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Sample records for u-series radioactive disequilibria

  1. Characterization of Contaminant Transport Using Naturally Occurring U-Series Disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, Michael; Ku, Teh-Lung

    1999-06-01

    The main goal of the research is to understand the migratory behavior of radioactive contaminants in subsurface fractured systems by using naturally occurring U-series radionuclides as tracers under in-situ physico-chemical and hydrogeologic conditions. Naturally-occurring uranium- and thorium-series radioactive disequilibria can provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of radioactive contaminants as well as on fluid transport and rock dissolution in a natural setting. This study will also provide an improved understanding of the hydrogeologic features of the site and their impact on the migration of radioactive contaminants. We intend to produce a realistic model of radionuclide migration in the Snake River Plain Aquifer beneath the INEEL by evaluating the retardation processes involved in the rock/water interaction. The major tasks are to (1) determine the natural distribution of U, Th, Pa and Ra isotopes in the groundwater as well as in rock minerals and sorbed phases, and (2) study rock/water interaction processes using U/Th series disequilibrium and a statistical analysis based model code for the calculation of in-situ retardation factors of radionuclides and rock/water interaction time scales.

  2. The relationship between riverine U-series disequilibria and erosion rates in a basaltic terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, N.; Burton, K. W.; Gislason, S. R.; Rogers, N. W.; Duchene, S.; Thomas, L.; Hodge, E.; Schaefer, B.

    2006-09-01

    U-series isotopes have been measured in the dissolved phase, suspended load and bedload of the main rivers draining basaltic catchments in Iceland. For the dissolved phase, ( 234U/ 238U) and ( 238U/ 230Th) range between 1.08 and 2.2, and 7.4 and 516, respectively. For the suspended load and bedload, ( 234U/ 238U) and ( 238U/ 230Th) range from 0.97 to 1.09 and from 0.93 to 1.05, respectively. Chemical erosion rates, calculated from dissolved major elements, range between 13 and 333 t km - 2 yr - 1 . Physical erosion rates have also been estimated, from existing data, and range between 21 and 4864 t/km 2/yr, with an average of 519 t km - 2 yr - 1 . U-series disequilibria indicate that weathering in Iceland operates at close to steady-state conditions. A model of continuous weathering indicates a maximum weathering timescale of 10 kyr, with an average rate of uranium release into water of 1.6 · 10 - 4 yr - 1 , which is significant when compared to granitic terrains located at similar latitudes and to tropical basaltic terrains. All river waters display ( 234U/ 238U) greater than secular equilibrium, consistent with the effects of alpha-recoil. The same dissolved phase ( 234U/ 238U) exhibit a negative trend with physical erosion rates, explained by the dominant effect of close-to-congruent chemical weathering of hyaloclastites in the younger basaltic terrains. Therefore, chemical erosion rate and mineral weathering susceptibility play a major role in determining 234U- 238U disequilibria in basaltic river waters. Comparison of global data for river basins in which weathering was recently strongly limited indicates a negative correlation between silicate weathering rates estimated with major elements and the age of weathering estimated with U-series disequilibria. This strongly suggests a key role of time and soil thickness on the chemical erosion of silicates.

  3. Assimilation of the plutonic roots of the Andean arc controls variations in U-series disequilibria at Volcan Llaima, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reubi, O.; Bourdon, B.; Dungan, M. A.; Koornneef, J. M.; Sellés, D.; Langmuir, C. H.; Aciego, S.

    2011-02-01

    U-series disequilibria provide important constraints on the processes and time scales of melt production, differentiation, and transport in subduction settings. Such constraints, which are essential for understanding the chemical evolution of the continental crust, are conventionally based on the assumption that the U-series disequilibria measured in mafic lavas are produced during mantle metasomatism and melting, and that intracrustal differentiation and assimilation have limited impacts. Here we show that mantle-derived U-series disequilibria in mafic lavas erupted at Volcán Llaima, Chile are significantly diminished by assimilation of plutonic rocks forming Llaima's subvolcanic basement. This contamination process is extremely subtle in terms of "classical" indicators of crustal assimilation like Sr, Nd or Pb isotopes because it is a manifestation of assimilative recycling of the plutonic roots of the arc. This process results in variations in U-series disequilibria and incompatible trace element ratios that are significant compared to regional and global variability in arc magmas. Furthermore, it yields linear correlations between U-series excesses and incompatible trace element ratios that are generally interpreted as slab-fluid indicators and chronometers, or tracers of sediment recycling in subduction zone. Cannibalization of ancestral magmas by ascending melts warrants careful evaluation when considering the components and chemical fluxes in subduction zones. Linear arrays defined by activity ratios of U-series nuclides with different half-lives may be the most reliable indicators of assimilative recycling of ancestral intrusive magmas.

  4. Characterization of Contaminant Transport Using Naturally-Occurring U-Series Disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    TEH-LUNG KU

    2001-06-01

    Study the migration of nuclear waste contaminants in subsurface fractured systems using naturally occurring uranium and thorium-series radionuclides as tracers under in-situ physico-chemical and hydrogeologic conditions. Radioactive disequilibria among members of these decay-series nuclides can provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of contaminants as well as on fluid transport and rock dissolution in a natural setting.

  5. Characterization of contaminant transport using naturally-occurring U-series disequilibria. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, M.; Ku, T.L.

    1998-06-01

    'The goal of the research is to study the migratory behavior of contaminants in subsurface fractured systems using naturally occurring uranium- and thorium-series radionuclides as tracers under in-situ physico-chemical and hydrogeologic conditions. Naturally occurring U- and Th-series disequilibria can provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of contaminants as well as on fluid transport and rock dissolution in a natural setting. The authors are developing a realistic model of contaminant migration in the Snake River Plain Aquifer beneath the INEEL by evaluating the retardation processes involved in the rock/water interaction. The major tasks are to: (1) determine the natural distribution of U, Th, Pa and Ra isotopes in the groundwater as well as in rock minerals and sorbed phases, and (2) study rock/water interaction processes using U/Th series disequilibria and a statistical analysis-based model code for the calculation of in-situ retardation factors of radionuclides and rock/water interaction time scales. This study will also provide an improved understanding of the hydrogeologic features of the site and their impact on the migration of contaminants. This report summarizes results after 20 months of a 36-month project. Studies performed at LANL include analysis of the long-lived nuclides {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 231}Pa by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Studies performed at the Univ. of Southern California include the measurement of short-lived naturally occurring radionuclides by decay-counting techniques and the development of models to predict the migration behavior of these radionuclides. Initial efforts began with analysis of 31, 0.5L water samples obtained through routine sampling by USGS and INEEL personnel. One significant observation from these data is that {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios are highest in waters that emanate from local recharge

  6. Examining Canonical Theories of U-series Disequilibria in Volcanic Arcs in Light of a More Comprehensive, Global Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayzar, T. M.; Nelson, B. K.; Portnyagin, M.; Bachmann, O.; Ponomareva, V.

    2011-12-01

    Disequilibrium in the short-lived U-series isotopic system occurs during partial melting, differentiation, and volatile transport; therefore, the U-series decay chain is a unique tool to examine the magnitude and timing of magmatic processes. However, our understanding of U-series fractionation in subduction zones is incomplete. We use published data from volcanoes around the world and new data from volcanic systems in the Kamchatka Arc (Bezymianny, Klyuchevskoy, and Karymsky) to examine two theories regarding the behavior of U-series nuclides: 1) that Th-excess in arc magmas, (230Th)/(238U) >1, is a function of arc-thickness/garnet in the melting region, or magnetite fractionation and 2) that 210Pb deficits, (210Pb)/(226Ra) <1, are the result of continuous magma degassing. Our results show that neither of these theories explains the complete dataset produced by the U-series community. Th-excess is generally observed in MORB and attributed to decompression melting; however, global data also record Th-excess in fluid-fluxed subduction zones. Limited experimental data suggest preferential U transport over Th in subduction zone fluids and, therefore, U-excess rather than Th-excess should exist in arcs. The common explanation for arc Th-excess is melt interaction with thick continental crust where phases such as garnet retain high U/Th in crystalline residues. We record Th-excess at Bezymianny, (230Th)/(238U) from 1.04-1.06 and Klyuchevskoy, (230Th)/(238U) from 1.01 and 1.08, volcanoes, which are located on relatively thin (~35 km), primitive crust. These magmas have low Sr/Y (15.5-19.9) that preclude a significant influence of garnet. In addition, LA-ICP-MS measurements of in-situ U and Th mineral-melt partitioning on erupted mineral phases (plagioclase, pyroxene, Fe-Ti oxides, apatite) suggest that U-series disequilibria are transparent to shallow crustal processing. Th-excess at Klyuchevskoy inversely correlates with Ba/Th, Sr/Th, Dy/Yb, and Ce/Pb. We suggest that

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT USING NATURALLY-OCCURRING U-SERIES DISEQUILIBRIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interactions of mixed wastes containing radionuclides with solid rock surface and the mobility of the radionuclides in aquifer systems depend not only on the chemistry of the nuclides and the physico-chemical effects of radioactive decay, but also on the site-specific hydroge...

  8. U-Th-Ba elemental fractionation during partial melting of crustal xenoliths and implications for U-series disequilibria in continental arc rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brens, R.; Hickey-Vargas, R.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding U-series isotopic disequilibria of partially melted crust is integral in determining the effect that crustal assimilation has on the U-series signature of magmas. Unfortunately, U-series isotopes are too low in abundance to determine by any micro-beam technique. In this work U, Th and Ba (as a proxy for Ra) abundances were measured in quenched glass in partially melted crustal xenoliths of granitic (71-73% SiO2) composition from the Mirador volcano in the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone using micro-beam techniques (EPMA and LA-ICP-MS). Since the crustal xenoliths are old (Miocene) they can be assumed to be at secular equilibrium. The eruption of Mirador occurred in 1979, and partial melting/quenching of the xenoliths accompanied the eruption. Any recent fractionation of U from Th or Th from Ra by partial melting will result in isotopic disequilibrium. A comparison of the ratios of the elements (Ba/Th & U/Th) in the quenched glasses with those of the whole rock reveals how much fractionation has occurred during partial melting. An EPMA was used to locate (through BSE images) and analyze glass pockets in the samples for major elements establishing a baseline idea for the composition of the potential assimilates with SiO2 contents between 54% and 75%, Al2O3 (13% - 27%) and K2O (0.2% - 7%). Laser ablation ICP-MS was used to analyze U, Th and Ba elements in the quenched partial melts, and ICP-MS was used for the whole rocks. Measured (Ba/Th glass)/(Ba/Th whole rock) are between 0.2 to 51 and (Th/U glass)/(Th/U whole rock) range from 0.3 to 7. The vast majority of analyses show barium and uranium excesses relative to Th in the glasses. Different ratios of U, Th and Ba (Ra) compared to the whole rock substantiate fractionation of these elements via partial melting. The results suggest that assimilation of partial melts of crustal rocks can play a role in producing U-series isotopic disequilibria, which is commonly observed in continental arc magmas.

  9. Degassing dynamics at Mount Etna inferred from radioactive disequilibria (210Pb-210Bi-210Po) in volcanic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terray, Luca; Gauthier, Pierre-Jean; Salerno, Giuseppe; La Spina, Alessandro; Giammanco, Salvatore; Sellitto, Pasquale; Briole, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic gases are significantly enriched in the last short-half-life radionuclides of the 238U series, namely the so-called Radon daughters 210Pb, 210Bi and 210Po. Because of their contrasted volatilities, these isotopes are strongly fractionated upon degassing, which gives rise to significant radioactive disequilibria between them in the gas phase. These disequilibria carry precious information on shallow degassing processes beneath active volcanoes: they remarkably constrain the magma residence time in the degassing reservoir and the duration of gas extraction from magma to surface. On Mount Etna (Sicily), where the study of these disequilibria was initiated thirty years ago (Lambert et al., EPSL, 1985-86), no measurement of 210Pb, 210Bi and 210Po in the gases has been performed for the last twenty years. Here we present new 210Pb-210Bi-210Po radioactive disequilibria measurements in volcanic plume gases of Mount Etna. Samples were collected in the bulk diluted plume at kilometric distance from the summit area during the May 2015 eruption, then in more concentrated plumes arising from each summit crater of Etna during quiescent degassing in July 2015. We found values of (210Bi/210Pb) = 7.0 ± 0.3 and (210Po/210Pb) = 80 ± 6 during both periods. These results suggest that 210Pb, 210Bi and 210Po are not significantly fractionated during the transport of the plume from the crater rim to close-downslope sites (<1 km). None of the previous degassing models (Lambert et al., EPSL, 1985-86 ; Gauthier et al., JVGR, 2000) satisfactorily explain measured activity ratios. We propose here a new degassing model based on the previous conceptualization designed for basaltic open-conduit volcanoes, like Stromboli. This model considers extreme Radon enrichments in volcanic gases as a source of 210Pb atoms produced by radioactive decay of 222Rn within gas bubbles travelling to surface. We constrain a magma residence time of 470 ± 170 days and an extraction time of the gases of 4

  10. Characterization of Contaminant Transport using Naturally-Occurring U-Series Disequilibria - Final Report - 05/01/1997 - 04/30/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, Michael T.; Ku, Teh-Lung

    2001-04-30

    The interactions of mixed wastes containing radionuclides with solid rock surface and the mobility of the radionuclides in aquifer systems depend not only on the chemistry of the nuclides and the physico-chemical effects of radioactive decay, but also on the site-specific hydrogeology. Thus, to characterize contaminant transport, it is best to cross-check figures derived from any small-scale laboratory experiments over limited times with that obtained from field-oriented, natural analog studies. We propose such a study using the naturally-occurring U and Th decay-series disequilibria. The work of ours and other researchers have shown that the parent/daughter disequilibrium patterns existing in groundwater systems can be modeled in terms of local nuclide mass balance to arrive at such information as the rock-water contact time (fluid flow) and rates of contaminant transport, taking into account the retardation effect due to nuclide/rock interaction contaminants at INEL by grouping them into three categories, represented by isotopes of (1) Th and Pa, (2) U and (3) Ra. Mass spectrometric measurements of these elements will be emphasized in order to minimize sample size requirements and to maximize precision. Results will form the data base for a model code for computing: (1) Fluid residence time (transport rates) in the basalt aquifers at various locations, (2) The in-situ adsorption and desorption rate constants, as well as the retardation factors, of various radionuclide wastes, and (3) Rock dissolution rate and its relation to preferential flow and contamination transport in the fractured rock.

