also appeared to establish later and were less stable than gender-typed toy and activity preferences. Gender-typed color preferences were largely uncorrelated with gender-typed toy and activity preferences. These results suggest that the factors influencing gender-typed color preferences and gender-typed toy and activity preferences differ in some respects. Our findings suggest that sociocognitive influences and play with gender-typed toys that happen to be made in gender-typed colors contribute to toddlers' gender-typed color preferences. PMID:25680819

  2. Significant Deregulated Pathways in Diabetes Type II Complications Identified through Expression Based Network Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukil, Sanchaita; Sinha, Meenakshee; Varshney, Lavneesh; Agrawal, Shipra

    Type 2 Diabetes is a complex multifactorial disease, which alters several signaling cascades giving rise to serious complications. It is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The present research work describes an integrated functional network biology approach to identify pathways that get transcriptionally altered and lead to complex complications thereby amplifying the phenotypic effect of the impaired disease state. We have identified two sub-network modules, which could be activated under abnormal circumstances in diabetes. Present work describes key proteins such as P85A and SRC serving as important nodes to mediate alternate signaling routes during diseased condition. P85A has been shown to be an important link between stress responsive MAPK and CVD markers involved in fibrosis. MAPK8 has been shown to interact with P85A and further activate CTGF through VEGF signaling. We have traced a novel and unique route correlating inflammation and fibrosis by considering P85A as a key mediator of signals. The next sub-network module shows SRC as a junction for various signaling processes, which results in interaction between NF-kB and beta catenin to cause cell death. The powerful interaction between these important genes in response to transcriptionally altered lipid metabolism and impaired inflammatory response via SRC causes apoptosis of cells. The crosstalk between inflammation, lipid homeostasis and stress, and their serious effects downstream have been explained in the present analyses.

  3. Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Voight, Benjamin F; Scott, Laura J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Morris, Andrew P; Dina, Christian; Welch, Ryan P; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Huth, Cornelia; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; McCulloch, Laura J; Ferreira, Teresa; Grallert, Harald; Amin, Najaf; Wu, Guanming; Willer, Cristen J; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; McCarroll, Steve A; Langenberg, Claudia; Hofmann, Oliver M; Dupuis, Josée; Qi, Lu; Segrè, Ayellet V; van Hoek, Mandy; Navarro, Pau; Ardlie, Kristin; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J; Blagieva, Roza; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bravenboer, Bert; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Burtt, Noisël P; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn; Couper, David J; Crawford, Gabe; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Katherine S; Elliott, Amanda L; Erdos, Michael R; Fox, Caroline S; Franklin, Christopher S; Ganser, Martha; Gieger, Christian; Grarup, Niels; Green, Todd; Griffin, Simon; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hadjadj, Samy; Hassanali, Neelam; Herder, Christian; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Paul R V; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen H L; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kraft, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Man; Lieverse, Aloysius; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Midthjell, Kristian; Morken, Mario A; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John R B; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Platou, Carl; Proença, Christine; Prokopenko, Inga; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil R; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Roden, Michael; Sampson, Michael J; Saxena, Richa; Shields, Beverley M; Shrader, Peter; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Sparsø, Thomas; Strassburger, Klaus; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Swift, Amy J; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Dam, Rob M; van Haeften, Timon W; van Herpt, Thijs; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Walters, G Bragi; Weedon, Michael N; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witteman, Jacqueline; Bergman, Richard N; Cauchi, Stephane; Collins, Francis S; Gloyn, Anna L; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hansen, Torben; Hide, Winston A; Hitman, Graham A; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Hveem, Kristian; Laakso, Markku; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rudan, Igor; Sijbrands, Eric; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watanabe, Richard M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehm, Bernhard O; Campbell, Harry; Daly, Mark J; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hu, Frank B; Meigs, James B; Pankow, James S; Pedersen, Oluf; Wichmann, H-Erich; Barroso, Inês; Florez, Jose C; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif; Sladek, Rob; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Wilson, James F; Illig, Thomas; Froguel, Philippe; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Stefansson, Kari; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I

    2011-01-01

    By combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals with combinedP < 5 × 10?8. These include a second independent signal at the KCNQ1 locus; the first report, to our knowledge, of an X-chromosomal association (near DUSP9); and a further instance of overlap between loci implicated in monogenic and multifactorial forms of diabetes (at HNF1A). The identified loci affect both beta-cell function and insulin action, and, overall, T2D association signals show evidence of enrichment for genes involved in cell cycle regulation. We also show that a high proportion of T2D susceptibility loci harbor independent association signals influencing apparently unrelated complex traits. PMID:20581827

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel loci for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuo; Fujita, Hayato; Johnson, Todd A; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Yasuda, Kazuki; Horikoshi, Momoko; Peng, Chen; Hu, Cheng; Ma, Ronald C W; Imamura, Minako; Iwata, Minoru; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Morizono, Takashi; Shojima, Nobuhiro; So, Wing Yee; Leung, Ting Fan; Kwan, Patrick; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jie; Yu, Weihui; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Hirose, Hiroshi; Kaku, Kohei; Ito, Chikako; Watada, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Yasushi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Jia, Weiping; Chan, Juliana C N; Teo, Yik Ying; Shyong, Tai E; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kubo, Michiaki; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Although over 60 loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified, there still remains a large genetic component to be clarified. To explore unidentified loci for T2D, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6 209 637 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were directly genotyped or imputed using East Asian references from the 1000 Genomes Project (June 2011 release) in 5976 Japanese patients with T2D and 20 829 nondiabetic individuals. Nineteen unreported loci were selected and taken forward to follow-up analyses. Combined discovery and follow-up analyses (30 392 cases and 34 814 controls) identified three new loci with genome-wide significance, which were MIR129-LEP [rs791595; risk allele = A; risk allele frequency (RAF) = 0.080; P = 2.55 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.17], GPSM1 [rs11787792; risk allele = A; RAF = 0.874; P = 1.74 × 10(-10); OR = 1.15] and SLC16A13 (rs312457; risk allele = G; RAF = 0.078; P = 7.69 × 10(-13); OR = 1.20). This study demonstrates that GWASs based on the imputation of genotypes using modern reference haplotypes such as that from the 1000 Genomes Project data can assist in identification of new loci for common diseases. PMID:23945395

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of a newly-identified substellar companion to an early-type star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, Robert; Patience, Jenny; Vigan, Arthur; Young, Patrick; Rajan, Abhi; Ward-Duong, Kim; Bulger, Joanna; Truitt, Amanda

    2014-02-01

    With the cross-dispersed spectroscopy mode of the GNIRS instrument, we propose to obtain YJHK spectra of a newly identified co-moving companion to a nearby A-type star. The co-moving object resolved in previous Gemini/NIRI observations has a K-band magnitude consistent with a 40-50 Mj companion, if physically associated. Based on the position of the early A-type primary on the colour-magnitude diagram, the age of the system is intermediate to known brown dwarfs within young moving groups (<100 Myrs), and within the field (>1 Gyrs) - occupying an age range for which very few brown dwarfs are currently known. We also propose to obtain higher-resolution NIFS K-band spectra in order to measure the C/O ratio of the companion, thought to be diagnostic of the mechanism through which the object formed, providing important context to the recent C/O measurement of the HR 8799 c exoplanet. The proposed observations will confirm the substellar nature of this object, as well as provide a useful empirical benchmark for the development of theoretical evolutionary models of these cool, low-mass objects.

  6. Targeted allelic expression profiling in human islets identifies cis-regulatory effects for multiple variants identified by type 2 diabetes genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jonathan M; Hysenaj, Gerald; Wood, Andrew R; Weedon, Michael N; Harries, Lorna W

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified variation at >65 genomic loci associated with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, but little progress has been made in elucidating the molecular mechanisms behind most of these associations. Using samples heterozygous for transcribed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), allelic expression profiling is a powerful technique for identifying cis-regulatory variants controlling gene expression. In this study, exonic SNPs, suitable for measuring mature mRNA levels and in high linkage disequilibrium with 65 lead type 2 diabetes GWAS SNPs, were identified and allelic expression determined by real-time PCR using RNA and DNA isolated from islets of 36 white nondiabetic donors. A significant allelic expression imbalance (AEI) was identified for 7/14 (50%) genes tested (ANPEP, CAMK2B, HMG20A, KCNJ11, NOTCH2, SLC30A8, and WFS1), with significant AEI confirmed for five of these genes using other linked exonic SNPs. Lastly, results of a targeted islet expression quantitative trait loci experiment support the AEI findings for ANPEP, further implicating ANPEP as the causative gene at its locus. The results of this study support the hypothesis that changes to cis-regulation of gene expression are involved in a large proportion of SNP associations with type 2 diabetes susceptibility. PMID:25392243

  7. Identifiers Identifiers

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    , July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] . Uniform://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

  8. Identifiers Identifiers

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    , July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] Stefan://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

  9. Identifying low-dimensional dynamics in type-I edge-localised-mode processes in JET plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, F. A.; Chapman, S. C.; Nicol, R. M.; Dendy, R. O.; Webster, A. J.; Alper, B. [EURATOM Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2013-04-15

    Edge localised mode (ELM) measurements from reproducibly similar plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak, which differ only in their gas puffing rate, are analysed in terms of the pattern in the sequence of inter-ELM time intervals. It is found that the category of ELM defined empirically as type I-typically more regular, less frequent, and having larger amplitude than other ELM types-embraces substantially different ELMing processes. By quantifying the structure in the sequence of inter-ELM time intervals using delay time plots, we reveal transitions between distinct phase space dynamics, implying transitions between distinct underlying physical processes. The control parameter for these transitions between these different ELMing processes is the gas puffing rate.

  10. Distinct charge orders in the planes and chains of ortho-III-ordered YBa2Cu3O(6+?) superconductors identified by resonant elastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Achkar, A J; Sutarto, R; Mao, X; He, F; Frano, A; Blanco-Canosa, S; Le Tacon, M; Ghiringhelli, G; Braicovich, L; Minola, M; Sala, M Moretti; Mazzoli, C; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Keimer, B; Sawatzky, G A; Hawthorn, D G

    2012-10-19

    Recently, charge density wave (CDW) order in the CuO(2) planes of underdoped YBa(2)Cu(3)O(6+?) was detected using resonant soft x-ray scattering. An important question remains: is the chain layer responsible for this charge ordering? Here, we explore the energy and polarization dependence of the resonant scattering intensity in a detwinned sample of YBa(2)Cu(3)O(6.75) with ortho-III oxygen ordering in the chain layer. We show that the ortho-III CDW order in the chains is distinct from the CDW order in the planes. The ortho-III structure gives rise to a commensurate superlattice reflection at Q=[0.33 0 L] whose energy and polarization dependence agrees with expectations for oxygen ordering and a spatial modulation of the Cu valence in the chains. Incommensurate peaks at [0.30 0 L] and [0 0.30 L] from the CDW order in the planes are shown to be distinct in Q as well as their temperature, energy, and polarization dependence, and are thus unrelated to the structure of the chain layer. Moreover, the energy dependence of the CDW order in the planes is shown to result from a spatial modulation of energies of the Cu 2p to 3d(x(2)-y(2)) transition, similar to stripe-ordered 214 cuprates. PMID:23215115

  11. KLF2 mutation is the most frequent somatic change in splenic marginal zone lymphoma and identifies a subset with distinct genotype

    E-print Network

    Clipson, Alexandra; Wang, Ming; de Leval, Laurence; Ashton-Key, Margaret; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Vassiliou, George; Bolli, Niccolo; Grove, Carolyn; Moody, Sarah; Ibarz, Leire Escudero; Gundem, Gunes; Brugger, Kim; Xue, Xuemin; Mi, Ella; Bench, Anthony; Scott, Mike; Liu, Hongxiang; Follows, George; Robles, Eloy F.; Climent, Jose Angel Martinez; Oscier, David; Watkins, A. James; Du, Ming-Qing

    2014-11-27

    To characterise the genetics of splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL), we performed whole exome sequencing of 16 cases and identified novel recurrent inactivating mutations in KLF2, a gene whose deficiency was previously shown to cause splenic...

  12. Parahippocampal gray matter alterations in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 identified by voxel based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Mercadillo, Roberto E; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Hernández-Castillo, Carlos Roberto; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Boll, Marie-Catherine; Pasaye, Erick H; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2014-12-15

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a genetic disorder causing cerebellar degeneration that result in motor and cognitive alterations. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses have found neurodegenerative patterns associated to SCA2, but they show some discrepancies. Moreover, behavioral deficits related to non-cerebellar functions are scarcely discussed in those reports. In this work we use behavioral and cognitive tests and VBM to identify and confirm cognitive and gray matter alterations in SCA2 patients compared with control subjects. Also, we discuss the cerebellar and non-cerebellar functions affected by this disease. Our results confirmed gray matter reduction in the cerebellar vermis, pons, and insular, frontal, parietal and temporal cortices. However, our analysis also found unreported loss of gray matter in the parahippocampal gyrus bilaterally. Motor performance test ratings correlated with total gray and white matter reductions, but executive performance and clinical features such as CAG repetitions and disease progression did not show any correlation. This pattern of cerebellar and non-cerebellar morphological alterations associated with SCA2 has to be considered to fully understand the motor and non-motor deficits that include language production and comprehension and some social skill changes that occur in these patients. PMID:25263602

  13. Use of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) to Identify Glycemic Intensification Strategies in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Maria; Lombardero, Manuel; DeAlmeida, Dilhari; Kanter, Justin; Magaji, Vasudev; Orchard, Trevor; Siminerio, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current treatment guidelines for type 2 diabetes (T2D) recommend individualized intensification of therapy for glycated hemoglobin (A1C) ? 7% in most patients. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the ability of an electronic medical record (EMR) to identify glycemic intensification strategies among T2D patients receiving pharmacologic therapy. Methods: Patient records between 2005 and 2011 with documentation of A1C and active prescriptions for any diabetes medications were queried to identify potential candidates for intensification based on A1C ? 7% while on 1-2 oral diabetes medications (ODM). Patients with follow-up A1C values within 1 year of index A1C were grouped according to intensification with insulin, GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA), a new class of ODM, or no intensification. Changes in A1C and continuation of intensification therapy were determined. Results: A total of 4921 patients meeting inclusion criteria were intensified with insulin (n = 416), GLP-1RA (n = 68), ODM (n = 1408), or no additional therapy (n = 3029). Patients receiving insulin had higher baseline (9.3 ± 2.0 vs 8.3 ± 1.2 vs 8.3 ± 1.3 vs 7.6 ± 1.0%, P < .0001) and follow-up A1C (8.1 ± 1.6 vs 7.5 ± 1.2 vs 7.6 ± 1.3 vs 7.2 ± 1.1%, P < .0001) despite experiencing larger absolute A1C reductions (?1.2 ± 2.1 vs ?0.8 ± 1.4 vs ?0.7 ± 1.4 vs ?0.3 ± 1.1%, P < .0001). Patients receiving GLP-1RA were more obese at baseline (BMI: 33.6 ± 7.1 vs 37.7 ± 6.1 vs 33.7 ± 6.8 vs 32.9 ± 7.1 kg/m2, P < .0001) and follow-up (BMI: 33.9 ± 7.3 vs 36.6 ± 6.1 vs 33.8 ± 7.0 vs 32.4 ± 7.0 kg/m2, P < .0001) despite experiencing more absolute weight reduction. Insulin was the most and GLP-1RA the least likely therapy to be continued. Conclusions: An EMR allows identification of prescribing practices and compliance with T2D treatment guidelines. Patients receiving intensification of glycemic medications had baseline A1C >8% suggesting that treatment recommendations are not being followed. PMID:25526759

  14. nAture methods | VOL.10 NO.6 | JUNE2013 | 577 the distinct cell types of multicellular organisms arise owing

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    reversal of gene pairs, such as those participating in toggle-switch circuits. this approach allows us line- age, characterized by SPI1 >> GATA1, whereas GATA1 specifies the erythroid lineage, in which GATA of the fate-determining TFs, resulting in their reversed expres- sion, which can be used to identify master

  15. The type of species of Apiognomonia, Apiognomonia veneta, with its Discula anamorph is distinct from Apiognomonia errabunda

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Species of Apiognomonia and their Discula anamorphic states in the Gnomoniaceae, Diaporthales, are known throughout the temperate northern hemisphere and cause diseases such as sycamore anthracnose. The genus Apiognomonia was described based on A. veneta as the type species; however, there has been...

  16. NEW POLLEN-SPECIFIC RECEPTOR KINASES IDENTIFIED IN TOMATO, MAIZE AND ARABIDOPSIS: THE TOMATO KINASES SHOW OVERLAPPING BUT DISTINCT LOCALIZATOIN PATTERNS ON POLLEN TUBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously characterized LePRKl and LePRK2, pollen-specific receptor kinases from tomato (Mushietti et al., 1998). Here we identify a similar receptor kinase from maize, ZmPRKl, that is also specifically expressed late in pollen development, and a third pollen receptor kinase from tomato, LePRK3...

  17. Mutational analysis of the Verticillium dahliae protein elicitor PevD1 identifies distinctive regions responsible for hypersensitive response and systemic acquired resistance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxian; Zeng, Hongmei; Liu, Zhipeng; Yang, Xiufen; Guo, Lihua; Qiu, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study, PevD1 was characterized as a novel protein elicitor produced by Verticillium dahliae inducing hypersensitive response (HR) and systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in tobacco plants; however, the detailed mechanisms of PevD1's elicitor activity remain unclear. In this study, five mutant fragments of PevD1 were generated by polymerase chain reaction-based mutagenesis and the truncated proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were used to test their elicitor activities. Biological activity analysis showed that the N-terminal and C-terminal of PevD1 had distinct influence on HR and SAR elicitation. Fragment PevD1?N98, which spans the C-terminal 57 amino acids of PevD1, was critical for the induction of HR in tobacco plants. In contrast, fragment PevD1?C57, the N-terminal of 98 amino acids of PevD1, retained the ability to induce SAR against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) but not induction of HR, suggesting that the induction of HR is not essential for SAR mediated by PevD1. Our results indicated that fragment PevD1?C57 could be a candidate peptide for plant protection against pathogens without causing negative effects. PMID:24080193

  18. Evaluating the Assignment of alkB Terminal Restriction Fragments and Sequence Types to Distinct Bacterial Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Giebler, Julia; Wick, Lukas Y.; Schloter, Michael; Harms, Hauke

    2013-01-01

    Sequence and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses revealed multiple alkB gene copies/cell in soil bacterial isolates and an apparently high genetic mobility among various phylogenetic groups. Identifying alkane degraders by alkB terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs) and sequences is strongly biased, as the phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and alkB gene sequences were highly inconsistent. PMID:23455350

  19. Conditional IFNAR1 ablation reveals distinct requirements of Type I IFN signaling for NK cell maturation and tumor surveillance.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Tatsuaki; Neugebauer, Nina; Putz, Eva M; Moritz, Nadine; Simma, Olivia; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Warsch, Wolfgang; Eckelhart, Eva; Kantner, Hans-Peter; Kalinke, Ulrich; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias; Sexl, Veronika; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2012-10-01

    Mice with an impaired Type I interferon (IFN) signaling (IFNAR1- and IFN?-deficient mice) display an increased susceptibility toward v-ABL-induced B-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The enhanced leukemogenesis in the absence of an intact Type I IFN signaling is caused by alterations within the tumor environment. Deletion of Ifnar1 in tumor cells (as obtained in Ifnar1(f/f) CD19-Cre mice) failed to impact on disease latency or type. In line with this observation, the initial transformation and proliferative capacity of tumor cells were unaltered irrespective of whether the cells expressed IFNAR1 or not. v-ABL-induced leukemogenesis is mainly subjected to natural killer (NK) cell-mediated tumor surveillance. Thus, we concentrated on NK cell functions in IFNAR1 deficient animals. Ifnar1(-/-) NK cells displayed maturation defects as well as an impaired cytolytic activity. When we deleted Ifnar1 selectively in mature NK cells (by crossing Ncr1-iCre mice to Ifnar1(f/f) animals), maturation was not altered. However, NK cells derived from Ifnar1(f/f) Ncr1-iCre mice showed a significant cytolytic defect in vitro against the hematopoietic cell lines YAC-1 and RMA-S, but not against the melanoma cell line B16F10. Interestingly, this defect was not related to an in vivo phenotype as v-ABL-induced leukemogenesis was unaltered in Ifnar1(f/f )Ncr1-iCre compared with Ifnar1(f/f) control mice. Moreover, the ability of Ifnar1(f/f) Ncr1-iCre NK cells to kill B16F10 melanoma cells was unaltered, both in vitro and in vivo. Our data reveal that despite the necessity for Type I IFN in NK cell maturation the expression of IFNAR1 on mature murine NK cells is not required for efficient tumor surveillance. PMID:23170251

  20. Conditional IFNAR1 ablation reveals distinct requirements of Type I IFN signaling for NK cell maturation and tumor surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Tatsuaki; Neugebauer, Nina; Putz, Eva M.; Moritz, Nadine; Simma, Olivia; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Warsch, Wolfgang; Eckelhart, Eva; Kantner, Hans-Peter; Kalinke, Ulrich; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias; Sexl, Veronika; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Mice with an impaired Type I interferon (IFN) signaling (IFNAR1- and IFN?-deficient mice) display an increased susceptibility toward v-ABL-induced B-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The enhanced leukemogenesis in the absence of an intact Type I IFN signaling is caused by alterations within the tumor environment. Deletion of Ifnar1 in tumor cells (as obtained in Ifnar1f/f CD19-Cre mice) failed to impact on disease latency or type. In line with this observation, the initial transformation and proliferative capacity of tumor cells were unaltered irrespective of whether the cells expressed IFNAR1 or not. v-ABL-induced leukemogenesis is mainly subjected to natural killer (NK) cell-mediated tumor surveillance. Thus, we concentrated on NK cell functions in IFNAR1 deficient animals. Ifnar1-/- NK cells displayed maturation defects as well as an impaired cytolytic activity. When we deleted Ifnar1 selectively in mature NK cells (by crossing Ncr1-iCre mice to Ifnar1f/f animals), maturation was not altered. However, NK cells derived from Ifnar1f/f Ncr1-iCre mice showed a significant cytolytic defect in vitro against the hematopoietic cell lines YAC-1 and RMA-S, but not against the melanoma cell line B16F10. Interestingly, this defect was not related to an in vivo phenotype as v-ABL-induced leukemogenesis was unaltered in Ifnar1f/f Ncr1-iCre compared with Ifnar1f/f control mice. Moreover, the ability of Ifnar1f/f Ncr1-iCre NK cells to kill B16F10 melanoma cells was unaltered, both in vitro and in vivo. Our data reveal that despite the necessity for Type I IFN in NK cell maturation the expression of IFNAR1 on mature murine NK cells is not required for efficient tumor surveillance. PMID:23170251

  1. Somatosensory neuron types identified by high-coverage single-cell RNA-sequencing and functional heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Lin; Li, Kai-Cheng; Wu, Dan; Chen, Yan; Luo, Hao; Zhao, Jing-Rong; Wang, Sa-Shuang; Sun, Ming-Ming; Lu, Ying-Jin; Zhong, Yan-Qing; Hu, Xu-Ye; Hou, Rui; Zhou, Bei-Bei; Bao, Lan; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neurons are distinguished by distinct signaling networks and receptive characteristics. Thus, sensory neuron types can be defined by linking transcriptome-based neuron typing with the sensory phenotypes. Here we classify somatosensory neurons of the mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by high-coverage single-cell RNA-sequencing (10 950 ± 1 218 genes per neuron) and neuron size-based hierarchical clustering. Moreover, single DRG neurons responding to cutaneous stimuli are recorded using an in vivo whole-cell patch clamp technique and classified by neuron-type genetic markers. Small diameter DRG neurons are classified into one type of low-threshold mechanoreceptor and five types of mechanoheat nociceptors (MHNs). Each of the MHN types is further categorized into two subtypes. Large DRG neurons are categorized into four types, including neurexophilin 1-expressing MHNs and mechanical nociceptors (MNs) expressing BAI1-associated protein 2-like 1 (Baiap2l1). Mechanoreceptors expressing trafficking protein particle complex 3-like and Baiap2l1-marked MNs are subdivided into two subtypes each. These results provide a new system for cataloging somatosensory neurons and their transcriptome databases. PMID:26691752

  2. Distinct cardiac and renal effects of ETA receptor antagonist and ACE inhibitor in experimental type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zoja, Carla; Cattaneo, Sara; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Zambelli, Vanessa; Salio, Monica; Corna, Daniela; Pagani, Chiara; Rottoli, Daniela; Bisighini, Cinzia; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2011-11-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is associated with cardiovascular morbidity. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors provide imperfect renoprotection in advanced type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular risk remains elevated. Endothelin (ET)-1 has a role in renal and cardiac dysfunction in diabetes. Here, we assessed whether combination therapy with an ACE inhibitor and ET(A) receptor antagonist provided reno- and cardioprotection in rats with overt type 2 diabetes. Four groups of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats were treated orally from 4 (when proteinuric) to 8 mo with vehicle, ramipril (1 mg/kg), sitaxsentan (60 mg/kg), and ramipril plus sitaxsentan. Lean rats served as controls. Combined therapy ameliorated proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis mostly as a result of the action of ramipril. Simultaneous blockade of ANG II and ET-1 pathways normalized renal monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interstitial inflammation. Cardiomyocyte loss, volume enlargement, and capillary rarefaction were prominent abnormalities of ZDF myocardium. Myocyte volume was reduced by ramipril and sitaxsentan, which also ameliorated heart capillary density. Drug combination restored myocardial structure and reestablished an adequate capillary network in the presence of increased cardiac expression of VEGF/VEGFR-1, and significant reduction of oxidative stress. In conclusion, in type 2 diabetes concomitant blockade of ANG II synthesis and ET-1 biological activity through an ET(A) receptor antagonist led to substantial albeit not complete renoprotection, almost due to the ACE inhibitor. The drug combination also showed cardioprotective properties, which however, were mainly dependent on the contribution of the ET(A) receptor antagonist through the action of VEGF. PMID:21816757

  3. Differential Expression Profiling of Spleen MicroRNAs in Response to Two Distinct Type II Interferons in Tetraodon nigroviridis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wan; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous, small non-coding RNAs approximately 18–26 nucleotides in length that regulate target gene expression at the post-transcription level. Interferon-? (IFN-?) is a Th1 cytokine that is involved in both the innate and adaptive immune responses. We previously identified two IFN-? genes in green-spotted puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis). To determine whether miRNAs participate in IFN-?-related immune responses, T. nigroviridis spleen cells were treated with recombinant IFN-? isoforms, and a Solexa high-throughput sequencing method was used to identify miRNAs. In total, 1,556, 1,538 and 1,573 miRNAs were found in the three samples, and differentially expressed miRNAs were determined. In total, 398 miRNAs were differentially expressed after rIFN-?1 treatment, and 438 miRNAs were differentially expressed after rIFN-?2 treatment; additionally, 403 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the treatment groups. Ten differentially expressed miRNAs were chosen for validation using qRT-PCR. Target genes for the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted, and GO and KEGG analyses were performed. This study provides basic knowledge regarding fish IFN-?-induced miRNAs and offers clues for further studies into the mechanisms underlying fish IFN-?-mediated immune responses. PMID:24800866

  4. A-type and B-type lamins initiate layer assembly at distinct areas of the nuclear envelope in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Kazuya; Tsunoyama, Taka-aki; Toda, Suguru; Osoda, Shinichi; Horigome, Tsuneyoshi; Fisher, Paul A.; Sugiyama, Shin

    2009-04-15

    To investigate nuclear lamina re-assembly in vivo, Drosophila A-type and B-type lamins were artificially expressed in Drosophila lamin Dm{sub 0}null mutant brain cells. Both exogenous lamin C (A-type) and Dm{sub 0} (B-type) formed sub-layers at the nuclear periphery, and efficiently reverted the abnormal clustering of the NPC. Lamin C initially appeared where NPCs were clustered, and subsequently extended along the nuclear periphery accompanied by the recovery of the regular distribution of NPCs. In contrast, lamin Dm{sub 0} did not show association with the clustered NPCs during lamina formation and NPC spacing recovered only after completion of a closed lamin Dm{sub 0} layer. Further, when lamin Dm{sub 0} and C were both expressed, they did not co-polymerize, initiating layer formation in separate regions. Thus, A and B-type lamins reveal differing properties during lamina assembly, with A-type having the primary role in organizing NPC distribution. This previously unknown complexity in the assembly of the nuclear lamina could be the basis for intricate nuclear envelope functions.

  5. Distinctive Skeletal Abnormalities With No Microdeletions or Microduplications on Array-CGH in a Boy With Mohr Syndrome (Oro-Facial-Digital Type II)

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Pospischill, Renata; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We describe a constellation of distinctive skeletal abnormalities in an 8-year-old boy who presented with the full clinical criteria of oro-facial-digital (OFD) type II (Mohr syndrome): bony changes of obtuse mandibular angle, bimanual hexadactyly and unilateral synostosis of the metacarpo-phalanges of 3-4, bilateral coxa valga associated with moderate hip subluxation, over-tubulation of the long bones, vertical talus of the left foot and talipes equinovarus of the right foot respectively. Interestingly, we encountered variable minor malformations in his parents, confirming the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. There were no microdeletions or microduplications after performing array-CGH-analysis. We report what might be a constellation of unreported skeletal abnormalities in a child with OFD type II (Mohr syndrome). PMID:26566416

  6. Distinctive Skeletal Abnormalities With No Microdeletions or Microduplications on Array-CGH in a Boy With Mohr Syndrome (Oro-Facial-Digital Type II).

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Pospischill, Renata; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    We describe a constellation of distinctive skeletal abnormalities in an 8-year-old boy who presented with the full clinical criteria of oro-facial-digital (OFD) type II (Mohr syndrome): bony changes of obtuse mandibular angle, bimanual hexadactyly and unilateral synostosis of the metacarpo-phalanges of 3-4, bilateral coxa valga associated with moderate hip subluxation, over-tubulation of the long bones, vertical talus of the left foot and talipes equinovarus of the right foot respectively. Interestingly, we encountered variable minor malformations in his parents, confirming the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. There were no microdeletions or microduplications after performing array-CGH-analysis. We report what might be a constellation of unreported skeletal abnormalities in a child with OFD type II (Mohr syndrome). PMID:26566416

  7. Acute myocardial infarction activates distinct inflammation and proliferation pathways in circulating monocytes, prior to recruitment, and identified through conserved transcriptional responses in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Ruparelia, Neil; Godec, Jernej; Lee, Regent; Chai, Joshua T.; Dall'Armellina, Erica; McAndrew, Debra; Digby, Janet E.; Forfar, J. Colin; Prendergast, Bernard D.; Kharbanda, Rajesh K.; Banning, Adrian P.; Neubauer, Stefan; Lygate, Craig A.; Channon, Keith M.; Haining, Nicholas W.; Choudhury, Robin P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play critical roles in tissue injury and repair following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Specifically targeting inflammatory monocytes in experimental models leads to reduced infarct size and improved healing. However, data from humans are sparse, and it remains unclear whether monocytes play an equally important role in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the monocyte response following AMI is conserved between humans and mice and interrogate patterns of gene expression to identify regulated functions. Methods and results Thirty patients (AMI) and 24 control patients (stable coronary atherosclerosis) were enrolled. Female C57BL/6J mice (n = 6/group) underwent AMI by surgical coronary ligation. Myocardial injury was quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (human) and echocardiography (mice). Peripheral monocytes were isolated at presentation and at 48 h. RNA from separated monocytes was hybridized to Illumina beadchips. Acute myocardial infarction resulted in a significant peripheral monocytosis in both species that positively correlated with the extent of myocardial injury. Analysis of the monocyte transcriptome following AMI demonstrated significant conservation and identified inflammation and mitosis as central processes to this response. These findings were validated in both species. Conclusions Our findings show that the monocyte transcriptome is conserved between mice and humans following AMI. Patterns of gene expression associated with inflammation and proliferation appear to be switched on prior to their infiltration of injured myocardium suggesting that the specific targeting of inflammatory and proliferative processes in these immune cells in humans are possible therapeutic strategies. Importantly, they could be effective in the hours after AMI. PMID:25982896

  8. Analysis of the Arabidopsis shoot meristem transcriptome during floral transition identifies distinct regulatory patterns and a leucine-rich repeat protein that promotes flowering.

    PubMed

    Torti, Stefano; Fornara, Fabio; Vincent, Coral; Andrés, Fernando; Nordström, Karl; Göbel, Ulrike; Knoll, Daniela; Schoof, Heiko; Coupland, George

    2012-02-01

    Flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana is induced by exposure to long days (LDs). During this process, the shoot apical meristem is converted to an inflorescence meristem that forms flowers, and this transition is maintained even if plants are returned to short days (SDs). We show that exposure to five LDs is sufficient to commit the meristem of SD-grown plants to flower as if they were exposed to continuous LDs. The MADS box proteins SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) and FRUITFULL (FUL) play essential roles in this commitment process and in the induction of flowering downstream of the transmissible FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) signal. We exploited laser microdissection and Solexa sequencing to identify 202 genes whose transcripts increase in the meristem during floral commitment. Expression of six of these transcripts was tested in different mutants, allowing them to be assigned to FT-dependent or FT-independent pathways. Most, but not all, of those dependent on FT and its paralog TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) also relied on SOC1 and FUL. However, this dependency on FT and TSF or SOC1 and FUL was often bypassed in the presence of the short vegetative phase mutation. FLOR1, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat protein, was induced in the early inflorescence meristem, and flor1 mutations delayed flowering. Our data contribute to the definition of LD-dependent pathways downstream and in parallel to FT. PMID:22319055

  9. Self-Selection Patterns of College Roommates as Identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchors, W. Scott; Hale, John, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated patterns and processes by which students (N=422) made unassisted roommate pairings within residence halls using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Results indicated introverts, intuitives, feelers, and perceivers each tended to self-select. (BL)

  10. Automated computation of arbor densities: a step toward identifying neuronal cell types

    E-print Network

    Sumbul, Uygar

    The shape and position of a neuron convey information regarding its molecular and functional identity. The identification of cell types from structure, a classic method, relies on the time-consuming step of arbor tracing. ...

  11. Oxytocin and vasopressin enhance synaptic transmission in the hypoglossal motor nucleus of young rats by acting on distinct receptor types.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, L J; Reymond-Marron, I; Dupré, A; Raggenbass, M

    2010-02-01

    Hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons innervate extrinsic and intrinsic muscles of the tongue and control behaviors such as suckling, swallowing, breathing or chewing. In young rats, XII motoneurons express V1a vasopressin and oxytocin receptors. Previous studies have shown that activation of these receptors induces direct powerful excitation in XII motoneurons. In addition, by activating V1a receptors vasopressin can also enhance inhibitory synaptic transmission in the XII nucleus. In the present work, we have further characterized the effect of these neuropeptides on synaptic transmission in the XII nucleus. We have used brainstem slices of young rats and whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Oxytocin enhanced the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents by a factor of two and a half. GABAergic and glycinergic events were both affected. The oxytocin effect was mediated by uterine-type oxytocin receptors. Vasopressin and oxytocin also increased the frequency of excitatory synaptic currents, the enhancement being sixfold for the former and twofold for the latter compound. These effects were mediated by V1a and oxytocin receptors, respectively. Miniature synaptic events were unaffected by either vasopressin or oxytocin. This indicates that the peptide-dependent facilitation of synaptic currents was mediated by receptors located on the somatodendritic membrane of interneurons or premotor neurons, and not by receptors sited on axon terminals contacting XII motoneurons. Accordingly, recordings obtained from non-motoneurons located near the border of the XII nucleus showed that part of these cells possess functional V1a and oxytocin receptors whose activation leads to excitation. Some of these neurons could be antidromically activated following electrical stimulation of the XII nucleus, suggesting that they may act as premotor neurons. We propose that in young rats, oxytocin and vasopressin may function as neuromodulators in brainstem motor circuits responsible of tongue movements. PMID:19896520

  12. Characterizing the successful student in general chemistry and physical science classes in terms of Jung's personality types as identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Wayne David

    1998-11-01

    A student's success in a science class can depend upon previous experiences, motivation, and the level of interest in the subject. Since psychological type is intrinsic to a person's whole being, it can be influential upon the student's motivation and interests. Thus, a study of student psychological types versus the level of success in a class, as measured by a percentage, has potential to uncover certain personality characteristics which may be helpful to or which may hinder a student's learning environment. This study was initiated, using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, to evaluate any correlation between a student's personality type and his/her performance in a science class. A total of 1041 students from three classes: Chemistry 121/122, Chemistry 112, Physical Science 100, volunteered for the study. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the levels of significance among sixteen personality types' averages. The results reveal that for the Chemistry 1121/122 course, the average score of the INTJ personality type was 5.1 to 12.6 points higher than every other personality type. The ANOVA identifies 3 personality types with averages significantly below the INTJ at the p < 0.05 significance level. The ANOVA analysis for the Chemistry 112 course identified significances between student scores at p = 0.08. The significance level for the differences among scores for the Physical Science 100 course was determined at a level of p = 0.02. Significance levels for p < 0.05 and <0.01 were identified between several groups in this course. The data suggest, that although personality type may not predict a particular student's success in a science class, students with certain personality traits may be favored in a chemistry class due the structure of the instruction and the presentation of the subject matter.

  13. Morphologically distinct types of amyloid plaques point the way to a better understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, M R; Nagele, R G

    2010-04-01

    The details of the sequence of pathological events leading to neuron death in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not known. Even the formation of amyloid plaques, one of the major histopathological hallmarks of AD, is not clearly understood; both the origin of the amyloid and the means of its deposition remain unclear. It is still widely considered, however, that amyloid plaques undergo gradual growth in the interstitial space of the brain via continual extracellular deposition of amyloid beta peptides at "seeding sites," and that these growing plaques encroach progressively on neurons and their axons and dendritic processes, eventually leading to neuronal death. Actually, histopathological evidence to support this mechanism is sparse and of uncertain validity. The fact that the amyloid deposits in AD brains that are collectively referred to as plaques are of multiple types and that each seems to have a different origin often is overlooked. We have shown experimentally that many of the so-called "diffuse amyloid plaques," which lack associated inflammatory cells, are either the result of leaks of amyloid from blood vessels at focal sites of blood-brain barrier breaches or are artifacts resulting from grazing sections through the margins of dense core plaques. In addition, we have provided experimental evidence that neuronal death via necrosis leaves a residue that takes the form of a spheroid "cloud" of amyloid, released by cell lysis, surrounding a dense core that often contains neuronal nuclear material. Support for a neuronal origin for these "dense core amyloid plaques" includes their ability to attract inflammatory cells (microglia and immigrant macrophages) and that they contain nuclear and cytoplasmic components that are somewhat resistant to proteolysis by lysosomes released during neuronal cell lysis. We discuss here the clinical and therapeutic importance of recognizing that amyloid deposition occurs both within neurons (intracellular) and in the interstitial (extracellular) space of the brain. For dense core plaques, we propose that the latter location largely follows from the former. This scenario suggests that blocking intraneuronal amyloid deposition should be a primary therapeutic target. This strategy also would be effective for blocking the gradual compromise of neuronal function resulting from this intraneuronal deposition, and the eventual death and lysis of these amyloid-burdened neurons that leads to amyloid release and the appearance of dense core amyloid plaques in the interstitium of AD brains. PMID:20121465

  14. A new point mutation in the ND1 mitochondrial gene identified in a type II diabetic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, V.N.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K.

    1995-08-01

    A novel mutation in a mitochondrial gene was identified in a patient with type II diabetes mellitus. G-to-A transition was localized at the nt3316 position of gene ND1 and resulted in alanine threonine replacement at position 4 of mitochondrial NAD-H-dehydrogenase. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Colon cancer molecular subtypes identified by expression profiling and associated to stroma, mucinous type and different clinical behavior

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colon cancer patients with the same stage show diverse clinical behavior due to tumor heterogeneity. We aimed to discover distinct classes of tumors based on microarray expression patterns, to analyze whether the molecular classification correlated with the histopathological stages or other clinical parameters and to study differences in the survival. Methods Hierarchical clustering was performed for class discovery in 88 colon tumors (stages I to IV). Pathways analysis and correlations between clinical parameters and our classification were analyzed. Tumor subtypes were validated using an external set of 78 patients. A 167 gene signature associated to the main subtype was generated using the 3-Nearest-Neighbor method. Coincidences with other prognostic predictors were assesed. Results Hierarchical clustering identified four robust tumor subtypes with biologically and clinically distinct behavior. Stromal components (p?distinctive of tumour-associated-stroma and components of the extracellular matrix in contrast to Low-stroma-subtype. Mucinous-subtype was reflected by the increased expression of trefoil factors and mucins as well as by a higher proportion of MSI and BRAF mutations. Tumor subtypes were validated using an external set of 78 patients. A 167 gene signature associated to the Low-stroma-subtype distinguished low risk patients from high risk patients in the external cohort (Dukes B and C:HR?=?8.56(2.53-29.01); Dukes B,C and D:HR?=?1.87(1.07-3.25)). Eight different reported survival gene signatures segregated our tumors into two groups the Low-stroma-subtype and the other tumor subtypes. Conclusions We have identified novel molecular subtypes in colon cancer with distinct biological and clinical behavior that are established from the initiation of the tumor. Tumor microenvironment is important for the classification and for the malignant power of the tumor. Differential gene sets and biological pathways characterize each tumor subtype reflecting underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis that may be used for the selection of targeted therapeutic procedures. This classification may contribute to an improvement in the management of the patients with CRC and to a more comprehensive prognosis. PMID:22712570

  16. Joint annotation of chromatin state and chromatin conformation reveals relationships among domain types and identifies domains of cell-type-specific expression

    PubMed Central

    Libbrecht, Maxwell W.; Ay, Ferhat; Hoffman, Michael M.; Gilbert, David M.; Bilmes, Jeffrey A.; Noble, William Stafford

    2015-01-01

    The genomic neighborhood of a gene influences its activity, a behavior that is attributable in part to domain-scale regulation. Previous genomic studies have identified many types of regulatory domains. However, due to the difficulty of integrating genomics data sets, the relationships among these domain types are poorly understood. Semi-automated genome annotation (SAGA) algorithms facilitate human interpretation of heterogeneous collections of genomics data by simultaneously partitioning the human genome and assigning labels to the resulting genomic segments. However, existing SAGA methods cannot integrate inherently pairwise chromatin conformation data. We developed a new computational method, called graph-based regularization (GBR), for expressing a pairwise prior that encourages certain pairs of genomic loci to receive the same label in a genome annotation. We used GBR to exploit chromatin conformation information during genome annotation by encouraging positions that are close in 3D to occupy the same type of domain. Using this approach, we produced a model of chromatin domains in eight human cell types, thereby revealing the relationships among known domain types. Through this model, we identified clusters of tightly regulated genes expressed in only a small number of cell types, which we term “specific expression domains.” We found that domain boundaries marked by promoters and CTCF motifs are consistent between cell types even when domain activity changes. Finally, we showed that GBR can be used to transfer information from well-studied cell types to less well-characterized cell types during genome annotation, making it possible to produce high-quality annotations of the hundreds of cell types with limited available data. PMID:25677182

  17. Identifying the types of waves: A value adding study on the ocean observing data buoy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, B.; Sannasiraj, S.; Sundar, V.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding of the wave climate in a particular place of interest is one of the primary aspects of any ocean observing system. Engineers and scientists working in the area of coastal or offshore engineering require to have knowledge on the types of waves that predominantly prevailing not only for the design of the ocean structures but also to understand the physical behavior of ocean surface. For example, identification of breaking waves is given prime importance as it has potential to answer for many of the water-air interaction or turbulence mixing problems. On the other hand, group of waves in which successive wave heights exceed the significant value could exert tremendous forces on the ocean structures and may lead catastrophic damage to it. Apart from deriving the conventional information such as the significant wave periods, heights and the predominant direction of prevailing, knowledge on the existence of type of waves would certainly help the designers, engineers and researchers. In an attempt to classify the types of waves from the buoy measurements, a detailed experimental program was conducted in the Department of Ocean Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras. The buoy model was subjected to variety of waves such as group and breaking waves. The challenging task of the study is to simulate the group and breaking waves in the controlled laboratory environment. For which, initially, these waves are simulated theoretically, which intern converted into first order wave paddle signals to simulate the waves in the flume. The buoy heave, surge and pitch motions were measured by using potentiometers and the non-contact motion capturing cameras. The experimentally obtained wave elevation and the buoy motions time histories were analyzed by statistical, continuous wavelet transformation and phase-time methods to find the traces of wave types. A careful step by step analysis of the buoy motions yields presence of wave groupiness and breaking events. The details of the model, instrumentation, testing conditions and the analysis are presented and discussed in this paper.

  18. Novel PTPRQ mutations identified in three congenital hearing loss patients with various types of hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Naoko; Moteki, Hideaki; Azaiez, Hela; Booth, Kevin T; Takahashi, Masahiro; Arai, Yasuhiro; Shearer, A Eliot; Sloan, Christina M; Nishio, Shin-ya; Kolbe, Diana L; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Smith, Richard J H; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective We present three patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) caused by the novel PTPRQ mutations, including clinical manifestations and phenotypic features. Methods Two hundred and twenty (220) Japanese subjects with sensorineural hearing loss from unrelated and non-consanguineous families were enrolled in the study. Targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel sequencing of all known non-syndromic hearing loss genes was performed to identify the genetic cause of hearing loss. Results Four novel causative PTPRQ mutations were identified in three cases. Case 1 had progressive profound SNHL with homozygous nonsense mutation. Case 2 had non-progressive profound SNHL with compound heterozygous mutation (nonsense and missense mutation). Case 3 had non-progressive moderate SNHL with compound heterozygous mutation (missense and splice site mutation). Caloric test and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test showed vestibular dysfunction in Case 1. Conclusion Hearing loss levels and progression among the present cases were varied, and there seem to be no obvious correlation between genotypes and the phenotypic features of their hearing loss. The PTPRQ mutation appeared to be responsible for the vestibular dysfunction. PMID:25788564

  19. Screening of a healthy newborn identifies three adult family members with symptomatic glutaric aciduria type I

    PubMed Central

    MCH, Janssen; LAJ, Kluijtmans; S.B., Wortmann

    2014-01-01

    We report three adult sibs (one female, two males) with symptomatic glutaric acidura type I, who were diagnosed after a low carnitine level was found by newborn screening in a healthy newborn of the women. All three adults had low plasma carnitine, elevated glutaric acid levels and pronounced 3-hydroxyglutaric aciduria. The diagnosis was confirmed by undetectable glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity in lymphocytes and two pathogenic heterozygous mutations in the GCDH gene (c.1060A > G, c.1154C > T). These results reinforce the notion that abnormal metabolite levels in newborns may lead to the diagnosis of adult metabolic disease in the mother and potentially other family members.