  11. Radioactive disequilibria in mineralised fracture samples from two uranium occurrences in northern Sweden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smellie, John A.T.; Rosholt, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    Mineralised fractures from two uranium occurrences in northern Sweden were examined mineralogically and isotopically to establish the presence or absence of radioactive equilibrium that may indicate recent rock-water interaction processes based on the natural mobility of uranium (i.e.; during the last 0.5 Ma). The results show evidence of radioactive disequilibrium in six of the nine samples investigated. Disequilibria are attributable to solution to solid 234U recoil gain (weakly mineralised zones adjacent to the main mineralisation) and solid to solution 234U recoil loss (moderate to highly mineralised zones). The absence of significant 238U loss in the samples emphasises the reducing conditions at the sampled depths. ?? 1984.

  12. Characterization of calculation of in-situ retardation factors of contaminant transport using naturally-radionuclides and rock/water interaction occurring U-Series disequilibria timescales. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Roback, R.; Murrel, M.; Goldstein, S.; Ku, T.L.; Luo, S.

    1997-01-01

    'The research is directed toward a quantitative assessment of contaminant transport rates in fracture-rock systems using uranium-series radionuclides. Naturally occurring uranium-and thorium-series radioactive disequilibria will provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of radioactive contaminants as well as on fluid transport and rock dissolution in a natural setting. This study will also provide an improved characterization of preferential flow and contaminant transport at the Idaho Environmental and Engineering Lab. (INEEL) site. To a lesser extent, the study will include rocks in the unsaturated zone. The authors will produce a realistic model of radionuclide migration under unsaturated and saturated field conditions at the INEEL site, taking into account the retardation processes involved in the rock/water interaction. The major tasks are to (1) determine the natural distribution of U, Th, Pa and Ra isotopes in rock minerals. sorbed phases on the rocks, and in fluids from both saturated and unsaturated zones at the site, and (2) study rock/water interaction processes using U/Th series disequilibrium and a statistical analysis-based model for the Geologic heterogeneity plays an important role in transporting contaminants in fractured rocks. Preferential flow paths in the fractured rocks act as a major pathway for transport of radioactive contaminants in groundwaters. The weathering/dissolution of rock by groundwater also influences contaminant mobility. Thus, it is important to understand the hydrogeologic features of the site and their impact on the migration of radioactive contaminants. In this regard, quantification of the rock weathering/dissolution rate and fluid residence time from the observed decay-series disequilibria will be valuable. By mapping the spatial distribution of the residence time of groundwater in fractured rocks, the subsurface preferential flow paths (with high rock permeability and short fluid residence

  13. U-Series Transport Studies at the Pena Blanca, Mexico Natural Analog Site

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Simmons; M. T. Murrell

    2001-05-31

    Natural analogs provide a line of evidence that supports the understanding of how natural and engineered processes would occur over long time frames and large spatial scales at a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Studies of U-series disequilibria within and around uranium deposits can provide valuable information on the timing of actinide mobility and hence the stability of a potential repository over geologic time scales. The Nopal I uranium deposit at Pena Blanca, Mexico, is situated in unsaturated tuff that is similar in composition to the Topopah Spring Tuff of Yucca Mountain and closely matches other evaluation criteria for suitable natural analogs. By modeling the observed radioactive isotope disequilibria at Nopal I, we can estimate the rates of sorption-desorption and dissolution-precipitation of the radionuclides over time. Such information is vital to the testing or validation of performance assessment models for geologic nuclear waste disposal.

  14. Study of natural radioactivity and the state of radioactive disequilibrium in U-series for rock samples, North Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Dine, Nadia Walley

    2008-01-01

    Twenty rock samples collected from North Eastern Desert in Egypt have been investigated. Natural radionuclide contents have been measured by gamma-ray spectrometry employing a shielded HPGe detector. The activities of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K have been determined in Bq/kg dry weight. The absorbed dose rate of gamma radiation ranged from 100.48 to 22,140.53 nGy/h. The representative external hazard index values (H(ex)) for the corresponding samples were estimated. In the present work, the state of radioactive disequilibrium in the U-series at Wadi Baligh area was studied. The activity ratios between (226)Ra/(214)Pb and (214)Pb/(214)Bi were measured. The thorium-to-uranium concentration ratios (Clark value) were also estimated. PMID:17869529

  15. Diffusive fractionation of U-series radionuclides during mantle melting and shallow-level melt cumulate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Orman, James A.; Saal, Alberto E.; Bourdon, Bernard; Hauri, Erik H.

    2006-09-01

    U-series radioactive disequilibria in basaltic lavas have been used to infer many important aspects of melt generation and extraction processes in Earth's mantle and crust, including the porosity of the melting zone, the solid mantle upwelling rate, and the melt transport rate. Most of these inferences have been based on simplified theoretical treatments of the fractionation process, which assume equilibrium partitioning of U-series nuclides among minerals and melt. We have developed a numerical model in which solid-state diffusion controls the exchange of U-series nuclides among multiple minerals and melt. First the initial steady-state distribution of nuclides among the phases, which represents a balance between diffusive fluxes and radioactive production and decay, is calculated. Next, partial melting begins, or a foreign melt is introduced into the system, and nuclides are again redistributed among the phases via diffusion. U-series nuclides can be separated during this stage due to differences in their diffusivity; radium in particular, and possibly protactinium as well, can be strongly fractionated from slower-diffusing thorium and uranium. We show that two distinct processes are not required for the generation of 226Ra and 230Th excesses in mid-ocean ridge basalts, as has been argued previously; instead the observed negative correlations of the ( 226Ra/ 230Th) activity ratio with ( 230Th/ 238U) and with the extent of trace element enrichment may result from diffusive fractionation of Ra from Th during partial melting of the mantle. Alternatively, the ( 226Ra/ 230Th) disequilibrium in mid-ocean ridge basalts may result from diffusive fractionation during shallow-level interaction of mantle melts with gabbroic cumulates, and we show that the results of the interaction have a weak dependence on the age of the cumulate if both plagioclase and clinopyroxene are present.

  16. A New Model for U-Series Isotope Fractionation During Igneous Processes, With Finite Diffusion and Multiple Solid Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Orman, J.; Saal, A.; Bourdon, B.; Hauri, E.

    2002-12-01

    U-series radioactive disequilibria in basaltic lavas have been used to infer many important aspects of melt generation and extraction processes, including the porosity of the melting zone, the mantle upwelling rate, and the melt transport rate. These inferences are based on simplified models for the fractionation of U-series isotopes during melting and melt transport. The commonly used "dynamic melting" and "equilibrium porous flow" models neglect solid-state diffusion and do not consider the influence of multiple solid phases on the initial distribution and subsequent fractionation of U-series isotopes. These factors can be very important, particularly for 226Ra which has a short half-life (~1600 yrs) and is strongly partitioned into minerals like plagioclase, amphibole, and mica while being almost perfectly excluded from clinopyroxene and garnet, the major U and Th bearing minerals in peridotite. Ignoring diffusion and multi-phase effects can lead to conclusions about the melting process that have no basis in reality. We have developed a numerical model that takes into account the effects of solid-state diffusion and considers the distribution of U-series isotopes among multiple solid phases and melt at each step of the melting process. In an undisturbed rock in secular equilibrium, daughter isotopes will tend to be transferred among the component phases until they reach a steady state in which diffusive fluxes are balanced by radioactive production and decay. In general the individual minerals will be neither in secular equilibrium (on the equiline) nor in partitioning equilibrium with each other (on a horizontal line on the equiline diagram), unless diffusion is very slow or very fast relative to the daughter decay rate. We start with an arbitrary distribution of daughter isotopes among the phases in the system, then turn on diffusion and allow isotopes to redistribute themselves until the steady state is reached (on a time scale comparable to the half-life of

  17. Characterization of U-series disequilibria at the Pena Blanca natural analogue site, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, V.; Goodell, P.C.; Anthony, E.Y.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate radionuclide migration from a uranium-mineralized breccia pipe. The site provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate radionuclide mobility in a geochemical environment similar to that around the proposed high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Samples represent fracture-infillings from both within and outside the breccia pipe. Mineral assemblages within the fractures include (1) pure kaolinite, (2) a mixture of iron-oxyhydroxides (goethite and hematite) with associated alunite and jarosite, which the authors refer to as the Fe-mineral assemblage, and (3) carbonates. Uranophane, weeksite, soddyite, and boltwoodite are associated with samples from within the breccia zone. The authors obtain radionuclide activities from gamma-ray rather than alpha spectroscopy, and the methodology for these measurements is presented in detail. Plots of {sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U vs. {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th show three distinct mobility trends. (1) The majority of the Fe-mineral samples from within the breccia pipe yield values between 1.0 and 1.1 for both ratios, (2) Fe-mineral samples from outside the ore zone and a kaolinite from within the ore zone have {sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U of 0.58 to 0.83 and {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th of 1.09 to 1.42, and (3) some Fe-mineral samples from within the breccia pipe have values of 1.2 and 0.9 respectively. These data, combined with those from other studies at Pena Blanca suggest that U and Ra are sometimes mobile in the near-surface environment and that multiple episodes of enrichment and leaching are required to explain the trends.

  18. U-series disequilibria in early diagenetic minerals from Lake Magadi sediments, Kenya: Dating potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Christian; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    1992-03-01

    At the southern end of the Gregory Rift Valley, Lake Magadi occupies the bottom of a relatively large drainage basin. It is presently covered by a thick trona crust, which overlies two silty-clay units deposited during Late Pleistocene high lake stands. These units consist of a mixture of detrital grains (anorthoclase, amphiboles, quartz), clays (illite, authigenic zeolites), phosphates, and sedimentary sodium silicates and cherts. A late diagenetic calcite is occasionally observed. The authigenic and/or diagenetic mineralogical phases were extracted and analyzed for their uranium and thorium isotope contents. All yielded highly correlated ( 234U /232Th vs. 238U /232Th ) and ( 230Th /232Th vs. 234U /232Th ) isochrons defining two-component mixing systems (detrital and authigenic phases). The detrital component is characterized by large excesses of 230Th (over 234U) and by 230Th /232Th ratios carrying an imprint of the source rocks (e.g., Precambrian basement vs. volcanics) and indicating efficient uranium-leaching processes during the previous pedologic cycle. The slope of the isochrons defines the 234U /238U and 230Th /234U ratios of the authigenic component, i.e., the age of the uranium-uptake episode. Zeolites yield an age of 10.4 ± 0.6 ka. This age is in agreement with the 14C chronology already established for the most recent high lake level episode in the basin (10,000-12,000 yr Bp). Sodium-silicates and cherts yield distinct ages of 98.5 ± 20 and 6 ± 3 ka, respectively, for the lower and upper lacustrine units. These ages allow the conclusion that (1) sedimentary silicates are of late diagenetic origin, and (2) that the lower lacustrine unit was deposited during a former high Lake Magadi level, possibly during the lacustrine episode dated at 135 ± 10 ka from uranium-series measurements on littoral stromatolites. Finally, the late diagenetic calcite, which yields an age of about 5 ka, indicates a significant change in the sediment interstitial water chemistry. This is also shown by the occurrence of calcitic oncolites in flat deposits assigned to a mid-Holocene minor oscillation of Lake Magadi level on the basis of their 14C ages. It is concluded that uranium-series measurements in diagenetic minerals may give access to the age of their formation. Dr. Christian Goetz passed away in May 1991, a few weeks after we received comments on the original version of our manuscript from its handling editor, Henry Schwarcz. Data and interpretations put forth in this paper are principally from one chapter of Christian's doctoral dissertation (Université Aix-Marseille II). Formerly at the Laboratoire de Géologie du Quaternaire of the CNRS, at Marseille (France), Christian Goetz was about to occupy a research position at the Institut de Physique du Globe, in Paris. He was 31 years old.