  20. Identify Structural Flaw Location and Type with an Inverse Algorithm of Resonance Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Lai, Canhai; Sun, Xin

    2015-10-20

    To evaluate the fitness-for-service of a structural component and to quantify its remaining useful life, aging and service-induced structural flaws must be quantitatively determined in service or during scheduled maintenance shutdowns. Resonance inspection (RI), a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique, distinguishes the anomalous parts from the good parts based on changes in the natural frequency spectra. Known for its numerous advantages, i.e., low inspection cost, high testing speed, and broad applicability to complex structures, RI has been widely used in the automobile industry for quality inspection. However, compared to other contemporary direct visualization-based NDE methods, a more widespread application of RI faces a fundamental challenge because such technology is unable to quantify the flaw details, e.g. location, dimensions, and types. In this study, the applicability of a maximum correlation-based inverse RI algorithm developed by the authors is further studied for various flaw cases. It is demonstrated that a variety of common structural flaws, i.e. stiffness degradation, voids, and cracks, can be accurately retrieved by this algorithm even when multiple different types of flaws coexist. The quantitative relations between the damage identification results and the flaw characteristics are also developed to assist the evaluation of the actual state of health of the engineering structures.

  1. Automated computation of arbor densities: a step toward identifying neuronal cell types

    PubMed Central

    Sümbül, Uygar; Zlateski, Aleksandar; Vishwanathan, Ashwin; Masland, Richard H.; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The shape and position of a neuron convey information regarding its molecular and functional identity. The identification of cell types from structure, a classic method, relies on the time-consuming step of arbor tracing. However, as genetic tools and imaging methods make data-driven approaches to neuronal circuit analysis feasible, the need for automated processing increases. Here, we first establish that mouse retinal ganglion cell types can be as precise about distributing their arbor volumes across the inner plexiform layer as they are about distributing the skeletons of the arbors. Then, we describe an automated approach to computing the spatial distribution of the dendritic arbors, or arbor density, with respect to a global depth coordinate based on this observation. Our method involves three-dimensional reconstruction of neuronal arbors by a supervised machine learning algorithm, post-processing of the enhanced stacks to remove somata and isolate the neuron of interest, and registration of neurons to each other using automatically detected arbors of the starburst amacrine interneurons as fiducial markers. In principle, this method could be generalizable to other structures of the CNS, provided that they allow sparse labeling of the cells and contain a reliable axis of spatial reference. PMID:25505389

  2. Picosecond-resolved FRET on non-amplified DNA for identifying individuals genetically susceptible to type-1 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardo, Luca; Tosi, Giovanna; Bondani, Maria; Accolla, Roberto; Andreoni, Alessandra

    2012-06-01

    By tens-of-picosecond resolved fluorescence detection we study Förster resonance energy transfer between a donor and a black-hole-quencher bound at the 5'- and 3'-positions of an oligonucleotide probe matching the highly polymorphic region between codons 51 and 58 of the human leukocyte antigen DQB1 0201 allele, conferring susceptibility to type-1 diabetes. The probe is annealed with non-amplified genomic DNAs carrying either the 0201 sequence or other DQB1 allelic variants. We detect the longest-lived donor fluorescence in the case of hybridization with the 0201 allele and definitely faster and distinct decays for the other allelic variants, some of which are single-nucleotide polymorphic.

  3. Identifying Clinical Study Types from PubMed Metadata: The Active (Machine) Learning Approach.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Adam G; Arachi, Diana; Bourgeois, Florence T

    2015-01-01

    We examined a process for automating the classification of articles in MEDLINE aimed at minimising manual effort without sacrificing accuracy. From 22,808 articles pertaining to 19 antidepressants, 1000 were randomly selected and manually labelled according to article type (including, randomised controlled trials, editorials, etc.). We applied a machine learning approach termed 'active learning', where the learner (machine) selects the order in which the user (human) labels examples. Via simulation, we determined the number of articles a user needed to label to produce a classifier with at least 95% recall and 90% precision in three scenarios related to evidence synthesis. We found that the active learning process reduced the number of training instances required by 70%, 19%, and 14% in the three scenarios. The results show that the active learning method may be used in some scenarios to produce accurate classifiers that meet the needs of evidence synthesis tasks and reduce manual effort. PMID:26262175

  4. Ticking Stellar Time Bomb Identified - Astronomers find prime suspect for a Type Ia supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope and its ability to obtain images as sharp as if taken from space, astronomers have made the first time-lapse movie of a rather unusual shell ejected by a "vampire star", which in November 2000 underwent an outburst after gulping down part of its companion's matter. This enabled astronomers to determine the distance and intrinsic brightness of the outbursting object. It appears that this double star system is a prime candidate to be one of the long-sought progenitors of the exploding stars known as Type Ia supernovae, critical for studies of dark energy. "One of the major problems in modern astrophysics is the fact that we still do not know exactly what kinds of stellar system explode as a Type Ia supernova," says Patrick Woudt, from the University of Cape Town and lead author of the paper reporting the results. "As these supernovae play a crucial role in showing that the Universe's expansion is currently accelerating, pushed by a mysterious dark energy, it is rather embarrassing." The astronomers studied the object known as V445 in the constellation of Puppis ("the Stern") in great detail. V445 Puppis is the first, and so far only, nova showing no evidence at all for hydrogen. It provides the first evidence for an outburst on the surface of a white dwarf [1] dominated by helium. "This is critical, as we know that Type Ia supernovae lack hydrogen," says co-author Danny Steeghs, from the University of Warwick, UK, "and the companion star in V445 Pup fits this nicely by also lacking hydrogen, instead dumping mainly helium gas onto the white dwarf." In November 2000, this system underwent a nova outburst, becoming 250 times brighter than before and ejecting a large quantity of matter into space. The team of astronomers used the NACO adaptive optics instrument [2] on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) to obtain very sharp images of V445 Puppis over a time span of two years. The images show a bipolar shell, initially with a very narrow waist, with lobes on each side. Two knots are also seen at both the extreme ends of the shell, which appear to move at about 30 million kilometres per hour. The shell - unlike any previously observed for a nova - is itself moving at about 24 million kilometres per hour. A thick disc of dust, which must have been produced during the last outburst, obscures the two central stars. "The incredible detail that we can see on such small scales - about hundred milliarcseconds, which is the apparent size of a one euro coin seen from about forty kilometres - is only possible thanks to the adaptive optics technology available on large ground-based telescopes such as ESO's VLT," says Steeghs. A supernova is one way that a star can end its life, exploding in a display of grandiose fireworks. One family of supernovae, called Type Ia supernovae, are of particular interest in cosmology as they can be used as "standard candles" to measure distances in the Universe [3] and so can be used to calibrate the accelerating expansion that is driven by dark energy. One defining characteristic of Type Ia supernovae is the lack of hydrogen in their spectrum. Yet hydrogen is the most common chemical element in the Universe. Such supernovae most likely arise in systems composed of two stars, one of them being the end product of the life of sun-like stars, or white dwarfs. When such white dwarfs, acting as stellar vampires that suck matter from their companion, become heavier than a given limit, they become unstable and explode [4]. The build-up is not a simple process. As the white dwarf cannibalises its prey, matter accumulates on its surface. If this layer becomes too dense, it becomes unstable and erupts as a nova. These controlled, mini-explosions eject part of the accumulated matter back into space. The crucial question is thus to know whether the white dwarf can manage to gain weight despite the outburst, that is, if some of the matter taken from the companion stays on the white dwarf, so that it will eventual

  5. Conformational changes of the bacterial type I ATP-binding cassette importer HisQMP2 at distinct steps of the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Heuveling, Johanna; Frochaux, Violette; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Wawrzinek, Robert; Wessig, Pablo; Herrmann, Andreas; Schneider, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Prokaryotic solute binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette import systems are divided into type I and type II and mechanistic differences in the transport process going along with this classification are under intensive investigation. Little is known about the conformational dynamics during the catalytic cycle especially concerning the transmembrane domains. The type I transporter for positively charged amino acids from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (LAO-HisQMP2) was studied by limited proteolysis in detergent solution in the absence and presence of co-factors including ATP, ADP, LAO/arginine, and Mg(2+) ions. Stable peptide fragments could be obtained and differentially susceptible cleavage sites were determined by mass spectrometry as Lys-258 in the nucleotide-binding subunit, HisP, and Arg-217/Arg-218 in the transmembrane subunit, HisQ. In contrast, transmembrane subunit HisM was gradually degraded but no stable fragment could be detected. HisP and HisQ were equally resistant under pre- and post-hydrolysis conditions in the presence of arginine-loaded solute-binding protein LAO and ATP/ADP. Some protection was also observed with LAO/arginine alone, thus reflecting binding to the transporter in the apo-state and transmembrane signaling. Comparable digestion patterns were obtained with the transporter reconstituted into proteoliposomes and nanodiscs. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy confirmed the change of HisQ(R218) to a more apolar microenvironment upon ATP binding and hydrolysis. Limited proteolysis was subsequently used as a tool to study the consequences of mutations on the transport cycle. Together, our data suggest similar conformational changes during the transport cycle as described for the maltose ABC transporter of Escherichia coli, despite distinct structural differences between both systems. PMID:24021237

  6. Distinct Cell Clusters Touching Islet Cells Induce Islet Cell Replication in Association with Over-Expression of Regenerating Gene (REG) Protein in Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Kaoru; Saitoh, Sei; Nishida, Yoriko; Yokota, Sadanori; Ohno, Shinichi; Mao, Xiayang; Akiyama, Daiichiro; Tanaka, Shoichiro; Awata, Takuya; Shimada, Akira; Oikawa, Youichi; Shimura, Hiroki; Furuya, Fumihiko; Takizawa, Soichi; Ichijo, Masashi; Ichijo, Sayaka; Itakura, Jun; Fujii, Hideki; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Takasawa, Shin; Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic islet endocrine cell-supporting architectures, including islet encapsulating basement membranes (BMs), extracellular matrix (ECM), and possible cell clusters, are unclear. Procedures The architectures around islet cell clusters, including BMs, ECM, and pancreatic acinar-like cell clusters, were studied in the non-diabetic state and in the inflamed milieu of fulminant type 1 diabetes in humans. Result Immunohistochemical and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that human islet cell clusters and acinar-like cell clusters adhere directly to each other with desmosomal structures and coated-pit-like structures between the two cell clusters. The two cell-clusters are encapsulated by a continuous capsule composed of common BMs/ECM. The acinar-like cell clusters have vesicles containing regenerating (REG) I? protein. The vesicles containing REG I? protein are directly secreted to islet cells. In the inflamed milieu of fulminant type 1 diabetes, the acinar-like cell clusters over-expressed REG I? protein. Islet endocrine cells, including beta-cells and non-beta cells, which were packed with the acinar-like cell clusters, show self-replication with a markedly increased number of Ki67-positive cells. Conclusion The acinar-like cell clusters touching islet endocrine cells are distinct, because the cell clusters are packed with pancreatic islet clusters and surrounded by common BMs/ECM. Furthermore, the acinar-like cell clusters express REG I? protein and secrete directly to neighboring islet endocrine cells in the non-diabetic state, and the cell clusters over-express REG I? in the inflamed milieu of fulminant type 1 diabetes with marked self-replication of islet cells. PMID:24759849

  7. Identifying and meeting the challenges of insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sorli, Christopher; Heile, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic illness that requires clinical recognition and treatment of the dual pathophysiologic entities of altered glycemic control and insulin resistance to reduce the risk of long-term micro- and macrovascular complications. Although insulin is one of the most effective and widely used therapeutic options in the management of diabetes, it is used by less than one-half of patients for whom it is recommended. Clinician-, patient-, and health care system-related challenges present numerous obstacles to insulin use in T2DM. Clinicians must remain informed about new insulin products, emerging technologies, and treatment options that have the potential to improve adherence to insulin therapy while optimizing glycemic control and mitigating the risks of therapy. Patient-related challenges may be overcome by actively listening to the patient’s fears and concerns regarding insulin therapy and by educating patients about the importance, rationale, and evolving role of insulin in individualized self-treatment regimens. Enlisting the services of Certified Diabetes Educators and office personnel can help in addressing patient-related challenges. Self-management of diabetes requires improved patient awareness regarding the importance of lifestyle modifications, self-monitoring, and/or continuous glucose monitoring, improved methods of insulin delivery (eg, insulin pens), and the enhanced convenience and safety provided by insulin analogs. Health care system-related challenges may be improved through control of the rising cost of insulin therapy while making it available to patients. To increase the success rate of treatment of T2DM, the 2012 position statement from the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes focused on individualized patient care and provided clinicians with general treatment goals, implementation strategies, and tools to evaluate the quality of care. PMID:25061317

  8. A monoclonal antibody identifies a 215 000-dalton nuclear envelope protein restricted to certain cell types.

    PubMed

    Brown, G; Turner, B M; Morris, C J; Bahman, A M; Fisher, A G; Whitfield, W G; Davies, S; Barthakur, R; Johnson, G D

    1985-11-01

    The monoclonal antibody, AGF2.3, was isolated from mice immunised with the human promyeloid cell line HL60. By immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy the antibody was shown to bind to the nuclear envelope in uninduced HL60 cells. Immunofluorescent staining was reduced to very low levels in HL60 cells induced to mature to monocytes or neutrophils by addition of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or dimethyl sulfoxide respectively. Blood neutrophils did not express the antigen. Weak immunofluorescent staining of cell nuclei was observed in peripheral blood lymphocytes and in sections of normal human kidney, tonsil and skin epithelium. The AGF2.3 antigen was strongly expressed on the nuclei of 21/21 haemopoietic cell lines and 21/25 permanent non-haemopoietic cell lines representing various cell types. In contrast, the antigen was not expressed by any of six primary (untransformed) cell cultures. These included fibroblasts, endothelial cells and keratinocytes. The antigen was expressed in the Q10 SV-40 transformed cell line derived from a non-expressing primary fibroblast culture. AGF2.3 antibody precipitated a protein with an apparent subunit molecular weight of approximately 215 kDa from Triton X-100 extracts of HL60 and HeLa cells labelled with 35S-methionine. This protein was not detectable in extracts of primary skin fibroblasts prepared in parallel. We conclude that AGF2.3 antibody recognises a previously undescribed protein associated with the nuclear envelope which is expressed at high levels in most transformed cell lines but which is weakly expressed or absent in normal tissues and primary cell cultures. PMID:2417847

  9. Particular Candida albicans Strains in the Digestive Tract of Dyspeptic Patients, Identified by Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yan-Bing; Zheng, Jian-Ling; Jin, Bo; Zhuo, De-Xiang; Huang, Zhu-Qing; Qi, He; Zhang, Wei; Duan, Wei; Fu, Ji-Ting; Wang, Chui-Jie; Mao, Ze-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a human commensal that is also responsible for chronic gastritis and peptic ulcerous disease. Little is known about the genetic profiles of the C. albicans strains in the digestive tract of dyspeptic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, diversity, and genetic profiles among C. albicans isolates recovered from natural colonization of the digestive tract in the dyspeptic patients. Methods and Findings Oral swab samples (n?=?111) and gastric mucosa samples (n?=?102) were obtained from a group of patients who presented dyspeptic symptoms or ulcer complaints. Oral swab samples (n?=?162) were also obtained from healthy volunteers. C. albicans isolates were characterized and analyzed by multilocus sequence typing. The prevalence of Candida spp. in the oral samples was not significantly different between the dyspeptic group and the healthy group (36.0%, 40/111 vs. 29.6%, 48/162; P > 0.05). However, there were significant differences between the groups in the distribution of species isolated and the genotypes of the C. albicans isolates. C. albicans was isolated from 97.8% of the Candida-positive subjects in the dyspeptic group, but from only 56.3% in the healthy group (P < 0.001). DST1593 was the dominant C. albicans genotype from the digestive tract of the dyspeptic group (60%, 27/45), but not the healthy group (14.8%, 4/27) (P < 0.001). Conclusions Our data suggest a possible link between particular C. albicans strain genotypes and the host microenvironment. Positivity for particular C. albicans genotypes could signify susceptibility to dyspepsia. PMID:22536371

  10. Loss of intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter haemolyticus as a result of three distinct types of alterations in the aac(6')-Ig gene, including insertion of IS17.

    PubMed Central

    Rudant, E; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of the aac(6')-Ig gene, encoding aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase-Ig [AAC(6')-Ig], was studied in 96 Acinetobacter haemolyticus strains and 12 proteolytic Acinetobacter strains, including Acinetobacter genomospecies 6, 13, and 14 and 3 unnamed species assigned to this genomic group by DNA-DNA hybridization. This gene was detected by DNA-DNA hybridization in all 96 A. haemolyticus strains and by PCR in 95 strains but was not detected in strains of other species, indicating that it may be used to identify A. haemolyticus. Three A. haemolyticus strains were susceptible to tobramycin and did not produce an aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetylating activity, although they contained aac(6')-Ig-related sequences. An analysis of three susceptible A. haemolyticus strains indicated that aminoglycoside resistance was abolished by the following three distinct mechanisms: (i) a point mutation in aac(6')-Ig that led to a Met56-->Arg substitution, which was shown by analysis of a revertant to be responsible for the loss of resistance; (ii) a polythymine insertion that altered the reading frame; and (iii) insertion of IS17, a new member of the IS903 family. These observations indicated that AAC(6')-Ig is not essential for the viability of A. haemolyticus, although the aac(6')-Ig gene was detected in all members of this species. PMID:9420034

  11. An artificial neural network to estimate physical activity energy expenditure and identify physical activity type from an accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Pober, David; Crouter, Scott; Bassett, David; Freedson, Patty

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop and test two artificial neural networks (ANN) to apply to physical activity data collected with a commonly used uniaxial accelerometer. The first ANN model estimated physical activity metabolic equivalents (METs), and the second ANN identified activity type. Subjects (n = 24 men and 24 women, mean age = 35 yr) completed a menu of activities that included sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous intensities, and each activity was performed for 10 min. There were three different activity menus, and 20 participants completed each menu. Oxygen consumption (in ml·kg?1·min?1) was measured continuously, and the average of minutes 4–9 was used to represent the oxygen cost of each activity. To calculate METs, activity oxygen consumption was divided by 3.5 ml·kg?1·min?1 (1 MET). Accelerometer data were collected second by second using the Actigraph model 7164. For the analysis, we used the distribution of counts (10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles of a minute's second-by-second counts) and temporal dynamics of counts (lag, one autocorrelation) as the accelerometer feature inputs to the ANN. To examine model performance, we used the leave-one-out cross-validation technique. The ANN prediction of METs root-mean-squared error was 1.22 METs (confidence interval: 1.14–1.30). For the prediction of activity type, the ANN correctly classified activity type 88.8% of the time (confidence interval: 86.4–91.2%). Activity types were low-level activities, locomotion, vigorous sports, and household activities/other activities. This novel approach of applying ANNs for processing Actigraph accelerometer data is promising and shows that we can successfully estimate activity METs and identify activity type using ANN analytic procedures. PMID:19644028

  12. Human monoclonal antibody 2G12 defines a distinctive neutralization epitope on the gp120 glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Trkola, A; Purtscher, M; Muster, T; Ballaun, C; Buchacher, A; Sullivan, N; Srinivasan, K; Sodroski, J; Moore, J P; Katinger, H

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized human monoclonal antibody 2G12 to the gp120 surface glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This antibody potently and broadly neutralizes primary and T-cell line-adapted clade B strains of HIV-1 in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell-based assay and inhibits syncytium formation in the AA-2 cell line. Furthermore, 2G12 possesses neutralizing activity against strains from clade A but not from clade E. Complement- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-activating functions of 2G12 were also defined. The gp120 epitope recognized by 2G12 was found to be distinctive; binding of 2G12 to LAI recombinant gp120 was abolished by amino acid substitutions removing N-linked carbohydrates in the C2, C3, V4, and C4 regions of gp120. This gp120 mutant recognition pattern has not previously been observed, indicating that the 2G12 epitope is unusual. consistent with this, antibodies able to block 2G12 binding to recombinant gp120 were not detected in significant quantities in 16 HIV-positive human serum samples. PMID:8551569

  13. Hunner-Type (Classic) Interstitial Cystitis: A Distinct Inflammatory Disorder Characterized by Pancystitis, with Frequent Expansion of Clonal B-Cells and Epithelial Denudation

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Teppei; Kunita, Akiko; Ota, Yasunori; Katoh, Hiroto; Niimi, Aya; Nomiya, Akira; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Goto, Akiteru; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic bladder disease with urinary frequency, bladder discomfort or bladder pain of unknown etiology. Based on cystoscopic findings, patients with IC are classified as either Hunner-type/classic IC (HIC), presenting with a specific Hunner lesion, or non-Hunner-type IC (NHIC), presenting with no Hunner lesion, but post-hydrodistension mucosal bleeding. Inflammatory cell infiltration, composed predominantly of lymphocytes, plasma cells and epithelial denudation, has in the past been documented as a major pathological IC finding. However, the significance of the pathological evaluation of IC, especially with regard to the difference between HIC and NHIC, has been downplayed in recent years. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical quantification of infiltrating T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes and plasma cells, and measured the amount of residual epithelium in urinary bladder biopsy specimens taken from patients with HIC and NHIC, and those with no IC, using image analysis software. In addition, in situ hybridization of the light chains was performed to examine clonal B-cell expansion. Lymphoplasmacytic infiltration was significantly more severe in HIC specimens than in NHIC specimens (P <0.0001). Substantial lymphoplasmacytic inflammation (?200 cells/mm2) was observed in 93% of HIC specimens, whereas only 8% of NHIC specimens were inflamed. Plasmacytic infiltration was more prominent in HIC specimens compared with NHIC and non-IC cystitis specimens (P <0.005). Furthermore, expansion of light-chain-restricted B-cells was observed in 31% of cases of HIC. The amount of residual epithelium was decreased in HIC specimens compared with NHIC specimens and non-IC cystitis specimens (P <0.0001). These results suggest that NHIC and HIC are distinct pathological entities, with the latter characterized by pancystitis, frequent clonal B-cell expansion and epithelial denudation. An abnormality in the B-cell population may be involved in the pathogenesis of HIC. PMID:26587589

  14. Peroxisomes in Different Skeletal Cell Types during Intramembranous and Endochondral Ossification and Their Regulation during Osteoblast Differentiation by Distinct Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guofeng; Karnati, Srikanth; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2015-01-01

    Ossification defects leading to craniofacial dysmorphism or rhizomelia are typical phenotypes in patients and corresponding knockout mouse models with distinct peroxisomal disorders. Despite these obvious skeletal pathologies, to date no careful analysis exists on the distribution and function of peroxisomes in skeletal tissues and their alterations during ossification. Therefore, we analyzed the peroxisomal compartment in different cell types of mouse cartilage and bone as well as in primary cultures of calvarial osteoblasts. The peroxisome number and metabolism strongly increased in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification from the reserve to the hypertrophic zone, whereas in bone, metabolically active osteoblasts contained a higher numerical abundance of this organelle than osteocytes. The high abundance of peroxisomes in these skeletal cell types is reflected by high levels of Pex11? gene expression. During culture, calvarial pre-osteoblasts differentiated into secretory osteoblasts accompanied by peroxisome proliferation and increased levels of peroxisomal genes and proteins. Since many peroxisomal genes contain a PPAR-responsive element, we analyzed the gene expression of PPAR?/ß/? in calvarial osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells, revealing higher levels for PPARß than for PPAR? and PPAR?. Treatment with different PPAR agonists and antagonists not only changed the peroxisomal compartment and associated gene expression, but also induced complex alterations of the gene expression patterns of the other PPAR family members. Studies in M3CT3-E1 cells showed that the PPARß agonist GW0742 activated the PPRE-mediated luciferase expression and up-regulated peroxisomal gene transcription (Pex11, Pex13, Pex14, Acox1 and Cat), whereas the PPARß antagonist GSK0660 led to repression of the PPRE and a decrease of the corresponding mRNA levels. In the same way, treatment of calvarial osteoblasts with GW0742 increased in peroxisome number and related gene expression and accelerated osteoblast differentiation. Taken together, our results suggest that PPARß regulates the numerical abundance and metabolic function of peroxisomes via Pex11ß in parallel to osteoblast differentiation. PMID:26630504

  15. MxA as a clinically applicable biomarker for identifying systemic interferon type I in primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Naomi I; Brkic, Zana; Waris, Matti; van Helden-Meeuwsen, Cornelia G; Heezen, Kim; van de Merwe, Joop P; van Daele, Paul L; Dalm, Virgil A S H; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Versnel, Marjan A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish an easy and practical assay for identifying systemic interferon (IFN) type I bioactivity in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). The IFN type I signature is present in over half of the pSS patients and identifies a subgroup with a higher disease activity. This signature is currently assessed via laborious expression profiles of multiple IFN type I-inducible genes. Methods In a cohort of 35 pSS patients, myxovirus-resistance protein A (MxA) was assessed as a potential biomarker for type I IFN activity, using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) on whole-blood and flow cytometric analyses (fluorescence-activated cell sorting, FACS) of isolated CD14 monocytes. In addition, potential biomarkers such as CD64, CD169 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) were simultaneously analysed in CD14 monocytes using FACS. The IFNscore, a measure for total type I IFN bioactivity, was calculated using expression values of the IFN type I signature genes—IFI44, IFI44L, IFIT3, LY6E and MX1—in CD14 monocytes, determined by real-time quantitative PCR. Results IFNscores correlated the strongest with monocyte MxA protein (r=0.741, p<0.001) and whole-blood MxA levels (r=0.764, p<0.001), weaker with CD169 (r=0.495, p<0.001) and CD64 (r=0.436, p=0.007), and not at all with BAFF protein. In particular, whole blood MxA levels correlated with EULAR Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index scores and numerous clinical pSS parameters. Interestingly, patients on hydroxychloroquine showed reduced MxA levels (EIA, p=0.04; FACS p=0.001). Conclusions The MxA assays were excellent tools to assess IFN type I activity in pSS, MxA-EIA being the most practical. MxA levels associate with features of active disease and are reduced in hydroxychloroquine-treated patients, suggesting the clinical applicability of MxA in stratifying patients according to IFN positivity. PMID:23831963

  16. On Identifiability of Bias-Type Actuator-Sensor Faults in Multiple-Model-Based Fault Detection and Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores a class of multiple-model-based fault detection and identification (FDI) methods for bias-type faults in actuators and sensors. These methods employ banks of Kalman-Bucy filters to detect the faults, determine the fault pattern, and estimate the fault values, wherein each Kalman-Bucy filter is tuned to a different failure pattern. Necessary and sufficient conditions are presented for identifiability of actuator faults, sensor faults, and simultaneous actuator and sensor faults. It is shown that FDI of simultaneous actuator and sensor faults is not possible using these methods when all sensors have biases.

  17. 'Snake River (SR)-type' volcanism at the Yellowstone hotspot track: Distinctive products from unusual, high-temperature silicic super-eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Branney, M.J.; Bonnichsen, B.; Andrews, G.D.M.; Ellis, B.; Barry, T.L.; McCurry, M.

    2008-01-01

    A new category of large-scale volcanism, here termed Snake River (SR)-type volcanism, is defined with reference to a distinctive volcanic facies association displayed by Miocene rocks in the central Snake River Plain area of southern Idaho and northern Nevada, USA. The facies association contrasts with those typical of silicic volcanism elsewhere and records unusual, voluminous and particularly environmentally devastating styles of eruption that remain poorly understood. It includes: (1) large-volume, lithic-poor rhyolitic ignimbrites with scarce pumice lapilli; (2) extensive, parallel-laminated, medium to coarse-grained ashfall deposits with large cuspate shards, crystals and a paucity of pumice lapilli; many are fused to black vitrophyre; (3) unusually extensive, large-volume rhyolite lavas; (4) unusually intense welding, rheomorphism, and widespread development of lava-like facies in the ignimbrites; (5) extensive, fines-rich ash deposits with abundant ash aggregates (pellets and accretionary lapilli); (6) the ashfall layers and ignimbrites contain abundant clasts of dense obsidian and vitrophyre; (7) a bimodal association between the rhyolitic rocks and numerous, coalescing low-profile basalt lava shields; and (8) widespread evidence of emplacement in lacustrine-alluvial environments, as revealed by intercalated lake sediments, ignimbrite peperites, rhyolitic and basaltic hyaloclastites, basalt pillow-lava deltas, rhyolitic and basaltic phreatomagmatic tuffs, alluvial sands and palaeosols. Many rhyolitic eruptions were high mass-flux, large volume and explosive (VEI 6-8), and involved H2O-poor, low-??18O, metaluminous rhyolite magmas with unusually low viscosities, partly due to high magmatic temperatures (900-1,050??C). SR-type volcanism contrasts with silicic volcanism at many other volcanic fields, where the fall deposits are typically Plinian with pumice lapilli, the ignimbrites are low to medium grade (non-welded to eutaxitic) with abundant pumice lapilli or fiamme, and the rhyolite extrusions are small volume silicic domes and coule??es. SR-type volcanism seems to have occurred at numerous times in Earth history, because elements of the facies association occur within some other volcanic fields, including Trans-Pecos Texas, Etendeka-Paran, Lebombo, the English Lake District, the Proterozoic Keewanawan volcanics of Minnesota and the Yardea Dacite of Australia. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  18. Tax and overlapping rex sequences do not confer the distinct transformation tropisms of human T-cell leukemia virus types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianxin; Xie, Li; Green, Patrick L

    2003-07-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and HTLV-2 are distinct oncogenic retroviruses that infect several cell types but display their biological and pathogenic activity only in T cells. Previous studies have indicated that in vivo HTLV-1 has a preferential tropism for CD4+ T cells, whereas HTLV-2 in vivo tropism is less clear but appears to favor CD8+ T cells. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are susceptible to HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infection in vitro, and HTLV-1 has a preferential immortalization and transformation tropism of CD4+ T cells, whereas HTLV-2 immortalizes and transforms primarily CD8+ T cells. The molecular mechanism that determines this tropism of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 has not been determined. HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 carry the tax and rex transregulatory genes in separate but partially overlapping reading frames. Since Tax has been shown to be critical for cellular transformation in vitro and interacts with numerous cellular processes, we hypothesized that the viral determinant of transformation tropism is encoded by tax. Using molecular clones of HTLV-1 (Ach) and HTLV-2 (pH6neo), we constructed recombinants in which tax and overlapping rex genes of the two viruses were exchanged. p19 Gag expression from proviral clones transfected into 293T cells indicated that both recombinants contained functional Tax and Rex but with significantly altered activity compared to the wild-type clones. Stable transfectants expressing recombinant viruses were established, irradiated, and cocultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Both recombinants were competent to transform T lymphocytes with an efficiency similar to that of the parental viruses. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that HTLV-1 and HTLV-1/TR2 had a preferential tropism for CD4+ T cells and that HTLV-2 and HTLV-2/TR1 had a preferential tropism for CD8(+) T cells. Our results indicate that tax/rex in different genetic backgrounds display altered functional activity but ultimately do not contribute to the different in vitro transformation tropisms. This first study with recombinants between HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 is the initial step in elucidating the different pathobiologies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. PMID:12829812

  19. `Snake River (SR)-type' volcanism at the Yellowstone hotspot track: distinctive products from unusual, high-temperature silicic super-eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branney, M. J.; Bonnichsen, B.; Andrews, G. D. M.; Ellis, B.; Barry, T. L.; McCurry, M.

    2008-01-01

    A new category of large-scale volcanism, here termed Snake River (SR)-type volcanism, is defined with reference to a distinctive volcanic facies association displayed by Miocene rocks in the central Snake River Plain area of southern Idaho and northern Nevada, USA. The facies association contrasts with those typical of silicic volcanism elsewhere and records unusual, voluminous and particularly environmentally devastating styles of eruption that remain poorly understood. It includes: (1) large-volume, lithic-poor rhyolitic ignimbrites with scarce pumice lapilli; (2) extensive, parallel-laminated, medium to coarse-grained ashfall deposits with large cuspate shards, crystals and a paucity of pumice lapilli; many are fused to black vitrophyre; (3) unusually extensive, large-volume rhyolite lavas; (4) unusually intense welding, rheomorphism, and widespread development of lava-like facies in the ignimbrites; (5) extensive, fines-rich ash deposits with abundant ash aggregates (pellets and accretionary lapilli); (6) the ashfall layers and ignimbrites contain abundant clasts of dense obsidian and vitrophyre; (7) a bimodal association between the rhyolitic rocks and numerous, coalescing low-profile basalt lava shields; and (8) widespread evidence of emplacement in lacustrine-alluvial environments, as revealed by intercalated lake sediments, ignimbrite peperites, rhyolitic and basaltic hyaloclastites, basalt pillow-lava deltas, rhyolitic and basaltic phreatomagmatic tuffs, alluvial sands and palaeosols. Many rhyolitic eruptions were high mass-flux, large volume and explosive (VEI 6-8), and involved H2O-poor, low-?18O, metaluminous rhyolite magmas with unusually low viscosities, partly due to high magmatic temperatures (900-1,050°C). SR-type volcanism contrasts with silicic volcanism at many other volcanic fields, where the fall deposits are typically Plinian with pumice lapilli, the ignimbrites are low to medium grade (non-welded to eutaxitic) with abundant pumice lapilli or fiamme, and the rhyolite extrusions are small volume silicic domes and coulées. SR-type volcanism seems to have occurred at numerous times in Earth history, because elements of the facies association occur within some other volcanic fields, including Trans-Pecos Texas, Etendeka-Paraná, Lebombo, the English Lake District, the Proterozoic Keewanawan volcanics of Minnesota and the Yardea Dacite of Australia.

  20. Distinct roles for IL-13 and IL-4 via IL-13 receptor ?1 and the type II IL-4 receptor in asthma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Munitz, A.; Brandt, E. B.; Mingler, M.; Finkelman, F. D.; Rothenberg, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    IL-13 and IL-4 are central T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines in the immune system and potent activators of inflammatory responses and fibrosis during Th2 inflammation. Recent studies using Il13ra1?/? mice have demonstrated a critical role for IL-13 receptor (IL-13R) ?1 in allergen-induced airway responses. However, these observations require further attention especially because IL-4 can induce similar lung pathology to IL-13, independent of IL-13, and is still present in the allergic lung. Thus, we hypothesized that IL-13R?1 regulates IL-4-induced responses in the lung. To dissect the role of IL-13R?1 and the type I and II IL-4Rs in experimental asthma, we examined lung pathology induced by allergen, IL-4, and IL-13 challenge in Il13ra1?/? mice. We report that IL-13R?1 is essential for baseline IgE production, but Th2 and IgE responses to T cell-dependent antigens are IL-13R?1-independent. Furthermore, we demonstrate that increased airway resistance, mucus, TGF-?, and eotaxin(s) production, but not cellular infiltration, are critically dependent on IL-13R?1. Surprisingly, our results identify a CCR3- and IL-13R?1-independent pathway for lung eosinophilia. Global expression profiling of lungs from mice stimulated with allergen or IL-4 demonstrated that marker genes of alternatively activated macrophages are differentially regulated by the type I and type II IL-4R. Taken together, our data provide a comprehensive mechanistic analysis of the critical role by which IL-13R?1 mediates allergic lung pathology and highlight unforeseen roles for the type II IL-4R. PMID:18480254

  1. Genome-wide association study for type 2 diabetes in Indians identifies a new susceptibility locus at 2q21.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Rubina; Chauhan, Ganesh; Dwivedi, Om Prakash; Mahajan, Anubha; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaur, Ismeet; Bandesh, Khushdeep; Singh, Tejbir; Mathai, Benan John; Pandey, Yogesh; Chidambaram, Manickam; Sharma, Amitabh; Chavali, Sreenivas; Sengupta, Shantanu; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmi; Venkatesh, Pradeep; Aggarwal, Sanjay K; Ghosh, Saurabh; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Srinath, Reddy K; Saxena, Madhukar; Banerjee, Monisha; Mathur, Sandeep; Bhansali, Anil; Shah, Viral N; Madhu, Sri Venkata; Marwaha, Raman K; Basu, Analabha; Scaria, Vinod; McCarthy, Mark I; Venkatesan, Radha; Mohan, Viswanathan; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2013-03-01

    Indians undergoing socioeconomic and lifestyle transitions will be maximally affected by epidemic of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of T2D in 12,535 Indians, a less explored but high-risk group. We identified a new type 2 diabetes-associated locus at 2q21, with the lead signal being rs6723108 (odds ratio 1.31; P = 3.32 × 10??). Imputation analysis refined the signal to rs998451 (odds ratio 1.56; P = 6.3 × 10?¹²) within TMEM163 that encodes a probable vesicular transporter in nerve terminals. TMEM163 variants also showed association with decreased fasting plasma insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, indicating a plausible effect through impaired insulin secretion. The 2q21 region also harbors RAB3GAP1 and ACMSD; those are involved in neurologic disorders. Forty-nine of 56 previously reported signals showed consistency in direction with similar effect sizes in Indians and previous studies, and 25 of them were also associated (P < 0.05). Known loci and the newly identified 2q21 locus altogether explained 7.65% variance in the risk of T2D in Indians. Our study suggests that common susceptibility variants for T2D are largely the same across populations, but also reveals a population-specific locus and provides further insights into genetic architecture and etiology of T2D. PMID:23209189

  2. Suzaku studies of the central engine in the typical type I Seyfert NGC 3227: detection of multiple primary X-ray continua with distinct properties

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Hirofumi; Makishima, Kazuo; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Sakurai, Soki; Miyake, Katsuma; Yamada, Shin'ya

    2014-10-10

    The type I Seyfert galaxy NGC 3227 was observed by Suzaku six times in 2008, with intervals of ?1 week and net exposures of ?50 ks each. Among the six observations, the source varied by nearly an order of magnitude; it was brightest in the first observation with a 2-10 keV luminosity of 1.2 × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}, while faintest in the fourth observation with 2.9 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1}. As it became fainter, the continuum in the 2-45 keV band became harder, while the narrow Fe-K? emission line, detected on all occasions at 6.4 keV of the source rest frame, remained approximately constant in the photon flux. Through a method of variability-assisted broadband spectroscopy, the 2-45 keV spectrum of NGC 3227 was decomposed into three distinct components. One is a relatively soft power-law continuum with a photon index of ?2.3, weakly absorbed and highly variable on timescales of ?5 ks; it was observed only when the source was above a threshold luminosity of ?6.6 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1} (in 2-10 keV), and was responsible for further source brightening beyond. Another is a harder and more absorbed continuum with a photon index of ?1.6, which persisted through the six observations and varied slowly on timescales of a few weeks by a factor of ?2. This component, carrying a major fraction of the broadband emission when the source is below the threshold luminosity, is considered as an additional primary emission. The last one is a reflection component with the narrow iron line, produced at large distances from the central black hole.

  3. Differentiation capacity and maintenance of differentiated phenotypes of human mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on two distinct types of 3D polymeric scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Leferink, A M; Santos, D; Karperien, M; Truckenmüller, R K; van Blitterswijk, C A; Moroni, L

    2015-12-30

    Many studies have shown the influence of soluble factors and material properties on the differentiation capacity of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) cultured as monolayers. These types of two-dimensional (2D) studies can be used as simplified models to understand cell processes related to stem cell sensing and mechano-transduction in a three-dimensional (3D) context. For several other mechanisms such as cell-cell signaling, cell proliferation and cell morphology, it is well-known that cells behave differently on a planar surface compared to cells in 3D environments. In classical tissue engineering approaches, a combination of cells, 3D scaffolds and soluble factors are considered as the key ingredients for the generation of mechanically stable 3D tissue constructs. However, when MSCs are used for tissue engineering strategies, little is known about the maintenance of their differentiation potential in 3D scaffolds after the removal of differentiation soluble factors. In this study, the differentiation potential of human MSCs (hMSCs) into the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages on two distinct 3D scaffolds, additive manufactured electrospun scaffolds, was assessed and compared to conventional 2D culture. Human MSCs cultured in the presence of soluble factors in 3D showed to differentiate to the same extent as hMSCs cultured as 2D monolayers or as scaffold-free pellets, indicating that the two scaffolds do not play a consistent role in the differentiation process. In the case of phenotypic changes, the achieved differentiated phenotype was not maintained after the removal of soluble factors, suggesting that the plasticity of hMSCs is retained in 3D cell culture systems. This finding can have implications for future tissue engineering approaches in which the validation of hMSC differentiation on 3D scaffolds will not be sufficient to ensure the maintenance of the functionality of the cells in the absence of appropriate differentiation signals. PMID:26566169

  4. Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study: a genetics collection available for identifying genetic susceptibility factors for diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Patricia W; Rogus, John J; Cleary, Patricia A; Zhao, Yuan; Smiles, Adam M; Steffes, Michael W; Bucksa, Jean; Gibson, Therese B; Cordovado, Suzanne K; Krolewski, Andrzej S; Nierras, Concepcion R; Warram, James H

    2006-07-01

    The Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study is an initiative that aims to identify genes that are involved in diabetic nephropathy. A large number of individuals with type 1 diabetes were screened to identify two subsets, one with clear-cut kidney disease and another with normal renal status despite long-term diabetes. Those who met additional entry criteria and consented to participate were enrolled. When possible, both parents also were enrolled to form family trios. As of November 2005, GoKinD included 3075 participants who comprise 671 case singletons, 623 control singletons, 272 case trios, and 323 control trios. Interested investigators may request the DNA collection and corresponding clinical data for GoKinD participants using the instructions and application form that are available at http://www.gokind.org/access. Participating scientists will have access to three data sets, each with distinct advantages. The set of 1294 singletons has adequate power to detect a wide range of genetic effects, even those of modest size. The set of case trios, which has adequate power to detect effects of moderate size, is not susceptible to false-positive results because of population substructure. The set of control trios is critical for excluding certain false-positive results that can occur in case trios and may be particularly useful for testing gene-environment interactions. Integration of the evidence from these three components into a single, unified analysis presents a challenge. This overview of the GoKinD study examines in detail the power of each study component and discusses analytic challenges that investigators will face in using this resource. PMID:16775037

  5. Low-Altitude and Land-Based Infrared Thermography to Identify Types of Groundwater Discharge in NWT Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, B.; Mochnacz, N. J.

    2009-05-01

    In tributaries of the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, groundwater discharge provides critical fish habitat for Dolly Varden and bull trout populations by maintaining base flows, creating thermal refugia in winter, and providing stable riverbed temperatures for spawning. Where temperature contrasts exist between surface water and groundwater, infrared thermography can use heat as a tracer to locate groundwater discharge areas. Thermal images acquired from satellites and high altitude airplanes tend to be expensive, lack the resolution necessary to identify small discharge locations, and do not allow real time decisions to investigate and ground truth identified temperature anomalies. Therefore, a system was developed using a handheld FLIR ThermaCam P25 infrared camera, visual video camera, infrared video capture system, and GPS in a low flying helicopter and on the ground. The advantage of the system was its ability to inexpensively and efficiently characterize several kilometer long reaches of river and identify springs and seeps on a sub-meter scale and in real time. The different types of groundwater discharge that can occur in these streams include: deep geothermally heated groundwater; shallow groundwater; and active zone water, but differentiating them can be difficult because observed thermal anomalies can be non-unique functions of the initial groundwater temperature, magnitude of discharge, air and surface water temperatures, and temporal variations. Work performed in March and September easily detected spring and seeps of deep groundwater (8 to 13 ° C) at Smith Creek, Gibson Creek, Gayna River, and Little Fish Creek. Shallow groundwater discharge was detected (1 to 3 ° C) at White Sand Creek, Canyon Creek, and Fish Creek, but was more difficult to identify. Subtle variations from surrounding temperatures (<1 ° C) at some sites suggested seeps from the hyporheic zone or possibly the active zone. The limitations of infrared thermography include only being able to measure temperatures of surfaces and difficulty differentiating spatial anomalies from possible temporal influences. Overall, the handheld system was a useful reconnaissance tool for identifying surficial expressions of different types of ground water discharge.

  6. Eliminating Unwanted Far-Field Excitation in Objective-Type TIRF. Part I. Identifying Sources of Nonevanescent Excitation Light

    PubMed Central

    Brunstein, Maia; Teremetz, Maxime; Hérault, Karine; Tourain, Christophe; Oheim, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) achieves subdiffraction axial sectioning by confining fluorophore excitation to a thin layer close to the cell/substrate boundary. However, it is often unknown how thin this light sheet actually is. Particularly in objective-type TIRFM, large deviations from the exponential intensity decay expected for pure evanescence have been reported. Nonevanescent excitation light diminishes the optical sectioning effect, reduces contrast, and renders TIRFM-image quantification uncertain. To identify the sources of this unwanted fluorescence excitation in deeper sample layers, we here combine azimuthal and polar beam scanning (spinning TIRF), atomic force microscopy, and wavefront analysis of beams passing through the objective periphery. Using a variety of intracellular fluorescent labels as well as negative staining experiments to measure cell-induced scattering, we find that azimuthal beam spinning produces TIRFM images that more accurately portray the real fluorophore distribution, but these images are still hampered by far-field excitation. Furthermore, although clearly measureable, cell-induced scattering is not the dominant source of far-field excitation light in objective-type TIRF, at least for most types of weakly scattering cells. It is the microscope illumination optical path that produces a large cell- and beam-angle invariant stray excitation that is insensitive to beam scanning. This instrument-induced glare is produced far from the sample plane, inside the microscope illumination optical path. We identify stray reflections and high-numerical aperture aberrations of the TIRF objective as one important source. This work is accompanied by a companion paper (Pt.2/2). PMID:24606927

  7. Identification of a distinct type IV collagen. alpha. chain with restricted kidney distribution and assignment of its gene to the locus of X chromosome-linked Alport syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hostikka, S.L.; Hoeyhtyae, M.; Tryggvason, K. ); Eddy, R.L.; Byers, M.G.; Shows, T.B. )

    1990-02-01

    The authors have identified and extensively characterized a type IV collagen {alpha} chain, referred to as {alpha}5(IV). Four overlapping cDNA clones isolated contain an open reading frame for 543 amino acid residues of the carboxyl-terminal end of a collagenous domain, a 229-residue carboxyl-terminal noncollagenous domain, and 1201 base pairs coding for a 3{prime} untranslated region. The collagenous Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeat sequence has five imperfections that coincide with those in the corresponding region of the {alpha}1(IV) chain. The noncollagenous domain has 12 conserved cysteine residues and 83% and 63% sequence identity with the noncollagenous domains of the {alpha}1(IV) and {alpha}2(IV) chains, respectively. The {alpha}5(IV) chain has less sequence identity with the putative bovine {alpha}3(IV) and {alpha}4(IV) chains. Antiserum against an {alpha}5(IV) synthetic peptide stained a polypeptide chain of about 185 kDa by immunoblot analysis and immunolocalization of the chain in human kidney was almost completely restricted to the glomerulus. The gene was assigned to the Xq22 locus by somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization. This may be identical or close to the locus of the X chromosome-linked Alport syndrome that is believed to be a type IV collagen disease.

  8. Dorothy Hodgkin Lecture 2014. Understanding genes identified by genome-wide association studies for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rutter, G A

    2014-12-01

    Whilst the heritable nature of Type 2 diabetes has been recognized for many years, only in the past two decades have linkage analyses in families and genome-wide association studies in large populations begun to reveal the genetic landscape of the disease in detail. Whilst the former have provided a powerful means of identifying the genes responsible for monogenic forms of the disease, the latter highlight relatively large genomic regions. These often harbour multiple genes, whose relative contribution to exaggerated disease risk is uncertain. In the present study, the approaches that have been used to dissect the role of just a few (TCF7L2, SLC30A8, ADCY5, MTNR1B and CDKAL1) of the ~ 500 genes identified at dozens of implicated loci are described. These are usually selected based on the strength of their effect on disease risk, and predictions as to their likely biological role. Direct determination of the effects of identified polymorphisms on gene expression in disease-relevant tissues, notably the pancreatic islet, are then performed to identify genes whose expression is affected by a particular polymorphism. Subsequent functional analyses then involve perturbing gene expression in vitro in ?-cell lines or isolated islets and in vivo in animal models. Although the majority of polymorphisms affect insulin production rather than action, and mainly affect the ? cell, effects via other tissues may also contribute, requiring careful consideration in the design and interpretation of experiments in model systems. These considerations illustrate the scale of the task needed to exploit genome-wide association study data for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25186316

  9. Mathematical Modeling and Experimental Validation of the Spatial Distribution of Boron in the Root of Arabidopsis thaliana Identify High Boron Accumulation in the Tip and Predict a Distinct Root Tip Uptake Function

    PubMed Central

    Shimotohno, Akie; Sotta, Naoyuki; Sato, Takafumi; De Ruvo, Micol; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Grieneisen, Verônica A.; Fujiwara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Boron, an essential micronutrient, is transported in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana mainly by two different types of transporters, BORs and NIPs (nodulin26-like intrinsic proteins). Both are plasma membrane localized, but have distinct transport properties and patterns of cell type-specific accumulation with different polar localizations, which are likely to affect boron distribution. Here, we used mathematical modeling and an experimental determination to address boron distributions in the root. A computational model of the root is created at the cellular level, describing the boron transporters as observed experimentally. Boron is allowed to diffuse into roots, in cells and cell walls, and to be transported over plasma membranes, reflecting the properties of the different transporters. The model predicts that a region around the quiescent center has a higher concentration of soluble boron than other portions. To evaluate this prediction experimentally, we determined the boron distribution in roots using laser ablation-inductivity coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The analysis indicated that the boron concentration is highest near the tip and is lower in the more proximal region of the meristem zone, similar to the pattern of soluble boron distribution predicted by the model. Our model also predicts that upward boron flux does not continuously increase from the root tip toward the mature region, indicating that boron taken up in the root tip is not efficiently transported to shoots. This suggests that root tip-absorbed boron is probably used for local root growth, and that instead it is the more mature root regions which have a greater role in transporting boron toward the shoots. PMID:25670713

  10. Two Distinct Antigenic Types of the Polysaccharide Chains of Helicobacter pylori Lipopolysaccharides Characterized by Reactivity with Sera from Humans with Natural Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Shin-Ichi; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Shibata, Yoshiko; Nakajima, Mizuho; Suzuki, Miyuki; Hayashi, Shunji; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Yokochi, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    We have purified lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from 10 Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates which were selected on the basis of chemotype and antigenic variation. Data from immunoblotting of the purified LPS with sera from humans with H. pylori infection and from absorption of the sera with LPS indicated the presence of two distinct epitopes, termed the highly antigenic and the weakly antigenic epitopes, on the polysaccharide chains. Among 68 H. pylori clinical isolates, all smooth strains possessed either epitope; the epitopes were each carried by about 50% of the smooth strains. Thus, H. pylori strains can be classified into three types on the basis of their antigenicity in humans: those with smooth LPS carrying the highly antigenic epitope, those with smooth LPS carrying the weakly antigenic epitope, and those with rough LPS. Sera from humans with H. pylori infection could be grouped into three categories: those containing immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the highly antigenic epitope, those containing IgG against the weakly antigenic epitope, and those containing both specific IgGs; these groups made up about 50%, less than 10%, and about 40%, respectively, of all infected sera tested. In other words, IgG against the highly antigenic epitope were detected in more than 90% of H. pylori-infected individuals with high titers. IgG against the weakly antigenic epitope were detected in about 50% of the sera tested; however, the antibody titers were low. The two human epitopes existed independently from the mimic structures of Lewis antigens, which are known to be an important epitope of H. pylori LPS. No significant relationship between the reactivities toward purified LPS of human sera and a panel of anti-Lewis antigen antibodies was found. Moreover, the reactivities of the anti-Lewis antigen antibodies, but not human sera, were sensitive to particular ?-l-fucosidases. The human epitopes appeared to be located on O-polysaccharide chains containing endo-?-galactosidase-sensitive galactose residues as the backbone. Data from chemical analyses indicated that all LPS commonly contained galactose, glucosamine, glucose, and fucose (except one rough strain) as probable polysaccharide components, together with typical components of inner core and lipid A. We were not able to distinguish between the differences of antigenicity in humans by on the basis of the chemical composition of the LPS. PMID:10603381

  11. Identifying type 1 diabetes candidate genes by DNA microarray analysis of islet-specific CD4 + T cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, Gregory J; Frielle, Christine; Brucklacher, Robert M; Salzberg, Anna C; Waldner, Hanspeter

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease resulting from the destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells and is fatal unless treated with insulin. During the last four decades, multiple insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) susceptibility/resistance loci that regulate T1D development have been identified in humans and non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, an established animal model for T1D. However, the exact mechanisms by which these loci confer diabetes risk and the identity of the causative genes remain largely elusive. To identify genes and molecular mechanisms that control the function of diabetogenic T cells, we conducted DNA microarray analysis in islet-specific CD4 + T cells from BDC2.5 TCR transgenic NOD mice that contain the Idd9 locus from T1D-susceptible NOD mice or T1D-resistant C57BL/10 mice. Here we describe in detail the contents and analyses for these gene expression data associated with our previous study [1]. Gene expression data are available at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) repository from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (accession number GSE64674). PMID:26484253

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies eight new loci for type 2 diabetes in east Asians.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Shin; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Hu, Cheng; Long, Jirong; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Sim, Xueling; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Wu, Ying; Go, Min Jin; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Kwak, Soo Heon; Ma, Ronald C W; Yamamoto, Ken; Adair, Linda S; Aung, Tin; Cai, Qiuyin; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Gao, Yutang; Hu, Frank B; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jeannette Jen-Mai; Lee, Nanette R; Li, Yun; Liu, Jian Jun; Lu, Wei; Nakamura, Jiro; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Daniel Peng-Keat; Tay, Wan Ting; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Wong, Tien Yin; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Congrong; So, Wing Yee; Ohnaka, Keizo; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Hara, Kazuo; Cho, Young Min; Cho, Nam H; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Bao, Yuqian; Hedman, Åsa K; Morris, Andrew P; McCarthy, Mark I; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Park, Kyong Soo; Jia, Weiping; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chan, Juliana C N; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Lee, Jong-Young; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Teo, Yik Ying; Tai, E Shyong; Shu, Xiao Ou; Mohlke, Karen L; Kato, Norihiro; Han, Bok-Ghee; Seielstad, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a three-stage genetic study to identify susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in east Asian populations. We followed our stage 1 meta-analysis of eight T2D genome-wide association studies (6,952 cases with T2D and 11,865 controls) with a stage 2 in silico replication analysis (5,843 cases and 4,574 controls) and a stage 3 de novo replication analysis (12,284 cases and 13,172 controls). The combined analysis identified eight new T2D loci reaching genome-wide significance, which mapped in or near GLIS3, PEPD, FITM2-R3HDML-HNF4A, KCNK16, MAEA, GCC1-PAX4, PSMD6 and ZFAND3. GLIS3, which is involved in pancreatic beta cell development and insulin gene expression, is known for its association with fasting glucose levels. The evidence of an association with T2D for PEPD and HNF4A has been shown in previous studies. KCNK16 may regulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion in the pancreas. These findings, derived from an east Asian population, provide new perspectives on the etiology of T2D. PMID:22158537

  13. Integrated Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis Identifies Haplotype-Specific Methylation in the FTO Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gareth A.; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Akan, Pelin; Stupka, Elia; Down, Thomas A.; Prokopenko, Inga; Morison, Ian M.; Mill, Jonathan; Pidsley, Ruth; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Beck, Stephan; Hitman, Graham A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent multi-dimensional approaches to the study of complex disease have revealed powerful insights into how genetic and epigenetic factors may underlie their aetiopathogenesis. We examined genotype-epigenotype interactions in the context of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), focussing on known regions of genomic susceptibility. We assayed DNA methylation in 60 females, stratified according to disease susceptibility haplotype using previously identified association loci. CpG methylation was assessed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on a targeted array (MeDIP-chip) and absolute methylation values were estimated using a Bayesian algorithm (BATMAN). Absolute methylation levels were quantified across LD blocks, and we identified increased DNA methylation on the FTO obesity susceptibility haplotype, tagged by the rs8050136 risk allele A (p?=?9.40×10?4, permutation p?=?1.0×10?3). Further analysis across the 46 kb LD block using sliding windows localised the most significant difference to be within a 7.7 kb region (p?=?1.13×10?7). Sequence level analysis, followed by pyrosequencing validation, revealed that the methylation difference was driven by the co-ordinated phase of CpG-creating SNPs across the risk haplotype. This 7.7 kb region of haplotype-specific methylation (HSM), encapsulates a Highly Conserved Non-Coding Element (HCNE) that has previously been validated as a long-range enhancer, supported by the histone H3K4me1 enhancer signature. This study demonstrates that integration of Genome-Wide Association (GWA) SNP and epigenomic DNA methylation data can identify potential novel genotype-epigenotype interactions within disease-associated loci, thus providing a novel route to aid unravelling common complex diseases. PMID:21124985

  14. Identifying postpartum intervention approaches to prevent type 2 diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes. Despite this "window of opportunity," few intervention studies have targeted postpartum women with a history of GDM. We sought perspectives of women with a history of GDM to identify a) barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle changes postpartum, and b) specific intervention approaches that would facilitate participation in a postpartum lifestyle intervention program. Methods We used mixed methods to gather data from women with a prior history of GDM, including focus groups and informant interviews. Analysis of focus groups relied on grounded theory and used open-coding to categorize data by themes, while frequency distributions were used for the informant interviews. Results Of 38 women eligible to participate in focus groups, only ten women were able to accommodate their schedules to attend a focus group and 15 completed informant interviews by phone. We analyzed data from 25 women (mean age 35, mean pre-pregnancy BMI 28, 52% Caucasian, 20% African American, 12% Asian, 8% American Indian, 8% refused to specify). Themes from the focus groups included concern about developing type 2 diabetes, barriers to changing diet, and barriers to increasing physical activity. In one focus group, women expressed frustration about feeling judged by their physicians during their GDM pregnancy. Cited barriers to lifestyle change were identified from both methods, and included time and financial constraints, childcare duties, lack of motivation, fatigue, and obstacles at work. Informants suggested facilitators for lifestyle change, including nutrition education, accountability, exercise partners/groups, access to gyms with childcare, and home exercise equipment. All focus group and informant interview participants reported access to the internet, and the majority expressed interest in an intervention program delivered primarily via the internet that would include the opportunity to work with a lifestyle coach. Conclusion Time constraints were a major barrier. Our findings suggest that an internet-based lifestyle intervention program should be tested as a novel approach to prevent type 2 diabetes in postpartum women with a history of GDM. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01102530 PMID:21435246

  15. Identifying the Influence of Variable Ice Types on Passive and Active Microwave Measurements for the Purpose of SWE Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, G. E.; Duguay, C. R.; Derksen, C.

    2010-12-01

    Dual polarized airborne passive microwave (PM) brightness temperatures (Tbs) at 6.9, 19 and 37 GHz H/V and satellite X-band (9.65 GHz VV/VH) active microwave backscatter measurements were combined with coincident in-situ measurements of snow and ice characteristics to determine the potential of unique emission/interaction caused by variable ice properties. Algorithms designed to estimate snow water equivalent (SWE) using the common brightness temperature difference approach (37GHz - 19 GHz) continually underestimate in-situ levels when applied to pure-ice pixels in the Canadian subarctic. Ice thickness measurements were positively correlated with 19 GHz vertically polarised (V pol) passive microwave emissions (R= 0.67), and negatively with 19 GHz horizontally polarised (H pol) emissions (R = -0.79), indicating that surface conditions at the ice/snow interface affect the emissivity at H pol. This study examines the effect of ice types on coincident passive and active microwave measurements for free-floating ice in two lakes (Sitidgi, Husky Lakes). Ice types are delineated using the SAR segmentation program MAGIC (MAp Guided Ice Classification) that has previously been used to characterize sea ice types. Based on output ice types produced by MAGIC, the relationship between active and passive microwave measurements is examined. Output ice classes corresponded well to those measured at coincident in-situ sampling sites. Emissions at 19 GHz H and cross-polarised X-band backscatter (9.65 GHz) increase coincident to ice types that exhibit more scattering potential. Clear ice exhibits the lowest return, followed by a transition zone between clear ice and grey ice. Grey ice exhibits higher returns as a result of the inclusion of spherical air bubbles, followed by rafted ice, which exhibits an excess of scattering potential. Concurrently, transects of dual polarized 6.9 and 19 GHz PM Tbs exhibited a positive relationship with cross-polarized active microwave backscatter (VH) over freshwater ice (Sitidgi Lake) with the highest R coefficient noticed in the H pol for 6.9 and 19 GHz emissions (R = 0.84 and 0.58 respectively). In brackish water, 6.9 and 19 GHz PM Tbs exhibited a negative relationship as a result of a high concentration of bubbles at the ice/water interface, and the incorporation of lossy brine pockets into the ice medium. This study identifies congruency between passive and active microwave measurements over lake ice for the purpose of improving SWE retrieval algorithms. Further quantification of passive microwave emission is needed for unique ice types, however it has been established that cross-polarised X-band backscatter can be utilized as a priori information for spaceborne PM algorithms, providing information on ice type, characteristics (floating, frozen to bed), and the presence of bubbles at the ice/water interface.

  16. Genomes of Ashbya Fungi Isolated from Insects Reveal Four Mating-Type Loci, Numerous Translocations, Lack of Transposons, and Distinct Gene Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Fred S.; Voegeli, Sylvia; Kuo, Sidney; Philippsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii is a cotton pathogen transmitted by insects. It is readily grown and manipulated in the laboratory and is commercially exploited as a natural overproducer of vitamin B2. Our previous genome analysis of A. gossypii isolate ATCC10895, collected in Trinidad nearly 100 years ago, revealed extensive synteny with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, leading us to use it as a model organism to understand the evolution of filamentous growth. To further develop Ashbya as a model system, we have investigated the ecological niche of A. gossypii and isolated additional strains and a sibling species, both useful in comparative analysis. We isolated fungi morphologically similar to A. gossypii from different plant-feeding insects of the suborder Heteroptera, generated a phylogenetic tree based on rDNA-ITS sequences, and performed high coverage short read sequencing with one A. gossypii isolate from Florida, a new species, Ashbya aceri, isolated in North Carolina, and a genetically marked derivative of ATCC10895 intensively used for functional studies. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, all strains carry four not three mating type loci, adding a new puzzle in the evolution of Ashbya species. Another surprise was the genome identity of 99.9% between the Florida strain and ATCC10895, isolated in Trinidad. The A. aceri and A. gossypii genomes show conserved gene orders rearranged by eight translocations, 90% overall sequence identity, and fewer tandem duplications in the A. aceri genome. Both species lack transposable elements. Finally, our work identifies plant-feeding insects of the suborder Heteroptera as the most likely natural reservoir of Ashbya, and that infection of cotton and other plants may be incidental to the growth of the fungus in its insect host. PMID:23749448

  17. Genome-wide association study in people of South Asian ancestry identifies six novel susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kooner, Jaspal S; Saleheen, Danish; Sim, Xueling; Sehmi, Joban; Zhang, Weihua; Frossard, Philippe; Been, Latonya F; Chia, Kee-Seng; Dimas, Antigone S; Hassanali, Neelam; Jafar, Tazeen; Jowett, Jeremy BM; Li, Xinzhing; Radha, Venkatesan; Rees, Simon D; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Young, Robin; Aung, Tin; Basit, Abdul; Chidambaram, Manickam; Das, Debashish; Grunberg, Elin; Hedman, Åsa K; Hydrie, Zafar I; Islam, Muhammed; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kowlessur, Sudhir; Kristensen, Malene M; Liju, Samuel; Lim, Wei-Yen; Matthews, David R; Liu, Jianjun; Morris, Andrew P; Nica, Alexandra C; Pinidiyapathirage, Janani M; Prokopenko, Inga; Rasheed, Asif; Samuel, Maria; Shah, Nabi; Shera, A Samad; Small, Kerrin S; Suo, Chen; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R; Wong, Tien Yin; Yang, Mingyu; Zhang, Fan; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Barnett, Anthony H; Caulfield, Mark; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Tim; Froguel, Philippe; Kato, Norihiro; Katulanda, Prasad; Kelly, M Ann; Liang, Junbin; Mohan, Viswanathan; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Scott, James; Seielstad, Mark; Zimmet, Paul Z; Elliott, Paul; Teo, Yik Ying; McCarthy, Mark I; Danesh, John; Tai, E Shyong; Chambers, John C

    2013-01-01

    We carried out a genome wide association study of type-2 diabetes (T2D) amongst 20,119 people of South Asian ancestry (5,561 with T2D); we identified 20 independent SNPs associated with T2D at P<10?4 for testing amongst a further 38,568 South Asians (13,170 with T2D). In combined analysis, common genetic variants at six novel loci (GRB14, ST6GAL1, VPS26A, HMG20A, AP3S2 and HNF4A) were associated with T2D (P=4.1×10?8 to P=1.9×10?11); SNPs at GRB14 were also associated with insulin sensitivity, and at ST6GAL1 and HNF4A with pancreatic beta-cell function respectively. Our findings provide additional insight into mechanisms underlying T2D, and demonstrate the potential for new discovery from genetic association studies in South Asians who have increased susceptibility to T2D. PMID:21874001

  18. System and method employing a self-organizing map load feature database to identify electric load types of different electric loads

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Bin; Harley, Ronald G.; Du, Liang; Yang, Yi; Sharma, Santosh K.; Zambare, Prachi; Madane, Mayura A.

    2014-06-17

    A method identifies electric load types of a plurality of different electric loads. The method includes providing a self-organizing map load feature database of a plurality of different electric load types and a plurality of neurons, each of the load types corresponding to a number of the neurons; employing a weight vector for each of the neurons; sensing a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the loads; determining a load feature vector including at least four different load features from the sensed voltage signal and the sensed current signal for a corresponding one of the loads; and identifying by a processor one of the load types by relating the load feature vector to the neurons of the database by identifying the weight vector of one of the neurons corresponding to the one of the load types that is a minimal distance to the load feature vector.

  19. Endocytotic routes of cobra cardiotoxins depend on spatial distribution of positively charged and hydrophobic domains to target distinct types of sulfated glycoconjugates on cell surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shao-Chen; Lin, Chien-Chu; Wang, Chia-Hui; Wu, Po-Long; Huang, Hsuan-Wei; Chang, Chung-I; Wu, Wen-guey

    2014-07-18

    Cobra cardiotoxins (CTX) are a family of three-fingered basic polypeptides known to interact with diverse targets such as heparan sulfates, sulfatides, and integrins on cell surfaces. After CTX bind to the membrane surface, they are internalized to intracellular space and exert their cytotoxicity via an unknown mechanism. By the combined in vitro kinetic binding, three-dimensional x-ray structure determination, and cell biology studies on the naturally abundant CTX homologues from the Taiwanese cobra, we showed that slight variations on the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains among CTX A2, A3, and A4 could lead to significant changes in their endocytotic pathways and action mechanisms via distinct sulfated glycoconjugate-mediated processes. The intracellular locations of these structurally similar CTX after internalization are shown to vary between the mitochondria and lysosomes via either dynamin2-dependent or -independent processes with distinct membrane cholesterol sensitivity. Evidence is presented to suggest that the shifting between the sulfated glycoconjugates as distinct targets of CTX A2, A3, and A4 might play roles in the co-evolutionary arms race between venomous snake toxins to cope with different membrane repair mechanisms at the cellular levels. The sensitivity of endocytotic routes to the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains may provide an explanation for the diverse endocytosis pathways of other cell-penetrating basic polypeptides. PMID:24898246

  20. Endocytotic Routes of Cobra Cardiotoxins Depend on Spatial Distribution of Positively Charged and Hydrophobic Domains to Target Distinct Types of Sulfated Glycoconjugates on Cell Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shao-Chen; Lin, Chien-Chu; Wang, Chia-Hui; Wu, Po-Long; Huang, Hsuan-Wei; Chang, Chung-I; Wu, Wen-guey

    2014-01-01

    Cobra cardiotoxins (CTX) are a family of three-fingered basic polypeptides known to interact with diverse targets such as heparan sulfates, sulfatides, and integrins on cell surfaces. After CTX bind to the membrane surface, they are internalized to intracellular space and exert their cytotoxicity via an unknown mechanism. By the combined in vitro kinetic binding, three-dimensional x-ray structure determination, and cell biology studies on the naturally abundant CTX homologues from the Taiwanese cobra, we showed that slight variations on the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains among CTX A2, A3, and A4 could lead to significant changes in their endocytotic pathways and action mechanisms via distinct sulfated glycoconjugate-mediated processes. The intracellular locations of these structurally similar CTX after internalization are shown to vary between the mitochondria and lysosomes via either dynamin2-dependent or -independent processes with distinct membrane cholesterol sensitivity. Evidence is presented to suggest that the shifting between the sulfated glycoconjugates as distinct targets of CTX A2, A3, and A4 might play roles in the co-evolutionary arms race between venomous snake toxins to cope with different membrane repair mechanisms at the cellular levels. The sensitivity of endocytotic routes to the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains may provide an explanation for the diverse endocytosis pathways of other cell-penetrating basic polypeptides. PMID:24898246

  1. Genetic disassembly and combinatorial reassembly identify a minimal functional repertoire of type III effectors in Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Cunnac, Sébastien; Chakravarthy, Suma; Kvitko, Brian H; Russell, Alistair B; Martin, Gregory B; Collmer, Alan

    2011-02-15

    The virulence of Pseudomonas syringae and many other proteobacterial pathogens is dependent on complex repertoires of effector proteins injected into host cells by type III secretion systems. The 28 well-expressed effector genes in the repertoire of the model pathogen P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 were deleted to produce polymutant DC3000D28E. Growth of DC3000D28E in Nicotiana benthamiana was symptomless and 4 logs lower than that of DC3000?hopQ1-1, which causes disease in this model plant. DC3000D28E seemed functionally effectorless but otherwise WT in diagnostic phenotypes relevant to plant interactions (for example, ability to inject the AvrPto-Cya reporter into N. benthamiana). Various effector genes were integrated by homologous recombination into native loci or by a programmable or random in vivo assembly shuttle (PRIVAS) system into the exchangeable effector locus in the Hrp pathogenicity island of DC3000D28E. The latter method exploited dual adapters and recombination in yeast for efficient assembly of PCR products into programmed or random combinations of multiple effector genes. Native and PRIVAS-mediated integrations were combined to identify a minimal functional repertoire of eight effector genes that restored much of the virulence of DC3000?hopQ1-1 in N. benthamiana, revealing a hierarchy in effector function: AvrPtoB acts with priority in suppressing immunity, enabling other effectors to promote further growth (HopM1 and HopE1), chlorosis (HopG1), lesion formation (HopAM1-1), and near full growth and symptom production (AvrE, HopAA1-1, and/or HopN1 functioning synergistically with the previous effectors). DC3000D28E, the PRIVAS method, and minimal functional repertoires provide new resources for probing the plant immune system. PMID:21282655

  2. A genome-wide association study identifies GRK5 and RASGRP1 as type 2 diabetes loci in Chinese Hans.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaixing; Gan, Wei; Lu, Ling; Dong, Xiao; Han, Xueyao; Hu, Cheng; Yang, Zhen; Sun, Liang; Bao, Wei; Li, Pengtao; He, Meian; Sun, Liangdan; Wang, Yiqin; Zhu, Jingwen; Ning, Qianqian; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Rong; Wen, Jie; Wang, Di; Zhu, Xilin; Guo, Kunquan; Zuo, Xianbo; Guo, Xiaohui; Yang, Handong; Zhou, Xianghai; Zhang, Xuejun; Qi, Lu; Loos, Ruth J F; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Tangchun; Liu, Ying; Liu, Liegang; Yang, Ze; Hu, Renming; Jia, Weiping; Ji, Linong; Li, Yixue; Lin, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in identification of type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk loci in the past few years, but our understanding of the genetic basis of T2D in ethnically diverse populations remains limited. We performed a genome-wide association study and a replication study in Chinese Hans comprising 8,569 T2D case subjects and 8,923 control subjects in total, from which 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms were selected for further follow-up in a de novo replication sample of 3,410 T2D case and 3,412 control subjects and an in silico replication sample of 6,952 T2D case and 11,865 control subjects. Besides confirming seven established T2D loci (CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, KCNQ1, CDC123, GLIS3, HNF1B, and DUSP9) at genome-wide significance, we identified two novel T2D loci, including G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) (rs10886471: P = 7.1 × 10(-9)) and RASGRP1 (rs7403531: P = 3.9 × 10(-9)), of which the association signal at GRK5 seems to be specific to East Asians. In nondiabetic individuals, the T2D risk-increasing allele of RASGRP1-rs7403531 was also associated with higher HbA(1c) and lower homeostasis model assessment of ?-cell function (P = 0.03 and 0.0209, respectively), whereas the T2D risk-increasing allele of GRK5-rs10886471 was also associated with higher fasting insulin (P = 0.0169) but not with fasting glucose. Our findings not only provide new insights into the pathophysiology of T2D, but may also shed light on the ethnic differences in T2D susceptibility. PMID:22961080

  3. Structurally distinct hybrid polymer/lipid nanoconstructs harboring a type-I ribotoxin as cellular imaging and glioblastoma-directed therapeutic vectors.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, M Sheikh; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Baliyan, Ankur; Poulose, Aby Cheruvathoor; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Minegishi, Hiroaki; Iwai, Seiki; Shimane, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2014-12-01

    A nanoformulation composed of a ribosome inactivating protein-curcin and a hybrid solid lipid nanovector has been devised against glioblastoma. The structurally distinct nanoparticles were highly compatible to human endothelial and neuronal cells. A sturdy drug release from the particles, recorded upto 72 h, was reflected in the time-dependent toxicity. Folate-targeted nanoparticles were specifically internalized by glioma, imparting superior toxicity and curbed an aggressively proliferating in vitro 3D cancer mass in addition to suppressing the anti-apoptotic survivin and cell matrix protein vinculin. Combined with the imaging potential of the encapsulated dye, the nanovector emanates as a multifunctional anti-cancer system. PMID:25181322

  4. System and method employing a minimum distance and a load feature database to identify electric load types of different electric loads

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Yi; Sharma, Santosh K; Zambare, Prachi; Madane, Mayura A

    2014-12-23

    A method identifies electric load types of a plurality of different electric loads. The method includes providing a load feature database of a plurality of different electric load types, each of the different electric load types including a first load feature vector having at least four different load features; sensing a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the different electric loads; determining a second load feature vector comprising at least four different load features from the sensed voltage signal and the sensed current signal for a corresponding one of the different electric loads; and identifying by a processor one of the different electric load types by determining a minimum distance of the second load feature vector to the first load feature vector of the different electric load types of the load feature database.

  5. Complexes between tissue-type plasminogen activator and proteinase inhibitors in human plasma, identified with an immunoradiometric assay

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, D.C.; Juhan-Vague, I.; Collen, D.

    1983-02-01

    Extrinsic (tissue-type) plasminogen activator antigen in human plasma, as measured by a two-site immunoradiometric assay, is composed of a fibrin-adsorbable and a nonadsorbable fraction. Gel filtration on Ultrogel AcA 44 in 1.6M KSCN of the fibrin-adsorbable fraction showed a peak with M/sub r/ approx. =70,000, which contained plasminogen activator activity and was assumed to represent free extrinsic plasminogen activator. The nonadsorbable fraction showed a broad peak with M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 without plasminogen activator activity. Overnight incubation at 37/sup 0/C of postexercise plasma revealed a shift of the M/sub r/ approx. =70,000 peak to the M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 position, suggesting that the M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 peak consists of extrinsic plasminogen activator-protease inhibitor complex(es). ..cap alpha../sub 2/-Antiplasmin is the main inhibitor of extrinsic plasminogen activator in plasma and is probably responsible for the generation of the M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 component. A possible involvement of other plasma proteinase inhibitors was explored by incubation of /sup 125/I-labeled extrinsic plasminogen activator in ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin-depleted plasma. A complex was formed with a t1/2 of about 1 hr, which was identified by immunoprecipitation as extrinsic plasminogen activator-..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin complex. Additional evidence for the presence of extrinsic plasminogen activator complexes with ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin in plasma was obtained from two-site immunoradiometric assays. It was concluded that plasma contains both free extrinsic plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator complexes with ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin. These complexes are also present in plasma collected on the active site inhibitor, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-CH/sub 2/Cl, at rest and after exercise and are therefore assumed to circulate in vivo. (JMT)

  6. Distinct accessory cell requirements define two types of rat T cell hybridomas specific for unique determinants in the encephalitogenic 68-86 region of myelin basic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mannie, M.D.; Paterson, P.Y.; Thomas, D.W.; Nairn, R. )

    1990-01-15

    Six clonotypically unique T cell hybridomas from Lewis rats were used to study accessory cell activities required for class II MHC restricted T cell responses to the 68-86 encephalitogenic sequence of myelin basic protein (MBP). T cell hybrids which were cultured with GP68-86 68-86 sequence of guinea pig MBP (GPMBP) and naive splenocytes (SPL) were induced to produce IL-2 as measured by the CTLL indicator cell line. The hybrids were categorized into two subsets (designated THYB-1 and THYB-2), because two distinct subset-specific pathways of communication between accessory cells and T cells were involved in GPMBP-induced IL-2 production. These pathways were distinguished by the following six observations. First, when the duration of a pulse of SPL with GPMBP was lengthened from 1 to 4 h, these SPL lost their ability to induce IL-2 production by THYB-2 hybrids yet nevertheless retained full stimulatory activity for THYB-1 hybrids. Second, paraformaldehyde fixation of GPMBP-pulsed SPL abrogated an activity necessary for Ag-induced IL-2 production by THYB-2 hybrids. These fixed SPL were nevertheless able to stimulate THYB-1 hybrids, albeit to a lesser extent than viable unfixed SPL. Third, the addition of either cycloheximide, cytochalasin B, or 2-deoxyglucose to an Ag pulse of SPL with GPMBP dramatically inhibited the subsequent responses of THYB-2 hybrids yet had little or no effect upon the reactivity of THYB-1 hybrids. Fourth, thymocytes lacked necessary activities for GPMBP evoked IL-2 production by THYB-2 hybrids yet strongly promoted THYB-1 hybrid responses. Fifth, exposure of SPL to as little as 500 rad of gamma-irradiation markedly attenuated THYB-2 hybrid response to GPMBP but did not affect THYB-1 responses. Sixth, anti-GPMBP responses by THYB-2 hybrids were observed only in the presence of both radioresistant adherent SPL and a distinct population of radiosensitive nonadherent SPL.

  7. Role of the Self-Administered, Self-Reported History Questionnaire to Identify Types of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Sensitivity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nayeb Aghaei, Hossein; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad; Mohammadi, Hassan Reza

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case-control design. Purpose To evaluate the role of the self-administered, self-reported history questionnaire (SSHQ) in identifying types of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Overview of Literature Diagnosis of types of LSS is controversial. Methods A total of 235 patients with LSS were asked to respond to the SSHQ. All of these patients recovered following surgical treatment. The classification of LSS patients was based on history, physical examinations, and imaging studies. It is considered to be the gold standard. Radicular and neurogenic claudication types of LSS were based on the SSHQ developed by Konno et al. Two categories of LSS were determined based on the SSHQ tool and gold standard. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was carried out to evaluate the diagnostic value of the SSHQ. Results The mean age of patients was 59.4 years. According to the criteria for gold standard, patients were diagnosed with the radicular type (n=103), and neurogenic claudication type (n=132). The questionnaire had desirable sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in categorizing the two types of LSS: 97.8%, 66.6%, and 96.8% for the radicular type, and 97.0%, 80.0%, and 95.7% for the neurogenic claudication type. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the SSHQ is a reliable and a valid measure and it may be a clinical diagnosis support tool for identifying patients with two types of LSS. PMID:26435785

  8. Types, numbers and distribution of synapses on the dendritic tree of an identified visual interneuron in the brain of the locust.

    PubMed

    Killmann, F; Gras, H; Schürmann, F

    1999-06-01

    The descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD), an identified descending interneuron in the brain of the locust Schistocerca gregaria has been investigated by using light and electron microscopy. We describe the fine structure, distribution and numbers of synapses that it receives from another identified brain neuron, the lobular giant movement detector (LGMD), and from unidentified neurons. The DCMD dendrites emerging from the integrative segment vary in form and number between individuals and sexes but always form a flattened dendritic domain. The arborizations and the integrative segment appear to be exclusively postsynaptic. Two types of synaptic contacts (Type 1 and 2) onto the DCMD can be discerned as having either round (Type 1) or pleiomorphic synaptic vesicles (Type 2) and by large (Type 1) or small (Type 2) subsynaptic appositions. Contact zones of Type 1 synapses are smaller than those of Type 2. LGMD-synapses are of Type 1 and occur intermingled with presynaptic sites of unidentified units. Some branches of the DCMD receiving input from unidentified units are devoid of contacting LGMD processes. Synapses of both types are randomly distributed over the DCMD integrative segment and at fibres with similar sizes. Type 1 synapses are much more frequent than Type 2 synapses and their number is negatively correlated with fibre diameter. For a whole DCMD dendritic arborization, a total of 8500 active zones of chemical synapses has been calculated, including a minimum of 2250 LGMD-synapses and about 1000 Type 2 synapses. The DCMD may thus receive a considerable amount of input from as yet unidentified neurons. PMID:10370151

  9. La distinction : addendum statistique.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Romain; Bianchi, Renzo

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is twofold: first, to assess the statistical significance of the data used by Pierre Bourdieu in Distinction; second, to test the hypothesis that the volume of capital (i.e., the global amount of capital) allows for a finer discrimination of dispositional differences than the composition of capital (i.e., the respective weight of the different types of capital in the global amount of capital). To these ends, five data samples were submitted to bilateral between-proportion comparison tests. The findings (1) reveal that about two-thirds of the differences reported by P. Bourdieu are significant and (2) support the view that the volume of capital prevails over its composition. Cette étude poursuit deux objectifs : établir, d'une part, la significativité statistique des données ayant servi de base empirique au modèle que Pierre Bourdieu propose dans La distinction ; mettre à l'épreuve, d'autre part, l'hypothèse selon laquelle le volume de capital (i.e. la quantité globale de capital) constitue, en matière de différenciation dispositionnelle, une variable plus déterminante que la structure du capital (i.e. le poids respectif des différents types de capital au sein du volume global de capital). À cette double fin, les données relatives à cinq échantillons sont soumises à des tests de comparaison bilatérale de proportions indépendantes. Les résultats obtenus (1) révèlent que près des deux tiers des différences observées par P. Bourdieu sont significatives et (2) soutiennent l'hypothèse de la prépondérance du volume de capital sur sa structure. PMID:26577883

  10. Gaucher disease types 1, 2, and 3: differential mutations of the acid beta-glucosidase active site identified with conduritol B epoxide derivatives and sphingosine.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, G A; Dinur, T; Osiecki, K M; Kruse, J R; Legler, G; Gatt, S

    1985-05-01

    To elucidate the genetic heterogeneity in Gaucher disease, the residual beta-glucosidase in cultured fibroblasts from affected patients with each of the major phenotypes was investigated in vitro and/or in viable cells by inhibitor studies using the covalent catalytic site inhibitors, conduritol B epoxide or its bromo derivative, and the reversible cationic inhibitor, sphingosine. These studies delineated three distinct groups (designated A, B, and C) of residual activities with characteristic responses to these inhibitors. Group A residual enzymes had normal I50 values (i.e., the concentration of inhibitor that results in 50% inhibition) for the inhibitors and normal or nearly normal t1/2 values for conduritol B epoxide. All neuronopathic (types 2 and 3) and most non-Jewish nonneuronopathic (type 1) patients had group A residual activities and, thus, could not be distinguished by these inhibitor studies. Group B residual enzymes had about four- to fivefold increased I50 values for the inhibitors and similarly increased t1/2 values for conduritol B epoxide. All Ashkenazi Jewish type 1 and only two non-Jewish type 1 patients had group B residual activities. The differences in I50 values between groups A and B also were confirmed by determining the uninhibited enzyme activity after culturing the cells in the presence of bromo-conduritol B epoxide. Group C residual activity had intermediate I50 values for the inhibitors and represented a single Afrikaner type 1 patient: this patient was a genetic compound for the group A (type 2) and group B (type 1) mutations. These inhibition studies indicated that: Gaucher disease type 1 is biochemically heterogeneous, neuronopathic and non-Jewish nonneuronopathic phenotypes cannot be reliably distinguished by these inhibitor studies, and the Ashkenazi Jewish form of Gaucher disease type 1 results from a unique mutation in a specific active site domain of acid beta-glucosidase that leads to a defective enzyme with a decreased Vmax. PMID:4003396

  11. Predictive Validity of Personality Types versus Personality Dimensions from Early Childhood to Adulthood: Implications for the Distinction between Core and Surface Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asendorpf, Jens B.; Denissen, Jaap J. A.

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the long-term predictive validity of person-centered personality types and variable-centered personality dimensions assessed between ages 4-6 years in a population sample of 154 children. Results indicated that the predictive power of both approaches was remarkably robust between age 17 and 22, and even increased in the case of…

  12. B-Cell and Monocyte Contribution to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Identified by Cell-Type-Specific Differential Expression Analysis in RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G.; Dominguez, Nicolas; Bean, Krista; Macwana, Susan R.; Roberts, Virginia; Glass, Edmund; James, Judith A.; Guthridge, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by complex interplay among immune cell types. SLE activity is experimentally assessed by several blood tests, including gene expression profiling of heterogeneous populations of cells in peripheral blood. To better understand the contribution of different cell types in SLE pathogenesis, we applied the two methods in cell-type-specific differential expression analysis, csSAM and DSection, to identify cell-type-specific gene expression differences in heterogeneous gene expression measures obtained using RNA-seq technology. We identified B-cell-, monocyte-, and neutrophil-specific gene expression differences. Immunoglobulin-coding gene expression was altered in B-cells, while a ribosomal signature was prominent in monocytes. On the contrary, genes differentially expressed in the heterogeneous mixture of cells did not show any functional enrichment. Our results identify antigen binding and structural constituents of ribosomes as functions altered by B-cell- and monocyte-specific gene expression differences, respectively. Finally, these results position both csSAM and DSection methods as viable techniques for cell-type-specific differential expression analysis, which may help uncover pathogenic, cell-type-specific processes in SLE. PMID:26512198

  13. Network analysis identifies a putative role for the PPAR and type 1 interferon pathways in glucocorticoid actions in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease influenced by genetic and environmental factors that affects ~300 million people worldwide, leading to ~250,000 deaths annually. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are well-known therapeutics that are used extensively to suppress airway inflammation in asthmatics. The airway epithelium plays an important role in the initiation and modulation of the inflammatory response. While the role of GCs in disease management is well understood, few studies have examined the holistic effects on the airway epithelium. Methods Gene expression data were used to generate a co-transcriptional network, which was interrogated to identify modules of functionally related genes. In parallel, expression data were mapped to the human protein-protein interaction (PPI) network in order to identify modules with differentially expressed genes. A common pathways approach was applied to highlight genes and pathways functionally relevant and significantly altered following GC treatment. Results Co-transcriptional network analysis identified pathways involved in inflammatory processes in the epithelium of asthmatics, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and PPAR signaling pathways. Analysis of the PPI network identified RXRA, PPARGC1A, STAT1 and IRF9, among others genes, as differentially expressed. Common pathways analysis highlighted TLR and PPAR signaling pathways, providing a link between general inflammatory processes and the actions of GCs. Promoter analysis identified genes regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) and PPAR pathways as well as highlighted the interferon pathway as a target of GCs. Conclusions Network analyses identified known genes and pathways associated with inflammatory processes in the airway epithelium of asthmatics. This workflow illustrated a hypothesis generating experimental design that integrated multiple analysis methods to produce a weight-of-evidence based approach upon which future focused studies can be designed. In this case, results suggested a mechanism whereby GCs repress TLR-mediated interferon production via upregulation of the PPAR signaling pathway. These results highlight the role of interferons in asthma and their potential as targets of future therapeutic efforts. PMID:22713245

  14. Comparative genomics of the white-rot fungi, Phanerochaete carnosa and P. chrysosporium, to elucidate the genetic basis of the distinct wood types they colonize

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Softwood is the predominant form of land plant biomass in the Northern hemisphere, and is among the most recalcitrant biomass resources to bioprocess technologies. The white rot fungus, Phanerochaete carnosa, has been isolated almost exclusively from softwoods, while most other known white-rot species, including Phanerochaete chrysosporium, were mainly isolated from hardwoods. Accordingly, it is anticipated that P. carnosa encodes a distinct set of enzymes and proteins that promote softwood decomposition. To elucidate the genetic basis of softwood bioconversion by a white-rot fungus, the present study reports the P. carnosa genome sequence and its comparative analysis with the previously reported P. chrysosporium genome. Results P. carnosa encodes a complete set of lignocellulose-active enzymes. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that P. carnosa is enriched with genes encoding manganese peroxidase, and that the most divergent glycoside hydrolase families were predicted to encode hemicellulases and glycoprotein degrading enzymes. Most remarkably, P. carnosa possesses one of the largest P450 contingents (266 P450s) among the sequenced and annotated wood-rotting basidiomycetes, nearly double that of P. chrysosporium. Along with metabolic pathway modeling, comparative growth studies on model compounds and chemical analyses of decomposed wood components showed greater tolerance of P. carnosa to various substrates including coniferous heartwood. Conclusions The P. carnosa genome is enriched with genes that encode P450 monooxygenases that can participate in extractives degradation, and manganese peroxidases involved in lignin degradation. The significant expansion of P450s in P. carnosa, along with differences in carbohydrate- and lignin-degrading enzymes, could be correlated to the utilization of heartwood and sapwood preparations from both coniferous and hardwood species. PMID:22937793

  15. Aggressive Emerging Pathovars of Xanthomonas arboricola Represent Widespread Epidemic Clones Distinct from Poorly Pathogenic Strains, as Revealed by Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Sophie; Essakhi, Salwa; Manceau, Charles; Jacques, Marie-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Deep and comprehensive knowledge of the genetic structure of pathogenic species is the cornerstone on which the design of precise molecular diagnostic tools is built. Xanthomonas arboricola is divided into pathovars, some of which are classified as quarantine organisms in many countries and are responsible for diseases on nut and stone fruit trees that have emerged worldwide. Recent taxonomic studies of the genus Xanthomonas showed that strains isolated from other hosts should be classified in X. arboricola, extending the host range of the species. To investigate the genetic structure of X. arboricola and the genetic relationships between highly pathogenic strains and strains apparently not relevant to plant health, we conducted multilocus sequence analyses on a collection of strains representative of the known diversity of the species. Most of the pathovars were clustered in separate monophyletic groups. The pathovars pruni, corylina, and juglandis, responsible for pandemics in specific hosts, were highly phylogenetically related and clustered in three distinct clonal complexes. In contrast, strains with no or uncertain pathogenicity were represented by numerous unrelated singletons scattered in the phylogenic tree. Depending on the pathovar, intra- and interspecies recombination played contrasting roles in generating nucleotide polymorphism. This work provides a population genetics framework for molecular epidemiological surveys of emerging plant pathogens within X. arboricola. Based on our results, we propose to reclassify three former pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris as X. arboricola pv. arracaciae comb. nov., X. arboricola pv. guizotiae comb. nov., and X. arboricola pv. zantedeschiae comb. nov. An emended description of X. arboricola Vauterin et al. 1995 is provided. PMID:25934623

  16. Comparative genomics of the white-rot fungi, Phanerochaete carnosa and P. chrysosporium, to elucidate the genetic basis of the distinct wood types they colonize

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; MacDonald, Jacqueline; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Salamov, Asaf; Hori, Chiaki; Aerts, Andrea; Henrissat, Bernard; Wiebenga, Ad; vanKuyk, Patricia A.; Barry, Kerrie; Lindquist, Erika; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Coutinho, Pedro; Gong, Yunchen; Samejima, Masahiro; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; de Vries, Ronald P.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Yadav, Jagit S.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Master, Emma R.