  19. The U-series comminution approach: where to from here

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Heather; Turner, Simon; Afonso, Juan; Turner, Michael; Hesse, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the rates of landscape evolution in response to climate change is inhibited by the difficulty of dating the formation of continental detrital sediments. The 'comminution age' dating model of DePaolo et al. (2006) hypothesises that the measured disequilibria between U-series nuclides (234U and 238U) in fine-grained continental (detrital) sediments can be used to calculate the time elapsed since mechanical weathering of a grain to the threshold size ( 50 µm). The comminution age includes the time that a particle has been mobilised in transport, held in temporary storage (e.g., soils and floodplains) and the time elapsed since final deposition to present day. Therefore, if the deposition age of sediment can be constrained independently, for example via optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating, the residence time of sediment (e.g., a palaeochannel deposit) can be determined. Despite the significant potential of this approach, there is still much work to be done before meaningful absolute comminution ages can be obtained. The calculated recoil loss factor and comminution age are highly dependent on the method of recoil loss factor determination used and the inherent assumptions. We present new and recently published uranium isotope data for aeolian sediment deposits, leached and unleached palaeochannel sediments and bedrock samples from Australia to exemplify areas of current uncertainty in the comminution age approach. In addition to the information gained from natural samples, Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted for a synthetic sediment sample to determine the individual and combined comminution age uncertainties associated to each input variable. Using a reasonable associated uncertainty for each input factor and including variations in the source rock and measured (234U/238U) ratios, the total combined uncertainty on comminution age in our simulation (for two methods of recoil loss factor estimation: weighted geometric and surface area

  20. U-Series Dating of Tropical Stalagmites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, J. F.; Carolin, S. A.; Cobb, K.; Subhas, A. V.; Rider, A.; Meckler, N.

    2013-12-01

    Stalagmites are often seen as one of the ideal phases for U-series disequilibrium dating. Typically closed systems with high 234/238 ratios and little initial Th-230, these samples have yielded some of the most precise and accurate ages of the climate system over the last half million years. However, conditions in tropical cave systems can fail on all of these criteria, many times all of them at once. We use our set of over 400 U-series analyses in stalagmites and dozens of others from host rocks and drip waters from the karst region in Northern Borneo to show how problems with low uranium content, very depleted 234/238 ratios, and high ';detrital' thorium can be overcome to yield quality dates. Isochrons are an important tool, and we explore their advantages and weaknesses, but understanding the location and signature of hiatuses is also important. We have developed several geochemical lines of evidence for how to identify these pauses in stalagmite growth. In addition we explore how many of these conditions might come about and how they may be ubiquitous to tropical systems worldwide. The most puzzling observation is low 234/238 ratios. Ranging from near secular equilibrium to values below -600 permil, the missing U-234 requires some specific weathering scenarios to explain the complementary suite of rocks, waters, and stalagmites. Other Me/Ca data helps understand the degree that prior precipitation affects the range U-series data. Some simple numerical models of water moving through karst help us to understand the implications of these extensive data sets.

  1. Uranium and thorium decay series disequilibria in young volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the central questions in igneous geochemistry that study of radioactive disequilibria can help to answer are: what are the rates of magma genesis; and what are the timescales of magma separation and transport. In addition to the temporal information that may be extracted from disequilibria data, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of a young rock may be used as a tracer of the Th/U ratio of its source region. Measurements were made by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry of {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th in 20 subduction related, 3 oceanic intraplate, and 10 continental intraplate volcanics. {sup 210}Pb was measured in all, {sup 226}Ra was measured in about half, and {sup 228}Th was measured in 10 of the most recent samples. Disequilibrium between {sup 228}Th and {sup 232}Th was found only in the Nacarbonatite samples from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania, which is attributable to {sup 228}Ra/{sup 232}Th {approximately} 27 at the time of eruption. These rocks also have {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th > 60. Three Ra-enrichment models are developed which constrain carbonatite magma formation at less than 20 years before eruption. The effects of different partial melting processes on the {sup 238}U decay series are investigated. If mid-ocean ridge basalts are formed by a dynamic melting process, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of the basalts provides a minimum estimate of the Th/U ratio of the source region. The {sup 238}U enrichment in arc volcanics is probably the results of metasomatism of the source by fluids derived from the subducting slab, and the {sup 230}Th enrichment observed for other volcanics is probably due to the partial melting process in the absence of U-bearing fluids.

  2. Minimum speed limit for ocean ridge magmatism from 210Pb-226Ra-230Th disequilibria.

    PubMed

    Rubin, K H; van der Zander, I; Smith, M C; Bergmanis, E C

    2005-09-22

    Although 70 per cent of global crustal magmatism occurs at mid-ocean ridges-where the heat budget controls crustal structure, hydrothermal activity and a vibrant biosphere-the tempo of magmatic inputs in these regions remains poorly understood. Such timescales can be assessed, however, with natural radioactive-decay-chain nuclides, because chemical disruption to secular equilibrium systems initiates parent-daughter disequilibria, which re-equilibrate by the shorter half-life in a pair. Here we use 210Pb-226Ra-230Th radioactive disequilibria and other geochemical attributes in oceanic basalts less than 20 years old to infer that melts of the Earth's mantle can be transported, accumulated and erupted in a few decades. This implies that magmatic conditions can fluctuate rapidly at ridge volcanoes. 210Pb deficits of up to 15 per cent relative to 226Ra occur in normal mid-ocean ridge basalts, with the largest deficits in the most magnesium-rich lavas. The 22-year half-life of 210Pb requires very recent fractionation of these two uranium-series nuclides. Relationships between 210Pb-deficits, (226Ra/230Th) activity ratios and compatible trace-element ratios preclude crustal-magma differentiation or daughter-isotope degassing as the main causes for the signal. A mantle-melting model can simulate observed disequilibria but preservation requires a subsequent mechanism to transport melt rapidly. The likelihood of magmatic disequilibria occurring before melt enters shallow crustal magma bodies also limits differentiation and heat replenishment timescales to decades at the localities studied. PMID:16177787

  3. Time scale and conditions of weathering under tropical climate: Study of the Amazon basin with U-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosseto, A.; Bourdon, B.; Gaillardet, J.; Allègre, C. J.; Filizola, N.

    2006-01-01

    The Rio Solimões/Amazonas (Amazon River) and its major tributaries have been analyzed for U-series nuclides. 238U- 234U- 230Th- 226Ra disequilibria have been measured in the dissolved (<0.2 μm) and suspended loads (>0.2 μm) as well as bed sands. U-series disequilibria are closely related to major and trace element compositions and therefore reflect elemental fractionation during chemical weathering. Moreover, while the dissolved load records present-day weathering, suspended particles integrate the erosion history over much longer time scales (>100 ka). Lowland rivers are characterized by long time scales of chemical erosion (⩾100 ka) resulting in a high weathering intensity. Moreover, exchange between suspended particles and the dissolved load may explain the U-series signature for these rivers. By combining U-series and Pb isotopes in suspended particles, we show that erosion in the Rio Madeira basin occurred as a multi-step process, whereby the pristine continental crust was eroded several hundreds of Ma ago to produce sediments that have then been integrated in the Cordillera by crustal shortening and are currently eroded. In contrast, recent erosion of a pristine crust is more likely for the Rio Solimões/Amazonas (<10 ka). The suspended particles of the rivers draining the Andes (Solimões/Amazonas, Madeira) suggest time scales of weathering ranging between 4 and 20 ka. This indicates that suspended particles transported by those rivers are not stored for long periods in the Andean foreland basin and the tropical plain. The sediments delivered to the ocean have resided only a few ka in the Amazon basin (6.3 ± 1 ka for the Rio Amazonas at Óbidos). Nevertheless, a large fraction of the sediments coming out from the Andes are trapped in the foreland basin and may never reach the ocean. Erosion in the Andes is not operating in steady state. U-series systematics shows unambiguously that rivers are exporting a lot more sediments than predicted by steady

  4. Using U-series and beryllium isotopes to reveal the occurrence and relative timing of crustal and mantle processes in the Southern Volcanic Zone of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, L. B.; Reubi, O.; Dungan, M. A.; Bourdon, B.; Langmuir, C. H.; Turner, S. J.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    the main edifice have been mixed with magma compositions similar to those at surrounding minor eruptive centers (Hickey-Vargas et al., 2002). The latter appear to be decompression melts of enriched mantle which manifest moderate U-Th-Ra disequilibrium and substantial 231Pa-excesses, whereas melts from Villarrica have substantial U- and Ra-excesses. Magmas from Osorno reflect a greater influence of sediments originating from the incoming slab. After discounting assimilated samples, all primary melts have uniformly high Pa-excesses (1.7-2.2) coincident with large variations in 238U-230Th disequilibria. Fluid addition-aging-melting successions at Antuco and Chillán may have led to compositions near U-Th equilibrium or with Th-excesses, respectively. Primary Ra-deficits at Chillán, Lonquimay, and Osorno are under investigation and potentially reflect melting of a cumulate body. Forthcoming 10Be data for select U-series samples will enable further clarification of the regional trend. Preliminary analyses of nine Llaima samples erupted between 1850 and 2009 confirm the successful elimination of a meteoric 10Be component and produce a data array consistent with assimilation. The invocation of radioactive decay to produce U-Th equilibrium (duration of at least 380 ky) could also explain the low 10Be/9Be compositions (half-life of 10Be=1,390 ky). Our comprehensive dataset may shed new light on melting processes in subduction zone systems.

  5. Theoretical studies of {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th-{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}U-{sup 231}Pa disequilibria in young lavas produced by mantle melting

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, H.; Zindler, A.

    2000-05-01

    This paper provides ready-to-use equations to describe variations in uranium-series (U-series) disequilibrium as a function of elemental distribution coefficients, melting porosity, melting rate, and melting time. The effects of these melting parameters on U-series disequilibria are quantitatively evaluated in both an absolute and relative sense. The importance of net elemental fractionation and ingrowth of daughter nuclides are also described and compared in terms of their relative contributions to total U-series disequilibrium. In addition, the authors compare the production of U-series disequilibrium during mantle melting to trace element fractionations produced by melting in a similar context. Trace element fractionations depend externally on the degree to which a source is melted, whereas U-series disequilibrium depends upon both the degree and rate of melting. In contrast to previous models, their approach to modeling U-series disequilibrium during dynamic melting collapses simply to a description of trace element behavior during dynamic melting when the appropriate decay terms are omitted. Their formulation shows that extremely small degrees of melting, sometimes called upon to explain observed extents of U-series disequilibrium, are not always required.

  6. Saprolite Formation Rates using U-series Isotopes in a Granodiorite Weathering Profile from Boulder Creek CZO (Colorado, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelt, Eric; Chabaux, Francois; Mills, T. Joseph; Anderson, Suzanne P.; Foster, Melissa A.

    2015-04-01

    Timescales of weathering profile formation and evolution are important kinetic parameters linked to erosion, climatic, and biological processes within the critical zone. In order to understand the complex kinetics of landscape evolution, water and soil resources, along with climate change, these parameters have to be estimated for many different contexts. The Betasso catchment, within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (BC-CZO) in Colorado, is a mountain catchment in Proterozoic granodiorite uplifted in the Laramide Orogeny ca. 50 Ma. In an exposure near the catchment divide, an approximately 1.5 m deep profile through soil and saprolite was sampled and analysed for bulk U-series disequilibria (238U-234U-230Th-226Ra) to estimate the profile weathering rate. The (234U/238U), (230Th/234U) and (226Ra/230Th) disequilibria through the entire profile are small but vary systematically with depth. In the deepest samples, values are close to equilibrium. Above this, values are progressively further from equilibrium with height in the profile, suggesting a continuous leaching of U and Ra compared to Th. The (234U/238U) disequilibria remain < 1 along the profile, suggesting no significant U addition from pore waters. Only the shallowest sample (~20 cm depth) highlights a 226Ra excess, likely resulting from vegetation cycling. In contrast, variations of Th content and (230Th/232Th) - (238U/232Th) activity ratios in the isochron diagram are huge, dividing the profile into distinct zones above and below 80 cm depth. Below 80 cm, the Th content gradually increases upward from 1.5 to 3.5 ppm suggesting a relative accumulation linked to chemical weathering. Above 80 cm, the Th content jumps to ~15 ppm with a similar increase of Th/Ti or Th/Zr ratios that clearly excludes the same process of relative accumulation. This strong shift is also observed in LREE concentrations, such as La, Ce and Nd, and in Sr isotopic composition, which suggests an external input of radiogenic

  7. U-series dating of Lake Nyos maar basalts, Cameroon (West Africa): Implications for potential hazards on the Lake Nyos dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aka, Festus T.; Yokoyama, Tetsuya; Kusakabe, Minoru; Nakamura, Eizo; Tanyileke, Gregory; Ateba, Bekoa; Ngako, Vincent; Nnange, Joseph; Hell, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    From previously published 14C and K-Ar data, the age of formation of Lake Nyos maar in Cameroon is still in dispute. Lake Nyos exploded in 1986, releasing CO 2 that killed 1750 people and over 3000 cattle. Here we report results of the first measurements of major elements, trace elements and U-series disequilibria in ten basanites/trachy-basalts and two olivine tholeiites from Lake Nyos. It is the first time tholeiites are described in Lake Nyos. But for the tholeiites which are in 238U- 230Th equilibrium, all the other samples possess 238U- 230Th disequilibrium with 15 to 28% enrichment of 230Th over 238U. The ( 226Ra/ 230Th) activity ratios of these samples indicate small (2 to 4%) but significant 226Ra excesses. U-Th systematics and evidence from oxygen isotopes of the basalts and Lake Nyos granitic quartz separates show that the U-series disequilibria in these samples are source-based and not due to crustal contamination or post-eruptive alteration. Enrichment of 230Th is strong prima facie evidence that Lake Nyos is younger than 350 ka. The 230Th- 226Ra age of Nyos samples calculated with the ( 226Ra/ 230Th) ratio for zero-age Mt. Cameroon samples is 3.7 ± 0.5 ka, although this is a lower limit as the actual age is estimated to be older than 5 ka, based on the measured mean 230Th/ 238U activity ratio. The general stability of the Lake Nyos pyroclastic dam is a cause for concern, but judging from its 230Th- 226Ra formation age, we do not think that in the absence of a big rock fall or landslide into the lake, a big earthquake or volcanic eruption close to the lake, collapse of the dam from erosion alone is as imminent and alarming as has been suggested.