    2012-02-17

    Background Softwood is the predominant form of land plant biomass in the Northern hemisphere, and is among the most recalcitrant biomass resources to bioprocess technologies. The white rot fungus, Phanerochaete carnosa, has been isolated almost exclusively from softwoods, while most other known white-rot species, including Phanerochaete chrysosporium, were mainly isolated from hardwoods. Accordingly, it is anticipated that P. carnosa encodes a distinct set of enzymes and proteins that promote softwood decomposition. To elucidate the genetic basis of softwood bioconversion by a white-rot fungus, the present study reports the P. carnosa genome sequence and its comparative analysis with the previously reported P. chrysosporium genome. Results P. carnosa encodes a complete set of lignocellulose-active enzymes. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that P. carnosa is enriched with genes encoding manganese peroxidase, and that the most divergent glycoside hydrolase families were predicted to encode hemicellulases and glycoprotein degrading enzymes. Most remarkably, P. carnosa possesses one of the largest P450 contingents (266 P450s) among the sequenced and annotated wood-rotting basidiomycetes, nearly double that of P. chrysosporium. Along with metabolic pathway modeling, comparative growth studies on model compounds and chemical analyses of decomposed wood components showed greater tolerance of P. carnosa to various substrates including coniferous heartwood. Conclusions The P. carnosa genome is enriched with genes that encode P450 monooxygenases that can participate in extractives degradation, and manganese peroxidases involved in lignin degradation. The significant expansion of P450s in P. carnosa, along with differences in carbohydrate- and lignin-degrading enzymes, could be correlated to the utilization of heartwood and sapwood preparations from both coniferous and hardwood species.

  17. Aggressive Emerging Pathovars of Xanthomonas arboricola Represent Widespread Epidemic Clones Distinct from Poorly Pathogenic Strains, as Revealed by Multilocus Sequence Typing.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Le Saux, Marion; Bonneau, Sophie; Essakhi, Salwa; Manceau, Charles; Jacques, Marie-Agnès

    2015-07-01

    Deep and comprehensive knowledge of the genetic structure of pathogenic species is the cornerstone on which the design of precise molecular diagnostic tools is built. Xanthomonas arboricola is divided into pathovars, some of which are classified as quarantine organisms in many countries and are responsible for diseases on nut and stone fruit trees that have emerged worldwide. Recent taxonomic studies of the genus Xanthomonas showed that strains isolated from other hosts should be classified in X. arboricola, extending the host range of the species. To investigate the genetic structure of X. arboricola and the genetic relationships between highly pathogenic strains and strains apparently not relevant to plant health, we conducted multilocus sequence analyses on a collection of strains representative of the known diversity of the species. Most of the pathovars were clustered in separate monophyletic groups. The pathovars pruni, corylina, and juglandis, responsible for pandemics in specific hosts, were highly phylogenetically related and clustered in three distinct clonal complexes. In contrast, strains with no or uncertain pathogenicity were represented by numerous unrelated singletons scattered in the phylogenic tree. Depending on the pathovar, intra- and interspecies recombination played contrasting roles in generating nucleotide polymorphism. This work provides a population genetics framework for molecular epidemiological surveys of emerging plant pathogens within X. arboricola. Based on our results, we propose to reclassify three former pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris as X. arboricola pv. arracaciae comb. nov., X. arboricola pv. guizotiae comb. nov., and X. arboricola pv. zantedeschiae comb. nov. An emended description of X. arboricola Vauterin et al. 1995 is provided. PMID:25934623

  18. Distinct functions and requirements for the Cys-His boxes of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein during RNA encapsidation and replication.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, M D; Fiore, D; Panganiban, A T

    1997-01-01

    The process of retroviral RNA encapsidation involves interaction between trans-acting viral proteins and cis-acting RNA elements. The encapsidation signal on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA is a multipartite structure composed of functional stem-loop structures. The nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the Gag polyprotein precursor contains two copies of a Cys-His box motif that have been demonstrated to be important in RNA encapsidation. To further characterize the role of the Cys-His boxes of the HIV-1 NC protein in RNA encapsidation, the relative efficiency of RNA encapsidation for virus particles that contained mutations within the Cys-His boxes was measured. Mutations that disrupted the first Cys-His box of the NC protein resulted in virus particles that encapsidated genomic RNA less efficiently and subgenomic RNA more efficiently than did wild-type virus. Mutations within the second Cys-His box did not significantly affect RNA encapsidation. In addition, a full complement of wild-type NC protein in virus particles is not required for efficient RNA encapsidation or virus replication. Finally, both Cys-His boxes of the NC protein play additional roles in virus replication. PMID:9371588

  19. O B J E C T I V E : T he student should be able to rank, identify, and compare the types of coal.

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Cari

    O B J E C T I V E : T he student should be able to rank, identify, and compare the types of coal. C O N C E P T S : T here are four basic varieties of coal, which are the result of geologic forces A L S : · coal specimens · worksheet · hardness kit (optional) · Bunsen burner or alcohol lamp

  20. Distinctive Immunomodulatory and Inflammatory Properties of the Escherichia coli Type II Heat-Labile Enterotoxin LT-IIa and Its B Pentamer following Intradermal Administration?

    PubMed Central

    Mathias-Santos, Camila; Rodrigues, Juliana F.; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria Elisabete; Connell, Terry D.; Ferreira, Luís C. S.

    2011-01-01

    The type I and type II heat-labile enterotoxins (LT-I and LT-II) are strong mucosal adjuvants when they are coadministered with soluble antigens. Nonetheless, data on the parenteral adjuvant activities of LT-II are still limited. Particularly, no previous study has evaluated the adjuvant effects and induced inflammatory reactions of LT-II holotoxins or their B pentameric subunits after delivery via the intradermal (i.d.) route to mice. In the present report, the adjuvant and local skin inflammatory effects of LT-IIa and its B subunit pentamer (LT-IIaB5) were determined. When coadministered with ovalbumin (OVA), LT-IIa and, to a lesser extent, LT-IIaB5 exhibited serum IgG adjuvant effects. In addition, LT-IIa but not LT-IIaB5 induced T cell-specific anti-OVA responses, particularly in respect to induction of antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses. LT-IIa and LT-IIaB5 induced differential tissue permeability and local inflammatory reactions after i.d. injection. Of particular interest was the reduced or complete lack of local reactions, such as edema and tissue induration, in mice i.d. inoculated with LT-IIa and LT-IIaB5, respectively, compared with mice immunized with LT-I. In conclusion, the present results show that LT-IIa and, to a lesser extent, LT-IIaB5 exert adjuvant effects when they are delivered via the i.d. route. In addition, the low inflammatory effects of LT-IIa and LT-IIaB5 in comparison to those of LT-I support the usefulness of LT-IIa and LT-IIaB5 as parenterally delivered vaccine adjuvants. PMID:21677110

  1. A multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV type 1 infection in a homosexual man and identified source patient.

    PubMed

    Monno, Laura; Punzi, Grazia; Brindicci, Gaetano; Lagioia, Antonella; Ladisa, Nicoletta; Saracino, Annalisa; Ingletti, Maria; Angarano, Gioacchino

    2007-10-01

    We report a case (IC) of multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV-1 infection in which the identification of the source patient (S) was supported by phylogenetic analysis of the pol gene and by the similarity of env sequences. HIV isolates from IC and S were characterized as non-syncytium viruses: a X4 variant (R(11) E(26)) was identified in both cases according to the V3 loop sequence. The pol mutational profile of IC included multiple protease and reverse-transcriptase inhibitor mutations similar to those in S. The lamivudine/tenofovir/tipranavir/ritonavir/enfuvirtide association was effective for IC but not for S. PMID:17961118

  2. Responding to the challenge of untreatable gonorrhea: ETX0914, a first-in-class agent with a distinct mechanism-of-action against bacterial Type II topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Basarab, Gregory S.; Kern, Gunther H.; McNulty, John; Mueller, John P.; Lawrence, Kenneth; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Alm, Richard A.; Barvian, Kevin; Doig, Peter; Galullo, Vincent; Gardner, Humphrey; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huband, Michael; Kimzey, Amy; Morningstar, Marshall; Kutschke, Amy; Lahiri, Sushmita D.; Perros, Manos; Singh, Renu; Schuck, Virna J. A.; Tommasi, Ruben; Walkup, Grant; Newman, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    With the diminishing effectiveness of current antibacterial therapies, it is critically important to discover agents that operate by a mechanism that circumvents existing resistance. ETX0914, the first of a new class of antibacterial agent targeted for the treatment of gonorrhea, operates by a novel mode-of-inhibition against bacterial type II topoisomerases. Incorporating an oxazolidinone on the scaffold mitigated toxicological issues often seen with topoisomerase inhibitors. Organisms resistant to other topoisomerase inhibitors were not cross-resistant with ETX0914 nor were spontaneous resistant mutants to ETX0914 cross-resistant with other topoisomerase inhibitor classes, including the widely used fluoroquinolone class. Preclinical evaluation of ETX0914 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics showed distribution into vascular tissues and efficacy in a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model that served as a surrogate for predicting efficacious exposures for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections. A wide safety margin to the efficacious exposure in toxicological evaluations supported progression to Phase 1. Dosing ETX0914 in human volunteers showed sufficient exposure and minimal adverse effects to expect a highly efficacious anti-gonorrhea therapy. PMID:26168713

  3. Responding to the challenge of untreatable gonorrhea: ETX0914, a first-in-class agent with a distinct mechanism-of-action against bacterial Type II topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Basarab, Gregory S; Kern, Gunther H; McNulty, John; Mueller, John P; Lawrence, Kenneth; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Alm, Richard A; Barvian, Kevin; Doig, Peter; Galullo, Vincent; Gardner, Humphrey; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huband, Michael; Kimzey, Amy; Morningstar, Marshall; Kutschke, Amy; Lahiri, Sushmita D; Perros, Manos; Singh, Renu; Schuck, Virna J A; Tommasi, Ruben; Walkup, Grant; Newman, Joseph V

    2015-01-01

    With the diminishing effectiveness of current antibacterial therapies, it is critically important to discover agents that operate by a mechanism that circumvents existing resistance. ETX0914, the first of a new class of antibacterial agent targeted for the treatment of gonorrhea, operates by a novel mode-of-inhibition against bacterial type II topoisomerases. Incorporating an oxazolidinone on the scaffold mitigated toxicological issues often seen with topoisomerase inhibitors. Organisms resistant to other topoisomerase inhibitors were not cross-resistant with ETX0914 nor were spontaneous resistant mutants to ETX0914 cross-resistant with other topoisomerase inhibitor classes, including the widely used fluoroquinolone class. Preclinical evaluation of ETX0914 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics showed distribution into vascular tissues and efficacy in a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model that served as a surrogate for predicting efficacious exposures for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections. A wide safety margin to the efficacious exposure in toxicological evaluations supported progression to Phase 1. Dosing ETX0914 in human volunteers showed sufficient exposure and minimal adverse effects to expect a highly efficacious anti-gonorrhea therapy. PMID:26168713

  4. L-type Ca2+ channel antagonists block voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in identified leech neurons.

    PubMed

    Dierkes, Paul Wilhelm; Wende, Verena; Hochstrate, Peter; Schlue, Wolf-Rüdiger

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the effect of L-type Ca2+ channel antagonists on the Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in leech Retzius, Leydig, AP, AE, P, and N neurons. The efficacy of the antagonists was quantified by monitoring their effect on the increase in the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i; measured by Fura-2) that was induced by depolarizing the cell membrane by raising the extracellular K+ concentration. This K+-induced [Ca2+]i increase was blocked by the phenylalkylamines verapamil, gallopamil, and devapamil, the benzothiazepine diltiazem, as well as by the 1,4-dihydropyridine nifedipine. The blocking effect of the three phenylalkylamines was similar, being most pronounced in P and N neurons and smaller in Leydig, Retzius, AP, and AE neurons. Contrastingly, diltiazem and nifedipine were similarly effective in the neurons investigated, whereby their efficacy was like that of the phenylalkylamines in Retzius, Leydig, AP, and AE neurons. Depending on cell type and blocking agent, the concentrations necessary to suppress the K+-induced [Ca2+]i increase by 50% were estimated to vary between 5 and 190 microM. At high concentrations, the phenylalkylamines and diltiazem by themselves caused a marked [Ca2+]i increase in Leydig, P, and N neurons, which is probably due to activation of the caffeine-sensitive ion channels present in the plasma membrane of these cells. Together with previous observations, the results indicate a distant relationship of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels present in many if not all leech neurons to vertebrate L-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:15193524

  5. Challenges for using quantitative PCR test batteries as a TIE-type approach to identify metal exposure in benthic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hook, Sharon E; Osborn, Hannah L; Spadaro, David A; Simpson, Stuart L

    2015-11-01

    The epibenthic amphipod Melita plumulosa shows unique gene expression profiles when exposed to different contaminants. We hypothesized that specific changes in transcript abundance could be used in a battery of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays as a toxicity identification evaluation (TIE)-like approach to identify the most relevant stressor in field-contaminated sediments. To test this hypothesis, seven candidate transcriptomic markers were selected, and their specificity following metal exposure was confirmed. The performance of these markers across different levels of added metals was verified. The ability of these transcripts to act as markers was tested by exposing amphipods to metal-contaminated field-collected sediments and measuring changes in transcript abundance via qPCR. For two of the three sediments tested, at least some of the transcriptomic patterns matched our predictions, suggesting that they would be effective in helping to identify metal exposure in field sediments. However, following exposure to the third sediment, transcriptomic patterns were unlike our predictions. These results suggest that the seven transcripts may be insufficient to discern individual contaminants from complex mixtures and that microarray or RNA-Seq global gene expression profiles may be more effective for TIE. Changes in transcriptomics based on laboratory exposures to single compounds should be carefully validated before the results are used to analyze mixtures. PMID:24994105

  6. Nuclear import, virion incorporation, and cell cycle arrest/differentiation are mediated by distinct functional domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr.

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, S; Ayyavoo, V; Patel, M; Kieber-Emmons, T; Weiner, D B

    1997-01-01

    The vpr gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a virion-associated protein that is essential for efficient viral replication in monocytes/macrophages. Vpr is primarily localized in the nucleus when expressed in the absence of other viral proteins. Vpr is packaged efficiently into viral particles through interactions with the p6 domain of the Gag precursor polyprotein p55gag. We developed a panel of expression vectors encoding Vpr molecules mutated in the amino-terminal helical domain, leucine-isoleucine (LR) domain, and carboxy-terminal domain to map the different functional domains and to define the interrelationships between virion incorporation, nuclear localization, cell cycle arrest, and differentiation functions of Vpr. We observed that substitution mutations in the N-terminal domain of Vpr impaired both nuclear localization and virion packaging, suggesting that the helical structure may play a vital role in modulating both of these biological properties. The LR domain was found to be involved in the nuclear localization of Vpr. In contrast, cell cycle arrest appears to be largely controlled by the C-terminal domain of Vpr. The LR and C-terminal domains do not appear to be essential for virion incorporation of Vpr. Interestingly, we found that two Vpr mutants harboring single amino acid substitutions (A30L and G75A) retained the ability to translocate to the nucleus but were impaired in the cell cycle arrest function. In contrast, mutation of Leu68 to Ser resulted in a protein that localizes in the cytoplasm while retaining the ability to arrest host cell proliferation. We speculate that the nuclear localization and cell cycle arrest functions of Vpr are not interrelated and that these functions are mediated by separable putative functional domains of Vpr. PMID:9261351

  7. A Study of the Vaginal Microbiome in Healthy Canadian Women Utilizing cpn60-Based Molecular Profiling Reveals Distinct Gardnerella Subgroup Community State Types.

    PubMed

    Albert, Arianne Y K; Chaban, Bonnie; Wagner, Emily C; Schellenberg, John J; Links, Matthew G; van Schalkwyk, Julie; Reid, Gregor; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Hill, Janet E; Money, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The vaginal microbiota is important in women's reproductive and overall health. However, the relationships between the structure, function and dynamics of this complex microbial community and health outcomes remain elusive. The objective of this study was to determine the phylogenetic range and abundance of prokaryotes in the vaginal microbiota of healthy, non-pregnant, ethnically diverse, reproductive-aged Canadian women. Socio-demographic, behavioural and clinical data were collected and vaginal swabs were analyzed from 310 women. Detailed profiles of their vaginal microbiomes were generated by pyrosequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target. Six community state types (CST) were delineated by hierarchical clustering, including three Lactobacillus-dominated CST (L. crispatus, L. iners, L. jensenii), two Gardnerella-dominated (subgroups A and C) and an "intermediate" CST which included a small number of women with microbiomes dominated by seven other species or with no dominant species but minority populations of Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Peptoniphilus, E. coli and various Proteobacteria in co-dominant communities. The striking correspondence between Nugent score and deep sequencing CST continues to reinforce the basic premise provided by the simpler Gram stain method, while additional analyses reveal detailed cpn60-based phylogeny and estimated abundance in microbial communities from vaginal samples. Ethnicity was the only demographic or clinical characteristic predicting CST, with differences in Asian and White women (p = 0.05). In conclusion, this study confirms previous work describing four cpn60-based subgroups of Gardnerella, revealing previously undescribed CST. The data describe the range of bacterial communities seen in Canadian women presenting with no specific vaginal health concerns, and provides an important baseline for future investigations of clinically important cohorts. PMID:26266808

  8. A Study of the Vaginal Microbiome in Healthy Canadian Women Utilizing cpn60-Based Molecular Profiling Reveals Distinct Gardnerella Subgroup Community State Types

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Emily C.; Schellenberg, John J.; Links, Matthew G.; van Schalkwyk, Julie; Reid, Gregor; Hemmingsen, Sean M.; Hill, Janet E.; Money, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The vaginal microbiota is important in women’s reproductive and overall health. However, the relationships between the structure, function and dynamics of this complex microbial community and health outcomes remain elusive. The objective of this study was to determine the phylogenetic range and abundance of prokaryotes in the vaginal microbiota of healthy, non-pregnant, ethnically diverse, reproductive-aged Canadian women. Socio-demographic, behavioural and clinical data were collected and vaginal swabs were analyzed from 310 women. Detailed profiles of their vaginal microbiomes were generated by pyrosequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target. Six community state types (CST) were delineated by hierarchical clustering, including three Lactobacillus-dominated CST (L. crispatus, L. iners, L. jensenii), two Gardnerella-dominated (subgroups A and C) and an “intermediate” CST which included a small number of women with microbiomes dominated by seven other species or with no dominant species but minority populations of Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Peptoniphilus, E. coli and various Proteobacteria in co-dominant communities. The striking correspondence between Nugent score and deep sequencing CST continues to reinforce the basic premise provided by the simpler Gram stain method, while additional analyses reveal detailed cpn60-based phylogeny and estimated abundance in microbial communities from vaginal samples. Ethnicity was the only demographic or clinical characteristic predicting CST, with differences in Asian and White women (p = 0.05). In conclusion, this study confirms previous work describing four cpn60-based subgroups of Gardnerella, revealing previously undescribed CST. The data describe the range of bacterial communities seen in Canadian women presenting with no specific vaginal health concerns, and provides an important baseline for future investigations of clinically important cohorts. PMID:26266808

  9. Investigation into Possible Differences in Salmonella Prevalence in the Peripheral Lymph Nodes of Cattle Derived from Distinct Production Systems and of Different Breed Types.

    PubMed

    Brown, T R; Edrington, T S; Loneragan, G H; Hanson, D L; Malin, K; Ison, J J; Nisbet, D J

    2015-11-01

    Previous research demonstrated significant variation in the prevalence of Salmonella in peripheral lymph nodes (LNs) of feedlot cattle and cull cows, with greater prevalence in feedlot cattle. Therefore, we performed experiments to investigate whether these differences in Salmonella prevalence in subiliac LNs are due to, or influenced by, breed, which in many respects is a proxy for the production system in which the animal is derived. Holstein steers are a by-product of dairy systems, and beef steers are an intended product of commercial beef operations. For the first experiment, Holstein and beef steers originating from the same feedlot and harvested on the same day were sampled. Of the 467 Holstein and 462 beef cattle LNs collected, 62.1% of Holstein and 59.7% of beef cattle samples harbored Salmonella (P = 0.46; qualitative culture), with 51.2 and 48.9% of samples containing quantifiable concentrations (P = 0.49), respectively. The concentration of Salmonella within the LN followed a decreasing trend over the collection period (May to October), averaging 1.4 log CFU/g of LN for both Holstein and beef cattle samples (P = 0.78). In a second experiment, we compared 100% Brahman cattle to their beef cattle counterparts, as we hypothesized that the resistance of Brahman cattle to insects may reduce Salmonella transmission via biting insects. Of the 42 Brahman and 31 beef cattle LNs collected, the concentration of Salmonella within the LN averaged 3.0 log CFU/g for Brahman cattle and 2.9 log CFU/g for beef cattle samples (P = 0.30). Using qualitative culture, we recovered Salmonella from 100% of LNs from Brahman cattle and 97% of beef cattle samples (P = 0.25). Results of this research indicate that the differences observed are not due to breed and are likely a function of age, immune function, or other factors yet to be identified. Understanding which cattle are more likely to harbor Salmonella within LNs will aid in targeting both pre- and postharvest intervention strategies. PMID:26555532

  10. 55- and 75-kilodalton tumor necrosis factor receptors mediate distinct actions in regard to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Herbein, G; Gordon, S

    1997-01-01

    We report in this study that repeated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) pretreatment, starting before and continued after infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), inhibits replication of the monocytotropic Ada strain in primary tissue culture-differentiated macrophages (TCDM), as assessed by sixfold lower levels of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity than that in untreated cells and absence of syncytium formation in TCDM cultures. In order to determine the pathways involved in inhibition of HIV-1 replication in primary TCDM pretreated with TNF-alpha, we tested TNF-alpha mutants T55 and T75, which recognize either the 55-kDa (TNF-R1) or the 75-kDa (TNF-R2) TNF receptor, respectively. Pretreatment of TCDM with the T75 mutant decreased the RT activity compared with that in untreated infected control cells fivefold and almost totally inhibited syncytium formation. In contrast, when TCDM were pretreated with the T55 mutant alone, syncytia were observed and RT activity was decreased about one-half. These results suggest that the inhibition of HIV-1 replication in TCDM pretreated with TNF-alpha might be mediated mainly through the 75-kDa TNF receptor (TNF-R2) rather than through the 55-kDa receptor (TNF-R1). Inhibition of HIV-1 replication in TCDM was observed with both T75 mutant pretreatment and posttreatment, starting at 1 h or 3 days after infection, whereas posttreatment with the T55 mutant, but not pretreatment, stimulated HIV-1 growth in primary TCDM. Both pre- and posttreatment with TNF-alpha inhibited HIV-1 replication in primary TCDM. The stimulation of HIV-1 replication by TNF-alpha in a chronically infected promonocytic cell line, U1, which contains two copies of integrated provirus, was mediated through the 55-kDa TNF-R1 alone and not through the 75-kDa TNF-R2. These results demonstrate that the 55-kDa TNF-R1 is involved in postintegration stimulation of HIV-1 while the 75-kDa TNF-R2 is involved in the inhibition of an early step of the viral life cycle in primary human TCDM. PMID:9094699

  11. Distinct Increased Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Type 5 (mGluR5) in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy With and Without Hippocampal Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kandratavicius, Ludmyla; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Monteiro, Mariana Raquel; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Assirati, Joao Alberto; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Kobayashi, Eliane; Leite, Joao Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) upregulation in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and the correlation of its expression with features of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) remains unclear. Here we characterized mGluR5 immunoreactivity in hippocampus, entorhinal cortex (EC), and subiculum of TLE specimens with confirmed HS, with neocortical TLE (non-HS) and necropsy controls. We correlated mGluR5 immunoreactivity with neuronal density, mossy fiber sprouting, astrogliosis (GFAP), and dendritic alterations (MAP2). TLE specimens showed increased mGluR5 expression, which was most pronounced in the EC, subiculum, CA2, and dentate gyrus outer molecular layer. Increased mGluR5 expression was seen in hippocampal head and body segments and was independent of neuronal density, astrogliosis, or dendritic alterations. Positive correlation between mGluR5 expression with mossy fiber sprouting and with MAP2 in CA3 and CA1 was found only in HS specimens. Negative correlation between mGluR5 expression with seizure frequency and epilepsy duration was found only in non-HS cases. Specimens from HS patients without previous history of febrile seizure (FS) showed higher mGluR5 and MAP2 expression in CA2. Our study suggests that mGluR5 upregulation is part of a repertoire of post-synaptic adaptations that might control overexcitation and excessive glutamate release rather than a dysfunction that leads to seizure facilitation. That would explain why non-HS cases, on which seizures are likely to originate outside the hippocampal formation, also exhibit upregulated mGluR5. On the other hand, lower mGluR5 expression was related to increased seizure frequency. In addition to its role in hyperexcitability, mGluR5 upregulation could play a role in counterbalance mechanisms along the hyperexcitable circuitry uniquely altered in sclerotic hippocampal formation. Inefficient post-synaptic compensatory morphological (dendritic branching) and glutamatergic (mGluR5 expression) mechanisms in CA2 subfield could potentially underlie the association of FS with HS and TLE. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23804486

  12. Teenage Drinking, Symbolic Capital and Distinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvinen, Margaretha; Gundelach, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This article analyses alcohol-related lifestyles among Danish teenagers. Building on Bourdieu's reasoning on symbolic capital and distinction, we analyse three interrelated themes. First, we show that alcohol-related variables (drinking patterns, drinking debut, experience of intoxication, etc.) can be used to identify some very distinctive life…

  13. Triton College: One Institution's Search for Distinctiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K.; Catanzaro, James L.

    1989-01-01

    Recounts Triton College's efforts to identify its distinctive elements. Reviews empirical evidence showing that Triton's school schedule, curricular offerings, and continuing education and support services are distinctive among local colleges. Discusses students' and staff members' perceptions of Triton. Considers the value of the research to the…

  14. A microarray analysis of two distinct lymphatic endothelial cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Schweighofer, Bernhard; Rohringer, Sabrina; Pröll, Johannes; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) to form two morphologically different populations, exhibiting significantly different surface protein expression levels of podoplanin, a major surface marker for this cell type. In vitro shockwave treatment (IVSWT) of LECs resulted in enrichment of the podoplaninhigh cell population and was accompanied by markedly increased cell proliferation, as well as 2D and 3D migration. Gene expression profiles of these distinct populations were established using Affymetrix microarray analyses. Here we provide additional details about our dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE62510) and describe how we analyzed the data to identify differently expressed genes in these two LEC populations. PMID:26484194

  15. A newly identified type of scrapie agent can naturally infect sheep with resistant PrP genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Le Dur, Annick; Béringue, Vincent; Andréoletti, Olivier; Reine, Fabienne; Laï, Thanh Lan; Baron, Thierry; Bratberg, Bjørn; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Sarradin, Pierre; Benestad, Sylvie L.; Laude, Hubert

    2005-01-01

    Scrapie in small ruminants belongs to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, a family of fatal neurodegenerative disorders that affect humans and animals and can transmit within and between species by ingestion or inoculation. Conversion of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP), normal cellular PrP (PrPc), into a misfolded form, abnormal PrP (PrPSc), plays a key role in TSE transmission and pathogenesis. The intensified surveillance of scrapie in the European Union, together with the improvement of PrPSc detection techniques, has led to the discovery of a growing number of so-called atypical scrapie cases. These include clinical Nor98 cases first identified in Norwegian sheep on the basis of unusual pathological and PrPSc molecular features and “cases” that produced discordant responses in the rapid tests currently applied to the large-scale random screening of slaughtered or fallen animals. Worryingly, a substantial proportion of such cases involved sheep with PrP genotypes known until now to confer natural resistance to conventional scrapie. Here we report that both Nor98 and discordant cases, including three sheep homozygous for the resistant PrPARR allele (A136R154R171), efficiently transmitted the disease to transgenic mice expressing ovine PrP, and that they shared unique biological and biochemical features upon propagation in mice. These observations support the view that a truly infectious TSE agent, unrecognized until recently, infects sheep and goat flocks and may have important implications in terms of scrapie control and public health. PMID:16239348

  16. Firing pattern of type-identified wrist extensor motor units during wrist extension and hand clenching in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, H; Schmied, A; Vedel, J P; Pagni, S

    1997-01-01

    1. Single motor unit activity was investigated in the extensor carpi radialis muscles during voluntary isometric contraction involving either the coactivation of the wrist agonist extensor muscles (wrist extension) or the coactivation of the wrist and finger antagonist extensor and flexor muscles (hand clenching). 2. The motor units were found to be activated at a similar level of motoneurone pool drive during both wrist extension and hand clenching, as indicated by the fact that the EMG activity at which they were recruited was practically the same in both cases (mean +/- S.D.: 20 +/- 26 and 21 +/- 25 mV, respectively). In addition, the net excitatory drive exerted on the motoneurones, as assessed from the mean interspike intervals, did not differ significantly between the two tasks (mean +/- S.D.: 104.57 +/- 17.24 and 103.01 +/- 16.26 ms, for wrist extension and hand clenching, respectively). 3. However, the discharge variability, in terms of the coefficient of variation of the interspike intervals, was slightly but significantly greater during hand clenching than during wrist extension (0.213 +/- 0.049 and 0.198 +/- 0.045, respectively). This increase involved all types of motor units, regardless of their contractile force. 4. We suggest that the greater motoneurone discharge variability observed during hand clenching may be attributable to an increase in the synaptic noise. This increase might be due to the activation of numerous afferent pathways mediating reciprocal interactions between antagonist motoneurone pools, as well as to the activation of hand cutaneous receptors that play a major role in the regulation of handling and gripping motor activities. PMID:9401979

  17. A transcriptomic approach to identify regulatory genes involved in fruit set of wild-type and parthenocarpic tomato genotypes.

    PubMed

    Ruiu, Fabrizio; Picarella, Maurizio Enea; Imanishi, Shunsuke; Mazzucato, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The tomato parthenocarpic fruit (pat) mutation associates a strong competence for parthenocarpy with homeotic transformation of anthers and aberrancy of ovules. To dissect this complex floral phenotype, genes involved in the pollination-independent fruit set of the pat mutant were investigated by microarray analysis using wild-type and mutant ovaries. Normalized expression data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and 2499 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) displaying a >1.5 log-fold change in at least one of the pairwise comparisons analyzed were detected. DEGs were categorized into 20 clusters and clusters classified into five groups representing transcripts with similar expression dynamics. The "regulatory function" group (685 DEGs) contained putative negative or positive fruit set regulators, "pollination-dependent" (411 DEGs) included genes activated by pollination, "fruit growth-related" (815 DEGs) genes activated at early fruit growth. The last groups listed genes with different or similar expression pattern at all stages in the two genotypes. qRT-PCR validation of 20 DEGs plus other four selected genes assessed the high reliability of microarray expression data; the average correlation coefficient for the 20 DEGs was 0.90. In all the groups were evidenced relevant transcription factors encoding proteins regulating meristem differentiation and floral organ development, genes involved in metabolism, transport and response of hormones, genes involved in cell division and in primary and secondary metabolism. Among pathways related to secondary metabolites emerged genes related to the synthesis of flavonoids, supporting the recent evidence that these compounds are important at the fruit set phase. Selected genes showing a de-regulated expression pattern in pat were studied in other four parthenocarpic genotypes either genetically anonymous or carrying lesions in known gene sequences. This comparative approach offered novel insights for improving the present molecular understanding of fruit set and parthenocarpy in tomato. PMID:26319515

  18. Methyl salicylate, identified as primary odorant of a specific receptor neuron type, inhibits oviposition by the moth Mamestra brassicae L. (Lepidoptera, noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Ulland, S; Ian, E; Mozuraitis, R; Borg-Karlson, A-K; Meadow, R; Mustaparta, H

    2008-01-01

    The cabbage moth, Mamestra brassicae L. (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae), is a polyphagous species that is often choosing plants of Brassica as hosts for oviposition. In the search for biologically relevant odorants used by these moths, gas chromatography linked to electrophysiological recordings from single receptor neurons (RNs) has been employed, resulting in classification of distinct types of neurons. This study presents specific olfactory RNs responding to methyl salicylate (MeS) as primary odorant and showing a weak response to methyl benzoate, the 2 aromatic compounds occurring together in several plant species. In 2 cases, the neuron was colocated with another RN type responding to 6 green leaf volatiles: 1-hexanol, (3Z)-hexen-1-ol, (2E)-hexen-1-ol, (3Z)-hexenyl acetate, (2Z)-hexen-1-ol, and an unidentified compound. Whereas the specific RNs detected the minor amounts of MeS in some plants, the compound was not found by gas chromatography linked to mass spectrometry in intact plants, but it was found after herbivore attack. The behavioral effect of MeS was studied in outdoor test arenas with Brassica napus and artificial plants. These experiments indicated that mated M. brassicae females avoid plants with dispensers emitting MeS. As it is induced by caterpillar feeding, this compound may mediate a message to mated M. brassicae females that the plant is already occupied. PMID:17846100

  19. Emergence of a few distinct structures from a single formal structure type during high-throughput screening for stable compounds: The case of RbCuS and RbCuSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimarchi, Giancarlo; Zhang, Xiuwen; DeVries Vermeer, Michael J.; Cantwell, Jacqueline; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.; Zunger, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Theoretical sorting of stable and synthesizable "missing compounds" from those that are unstable is a crucial step in the discovery of previously unknown functional materials. This active research area often involves high-throughput (HT) examination of the total energy of a given compound in a list of candidate formal structure types (FSTs), searching for those with the lowest energy within that list. While it is well appreciated that local relaxation methods based on a fixed list of structure types can lead to inaccurate geometries, this approach is widely used in HT studies because it produces answers faster than global optimization methods (that vary lattice vectors and atomic positions without local restrictions). We find, however, a different failure mode of the HT protocol: specific crystallographic classes of formal structure types each correspond to a series of chemically distinct "daughter structure types" (DSTs) that have the same space group but possess totally different local bonding configurations, including coordination types. Failure to include such DSTs in the fixed list of examined candidate structures used in contemporary high-throughput approaches can lead to qualitative misidentification of the stable bonding pattern, not just quantitative inaccuracies. In this work, we (i) clarify the understanding of the general DST-FST relationship, thus improving current discovery HT approaches, (ii) illustrate this failure mode for RbCuS and RbCuSe (the latter being a yet unreported compound and is predicted here) by developing a synthesis method and accelerated crystal-structure determination, and (iii) apply the genetic-algorithm-based global space-group optimization (GSGO) approach which is not vulnerable to the failure mode of HT searches of fixed lists, demonstrating a correct identification of the stable DST. The broad impact of items (i)-(iii) lies in the demonstrated predictive ability of a more comprehensive search strategy than what is currently used—use HT calculations as the preliminary broad screening followed by unbiased GSGO of the final candidates.

  20. Independent optical excitation of distinct neural populations

    E-print Network

    Klapoetke, Nathan Cao

    Optogenetic tools enable examination of how specific cell types contribute to brain circuit functions. A long-standing question is whether it is possible to independently activate two distinct neural populations in mammalian ...

  1. Replication Study in a Japanese Population to Evaluate the Association between 10 SNP Loci, Identified in European Genome-Wide Association Studies, and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Minako; Tanaka, Yasushi; Iwata, Minoru; Hirose, Hiroshi; Kaku, Kohei; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Watada, Hirotaka; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Maeda, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Aim We performed a replication study in a Japanese population to evaluate the association between type 2 diabetes and 7 susceptibility loci originally identified by European genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 2012: ZMIZ1, KLHDC5, TLE1, ANKRD55, CILP2, MC4R, and BCAR1. We also examined the association of 3 additional loci: CCND2 and GIPR, identified in sex-differentiated analyses, and LAMA1, which was shown to be associated with non-obese European type 2 diabetes. Methods We genotyped 6,972 Japanese participants (4,280 type 2 diabetes patients and 2,692 controls) for each of the 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): rs12571751 in ZMIZ1, rs10842994 near KLHDC5, rs2796441 near TLE1, rs459193 near ANKRD55, rs10401969 in CILP2, rs12970134 near MC4R, rs7202877 near BCAR1, rs11063069 near CCND2, rs8108269 near GIPR, and rs8090011 in LAMA1 using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction invader assay. The association of each SNP locus with the disease was evaluated using a logistic regression analysis. Results All SNPs examined in this study had the same direction of effect (odds ratio > 1.0, p = 9.77 × 10-4, binomial test), as in the original reports. Among them, rs12571751 in ZMIZ1 was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes [p = 0.0041, odds ratio = 1.123, 95% confidence interval 1.037–1.215, adjusted for sex, age and body mass index (BMI)], but we did not observe significant association of the remaining 9 SNP loci with type 2 diabetes in the present Japanese population (p ? 0.005). A genetic risk score, constructed from the sum of risk alleles for the 7 SNP loci identified by un-stratified analyses in the European GWAS meta-analysis were associated with type 2 diabetes in the present Japanese population (p = 2.3 × 10-4, adjusted for sex, age and BMI). Conclusions ZMIZ1 locus has a significant effect on conferring susceptibility to type 2 diabetes also in the Japanese population. PMID:25951451

  2. A distinctive type of ascending prominence - 'Fountain'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hansen, R. T.; Riddle, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    Cinematographic observations of solar prominences made at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, during the past few years suggest that there is a well-defined subclass of ascending prominences characterized by closed-system transference of chromospheric material along an arch or loop (up one leg and down the other). While this occurs, the entire prominence envelope steadily rises upward and expands through the corona. These prominences are denoted as 'fountains'. Several examples are described. Fountains appear to be well contained by coronal magnetic fields. Their total kinetic energy is of the order of 10 to the 30th power erg, but dissipation is typically quite slow (over time periods of 100 min or so), so that the correlative disturbances (radio bursts, coronal transients, chromospheric brightenings) are generally not spectacular or nonexistent.

  3. Sapronosis: a distinctive type of infectious agent.

    PubMed

    Kuris, Armand M; Lafferty, Kevin D; Sokolow, Susanne H

    2014-08-01

    Sapronotic disease agents have evolutionary and epidemiological properties unlike other infectious organisms. Their essential saprophagic existence prevents coevolution, and no host-parasite virulence trade-off can evolve. However, the host may evolve defenses. Models of pathogens show that sapronoses, lacking a threshold of transmission, cannot regulate host populations, although they can reduce host abundance and even extirpate their hosts. Immunocompromised hosts are relatively susceptible to sapronoses. Some particularly important sapronoses, such as cholera and anthrax, can sustain an epidemic in a host population. However, these microbes ultimately persist as saprophages. One-third of human infectious disease agents are sapronotic, including nearly all fungal diseases. Recognition that an infectious disease is sapronotic illuminates a need for effective environmental control strategies. PMID:25028088

  4. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Loci Identified in Genome-Wide Association Studies with Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components in a Chinese Population with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Bo; Hong, Jing; Yang, Wenying

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is prevalent in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. The comorbidity of MetS and T2D increases the risk of cardiovascular complications. The aim of the present study was to determine the T2D-related genetic variants that contribute to MetS-related components in T2D patients of Chinese ancestry. We successfully genotyped 25 genome wide association study validated T2D-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 5,169 T2D individuals and 4,560 normal glycemic controls recruited from the Chinese National Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Study (DMS). We defined MetS in this population using the harmonized criteria (2009) combined with the Chinese criteria for abdominal obesity. The associations between SNPs and MetS-related components, as well as the associations between SNPs and risk for T2D with or without MetS, were subjected to logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and sex. Results showed that the T2D risk alleles of rs243021 located near BCL11A, rs10830963 in MTNR1B, and rs2237895 in KCNQ1 were related to a lower risk for abdominal obesity in T2D patients (rs243021: 0.92 (0.84, 1.00), P = 4.42 × 10?2; rs10830963: 0.92 (0.85, 1.00), P = 4.07 × 10?2; rs2237895: 0.89 (0.82, 0.98), P = 1.29 × 10?2). The T2D risk alleles of rs972283 near KLF14 contributed to a higher risk of elevated blood pressure (1.10 (1.00, 1.22), P = 4.48 × 10?2), while the T2D risk allele of rs7903146 in TCF7L2 was related to a lower risk for elevated blood pressure (0.74 (0.61, 0.90), P = 2.56 × 10?3). The T2D risk alleles of rs972283 near KLF14 and rs11634397 near ZFAND6 were associated with a higher risk for elevated triglycerides (rs972283: 1.11 (1.02, 1.24), P = 1.46 × 10?2; rs11634397: 1.14 (1.00, 1.29), P = 4.66 × 10?2), while the T2D risk alleles of rs780094 in GCKR and rs7903146 in TCF7L2 were related to a lower risk of elevated triglycerides (rs780094: 0.86 (0.80, 0.93), P = 1.35 × 10?4; rs7903146: 0.82 (0.69, 0.98), P = 3.18 × 10?2). The genotype risk score of the 25 T2D-related SNPs was related to a lower risk for abdominal obesity (Ptrend = 1.29 × 10?2) and lower waist circumference (P = 2.20 × 10?3). Genetic variants of WFS1, CDKAL1, CDKN2BAS, TCF7L2, HHEX, KCNQ1, TSPAN8/LGR5, FTO, and TCF2 were associated with the risk for T2D with MetS, as well as the risk for development of T2D with at least one of the MetS components (P < 0.05). In addition, genetic variants of BCL11A, GCKR, ADAMTS9, CDKAL1, KLF14, CDKN2BAS, TCF7L2, CDC123/CAMK1D, HHEX, MTNR1B, and KCNQ1 contributed to the risk for T2D without MetS (P < 0.05). In conclusion, these findings highlight the contribution of T2D-related genetic loci to MetS in a Chinese Han population. The study also provides insight into the pleotropic effects of genome-wide association loci of diabetes on metabolic regulation. PMID:26599349

  5. Recurrent TERT promoter mutations identified in a large-scale study of multiple tumor types are associated with increased TERT expression and telomerase activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Zhaohui; He, Xu-Jun; Diplas, Bill H.; Yang, Rui; Killela, Patrick J.; Liang, Junbo; Meng, Qun; Ye, Zai-Yuan; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xiao-Ting; Xu, Li; He, Xiang-Lei; Zhao, Zhong-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Juan; Wang, Hui-Ju; Ma, Ying-Yu; Xia, Ying-Jie; Li, Li; Zhang, Ru-Xuan; Jin, Tao; Zhao, Zhong-Kuo; Xu, Ji; Yu, Sheng; Wu, Fang; Wang, Si-Zhen; Jiao, Yu-Chen; Yan, Hai; Tao, Hou-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background Several somatic mutation hotspots were recently identified in the TERT promoter region in human cancers. Large scale studies of these mutations in multiple tumor types are limited, in particular in Asian populations. This study aimed to: analyze TERT promoter mutations in multiple tumor types in a large Chinese patient cohort, investigate novel tumor types and assess the functional significance of the mutations. Methods TERT promoter mutation status was assessed by Sanger sequencing for 13 different tumor types and 799 tumor tissues from Chinese cancer patients. Thymic epithelial tumors, gastrointestinal leiomyoma, and gastric schwannoma were included, for which the TERT promoter has not been previously sequenced. Functional studies included TERT expression by RT-qPCR, telomerase activity by the TRAP assay, and promoter activity by the luciferase reporter assay. Results TERT promoter mutations were highly frequent in glioblastoma (83.9%), urothelial carcinoma (64.5%), oligodendroglioma (70.0%), medulloblastoma (33.3%), and hepatocellular carcinoma (31.4%). C228T and C250T were the most common mutations. In urothelial carcinoma, several novel rare mutations were identified. TERT promoter mutations were absent in GIST, thymic epithelial tumors, gastrointestinal leiomyoma, gastric schwannoma, cholangiocarcinoma, gastric and pancreatic cancer. TERT promoter mutations highly correlated with upregulated TERT mRNA expression and telomerase activity in adult gliomas. These mutations differentially enhanced the transcriptional activity of the TERT core promoter. Conclusions TERT promoter mutations are frequent in multiple tumor types and have similar distributions in Chinese cancer patients. The functional significance of these mutations reflect the importance to telomere maintenance and hence tumorigenesis, making them potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25843513

  6. Analysis of the Crystal Structure of the ExsC.ExsE Complex Reveals Distinctive Binding Interactions of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Secretion Chaperone ExsC with ExsE and ExsD

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelaar, N.J.; Robinson, H.; Jing, X.; Schubot, F. D.

    2010-07-20

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, like many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, requires its type III secretion system (T3SS) to facilitate acute infections. In P. aeruginosa, the expression of all T3SS-related genes is regulated by the transcriptional activator ExsA. A signaling cascade involving ExsA and three additional proteins, ExsC, ExsD, and ExsE, directly ties the upregulation of ExsA-mediated transcription to the activation of the type III secretion apparatus. In order to characterize the events underlying the signaling process, the crystal structure of the T3SS chaperone ExsC in complex with its cognate effector ExsE has been determined. The structure reveals critical contacts that mediate the interactions between these two proteins. Particularly striking is the presence of two Arg-X-Val-X-Arg motifs in ExsE that form identical interactions along opposite sides of an ExsC dimer. The structure also provides insights into the interactions of ExsC with the antiactivator protein ExsD. It was shown that the amino-terminal 46 residues of ExsD are sufficient for ExsC binding. On the basis of these findings, a new model for the ExsC {center_dot} ExsD complex is proposed to explain its distinctive 2:2 stoichiometry and why ExsC displays a weaker affinity for ExsD than for ExsE.