  8. In-situ measurements of U-series nuclides by electron microprobe on zircons and monazites from Gandak river sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosia, C.; Deloule, E.; France-Lanord, C.; Chabaux, F.

    2015-12-01

    Determination of sediment transfer time during transport in the alluvial plains is a critical issue to correctly understand the relationship between climate, tectonics and Earth surface evolution. The residence time of river sediments may be constrained by analyzing the U series nuclides fractionations (e.g. [1] and [2]), which are created during water rock interactions by the ejection of the daughter nuclides of the grain (α-recoil) and the preferential mobilization of nuclides in decay damaged crystal structure. However, recent studies on sediments from the Gandak river, one of the main Ganga tributary, highlighted the difficulties to obtain reproducible data on bulk sediments, due to the nuggets distribution of U-Th enriched minor minerals in the samples (Bosia et al., unpublished data). We therefore decided to analyze the U and Th isotopic systematic at a grain-scale for Himalayan sediments from the Gandak river. This has been tested by performing in situ depth profiles of 238U-234U-230Th and 232Th on zircons and monazites (50-250 μm) by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) at the CRPG, Nancy, France. The first results point the occurrence of 238U-234U-230Th disequilibria in the outermost parts of both monazite and zircon minerals with a return to the equilibrium state in the core of the grains. The relative U and Th enrichment is however slightly different depending on considered minerals, suggesting possible adsorption processes of 230-Th. Coupled to a simple model of U and Th mobility during water-mineral interactions, these data should help to constrain the origin of 238U-234U-230Th disequilibria in these minerals. Moreover, the results of the study should be relevant to discuss the potential of this approach to constrain the residence time of zircons and monazites in the Gandak alluvial plain. [1] Chabaux et al., 2012, C. R. Geoscience, 344 (11-12): 688-703; [2] Granet et al., 2007, Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 261 (3-4): 389-406.

  9. Methods for obtaining sorption data from uranium-series disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, D.L.; Bryant, E.A.

    1987-12-01

    Two possible methods have been identified for obtaining in situ retardation factors from measurements of uranium-series disequilibria at Yucca Mountain. The first method would make use of the enhanced {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratio in groundwater to derive a signature for exchangeable uranium sorbed on the rock; the exchangeable uranium would be leached and assayed. The second method would use the ratio of {sup 222}Rn to {sup 234}U in solution, corrected for weathering, to infer the retardation factor for uranium. Similar methods could be applied to thorium and radium.

  10. Dispersion of U-series natural radionuclides in stream sediments from Edale, UK.

    PubMed

    Siddeeg, Saifeldin M; Bryan, Nicholas D; Livens, Francis R

    2014-05-01

    The spatial distribution of (238)U-series radionuclides, specifically 238U, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra, has been determined in stream sediments from Edale, Derbyshire, United Kingdom, to explore the behaviour of U-series radionuclides during weathering. For uranium and thorium, two different extraction methods were used, total dissolution with HNO3/HF in a microwave and leaching with aqua regia. This was followed by radiochemical separation using extraction chromatography, then alpha spectrometry measurement. The total radium contents in the sediments were measured using gamma spectrometry, while the leached fraction was measured in the same way as for uranium and thorium. The total sediment content of uranium and thorium ranges from ∼10 up to ∼200 Bq kg(-1), while the radium specific activity lies between ∼15 and 180 Bq kg(-1). In the aqua regia extractions, the uranium and thorium contents are in the range of ∼5 to ∼100 Bq kg(-1), while the radium specific activities are similar to those measured by total dissolution. All the radionuclides show no correlation with organic matter content. The activity ratios 234U/238U, 230Th/238U and 226Ra/238U were used to determine the degree of radioactive disequilibrium. The data show disequilibrium in most of the sediments, with activity ratios of 234U/238U, 230Th/238U and 226Ra/238U>1, inconsistent with evolution through straightforward weathering processes. Multivariate cluster analysis based on five variables, the specific activities of 238U, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra and loss on ignition, was employed to group the data and identify five distinct clusters. There seems to be a link between high radionuclide concentrations and proximity to landslips. PMID:24562972

  11. U-series Dating of Stalagmites from Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, J. F.; Partin, J.; Cobb, K.; Clark, B.

    2006-12-01

    In a series of field campaigns dating back to the fall of 2003 we have collected over 60 stalagmites from the Gunung Buda cave system in Sarawak, Malaysia (4°N, 115°E). At least twenty of these samples have excellent calcite preservation and span an age range from modern to over 500,000 years old. The bulk of the collection is of early glacial to Holocene age and can provide multiple overlapping records of climate variability from the Western Pacific Warm Pool. However, generating absolute U-series ages from this collection is challenging. The host rock is a Miocene aged limestone that is covered by rainforest with virtually no topsoil development. This setting leaves the typical stalagmite sample with a low uranium concentration (100s of ppb), a low initial δ234U (-650‰ to -100‰), and a relatively high detrital Th concentration (10s to 100s of pmol/g). We have generated age models in these difficult circumstances by making over 150 MC-ICP-MS measurements of the 238U-234U-230Th-232Th disequilibrium system. Ages are limited by our correction for initial 230Th. This is a common problem in U-series dating of stalagmites that we have addressed by generating a "histogram" of initial 230/232 values. With 14 isochrons from four separate stalagmites spanning the glacial maximum through the Holocene we can conservatively constrain the initial 230/232 atom ratio to be 60±10x10-6. There are small differences in the weighted mean of this value between stalagmites, but no systematic differences with time within a stalagmite. The very low δ234U values are intriguing and must represent the effects of recent weathering of the host limestone. These low and variable δ234U ratios also make it imperative to calculate the initial 230/232 ratios with full three-dimensional isochrons, extrapolating to zero U-238 on a "Rosholt Diagram" does not produce a consistent answer between the samples. Overall we can produce 2 sigma age errors that are better than 1% for the combined

  12. Chemical Disequilibria and Sources of Gibbs Free Energy Inside Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.

    2010-12-01

    Non-photosynthetic organisms use chemical disequilibria in the environment to gain metabolic energy from enzyme catalyzed oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions. The presence of carbon dioxide, ammonia, formaldehyde, methanol, methane and other hydrocarbons in the eruptive plume of Enceladus [1] implies diverse redox disequilibria in the interior. In the history of the moon, redox disequilibria could have been activated through melting of a volatile-rich ice and following water-rock-organic interactions. Previous and/or present aqueous processes are consistent with the detection of NaCl and Na2CO3/NaHCO3-bearing grains emitted from Enceladus [2]. A low K/Na ratio in the grains [2] and a low upper limit for N2 in the plume [3] indicate low temperature (possibly < 273 K) of aqueous processes. Although many of the energetically favorable redox reactions are sluggish at low temperature, they could be catalyzed by enzymes if organisms were (are) present. The redox conditions in aqueous systems and amounts of available Gibbs free energy should have been affected by the production, consumption and escape of hydrogen. Aqueous oxidation of minerals (Fe-Ni metal, Fe-Ni phosphides, etc.) accreted on Enceladus should have led to H2 production, which is consistent with H2 detection in the plume [1]. Numerical evaluations based on concentrations of plume gases [1] reveal sufficient energy sources available to support metabolically diverse life at a wide range of activities (a) of dissolved H2 (log aH2 from 0 to -10). Formaldehyde, carbon dioxide [c.f. 4], HCN (if it is present), methanol, acetylene and other hydrocarbons have the potential to react with H2 to form methane. Aqueous hydrogenations of acetylene, HCN and formaldehyde to produce methanol are energetically favorable as well. Both favorable hydrogenation and hydration of HCN lead to formation of ammonia. Condensed organic species could also participate in redox reactions. Methane and ammonia are the final products of

  13. U-series dating of diagenetically altered fossil reef corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Denis; Mangini, Augusto; Felis, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Initial ( 234U/ 238U) activity ratios higher than those expected from closed system evolution of seawater are an outstanding problem in U-series dating of fossil reef corals. The increased activity ratios are ascribed to post-depositional diagenesis. We analysed six Last Interglacial and one Holocene coral of the genus Porites collected near the northern end of the Gulf of Aqaba (northern Red Sea) together with three recent corals from this location as a modern reference. While the values measured on the recent samples show no deviation from expected values, the Holocene and Last Interglacial corals display highly elevated ( 234U/ 238U) activity ratios as well as increased 238U and 232Th concentrations. ( 234U/ 238U) activity ratios are strongly correlated with ( 230Th/ 238U) and total uranium content. A model assuming different degrees of uranium addition and subsequent loss in different sub-samples of one coral produces straight lines (isochrons) on a ( 234U/ 238U)-( 230Th/ 238U) plot and predicts that the true age of the coral can be calculated by intersecting this isochron with the seawater evolution curve. We used the strong correlation detected in the Aqaba corals to calculate isochron ages. The isochron age of the Holocene coral (3116 +167 -156 yr) is concordant with its calibrated 14C age (2963 +92 -103 yr). The ages of the Last Interglacial corals are between 121 (+6.7 -5.3) and 121.9 (+7.0 -6.3) kyr for a higher terrace (7-10 m asl) and 106.4 (+8.9 -8.1) and 117.1 (+19.7 -15.3) kyr for a lower terrace (4-5 m asl). One Last Interglacial coral with an aragonite content of ˜85% could not be dated. The elevation and ages of the fossil terraces are consistent with existing sea level reconstructions from the Red Sea.

  14. Evaluation of Pleistocene groundwater flow through fractured tuffs using a U-series disequilibrium approach, Pahute Mesa, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Nichols, Paul J.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater flow through fractured felsic tuffs and lavas at the Nevada National Security Site represents the most likely mechanism for transport of radionuclides away from underground nuclear tests at Pahute Mesa. To help evaluate fracture flow and matrix–water exchange, we have determined U-series isotopic compositions on more than 40 drill core samples from 5 boreholes that represent discrete fracture surfaces, breccia zones, and interiors of unfractured core. The U-series approach relies on the disruption of radioactive secular equilibrium between isotopes in the uranium-series decay chain due to preferential mobilization of 234U relative to 238U, and U relative to Th. Samples from discrete fractures were obtained by milling fracture surfaces containing thin secondary mineral coatings of clays, silica, Fe–Mn oxyhydroxides, and zeolite. Intact core interiors and breccia fragments were sampled in bulk. In addition, profiles of rock matrix extending 15 to 44 mm away from several fractures that show evidence of recent flow were analyzed to investigate the extent of fracture/matrix water exchange. Samples of rock matrix have 234U/238U and 230Th/238U activity ratios (AR) closest to radioactive secular equilibrium indicating only small amounts of groundwater penetrated unfractured matrix. Greater U mobility was observed in welded-tuff matrix with elevated porosity and in zeolitized bedded tuff. Samples of brecciated core were also in secular equilibrium implying a lack of long-range hydraulic connectivity in these cases. Samples of discrete fracture surfaces typically, but not always, were in radioactive disequilibrium. Many fractures had isotopic compositions plotting near the 230Th-234U 1:1 line indicating a steady-state balance between U input and removal along with radioactive decay. Numerical simulations of U-series isotope evolution indicate that 0.5 to 1 million years are required to reach steady-state compositions. Once attained, disequilibrium 234U/238U

  15. 234U/238U Disequilibria along sedimentary discontinuities in a deep formation: late diagenetic U-relocation processes vs. large scale fluid circulation evidence ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, P.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Michelot, J.-L.; Doucelance, R.; Ghaleb, B.