  7. Use of Whole-Genome Phylogeny and Comparisons for Development of a Multiplex PCR Assay To Identify Sequence Type 36 Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jeffrey A.; Xu, Feng; Ilyas, Saba; Siwakoti, Puskar; Cooper, Vaughn S.; Jones, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus sequence type 36 (ST36) strains that are native to the Pacific Ocean have recently caused multistate outbreaks of gastroenteritis linked to shellfish harvested from the Atlantic Ocean. Whole-genome comparisons of 295 genomes of V. parahaemolyticus, including several traced to northeastern U.S. sources, were used to identify diagnostic loci, one putatively encoding an endonuclease (prp), and two others potentially conferring O-antigenic properties (cps and flp). The combination of all three loci was present in only one clade of closely related strains of ST36, ST59, and one additional unknown sequence type. However, each locus was also identified outside this clade, with prp and flp occurring in only two nonclade isolates and cps in four. Based on the distribution of these loci in sequenced genomes, prp identified clade strains with >99% accuracy, but the addition of one more locus increased accuracy to 100%. Oligonucleotide primers targeting prp and cps were combined in a multiplex PCR method that defines species using the tlh locus and determines the presence of both the tdh and trh hemolysin-encoding genes, which are also present in ST36. Application of the method in vitro to a collection of 94 clinical isolates collected over a 4-year period in three northeastern U.S. states and 87 environmental isolates revealed that the prp and cps amplicons were detected only in clinical isolates identified as belonging to the ST36 clade and in no environmental isolates from the region. The assay should improve detection and surveillance, thereby reducing infections. PMID:25832299

  8. Comparison of gene expression patterns across twelve tumor types identifies a cancer supercluster characterized by TP53 mutations and cell cycle defects

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Emmanuel; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Kim, Hoon; Mills, Gordon M.; Treviño, Victor; Verhaak, Roel GW

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional profile based subtypes of cancer are often viewed as identifying different diseases from the same tissue origin. Understanding the mechanisms driving the subtypes may be key in development of novel therapeutics but is challenged by lineage-specific expression signals. Using a t-test statistics approach we compared gene expression subtypes across twelve tumor types, which identified eight transcriptional superclusters characterized by commonly activated disease pathways and similarities in gene expression. One of the largest superclusters was determined by the upregulation of a proliferation signature, significant enrichment in TP53 mutations, genomic loss of CDKN2A (p16ARF), evidence of increased numbers of DNA double strand breaks and high expression of cyclin B1 protein. These correlations suggested that abrogation of the P53 mediated apoptosis response to DNA damage results in activation of cell cycle pathways and represents a common theme in cancer. A second consistent pattern, observed in nine of eleven solid tumor types, was a subtype related to an activated tumor-associated stroma. The similarity in transcriptional footprints across cancers suggested that tumor subtypes are commonly unified by a limited number of molecular themes. PMID:25088195

  9. Compounds with species and cell type specific toxicity identified in a 2,000 compound drug screen of neural stem cells and rat mixed cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Nasir; Efthymiou, Anastasia G.; Mather, Karly; Chester, Nathaniel; Wang, Xiantao; Nath, Avindra; Rao, Mahendra S.; Steiner, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Human primary neural tissue is a vital component for the quick and simple determination of chemical compound neurotoxicity in vitro. In particular, such tissue would be ideal for high-throughput screens that can be used to identify novel neurotoxic or neurotherapeutic compounds. We have previously established a high-throughput screening platform using human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and neurons. In this study, we conducted a 2,000 compound screen with human NSCs and rat cortical cells to identify compounds that are selectively toxic to each group. Approximately 100 of the tested compounds showed specific toxicity to human NSCs. A secondary screen of a small subset of compounds from the primary screen on human iPSCs, NSC-derived neurons, and fetal astrocytes validated the results from >80% of these compounds with some showing cell specific toxicity. Amongst those compounds were several cardiac glycosides, all of which were selectively toxic to the human cells. As the screen was able to reliably identify neurotoxicants, many with species and cell-type specificity, this study demonstrates the feasibility of this NSC-driven platform for higher-throughput neurotoxicity screens. PMID:25454721

  10. Use of Whole-Genus Genome Sequence Data To Develop a Multilocus Sequence Typing Tool That Accurately Identifies Yersinia Isolates to the Species and Subspecies Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Miquette; Chattaway, Marie A.; Reuter, Sandra; Savin, Cyril; Strauch, Eckhard; Carniel, Elisabeth; Connor, Thomas; Van Damme, Inge; Rajakaruna, Lakshani; Rajendram, Dunstan; Jenkins, Claire; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Yersinia is a large and diverse bacterial genus consisting of human-pathogenic species, a fish-pathogenic species, and a large number of environmental species. Recently, the phylogenetic and population structure of the entire genus was elucidated through the genome sequence data of 241 strains encompassing every known species in the genus. Here we report the mining of this enormous data set to create a multilocus sequence typing-based scheme that can identify Yersinia strains to the species level to a level of resolution equal to that for whole-genome sequencing. Our assay is designed to be able to accurately subtype the important human-pathogenic species Yersinia enterocolitica to whole-genome resolution levels. We also report the validation of the scheme on 386 strains from reference laboratory collections across Europe. We propose that the scheme is an important molecular typing system to allow accurate and reproducible identification of Yersinia isolates to the species level, a process often inconsistent in nonspecialist laboratories. Additionally, our assay is the most phylogenetically informative typing scheme available for Y. enterocolitica. PMID:25339391

  11. Identifying the integrated neural networks involved in capsaicin-induced pain using fMRI in awake TRPV1 knockout and wild-type rats

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Jason R.; Kenkel, William; Caccaviello, John C.; Gamber, Kevin; Simmons, Phil; Nedelman, Mark; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). Capsaicin is an exogenous ligand for the TRPV1 receptor, and in wild-type rats, activated the putative pain neural circuit. In addition, capsaicin-treated wild-type rats exhibited activation in brain regions comprising the Papez circuit and habenular system, systems that play important roles in the integration of emotional information, and learning and memory of aversive information, respectively. As expected, capsaicin administration to TRPV1-KO rats failed to elicit the robust BOLD activation pattern observed in wild-type controls. However, the intradermal injection of formalin elicited a significant activation of the putative pain pathway as represented by such areas as the anterior cingulate, somatosensory cortex, parabrachial nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. Notably, comparison of neural responses to capsaicin in wild-type vs. knock-out rats uncovered evidence that capsaicin may function in an antinociceptive capacity independent of TRPV1 signaling. Our data suggest that neuroimaging of pain in awake, conscious animals has the potential to inform the neurobiological basis of full and integrated perceptions of pain. PMID:25745388

  12. Definition of a fluorescence in-situ hybridization score identifies high- and low-level FGFR1 amplification types in squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Heukamp, Lukas C; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Riesner, Katharina; Schmitz, Katja; Binot, Elke; Paggen, Ellen; Albus, Kerstin; Schulte, Wolfgang; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Schlesinger, Andreas; Ansén, Sascha; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Brockmann, Michael; Serke, Monika; Gerigk, Ulrich; Huss, Sebastian; Göke, Friederike; Perner, Sven; Hekmat, Khosro; Frank, Konrad F; Reiser, Marcel; Schnell, Roland; Bos, Marc; Mattonet, Christian; Sos, Martin; Stoelben, Erich; Wolf, Jürgen; Zander, Thomas; Buettner, Reinhard

    2012-11-01

    We recently reported fibroblast growth factor receptor-type 1 (FGFR1) amplification to be associated with therapeutically tractable FGFR1 dependency in squamous cell lung cancer. This makes FGFR1 a novel target for directed therapy in these tumors. To reproducibly identify patients for clinical studies, we developed a standardized reading and evaluation strategy for FGFR1 fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and propose evaluation criteria, describe different patterns of low- and high-level amplifications and report on the prevalence of FGFR1 amplifications in pulmonary carcinomas. A total of 420 lung cancer patients including 307 squamous carcinomas, 100 adenocarcinomas of the lung and 13 carcinomas of other types were analyzed for FGFR1 amplification using a dual color FISH. We found heterogeneous and different patterns of gene copy numbers. FGFR1 amplifications were observed in 20% of pulmonary squamous carcinomas but not in adenocarcinomas. High-level amplification (as defined by an FGFR1/centromer 8 (CEN8) ratio ?2.0, or average number of FGFR1 signals per tumor cell nucleus ?6, or the percentage of tumor cells containing ?15 FGFR1 signals or large clusters ?10%) was detected at a frequency of 16% and low-level amplification (as defined by ?5 FGFR1 signals in ?50% of tumor cells) at a frequency of 4%. We conclude that FGFR1 amplification is one of the most frequent therapeutically tractable genetic lesions in pulmonary carcinomas. Standardized reporting of FGFR1 amplification in squamous carcinomas of the lung will become increasingly important to correlate therapeutic responses with FGFR1 inhibitors in clinical studies. Thus, our reading and evaluation strategy might serve as a basis for identifying patients for ongoing and upcoming clinical trials. PMID:22684217

  13. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J.; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F.; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tainle; de Bakker, Paul IW; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Charles; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin NA; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John RB; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbæk, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple new genomic loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D)1-11. Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to discover loci at which common alleles have modest effects, we performed meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans encompassing 10,128 individuals of European-descent and ~2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed). Replication testing was performed in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. At least six new loci with robust evidence for association were detected, including the JAZF1 (p=5.0×10?14), CDC123/CAMK1D (p=1.2×10?10), TSPAN8/LGR5 (p=1.1×10?9), THADA (p=1.1×10?9), ADAMTS9 (p=1.2×10?8), and NOTCH2 (p=4.1×10?8) gene regions. The large number of loci with relatively small effects indicates the value of large discovery and follow-up samples in identifying additional clues about the inherited basis of T2D. PMID:18372903

  14. A novel computational framework for simultaneous integration of multiple types of genomic data to identify microRNA-gene regulatory modules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shihua; Li, Qingjiao; Liu, Juan; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: It is well known that microRNAs (miRNAs) and genes work cooperatively to form the key part of gene regulatory networks. However, the specific functional roles of most miRNAs and their combinatorial effects in cellular processes are still unclear. The availability of multiple types of functional genomic data provides unprecedented opportunities to study the miRNA–gene regulation. A major challenge is how to integrate the diverse genomic data to identify the regulatory modules of miRNAs and genes. Results: Here we propose an effective data integration framework to identify the miRNA–gene regulatory comodules. The miRNA and gene expression profiles are jointly analyzed in a multiple non-negative matrix factorization framework, and additional network data are simultaneously integrated in a regularized manner. Meanwhile, we employ the sparsity penalties to the variables to achieve modular solutions. The mathematical formulation can be effectively solved by an iterative multiplicative updating algorithm. We apply the proposed method to integrate a set of heterogeneous data sources including the expression profiles of miRNAs and genes on 385 human ovarian cancer samples, computationally predicted miRNA–gene interactions, and gene–gene interactions. We demonstrate that the miRNAs and genes in 69% of the regulatory comodules are significantly associated. Moreover, the comodules are significantly enriched in known functional sets such as miRNA clusters, GO biological processes and KEGG pathways, respectively. Furthermore, many miRNAs and genes in the comodules are related with various cancers including ovarian cancer. Finally, we show that comodules can stratify patients (samples) into groups with significant clinical characteristics. Availability: The program and supplementary materials are available at http://zhoulab.usc.edu/SNMNMF/. Contact: xjzhou@usc.edu; zsh@amss.ac.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21685098

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of Small RNAs Expressed by Yersinia pestis Identifies a Regulator of the Yop-Ysc Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Schiano, Chelsea A.; Koo, Jovanka T.; Schipma, Matthew J.; Caulfield, Adam J.; Jafari, Nadereh

    2014-01-01

    Small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules are integral components of the regulatory machinery for many bacterial species and are known to posttranscriptionally regulate metabolic and stress-response pathways, quorum sensing, virulence factors, and more. The Yop-Ysc type III secretion system (T3SS) is a critical virulence component for the pathogenic Yersinia species, and the regulation of this system is tightly controlled at each step from transcription to translocation of effectors into host cells. The contribution of sRNAs to the regulation of the T3SS in Yersinia has been largely unstudied, however. Previously, our lab identified a role for the sRNA chaperone protein Hfq in the regulation of components of the T3SS in the gastrointestinal pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Here we present data demonstrating a similar requirement for Hfq in the closely related species Yersinia pestis. Through deep sequencing analysis of the Y. pestis sRNA-ome, we found 63 previously unidentified putative sRNAs in this species. We identified a Yersinia-specific sRNA, Ysr141, carried by the T3SS plasmid pCD1 that is required for the production of multiple T3SS proteins. In addition, we show that Ysr141 targets an untranslated region upstream of yopJ to posttranscriptionally activate the synthesis of the YopJ protein. Furthermore, Ysr141 may be an unstable and/or processed sRNA, which could contribute to its function in the regulation of the T3SS. The discovery of an sRNA that influences the synthesis of the T3SS adds an additional layer of regulation to this tightly controlled virulence determinant of Y. pestis. PMID:24532772

  16. The Utility of Carotid Ultrasonography in Identifying Severe Coronary Artery Disease in Asymptomatic Type 2 Diabetic Patients Without History of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Yoko; Katakami, Naoto; Kaneto, Hideaki; Nishio, Mayu; Kasami, Ryuichi; Sakamoto, Ken’ya; Umayahara, Yutaka; Sumitsuji, Satoru; Ueda, Yasunori; Kosugi, Keisuke; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although many studies have shown that carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD), it remains inconclusive whether assessment of carotid IMT is useful as a screening test for asymptomatic but severe CAD in diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 333 asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients without history of CAD underwent exercise electrocardiogram or myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for detection of silent myocardial ischemia, and those whose test results were positive were subjected to coronary computed tomography angiography or coronary angiography. The ability of carotid IMT to identify severe CAD corresponding to treatment with revascularization was examined by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. RESULTS Among the 333 subjects, 17 were treated with revascularization. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that maximum IMT was an independent predictor of severe CAD even after adjustment for conventional risk factors. ROC curve analyses revealed that the addition of maximum IMT to conventional risk factors significantly improved the prediction ability for severe CAD (from area under the curve, 0.67 to 0.79; P = 0.039). The greatest sensitivity and specificity were obtained when the cut-off value of maximum IMT was set at 2.45 mm (pretest probability, 5%; posttest probability, 11%; sensitivity, 71%). When we applied age-specific cut-off values, the sensitivity of screening further increased in both the nonelderly (pretest probability, 6%; posttest probability, 10%; sensitivity, 100%) and the elderly subjects (pretest probability, 5%; posttest probability, 15%; sensitivity, 100%). CONCLUSIONS Our study suggests that carotid maximum IMT is useful for screening asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with severe CAD equivalent to revascularization. PMID:23404302

  17. Use of a High-Density Protein Microarray to Identify Autoantibodies in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and an HLA Background Associated with Reduced Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Douglas C; Piaggi, Paolo; Hanson, Robert L; Knowler, William C; Bucci, John; Thio, Guene; Hohenadel, Maximilian G; Bogardus, Clifton; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    New biomarkers for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may aid diagnosis, drug development or clinical treatment. Evidence is increasing for the adaptive immune system's role in T2DM and suggests the presence of unidentified autoantibodies. While high-density protein microarrays have emerged as a useful technology to identify possible novel autoantigens in autoimmune diseases, its application in T2DM has lagged. In Pima Indians, the HLA haplotype (HLA-DRB1*02) is protective against T2DM and, when studied when they have normal glucose tolerance, subjects with this HLA haplotype have higher insulin secretion compared to those without the protective haplotype. Possible autoantibody biomarkers were identified using microarrays containing 9480 proteins in plasma from Pima Indians with T2DM without the protective haplotype (n = 7) compared with those with normal glucose regulation (NGR) with the protective haplotype (n = 11). A subsequent validation phase involving 45 cases and 45 controls, matched by age, sex and specimen storage time, evaluated 77 proteins. Eleven autoantigens had higher antibody signals among T2DM subjects with the lower insulin-secretion HLA background compared with NGR subjects with the higher insulin-secretion HLA background (p<0.05, adjusted for multiple comparisons). PPARG2 and UBE2M had lowest p-values (adjusted p = 0.023) while PPARG2 and RGS17 had highest case-to-control antibody signal ratios (1.7). A multi-protein classifier involving the 11 autoantigens had sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.73, 0.80, and 0.83 (95% CI 0.74-0.91, p = 3.4x10-8), respectively. This study identified 11 novel autoantigens which were associated with T2DM and an HLA background associated with reduced insulin secretion. While further studies are needed to distinguish whether these antibodies are associated with insulin secretion via the HLA background, T2DM more broadly, or a combination of the two, this study may aid the search for autoantibody biomarkers by narrowing the list of protein targets. PMID:26606528

  18. Use of a High-Density Protein Microarray to Identify Autoantibodies in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and an HLA Background Associated with Reduced Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Douglas C.; Piaggi, Paolo; Hanson, Robert L.; Knowler, William C.; Bucci, John; Thio, Guene; Hohenadel, Maximilian G.; Bogardus, Clifton; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    New biomarkers for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may aid diagnosis, drug development or clinical treatment. Evidence is increasing for the adaptive immune system’s role in T2DM and suggests the presence of unidentified autoantibodies. While high-density protein microarrays have emerged as a useful technology to identify possible novel autoantigens in autoimmune diseases, its application in T2DM has lagged. In Pima Indians, the HLA haplotype (HLA-DRB1*02) is protective against T2DM and, when studied when they have normal glucose tolerance, subjects with this HLA haplotype have higher insulin secretion compared to those without the protective haplotype. Possible autoantibody biomarkers were identified using microarrays containing 9480 proteins in plasma from Pima Indians with T2DM without the protective haplotype (n = 7) compared with those with normal glucose regulation (NGR) with the protective haplotype (n = 11). A subsequent validation phase involving 45 cases and 45 controls, matched by age, sex and specimen storage time, evaluated 77 proteins. Eleven autoantigens had higher antibody signals among T2DM subjects with the lower insulin-secretion HLA background compared with NGR subjects with the higher insulin-secretion HLA background (p<0.05, adjusted for multiple comparisons). PPARG2 and UBE2M had lowest p-values (adjusted p = 0.023) while PPARG2 and RGS17 had highest case-to-control antibody signal ratios (1.7). A multi-protein classifier involving the 11 autoantigens had sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.73, 0.80, and 0.83 (95% CI 0.74–0.91, p = 3.4x10-8), respectively. This study identified 11 novel autoantigens which were associated with T2DM and an HLA background associated with reduced insulin secretion. While further studies are needed to distinguish whether these antibodies are associated with insulin secretion via the HLA background, T2DM more broadly, or a combination of the two, this study may aid the search for autoantibody biomarkers by narrowing the list of protein targets. PMID:26606528

  19. The rate of high ovarian response in women identified at risk by a high serum AMH level is influenced by the type of gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Bjarke M.; La Marca, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to compare ovarian response and clinical outcome of potential high-responders after stimulation with highly purified menotropin (HP-hMG) or recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH) for in vitro fertilisation/intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Retrospective analysis was performed on data collected in two randomized controlled trials, one conducted following a long GnRH agonist protocol and the other with an antagonist protocol. Potential high-responders (n?=?155 and n?=?188 in the agonist and antagonist protocol, respectively) were defined as having an initial anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) value >75th percentile (5.2?ng/ml). In both protocols, HP-hMG stimulation in women in the high AMH category was associated with a significantly lower occurrence of high response (?15 oocytes retrieved) than rFSH stimulation; 33% versus 51% (p?=?0.025) and 31% versus 49% (p?=?0.015) in the long agonist and antagonist protocol, respectively. In the potential high-responder women, trends for improved live birth rate were observed with HP-hMG compared with rFSH (long agonist protocol: 33% versus 20%, p?=?0.074; antagonist protocol: 34% versus 23%, p?=?0.075; overall population: 34% versus 22%, p?=?0.012). In conclusion, the type of gonadotropin used for ovarian stimulation influences high-response rates and potentially clinical outcome in women identified as potential high-responders. PMID:24576226

  20. Two novel mutations in glucocerebrosidase, C23W and IVS7-1 G>A, identified in Type 1 Gaucher patients heterozygous for N370S.

    PubMed

    Jack, Alexandria; Amato, Dominick; Morris, Geoffrey; Choy, Francis Y M

    2014-03-15

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity. There have been nearly 300 mutations described to date. Novel mutations can potentially provide insight into the biochemical basis of the disease. Two novel mutations are described in two Type 1 Gaucher patients with N370S compound heterozygosity; a point mutation that causes an amino acid substitution at cysteine residue 23 for tryptophan, and a second point mutation within the splicing element at the 3' end of intron 7. Both mutations were identified by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of patient glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was established for both novel mutations for efficient identification in future patients. Past literature suggests that mutations affecting cysteine residues involved in disulfide bridges, as well as mutations affecting splicing patterns of the glucocerebrosidase transcript, are detrimental to enzyme activity. However, compound heterozygosity with N370S, a mild mutation, will lead to a mild phenotype. The cases reported here support these past findings. PMID:24434810

  1. Protein corona of nanoparticles: distinct proteins regulate the cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Sandra; Schöttler, Susanne; Kotman, Niklas; Baier, Grit; Musyanovych, Anna; Kuharev, Jörg; Landfester, Katharina; Schild, Hansjörg; Jahn, Olaf; Tenzer, Stefan; Mailänder, Volker

    2015-04-13

    Understanding nanoparticle-protein interactions is a crucial issue in the development of targeted nanomaterial delivery. Besides unraveling the composition of the nanoparticle's protein coronas, distinct proteins thereof could control nanoparticle uptake into specific cell types. Here we differentially analyzed the protein corona composition on four polymeric differently functionalized nanoparticles by label-free quantitative mass spectrometry. Next, we correlated the relative abundance of identified proteins in the corona with enhanced or decreased cellular uptake of nanoparticles into human cancer and bone marrow stem cells to identify key candidates. Finally, we verified these candidate proteins by artificially decorating nanoparticles with individual proteins showing that nanoparticles precoated with the apolipoproteins ApoA4 or ApoC3 significantly decreased the cellular uptake, whereas precoating with ApoH increased the cellular uptake. PMID:25794196

  2. Allelic expression imbalance screening of genes in chromosome 1q21-24 region to identify functional variants for Type 2 diabetes susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Ashis K; Sharma, Neeraj K; Elbein, Steven C; Das, Swapan K

    2013-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D)-associated SNPs are more likely to be expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). The allelic expression imbalance (AEI) analysis is the measure of relative expression between two allelic transcripts and is the most sensitive measurement to detect cis-regulatory effects. We performed AEI screening to detect cis-regulators for genes expressed in transformed lymphocytes of 190 Caucasian (CA) and African American (AA) subjects to identify functional variants for T2D susceptibility in the chromosome 1q21-24 region of linkage. Among transcribed SNPs studied in 115 genes, significant AEI (P < 0.001) occurred in 28 and 30 genes in CA and AA subjects, respectively. Analysis of the effect of selected AEI-SNPs (?10% mean AEI) on total gene expression further established the cis-eQTLs in thioesterase superfamily member-4 (THEM4) (rs13320, P = 0.027), and IGSF8 (rs1131891, P = 0.02). Examination of published genome-wide association data identified significant associations (P < 0.01) of three AEI-SNPs with T2D in the DIAGRAM-v3 dataset. Six AEI single nucleotide polymorphisms, including rs13320 (P = 1.35E-04) in THEM4, were associated with glucose homeostasis traits in the MAGIC dataset. Evaluation of AEI-SNPs for association with glucose homeostasis traits in 611 nondiabetic subjects showed lower AIRG (P = 0.005) in those with TT/TC genotype for rs13320. THEM4 expression in adipose was higher (P = 0.005) in subjects carrying the T allele; in vitro analysis with luciferase construct confirmed the higher expression of the T allele. Resequencing of THEM4 exons in 192 CA subjects revealed four coding nonsynonymous variants, but did not explain transmission of T2D in 718 subjects from 67 Caucasian pedigrees. Our study indicates the role of a cis-regulatory SNP in THEM4 that may influence T2D predisposition by modulating glucose homeostasis. PMID:23673729

  3. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis of Human Pancreatic Islets from Type 2 Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Donors Identifies Candidate Genes That Influence Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Dayeh, Tasnim; Volkov, Petr; Salö, Sofia; Hall, Elin; Nilsson, Emma; Olsson, Anders H.; Kirkpatrick, Clare L.; Wollheim, Claes B.; Eliasson, Lena; Rönn, Tina; Bacos, Karl; Ling, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Impaired insulin secretion is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epigenetics may affect disease susceptibility. To describe the human methylome in pancreatic islets and determine the epigenetic basis of T2D, we analyzed DNA methylation of 479,927 CpG sites and the transcriptome in pancreatic islets from T2D and non-diabetic donors. We provide a detailed map of the global DNA methylation pattern in human islets, ?- and ?-cells. Genomic regions close to the transcription start site showed low degrees of methylation and regions further away from the transcription start site such as the gene body, 3?UTR and intergenic regions showed a higher degree of methylation. While CpG islands were hypomethylated, the surrounding 2 kb shores showed an intermediate degree of methylation, whereas regions further away (shelves and open sea) were hypermethylated in human islets, ?- and ?-cells. We identified 1,649 CpG sites and 853 genes, including TCF7L2, FTO and KCNQ1, with differential DNA methylation in T2D islets after correction for multiple testing. The majority of the differentially methylated CpG sites had an intermediate degree of methylation and were underrepresented in CpG islands (?7%) and overrepresented in the open sea (?60%). 102 of the differentially methylated genes, including CDKN1A, PDE7B, SEPT9 and EXOC3L2, were differentially expressed in T2D islets. Methylation of CDKN1A and PDE7B promoters in vitro suppressed their transcriptional activity. Functional analyses demonstrated that identified candidate genes affect pancreatic ?- and ?-cells as Exoc3l silencing reduced exocytosis and overexpression of Cdkn1a, Pde7b and Sept9 perturbed insulin and glucagon secretion in clonal ?- and ?-cells, respectively. Together, our data can serve as a reference methylome in human islets. We provide new target genes with altered DNA methylation and expression in human T2D islets that contribute to perturbed insulin and glucagon secretion. These results highlight the importance of epigenetics in the pathogenesis of T2D. PMID:24603685

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Alternative Thresholds of the Fasting Plasma Glucose Test to Identify the Target Population for Type 2 Diabetes Prevention in Adults Aged ?45 Years

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ping; Kahn, Henry S.; Gregg, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The study objective was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of alternative fasting plasma glucose (FPG) thresholds to identify adults at high risk for type 2 diabetes for diabetes preventive intervention. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used a validated simulation model to examine the change in lifetime quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and medical costs when the FPG threshold was progressively lowered in 5-mg/dL decrements from 120 to 90 mg/dL. The study sample includes nondiabetic adults aged ?45 years in the United States using 2006–2010 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. High-risk individuals were assumed to receive a lifestyle intervention, as that used in the Diabetes Prevention Program. We calculated cost per QALY by dividing the incremental cost by incremental QALY when lowering the threshold to the next consecutive level. Medical costs were assessed from a health care system perspective. We conducted univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness of the results using different simulation scenarios and parameters. RESULTS Progressively lowering the FPG threshold would monotonically increase QALYs, cost, and cost per QALY. Reducing (in 5-mg/dL decrements) the threshold from 120 to 90 mg/dL cost $30,100, $32,900, $42,300, $60,700, $81,800, and $115,800 per QALY gained, respectively. The costs per QALY gained were lower for all thresholds under a lower-cost and less-effective intervention scenario. CONCLUSIONS Lowering the FPG threshold leads to a greater health benefit of diabetes prevention but reduces the cost-effectiveness. Using the conventional benchmark of $50,000 per QALY, a threshold of 105 mg/dL or higher would be cost effective. A lower threshold could be selected if the intervention cost could be lowered. PMID:24135386

  5. The UV-filter benzophenone-1 inhibits 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3: Virtual screening as a strategy to identify potential endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nashev, Lyubomir G; Schuster, Daniela; Laggner, Christian; Sodha, Seloni; Langer, Thierry; Wolber, Gerhard; Odermatt, Alex

    2010-04-15

    The prevalence of male reproductive disorders and testicular cancer is steadily increasing. Because the exposure to chemicals disrupting natural hormone action has been associated with these diseases, it is important to identify endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their targets of action. Here, a 3D-structural database that can be applied for virtual screening approaches to facilitate the identification of EDCs was constructed. The database was screened using pharmacophores of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3 (17beta-HSD3), which catalyzes the last step of testosterone synthesis in testicular Leydig cells and plays an essential role during male sexual development. Among other chemicals, benzophenone (BP) UV-filters were predicted as potential 17beta-HSD3 inhibitors. Biological analyses revealed (2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-phenylmethanone (also known as benzophenone-1, BP-1) as an inhibitor of human 17beta-HSD3 (IC(50) 1.05microM). BP-1 also efficiently blocked conversion of androstenedione to testosterone by mouse and rat 17beta-HSD3 in whole-organ enzyme assays. Moreover, BP-1 antagonized the testosterone-dependent activation of androgen receptors (IC(50) 5.7microM), suggesting synergistic anti-androgenic effects of BP-1 by preventing testosterone formation and blocking receptor activation. In addition, analyses of several commonly used UV-filters on estrogen- and androgen-metabolizing 17beta-HSD enzymes revealed 3-benzylidene camphor (3-BC) and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) as low micromolar 17beta-HSD2 inhibitors. In conclusion, screening of virtual chemical structure libraries can facilitate the identification of compounds interfering with hormone action. The potential disruption of 17beta-HSD enzyme function by the UV-filters BP-1, 3-BC and 4-MBC requires further investigation and should be considered for safety assessment of these chemicals. PMID:20005209

  6. Genome-Wide Association Identifies Nine Common Variants Associated With Fasting Proinsulin Levels and Provides New Insights Into the Pathophysiology of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Strawbridge, Rona J.; Dupuis, Josée; Prokopenko, Inga; Barker, Adam; Ahlqvist, Emma; Rybin, Denis; Petrie, John R.; Travers, Mary E.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Dimas, Antigone S.; Nica, Alexandra; Wheeler, Eleanor; Chen, Han; Voight, Benjamin F.; Taneera, Jalal; Kanoni, Stavroula; Peden, John F.; Turrini, Fabiola; Gustafsson, Stefan; Zabena, Carina; Almgren, Peter; Barker, David J.P.; Barnes, Daniel; Dennison, Elaine M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Eriksson, Per; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Goel, Anuj; Gu, Harvest F.; Horikoshi, Momoko; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U.; Jameson, Karen A.; Kajantie, Eero; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Luan, Jian'an; Makrilakis, Konstantinos; Manning, Alisa K.; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; Narisu, Narisu; Nastase Mannila, Maria; Öhrvik, John; Osmond, Clive; Pascoe, Laura; Payne, Felicity; Sayer, Avan A.; Sennblad, Bengt; Silveira, Angela; Stan?áková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathy; Swift, Amy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van 't Hooft, Ferdinand M.; Walker, Mark; Weedon, Michael N.; Xie, Weijia; Zethelius, Björn; Ongen, Halit; Mälarstig, Anders; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Saleheen, Danish; Chambers, John; Parish, Sarah; Danesh, John; Kooner, Jaspal; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Lind, Lars; Cooper, Cyrus C.; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Ferrannini, Ele; Forsen, Tom J.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Froguel, Philippe; Johnson, Paul; Deloukas, Panos; Collins, Francis S.; Laakso, Markku; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Groop, Leif; Pattou, François; Gloyn, Anna L.; Dedoussis, George V.; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Meigs, James B.; Barroso, Inês; Watanabe, Richard M.; Ingelsson, Erik; Langenberg, Claudia; Hamsten, Anders; Florez, Jose C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Proinsulin is a precursor of mature insulin and C-peptide. Higher circulating proinsulin levels are associated with impaired ?-cell function, raised glucose levels, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Studies of the insulin processing pathway could provide new insights about T2D pathophysiology. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We have conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association tests of ?2.5 million genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and fasting proinsulin levels in 10,701 nondiabetic adults of European ancestry, with follow-up of 23 loci in up to 16,378 individuals, using additive genetic models adjusted for age, sex, fasting insulin, and study-specific covariates. RESULTS Nine SNPs at eight loci were associated with proinsulin levels (P < 5 × 10?8). Two loci (LARP6 and SGSM2) have not been previously related to metabolic traits, one (MADD) has been associated with fasting glucose, one (PCSK1) has been implicated in obesity, and four (TCF7L2, SLC30A8, VPS13C/C2CD4A/B, and ARAP1, formerly CENTD2) increase T2D risk. The proinsulin-raising allele of ARAP1 was associated with a lower fasting glucose (P = 1.7 × 10?4), improved ?-cell function (P = 1.1 × 10?5), and lower risk of T2D (odds ratio 0.88; P = 7.8 × 10?6). Notably, PCSK1 encodes the protein prohormone convertase 1/3, the first enzyme in the insulin processing pathway. A genotype score composed of the nine proinsulin-raising alleles was not associated with coronary disease in two large case-control datasets. CONCLUSIONS We have identified nine genetic variants associated with fasting proinsulin. Our findings illuminate the biology underlying glucose homeostasis and T2D development in humans and argue against a direct role of proinsulin in coronary artery disease pathogenesis. PMID:21873549

  7. Conditional meta-analysis stratifying on detailed HLA genotypes identifies a novel type 1 diabetes locus around TCF19 in the MHC

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yee Him; Watkinson, John

    2010-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 are the strongest genetic factors for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Additional loci in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are difficult to identify due to the region’s high gene density and complex linkage disequilibrium (LD). To facilitate the association analysis, two novel algorithms were implemented in this study: one for phasing the multi-allelic HLA genotypes in trio families, and one for partitioning the HLA strata in conditional testing. Screening and replication were performed on two large and independent datasets: the Wellcome Trust Case–Control Consortium (WTCCC) dataset of 2,000 cases and 1,504 controls, and the T1D Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) dataset of 2,300 nuclear families. After imputation, the two datasets have 1,941 common SNPs in the MHC, of which 22 were successfully tested and replicated based on the statistical testing stratifying on the detailed DRB1 and DQB1 genotypes. Further conditional tests using the combined dataset confirmed eight novel SNP associations around 31.3 Mb on chromosome 6 (rs3094663, p = 1.66 × 10?11 and rs2523619, p = 2.77 × 10?10 conditional on the DR/DQ genotypes). A subsequent LD analysis established TCF19, POU5F1, CCHCR1 and PSORS1C1 as potential causal genes for the observed association. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00439-010-0908-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21076979

  8. Comparative analysis of type 2 diabetes-associated SNP alleles identifies allele-specific DNA-binding proteins for the KCNQ1 locus.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Masaki; Udagawa, Haruhide; Watanabe, Atsushi; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Naoko; Kawaguchi, Miho; Uebanso, Takashi; Nishimura, Wataru; Nammo, Takao; Yasuda, Kazuki

    2015-07-01

    Although recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful, it remains a big challenge to functionally annotate disease?associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as the majority of these SNPs are located in non?coding regions of the genome. In this study, we described a novel strategy for identifying the proteins that bind to the SNP?containing locus in an allele?specific manner and successfully applied this method to SNPs in the type 2 diabetes mellitus susceptibility gene, potassium voltage?gated channel, KQT?like subfamily Q, member 1 (KCNQ1). DNA fragments encompassing SNPs, and risk or non?risk alleles were immobilized onto the novel nanobeads and DNA?binding proteins were purified from the nuclear extracts of pancreatic ? cells using these DNA?immobilized nanobeads. Comparative analysis of the allele-specific DNA-binding proteins indicated that the affinities of several proteins for the examined SNPs differed between the alleles. Nuclear transcription factor Y (NF?Y) specifically bound the non?risk allele of the SNP rs2074196 region and stimulated the transcriptional activity of an artificial promoter containing SNP rs2074196 in an allele?specific manner. These results suggest that SNP rs2074196 modulates the affinity of the locus for NF?Y and possibly induces subsequent changes in gene expression. The findings of this study indicate that our comparative method using novel nanobeads is effective for the identification of allele?specific DNA?binding proteins, which may provide important clues for the functional impact of disease?associated non?coding SNPs. PMID:25955334

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies a novel locus contributing to type 2 diabetes susceptibility in Sikhs of Punjabi origin from India.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Richa; Saleheen, Danish; Been, Latonya F; Garavito, Martha L; Braun, Timothy; Bjonnes, Andrew; Young, Robin; Ho, Weang Kee; Rasheed, Asif; Frossard, Philippe; Sim, Xueling; Hassanali, Neelam; Radha, Venkatesan; Chidambaram, Manickam; Liju, Samuel; Rees, Simon D; Ng, Daniel Peng-Keat; Wong, Tien-Yin; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Hara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Yasushi; Hirose, Hiroshi; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P; Basit, Abdul; Barnett, Anthony H; Katulanda, Prasad; Matthews, David; Mohan, Viswanathan; Wander, Gurpreet S; Singh, Jai Rup; Mehra, Narinder K; Ralhan, Sarju; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Mulvihill, John J; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Maeda, Shiro; Cho, Yoon S; Tai, E Shyong; Kelly, M Ann; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kadowaki, Takashi; Deloukas, Panos; Rader, Daniel J; Danesh, John; Sanghera, Dharambir K

    2013-05-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a multistage meta-analysis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Punjabi Sikhs from India. Our discovery GWAS in 1,616 individuals (842 case subjects) was followed by in silico replication of the top 513 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (P < 10?³) in Punjabi Sikhs (n = 2,819; 801 case subjects). We further replicated 66 SNPs (P < 10??) through genotyping in a Punjabi Sikh sample (n = 2,894; 1,711 case subjects). On combined meta-analysis in Sikh populations (n = 7,329; 3,354 case subjects), we identified a novel locus in association with T2D at 13q12 represented by a directly genotyped intronic SNP (rs9552911, P = 1.82 × 10??) in the SGCG gene. Next, we undertook in silico replication (stage 2b) of the top 513 signals (P < 10?³) in 29,157 non-Sikh South Asians (10,971 case subjects) and de novo genotyping of up to 31 top signals (P < 10??) in 10,817 South Asians (5,157 case subjects) (stage 3b). In combined South Asian meta-analysis, we observed six suggestive associations (P < 10?? to < 10??), including SNPs at HMG1L1/CTCFL, PLXNA4, SCAP, and chr5p11. Further evaluation of 31 top SNPs in 33,707 East Asians (16,746 case subjects) (stage 3c) and 47,117 Europeans (8,130 case subjects) (stage 3d), and joint meta-analysis of 128,127 individuals (44,358 case subjects) from 27 multiethnic studies, did not reveal any additional loci nor was there any evidence of replication for the new variant. Our findings provide new evidence on the presence of a population-specific signal in relation to T2D, which may provide additional insights into T2D pathogenesis. PMID:23300278

  10. Foundations of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaxe, Christiane A. M.

    This treatise on the theoretical and historical foundations of distinctive feature theory traces the evolution of the distinctive features concept in the context of related notions current in linguistic theory, discusses the evolution of individual distinctive features, and criticizes certain acoustic and perceptual correlates attributed to these…

  11. Identifying the seasonal origins of human campylobacteriosis

    PubMed Central

    STRACHAN, N. J. C.; ROTARIU, O.; SMITH-PALMER, A.; COWDEN, J.; SHEPPARD, S. K.; O’BRIEN, S. J.; MAIDEN, M. C. J.; MACRAE, M.; BESSELL, P. R.; MATTHEWS, L.; REID, S. W. J.; INNOCENT, G. T.; OGDEN, I. D.; FORBES, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human campylobacteriosis exhibits a distinctive seasonality in temperate regions. This paper aims to identify the origins of this seasonality. Clinical isolates [typed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST)] and epidemiological data were collected from Scotland. Young rural children were found to have an increased burden of disease in the late spring due to strains of non-chicken origin (e.g. ruminant and wild bird strains from environmental sources). In contrast the adult population had an extended summer peak associated with chicken strains. Travel abroad and UK mainland travel were associated with up to 17% and 18% of cases, respectively. International strains were associated with chicken, had a higher diversity than indigenous strains and a different spectrum of MLST types representative of these countries. Integrating empirical epidemiology and molecular subtyping can successfully elucidate the seasonal components of human campylobacteriosis. The findings will enable public health officials to focus strategies to reduce the disease burden. PMID:22989449

  12. An Islet-Targeted Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies Novel Genes Implicated in Cytokine-Mediated Islet Stress in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Poonam R; Mackey, Aaron J; Dejene, Eden A; Ramadan, James W; Langefeld, Carl D; Palmer, Nicholette D; Taylor, Kent D; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Watanabe, Richard M; Rich, Stephen S; Nunemaker, Craig S

    2015-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies in human type 2 diabetes (T2D) have renewed interest in the pancreatic islet as a contributor to T2D risk. Chronic low-grade inflammation resulting from obesity is a risk factor for T2D and a possible trigger of ?-cell failure. In this study, microarray data were collected from mouse islets after overnight treatment with cytokines at concentrations consistent with the chronic low-grade inflammation in T2D. Genes with a cytokine-induced change of >2-fold were then examined for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) using data from the Genetics Underlying Diabetes in Hispanics (GUARDIAN) Consortium. Significant evidence of association was found between AIRg and single nucleotide polymorphisms in Arap3 (5q31.3), F13a1 (6p25.3), Klhl6 (3q27.1), Nid1 (1q42.3), Pamr1 (11p13), Ripk2 (8q21.3), and Steap4 (7q21.12). To assess the potential relevance to islet function, mouse islets were exposed to conditions modeling low-grade inflammation, mitochondrial stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, glucotoxicity, and lipotoxicity. RT-PCR revealed that one or more forms of stress significantly altered expression levels of all genes except Arap3. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress up-regulated both Pamr1 and Klhl6. Three genes confirmed microarray predictions of significant cytokine sensitivity: F13a1 was down-regulated 3.3-fold by cytokines, Ripk2 was up-regulated 1.5- to 3-fold by all stressors, and Steap4 was profoundly cytokine sensitive (167-fold up-regulation). Three genes were thus closely associated with low-grade inflammation in murine islets and also with a marker for islet function (AIRg) in a diabetes-prone human population. This islet-targeted genome-wide association scan identified several previously unrecognized candidate genes related to islet dysfunction during the development of T2D. PMID:26018251

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies a Novel Locus Contributing to Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility in Sikhs of Punjabi Origin From India

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Richa; Saleheen, Danish; Been, Latonya F.; Garavito, Martha L.; Braun, Timothy; Bjonnes, Andrew; Young, Robin; Ho, Weang Kee; Rasheed, Asif; Frossard, Philippe; Sim, Xueling; Hassanali, Neelam; Radha, Venkatesan; Chidambaram, Manickam; Liju, Samuel; Rees, Simon D.; Ng, Daniel Peng-Keat; Wong, Tien-Yin; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Hara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Yasushi; Hirose, Hiroshi; McCarthy, Mark I.; Morris, Andrew P.; Basit, Abdul; Barnett, Anthony H.; Katulanda, Prasad; Matthews, David; Mohan, Viswanathan; Wander, Gurpreet S.; Singh, Jai Rup; Mehra, Narinder K.; Ralhan, Sarju; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Mulvihill, John J.; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Maeda, Shiro; Cho, Yoon S.; Tai, E. Shyong; Kelly, M. Ann; Chambers, John C.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kadowaki, Takashi; Deloukas, Panos; Rader, Daniel J.; Danesh, John; Sanghera, Dharambir K.

    2013-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a multistage meta-analysis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Punjabi Sikhs from India. Our discovery GWAS in 1,616 individuals (842 case subjects) was followed by in silico replication of the top 513 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (P < 10?3) in Punjabi Sikhs (n = 2,819; 801 case subjects). We further replicated 66 SNPs (P < 10?4) through genotyping in a Punjabi Sikh sample (n = 2,894; 1,711 case subjects). On combined meta-analysis in Sikh populations (n = 7,329; 3,354 case subjects), we identified a novel locus in association with T2D at 13q12 represented by a directly genotyped intronic SNP (rs9552911, P = 1.82 × 10?8) in the SGCG gene. Next, we undertook in silico replication (stage 2b) of the top 513 signals (P < 10?3) in 29,157 non-Sikh South Asians (10,971 case subjects) and de novo genotyping of up to 31 top signals (P < 10?4) in 10,817 South Asians (5,157 case subjects) (stage 3b). In combined South Asian meta-analysis, we observed six suggestive associations (P < 10?5 to < 10?7), including SNPs at HMG1L1/CTCFL, PLXNA4, SCAP, and chr5p11. Further evaluation of 31 top SNPs in 33,707 East Asians (16,746 case subjects) (stage 3c) and 47,117 Europeans (8,130 case subjects) (stage 3d), and joint meta-analysis of 128,127 individuals (44,358 case subjects) from 27 multiethnic studies, did not reveal any additional loci nor was there any evidence of replication for the new variant. Our findings provide new evidence on the presence of a population-specific signal in relation to T2D, which may provide additional insights into T2D pathogenesis. PMID:23300278

  14. Multilocus Sequence Typing Confirms the Close Genetic Interrelatedness of Three Distinct Flavescence Dorée Phytoplasma Strain Clusters and Group 16SrV Phytoplasmas Infecting Grapevine and Alder in Europe?

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Guillaume; Malembic-Maher, Sylvie; Salar, Pascal; Bonnet, Patrick; Maixner, Michael; Marcone, Carmine; Boudon-Padieu, Elisabeth; Foissac, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Vineyards of southern France and northern Italy are affected by the flavescence dorée (FD) phytoplasma, a quarantine pathogen transmitted by the leafhopper of Nearctic origin Scaphoideus titanus. To better trace propagation of FD strains and identify possible passage between the vineyard and wild plant compartments, molecular typing of phytoplasma strains was applied. The sequences of the two genetic loci map and uvrB-degV, along with the sequence of the secY gene, were determined among a collection of FD and FD-related phytoplasmas infecting grapevine, alder, elm, blackberry, and Spanish broom in Europe. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses consistently indicated the existence of three FD phytoplasma strain clusters. Strain cluster FD1 (comprising isolate FD70) displayed low variability and represented 17% of the disease cases in the French vineyard, with a higher incidence of the cases in southwestern France. Strain cluster FD2 (comprising isolates FD92 and FD-D) displayed no variability and was detected both in France (83% of the cases) and in Italy, whereas the more-variable strain cluster FD3 (comprising isolate FD-C) was detected only in Italy. The clonal property of FD2 and its wide distribution are consistent with diffusion through propagation of infected-plant material. German Palatinate grapevine yellows phytoplasmas (PGY) appeared variable and were often related to some of the alder phytoplasmas (AldY) detected in Italy and France. Finally, phylogenetic analyses concluded that FD, PGY, and AldY were members of the same phylogenetic subclade, which may have originated in Europe. PMID:17468266

  15. A multilabel model based on Chou's pseudo-amino acid composition for identifying membrane proteins with both single and multiple functional types.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Yuan, Jing-Qi

    2013-04-01

    Predicting membrane protein type is a meaningful task because this kind of information is very useful to explain the function of membrane proteins. Due to the explosion of new protein sequences discovered, it is highly desired to develop efficient computation tools for quickly and accurately predicting the membrane type for a given protein sequence. Even though several membrane predictors have been developed, they can only deal with the membrane proteins which belong to the single membrane type. The fact is that there are membrane proteins belonging to two or more than two types. To solve this problem, a system for predicting membrane protein sequences with single or multiple types is proposed. Pseudo-amino acid composition, which has proven to be a very efficient tool in representing protein sequences, and a multilabel KNN algorithm are used to compose this prediction engine. The results of this initial study are encouraging. PMID:23546013

  16. VSEAMS: A pipeline for variant set enrichment analysis using summary GWAS data identifies IKZF3, BATF and ESRRA as key transcription factors in type 1 diabetes

    E-print Network

    Burren, Oliver S.; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris

    2014-08-27

    Motivation: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many loci implicated in disease susceptibility. Integration of GWAS summary statistics (P-values) and functional genomic datasets should help to elucidate mechanisms. Results: We...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Oleiagrimonas soli 3.5XT, a Type Species in a Newly Identified Genus, Isolated from an Oil Field in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Fang, Tingting; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Oleiagrimonas gudaosoli 3.5X(T) was isolated from an oil field and identified as a new member of a novel genus. The draft genome sequence of this strain, which comprises 3,379,958 bp encoding 3,010 open reading frames (ORFs), can provide insight into the life style of this newly identified genus in petroleum-contaminated soil. PMID:25977438

  18. Chemistry & Biology Distinct Structural Elements Dictate the Specificity

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Article Distinct Structural Elements Dictate the Specificity of the Type III, we have determined the crystal structures of ORAS to 1.75 A° resolution, the Phe-252/Gly site. The structures reveal a distinct rearrangement of structural elements near the active site that allows

  19. Listening and Questioning: The "Apophatic/Cataphatic" Distinction Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waks, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    In an earlier article I drew a distinction between two general types of listening. In one the listener brings pre-determined categories to bear in extracting useful information from the speaker's utterance. In the other the listener suspends such categories to hear as much as possible in the utterance. This distinction has been challenged by…

  20. Adult Lineage-Restricted CNS Progenitors Specify Distinct Glioblastoma Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Alcantara Llaguno, Sheila R; Wang, Zilai; Sun, Daochun; Chen, Jian; Xu, Jing; Kim, Euiseok; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Raisanen, Jack M; Burns, Dennis K; Johnson, Jane E; Parada, Luis F

    2015-10-12

    A central question in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) research is the identity of the tumor-initiating cell, and its contribution to the malignant phenotype and genomic state. We examine the potential of adult lineage-restricted progenitors to induce fully penetrant GBM using CNS progenitor-specific inducible Cre mice to mutate Nf1, Trp53, and Pten. We identify two phenotypically and molecularly distinct GBM subtypes governed by identical driver mutations. We demonstrate that the two subtypes arise from functionally independent pools of adult CNS progenitors. Despite histologic identity as GBM, these tumor types are separable based on the lineage of the tumor-initiating cell. These studies point to the cell of origin as a major determinant of GBM subtype diversity. PMID:26461091

  1. Is Face Distinctiveness Gender Based?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Gallay, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study the role of gender category in evaluations of face distinctiveness. In Experiment 1, participants had to evaluate the distinctiveness and the femininity-masculinity of real or artificial composite faces. The composite faces were created by blending either faces of the same gender (sexed composite faces,…

  2. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  3. A 1-year lifestyle intervention for weight loss in individuals with type 2 diabetes reduces high C-reactive protein levels and identifies metabolic predictors of change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: We examined whether a 1-year intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss reduced elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in obese individuals with diabetes and identified metabolic and fitness predictors of hs-CRP change. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Look A...