    2003-04-01

    This work is part of geological investigations undertaken by the French Agency for Nuclear Waste Management (ANDRA) in order to study the safety of radioactive waste repository in deep geological clay layers. The target formation, from Mesozoic sedimentary rocks of the eastern Paris basin (France), is a thick (130--145 m), 400--500 m deep, Callovo-Oxfordian argilite unit, that is over- and underlain by Oxfordian and Bathonian limestones, respectively. Borehole core samples have been analysed for their uranium content and 234U/238U isotopic composition in order to examine the state of radioactive equilibrium existing between these two radionuclides naturally occurring in the rock. Any observations of disequilibrium should allow i) to document the mobility of these actinides in such deposits, and ii) to constrain the time scale of the geological phenomena responsible for it. Highly precise and accurate (234U/238U) analyses were obtained using Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The overall reproducibility, including both chemical separation and spectrometric measurement, is about 0.15% (2σ). Most samples of the target formation and its bounding rocks display secular equilibrium. However, in the Bathonian formation near the interface with the argilite layer, significant (234U/238U) disequilibria are observed along sub-horizontal sedimentary discontinuities, identified as styloliths, indicating that the process involved has been active during the last Ma. Isotopic and elemental compositions of uranium have been determined along a transect, perpendicular to a major discontinuity. The transect exhibits a symmetric pattern relative to this discontinuity with: (1) an increase of the U-concentration towards the stylolitic joint and (2) a sharp transition between significant (234U/238U) < 1 disequilibria in the stylolith to an excess of 234U ((234U/238U) = 1.05) in the vicinity of the joint, followed by a smooth decrease of the activity ratio

  16. Disequilibrium of the 238U series in basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Somayajulu, B.L.K.; Tatsumoto, M.; Rosholt, J.N.; Knight, R.J.

    1966-01-01

    Radioisotope analyses of basalt samples from Hawaii, Japan, and Iwo Jima show that: (1) 234U and 238U are virtually in radioactive equilibrium, (2) 230Th exceeds equilibrium values in all these samples, (3) 210Pb concentrations range from 10-200% of the equilibrium values and average 30% deficient, and (4) 226Ra is probably not in equilibrium with 234U. The source regions of the basalts or magma forming processes are open systems, chemically. The enrichment of some of the uranium-daughter nuclides is insufficient to account for the excess 206Pb in volcanic rocks. The isotopic composition of lead and specific activity of 210Pb in sublimates from Showa-shinzan, Japan are also reported. ?? 1966.

  17. Impact of the 235U series on doses from intakes of natural uranium and decay progeny.

    PubMed

    Lowe, L M

    1997-10-01

    The doses from 235U series radionuclides have often been ignored in dose assessments involving natural uranium and progeny. This is due to the relatively low abundance of 235U in natural uranium (less than 5% on an activity basis). However, inclusion of the 235U series radionuclides, especially 227Ac and 231Pa, in dose calculations can have a substantial impact on estimated inhalation doses. PMID:9314233

  18. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry U-series dating of a hominid site near Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Xin; Hu, Kai; Collerson, Kenneth D.; Xu, Han-Kui

    2001-01-01

    Mass spectrometric U-series dating of speleothems from Tangshan Cave, combined with ecological and paleoclimatic evidence, indicates that Nanjing Man, a typical Homo erectus morphologically correlated with Peking Man at Zhoukoudian, should be at least 580 k.y. old, or more likely lived during the glacial oxygen isotope stage 16 (˜620 ka). Such an age estimate, which is ˜270 ka older than previous electron spin resonance and alpha-counting U-series dates, has significant implications for the evolution of Asian H. erectus. Dentine and enamel samples from the coexisting fossil layer yield significantly younger apparent ages, that of the enamel sample being only less than one-fourth of the minimum age of Nanjing Man. This suggests that U uptake history is far more complex than existing models can handle. As a result, great care must be taken in the interpretation of electron spin resonance and U-series dates of fossil teeth.

  19. Constraining the timescales of sediment transport in lowland regions using U-series isotopes and morphometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ashley; Dosseto, Anthony; Chivas, Allan; May, Jan-Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    The uranium-series (U-series) isotopes are fractionated by chemical and physical weathering, and undergo radioactive decay on timescales relevant to Earth-surface processes (103-106 a). The comminution age technique is based on the disequilibrium between 234U and 238U due to the effects of alpha-decay in fine-grained (< 63 µm) sediment [1]. The calculated comminution age represents the sediment residence time i.e. the time elapsed since a sediment grain was formed by weathering from bedrock, until its eventual deposition. When applied to fluvial systems, this integrates storage in the weathering profile, transit time in the catchment and any temporary storage in alluvial deposits. Despite the majority of global sediment flux to the oceans being derived from slowly eroding lowland regions, still little is known with regard to the dominant controls of erosion in these areas [2]. Here we apply the comminution age technique to the six major catchments in the Gulf of Carpentaria basin (GOC) in northern Australia to investigate the temporal dynamics of erosion in lowland regions. In addition, the geomorphometric properties of the catchments were measured using Geographic Information System techniques (GIS) in order to disentangle topographic vs. climatic controls on the sediment residence time. The sediment residence times calculated from U-series isotopes do not increase linearly downstream which reflects the complicated nature of sediment transport in lowland regions. The sediment residence time appears to be broadly correlated with mean annual precipitation but this relationship is less clear following consideration of the geomorphometric properties of each sub-catchment. This highlights the tendency of geochronological approaches to oversimplify the mechanisms of sediment transport in fluvial systems. Understanding what controls the temporal dynamics of erosion in fluvial system on millennial timescales requires the combination of the hitherto commonly separate

  20. Precise microsampling of poorly laminated speleothems for U-series dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drysdale, R.; Paul, B.; Hellstrom, J.; Couchoud, I.; Greig, A.; Bajo, P.; Zanchetta, G.; Isola, I.; Spötl, C.; Baneschi, I.; Regattieri, E.; Woodhead, J.

    2012-04-01

    Speleothems are recognised as important palaeoclimate archives partly because of the ability to date them accurately and precisely by uranium-series (U-series) methods. The practicalities of sampling speleothem sections for U-series dating are, in most cases, fairly straightforward due to the presence of visible growth layers. However, not all speleothems possess this property, which depends upon the conditions of calcium carbonate precipitation. In this paper, we describe a method for generating U-series dating samples in which growth layers are resolved from trace-element images produced by laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). We apply this method to a section of an Italian subaqueous speleothem (CD3) that lacks persistent visible growth layering. The trace-element imaging revealed growth layers that are strongly non-planar in their geometry owing to the speleothem's pronounced euhedral crystal terminations. The most prominent trace-element layers were first digitized as x,y vector contours. We then interpolated these in the growth-axis direction to generate a series of contour lines at ~250-μm increments. The coordinates of these contours were used to guide the sampling via a computerised micromilling lathe. This produced a total of 22 samples for U-series dating by multi-collector ICP-MS. The dating results returned ages in correct stratigraphic order within error. Close inspection of the U-series data suggests that the main sources of age uncertainty are unrelated to the contour sampling. Comparisons between stable oxygen and carbon isotope profiles derived from aliquots of the dating samples and two other stable isotope profiles from CD3 spanning the same time period compare very favourably. Taken together, this suggests that our trace-element contouring method provides a reliable means for extracting samples for dating (and other geochemical analyses), and can be applied to similar speleothems lacking visible growth

  1. Ra-Th disequilibria systematics: Timescale of carbonatite magma formation at Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ross W.; Gill, James B.; Bruland, Kenneth W.

    1986-06-01

    Carbonatite magma can form and erupt within 7 to 18 years, and the event seems associated with prior volcanic eruptions. This determination of magma age is possible because the carbonatite lava and ash which were erupted in 1960-1966 from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania, have the most extreme disequilibria between U and Th series nuclides yet measured in volcanic rocks. At the time of eruption: ( 228Ra) /( 232Th) ≈ 27 and ( 226Ra) /( 230Th) > 60 ; ( 238U) /( 232Th) > 10 , while ( 232Th) /( 232Th) = 1.0 ; and ( 210Pb) /( 226Ra) ≈ 0.3 . Three end-member models are presented which enable interpretation of these disequilibria. If the disequilibrium formed instantaneously, the event occurred about 7 years before initial eruption, and just before the last preceding but small eruption of Oldoinyo Lengai. If, instead, the disequilibrium formed continuously, the process must have begun 15 to 18 years before initial eruption, just after the last preceding major eruption. The disequilibria data confirm that the carbonatites are not fused trona, but do not distinguish between other genetic options (mantle fusion, selective assimilation, liquid immiscibility). However, the shortness of magma-formation time together with mass-balance considerations suggest formation due to the continuous exsolution of 2 to 20% of carbonatite from nephelinite which was itself Ra-enriched.

  2. IXth millenium B.C. ceramics from Niger: detection of a U-series disequilibrium and TL dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guibert, P.; Schvoerer, M.; Etcheverry, M. P.; Szepertyski, B.; Ney, C.

    A set of pottery sherds collected from two ancient neolithic sites in Niger (Tagalagal and Adrar Bous 10) has been dated by thermoluminescence. The natural radioactivity of these ceramics and of their surrounding sediments was measured using low background gamma spectrometry and atomic emission plasma spectrometry. With gamma spectrometry, the comparison between the activity of 238U (deduced from the 235U and 234Th gamma emissions) and that of 226Ra (deduced from 214Pb and 214Bi γ emissions in equilibrium with 222Rn) shows a significant disequilibrium of the U-series. The activity ratio {38U}/{226Ra}, which is greater than unity in this case, is interpreted as a result of either uranium enrichment ( 234U, 235U, 238U) or radium impoverishment that has been occurring since the burying of the archaeological artefacts. The effects of the changes in radiochemical composition on the annual dose are discussed and various determinations of the annual dose are analysed according to different hypotheses of disequilibrium (either permanent state or recent occurrence). The TL results: Tagalagal — 9820±780-10, 180±780 years/1993, Adrar Bous 10 — 9530±750-10,500±730 years/1993, are consistent with the radiocarbon dates obtained from charcoals collected at the same locations (the uncalibrated 14C dates belong to the 9100-9370 BP range). These results are of fundamental interest for the chronology of early neolithic cultures.

  3. Degassing processes and eruptive activity at Merapi volcano: The bearing of short-lived U-series isotopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, P. J.; Le Cloarec, M. F.

    2003-04-01

    For more than 20 years, volcanic gases have been regularly collected at Merapi volcano (Central Java, Indonesia) and subsequently analyzed for their radionuclide (210Pb, 210Bi, and 210Po) and SO_2 contents. Gas sampling was carried out during various periods of contrasted volcanic activity and at different locations: high-temperature fumarolic fields (Woro: 600^oC; Gendol 850^oC), main plume released through fractures within the summit crater, and active growing lava domes. These new results show the high volatility of the three radionuclides in andesitic gases, although their emanation coefficients (0.94%, 3.5%, and <= 53% for 210Pb, 210Bi, and 210Po, respectively) are significantly lower than those observed at basaltic volcanoes. This emphasizes the major role of magma temperature on the degassing of these metals, which are mainly transported in volcanic gases as Pb-chloride compounds, and Bi- and Po-metallic species. 210Pb--210Bi--210Po radioactive disequilibria in the gas phase at Merapi appear to be characteristic of the degassing processes and gas paths within the edifice. Gases released at both Gendol and Woro fumarolic fields are clearly of magmatic origin, but their 210Pb--210Bi--210Po isotopic signature is strongly altered by secondary processes: condensation and transformation of gases crossing brines (Woro); deposition and subsequent degassing of sublimates according to temperature variations in the ground (Woro, Gendol). High-temperature gases collected in the main plume are of pure primary magmatic origin. They are likely directly tapped in the degassing reservoir and escape through the main fractures with little interaction with the dome-forming host rocks. On the other hand, gases arising from the growing dome are strongly depleted in the most volatile isotopes and gas species. We conclude from these observations that lava is almost completely degassed prior to its emission at the surface, and that magmatic degassing at Merapi is an open

  4. U-series dating of bone using the diffusion-adsorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, A. W. G.; Hedges, R. E. M.; Van calsteren, P.

    2002-12-01

    U-series dating of bone has suffered problems of reliability since its inception because bone remains an open system with respect to uranium. Commonly applied a priori assumptions of U uptake, such as early uptake or linear uptake, are inadequate because they have no physical or chemical bases, no means of demonstrating which model is suitable for a particular bone, and no intrinsic tests of reliability. Despite this and numerous examples of anomalous U-series dates, such assumptions are still routinely applied. We address this problem using the diffusion-adsorption (D-A) model of U uptake (Millard and Hedges, 1996), which incorporates a physicochemical description of U uptake. Using this model, we show how the U uptake of a bone responds to geochemical changes in the burial environment, which can lead to phenomena such as the removal of U from bones ("leaching") or U uptake late in their burial history ("recent uptake"), and we show how the overall uptake history is reflected in distributions (profiles) of U and U-series isotopes across a bone section. We present measurements of U concentration profiles, and 230Th/ 234U profiles on archeological bone from a number of different sites and burial environments and compare the results to profiles predicted by the D-A model. Bones that have undergone complex uptake histories (which include U leaching or recent uptake) are identified on the basis of these profiles and rejected as unsuitable for dating. For bones that appear to have undergone uptake under constant geochemical conditions, the D-A model is applied to calculate U-series dates, with much improved reliability.

  5. Modeling of U-series Radionuclide Transport Through Soil at Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, K. E.; Goodell, P. C.; Walton, J. C.; Anthony, E. Y.; Ren, M.

    2007-05-01

    The Nopal I uranium deposit is located at Pena Blanca in Chihuahua, Mexico. Mining of high-grade uranium ore occurred in the early 1980s, with the ore stockpiled nearby. The stockpile was mostly cleared in the 1990s; however, some of the high-grade boulders have remained there, creating localized sources of radioactivity for a period of 25-30 years. This provides a unique opportunity to study radionuclide transport, because the study area did not have any uranium contamination predating the stockpile in the 1980s. One high-grade boulder was selected for study based upon its shape, location, and high activity. The presumed drip-line off of the boulder was marked, samples from the boulder surface were taken, and then the boulder was moved several feet away. Soil samples were taken from directly beneath the boulder, around the drip-line, and down slope. Eight of these samples were collected in a vertical profile directly beneath the boulder. Visible flakes of boulder material were removed from the surficial soil samples, because they would have higher concentrations of U-series radionuclides and cause the activities in the soil samples to be excessively high. The vertical sampling profile used 2-inch thicknesses for each sample. The soil samples were packaged into thin plastic containers to minimize the attenuation and to standardize sample geometry, and then they were analyzed by gamma-ray spectroscopy with a Ge(Li) detector for Th-234, Pa-234, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-214, Bi-214, and Pb-210. The raw counts were corrected for self-attenuation and normalized using BL-5, a uranium standard from Beaverlodge, Saskatchewan. BL-5 allowed the counts obtained on the Ge(Li) to be referenced to a known concentration or activity, which was then applied to the soil unknowns for a reliable calculation of their concentrations. Gamma ray spectra of five soil samples from the vertical profile exhibit decreasing activities with increasing depth for the selected radionuclides

  6. Evaluation of New Geological Reference Materials for U-Series Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, J. S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Nunn, A. J.; Ui Chearnaigh, K.; Amato, R.; Murrell, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium-series analytical measurements are widely used in geochemistry, geochronology, paleoclimatology, volcanology, environmental risk assessment and other fields. Recent advances in high-resolution, rapid, in situ microanalytical techniques e.g. LA-ICP-MS and SIMS present numerous opportunities for the geoanalytical community. As with other analytical techniques, the quality of the elemental concentration and isotopic data obtained through microanalytical techniques is dependent on the accurate characterization of suitable reference materials. Even for the case of fs-laser ablation applications, a range of well-characterized standards are required for high precision U-series work. Advances have been made in evaluating existing standard reference materials for U-series isotopic analysis, but this work is ongoing as more reference materials become available. In this study we present MC-TIMS and MC-ICP-MS results for uranium and thorium isotopic ratios and elemental concentrations measured in a suite of newly available Chinese Geological Standard Glasses (CGSG) designed for microanalysis. These glasses exhibit a range of chemical compositions including basalt, syenite, andesite and a soil. U concentrations for these glasses range from ≈2 to 14 μg/g and [Th]/[U] ratios range from ≈4 to 6. Uranium and thorium concentration and isotopic data will also be presented for rhyolitic obsidian from Macusani, SE Peru, which can be used as a rhyolitic reference material. These high-precision and high-accuracy ratios, from a suite of standards that exhibit a range of natural, non-basaltic compositions, will complement data from existing standards and expand the catalogue of reference materials that are appropriate for in situ U-series work. These results can be used to assess the performance of microanalytical techniques and will facilitate inter-laboratory comparison of data within the broader geoscience community.

  7. Symbiont survival and host-symbiont disequilibria under differential vertical transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, M S; Arnold, J; Asmussen, M A

    2000-01-01

    Interspecific genetic interactions in host-symbiont systems raise intriguing coevolutionary questions and may influence the effectiveness of public health and management policies. Here we present an analytical and numerical investigation of the effects of host genetic heterogeneity in the rate of vertical transmission of a symbiont. We consider the baseline case with a monomorphic symbiont and a single diallelic locus in its diploid host, where vertical transmission is the sole force. Our analysis introduces interspecific disequilibria to quantify nonrandom associations between host genotypes and alleles and symbiont presence/absence. The transient and equilibrium behavior is examined in simulations with randomly generated initial conditions and transmission parameters. Compared to the case where vertical transmission rates are uniform across host genotypes, differential transmission (i) increases average symbiont survival from 50% to almost 60%, (ii) dramatically reduces the minimum average transmission rate for symbiont survival from 0.5 to 0.008, and (iii) readily creates permanent host-symbiont disequilibria de novo, whereas uniform transmission can neither create nor maintain such associations. On average, heterozygotes are slightly more likely to carry and maintain the symbiont in the population and are more randomly associated with the symbiont. Results show that simple evolutionary forces can create substantial nonrandom associations between two species. PMID:10757775

  8. Partitioning, duality, and linkage disequilibria in the Moran model with recombination.

    PubMed

    Esser, Mareike; Probst, Sebastian; Baake, Ellen

    2016-07-01

    The multilocus Moran model with recombination is considered, which describes the evolution of the genetic composition of a population under recombination and resampling. We investigate a marginal ancestral recombination process, where each site is sampled only in one individual and we do not make any scaling assumptions in the first place. Following the ancestry of these loci backward in time yields a partition-valued Markov process, which experiences splitting and coalescence. In the diffusion limit, this process turns into a marginalised version of the multilocus ancestral recombination graph. With the help of an inclusion-exclusion principle and so-called recombinators we show that the type distribution corresponding to a given partition may be represented in a systematic way by a sampling function. The same is true of correlation functions (known as linkage disequilibria in genetics) of all orders. We prove that the partitioning process (backward in time) is dual to the Moran population process (forward in time), where the sampling function plays the role of the duality function. This sheds new light on the work of Bobrowski et al. (J Math Biol 61:455-473, 2010). The result also leads to a closed system of ordinary differential equations for the expectations of the sampling functions, which can be translated into expected type distributions and expected linkage disequilibria. PMID:26545359

  9. U-series dating of Locality 15 at Zhoukoudian, China, and implications for hominid evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guanjun J.; Gao, Xing; Zhao, Jian-xin; Collerson, Kenneth D.

    2004-09-01

    This paper reports U-series dates on speleothem samples from Locality 15 at Zhoukoudian, one of the richest Paleolithic sites in northern China. The age of the lower part of Layer 2 is securely bracketed between 155,000 and 284,000 yr. The underlying Layer 3 dates back at least 284,000 yr. Layer 4, further below, should be older still, possibly by a cycle on the SPECMAP time scale before 284,000 yr ago. These ages, much greater than the previous estimates of 110,000-140,000 yr from U-series and electron spin resonance dating of fossil teeth, suggest that Locality 15 was broadly contemporaneous with Locality 4 (New Cave) and with the uppermost strata of Locality 1 (Peking Man site). The physical evolution and cultural development evidenced by the timing of the Zhoukoudian localities are in line with the opinion of Chinese anthropologists for a regional transition from Homo erectus to archaic Homo sapiens.

  10. U-series and radiocarbon analyses of human and faunal remains from Wajak, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Storm, Paul; Wood, Rachel; Stringer, Chris; Bartsiokas, Antonis; de Vos, John; Aubert, Maxime; Kinsley, Les; Grün, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    Laser ablation U-series dating results on human and faunal bone fragments from Wajak, Indonesia, indicate a minimum age of between 37.4 and 28.5 ka (thousands of years ago) for the whole assemblage. These are significantly older than previously published radiocarbon estimates on bone carbonate, which suggested a Holocene age for a human bone fragment and a late Pleistocene age for a faunal bone. The analysis of the organic components in the faunal material show severe degradation and a positive δ(13)C ratio indicate a high degree of secondary carbonatisation. This may explain why the thermal release method used for the original age assessments yielded such young ages. While the older U-series ages are not in contradiction with the morphology of the Wajak human fossils or Javanese biostratigraphy, they will require a reassessment of the evolutionary relationships of modern human remains in Southeast Asia and Oceania. It can be expected that systematic direct dating of human fossils from this area will lead to further revisions of our understanding of modern human evolution. PMID:23465338

  11. Timescale of erosion in high mountain range. What do U-series tell us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomies, C.; Bickle, M. J.; Tipper, E. T.; Chapman, H. J.; Fairchild, I. J.; Harris, N.

    2003-04-01

    We aim is to better understand the feedbacks which control long term climate by studying weathering yields in a rapidly eroding mountainous environment. This study focuses on one of the large Nepalese river, the Marsyandi which drains all the main structural units of the Nepalese Himalaya. Here we use, in addition to major element, Sr and Sr isotopes, the disequilibria of the 234U/238U and 238U/230Th activity ratios of river water, suspended load, bedload and rocks in an attempt to determine the weathering inputs and the timescale of the weathering processes. In addition a weekly sampling of the dissolved load at four sites enables us to measure the impact of the monsoon seasonality on the uranium activity of the dissolved load. This sampling helps to quantify the groundwater inputs and therefore the erosion processes involved. Throughout the dry and the monsoon season the main U source to the Marsyandi is the Dhudh khola which drains the uranium rich Manaslu granite. The uranium concentrations of the river waters exhibit a trend explicable in term of mixing of a silicate and carbonate end members. Surprisingly (234U/238U)a<1 in water and (234U/238U)a>1 in bedload suggest that, in parts of the range, the bedrock undergoes a first stage of weathering by groundwater at depth followed by further chemical weathering at the surface. The main uranium fractionation occurs during the first stage of groundwater weathering. The duration of this stage, within the last 1.5Ma, is mainly controlled by the uplift rate of the range currently estimated at 3mm/y. Highly variable (234U/238U) activity found in the dissolved load of rivers draining the TSS formation reflects the complexity of the interactions between weathering processes, lithology and tectonics.

  12. U-series dating and stable isotope records of speleothem records from the Scladina Cave (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lubbe, Jeroen; Bonjean, Dominique; Hellstrom, John; Verheyden, Sophie; Vonhof, Hubert

    2015-04-01

    The Scladina cave, situated in the village of Sclayn (Ardennes, Belgium) at the southern bank of the Meuse, is famous for its Neanderthal fossils and artefacts. The infilling of the cave consists of a succession of flowstone layers interbedded with reworked loess sediment from outside the cave. The younger flowstone layers correspond to interglacials MIS 5 and the Holocene, while the reworked loess sediments represent cooler conditions. By careful diagenetic screening, well-preserved speleothem material was selected for U-series dating and stable isotope analysis of calcite and fluid inclusions. The results provide important new constraints on the age of Neanderthal fossils and artefacts, and bracket the time periods with a hydroclimate favorable for speleothem growth. The combination of fluid inclusion and calcite isotope analysis documents climate variability in the interglacials at high temporal resolution.

  13. U-series disequilibrium constraints on magma generation at the Jan Mayen hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, E. R.; Chernow, R.; Elkins, L. J.; Sims, K. W.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Devey, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    The incompatible element-enriched magma source beneath the Jan Mayen Island hotspot influences melt generation on the adjacent northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge system and likely derives from either a small, local mantle plume, ancient Icelandic plume material emplaced in the mantle source, and/or sub-continental lithospheric mantle remnants emplaced locally by rifting of Greenland. The slow spreading Northern Kolbeinsey and Southern Mohns Ridges are immediately adjacent to Jan Mayen Island. Both have relatively shallow ridge axes, particularly the extremely shallow Eggvin Bank region of the Northern Kolbeinsey Ridge, which host anomalously large central volcanic edifices. We are currently collecting U-series disequilibrium and long-lived radiogenic isotope data for fresh, glassy mid-ocean ridge basalts from the Northern Kolbeinsey and Southern Mohns Ridge segments to better constrain source composition, depth of melting in the garnet peridotite stability field, solid mantle upwelling rates, and the nature of melt extraction beneath those segments. In particular, we are measuring isotopic data for geographically well-located samples collected from hummocky pillow basalt flows within the axial valley of the Northern Kolbeinsey Ridge segment as well as from the large volcanoes on both ridge segments, to further determine the role of the Jan Mayen hotspot in crustal construction on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Recently collected data show particularly high strontium isotope ratios consistent with trace element patterns that suggest a distinct local plume located beneath the Jan Mayen hotspot. A plume model for Jan Mayen is supported by new bathymetric imaging of adjacent ridge segments that reveals excess volcanism beneath the large axial volcanoes and a radial distribution of enrichment surrounding Jan Mayen Island. We predict that age-constrained U-series disequilibrium measurements will support active mantle upwelling focused beneath both Jan Mayen Island and the large axial

  14. Use of U-Series Isotopic Disequilibrium to Investigate the Nature and Distribution of Actively Flowing Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, P. J.; Paces, J. B.; Neymark, L. A.; Rajaram, H.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater transport of radioisotopes from underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy. Extensive testing was conducted near or below the regional water table (saturated zone; SZ) at Pahute Mesa and within the unsaturated (or partially saturated) zone at Rainier Mesa. Groundwater flow in these rocks is believed to occur mainly through a connected network of fractures. To better understand flow in these fractured rocks, we analyzed U-series isotopes (238U-234U-230Th) from drill core samples. In rock isolated from flow over the last million years, isotopes in the 238U decay chain reach a state of radioactive secular equilibrium, where 234U/238U and 230Th/238U activity ratios (AR) = 1.0. More recent water-rock interaction results in mobilization of 234U relative to 238U, and U relative to Th in migrating waters. Rock surfaces that incorporate this U or are leached of 234U and U will show U-series disequilibrium. Isotope data can thus provide time-sensitive information on hydrologic conditions in host rocks without directly observing or measuring flowing water. To investigate NNSS fracture networks, core was selected from confining units (bedded and zeolitized felsic tuffs) and aquifers (felsic welded tuffs and lavas) in five boreholes on Pahute Mesa and two boreholes on Rainier Mesa. Samples include interiors of intact core as well as natural fracture surfaces and brecciated core. Intact core and brecciated samples were crushed and powdered. Fracture surfaces were sampled using dental burs to remove the outer 0.1 to 0.5 mm of fracture surfaces, which may have thin mineral coatings of zeolites, clays, and Mn oxides. Samples were totally digested, spiked with a 236U-229Th tracer, and analyzed by a solid-source TRITON° mass spectrometer equipped with an energy filter and single ion counter. Results show that 8 of 9 intact core samples have 234U/238U AR within ±5% of 1.0, suggesting little or no

  15. Pressure disequilibria induced by rapid valve closure in noble gas extraction lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Leah E.; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett

    2015-06-01

    Pressure disequilibria during rapid valve closures can affect calculated molar quantities for a range of gas abundance measurements (e.g., K-Ar geochronology, (U-Th)/He geochronology, noble gas cosmogenic chronology). Modeling indicates this effect in a system with a 10 L reservoir reaches a bias of 1% before 1000 pipette aliquants have been removed from the system, and a bias of 10% before 10,000 aliquants. Herein we explore the causes and effects of this problem, which is the result of volume changes during valve closure. We also present a solution in the form of an electropneumatic pressure regulator that can precisely control valve motion. This solution reduces the effect to ˜0.3% even after 10,000 aliquants have been removed from a 10 L reservoir.