  4. PROJECT SUMMARY/ABSTRACT More than 27 million Americans suffer from Type 2 diabetes (T2D). GWAS have identified 128 lead SNPs

    E-print Network

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    PROJECT SUMMARY/ABSTRACT More than 27 million Americans suffer from Type 2 diabetes (T2D). GWAS characterizing variants found in GWAS is that each lead SNP directly associated with a trait is in LD2D GWAS data and test variants for their gene regulatory function. In Aim 1 we will analyze 5

  5. Keyword Thesaurus. A List of Terms and Codes to Identify Areas of Interest for Research and Other Types of Sponsored Programs. Keyword Thesaurus Project Update for New Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodman, John A.

    This list of program types and keywords (with codes) was prepared for program officers at the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Institute of Education, and the National Science Foundation to use when preparing program announcements and requests for proposals. Staff persons responsible for screening such documents at colleges and…

  6. PATHOGENIC AND ANTIGENIC PROPERTIES OF PHYLOGENETICALLY DISTINCT REASSORTANT H3N2 SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUSES CO-CIRCULATING IN THE UNITED STATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine influenza is an acute respiratory disease caused by type A influenza viruses. Before 1998, swine influenza isolates in the U.S. were mainly of the classical H1N1 lineage. Since then, phylogenetically distinct reassortant H3N2 viruses have been identified as respiratory pathogens in pigs on U.S...

  7. Emergence of a New Lineage of Dengue Virus Type 2 Identified in Travelers Entering Western Australia from Indonesia, 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Timo; McCarthy, Suzi; Chidlow, Glenys; Luang-Suarkia, Dagwin; Holmes, Edward C.; Smith, David W.; Imrie, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) transmission is ubiquitous throughout the tropics. More than 70% of the current global dengue disease burden is borne by people who live in the Asia-Pacific region. We sequenced the E gene of DENV isolated from travellers entering Western Australia between 2010–2012, most of whom visited Indonesia, and identified a diverse array of DENV1-4, including multiple co-circulating viral lineages. Most viruses were closely related to lineages known to have circulated in Indonesia for some time, indicating that this geographic region serves as a major hub for dengue genetic diversity. Most notably, we identified a new lineage of DENV-2 (Cosmopolitan genotype) that emerged in Bali in 2011–2012. The spread of this lineage should clearly be monitored. Surveillance of symptomatic returned travellers provides important and timely information on circulating DENV serotypes and genotypes, and can reveal the herald wave of dengue and other emerging infectious diseases. PMID:25635775

  8. Identifying Type IIn supernova progenitors in our Galaxy: the circumstellar environment of the Galactic luminous blue variable candidate Gal 026.47+0.02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Trigilio, C.; Buemi, C. S.; Leto, P.; Agliozzo, C.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Flagey, N.; Paladini, R.; Molinari, S.

    2012-12-01

    New data from the Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) and the Expanded Very Large Array, together with ancillary multifrequency data from different archives, have provided a comprehensive picture of the circumstellar envelope (CSE) surrounding the Galactic luminous blue variable (LBV) candidate Gal 026.47+0.02. The high angular resolution of both the 70-?m and 6-cm maps has allowed us to appreciate finest details of the nebula, whose morphology is consistent with a series of nested tori. The inner torus, which is close to the central object, is fully ionized, indicating events of aspherical mass loss. We have derived the physical properties of the CSE, including, in particular, one of the highest current-day mass losses from the central object and a very massive nebula, which consists of, at least, 17 M? of ionized gas, with 1.2-3.2 × 10-2 M? in the form of dust. Altogether, the physical properties of Gal 026.47+0.02, including a very high stellar luminosity, point towards a very massive progenitor on the main sequence. According to the current models for Type IIn supernovae, the CSEs associated with possible progenitors have well constrained properties in both content and morphology. The derived physical characteristics of the nebula associated with Gal 026.47+0.02 actually satisfy all such requirements, providing some observational evidence of a direct link between a LBV and a possible Type IIn supernova.

  9. Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum in the Czech Republic during 2011 to 2013: Increased Prevalence of Identified Genotypes and of Isolates with Macrolide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Grillová, Linda; P?trošová, Helena; Mikalová, Lenka; Strnadel, Radim; Dastychová, Eliška; Kuklová, Ivana; Kojanová, Martina; Kreidlová, Miluše; Va?ousová, Daniela; Hercogová, Jana; Procházka, P?emysl; Zákoucká, Hana; Krch?áková, Alena; Vašk?, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, a total of 262 samples, from 188 patients suspected of having syphilis were tested for the presence of treponemal DNA by PCR amplification of five chromosomal loci, including the polA (TP0105), tmpC (TP0319), TP0136, TP0548, and 23S rRNA genes. Altogether, 146 samples from 103 patients were PCR positive for treponemal DNA. A set of 81 samples from 62 PCR-positive patients were typeable, and among them, nine different genotypes were identified. Compared to a previous study in the Czech Republic during 2004 to 2010, the number of genotypes detected among syphilis patients in a particular year increased to six in both 2012 and 2013, although they were not the same six. The proportion of macrolide-resistant clinical isolates in this 3-year study was 66.7%. PMID:25100820

  10. Complexity in the tumour microenvironment: Cancer associated fibroblast gene expression patterns identify both common and unique features of tumour-stroma crosstalk across cancer types.

    PubMed

    Gandellini, Paolo; Andriani, Francesca; Merlino, Giuseppe; D'Aiuto, Francesca; Roz, Luca; Callari, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Cancer is a complex disease, driven by the accumulation of several somatic aberrations but fostered by a two-way interaction between tumour cells and the surrounding microenvironment. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent one of the major players in tumour-stroma crosstalk. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies, often conducted by employing high throughput approaches, have started unravelling the key pathways involved in their functional effects. This review focus on open challenges in the study of CAF properties and function, highlighting at the same time the existence of common mechanisms as well as peculiarities in different cancer types (breast, prostate and lung cancer). Although still limited by current experimental models, which are unable to deal with the full level of complexity of the tumour microenvironment, a better understanding of these mechanisms may enable the identification of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets, to improve current strategies for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26320408

  11. Functional Properties of a Newly Identified C-terminal Splice Variant of Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Gabriella; Gebhart, Mathias; Scharinger, Anja; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Busquet, Perrine; Poggiani, Chiara; Sartori, Simone; Mangoni, Matteo E.; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Herzig, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    An intramolecular interaction between a distal (DCRD) and a proximal regulatory domain (PCRD) within the C terminus of long Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels (Cav1.3L) is a major determinant of their voltage- and Ca2+-dependent gating kinetics. Removal of these regulatory domains by alternative splicing generates Cav1.342A channels that activate at a more negative voltage range and exhibit more pronounced Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Here we describe the discovery of a novel short splice variant (Cav1.343S) that is expressed at high levels in the brain but not in the heart. It lacks the DCRD but, in contrast to Cav1.342A, still contains PCRD. When expressed together with ?2?1 and ?3 subunits in tsA-201 cells, Cav1.343S also activated at more negative voltages like Cav1.342A but Ca2+-dependent inactivation was less pronounced. Single channel recordings revealed much higher channel open probabilities for both short splice variants as compared with Cav1.3L. The presence of the proximal C terminus in Cav1.343S channels preserved their modulation by distal C terminus-containing Cav1.3- and Cav1.2-derived C-terminal peptides. Removal of the C-terminal modulation by alternative splicing also induced a faster decay of Ca2+ influx during electrical activities mimicking trains of neuronal action potentials. Our findings extend the spectrum of functionally diverse Cav1.3 L-type channels produced by tissue-specific alternative splicing. This diversity may help to fine tune Ca2+ channel signaling and, in the case of short variants lacking a functional C-terminal modulation, prevent excessive Ca2+ accumulation during burst firing in neurons. This may be especially important in neurons that are affected by Ca2+-induced neurodegenerative processes. PMID:21998310

  12. An NF-?B-Based High-Throughput Screen Identifies Piericidins as Inhibitors of the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Miles C.; Wong, Weng Ruh; Dupzyk, Allison J.; Bray, Walter M.; Linington, Roger G.

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a bacterial appendage used by dozens of Gram-negative pathogens to subvert host defenses and cause disease, making it an ideal target for pathogen-specific antimicrobials. Here, we report the discovery and initial characterization of two related natural products with T3SS-inhibitory activity that were derived from a marine actinobacterium. Bacterial extracts containing piericidin A1 and the piericidin derivative Mer-A 2026B inhibited Yersinia pseudotuberculosis from triggering T3SS-dependent activation of the host transcription factor NF-?B in HEK293T cells but were not toxic to mammalian cells. As the Yersinia T3SS must be functional in order to trigger NF-?B activation, these data indicate that piericidin A1 and Mer-A 2026B block T3SS function. Consistent with this, purified piericidin A1 and Mer-A 2026B dose-dependently inhibited translocation of the Y. pseudotuberculosis T3SS effector protein YopM inside CHO cells. In contrast, neither compound perturbed bacterial growth in vitro, indicating that piericidin A1 and Mer-A 2026B do not function as general antibiotics in Yersinia. In addition, when Yersinia was incubated under T3SS-inducing culture conditions in the absence of host cells, Mer-A 2026B and piericidin A1 inhibited secretion of T3SS cargo as effectively as or better than several previously described T3SS inhibitors, such as MBX-1641 and aurodox. This suggests that Mer-A 2026B and piericidin A1 do not block type III secretion by blocking the bacterium-host cell interaction, but rather inhibit an earlier stage, such as T3SS needle assembly. In summary, the marine-derived natural products Mer-A 2026B and piericidin A1 possess previously uncharacterized activity against the bacterial T3SS. PMID:24295981

  13. A Multi-Omics Approach Identifies Key Hubs Associated with Cell Type-Specific Responses of Airway Epithelial Cells to Staphylococcal Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Harms, Manuela; Ventz, Katharina; Gierok, Philipp; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2015-01-01

    Responsiveness of cells to alpha-toxin (Hla) from Staphylococcus aureus appears to occur in a cell-type dependent manner. Here, we compare two human bronchial epithelial cell lines, i.e. Hla-susceptible 16HBE14o- and Hla-resistant S9 cells, by a quantitative multi-omics strategy for a better understanding of Hla-induced cellular programs. Phosphoproteomics revealed a substantial impact on phosphorylation-dependent signaling in both cell models and highlights alterations in signaling pathways associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts as well as the actin cytoskeleton as key features of early rHla-induced effects. Along comparable changes in down-stream activity of major protein kinases significant differences between both models were found upon rHla-treatment including activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and mitogen-activated protein kinases MAPK1/3 signaling in S9 and repression in 16HBE14o- cells. System-wide transcript and protein expression profiling indicate induction of an immediate early response in either model. In addition, EGFR and MAPK1/3-mediated changes in gene expression suggest cellular recovery and survival in S9 cells but cell death in 16HBE14o- cells. Strikingly, inhibition of the EGFR sensitized S9 cells to Hla indicating that the cellular capacity of activation of the EGFR is a major protective determinant against Hla-mediated cytotoxic effects. PMID:25816343

  14. Intrinsic defects in erythroid cells from familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 5 patients identify a role for STXBP2/Munc18-2 in erythropoiesis and phospholipid scrambling.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Elena B; Beuger, Boukje M; Veldthuis, Martijn; van der Werff Ten Bosch, Jutte; Kühnle, Ingrid; van den Akker, Emile; van den Berg, Timo K; van Zwieten, Rob; van Bruggen, Robin

    2015-12-01

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 5 (FHL-5) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in STXBP2/Munc18-2. Munc18-2 plays a role in the degranulation machinery of natural killer cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Mutations in STXBP2/Munc18-2 lead to impaired killing of target cells by natural killer cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in turn results in elevated levels of the inflammatory cytokine interferon ?, macrophage activation, and hemophagocytosis. Even though patients with FHL-5 present with anemia and hemolysis, no link between the disease and the erythroid lineage has been established. Here we report that red blood cells express Munc18-2 and that erythroid cells from patients with FHL-5 exhibit intrinsic defects caused by STXBP2/Munc18-2 mutations. Red blood cells from patients with FHL-5 expose less phosphatidylserine on their surface upon Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin treatment. Furthermore, cultured erythroblasts from patients with FHL-5 display defective erythropoiesis characterized by decreased CD235a expression and aberrant cell morphology. PMID:26320718

  15. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies an Adult-onset Case of Methylmalonic Aciduria and Homocystinuria Type C (cblC) with Non-syndromic Bull’s Eye Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Collison, Frederick T.; Xie, Yajing (Angela); Gambin, Tomasz; Jhangiani, Shalini; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard; Lupski, James R.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Allikmets, Rando

    2015-01-01

    Background Methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C (cblC), a disorder of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) metabolism caused by mutations in the MMACHC gene, presents with many systemic symptoms, including neurological, cognitive, psychiatric, and thromboembolic events. Retinal phenotypes, including maculopathy, pigmentary retinopathy, and optic atrophy are common in early onset form of the disease but are rare in adult onset forms. Materials and Methods An adult Hispanic female presented with decreased central vision, bilateral pericentral ring scotomas and bull’s eye-appearing macular lesions at 28 years of age. Her medical history was otherwise unremarkable except for iron deficiency anemia and both urinary tract and kidney infections. Screening of the ABCA4 gene, mutations in which frequently cause bull’s eye maculopathy, was negative. Subsequently, analysis with whole exome sequencing was performed. Results Whole exome sequencing discovered compound heterozygous mutations in MMACHC, c.G482A:p.Arg161Gln and c.270_271insA:p.Arg91Lysfs*14, which segregated with the disease in the family. The genetic diagnosis was confirmed by biochemical laboratory testing, showing highly elevated urine methylmalonic acid/creatinine and homocysteine levels, and suggesting disease management with hydroxycobalamin injections and carnitine supplementation. Conclusions In summary, a unique case of an adult patient with bull’s eye macular lesions and no clinically relevant systemic symptoms was diagnosed with cblC by genetic screening and follow-up biochemical laboratory tests. PMID:25687216

  16. Lasing and polariton condensation: Two distinct transitions in GaAs microcavities with stress traps

    SciTech Connect

    Nelsen, B.; Balili, R.; Snoke, D. W.; Pfeiffer, L.; West, K.

    2009-06-15

    We have used stress to create a harmonic potential for polaritons in GaAs microcavities and have previously reported that the polaritons undergo spontaneous coherence in the trap. In this paper we present results for both trapped conditions and resonant, nontrapped conditions in the same sample. We find that the results are qualitatively different with two distinct types of transitions. At low density in the trap, the polaritons remain in the strong coupling regime while going through the threshold for onset of coherence; at higher density, there is a different threshold behavior, which occurs with weak coupling and can be identified with lasing; this transition occurs both with and without a trap. The transition at lower density can therefore be identified as a type of nonequilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation.

  17. Shining Light on the Differences in Molecular Structural Chemical Makeup and the Cause of Distinct Degradation Behavior Between Malting- and Feed- Type Barley Using Synchrotorn FTIR Microspectroscopy: A Novel Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.; Doiron, K.; Liu, D.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use advanced synchrotron-sourced FTIR microspectroscopy (SFTIRM) as a novel approach to identify the differences in protein and carbohydrate molecular structure (chemical makeup) between these two varieties of barley and illustrate the exact causes for their significantly different degradation kinetics. Items assessed included (1) molecular structural differences in protein amide I to amide II intensities and their ratio within cellular dimensions, (2) molecular structural differences in protein secondary structure profile and their ratios, and (3) molecular structural differences in carbohydrate component peak profile. Our hypothesis was that molecular structure (chemical makeup) affects barley quality, fermentation, and degradation behavior in both humans and animals. Using SFTIRM, the protein and carbohydrate molecular structural chemical makeup of barley was revealed and identified. The protein molecular structural chemical makeup differed significantly between the two varieties of barleys. No difference in carbohydrate molecular structural chemical makeup was detected. Harrington was lower than Valier in protein amide I, amide II, and protein amide I to amide II ratio, while Harrington was relatively higher in model-fitted protein a-helix and {beta}-sheet, but lower in the others ({beta}-turn and random coil). These results indicated that it is the molecular structure of protein (chemical makeup) that may play a major role in the different degradation kinetics between the two varieties of barleys (not the molecular structure of carbohydrate). It is believed that use of the advanced synchrotron technology will make a significant step and an important contribution to research in examining the molecular structure (chemical makeup) of plant, feed, and seeds.

  18. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C; Sampson, Joshua N; Hoskins, Jason W; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S; Abnet, Christian C; Adjei, Andrew A; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Berg, Christine D; Berndt, Sonja I; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Chu, Lisa W; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A; Colt, Joanne S; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B; Cortessis, Victoria K; Crawford, E David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W Ryan; Duell, Eric J; Elena, Joanne W; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fridley, Brooke L; Fuchs, Charles S; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Gaziano, J Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S; Giffen, Carol A; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Harris, Curtis C; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J; Inskip, Peter D; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Meltzer, Paul S; Mensah, James E; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S; Mondul, Alison M; Moore, Lee E; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart

    2014-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  19. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S.; Abnet, Christian C.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Berg, Christine D.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A.; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Chu, Lisa W.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A.; Colt, Joanne S.; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Crawford, E. David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P.; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W. Ryan; Duell, Eric J.; Elena, Joanne W.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Giffen, Carol A.; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H.; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H. Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B.; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E.; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W.; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J.; Inskip, Peter D.; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P.; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C.; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P.; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mensah, James E.; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mondul, Alison M.; Moore, Lee E.; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H.; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V.; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10?39; Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10?36 and PConditional = 2.36 × 10?8; Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10?12 and PConditional = 5.19 × 10?6, Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10?6; and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10?15 and PConditional = 5.35 × 10?7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10?18 and PConditional = 7.06 × 10?16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  20. Distinct dopamine neurons mediate reward signals for short- and long-term memories

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Aso, Yoshinori; Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Friedrich, Anja B.; Sima, Richard J.; Preat, Thomas; Rubin, Gerald M.; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster can acquire a stable appetitive olfactory memory when the presentation of a sugar reward and an odor are paired. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which a single training induces long-term memory are poorly understood. Here we show that two distinct subsets of dopamine neurons in the fly brain signal reward for short-term (STM) and long-term memories (LTM). One subset induces memory that decays within several hours, whereas the other induces memory that gradually develops after training. They convey reward signals to spatially segregated synaptic domains of the mushroom body (MB), a potential site for convergence. Furthermore, we identified a single type of dopamine neuron that conveys the reward signal to restricted subdomains of the mushroom body lobes and induces long-term memory. Constant appetitive memory retention after a single training session thus comprises two memory components triggered by distinct dopamine neurons. PMID:25548178

  1. Spatially Distinct Neutrophil Responses within the Inflammatory Lesions of Pneumonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Stasulli, Nikolas M.; Eichelberger, Kara R.; Price, Paul A.; Pechous, Roger D.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Parker, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During pneumonic plague, the bacterium Yersinia pestis elicits the development of inflammatory lung lesions that continue to expand throughout infection. This lesion development and persistence are poorly understood. Here, we examine spatially distinct regions of lung lesions using laser capture microdissection and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis to identify transcriptional differences between lesion microenvironments. We show that cellular pathways involved in leukocyte migration and apoptosis are downregulated in the center of lung lesions compared to the periphery. Probing for the bacterial factor(s) important for the alteration in neutrophil survival, we show both in vitro and in vivo that Y. pestis increases neutrophil survival in a manner that is dependent on the type III secretion system effector YopM. This research explores the complexity of spatially distinct host-microbe interactions and emphasizes the importance of cell relevance in assays in order to fully understand Y. pestis virulence. PMID:26463167

  2. Distinct dopamine neurons mediate reward signals for short- and long-term memories.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Aso, Yoshinori; Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Friedrich, Anja B; Sima, Richard J; Preat, Thomas; Rubin, Gerald M; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2015-01-13

    Drosophila melanogaster can acquire a stable appetitive olfactory memory when the presentation of a sugar reward and an odor are paired. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which a single training induces long-term memory are poorly understood. Here we show that two distinct subsets of dopamine neurons in the fly brain signal reward for short-term (STM) and long-term memories (LTM). One subset induces memory that decays within several hours, whereas the other induces memory that gradually develops after training. They convey reward signals to spatially segregated synaptic domains of the mushroom body (MB), a potential site for convergence. Furthermore, we identified a single type of dopamine neuron that conveys the reward signal to restricted subdomains of the mushroom body lobes and induces long-term memory. Constant appetitive memory retention after a single training session thus comprises two memory components triggered by distinct dopamine neurons. PMID:25548178

  3. Distinctiveness Maps for Image Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Tomasi, Carlo

    2000-01-01

    Stereo correspondence is hard because different image features can look alike. We propose a measure for the ambiguity of image points that allows matching distinctive points first and breaks down the matching task into smaller and separate subproblems. Experiments with an algorithm based on this measure demonstrate the ensuing efficiency and low likelihood of incorrect matches.

  4. Eye movements reveal distinct encoding patterns for number and cumulative surface area in random dot arrays

    PubMed Central

    Odic, Darko; Halberda, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Humans can quickly and intuitively represent the number of objects in a scene using visual evidence through the Approximate Number System (ANS). But the computations that support the encoding of visual number—the transformation from the retinal input into ANS representations—remain controversial. Two types of number encoding theories have been proposed: those arguing that number is encoded through a dedicated, enumeration computation, and those arguing that visual number is inferred from nonnumber specific visual features, such as surface area, density, convex hull, etc. Here, we attempt to adjudicate between these two theories by testing participants on both a number and a cumulative area task while also tracking their eye-movements. We hypothesize that if approximate number and surface area depend on distinct encoding computations, saccadic signatures should be distinct for the two tasks, even if the visual stimuli are identical. Consistent with this hypothesis, we find that discriminating number versus cumulative area modulates both where participants look (i.e., participants spend more time looking at the more numerous set in the number task and the larger set in the cumulative area task), and how participants look (i.e., cumulative area encoding shows fewer, longer saccades, while number encoding shows many short saccades and many switches between targets). We further identify several saccadic signatures that are associated with task difficulty and correct versus incorrect trials for both dimensions. These results suggest distinct encoding algorithms for number and cumulative area extraction, and thereby distinct representations of these dimensions. PMID:26575191

  5. Eye movements reveal distinct encoding patterns for number and cumulative surface area in random dot arrays.

    PubMed

    Odic, Darko; Halberda, Justin

    2015-11-01

    Humans can quickly and intuitively represent the number of objects in a scene using visual evidence through the Approximate Number System (ANS). But the computations that support the encoding of visual number-the transformation from the retinal input into ANS representations-remain controversial. Two types of number encoding theories have been proposed: those arguing that number is encoded through a dedicated, enumeration computation, and those arguing that visual number is inferred from nonnumber specific visual features, such as surface area, density, convex hull, etc. Here, we attempt to adjudicate between these two theories by testing participants on both a number and a cumulative area task while also tracking their eye-movements. We hypothesize that if approximate number and surface area depend on distinct encoding computations, saccadic signatures should be distinct for the two tasks, even if the visual stimuli are identical. Consistent with this hypothesis, we find that discriminating number versus cumulative area modulates both where participants look (i.e., participants spend more time looking at the more numerous set in the number task and the larger set in the cumulative area task), and how participants look (i.e., cumulative area encoding shows fewer, longer saccades, while number encoding shows many short saccades and many switches between targets). We further identify several saccadic signatures that are associated with task difficulty and correct versus incorrect trials for both dimensions. These results suggest distinct encoding algorithms for number and cumulative area extraction, and thereby distinct representations of these dimensions. PMID:26575191

  6. Distinct Humoral and Cellular Immunity Induced by Alternating Prime-boost Vaccination Using Plasmid DNA and Live Viral Vector Vaccines Expressing the E Protein of Dengue Virus Type 2

    PubMed Central

    George, Junu A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue virus, which belongs to the Flavivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family, causes fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) with infection risk of 2.5 billion people worldwide. However, approved vaccines are still not available. Here, we explored the immune responses induced by alternating prime-boost vaccination using DNA vaccine, adenovirus, and vaccinia virus expressing E protein of dengue virus type 2 (DenV2). Methods Following immunization with DNA vaccine (pDE), adenovirus (rAd-E), and/or vaccinia virus (VV-E) expressing E protein, E protein-specific IgG and its isotypes were determined by conventional ELISA. Intracellular CD154 and cytokine staining was used for enumerating CD4+ T cells specific for E protein. E protein-specific CD8+ T cell responses were evaluated by in vivo CTL killing activity and intracellular IFN-? staining. Results Among three constructs, VV-E induced the most potent IgG responses, Th1-type cytokine production by stimulated CD4+ T cells, and the CD8+ T cell response. Furthermore, when the three constructs were used for alternating prime-boost vaccination, the results revealed a different pattern of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. i) Priming with VV-E induced higher E-specific IgG level but it was decreased rapidly. ii) Strong CD8+ T cell responses specific for E protein were induced when VV-E was used for the priming step, and such CD8+ T cell responses were significantly boosted with pDE. iii) Priming with rAd-E induced stronger CD4+ T cell responses which subsequently boosted with pDE to a greater extent than VV-E and rAd-E. Conclusion These results indicate that priming with live viral vector vaccines could induce different patterns of E protein- specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses which were significantly enhanced by booster vaccination with the DNA vaccine. Therefore, our observation will provide valuable information for the establishment of optimal prime-boost vaccination against DenV. PMID:22194710

  7. Human CD45RA(-) FoxP3(hi) Memory-Type Regulatory T Cells Show Distinct TCR Repertoires With Conventional T Cells and Play an Important Role in Controlling Early Immune Activation.

    PubMed

    Lei, H; Kuchenbecker, L; Streitz, M; Sawitzki, B; Vogt, K; Landwehr-Kenzel, S; Millward, J; Juelke, K; Babel, N; Neumann, A; Reinke, P; Volk, H-D

    2015-10-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with regulatory T cells (Treg) is a new option to promote immune tolerance following solid organ transplantation (SOT). However, Treg from elderly patients awaiting transplantation are dominated by the CD45RA(-) CD62L(+) central memory type Treg subset (TregCM), and the yield of well-characterized and stable naïve Treg (TregN) is low. It is, therefore, important to determine whether these TregCM are derived from the thymus and express high stability, suppressive capacity and a broad antigen repertoire like TregN. In this study, we showed that TregCM use a different T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire from conventional T cells (Tconv), using next-generation sequencing of all 24 V? families, with an average depth of 534?677 sequences. This showed almost no contamination with induced Treg. Furthermore, TregCM showed enhanced suppressive activity on Tconv at early checkpoints of immune activation controlling activation markers expression and cytokine secretion, but comparable inhibition of proliferation. Following in vitro expansion under mTOR inhibition, TregCM expanded equally as well as TregN without losing their function. Despite relatively limited TCR repertoire, TregCM also showed specific alloresponse, although slightly reduced compared to TregN. These results support the therapeutic usefulness of manufacturing Treg products from CD45RA(-) CD62L(+) Treg-enriched starting material to be applied for adoptive Treg therapy. PMID:25988290

  8. Morphological Differences between Larvae of the Ciona intestinalis Species Complex: Hints for a Valid Taxonomic Definition of Distinct Species

    PubMed Central

    Pennati, Roberta; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Brunetti, Riccardo; Caicci, Federico; Gasparini, Fabio; Griggio, Francesca; Sato, Atsuko; Stach, Thomas; Kaul-Strehlow, Sabrina; Gissi, Carmela; Manni, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The cosmopolitan ascidian Ciona intestinalis is the most common model species of Tunicata, the sister-group of Vertebrata, and widely used in developmental biology, genomics and evolutionary studies. Recently, molecular studies suggested the presence of cryptic species hidden within the C. intestinalis species, namely C. intestinalis type A and type B. So far, no substantial morphological differences have been identified between individuals belonging to the two types. Here we present morphometric, immunohistochemical, and histological analyses, as well as 3-D reconstructions, of late larvae obtained by cross-fertilization experiments of molecularly determined type A and type B adults, sampled in different seasons and in four different localities. Our data point to quantitative and qualitative differences in the trunk shape of larvae belonging to the two types. In particular, type B larvae exhibit a longer pre-oral lobe, longer and relatively narrower total body length, and a shorter ocellus-tail distance than type A larvae. All these differences were found to be statistically significant in a Discriminant Analysis. Depending on the number of analyzed parameters, the obtained discriminant function was able to correctly classify > 93% of the larvae, with the remaining misclassified larvae attributable to the existence of intra-type seasonal variability. No larval differences were observed at the level of histology and immunohistochemical localization of peripheral sensory neurons. We conclude that type A and type B are two distinct species that can be distinguished on the basis of larval morphology and molecular data. Since the identified larval differences appear to be valid diagnostic characters, we suggest to raise both types to the rank of species and to assign them distinct names. PMID:25955391

  9. Identification of distinct subpopulations of intercalated cells in the mouse collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Teng-umnuay, P; Verlander, J W; Yuan, W; Tisher, C C; Madsen, K M

    1996-02-01

    Structurally and functionally distinct populations of intercalated cells have been described in the collecting duct of both rat and rabbit. However, little is known about these cells in the mouse kidney. The study presented here examines ultrastructural and immunological characteristics of different types of intercalated cells in the mouse. Kidneys of two strains of normal female mice, C57BL/6 and IBR, were preserved by in vivo perfusion with 1% glutaraldehyde or paraformaldehyde-picric acid fixatives and processed for morphological evaluation or light and electron microscopic immunohistochemistry, respectively. The avidin-biotin-horseradish peroxidase procedure was performed on was sections using antibodies against carbonic anhydrase II, H+ -ATPase and Band 3 protein. Immunogold cytochemistry was performed on Lowicryl sections using antibodies to H+ -ATPase and Band 3 protein. Colocalization of H+ -ATPase and Band 3 protein was performed by double labeling using an immunogold technique with silver enhancement. Intercalated cells identified by positive staining for H+ -ATPase and carbonic anhydrase II constituted 35% to 40% of all cells in the connecting tubule (CNT), cortical collecting duct (CCD), and outer medullary collecting duct (OMCD). Type A intercalated cells identified by positive Band 3 staining constituted 16%, 24%, and 33% of the total cell population in the CNT, CCD, and OMCD, respectively. Electron microscopy and immunogold cytochemistry demonstrated three distinct populations of intercalated cells. Type A intercalated cells with apical H+ -ATPase and basolateral Band 3 immunoreactivity were present in all segments examined, and had prominent apical microprojections and characteristic tubulovesicular structures beneath the apical surface, both coated with studs on the cytoplasmic face. Type B intercalated cells with basolateral and cytoplasmic H+-ATPase and no Band 3 immunoreactivity were most frequently observed in the initial collecting tubule, but were present also in the CNT and early CCD. Type B intercalated cells had a fairly smooth apical surface, a gray zone free of organelles beneath the apical plasma membrane, and small cytoplasmic vesicles without studs throughout the cell. A third type of intercalated cell with apical and cytoplasmic H+-ATPase, but no basolateral Band 3 protein, was observed exclusively in the CNT and the initial collecting tubule. This type of cell was large, with numerous mitochondria, and vesicles coated with studs were present throughout the cell. It resembled a third type of intercalated cell described previously in the rat. It is concluded that three morphologically and immunologically distinct types of intercalated cells are present in the mouse kidney. PMID:8785396

  10. Distinct Upstream Role of Type I IFN Signaling in Hematopoietic Stem Cell-Derived and Epithelial Resident Cells for Concerted Recruitment of Ly-6Chi Monocytes and NK Cells via CCL2-CCL3 Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-I)-dependent orchestrated mobilization of innate cells in inflamed tissues is believed to play a critical role in controlling replication and CNS-invasion of herpes simplex virus (HSV). However, the crucial regulators and cell populations that are affected by IFN-I to establish the early environment of innate cells in HSV-infected mucosal tissues are largely unknown. Here, we found that IFN-I signaling promoted the differentiation of CCL2-producing Ly-6Chi monocytes and IFN-?/granzyme B-producing NK cells, whereas deficiency of IFN-I signaling induced Ly-6Clo monocytes producing CXCL1 and CXCL2. More interestingly, recruitment of Ly-6Chi monocytes preceded that of NK cells with the levels peaked at 24 h post-infection in IFN-I–dependent manner, which was kinetically associated with the CCL2-CCL3 cascade response. Early Ly-6Chi monocyte recruitment was governed by CCL2 produced from hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-derived leukocytes, whereas NK cell recruitment predominantly depended on CC chemokines produced by resident epithelial cells. Also, IFN-I signaling in HSC-derived leukocytes appeared to suppress Ly-6Ghi neutrophil recruitment to ameliorate immunopathology. Finally, tissue resident CD11bhiF4/80hi macrophages and CD11chiEpCAM+ dendritic cells appeared to produce initial CCL2 for migration-based self-amplification of early infiltrated Ly-6Chi monocytes upon stimulation by IFN-I produced from infected epithelial cells. Ultimately, these results decipher a detailed IFN-I–dependent pathway that establishes orchestrated mobilization of Ly-6Chi monocytes and NK cells through CCL2-CCL3 cascade response of HSC-derived leukocytes and epithelium-resident cells. Therefore, this cascade response of resident–to-hematopoietic–to-resident cells that drives cytokine–to-chemokine–to-cytokine production to recruit orchestrated innate cells is critical for attenuation of HSV replication in inflamed tissues. PMID:26618488

  11. Distinct Upstream Role of Type I IFN Signaling in Hematopoietic Stem Cell-Derived and Epithelial Resident Cells for Concerted Recruitment of Ly-6Chi Monocytes and NK Cells via CCL2-CCL3 Cascade.

    PubMed

    Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-11-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-I)-dependent orchestrated mobilization of innate cells in inflamed tissues is believed to play a critical role in controlling replication and CNS-invasion of herpes simplex virus (HSV). However, the crucial regulators and cell populations that are affected by IFN-I to establish the early environment of innate cells in HSV-infected mucosal tissues are largely unknown. Here, we found that IFN-I signaling promoted the differentiation of CCL2-producing Ly-6Chi monocytes and IFN-?/granzyme B-producing NK cells, whereas deficiency of IFN-I signaling induced Ly-6Clo monocytes producing CXCL1 and CXCL2. More interestingly, recruitment of Ly-6Chi monocytes preceded that of NK cells with the levels peaked at 24 h post-infection in IFN-I-dependent manner, which was kinetically associated with the CCL2-CCL3 cascade response. Early Ly-6Chi monocyte recruitment was governed by CCL2 produced from hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-derived leukocytes, whereas NK cell recruitment predominantly depended on CC chemokines produced by resident epithelial cells. Also, IFN-I signaling in HSC-derived leukocytes appeared to suppress Ly-6Ghi neutrophil recruitment to ameliorate immunopathology. Finally, tissue resident CD11bhiF4/80hi macrophages and CD11chiEpCAM+ dendritic cells appeared to produce initial CCL2 for migration-based self-amplification of early infiltrated Ly-6Chi monocytes upon stimulation by IFN-I produced from infected epithelial cells. Ultimately, these results decipher a detailed IFN-I-dependent pathway that establishes orchestrated mobilization of Ly-6Chi monocytes and NK cells through CCL2-CCL3 cascade response of HSC-derived leukocytes and epithelium-resident cells. Therefore, this cascade response of resident-to-hematopoietic-to-resident cells that drives cytokine-to-chemokine-to-cytokine production to recruit orchestrated innate cells is critical for attenuation of HSV replication in inflamed tissues. PMID:26618488

  12. Genome-wide association and meta-analysis in populations from Starr County, Texas, and Mexico City identify type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci and enrichment for expression quantitative trait loci in top signals

    PubMed Central

    Below, J. E.; Gamazon, E. R.; Morrison, J. V.; Konkashbaev, A.; Pluzhnikov, A.; McKeigue, P. M.; Parra, E. J.; Elbein, S. C.; Hallman, D. M.; Nicolae, D. L.; Bell, G. I.; Cruz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We conducted genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses to identify and characterise risk loci for type 2 diabetes in Mexican-Americans from Starr County, TX, USA. Method Using 1.8 million directly interrogated and imputed genotypes in 837 unrelated type 2 diabetes cases and 436 normoglycaemic controls, we conducted Armitage trend tests. To improve power in this population with high disease rates, we also performed ordinal regression including an intermediate class with impaired fasting glucose and/or glucose tolerance. These analyses were followed by meta-analysis with a study of 967 type 2 diabetes cases and 343 normoglycaemic controls from Mexico City, Mexico. Result The top signals (unadjusted p value <1×10?5) included 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight gene regions (PER3, PARD3B, EPHA4, TOMM7, PTPRD, HNT [also known as RREB1], LOC729993 and IL34) and six intergenic regions. Among these was a missense polymorphism (rs10462020; Gly639Val) in the clock gene PER3, a system recently implicated in diabetes. We also report a second signal (minimum p value 1.52× 10?6) within PTPRD, independent of the previously implicated SNP, in a population of Han Chinese. Top meta-analysis signals included known regions HNF1A and KCNQ1. Annotation of top association signals in both studies revealed a marked excess of trans-acting eQTL in both adipose and muscle tissues. Conclusions/Interpretation In the largest study of type 2 diabetes in Mexican populations to date, we identified modest associations of novel and previously reported SNPs. In addition, in our top signals we report significant excess of SNPs that predict transcript levels in muscle and adipose tissues. PMID:21647700

  13. Anticancer Properties of Distinct Antimalarial Drug Classes

    PubMed Central

    Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Guy, R. Kiplin; Chibale, Kelly; Haynes, Richard K.; Peitz, Ingmar; Kelter, Gerhard; Phillips, Margaret A.; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L.; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Wells, Timothy N. C.