  16. Determination of transfer time for sediments in alluvial plains using 238U-234U-230Th disequilibria: The case of the Ganges river system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, François; Blaes, Estelle; Granet, Mathieu; Roupert, Raphaël di Chiara; Stille, Peter

    2012-11-01

    An approach to deriving the transfer time of sediments within alluvial plains by using the variation of the U-series nuclides in sediments collected along rivers is presented in this article and discussed in the light of new data from samples from different locations within the Ganges watershed and its outlet. These data indicate that the upstream-downstream variation of 238U-234U-230Th disequilibria in the sediments, with different variation trends for suspended and coarse-grained sediments, is probably a general feature of all Himalayan rivers flowing across the Indo-Gangetic plain. The data therefore confirm the occurrence of very different transfer times within the plain, depending on the sediments granulometry, with much shorter transfer time for the fine-grained (a few ky or less) than for the coarse-grained sediments (100 ky or more). A new solving approach, using a parallel stochastic Quantum-behaved Particle Swarm Optimization (p-QPSO), has been developed for identifying the unknown parameters of the model necessary for the determination of the transfer time. The data of sediments collected at the Ganges outlet show significant variations of the 234U/230Th activity ratios for the fine-grained sediment end-member collected in 2004 and 2008. Such variations indicate that the fine-grained sediments transit quickly (a year or less) within the plain. The highly variable activity ratios might be the result of quickly changing weathering intensities. Conversely, the U-Th variations observed for the 2004 and 2008 bedload from the Ganges basin cannot result from a short sedimentary transfer time. They probably result from the dredge sampling procedure, which might be influenced by local placer effects controlling the abundance of U and Th carrying minerals. Dredging may not allow the sampling of a representative bedload, hence it may cause an artificial mineralogical and, therefore, an U-Th variability for bedload sediments collected at different periods. At this

  17. Mid-ocean ridge basalt generation along the slow-spreading, South Mid-Atlantic Ridge (5-11°S): Inferences from 238U-230Th-226Ra disequilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Simon; Kokfelt, Thomas; Hauff, Folkmar; Haase, Karsten; Lundstrom, Craig; Hoernle, Kaj; Yeo, Isobel; Devey, Colin

    2015-11-01

    U-series disequilibria have provided important constraints on the physical processes of partial melting that produce basaltic magma beneath mid-ocean ridges. Here we present the first 238U-230Th-226Ra isotope data for a suite of 83 basalts sampled between 5°S and 11°S along the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This section of the ridge can be divided into 5 segments (A0-A4) and the depths to the ridge axis span much of the global range, varying from 1429 to 4514 m. Previous work has also demonstrated that strong trace element and radiogenic isotope heterogeneity existed in the source regions of these basalts. Accordingly, this area provides an ideal location in which to investigate the effects of both inferred melt column length and recycled materials. 226Ra-230Th disequilibria indicate that the majority of the basalts are less than a few millennia old such that their 230Th values do not require any age correction. The U-Th isotope data span a significant range from secular equilibrium up to 32% 230Th excess, also similar to the global range, and vary from segment to segment. However, the (230Th/238U) ratios are not negatively correlated with axial depth and the samples with the largest 230Th excesses come from the deepest ridge segment (A1). Two sub-parallel and positively sloped arrays (for segments A0-2 and A3 and A4) between (230Th/238U) and Th/U ratios can be modelled in various ways as mixing between melts from peridotite and recycled mafic lithologies. Despite abundant evidence for source heterogeneity, there is no simple correlation between (230Th/238U) and radiogenic isotope ratios suggesting that at least some of the trace element and radiogenic isotope variability may have been imparted to the source regions >350 kyr prior to partial melting to produce the basalts. In our preferred model, the two (230Th/238U) versus Th/U arrays can be explained by mixing of melts from one or more recycled mafic lithologies with melts derived from chemically heterogeneous

  18. Carbonate mound evolution and coral diagenesis viewed by U-series dating of deep water corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, N.; Ricard, E.; Blamart, D.; van der Land, C.; Colin, C.; Foubert, A.; van Rooij, D.; van Weering, T.

    2007-12-01

    U-series dating of constructional deep sea corals is a powerful tool to reconstruct the evolution of carbonate mound sediments driven by coral growth, sediment trapping and diagenesis. Here we have investigated in great detail the time framework of constructional corals such as L. pertusa and M. oculata on 5 different mounds of the eastern North Atlantic (on Rockall Bank and in Porcupine Seabight) taken at variable depth and location (610 to 880m water depth). Periods favorable for coral growth are the Holocene and prior interglacials such as marine isotope stage 5 and 7, while glacial coral growth seems inhibited or extremely reduced. Coral development is almost continuous throughout the Holocene since mound re-colonization about 10,500 years ago. Mound accumulation rates vary between 20 and 220 cm/kyr determined from the coral age - depth relationship in each core. Those changes are most likely driven by changes between horizontal and vertical mound accumulation, food supply and ocean circulation. In addition, coral dating allowed to identify an important erosional event recorded in core MD01-2455G from Rockall Bank. Here a 1m thick sediment layer containing ancient corals likely from the start of Holocene re-colonization was displaced (collapsed) from further upslope on top of younger corals of ~2500 to 3000 years age. Prior to the initiation of coral growth diagenesis occurred frequently resulting in (1) the construction of so called carbonate hardgrounds and/or (2) the dissolution of the pre-Holocene coral framework. Solely, the deepest selected core in Porcupine Seabight (MD01-2463G at 880m depth) reveals coral re-colonization on an undisturbed ancient reef structure that dates back to 250,000 years. Diagenesis of earlier coral reef generations leading to coral dissolution leads to a loss of magnetic susceptibility and open system behavior of the coral skeletons with respect to U-series dating. While the processes causing such diagenetic layers are barely

  19. U-Series dating of Liujiang hominid site in Guangxi, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guanjun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qian; Zhao, Jianxin; Collerson, Kenneth; Zhou, Chunlin; Tobias, Phillip V

    2002-12-01

    It has been established that modern humans were living in the Levant and Africa ca. 100ka ago. Hitherto, this has contrasted with the situation in China where no unequivocal specimens of this species have been securely dated to more than 30ka. Here we present the results of stratigraphic studies and U-series dating of the Tongtianyan Cave, the discovery site of the Liujiang hominid, which represents one of the few well-preserved fossils of modern Homo sapiens in China. The human fossils are inferred to come from either a refilling breccia or a primarily deposited gravel-bearing sandy clay layer. In the former case, which is better supported, the fossils would date to at least approximately 68ka, but more likely to approximately 111-139ka. Alternatively, they would be older than approximately 153ka. Both scenarios would make the Liujiang hominid one of the earliest modern humans in East Asia, possibly contemporaneous with the earliest known representatives from the Levant and Africa. Parallel studies on other Chinese localities have provided supporting evidence for the redating of Liujiang, which may have important implications for the origin of modern humans. PMID:12473485

  20. New U-series dates at the Caune de l'Arago, France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falgueres, Christophe; Yokoyama, Y.; Shen, G.; Bischoff, J.L.; Ku, T.-L.; de Lumley, Henry

    2004-01-01

    In the beginning of the 1980s, the Caune de l'Arago was the focus of an interdisciplinary effort to establish the chronology of the Homo heidelbergensis (Preneandertals) fossils using a variety of techniques on bones and on speleothems. The result was a very large spread of dates particularly on bone samples. Amid the large spread of results, some radiometric data on speleothems showed a convergence in agreement with inferences from faunal studies. We present new U-series results on the stalagmitic formation located at the bottom of Unit IV (at the base of the Upper Stratigraphic Complex). Samples and splits were collaboratively analyzed in the four different laboratories with excellent interlaboratory agreement. Results show the complex sequence of this stalagmitic formation. The most ancient part is systematically at internal isotopic equilibrium (>350 ka) suggesting growth during or before isotopic stage 9, representing a minimum age for the human remains found in Unit III of the Middle Stratigraphical Complex which is stratigraphically under the basis of the studied stalagmitic formation. Overlaying parts of the speleothem date to the beginning of marine isotope stages 7 and 5. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. New U-series dates at the Caune de l'Arago, France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falgueres, Christophe; Yokoyama, Y.; Shen, G.; Bischoff, J.L.; Ku, T.-L.; de Lumley, Henry

    2004-01-01

    In the beginning of the 1980s, the Caune de l'Arago was the focus of an interdisciplinary effort to establish the chronology of the Homo heidelbergensis (Preneandertals) fossils using a variety of techniques on bones and on speleothems. The result was a very large spread of dates particularly on bone samples. Amid the large spread of results, some radiometric data on speleothems showed a convergence in agreement with inferences from faunal studies. We present new U-series results on the stalagmitic formation located at the bottom of Unit IV (at the base of the Upper Stratigraphic Complex). Samples and splits were collaboratively analyzed in the four different laboratories with excellent interlaboratory agreement. Results show the complex sequence of this stalagmitic formation. The most ancient part is systematically at internal isotopic equilibrium (>350 ka) suggesting growth during or before isotopic stage 9, representing a minimum age for the human remains found in Unit III of the Middle Stratigraphical Complex which is stratigraphically under the basis of the studied stalagmitic formation. Overlaying parts of the speleothem date to the beginning of marine isotope stages 7 and 5. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. U-series ages of solitary corals from the California coast by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, M.; Wasserburg, G.J.; Chen, J.H. ); Lajoie, K.R. )

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of dating fossil solitary corals from Pleistocene marine strandlines outside tropical latitudes using the recently developed high sensitivity, high-precision U-series technique based on thermal-ionization mass-spectrometry (TIMS). The TIMS technique is much more efficient than conventional {alpha} spectrometry and, as a result, multiple samples of an individual coral skeleton, or different specimens from the same bed can be analyzed. Detached and well-rounded fossil specimens of the solitary coral Balanophyllia elegans were collected from relict littoral deposits on emergent marine terraces along the California coast at Cayucos terrace, Shell Beach terrace, Nestor terrace, San Diego, Bird Rock terrace, San Diego. Attached living specimens were collected from the intertidal zone on the modern terrace at Moss Beach. The calculated initial {sup 234}U activities in the fossil specimens of Balanophyllia elegans are higher than the {sup 234}U activity in modern seawater or in the modern specimen. The higher initial activities could possibly reflect the influx of {sup 234}U-enriched continental water into Pleistocene coastal waters, or it could reflect the influx of {sup 234}U-enriched continental water into Pleistocene coastal waters, or it could reflect minor diagenetic alteration, a persistent and fundamental problem in dating all corals.

  3. ESR, U-series and paleomagnetic dating of Gigantopithecus fauna from Chuifeng Cave, Guangxi, southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qingfeng; Wang, Wei; Deng, Chenglong; Voinchet, Pierre; Lin, Min; Zazzo, Antoine; Douville, Eric; Dolo, Jean-Michel; Falguères, Christophe; Bahain, Jean-Jacques

    2014-07-01

    Several Gigantopithecus faunas associated with taxonomically undetermined hominoid fossils and/or stone artifacts are known from southern China. These faunas are particularly important for the study of the evolution of humans and other mammals in Asia. However, the geochronology of the Gigantopithecus faunas remains uncertain. In order to solve this problem, a program of geochronological studies of Gigantopithecus faunas in Guangxi Province was recently initiated. Chuifeng Cave is the first studied site, which yielded 92 Gigantopithecus blacki teeth associated with numerous other mammalian fossils. We carried out combined ESR/U-series dating of fossil teeth and sediment paleomagnetic studies. Our ESR results suggest that the lower layers at this cave can be dated to 1.92 ± 0.14 Ma and the upper layers can be dated to older than 1.38 ± 0.17 Ma. Correlation of the recognized magnetozones to the geomagnetic polarity timescale was achieved by combining magnetostratigraphic, biostratigraphic and ESR data. The combined chronologies establish an Olduvai subchron (1.945-1.778 Ma) for the lowermost Chuifeng Cave sediments. We also analyzed the enamel δ13C values of the Gigantopithecus faunas. Our results show that southern China was dominated by C3 plants during the early Pleistocene and that the Gigantopithecus faunas lived in a woodland-forest ecosystem.