    2013-01-01

    We have tested five distinct classes of established and experimental antimalarial drugs for their anticancer potential, using a panel of 91 human cancer lines. Three classes of drugs: artemisinins, synthetic peroxides and DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase) inhibitors effected potent inhibition of proliferation with IC50s in the nM- low µM range, whereas a DHODH (dihydroorotate dehydrogenase) and a putative kinase inhibitor displayed no activity. Furthermore, significant synergies were identified with erlotinib, imatinib, cisplatin, dasatinib and vincristine. Cluster analysis of the antimalarials based on their differential inhibition of the various cancer lines clearly segregated the synthetic peroxides OZ277 and OZ439 from the artemisinin cluster that included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin and artemisone, and from the DHFR inhibitors pyrimethamine and P218 (a parasite DHFR inhibitor), emphasizing their shared mode of action. In order to further understand the basis of the selectivity of these compounds against different cancers, microarray-based gene expression data for 85 of the used cell lines were generated. For each compound, distinct sets of genes were identified whose expression significantly correlated with compound sensitivity. Several of the antimalarials tested in this study have well-established and excellent safety profiles with a plasma exposure, when conservatively used in malaria, that is well above the IC50s that we identified in this study. Given their unique mode of action and potential for unique synergies with established anticancer drugs, our results provide a strong basis to further explore the potential application of these compounds in cancer in pre-clinical or and clinical settings. PMID:24391728

  14. Distinct clinical characteristics of myeloproliferative neoplasms with calreticulin mutations

    PubMed Central

    Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Krahling, Tunde; Balassa, Katalin; Halm, Gabriella; Bors, Andras; Koszarska, Magdalena; Batai, Arpad; Dolgos, Janos; Csomor, Judit; Egyed, Miklos; Sipos, Andrea; Remenyi, Peter; Tordai, Attila; Masszi, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Somatic insertions/deletions in the calreticulin gene have recently been discovered to be causative alterations in myeloproliferative neoplasms. A combination of qualitative and quantitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, fragment-sizing, high resolution melting and Sanger-sequencing was applied for the detection of three driver mutations (in Janus kinase 2, calreticulin and myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene genes) in 289 cases of essential thrombocythemia and 99 cases of primary myelofibrosis. In essential thrombocythemia, 154 (53%) Janus kinase 2 V617F, 96 (33%) calreticulin, 9 (3%) myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene gene mutation-positive and 30 triple-negative (11%) cases were identified, while in primary myelofibrosis 56 (57%) Janus kinase 2 V617F, 25 (25%) calreticulin, 7 (7%) myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene gene mutation-positive and 11 (11%) triple-negative cases were identified. Patients positive for the calreticulin mutation were younger and had higher platelet counts compared to Janus kinase 2 mutation-positive counterparts. Calreticulin mutation-positive patients with essential thrombocythemia showed a lower risk of developing venous thrombosis, but no difference in overall survival. Calreticulin mutation-positive patients with primary myelofibrosis had a better overall survival compared to that of the Janus kinase 2 mutation-positive (P=0.04) or triple-negative cases (P=0.01). Type 2 calreticulin mutation occurred more frequently in essential thrombocythemia than in primary myelofibrosis (P=0.049). In essential thrombocythemia, the calreticulin mutational load was higher than the Janus kinase 2 mutational load (P<0.001), and increased gradually in advanced stages. Calreticulin mutational load influenced blood counts even at the time point of diagnosis in essential thrombocythemia. We confirm that calreticulin mutation is associated with distinct clinical characteristics and explored relationships between mutation type, load and clinical outcome. PMID:24895336

  15. Microdensitometer-computer correlation analysis of two distinct, spatially segregated classes of microtubule bridges in Allogromia pseudopodia.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C G; Bollard, S M; Jensen, L C; Travis, J L; Bowser, S S

    1990-01-01

    Previous video-light microscopic studies have shown that the microtubule bundles in the pseudopodia of foraminiferan protists display several types of movements in vivo, including active bending, zipping/splaying, and axial translocations. To gain insight into the types and arrangement of microtubule-associated proteins (e.g., mechanoenzymes, crosslinkers) in such a highly dynamic system, we employed microdensitometric-computer correlation methods to analyze, quantitatively, intermicrotubule bridges in thin-section electron micrographs of Allogromia laticollaris and Allogromia sp. (strain NF). Two distinct bridges occupying mutually exclusive zones between adjacent microtubules were identified. Type I bridges displayed a single axial repeat (34 nm for A. laticollaris and 28 nm for Allogromia sp.) and Type II bridges showed a typical 12-dimer helical superlattice pattern. In A. laticollaris, the two types of bridges were morphologically distinct: Type I bridges were aligned perpendicular to the microtubule wall and were 23-nm wide with an electron-lucent core; Type II bridges were irregular filaments projecting from the microtubules at various angles. When compared with the known distribution of microtubule-associated proteins in other systems, our findings indicate that, in vivo, Allogromia pseudopodial microtubules are decorated with MAP2-like bridges interrupted by discrete clusters of a dynein-like component. PMID:2100143

  16. Nevus anemicus: a distinctive cutaneous finding in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martín, Angela; García-Martínez, Francisco Javier; Duat, Anna; López-Martín, Inmaculada; Noguera-Morel, Lucero; Torrelo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Nevus anemicus (NA) is a cutaneous anomaly characterized by pale, well-defined patches with limited vascularization after rubbing. They are largely known to be associated with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and have received little attention in the literature until recently. We sought to characterize the prevalence and clinical features of patients with NA and NF1. We conducted an observational prospective study of 99 children with NF1 at the Hospital Niño Jesús, Madrid, Spain, from January 1, 2012, through July 31, 2013, and reviewed three other series of patients with NF1 and NA recently reported. The prevalence of NA in children with NF1 ranged from 8.8% to 51%, being much more prevalent at younger ages. Prospective studies yielded a higher prevalence than retrospective studies. NA was located most commonly on the trunk, particularly on the anterior chest wall, and was often multiple. Patients with segmental NF1 or isolated café au lait spots rarely had NA, and NA was absent in other genodermatoses. The collection of data was not homogeneous in all studies. NA has a high prevalence in individuals with NF1 patients but seems to be absent in connection with other genodermatoses, therefore its presence can assist in the diagnosis of suspected cases of NF1. The subtle clinical appearance of NA makes its detection difficult, and physicians involved in the care of children with NF1 must be aware of its possible presence and significance. PMID:25690591

  17. Distinct Cerebellar Contributions to Intrinsic Connectivity Networks

    PubMed Central

    Habas, Christophe; Kamdar, Nirav; Nguyen, Daniel; Keller, Katherine; Beckmann, Christian F.; Menon, Vinod; Greicius, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Convergent data from various scientific approaches strongly implicate cerebellar systems in non-motor functions. The functional anatomy of these systems has been pieced together from disparate sources such as animal studies, lesion studies in humans, and structural and functional imaging studies in humans. To better define this distinct functional anatomy, in the current study we delineate the role of the cerebellum in several non-motor systems simultaneously and in the same subjects using resting state functional connectivity MRI. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to resting state data from two independent datasets to identify common cerebellar contributions to several previously identified intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) involved in executive control, episodic memory/self-reflection, salience detection, and sensorimotor function. We found distinct cerebellar contributions to each of these ICNs. The neocerebellum participates in: 1. the right and left executive control networks (especially crus I and II), 2. the salience network (lobule VI), and 3. the default-mode network (lobule IX). Little to no overlap was detected between these cerebellar regions and the sensorimotor cerebellum (lobules V–VI). Clusters were also located in pontine and dentate nuclei, prominent points of convergence for cerebellar input and output respectively. The results suggest that the most phylogenetically recent part of the cerebellum, particularly crus I and II make contributions to parallel cortico-cerebellar loops involved in executive control, salience detection, and episodic memory/self-reflection. The largest portions of the neocerebellum take part in the executive control network implicated in higher cognitive functions such as working memory. PMID:19571149

  18. Independent Optical Excitation of Distinct Neural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Klapoetke, Nathan C; Murata, Yasunobu; Kim, Sung Soo; Pulver, Stefan R.; Birdsey-Benson, Amanda; Cho, Yong Ku; Morimoto, Tania K; Chuong, Amy S; Carpenter, Eric J; Tian, Zhijian; Wang, Jun; Xie, Yinlong; Yan, Zhixiang; Zhang, Yong; Chow, Brian Y; Surek, Barbara; Melkonian, Michael; Jayaraman, Vivek; Constantine-Paton, Martha; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Boyden, Edward S

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic tools enable the causal examination of how specific cell types contribute to brain circuit functions. A long-standing question is whether it is possible to independently activate two distinct neural populations in mammalian brain tissue. Such a capability would enable the examination of how different synapses or pathways interact to support computation. Here we report two new channelrhodopsins, Chronos and Chrimson, obtained through the de novo sequencing and physiological characterization of opsins from over 100 species of algae. Chrimson is 45 nm red-shifted relative to any previous channelrhodopsin, important for scenarios where red light would be preferred; we show minimal visual system mediated behavioral artifact in optogenetically stimulated Drosophila. Chronos has faster kinetics than any previous channelrhodopsin, yet is effectively more light-sensitive. Together, these two reagents enable crosstalk-free two-color activation of neural spiking and downstream synaptic transmission in independent neural populations in mouse brain slice. PMID:24509633

  19. A distinct tymovirus infecting Cassia hoffmannseggii in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, C; Pio-Ribeiro, G; Andrade, G P; Melo, F L; Oliveira, V C; Guimarães, F C; Resende, R O; Kitajima, E W; Rezende, J A M; Nagata, Tatsuya

    2012-08-01

    Leaves of Cassia hoffmannseggii, a wild fabaceous species found in the Atlantic Forest, with a severe mosaic symptom were collected in Pernambuco State, Brazil. By transmission electron microscopy, two types of virus particles were found: the first was recognized as particles of a potyvirus, which was later identified as Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus; and the second was isometric and present in high concentration. The observation of vesicles at the periphery of chloroplasts suggested a tymovirus infection, which was confirmed by subsequent assays. A serological assay against several tymovirus antisera resulted in positive reaction of this tymo-like virus with an antiserum of Passion fruit yellow mosaic virus. By means of RT-PCR and using degenerated primers for the conserved region of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene of tymoviruses, a specific DNA fragment was amplified and sequenced. Based on this sequence, a specific forward primer was synthesized and successfully used to amplify the 3' terminal genome region, containing the partial RdRp gene and the complete coat protein (CP) sequences. The CP was 188 amino acids (aa) long, and the highest CP aa identity was observed with Kennedya yellow mosaic virus (61 %). Based on the current ICTV demarcation criterion, this isolate was considered as a distinct tymovirus and tentatively named as Cassia yellow mosaic-associated virus. PMID:22528644

  20. Multiple hydroxyphenethyl glucosinolate isomers and their tandem mass spectrometric distinction in a geographically structured polymorphism in the crucifer Barbarea vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Agerbirk, Niels; Olsen, Carl Erik; Heimes, Christine; Christensen, Stina; Bak, Søren; Hauser, Thure P

    2015-07-01

    Two distinct glucosinolate (GSL) chemotypes (P and G-types) of Barbarea vulgaris (Brassicaceae) were known from southern Scandinavia, but whether the types were consistent in a wider geographic area was not known. Populations (26) from Eastern and Central Europe were analyzed for GSLs in order to investigate whether the two types were consistent in this area. Most (21) could be attributed to one of the previously described GSL profile types, the P-type (13 populations) and the G-type (8 populations), based on differences in the stereochemistry of 2-hydroxylation, presence or absence of phenolic glucobarbarin derivatives, and qualitative differences in indole GSL decoration (tested for a subset of 8+6 populations only). The distinction agreed with previous molecular genetic analysis of the same individuals. Geographically, the P-type typically occurred in Eastern Europe while the G-type mainly occurred in Central Europe. Of the remaining five populations, minor deviations were observed in some individuals from two populations genetically assigned to the G-type, and a hybrid population from Finland contained an additional dihydroxyphenethyl GSL isomer attributed to a combinatorial effect of P-type and G-type genes. Major exceptions to the typical GSL profiles were observed in two populations: (1) A G-type population from Slovenia deviated by a high frequency of a known variant in glucobarbarin biosynthesis ('NAS form') co-occurring with usual G-type individuals. (2) A population from Caucasus exhibited a highly deviating GSL profile dominated by p-hydroxyphenethyl GSL that was insignificant in other accessions, as well as two GSLs investigated by NMR, m-hydroxyphenethylGSL and a partially identified m,p disubstituted hydroxy-methoxy derivative of phenethylGSL. Tandem HPLC-MS of seven NMR-identified desulfoGSLs was carried out and interpreted for increased certainty in peak identification and as a tool for partial structure elucidation. The distinct, geographically separated chemotypes and rare variants are discussed in relation to future taxonomic revision and the genetics and ecology of GSLs in B. vulgaris. PMID:25277803

  1. OVCAR-3 Spheroid-Derived Cells Display Distinct Metabolic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A.; Wang, Lijuan; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells. Methods To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines. Results These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines. Conclusions Overall, we demonstrate for the first time that metabolism in an ovarian cancer stem cell line is distinct from that of more differentiated isogenic cancer cells, supporting the potential importance of metabolism in the differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells. PMID:25688563

  2. The voice quality distinction in Dinka songs 

    E-print Network

    Rognoni, Luca

    2010-11-24

    The purpose of this work is to study the distinction of the voice quality in Dinka songs, in particular to determine whether and how the phonemic distinction between modal and breathy vowel is conveyed in singing. The ...

  3. Rescue of an In Vitro Neuron Phenotype Identified in Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C1 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons by Modulating the WNT Pathway and Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Efthymiou, Anastasia G.; Steiner, Joe; Pavan, William J.; Wincovitch, Stephen; Larson, Denise M.; Porter, Forbes D.; Rao, Mahendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a familial disorder that has devastating consequences on postnatal development with multisystem effects, including neurodegeneration. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment option for NPC1; however, several potentially therapeutic compounds have been identified in assays using yeast, rodent models, and NPC1 human fibroblasts. Although these discoveries were made in fibroblasts from NPC1 subjects and were in some instances validated in animal models of the disease, testing these drugs on a cell type more relevant for NPC1 neurological disease would greatly facilitate both study of the disease and identification of more relevant therapeutic compounds. Toward this goal, we have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a subject homozygous for the most frequent NPC1 mutation (p.I1061T) and subsequently created a stable line of neural stem cells (NSCs). These NSCs were then used to create neurons as an appropriate disease model. NPC1 neurons display a premature cell death phenotype, and gene expression analysis of these cells suggests dysfunction of important signaling pathways, including calcium and WNT. The clear readout from these cells makes them ideal candidates for high-throughput screening and will be a valuable tool to better understand the development of NPC1 in neural cells, as well as to develop better therapeutic options for NPC1. PMID:25637190

  4. The Abstract/Concrete Distinction 1 Running head: THE ABSTRACT/CONCRETE DISTINCTION

    E-print Network

    Korhonen, Anna

    The Abstract/Concrete Distinction 1 Running head: THE ABSTRACT/CONCRETE DISTINCTION Keywords: Psychology; Computer science; Cognitive architecture; Concepts; Representation; Semantics; Concreteness. A Large-scale Empirical Analysis of the Abstract/Concrete Distinction Felix Hill Anna Korhonen Christian

  5. Novel mutations target distinct subgroups of medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Giles; Parker, Matthew; Kranenburg, Tanya A.; Lu, Charles; Chen, Xiang; Ding, Li; Phoenix, Timothy N.; Hedlund, Erin; Wei, Lei; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Chalhoub, Nader; Baker, Suzanne J.; Huether, Robert; Kriwacki, Richard; Curley, Natasha; Thiruvenkatam, Radhika; Wang, Jianmin; Wu, Gang; Rusch, Michael; Hong, Xin; Beckford, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Ma, Jing; Easton, John; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Lin, Tong; Li, Shaoyi; Pounds, Stanley; Paugh, Steven; Zhao, David; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Roussel, Martine F.; Finkelstein, David; Ellison, David W.; Lau, Ching C.; Bouffet, Eric; Hassall, Tim; Gururangan, Sridharan; Cohn, Richard; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Dooling, David J.; Ochoa, Kerri; Gajjar, Amar; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Downing, James R.; Zhang, Jinghui; Gilbertson, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is a malignant childhood brain tumour comprising four discrete subgroups. To identify mutations that drive medulloblastoma we sequenced the entire genomes of 37 tumours and matched normal blood. One hundred and thirty-six genes harbouring somatic mutations in this discovery set were sequenced in an additional 56 medulloblastomas. Recurrent mutations were detected in 41 genes not yet implicated in medulloblastoma: several target distinct components of the epigenetic machinery in different disease subgroups, e.g., regulators of H3K27 and H3K4 trimethylation in subgroup-3 and 4 (e.g., KDM6A and ZMYM3), and CTNNB1-associated chromatin remodellers in WNT-subgroup tumours (e.g., SMARCA4 and CREBBP). Modelling of mutations in mouse lower rhombic lip progenitors that generate WNT-subgroup tumours, identified genes that maintain this cell lineage (DDX3X) as well as mutated genes that initiate (CDH1) or cooperate (PIK3CA) in tumourigenesis. These data provide important new insights into the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma subgroups and highlight targets for therapeutic development. PMID:22722829

  6. Novel mutations target distinct subgroups of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Giles; Parker, Matthew; Kranenburg, Tanya A; Lu, Charles; Chen, Xiang; Ding, Li; Phoenix, Timothy N; Hedlund, Erin; Wei, Lei; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Chalhoub, Nader; Baker, Suzanne J; Huether, Robert; Kriwacki, Richard; Curley, Natasha; Thiruvenkatam, Radhika; Wang, Jianmin; Wu, Gang; Rusch, Michael; Hong, Xin; Becksfort, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Ma, Jing; Easton, John; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Lin, Tong; Li, Shaoyi; Pounds, Stanley; Paugh, Steven; Zhao, David; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Roussel, Martine F; Finkelstein, David; Ellison, David W; Lau, Ching C; Bouffet, Eric; Hassall, Tim; Gururangan, Sridharan; Cohn, Richard; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Dooling, David J; Ochoa, Kerri; Gajjar, Amar; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James R; Zhang, Jinghui; Gilbertson, Richard J

    2012-08-01

    Medulloblastoma is a malignant childhood brain tumour comprising four discrete subgroups. Here, to identify mutations that drive medulloblastoma, we sequenced the entire genomes of 37 tumours and matched normal blood. One-hundred and thirty-six genes harbouring somatic mutations in this discovery set were sequenced in an additional 56 medulloblastomas. Recurrent mutations were detected in 41 genes not yet implicated in medulloblastoma; several target distinct components of the epigenetic machinery in different disease subgroups, such as regulators of H3K27 and H3K4 trimethylation in subgroups 3 and 4 (for example, KDM6A and ZMYM3), and CTNNB1-associated chromatin re-modellers in WNT-subgroup tumours (for example, SMARCA4 and CREBBP). Modelling of mutations in mouse lower rhombic lip progenitors that generate WNT-subgroup tumours identified genes that maintain this cell lineage (DDX3X), as well as mutated genes that initiate (CDH1) or cooperate (PIK3CA) in tumorigenesis. These data provide important new insights into the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma subgroups and highlight targets for therapeutic development. PMID:22722829

  7. Vestibular stimulation leads to distinct hemodynamic patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that responses of a particular sympathetic nerve to vestibular stimulation depend on the type of tissue the nerve innervates as well as its anatomic location. In the present study, we sought to determine whether such precise patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes could lead to specific hemodynamic alterations in response to vestibular afferent activation. We simultaneously measured changes in systemic blood pressure and blood flow (with the use of Doppler flowmetry) to the hindlimb (femoral artery), forelimb (brachial artery), and kidney (renal artery) in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized, baroreceptor-denervated cats. Electrical vestibular stimulation led to depressor responses, 8 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SE) in magnitude, that were accompanied by decreases in femoral vasoconstriction (23 +/- 4% decrease in vascular resistance or 36 +/- 7% increase in vascular conductance) and increases in brachial vascular tone (resistance increase of 10 +/- 6% and conductance decrease of 11 +/- 4%). Relatively small changes (<5%) in renal vascular tone were observed. In contrast, electrical stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents produced pressor responses (20 +/- 6 mmHg) that were accompanied by vasoconstriction in all three beds. These data suggest that vestibular inputs lead to a complex pattern of cardiovascular changes that is distinct from that which occurs in response to activation of other types of somatic afferents.

  8. Vocal sharing and individual acoustic distinctiveness within a group of captive orcas (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Kremers, Dorothee; Lemasson, Alban; Almunia, Javier; Wanker, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    Among vocal learners, some animal species are known to develop individually distinctive vocalizations, and others clearly learn to produce group signatures. The optimal vocal sharing hypothesis suggests that vocal divergence and convergence are not compulsorily exclusive and both can be found at different levels in a given species. Being individually recognizable is socially important even in species sharing vocal badges. Acoustic divergence is not systematically controlled as it can simply be due to interindividual morphological differences. We tested that hypothesis in a species known to learn their family vocal dialect socially: the orca (Orcinus orca). We identified 13 different call types, including some shared by all group members, some shared only by 2 or 3 individuals, and others particular to 1 individual. Sharing was higher between males than between females. Three of our 4 orcas each produced a unique call type, which was preferably emitted. The call types shared by all orcas still presented individual acoustic distinctiveness that could, to some degree, be explained by morphological differences. We found evidence for strong similarities between some of the call types of our captive orcas and the call types of their ancestors, which are Canadian and Icelandic free-ranging orcas. Our findings suggest that captive orcas use a complex vocal repertoire enabling each individual to produce sounds that are similar to some of their partners', which might be used as social badges to advertise their preferential bonds, as well as individual-specific calls. Our findings open new lines of research concerning the functional value of a balanced "diverging-converging" vocal system. PMID:22866769

  9. Liquidity Spillover in International Stock Markets through Distinct Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale. PMID:24465918

  10. Liquidity spillover in international stock markets through distinct time scales.

    PubMed

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale. PMID:24465918

  11. Identifying Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ashish K.; Kuperman, Gilad J.; Teich, Jonathan M.; Leape, Lucian; Shea, Brian; Rittenberg, Eve; Burdick, Elisabeth; Seger, Diane Lew; Vliet, Martha Vander; Bates, David W.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Background: Adverse drug events (ADEs) are both common and costly. Most hospitals identify ADEs using spontaneous reporting, but this approach lacks sensitivity; chart review identifies more events but is expensive. Computer-based approaches to ADE identification appear promising, but they have not been directly compared with chart review and they are not widely used. Objectives: To develop a computer-based ADE monitor, and to compare the rate and type of ADEs found with the monitor with those discovered by chart review and by stimulated voluntary report. Design: Prospective cohort study in one tertiary-care hospital. Participants: All patients admitted to nine medical and surgical units in a tertiary-care hospital over an eight-month period. Main Outcome Measure: Adverse drug events identified by the computer-based monitor, by chart review, and by stimulated voluntary report. Methods: A computer-based monitoring program identified alerts, which were situations suggesting that an ADE might be present (e.g., an order for an antidote such as naloxone). A trained reviewer then examined patients' hospital records to determine whether an ADE had occurred. The results of the computer-based monitoring strategy were compared with two other ADE detection strategies: intensive chart review and stimulated voluntary report by nurses and pharmacists. The monitor and the chart review strategies were independent, and the reviewers were blinded. Results: The computer monitoring strategy identified 2,620 alerts, of which 275 were determined to be ADEs. The chart review found 398 ADEs, whereas voluntary report detected 23. Of the 617 ADEs detected by at least one method, 76 ADEs were detected by both computer monitor and chart review. The computer monitor identified 45 percent; chart review, 65 percent; and voluntary report, 4 percent. The ADEs identified by computer monitor were more likely to be classified as “severe” than were those identified by chart review (51 versus 42 percent, p =.04). The positive predictive value of computer-generated alerts was 16 percent during the first eight weeks of the study; rule modifications increased this to 23 percent in the final eight weeks. The computer strategy required 11 person-hours per week to execute, whereas chart review required 55 person-hours per week and voluntary report strategy required 5. Conclusions: The computer-based monitor identified fewer ADEs than did chart review but many more ADEs than did stimulated voluntary report. The overlap among the ADEs identified using different methods was small, suggesting that the incidence of ADEs may be higher than previously reported and that different detection methods capture different events. The computer-based monitoring system represents an efficient approach for measuring ADE frequency and gauging the effectiveness of ADE prevention programs. PMID:9609500

  12. Optimal distinction between non-orthogonal quantum states

    E-print Network

    Asher Peres; Daniel Terno

    1998-04-12

    Given a finite set of linearly independent quantum states, an observer who examines a single quantum system may sometimes identify its state with certainty. However, unless these quantum states are orthogonal, there is a finite probability of failure. A complete solution is given to the problem of optimal distinction of three states, having arbitrary prior probabilities and arbitrary detection values. A generalization to more than three states is outlined.

  13. Identification of Thiothrix unzii in Two Distinct Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.

    2001-07-11

    Molecular procedures were used to identify Thiothrix spp. in biofilms from sulfide-rich waters in two distinct Florida ecosystems. These Thiothrix spp.-containing biofilms at these sites have been consistently observed for over 10 years. Clonal libraries of biofilm 16S rDNA from each site contained rDNA sequences that were 99 to 99.5 percent similar to Thiothrix unzii.

  14. Magnaporthe oryzae populations adapted to finger millet and rice exhibit distinctive patterns of genetic diversity, sexuality and host interaction.

    PubMed

    Takan, J P; Chipili, J; Muthumeenakshi, S; Talbot, N J; Manyasa, E O; Bandyopadhyay, R; Sere, Y; Nutsugah, S K; Talhinhas, P; Hossain, M; Brown, A E; Sreenivasaprasad, S

    2012-02-01

    In this study, host-specific forms of the blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) were characterised from distinct cropping locations using a combination of molecular and biological assays. Finger millet blast populations in East Africa revealed a continuous genetic variation pattern and lack of clonal lineages, with a wide range of haplotypes. M. oryzae populations lacked the grasshopper (grh) element (96%) and appeared distinct to those in Asia. An overall near equal distribution (47-53%) of the mating types MAT1-1 and MAT1-2, high fertility status (84-89%) and the dominance of hermaphrodites (64%) suggest a strong sexual reproductive potential. Differences in pathogen aggressiveness and lack of cultivar incompatibility suggest the importance of quantitative resistance. Rice blast populations in West Africa showed a typical lineage-based structure. Among the nine lineages identified, three comprised ~90% of the isolates. Skewed distribution of the mating types MAT1-1 (29%) and MAT1-2 (71%) was accompanied by low fertility. Clear differences in cultivar compatibility within and between lineages suggest R gene-mediated interactions. Distinctive patterns of genetic diversity, sexual reproductive potential and pathogenicity suggest adaptive divergence of host-specific forms of M. oryzae populations linked to crop domestication and agricultural intensification. PMID:21701860

  15. Novel amino-carbonitrile-pyrazole identified in a small molecule screen activates wild-type and ?F508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the absence of a cAMP agonist.

    PubMed

    Namkung, Wan; Park, Jinhong; Seo, Yohan; Verkman, A S

    2013-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl? channel. We developed a phenotype-based high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule activators of human airway epithelial Ca²?-activated Cl? channels (CaCCs) for CF therapy. Unexpectedly, screening of ?110,000 synthetic small molecules revealed an amino-carbonitrile-pyrazole, C(act)-A1, that activated CFTR but not CaCC Cl? conductance. C(act)-A1 produced large and sustained CFTR Cl? currents in CFTR-expressing Fisher rat thyroid (FRT) cells and in primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells, without increasing intracellular cAMP and in the absence of a cAMP agonist. C(act)-A1 produced linear whole-cell currents. C(act)-A1 also activated ?F508-CFTR Cl? currents in low temperature-rescued ?F508-CFTR-expressing FRT cells and CF-HBE cells (from homozygous ?F508 patients) in the absence of a cAMP agonist, and showed additive effects with forskolin. In contrast, N-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (VX-770) and genistein produced little or no ?F508-CFTR Cl? current in the absence of a cAMP agonist. In FRT cells expressing G551D-CFTR and in CF nasal polyp epithelial cells (from a heterozygous G551D/Y1092X-CFTR patient), C(act)-A1 produced little Cl? current by itself but showed synergy with forskolin. The amino-carbonitrile-pyrazole C(act)-A1 identified here is unique among prior CFTR-activating compounds, as it strongly activated wild-type and ?F508-CFTR in the absence of a cAMP agonist. Increasing ?F508-CFTR Cl? conductance by an "activator," as defined by activation in the absence of cAMP stimulation, provides a novel strategy for CF therapy that is different from that of a "potentiator," which requires cAMP elevation. PMID:23788656

  16. Novel Amino-Carbonitrile-Pyrazole Identified in a Small Molecule Screen Activates Wild-Type and ?F508 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in the Absence of a cAMP Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhong; Seo, Yohan; Verkman, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl? channel. We developed a phenotype-based high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule activators of human airway epithelial Ca2+-activated Cl? channels (CaCCs) for CF therapy. Unexpectedly, screening of ?110,000 synthetic small molecules revealed an amino-carbonitrile-pyrazole, Cact-A1, that activated CFTR but not CaCC Cl? conductance. Cact-A1 produced large and sustained CFTR Cl? currents in CFTR-expressing Fisher rat thyroid (FRT) cells and in primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells, without increasing intracellular cAMP and in the absence of a cAMP agonist. Cact-A1 produced linear whole-cell currents. Cact-A1 also activated ?F508-CFTR Cl? currents in low temperature-rescued ?F508-CFTR-expressing FRT cells and CF-HBE cells (from homozygous ?F508 patients) in the absence of a cAMP agonist, and showed additive effects with forskolin. In contrast, N-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (VX-770) and genistein produced little or no ?F508-CFTR Cl? current in the absence of a cAMP agonist. In FRT cells expressing G551D-CFTR and in CF nasal polyp epithelial cells (from a heterozygous G551D/Y1092X-CFTR patient), Cact-A1 produced little Cl? current by itself but showed synergy with forskolin. The amino-carbonitrile-pyrazole Cact-A1 identified here is unique among prior CFTR-activating compounds, as it strongly activated wild-type and ?F508-CFTR in the absence of a cAMP agonist. Increasing ?F508-CFTR Cl? conductance by an “activator,” as defined by activation in the absence of cAMP stimulation, provides a novel strategy for CF therapy that is different from that of a “potentiator,” which requires cAMP elevation. PMID:23788656

  17. Identification of a third distinct estrogen receptor and reclassification of estrogen receptors

    E-print Network

    Crews, David

    Identification of a third distinct estrogen receptor and reclassification of estrogen receptors three distinct estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes: ER , ER , and a unique type, ER , cloned from a teleost ERs in one species expands the role of ER multiplicity in estrogen signaling systems and provides

  18. An Arabidopsis Transcriptional Regulatory Map Reveals Distinct Functional and Evolutionary Features of Novel Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinpu; He, Kun; Tang, Xing; Li, Zhe; Lv, Le; Zhao, Yi; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2015-07-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play key roles in both development and stress responses. By integrating into and rewiring original systems, novel TFs contribute significantly to the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. Here, we report a high-confidence transcriptional regulatory map covering 388 TFs from 47 families in Arabidopsis. Systematic analysis of this map revealed the architectural heterogeneity of developmental and stress response subnetworks and identified three types of novel network motifs that are absent from unicellular organisms and essential for multicellular development. Moreover, TFs of novel families that emerged during plant landing present higher binding specificities and are preferentially wired into developmental processes and these novel network motifs. Further unveiled connection between the binding specificity and wiring preference of TFs explains the wiring preferences of novel-family TFs. These results reveal distinct functional and evolutionary features of novel TFs, suggesting a plausible mechanism for their contribution to the evolution of multicellular organisms. PMID:25750178

  19. An Arabidopsis Transcriptional Regulatory Map Reveals Distinct Functional and Evolutionary Features of Novel Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jinpu; He, Kun; Tang, Xing; Li, Zhe; Lv, Le; Zhao, Yi; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play key roles in both development and stress responses. By integrating into and rewiring original systems, novel TFs contribute significantly to the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. Here, we report a high-confidence transcriptional regulatory map covering 388 TFs from 47 families in Arabidopsis. Systematic analysis of this map revealed the architectural heterogeneity of developmental and stress response subnetworks and identified three types of novel network motifs that are absent from unicellular organisms and essential for multicellular development. Moreover, TFs of novel families that emerged during plant landing present higher binding specificities and are preferentially wired into developmental processes and these novel network motifs. Further unveiled connection between the binding specificity and wiring preference of TFs explains the wiring preferences of novel-family TFs. These results reveal distinct functional and evolutionary features of novel TFs, suggesting a plausible mechanism for their contribution to the evolution of multicellular organisms. PMID:25750178

  20. Six genetically distinct clades of Palola (Eunicidae, Annelida) from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Anja

    2015-01-01

    A total of 36 lots of Palola spp. (Eunicidae, Annelida) were collected during the Lizard Island Polychaete Workshop on Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. Of these, 21 specimens were sequenced for a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene. These sequences were analysed in conjunction with existing sequences of Palola spp. from other geographic regions. The samples from Lizard Island form six distinct clades, although none of them can clearly be assigned to any of the nominal species. Four of the six Lizard Island clades fall into species group A and the remaining two into species group B (which also includes the type species, Palola viridis). All sequenced specimens were characterized morphologically as far as possible and a dichotomous key was assembled. Based on this key, the remaining samples were identified as belonging to one of the clades. PMID:26624083

  1. Distinctive microstructural features of aged sodium silicate-activated slag concretes

    SciTech Connect

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Bernal, Susan A.; Mejía de Gutiérrez, Ruby; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van; Provis, John L.

    2014-11-15

    Electron microscopic characterisation of 7-year old alkali-activated blast-furnace slag concretes enabled the identification of distinct microstructural features, providing insight into the mechanisms by which these materials evolve over time. Backscattered electron images show the formation of Liesegang-type ring formations, suggesting that the reaction at advanced age is likely to follow an Oswald supersaturation–nucleation–depletion cycle. Segregation of Ca-rich veins, related to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2}, is observed in microcracked regions due to the ongoing reaction between the pore solution and available calcium from remnant slag grains. A highly dense and uniform interfacial transition zone is identified between siliceous aggregate particles and the alkali activated slag binders, across the concretes assessed. Alkali-activated slag concretes retain a highly dense and stable microstructure at advanced ages, where any microcracks induced at early ages seem to be partially closing, and the remnant slag grains continue reacting.

  2. Sharply distinct d-band quantum-well states in palladium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Srijan Kumar; Manna, Sujit; Przybylski, Marek; Stepanyuk, Valeri S.; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    We probe d-band quantum-well (QW) states in Pd nanofilms grown on Cu(001) using first- principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) experiments. This study reveals that QW states occur in the Pd overlayer films over a strikingly large film thickness and in a large binding energy range. The magnetic quantum number resolved orbital characters of these states are identified unambiguously by our DFT calculations. Calculations also demonstrate oscillatory multilayer relaxation and d-derived quantum size oscillation of the electronic density of states at the Fermi energy. The pseudomorphic growth, well-defined interface, and STS with single-layer thickness resolution allow us to probe individual QW states arising from the electron confinement along the growth axis of Pd films and to extract an accurate dispersion of the (?5-type) d electronic band, as these states are laterally highly localized and give rise to distinct and sharp peaks in the tunneling spectra.

  3. Protein patterns and proteins that identify subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Makoto; Weil, Robert J; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Huang, Steve; Lei, Jingqi; Huang, Tai-Nan; Lee, Youn-Soo; Bhowmick, Deb A; Lubensky, Irina A; Oldfield, Edward H; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2004-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been subdivided into two types based on clinical and genetic findings: primary tumors, which arise de novo, and secondary tumors, which progress from lower grade gliomas to GBMs. To analyse this dichotomy at the protein level, we employed selective tissue microdissection to obtain pure populations of tumor cells, which we studied using two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and protein sequencing of select target proteins. Protein patterns were analysed in a blinded manner from the clinical and genetic data. 2-DGE clearly identified two distinct populations of tumors. 2-DGE was reproducible and reliable, as multiple samples analysed from the same patient gave identical results. In addition, we isolated and sequenced 11 proteins that were uniquely expressed in either the primary or the secondary GBMs, but not both. We demonstrate that specific proteomic patterns can be reproducibly identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis from limited numbers of selectively procured, microdissected tumor cells and that two patterns of GBMs, primary versus secondary, previously distinguished by clinical and genetic differences, can be recognized at the protein level. Proteins that are expressed distinctively may have important implications for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of patients with GBM. PMID:15286718

  4. When distinctiveness fails, false memories prevail.

    PubMed

    Howe, M L

    1998-11-01

    The argument advanced in this article is that false memories can arise because of processes that normally affect forgetting, namely, the decline of distinctiveness and the rise of retroactive interference. Specifically, when the distinctiveness of a trace relative to the background of other traces diminishes, the potential for interference among like traces increases. To the extent that memories lose their distinctive properties, including the source of the memory, such memories may become confused with events that are supposed to be recalled as actually having occurred. This idea is elaborated in the context of studies of the effects of distinctiveness on reducing retroactive interference in children's long-term retention. It is concluded that advances in understanding false memories and the role distinctiveness might play in reducing such misrememberings is contingent on the development of additional formal modeling approaches like the one presented in the lead paper by Brainerd and Reyna (1998, this issue). PMID:9843622

  5. Common and Distinct Patterns of Affective Response in Dimensions of Anxiety and Depression

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Common and Distinct Patterns of Affective Response in Dimensions of Anxiety and Depression affective dimensions--anxious apprehension, anxious arousal, and anhedonic depression--using an emotion types of mood symptoms are discussed. Keywords: startle reflex, emotion, anxiety, depression, positive

  6. Distinct Genetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Daremipouran, Mohammad; Smoot, Duane T.; Lee, Edward; Brim, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Background Colon cancer (CRC) development often includes chromosomal instability (CIN) leading to amplifications and deletions of large DNA segments. Epidemiological, clinical, and cytogenetic studies showed that there are considerable differences between CRC tumors from African Americans (AAs) and Caucasian patients. In this study, we determined genomic copy number aberrations in sporadic CRC tumors from AAs, in order to investigate possible explanations for the observed disparities. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied genome-wide array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) using a 105k chip to identify copy number aberrations in samples from 15 AAs. In addition, we did a population comparative analysis with aCGH data in Caucasians as well as with a widely publicized list of colon cancer genes (CAN genes). There was an average of 20 aberrations per patient with more amplifications than deletions. Analysis of DNA copy number of frequently altered chromosomes revealed that deletions occurred primarily in chromosomes 4, 8 and 18. Chromosomal duplications occurred in more than 50% of cases on chromosomes 7, 8, 13, 20 and X. The CIN profile showed some differences when compared to Caucasian alterations. Conclusions/Significance Chromosome X amplification in male patients and chromosomes 4, 8 and 18 deletions were prominent aberrations in AAs. Some CAN genes were altered at high frequencies in AAs with EXOC4, EPHB6, GNAS, MLL3 and TBX22 as the most frequently deleted genes and HAPLN1, ADAM29, SMAD2 and SMAD4 as the most frequently amplified genes. The observed CIN may play a distinctive role in CRC in AAs. PMID:20126641

  7. M.D. With Distinction in Medical Education Page 1 MD with Distinction in Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    M.D. With Distinction in Medical Education Page 1 MD with Distinction in Medical Education Goals and Objectives The MD with Distinction in Medical Education Program provides UTHSCSA medical students with an opportunity to spend part of their medical school career participating in activities focused on different

  8. Ecological Dynamics of Two Distinct Viruses Infecting Marine Eukaryotic Decomposer Thraustochytrids (Labyrinthulomycetes, Stramenopiles).

    PubMed

    Takao, Yoshitake; Tomaru, Yuji; Nagasaki, Keizo; Honda, Daiske

    2015-01-01

    Thraustochytrids are cosmopolitan osmotrophic or heterotrophic microorganisms that are considered as important decomposers in coastal ecosystems. However, because of a lack of estimation method for each genus or systematic group of them, relatively little is known about their ecology in situ. Previously, we reported two distinct types of virus infecting thraustochytrids (AuRNAV: reported as SssRNAV, and SmDNAV) suggesting they have wide distributions in the host-virus systems of coastal environments. Here we conducted a field survey from 2004 through 2005 to show the fluctuation pattern of thraustochytrids and their viruses in Hiroshima Bay, Japan. During the field survey, we monitored the dynamics of the two types of thraustochytrid-infecting virus: small viruses causing lysis of Aurantiochytrium sp. NIBH N1-27 (identified as AuRNAV) and the large viruses of Sicyoidochytrium minutum NBRC 102975 (similar to SmDNAV in physiology and morphology). Fluctuation patterns of the two distinct types of virus were different from each other. This may reflect the difference in the preference of organic substrates; i.e., it may be likely the host of AuRNAV (Aurantiochytrium sp.) increases utilizing algal dead bodies or feeble cells as the virus shows a large increase in abundance following raphidophyte blooms; whereas, the trophic nutrient supply for S. minutum may primarily depend on other constantly-supplied organic compounds because it did not show any significant change in abundance throughout the survey. Further study concerning the population composition of thraustochytrids and their viruses may demonstrate the microbial ecology (especially concerning the detrital food web) of marine environments. PMID:26203654

  9. Relationship between Distinct African Cholera Epidemics Revealed via MLVA Haplotyping of 337 Vibrio cholerae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sandra; Miwanda, Berthe; Sadji, Adodo Yao; Thefenne, Hélène; Jeddi, Fakhri; Rebaudet, Stanislas; de Boeck, Hilde; Bidjada, Bawimodom; Depina, Jean-Jacques; Bompangue, Didier; Abedi, Aaron Aruna; Koivogui, Lamine; Keita, Sakoba; Garnotel, Eric; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Ruimy, Raymond; Thomson, Nicholas; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    Background Since cholera appeared in Africa during the 1970s, cases have been reported on the continent every year. In Sub-Saharan Africa, cholera outbreaks primarily cluster at certain hotspots including the African Great Lakes Region and West Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we applied MLVA (Multi-Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis) typing of 337 Vibrio cholerae isolates from recent cholera epidemics in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Zambia, Guinea and Togo. We aimed to assess the relationship between outbreaks. Applying this method, we identified 89 unique MLVA haplotypes across our isolate collection. MLVA typing revealed the short-term divergence and microevolution of these Vibrio cholerae populations to provide insight into the dynamics of cholera outbreaks in each country. Our analyses also revealed strong geographical clustering. Isolates from the African Great Lakes Region (DRC and Zambia) formed a closely related group, while West African isolates (Togo and Guinea) constituted a separate cluster. At a country-level scale our analyses revealed several distinct MLVA groups, most notably DRC 2011/2012, DRC 2009, Zambia 2012 and Guinea 2012. We also found that certain MLVA types collected in the DRC persisted in the country for several years, occasionally giving rise to expansive epidemics. Finally, we found that the six environmental isolates in our panel were unrelated to the epidemic isolates. Conclusions/Significance To effectively combat the disease, it is critical to understand the mechanisms of cholera emergence and diffusion in a region-specific manner. Overall, these findings demonstrate the relationship between distinct epidemics in West Africa and the African Great Lakes Region. This study also highlights the importance of monitoring and analyzing Vibrio cholerae isolates. PMID:26110870

  10. Ecological Dynamics of Two Distinct Viruses Infecting Marine Eukaryotic Decomposer Thraustochytrids (Labyrinthulomycetes, Stramenopiles)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Yoshitake; Tomaru, Yuji; Nagasaki, Keizo; Honda, Daiske

    2015-01-01

    Thraustochytrids are cosmopolitan osmotrophic or heterotrophic microorganisms that are considered as important decomposers in coastal ecosystems. However, because of a lack of estimation method for each genus or systematic group of them, relatively little is known about their ecology in situ. Previously, we reported two distinct types of virus infecting thraustochytrids (AuRNAV: reported as SssRNAV, and SmDNAV) suggesting they have wide distributions in the host-virus systems of coastal environments. Here we conducted a field survey from 2004 through 2005 to show the fluctuation pattern of thraustochytrids and their viruses in Hiroshima Bay, Japan. During the field survey, we monitored the dynamics of the two types of thraustochytrid-infecting virus: small viruses causing lysis of Aurantiochytrium sp. NIBH N1-27 (identified as AuRNAV) and the large viruses of Sicyoidochytrium minutum NBRC 102975 (similar to SmDNAV in physiology and morphology). Fluctuation patterns of the two distinct types of virus were different from each other. This may reflect the difference in the preference of organic substrates; i.e., it may be likely the host of AuRNAV (Aurantiochytrium sp.) increases utilizing algal dead bodies or feeble cells as the virus shows a large increase in abundance following raphidophyte blooms; whereas, the trophic nutrient supply for S. minutum may primarily depend on other constantly-supplied organic compounds because it did not show any significant change in abundance throughout the survey. Further study concerning the population composition of thraustochytrids and their viruses may demonstrate the microbial ecology (especially concerning the detrital food web) of marine environments. PMID:26203654

  11. Biallelic Mutation of BEST1 Causes a Distinct Retinopathy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Rosemary; Millar, Ian D.; Leroy, Bart P.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Fearon, Ian M.; De Baere, Elfrida; Brown, Peter D.; Robson, Anthony G.; Wright, Genevieve A.; Kestelyn, Philippe; Holder, Graham E.; Webster, Andrew R.; Manson, Forbes D.C.; Black, Graeme C.M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a distinct retinal disorder, autosomal-recessive bestrophinopathy (ARB), that is consequent upon biallelic mutation in BEST1 and is associated with central visual loss, a characteristic retinopathy, an absent electro-oculogram light rise, and a reduced electroretinogram. Heterozygous mutations in BEST1 have previously been found to cause the two dominantly inherited disorders, Best macular dystrophy and autosomal-dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy. The transmembrane protein bestrophin-1, encoded by BEST1, is located at the basolateral membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium in which it probably functions as a Cl? channel. We sequenced BEST1 in five families, identifying DNA variants in each of ten alleles. These encoded six different missense variants and one nonsense variant. The alleles segregated appropriately for a recessive disorder in each family. No clinical or electrophysiological abnormalities were identified in any heterozygotes. We conducted whole-cell patch-clamping of HEK293 cells transfected with bestrophin-1 to measure the Cl? current. Two ARB missense isoforms severely reduced channel activity. However, unlike two other alleles previously associated with Best disease, cotransfection with wild-type bestrophin-1 did not impair the formation of active wild-type bestrophin-1 channels, consistent with the recessive nature of the condition. We propose that ARB is the null phenotype of bestrophin-1 in humans. PMID:18179881

  12. Cellular diversity within embryonic stem cells: pluripotent clonal sublines show distinct differentiation potential

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Yannick; Béna, Frédérique; Gimelli, Stefania; Tirefort, Diderik; Dubois-Dauphin, Michel; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Preynat-Seauve, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem cells (ESC), derived from the early inner cell mass (ICM), are constituted of theoretically homogeneous pluripotent cells. Our study was designed to test this concept using experimental approaches that allowed characterization of progenies derived from single parental mouse ESC. Flow cytometry analysis showed that a fraction of ESC submitted to neural differentiation generates progenies that escape the desired phenotype. Live imaging of individual cells demonstrated significant variations in the capacity of parental ESC to generate neurons, raising the possibility of clonal diversity among ESC. To further substantiate this hypothesis, clonal sublines from ESC were generated by limit dilution. Transcriptome analysis of undifferentiated sublines showed marked differences in gene expression despite the fact that all clones expressed pluripotency markers. Sublines showed distinct differentiation potential, both in phenotypic differentiation assays and with respect to gene expression in embryoid bodies. Clones generated from another ESC line also showed individualities in their differentiation potential, demonstrating the wider applicability of these findings. Taken together, our observations demonstrate that pluripotent ESC consist of individual cell types with distinct differentiation potentials. These findings identify novel elements for the biological understanding of ESC and provide new tools with a major potential for their future in vitro and in vivo use. PMID:21535399

  13. Identifying Differences in Cultural Behavior in Online Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Michelle L.; Engel, David W.; Bell, Eric B.; Mcgrath, Liam R.

    2012-07-23

    We have developed methods to identify online communities, or groups, using a combination of structural information variables and content information variables from weblog posts and their comments to build a characteristic footprint for groups. We have worked with both explicitly connected groups and 'abstract' groups, in which the connection between individuals is in interest (as determined by content based features) and behavior (metadata based features) as opposed to explicit links. We find that these variables do a good job at identifying groups, placing members within a group, and helping determine the appropriate granularity for group boundaries. The group footprint can then be used to identify differences between the online groups. In the work described here we are interested in determining how an individual's online behavior is influenced by their membership in more than one group. For example, individuals belong to a certain culture; they may belong as well to a demographic group, and other 'chosen' groups such as churches or clubs. There is a plethora of evidence surrounding the culturally sensitive adoption, use, and behavior on the Internet. In this work we begin to investigate how culturally defined internet behaviors may influence behaviors of subgroups. We do this through a series of experiments in which we analyze the interaction between culturally defined behaviors and the behaviors of the subgroups. Our goal is to (a) identify if our features can capture cultural distinctions in internet use, and (b) determine what kinds of interaction there are between levels and types of groups.

  14. Transcriptome analyses of early cucumber fruit growth identifies distinct gene modules associated with phases of development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Early stages of fruit development from initial set through exponential growth are critical determinants of size and yield, however, there has been little detailed analysis of this phase of development. In this study we combined morphological analysis with 454 pyrosequencing to study transcript level changes occurring in young cucumber fruit at five ages from anthesis through the end of exponential growth. Results The fruit samples produced 1.13 million ESTs which were assembled into 27,859 contigs with a mean length of 834 base pairs and a mean of 67 reads per contig. All contigs were mapped to the cucumber genome. Principal component analysis separated the fruit ages into three groups corresponding with cell division/pre-exponential growth (0 and 4 days post pollination (dpp)), peak exponential expansion (8dpp), and late/post-exponential expansion stages of growth (12 and 16 dpp). Transcripts predominantly expressed at 0 and 4 dpp included homologs of histones, cyclins, and plastid and photosynthesis related genes. The group of genes with peak transcript levels at 8dpp included cytoskeleton, cell wall, lipid metabolism and phloem related proteins. This group was also dominated by genes with unknown function or without known homologs outside of cucurbits. A second shift in transcript profile was observed at 12-16dpp, which was characterized by abiotic and biotic stress related genes and significant enrichment for transcription factor gene homologs, including many associated with stress response and development. Conclusions The transcriptome data coupled with morphological analyses provide an informative picture of early fruit development. Progressive waves of transcript abundance were associated with cell division, development of photosynthetic capacity, cell expansion and fruit growth, phloem activity, protection of the fruit surface, and finally transition away from fruit growth toward a stage of enhanced stress responses. These results suggest that the interval between expansive growth and ripening includes further developmental differentiation with an emphasis on defense. The increased transcript levels of cucurbit-specific genes during the exponential growth stage may indicate unique factors contributing to rapid growth in cucurbits. PMID:23031452

  15. Distinct Genomic Profiles in Hereditary Breast Tumors Identified by Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    E-print Network

    Ringnér, Markus

    Lund Strategic Research Center for Stem Cell Biology and Cell Therapy and 3 Department of Theoretical Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and 6 Section of Cancer Genetics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey, United Kingdom Abstract Mutations in BRCA1

  16. Distinct disease phases in muscles of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy patients identified by MR detected fat infiltration.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Barbara H; Voet, Nicoline B M; Nabuurs, Christine I; Kan, Hermien E; de Rooy, Jacky W J; Geurts, Alexander C; Padberg, George W; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an untreatable disease, characterized by asymmetric progressive weakness of skeletal muscle with fatty infiltration. Although the main genetic defect has been uncovered, the downstream mechanisms causing FSHD are not understood. The objective of this study was to determine natural disease state and progression in muscles of FSHD patients and to establish diagnostic biomarkers by quantitative MRI of fat infiltration and phosphorylated metabolites. MRI was performed at 3T with dedicated coils on legs of 41 patients (28 men/13 women, age 34-76 years), of which eleven were re-examined after four months of usual care. Muscular fat fraction was determined with multi spin-echo and T1 weighted MRI, edema by TIRM and phosphorylated metabolites by 3D (31)P MR spectroscopic imaging. Fat fractions were compared to clinical severity, muscle force, age, edema and phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP. Longitudinal intramuscular fat fraction variation was analyzed by linear regression. Increased intramuscular fat correlated with age (p<0.05), FSHD severity score (p<0.0001), inversely with muscle strength (p<0.0001), and also occurred sub-clinically. Muscles were nearly dichotomously divided in those with high and with low fat fraction, with only 13% having an intermediate fat fraction. The intramuscular fat fraction along the muscle's length, increased from proximal to distal. This fat gradient was the steepest for intermediate fat infiltrated muscles (0.07±0.01/cm, p<0.001). Leg muscles in this intermediate phase showed a decreased PCr/ATP (p<0.05) and the fastest increase in fatty infiltration over time (0.18±0.15/year, p<0.001), which correlated with initial edema (p<0.01), if present. Thus, in the MR assessment of fat infiltration as biomarker for diseased muscles, the intramuscular fat distribution needs to be taken into account. Our results indicate that healthy individual leg muscles become diseased by entering a progressive phase with distal fat infiltration and altered energy metabolite levels. Fat replacement then relatively rapidly spreads over the whole muscle. PMID:24454861

  17. Distinct profiles of human embryonic stem cell metabolism and mitochondria identified by oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jarmon G; Rathjen, Joy; Sheedy, John R; Gardner, David K; Harvey, Alexandra J

    2015-10-01

    Oxygen is a powerful regulator of cell function and embryonic development. It has previously been determined that oxygen regulates human embryonic stem (hES) cell glycolytic and amino acid metabolism, but the effects on mitochondria are as yet unknown. Two hES cell lines (MEL1, MEL2) were analyzed to determine the role of 5% (physiological) and 20% (atmospheric) oxygen in regulating mitochondrial activity. In response to extended physiological oxygen culture, MEL2 hES cells displayed reduced mtDNA content, mitochondrial mass and expression of metabolic genes TFAM, NRF1, PPARa and MT-ND4. Furthermore, MEL2 hES cell glucose consumption, lactate production and amino acid turnover were elevated under physiological oxygen. In stark contrast, MEL1 hES cell amino acid and carbohydrate use and mitochondrial function were relatively unaltered in response to oxygen. Furthermore, differentiation kinetics were delayed in the MEL1 hES cell line following BMP4 treatment. Here we report the first incidence of metabolic dysfunction in a hES cell population, defined as a failure to respond to oxygen concentration through the modulation of metabolism, demonstrating that hES cells can be perturbed during culture despite exhibiting the defining characteristics of pluripotent cells. Collectively, these data reveal a central role for oxygen in the regulation of hES cell metabolism and mitochondrial function, whereby physiological oxygen promotes glucose flux and suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis and gene expression. PMID:26159831

  18. Distinct Disease Phases in Muscles of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients Identified by MR Detected Fat Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Barbara H.; Voet, Nicoline B. M.; Nabuurs, Christine I.; Kan, Hermien E.; de Rooy, Jacky W. J.; Geurts, Alexander C.; Padberg, George W.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an untreatable disease, characterized by asymmetric progressive weakness of skeletal muscle with fatty infiltration. Although the main genetic defect has been uncovered, the downstream mechanisms causing FSHD are not understood. The objective of this study was to determine natural disease state and progression in muscles of FSHD patients and to establish diagnostic biomarkers by quantitative MRI of fat infiltration and phosphorylated metabolites. MRI was performed at 3T with dedicated coils on legs of 41 patients (28 men/13 women, age 34–76 years), of which eleven were re-examined after four months of usual care. Muscular fat fraction was determined with multi spin-echo and T1 weighted MRI, edema by TIRM and phosphorylated metabolites by 3D 31P MR spectroscopic imaging. Fat fractions were compared to clinical severity, muscle force, age, edema and phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP. Longitudinal intramuscular fat fraction variation was analyzed by linear regression. Increased intramuscular fat correlated with age (p<0.05), FSHD severity score (p<0.0001), inversely with muscle strength (p<0.0001), and also occurred sub-clinically. Muscles were nearly dichotomously divided in those with high and with low fat fraction, with only 13% having an intermediate fat fraction. The intramuscular fat fraction along the muscle’s length, increased from proximal to distal. This fat gradient was the steepest for intermediate fat infiltrated muscles (0.07±0.01/cm, p<0.001). Leg muscles in this intermediate phase showed a decreased PCr/ATP (p<0.05) and the fastest increase in fatty infiltration over time (0.18±0.15/year, p<0.001), which correlated with initial edema (p<0.01), if present. Thus, in the MR assessment of fat infiltration as biomarker for diseased muscles, the intramuscular fat distribution needs to be taken into account. Our results indicate that healthy individual leg muscles become diseased by entering a progressive phase with distal fat infiltration and altered energy metabolite levels. Fat replacement then relatively rapidly spreads over the whole muscle. PMID:24454861

  19. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  20. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  1. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  2. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  3. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT §...

  4. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences. Aims To examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders. Method We performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes. Results Basal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders. Conclusions From a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  5. Strategy, Distinctive Competence, and Organizational Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Charles C.; Hrebiniak, Lawrence G.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the perceptions of top managers in four industries (plastics, semiconductors, automotives, and air transportation) who examined relationships among strategy, distinctive competence, and organizational performance. (Author/IRT)

  6. Hemispheric lateralization of semantic feature distinctiveness

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, M.; Machado, N.; Blumstein, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent models of semantic memory propose that the semantic representation of concepts is based, in part, on a network of features. In this view, a feature that is distinctive for an object (a zebra has stripes) is processed differently from a feature that is shared across many objects (a zebra has four legs). The goal of this paper is to determine whether there are hemispheric differences in such processing. In a feature verification task, participants responded ‘yes’ or ‘no’ following concepts which were presented to a single visual field (left or right) paired with a shared or distinctive feature. Both hemispheres showed faster reaction times to shared features than to distinctive features, although right hemisphere responses were significantly slower overall and particularly in the processing of distinctive features. These findings support models of semantic processing in which the dominant left hemisphere more efficiently performs highly discriminating ‘fine’ encoding, in contrast to the right hemisphere which performs less discriminating ‘coarse’ encoding. PMID:26022059

  7. On Count/Mass Distinction in Slovene

    E-print Network

    Mitrovi?, Moreno

    2011-01-01

    oznacuje oblikoslovno. V clanku so predlagane pomenoslovne in skladenjske analize števnosti slovenskega samostalnika. ENG: This paper is a model-theoretic investigation into the count/mass distinction in Slovene. It overviews and accounts for Slovene nouns...

  8. ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS AND TUTORIALS Distinctive Undergraduate Scholarships

    E-print Network

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    11 ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS AND TUTORIALS Distinctive Undergraduate Scholarships Williams College, through the Office of Financial Aid, administers over three hundred endowed scholarships, all of which for all these and other endowed scholarships. No separate ap- plication is required. Limited space

  9. Hemispheric lateralization of semantic feature distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Reilly, M; Machado, N; Blumstein, S E

    2015-08-01

    Recent models of semantic memory propose that the semantic representation of concepts is based, in part, on a network of features. In this view, a feature that is distinctive for an object (a zebra has stripes) is processed differently from a feature that is shared across many objects (a zebra has four legs). The goal of this paper is to determine whether there are hemispheric differences in such processing. In a feature verification task, participants responded 'yes' or 'no' following concepts which were presented to a single visual field (left or right) paired with a shared or distinctive feature. Both hemispheres showed faster reaction times to shared features than to distinctive features, although right hemisphere responses were significantly slower overall and particularly in the processing of distinctive features. These findings support models of semantic processing in which the dominant left hemisphere more efficiently performs highly discriminating 'fine' encoding, in contrast to the right hemisphere which performs less discriminating 'coarse' encoding. PMID:26022059

  10. Distinction bias: misprediction and mischoice due to joint evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hsee, Christopher K; Zhang, Jiao

    2004-05-01

    This research identifies a new source of failure to make accurate affective predictions or to make experientially optimal choices. When people make predictions or choices, they are often in the joint evaluation (JE) mode; when people actually experience an event, they are often in the single evaluation (SE) mode. The "utility function" of an attribute can vary systematically between SE and JE. When people in JE make predictions or choices for events to be experienced in SE, they often resort to their JE preferences rather than their SE preferences and overpredict the difference that different values of an attribute (e.g., different salaries) will make to their happiness in SE. This overprediction is referred to as the distinction bias. The present research also specifies when the distinction bias occurs and when it does not. This research contributes to literatures on experienced utility, affective forecasting, and happiness. PMID:15161394

  11. Assembly and structure of Lys33-linked polyubiquitin reveals distinct conformations

    PubMed Central

    Kristariyanto, Yosua Adi; Choi, Soo-Youn; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Campbell, David G; Morrice, Nicholas A; Toth, Rachel; Kulathu, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitylation regulates a multitude of biological processes and this versatility stems from the ability of ubiquitin (Ub) to form topologically different polymers of eight different linkage types. Whereas some linkages have been studied in detail, other linkage types including Lys33-linked polyUb are poorly understood. In the present study, we identify an enzymatic system for the large-scale assembly of Lys33 chains by combining the HECT (homologous to the E6–AP C-terminus) E3 ligase AREL1 (apoptosis-resistant E3 Ub protein ligase 1) with linkage selective deubiquitinases (DUBs). Moreover, this first characterization of the chain selectivity of AREL1 indicates its preference for assembling Lys33- and Lys11-linked Ub chains. Intriguingly, the crystal structure of Lys33-linked diUb reveals that it adopts a compact conformation very similar to that observed for Lys11-linked diUb. In contrast, crystallographic analysis of Lys33-linked triUb reveals a more extended conformation. These two distinct conformational states of Lys33-linked polyUb may be selectively recognized by Ub-binding domains (UBD) and enzymes of the Ub system. Importantly, our work provides a method to assemble Lys33-linked polyUb that will allow further characterization of this atypical chain type. PMID:25723849

  12. Distinct roles of yeast MEC and RAD checkpoint genes in transcriptional induction after DNA damage and implications for function.

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, G L; Weinert, T A

    1996-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, checkpoint genes cause arrest of cell division when DNA is damaged or when DNA replication is blocked. In this study of budding yeast checkpoint genes, we identify and characterize another role for these checkpoint genes after DNA damage-transcriptional induction of genes. We found that three checkpoint genes (of six genes tested) have strong and distinct roles in transcriptional induction in four distinct pathways of regulation (each defined by induction of specific genes). MEC1 mediates the response in three transcriptional pathways, RAD53 mediates two of these pathways, and RAD17 mediates but a single pathway. The three other checkpoint genes (including RAD9) have small (twofold) but significant roles in transcriptional induction in all pathways. One of the pathways that we identify here leads to induction of MEC1 and RAD53 checkpoint genes themselves. This suggests a positive feedback circuit that may increase the cell's ability to respond to DNA damage. We make two primary conclusions from these studies. First, MEC1 appears to be the key regulator because it is required for all responses (both transcriptional and cell cycle arrest), while other genes serve only a subset of these responses. Second, the two types of responses, transcriptional induction and cell cycle arrest, appear distinct because both require MEC1 yet only cell cycle arrest requires RAD9. These and other results were used to formulate a working model of checkpoint gene function that accounts for roles of different checkpoint genes in different responses and after different types of damage. The conclusion that the yeast MEC1 gene is a key regulator also has implications for the role of a putative human homologue, the ATM gene. Images PMID:8744945

  13. Puerto Rico and Florida manatees represent genetically distinct groups

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A.; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; King, Timothy L.; Bonde, Robert K.; Gray, Brian A.; McGuire, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) populations in Florida (T. m. latirostris) and Puerto Rico (T. m. manatus) are considered distinct subspecies and are listed together as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act. Sustained management and conservation efforts for the Florida subspecies have led to the suggested reclassification of the species to a threatened or delisted status. However, the two populations are geographically distant, morphologically distinct, and habitat degradation and boat strikes continue to threaten the Puerto Rico population. Here, 15 microsatellite markers and mitochondrial control region sequences were used to determine the relatedness of the two populations and investigate the genetic diversity and phylogeographic organization of the Puerto Rico population. Highly divergent allele frequencies were identified between Florida and Puerto Rico using microsatellite (F ST = 0.16; R ST = 0.12 (P ST = 0.66; ? ST = 0.50 (P E = 0.45; NA = 3.9), were similar, but lower than those previously identified in Florida (HE = 0.48, NA = 4.8). Within Puerto Rico, the mitochondrial genetic diversity values (? = 0.001; h = 0.49) were slightly lower than those previously reported (? = 0.002; h = 0.54) and strong phylogeographic structure was identified (F ST global = 0.82; ? ST global = 0.78 (P < 0.001)). The genetic division with Florida, low diversity, small population size (N = 250), and distinct threats and habitat emphasize the need for separate protections in Puerto Rico. Conservation efforts including threat mitigation, migration corridors, and protection of subpopulations could lead to improved genetic variation in the endangered Puerto Rico manatee population.

  14. Discriminatory Indices of Typing Methods for Epidemiologic Analysis of Contemporary Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Marcela; Hogan, Patrick G.; Satola, Sarah W.; Crispell, Emily; Wylie, Todd; Gao, Hongyu; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Historically, a number of typing methods have been evaluated for Staphylococcus aureus strain characterization. The emergence of contemporary strains of community-associated S. aureus, and the ensuing epidemic with a predominant strain type (USA300), necessitates re-evaluation of the discriminatory power of these typing methods for discerning molecular epidemiology and transmission dynamics, essential to investigations of hospital and community outbreaks. We compared the discriminatory index of 5 typing methods for contemporary S. aureus strain characterization. Children presenting to St. Louis Children's Hospital and community pediatric practices in St. Louis, Missouri (MO), with community-associated S. aureus infections were enrolled. Repetitive sequence-based PCR (repPCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal protein A (spa), and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing were performed on 200 S. aureus isolates. The discriminatory index of each method was calculated using the standard formula for this metric, where a value of 1 is highly discriminatory and a value of 0 is not discriminatory. Overall, we identified 26 distinct strain types by repPCR, 17 strain types by PFGE, 30 strain types by MLST, 68 strain types by spa typing, and 5 strain types by SCCmec typing. RepPCR had the highest discriminatory index (D) of all methods (D?=?0.88), followed by spa typing (D?=?0.87), MLST (D?=?0.84), PFGE (D?=?0.76), and SCCmec typing (D?=?0.60). The method with the highest D among MRSA isolates was repPCR (D?=?0.64) followed by spa typing (D?=?0.45) and MLST (D?=?0.44). The method with the highest D among MSSA isolates was spa typing (D?=?0.98), followed by MLST (D?=?0.93), repPCR (D?=?0.92), and PFGE (D?=?0.89). Among isolates designated USA300 by PFGE, repPCR was most discriminatory, with 10 distinct strain types identified (D?=?0.63). We identified 45 MRSA isolates which were classified as identical by PFGE, MLST, spa typing, and SCCmec typing (USA300, ST8, t008, SCCmec IV, respectively); within this collection, there were 5 distinct strain types identified by repPCR. The typing methods yielded comparable discriminatory power for S. aureus characterization overall; when discriminating among USA300 isolates, repPCR retained the highest discriminatory power. This property is advantageous for investigations conducted in the era of contemporary S. aureus infections. PMID:26376402

  15. Identifying Savings Opportunities 

    E-print Network

    Chari, S.

    1993-01-01

    process to identify any opportunity through change of process. Such opportunities to change end-use processes in the auto parts manufacturing facility were not identified. Change the Entire System Of all the DSM measures, this is the hardest one...

  16. Uclacyanins, stellacyanins, and plantacyanins are distinct subfamilies of phytocyanins: plant-specific mononuclear blue copper proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nersissian, A. M.; Immoos, C.; Hill, M. G.; Hart, P. J.; Williams, G.; Herrmann, R. G.; Valentine, J. S.

    1998-01-01

    The cDNAs encoding plantacyanin from spinach were isolated and characterized. In addition, four new cDNA sequences from Arabidopsis ESTs were identified that encode polypeptides resembling phytocyanins, plant-specific proteins constituting a distinct family of mononuclear blue copper proteins. One of them encodes plantacyanin from Arabidopsis, while three others, designated as uclacyanin 1, 2, and 3, encode protein precursors that are closely related to precursors of stellacyanins and a blue copper protein from pea pods. Comparative analyses with known phytocyanins allow further classification of these proteins into three distinct subfamilies designated as uclacyanins, stellacyanins, and plantacyanins. This specification is based on (1) their spectroscopic properties, (2) their glycosylation state, (3) the domain organization of their precursors, and (4) their copper-binding amino acids. The recombinant copper binding domain of Arabidopsis uclacyanin 1 was expressed, purified, and shown to bind a copper atom in a fashion known as "blue" or type 1. The mutant of cucumber stellacyanin in which the glutamine axial ligand was substituted by a methionine (Q99M) was purified and shown to possess spectroscopic properties similar to uclacyanin 1 rather than to plantacyanins. Its redox potential was determined by cyclic voltammetry to be +420 mV, a value that is significantly higher than that determined for the wild-type protein (+260 mV). The available structural data suggest that stellacyanins (and possibly other phytocyanins) might not be diffusible electron-transfer proteins participating in long-range electron-transfer processes. Conceivably, they are involved in redox reactions occurring during primary defense responses in plants and/or in lignin formation. PMID:9761472

  17. Identifying Signs of Tinea Pedis: A Key to Understanding Clinical Variables.

    PubMed

    Canavan, Theresa N; Elewski, Boni E

    2015-10-01

    Tinea pedis is a frequently encountered dermatophytosis affecting the superficial skin of the feet, primarily of adults. The prevalence of tinea pedis has increased over the last several decades due to an increase in multiple risk factors. Infection from dermatophytes is most common, but infection from other fungi can also result in tinea pedis. Four distinct clinical presentations occur: interdigital, moccasin, vesicular, and acute ulcerative types. A variety of physical exam findings can help the clinician identify patients with tinea pedis.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2015;14(suppl 10):s42-s47. PMID:26461834

  18. Remembering and knowing: electrophysiological distinctions at encoding but not retrieval.

    PubMed

    Voss, Joel L; Paller, Ken A

    2009-05-15

    Contemporary memory theories often distinguish between contextual recollection and acontextual familiarity as two fundamentally different types of recognition memory. It is currently unclear whether recollection and familiarity are supported by two correspondingly distinct retrieval mechanisms, or whether the same type of retrieval processing supports both phenomena. Electrophysiological findings in humans have widely been cited as support for the former, two-process position, in that late-onset parietal "LPC" potentials have been linked to recollection and earlier frontal "FN400" potentials to familiarity. However, recognition memory is generally studied using conceptually rich stimuli such as words, which leaves open an alternative interpretation that one or both of these electrophysiological signals reflect conceptual processing distinct from recollection and familiarity per se. We tested this hypothesis using conceptually impoverished kaleidoscope images, such that opportunities for conceptual processing were minimized. Recollection-based and familiarity-based recognition in a remember/know paradigm were both indexed by LPC potentials. Old/new amplitude differences were greater for recollection compared to familiarity. Despite ample familiarity-based recognition, FN400 old/new effects were not observed, consistent with the contention that these potentials index conceptual processing rather than familiarity. These results cast doubt on interpretations of prior electrophysiological evidence obtained using conceptually rich stimuli as dissociating neural mechanisms of recollection and familiarity. We also found that neural events during encoding differentially predicted later recollection versus later familiarity. Collectively, these findings suggest that the engagement of distinct encoding processes can preferentially lead to recollection or to familiarity even if one type of retrieval process is responsible for both memory expressions. PMID:19457375

  19. Distinctive Serum miRNA Profile in Mouse Models of Striated Muscular Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Paul; Duvallet, Angélique; Poupiot, Jérôme; Charrier, Sabine; Arock, Michel; Montus, Marie; Nelson, Isabelle; Richard, Isabelle; Carrier, Lucie; Servais, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Bonne, Gisèle; Israeli, David

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers are critically important for disease diagnosis and monitoring. In particular, close monitoring of disease evolution is eminently required for the evaluation of therapeutic treatments. Classical monitoring methods in muscular dystrophies are largely based on histological and molecular analyses of muscle biopsies. Such biopsies are invasive and therefore difficult to obtain. The serum protein creatine kinase is a useful biomarker, which is however not specific for a given pathology and correlates poorly with the severity or course of the muscular pathology. The aim of the present study was the systematic evaluation of serum microRNAs (miRNAs) as biomarkers in striated muscle pathologies. Mouse models for five striated muscle pathologies were investigated: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C), Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Two-step RT-qPCR methodology was elaborated, using two different RT-qPCR miRNA quantification technologies. We identified miRNA modulation in the serum of all the five mouse models. The most highly dysregulated serum miRNAs were found to be commonly upregulated in DMD, LGMD2D and LGMD2C mouse models, which all exhibit massive destruction of striated muscle tissues. Some of these miRNAs were down rather than upregulated in the EDMD mice, a model without massive myofiber destruction. The dysregulated miRNAs identified in the HCM model were different, with the exception of one dysregulated miRNA common to all pathologies. Importantly, a specific and distinctive circulating miRNA profile was identified for each studied pathological mouse model. The differential expression of a few dysregulated miRNAs in the DMD mice was further evaluated in DMD patients, providing new candidates of circulating miRNA biomarkers for DMD. PMID:23418438

  20. Marquette Island: A Distinct Mafic Lithology Discovered by Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Gellert, R.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; Fleischer, I.; Jolliff, B. L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Ming, D. W.; Yingst, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    While rolling over the Meridiani Planum sedimentary terrane, the rover Opportunity has occasionally discovered large, > 10 cm erratics. Most of these have proven to be meteorites [1], but one - Bounce Rock - is a martian basaltic rock similar in composition to the meteorite EETA79001 lithology B [2]. Presently, Opportunity is intensively investigating an --30 cm tall rock named Marquette Island that may be a distinct type of martian mafic lithology. We report the results of its continuing investigation using the Microscopic Imager (MI); Mossbauer Spectrometer (MB) and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). A companion abstract discusses the results of Panoramic Camera (Pancam) imaging of the rock [3].

  1. Quantitative Interactor Screening with next-generation Sequencing (QIS-Seq) identifies Arabidopsis thaliana MLO2 as a target of the Psuedomonas syringe type III effector HopZ2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Identification of protein-protein interactions is a fundamental aspect of understanding protein function. A commonly used method for identifying protein interactions is the yeast two-hybrid system. Results: Here we describe the application of next-generation sequencing to yeast two-hybri...

  2. Identifying vacancy complexes in compound semiconductors with positron annihilation spectroscopy: a case study of InN

    E-print Network

    Rauch, Christian; Tuomisto, Filip

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of vacancy and vacancy-impurity complexes in InN combining positron annihilation spectroscopy and ab-initio calculations. Positron densities and annihilation characteristics of common vacancy-type defects are calculated using density functional theory and the feasibility of their experimental detection and distinction with positron annihilation methods is discussed. The computational results are compared to positron lifetime and conventional as well as coincidence Doppler broadening measurements of several representative InN samples. The particular dominant vacancy-type positron traps are identified and their characteristic positron lifetimes, Doppler ratio curves and lineshape parameters determined. We find that In vacancies and their complexes with N vacancies or impurities act as efficient positron traps, inducing distinct changes in the annihilation parameters compared to the InN lattice. Neutral or positively charged N vacancies and pure N vacancy complexes on the other h...

  3. Identifying Relationships Among Lower Extremity Alignment Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Shultz, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Context: The relationship between lower extremity alignment and lower extremity injury risk remains poorly understood, perhaps because most authors have examined only individual or a select group of alignment variables. Examining the relationships among alignment variables may allow us to more accurately describe lower extremity posture and clarify the relationship between lower extremity alignment and injury risk in future studies. Objective: To measure lower extremity alignment variables and examine whether relationships could be identified among these variables. Design: Observational study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Two hundred eighteen (102 males: age ?=? 23.1 ± 3.2 years, height ?=? 177.3 ± 8.4 cm, mass ?=? 80.8 ± 13.0 kg; 116 females: age ?=? 21.8 ± 2.7 years, height ?=? 163.5 ± 7.4 cm, mass ?=? 63.4 ± 12.4 kg) healthy, college-aged participants. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured pelvic angle, femoral anteversion, quadriceps angle, tibiofemoral angle, genu recurvatum, and tibial torsion to the nearest degree and navicular drop to the nearest millimeter on the right and left lower extremities. Separate principal components factor analyses were performed for each sex and side (left, right). Results: A distinct lower extremity factor was identified, with relationships observed among increased pelvic angle, increased quadriceps angle, and increased tibiofemoral angle. A second distinct lower extremity factor was identified, with relationships observed among increased supine genu recurvatum, decreased tibial torsion, and increased navicular drop. Femoral anteversion loaded as an independent third factor. These distinct lower extremity alignment factors were consistent across side and sex. Conclusions: Factor analysis identified 3 distinct lower extremity alignment factors that describe the potential interactions among lower extremity alignment variables. Future authors should examine how these collective alignment variables, both independently and in combination, influence dynamic knee function and risk for lower extremity injuries. PMID:19771290

  4. Adenosine/guanosine preferring nucleoside ribohydrolase is a distinct, druggable antitrichomonal target.

    PubMed

    Beck, Sierra; Muellers, Samantha N; Benzie, Annie Laurie; Parkin, David W; Stockman, Brian J

    2015-11-15

    Nucleoside salvage pathway enzymes used by Trichomonas vaginalis are distinct from the pathway involved in activation of existing 5-nitroimidazole drugs. They thus represent excellent targets for developing novel, mechanism-based antitrichomonal agents. The purine-specific adenosine/guanosine preferring ribohydrolase (AGNH) was screened against the NIH Clinical Collection to assess its druggability. Eight compounds, including five flavonoids, were identified with IC50 values ?10?M and confirmed in counter screens run in the presence of detergent. The inhibitors are structurally distinct from inhibitors of the pyrimidine-specific uridine ribohydrolase (UNH) thus indicating that AGNH is a distinct, druggable target from UNH. PMID:26592812

  5. Deep-sea seabed habitats: Do they support distinct mega-epifaunal communities that have different vulnerabilities to anthropogenic disturbance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, David A.; Rowden, Ashley A.; Leduc, Daniel; Beaumont, Jennifer; Clark, Malcolm R.

    2016-01-01

    Growing economic interest in seabed resources in the deep-sea highlights the need for information about the spatial distribution and vulnerability to disturbance of benthic habitats and fauna. Categorisation of seabed habitats for management is often based on topographic features such as canyons and seamounts that can be distinguished using regional bathymetry ('mega-habitats'). This is practical but because such habitats are contiguous with others, there is potential for overlap in the communities associated with them. Because concepts of habitat and community vulnerability are based on the traits of individual taxa, the nature and extent of differences between communities have implications for strategies to manage the environmental effects of resource use. Using towed video camera transects, we surveyed mega-epifaunal communities of three topographically-defined habitats (canyon, seamount or knoll, and continental slope) and two physico-chemically defined meso-scale habitats (cold seep and hydrothermal vent) in two regions off New Zealand to assess whether each supports a distinct type of community. Cold seep and hydrothermal vent communities were strongly distinct from those in other habitats. Across the other habitats, however, distinctions between communities were often weak and were not consistent between regions. Dissimilarities among communities across all habitats were stronger and the density of filter-feeding taxa was higher in the Bay of Plenty than on the Hikurangi Margin, whereas densities of predatory and scavenging taxa were higher on the Hikurangi Margin. Substratum diversity at small spatial scales (<1 km) and trawl history were significantly correlated with community composition in both regions. We conclude that, (1) a lack of consistent distinction between communities raises questions about the general utility of topographically-defined mega-habitats in environmental management, (2) fine-scale survey of individual features is necessary to identify the locations, characteristics, and extents of ecologically important or vulnerable seabed communities, and (3) evaluation of habitat vulnerability to future events should be in the context of previous and current disturbances.

  6. Choline acetyltransferase-like immunoreactivity in a physiologically distinct subtype of olfactory nonspiking local interneurons in the cockroach (periplaneta americana).

    PubMed

    Fusca, Debora; Husch, Andreas; Baumann, Arnd; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2013-10-15

    Behavioral and physiological studies have shown that local interneurons are pivotal for processing odor information in the insect antennal lobe. They mediate inhibitory and excitatory interactions between the glomerular pathways and ultimately shape the tuning profile of projection neurons. To identify putative cholinergic local interneurons in the antennal lobe of Periplaneta americana, an antibody raised against the biosynthetic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) was applied to individual morphologically and electrophysiologically characterized local interneurons. In nonspiking type IIa1 local interneurons, which were classified in this study, we found ChAT-like immunoreactivity suggesting that they are most likely excitatory. This is a well-defined population of neurons that generates Ca(2+) -driven spikelets upon depolarization and stimulation with odorants, but not Na(+) -driven action potentials, because they lack voltage-activated transient Na(+) currents. The nonspiking type IIa2 and type IIb local interneurons, in which Ca(2+) -driven spikelets were absent, had no ChAT-like immunoreactivity. The GABA-like immunoreactive, spiking type I local interneurons had no ChAT-like immunoreactivity. In addition, we showed that uniglomerular projection neurons with cell bodies located in the ventral portion of the ventrolateral somata group and projections along the inner antennocerebral tract exhibited ChAT-like immunoreactivity. Assigning potential transmitters and neuromodulators to distinct morphological and electrophysiological types of antennal lobe neurons is an important prerequisite for a detailed understanding of odor information processing in insects. PMID:23749599

  7. Fluctuation of similarity to detect transitions between distinct dynamical regimes in short time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nishant; Marwan, Norbert; Zou, Yong; Mucha, Peter J.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    A method to identify distinct dynamical regimes and transitions between those regimes in a short univariate time series was recently introduced [N. Malik et al., Europhys. Lett. 97, 40009 (2012), 10.1209/0295-5075/97/40009], employing the computation of fluctuations in a measure of nonlinear similarity based on local recurrence properties. In this work, we describe the details of the analytical relationships between this newly introduced measure and the well-known concepts of attractor dimensions and Lyapunov exponents. We show that the new measure has linear dependence on the effective dimension of the attractor and it measures the variations in the sum of the Lyapunov spectrum. To illustrate the practical usefulness of the method, we identify various types of dynamical transitions in different nonlinear models. We present testbed examples for the new method's robustness against noise and missing values in the time series. We also use this method to analyze time series of social dynamics, specifically an analysis of the US crime record time series from 1975 to 1993. Using this method, we find that dynamical complexity in robberies was influenced by the unemployment rate until the late 1980s. We have also observed a dynamical transition in homicide and robbery rates in the late 1980s and early 1990s, leading to increase in the dynamical complexity of these rates.

  8. Is Postpartum Depression a Distinct Disorder?

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Arianna; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2015-10-01

    The nosology of postpartum depression (PPD) is controversial. We review the evidence and arguments for and against the recognition of PPD as a distinct disorder and discuss the etiopathogenic and diagnostic validity of PPD as a distinct disorder, including its utility and indications for further research. Although multiple epidemiological and clinical studies have found that depression is more common following childbirth than at other times in a woman's life, there is conflicting evidence for the validity of PPD as a distinct disorder. PPD is likely to be a complex phenotype, encompassing several disorders with different disease pathways. It is plausible that for a sub-group of vulnerable women, childbirth triggers episodes of depression. However, even within this group, the mechanisms underpinning the mood disturbances are likely complex and heterogeneous. The distinction between depression occurring in the perinatal period and depression at other times is important for both research and clinical practice. Research should differentiate between episodes that begin during pregnancy and postpartum, as the pathogenetic factors involved may differ and require specialized treatment. PMID:26267038

  9. FULL ARTICLE Nanoscale distinction of membrane patches

    E-print Network

    Gerwert, Klaus

    FULL ARTICLE Nanoscale distinction of membrane patches ­ a TERS study of Halobacterium salinarum Supporting information for this article is available free of charge under http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbio mechanisms take place at this site, ranging from transport of nutrients and waste to cell signalling events

  10. Attention and consciousness: two distinct brain processes

    E-print Network

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Attention and consciousness: two distinct brain processes Christof Koch1 and Naotsugu Tsuchiya2 1 relationship between attention and consciousness has led many scholars to conflate these processes. Subjects can become conscious of an iso- lated object or the gist of a scene despite the near absence

  11. The Distinctive Difficulties of Disagreeable Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Brett; Hafen, Christopher A.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether disagreeable youth are distinct from aggressive youth, victimized youth, and withdrawn youth. Young adolescents (120 girls and 104 boys, M = 13.59 years old) completed personality and adjustment inventories. Aggression, withdrawal, and victimization scores were derived from peer nominations (N = 807). Cluster analyses…

  12. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Nicolas A; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    BackgroundIt is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences.AimsTo examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders.MethodWe performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes.ResultsBasal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders.ConclusionsFrom a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  13. Knowledge Affords Distinctive Processing in Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, R. Reed; Rawson, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of knowledge on memory generally is processing. However, both conceptual and empirical reasons exist to suspect that the organizational account is incomplete. Recently a revised version of that account has been proposed under the rubric of distinctiveness theory (Rawson & Van Overschelde, 2008). The goal of the experiments reported…

  14. Teacher Preparation for Distinctive Evangelical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Thomas Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the current atmosphere of expanding school choice, evangelical Christian schools provide a distinctive alternative consistent with deeply held beliefs of what is required for human flourishing, and represent a significant resource for parents seeking education based on a perspective diverging from those promoted by popular culture and public…

  15. Toward a Distinctive Christian Undergraduate Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas M.; VanderVeen, Steve

    2008-01-01

    We motivate and develop a theoretical framework for creating a distinctive Christian undergraduate management program that is directed toward providing (a) the necessary intellectual characteristics to do "well" and (b) the necessary emotional characteristics to do "good." This framework consists of seven propositions that connect the learning…

  16. Evidence for distinct stocks of king mackerel,

    E-print Network

    Evidence for distinct stocks of king mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla, in the Gulf of Mexico Allyn G.-Evidence support- ing a two stock hypothesis for king mackerel, Scomberornorus cavalla, in the Gulf of Mexico Nacional de la Pesca Mexico City. Mexico The king mackerel, Scomber- omorus cavalla, is a widely distrib

  17. Indopithecus giganteus distinct from Sivapithecus indicus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madden, C.T.; Lewis, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The very large Eurasian Miocene ape Indopithecus giganteus is distinct from contemporanious Sivapithecus (non-Dryopithecus)indicus. The probabilities that length and width for the only specimen of I. giganteus could be sampled from populations similar or identical to those of S. indicus are less than six chances in 100,000 for both parameters. ?? 1980 Japan Monkey Centre.

  18. When Distinctiveness Fails, False Memories Prevail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that fuzzy-trace theory provides a link between indices of memory performance and the theoretical processes that underlie that performance. Author argues false memories can arise because of processes that normally affect forgetting. Maintains that, to the extent that memories lose their distinctive properties, such memories may become…

  19. Distinct colicin M-like bacteriocin-immunity pairs in Burkholderia

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G. K.; De Mot, René

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli bacteriocin colicin M (ColM) acts via degradation of the cell wall precursor lipid II in target cells. ColM producers avoid self-inhibition by a periplasmic immunity protein anchored in the inner membrane. In this study, we identified colM-like bacteriocin genes in genomes of several ?-proteobacterial strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. Two selected Burkholderia ambifaria proteins, designated burkhocins M1 and M2, were produced recombinantly and showed antagonistic activity against Bcc strains. In their considerably sequence-diverged catalytic domain, a conserved aspartate residue equally proved pivotal for cytotoxicity. Immunity to M-type burkhocins is conferred upon susceptible strains by heterologous expression of a cognate gene located either upstream or downstream of the toxin gene. These genes lack homology with currently known ColM immunity genes and encode inner membrane-associated proteins of two distinct types, differing in predicted transmembrane topology and moiety exposed to the periplasm. The addition of burkhocins to the bacteriocin complement of Burkholderia reveals a wider phylogenetic distribution of ColM-like bacteriotoxins, beyond the ?-proteobacterial genera Escherichia, Pectobacterium and Pseudomonas, and illuminates the diversified nature of immunity-providing proteins. PMID:26610609

  20. Climate change and physical disturbance manipulations result in distinct biological soil crust communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steven, Blaire; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Reed, Sasha C.; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) colonize plant interspaces in many drylands and are critical to soil nutrient cycling. Multiple climate change and land use factors have been shown to detrimentally impact biocrusts on a macroscopic (i.e., visual) scale. However, the impact of these perturbations on the bacterial components of the biocrusts remain poorly understood. We employed multiple long-term field experiments to assess the impacts of chronic physical (foot trampling) and climatic changes (2 °C soil warming, altered summer precipitation (wetting), and combined warming and wetting) on biocrust bacterial biomass, composition, and metabolic profile. The biocrust bacterial communities adopted distinct states based on the mechanism of disturbance. Chronic trampling decreased biomass and caused small community compositional change. Soil warming had little effect on biocrust biomass or composition, while wetting resulted in an increase in cyanobacterial biomass and altered bacterial composition. Warming combined with wetting dramatically altered bacterial composition and decreased cyanobacteria abundance. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing identified four functional gene categories that differed in relative abundance among the manipulations, suggesting that climate and land use changes affected soil bacterial functional potential. This study illustrates that different types of biocrust disturbance damage biocrusts in macroscopically similar ways, but they differentially impact the resident soil bacterial communities and the community functional profile can differ depending on the disturbance type. Therefore, the nature of the perturbation and the microbial response are important considerations for management and restoration of drylands.

  1. PAPC mediates self/non–self-distinction during Snail1-dependent tissue separation

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Olivia; Damm, Erich W.; Parent, Serge E.; Barua, Debanjan; Smith, Tamara H.L.; Wen, Jason W.H.; Lepage, Stephanie E.; Nagel, Martina; Ibrahim-Gawel, Hady; Huang, Yunyun

    2015-01-01

    Cleft-like boundaries represent a type of cell sorting boundary characterized by the presence of a physical gap between tissues. We studied the cleft-like ectoderm–mesoderm boundary in Xenopus laevis and zebrafish gastrulae. We identified the transcription factor Snail1 as being essential for tissue separation, showed that its expression in the mesoderm depends on noncanonical Wnt signaling, and demonstrated that it enables paraxial protocadherin (PAPC) to promote tissue separation through two novel functions. First, PAPC attenuates planar cell polarity signaling at the ectoderm–mesoderm boundary to lower cell adhesion and facilitate cleft formation. Second, PAPC controls formation of a distinct type of adhesive contact between mesoderm and ectoderm cells that shows properties of a cleft-like boundary at the single-cell level. It consists of short stretches of adherens junction–like contacts inserted between intermediate-sized contacts and large intercellular gaps. These roles of PAPC constitute a self/non–self-recognition mechanism that determines the site of boundary formation at the interface between PAPC-expressing and -nonexpressing cells. PMID:25778923

  2. Generation of biologically active endostatin fragments from human collagen XVIII by distinct matrix metalloproteases

    SciTech Connect

    Heljasvaara, Ritva; Nyberg, Pia; Luostarinen, Jani; Parikka, Mataleena; Heikkilae, Pia; Rehn, Marko; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula; Pihlajaniemi, Taina . E-mail: taina.pihlajaniemi@oulu.fi

    2005-07-15

    Endostatin, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and tumor growth, is proteolytically cleaved from the C-terminal noncollagenous NC1 domain of type XVIII collagen. We investigated the endostatin formation from human collagen XVIII by several MMPs in vitro. The generation of endostatin fragments differing in molecular size (24-30 kDa) and in N-terminal sequences was identified in the cases of MMP-3, -7, -9, -13 and -20. The cleavage sites were located in the protease-sensitive hinge region between the trimerization and endostatin domains of NC1. MMP-1, -2, -8 and -12 did not show any significant activity against the C-terminus of collagen XVIII. The anti-proliferative effect of the 20-kDa endostatin, three longer endostatin-containing fragments generated in vitro by distinct MMPs and the entire NC1 domain, on bFGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells was established. The anti-migratory potential of some of these fragments was also studied. In addition, production of endostatin fragments between 24-30 kDa by human hepatoblastoma cells was shown to be due to MMP action on type XVIII collagen. Our results indicate that certain, especially cancer-related, MMP family members can generate biologically active endostatin-containing polypeptides from collagen XVIII and thus, by releasing endostatin fragments, may participate in the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis.

  3. Climate Change and Physical Disturbance Manipulations Result in Distinct Biological Soil Crust Communities.

    PubMed

    Steven, Blaire; Kuske, Cheryl R; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Reed, Sasha C; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-11-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) colonize plant interspaces in many drylands and are critical to soil nutrient cycling. Multiple climate change and land use factors have been shown to detrimentally impact biocrusts on a macroscopic (i.e., visual) scale. However, the impact of these perturbations on the bacterial components of the biocrusts remains poorly understood. We employed multiple long-term field experiments to assess the impacts of chronic physical (foot trampling) and climatic changes (2°C soil warming, altered summer precipitation [wetting], and combined warming and wetting) on biocrust bacterial biomass, composition, and metabolic profile. The biocrust bacterial communities adopted distinct states based on the mechanism of disturbance. Chronic trampling decreased biomass and caused small community compositional changes. Soil warming had little effect on biocrust biomass or composition, while wetting resulted in an increase in the cyanobacterial biomass and altered bacterial composition. Warming combined with wetting dramatically altered bacterial composition and decreased Cyanobacteria abundance. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing identified four functional gene categories that differed in relative abundance among the manipulations, suggesting that climate and land use changes affected soil bacterial functional potential. This study illustrates that different types of biocrust disturbance damage biocrusts in macroscopically similar ways, but they differentially impact the resident soil bacterial communities, and the communities' functional profiles can differ depending on the disturbance type. Therefore, the nature of the perturbation and the microbial response are important considerations for management and restoration of drylands. PMID:26276111

  4. The putative Poc complex controls two distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa polar motility mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cowles, Kimberly N.; Moser, Theresa S.; Siryaporn, Albert; Nyakudarika, Natsai; Dixon, William; Turner, Jonathan J.; Gitai, Zemer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Each Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell localizes two types of motility structures, a single flagellum and one or two clusters of type IV pili, to the cell poles. Previous studies suggested that these motility structures arrive at the pole through distinct mechanisms. Here we performed a swimming motility screen to identify polar flagellum localization factors and discovered three genes homologous to the TonB/ExbB/ExbD complex that have defects in both flagella-mediated swimming and pilus-mediated twitching motility. We found that deletion of tonB3, PA2983 or PA2982 led to non-polar localization of the flagellum and FlhF, which was thought to sit at the top of the flagellar localization hierarchy. Surprisingly, these mutants also exhibited pronounced changes in pilus formation or localization, indicating that these proteins may co-ordinate both the pilus and flagellum motility systems. Thus, we have renamed PA2983 and PA2982, pocA and pocB, respectively, for polar organelle co-ordinator to reflect this function. Our results suggest that TonB3, PocA and PocB may form a membrane-associated complex, which we term the Poc complex. These proteins do not exhibit polar localization themselves, but are required for increased expression of pilus genes upon surface association, indicating that they regulate motility structures through either localization or transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:24102920

  5. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R.; Buckley, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Method: Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody–positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. Results: Three distinct clinicoradiologic phenotypes were recognized: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Conclusion: Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease. PMID:25340058

  6. Distinctive Clinical Correlates of Psychotic Major Depression: The CRESCEND Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Hwa-Young; Sakong, Jeong-Kyu; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this investigation was to identify distinctive clinical correlates of psychotic major depression (PMD) as compared with non-psychotic major depression (NPMD) in a large cohort of Korean patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods We recruited 966 MDD patients of age over 18 years from the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea (CRESCEND) study. Diagnoses of PMD (n=24) and NPMD (n=942) were made with the DSM-IV definitions and confirmed with SCID. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS), depression (HAMD), anxiety (HAMA), global severity (CGI-S), suicidal ideation (SSI-Beck), functioning (SOFAS), and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF). Using independent t-tests and ?2 tests, we compared clinical characteristics of patients with PMD and NPMD. A binary logistic regression model was constructed to identify factors independently associated with increased likelihood of PMD. Results PMD subjects were characterized by a higher rate of inpatient enrollment, and higher scores on many items on BPRS (somatic concern, anxiety, emotional withdrawal, guilt feelings, tension, depression, suspiciousness, hallucination, motor retardation, blunted affect and excitement) global severity (CGI-s), and suicidal ideation (SSI-Beck). The explanatory factor model revealed that high levels of tension, excitement, and suicidal ideation were associated with increased likelihood of PMD. Conclusion Our findings partly support the view that PMD has its own distinctive clinical manifestation and course, and may be considered a diagnostic entity separate from NPMD. PMID:25110501

  7. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death.

    PubMed

    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18(th) century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease. PMID:20949072

  8. Molecular Types of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Sensitive S. aureus Strains Causing Skin and Soft Tissue Infections and Nasal Colonization, Identified in Community Health Centers in New York City.

    PubMed

    Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Raygoza Garay, Juan Antonio; Mwangi, Michael; Tobin, Jonathan N; Tsang, Amanda; Khalida, Chamanara; D'Orazio, Brianna; Kost, Rhonda G; Leinberger-Jabari, Andrea; Coffran, Cameron; Evering, Teresa H; Coller, Barry S; Balachandra, Shirish; Urban, Tracie; Parola, Claude; Salvato, Scott; Jenks, Nancy; Wu, Daren; Burgess, Rhonda; Chung, Marilyn; de Lencastre, Herminia; Tomasz, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    In November 2011, The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), the Laboratory of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, and Clinical Directors Network (CDN) launched a research and learning collaborative project with six community health centers in the New York City metropolitan area to determine the nature (clonal type) of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus strains causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Between November 2011 and March 2013, wound and nasal samples from 129 patients with active SSTIs suspicious for S. aureus were collected and characterized by molecular typing techniques. In 63 of 129 patients, the skin wounds were infected by S. aureus: methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was recovered from 39 wounds and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was recovered from 24. Most-46 of the 63-wound isolates belonged to the CC8/Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive (PVL(+)) group of S. aureus clone USA300: 34 of these strains were MRSA and 12 were MSSA. Of the 63 patients with S. aureus infections, 30 were also colonized by S. aureus in the nares: 16 of the colonizing isolates were MRSA, and 14 were MSSA, and the majority of the colonizing isolates belonged to the USA300 clonal group. In most cases (70%), the colonizing isolate belonged to the same clonal type as the strain involved with the infection. In three of the patients, the identity of invasive and colonizing MRSA isolates was further documented by whole-genome sequencing. PMID:26063853

  9. Distinctive Nanoscale Organization of Dicationic versus Monocationic Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Feng, Guang; Banuelos, Jose Leo; Rother, Gernot; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T

    2013-01-01

    The distinctive structural organization of dicationic ionic liquids (DILs) with varying alkyl linkage chain lengths is systematically investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In comparison with their counterparts, monocationic ionic liquids (MILs) with free alkyl chain, the DILs with short linkage chains exhibit almost identical structural features regardless of anion types, whereas the long-chain DILs display a relatively insignificant prepeak and low heterogeneity order parameter (HOP), which is accompanied by the less evident structural heterogeneity. Moreover, the predominant role of anion type in the structure of DILs was verified, similar to what is observed in MILs. Finally, the different nanoscale organizations in DILs and MILs are rationalized by the relatively unfavorable straight and folded chain models proposed for the nanoaggregates in DILs and the favorable micelle-like arrangement for those in MILs.

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