  4. Comment on Ra-Th disequilibria systematics: Timescale of carbonatite magma formation at Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect

    Gittins, J. )

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses potential flaws in study by Williams, Gill, and bruland (1986) dealing with the extreme disequilibria between uranium and thorium series nuclides in alkalic carbonatite lava specimens. It discusses the apparent discrepencies between chemical compositions of lava which were reported from the same eruption. Clarification is made on the actual timing of eruptions in this volcanic region and the effects this would have on the petrogenesis interpretation of these rocks.

  5. U-series constraints on the Holocene human presence in the Cuatro Cienegas basin, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S. R.; Felstead, N.; Gonzalez, S.; Leng, M. J.; Metcalfe, S. E.; Patchett, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    U-series tufa ages dating a human trackway have been obtained, part of a larger Late Pleistocene - Recent palaeoclimate and human occupation study of the Cuatro Cienegas basin, NE Mexico. Our analytical approach, including tracer calibration, couples aspects of what we consider best practice in the U-series community with our U-Pb experiences which includes the EarthTime U-Pb tracer calibration exercise. The recently discovered trackway is near a small hydrothermal pool within the basin [1], an ecologically highly significant oasis in the Chihuahuan desert. The oasis comprises >200 freshwater hydrothermal pools and a river system, and the related ecosystem hosts >70 endemic species[2]. Pools are fed by waters that circulate a deep karstic system and that originate in the surrounding upper Jurassic-lower Cretaceous Sierra Madre Oriental mountains (>3000m) [3]. The area hosted nomadic hunter-gatherers during the Holocene, and possibly as early as Late Pleistocene (~12 ka BP). Despite the basin's ecological significance, only three palaeoenvironmental studies have been published to date, and limited geochronological constraints are available. A pollen study of drill core through peats and tufas proximal to the pools suggested a long period of climatic stability and biogeographic isolation[4], a notion supported by the large number of endemic species, but other palynological and plant macrofossil data suggest that large climatic changes occurred post Late Pleistocene [5]. The 10 m long in situ trackway is preserved in tufa and five samples from the uppermost surfaces were analysed to date the footprints. The tufas comprise clean carbonate with no petrographic evidence of replacement and little contaminant detrital material (on some exposed upper surfaces). Powdered tufa was processed following [6-8], and analysed by TIMS (Triton, U) and MC-ICP-MS (Th, Nu HR), although our future analyses will primarily be obtained on a Neptune. Samples were spiked with a 229Th/236U

  6. U-Th-Ra disequilibria in sediments of the Dora Baltea river (Italia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, F.; Deloche, A.; Pelt, E.; Granet, M.; Perrone, Th.; Boutin, R.; Viville, D.; Rihs, S.; Stille, P.

    2012-04-01

    In order to constrain the transfer time of sediments in Alpine rivers, we propose to use the U-series nuclides approach recently developed for Himalayan rivers (e.g., Chabaux et al., 2008; Granet et al., 2010). Therefore, a series of bank sediments has beeen collected along the Dora Baltea river (Italia), one of the Po's tributaries draining the southern slope of the Mont Blanc Massif. In addition to U series nuclides, major and trace element concentrations and Sr and Nd isotope ratios have been analyzed for each sample. The study indicates that the (234U/238U)-, (230Th/234U)- and the (226Ra/230Th)- activity ratios are very similar for all the samples, whereas the 230Th/232Th ratios can differ from one sample to another. Such a variation, consistent with the Sr and Nd isotope data, is certainly the consequence of mineralogical heterogeneities in the samples. This suggests that the use of 238U-230Th-232Th systematics alone is probably insufficient for constraining the transfer time of sediments in the Po rivers alluvial plain, whereas the combination of 238U-230Th disequilibrium with the 230Th-226Ra disequilibrium can help to constrain such time information.

  7. U-series isotope and geodynamic constraints on mantle melting processes beneath the Newer Volcanic Province in South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidjuk, Zoe; Turner, Simon; Sandiford, Mike; George, Rhiannon; Foden, John; Etheridge, Mike

    2007-09-01

    Young (< 5 kyr) olivine- and clinopyroxene-phyric ne-hawaiites from Mounts Gambier and Schank in the Newer Volcanic Province in South Australia have been analysed for major and trace elements as well as for Sr and Nd isotopes and 238U- 230Th disequilibria in order to constrain the mantle melting processes responsible for their origin. The rocks are relatively primitive (6.9-9.1% MgO), incompatible trace element-enriched alkali basalts with 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.70398-0.70415 and 143Nd/ 144Nd = 0.51280-0.51271. Trace element modelling suggests that they reflect 3-6% partial melting in the presence of 2-8% residual garnet. Trends towards low K/K * are accompanied by decreasing 87Sr/ 86Sr and provide evidence for the involvement of hydrous phases during melting. 230Th excesses of 12-57% cannot be simulated by batch melting of the lithosphere and instead require dynamic melting models. It is argued that the distinction between continental basalts bearing significant U-Th disequilibria and those in secular equilibrium reflects dynamic melting in upwelling asthenosphere, rather than static batch melting within the lithosphere or the presence or absence of residual garnet. Upwelling rates are estimated at ˜ 1.5 cm/yr. A subdued, localised topographic uplift associated with the magmatism suggests that any upwelling is more likely associated with a secondary mode localised to the upper mantle, rather than a broad zone of deeply-sourced (plume) upwelling. Upper mantle, 'edge-driven' convection is consistent with seismic tomographic and anisotropy studies that imply rapid differential motion of variable thickness Australian lithosphere and the underlying asthenosphere. In this scenario, melting is linked to a significant contribution from hydrous mantle that is envisaged as resulting either from convective entrainment of lithosphere along the trailing edge of a lithospheric keel, or inherited variability in the asthenosphere.

  8. Tracking Crystals Within Magma Reservoirs: U-series Crystal Ages and Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, K. M.

    2004-05-01

    U-series crystal ages can be used as tracers of crystal populations within a magma reservoir system, as well as providing information on the timescales of crystal and/or magma storage within reservoirs. 226Ra-230Th crystal ages in recent lavas from Mt St Helens (MSH), and Mt Shasta are several (2-5) ka. Similar ages were found by other workers for lavas from Tonga and the Lesser Antilles (Turner et al., 2003, EPSL 214 p. 279). However, Ra-Th and Th-U ages in seven of these thirteen samples are discordant, with Th-U ages of tens of ka. This pattern likely indicates progressive and/or episodic crystal growth where the Th-U ages more closely represent average ages while Ra-Th ages are weighted toward recent crystallization. This in turn suggests that crystals in arc lavas may in general reside within the crust for tens of ka, whereas the liquids may be much more transient features of the reservoir system. Diffusive equilibration of trace elements within zoned crystals and between crystals and liquids is a function of the duration of crystal residence at high temperatures. Therefore, the combination of crystal ages and trace element zoning patterns can potentially provide information about the temperature conditions of storage of these crystals. In addition, although Th-U diffusion in pyroxene and plagioclase is slow enough that ages will be robust at magmatic temperatures, Ra diffusion at high temperature could potentially modify Ra-Th ages. Ra-Th apparent ages could be either younger or older than the crystallization ages, considering that a chemical potential could be produced by introduction of crystals into an unrelated magma and also by in-situ decay. Measurement of Ba zoning in the same crystals can provide a test of the extent of Ra diffusion, thus making it possible to distinguish diffusive effects from aging. For the MSH samples (with one exception), preservation of Ba disequilibrium within individual crystals indicates that diffusion cannot have modified the

  9. Middle Palaeolithic refugium, or archaeological misconception? A new U-Series and radiocarbon chronology of Abric Agut (Capellades, Spain)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaquero, Manola; Esteban, M.; Allue, E.; Vallverdu, J.; Carbonell, E.; Bischoff, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    New U-Series and C14 (AMS) dates are provided for the Abric Agut (Capellades, Barcelona, Spain). This site was previously considered to be of Middle Palaeolithic age according to the characteristics of the lithic assemblage. In addition, human teeth were uncovered and attributed to neandertals. However, radiometric dating clearly indicates a Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene age. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 238U, 232Th profiling and U-series isotope analysis of fossil teeth by laser ablation-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggins, Stephen; Grün, Rainer; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Shelley, Michael; Taylor, Lois

    2003-05-01

    U and Th concentration profiles in fossil hominid and faunal teeth have been measured by laser ablation ICPMS. These profiles record diverse modes of U and Th uptake, particularly within enamel, that can be broadly related to the state of sample preservation. Observed U profiles are in general inconsistent with existing diffusion-adsorption models developed for U-uptake in bone and teeth. Where the models appear applicable, calculated diffusion rates are several orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates. Laser ablation ICPMS offers a means of rapidly characterizing U and Th distributions in the enamel and dentine components of teeth as a precursor to ESR and U-series dating. In particular, it should allow the identification of teeth (and also bone) samples that have simple U-uptake histories and are amenable to precise dating by time-consuming and expensive Th-U and Pa-U TIMS techniques. We also demonstrated the use of laser ablation ICPMS to measure U-series isotopes in dentine and enamel samples with relatively high U concentrations (>20 ppm). These results, obtained using a quadrupole ICPMS, illustrate significant promise for in situ U-series isotope analysis, particularly when combined with the greater sensitivity and multi-collection capabilities of new sector ICPMS instrumentation. The latter may permit precise isotope ratio measurements on samples containing only a few ppm of U.

  11. U-Th-Ra-Pa Disequilibria in the Kasuga Seamounts: recent "sediment" flux melting in the Mariana rear arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, J.; Holden, P.

    2002-12-01

    Mariana volcanic front lavas define a U-Th isotope mixing line with an apparent age of 30 Ka between U-enriched "basalt fluid"-dominated Guguan and "sediment melt"-dominated Uracas in 238U-230Th equilibrium (Elliott et al., 1997). However, new results for basalts collected by dredging and diving on the shoshonitic Kasuga Seamounts, 10-20 km behind the VF, require re-interpretation of both Mariana components. Kasuga basalts are the local "sediment" extreme, reaching La/Sm = 5, Th/Nb=0.75, and eNd=3 in the most K-rich samples. Despite this extremity, their U-Th disequilibria lie along the same mixing line as for the VF, but extend to 20 percent 230Th-enrichment and (230Th)/(232Th) lower than at the intersection with the equiline. This indicates deeper melting than at the VF, and that the source's Th/U ratio was higher than the intersection. (226Ra)/(230Th) ratios extend to 3.5 even though samples have unknown eruption ages and Ba/Th is only 100, much lower than at the VF. (231Pa)/(235U) is mostly 1.7, higher than at the VF. (231Pa)/(230Th) correlates positively with excess U, consistent with recent flux melting. However, the mantle being melted is more fertile than at the VF, and the flux is more "sedimentary" apart from its disequilibria. Disequilibria in the highest-K Kasuga are most like Kick-em-Jenny, the most sediment-rich part of the Antilles.

  12. U-series dating of pillow rim glass from recent volcanism at an Axial Volcanic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. E.; van Calsteren, P. W.; Jc024 Shipboard Party

    2010-12-01

    Visual observations using camera systems on the tethered ROV Isis deployed during the 2008 JC024 cruise to the Mid Atlantic Ridge at 45°N showed1 numerous monogenetic volcanoes that are essentially piles of lava pillows. The pillows are usually ˜1m diameter and >2m long and form mounds with average dimensions around 300m diameter, ˜150m altitude, and 0.005km3 volume. Small protrusions, 10-50cm long, which are numerous on pillows appear to be the youngest regions, were sampled using the pincers on the hydraulic arms of Isis, and returned to the surface. On the surface, any glass crust on the pillow protrusions was chiselled off using clean tools and double bagged in polythene. In the laboratory a portion of the glass was crushed in a jeweller’s roller mill and sieved using stainless steel sieves to obtain a sufficient amount of the fraction 0.125-0.250mm for hand picking, using a binocular microscope with the glass submerged in a mix of water and iso-propyl alcohol. The samples were subsequently leached using the procedure of Standish & Sims2. Samples were spiked with a mixed 229Th-236U spike and the U, Th and Ra fractions were separated and purified using standard chemistry methods. U and Th isotope ratios were determined using a Nu Instruments MC-ICPMS and Ra isotope ratios were determined using a MAT-262-RPQII TIMS instrument. The U-series data were evaluated using a MathCad program based on published4,5,6 equations. The data can be successfully modelled by assuming the ‘accepted’ mantle upwelling rate for the region of 11mm.y-1. The U-Th characteristics are mostly derived during ‘porous flow’ magma upwelling in the garnet stability zone, ranging to a depth of 60km with incipient melting starting at 70km. Above 60km depth the melt fraction will be >3% and the mantle mineralogy devoid of phases that fractionate U-Th significantly. Moreover, at melt fractions >3%, channel flow will be dominant and magma will transit to eruption on time-scales that are

  13. Modeling Magma Mixing: Evidence from U-series age dating and Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, R.; Cooper, K. M.; Bergantz, G. W.

    2007-12-01

    -pairs, heterogeneity of particle populations is large. After one overturn event, even the "thin section scale" can contain phenocrysts that derive from the entire magmatic system. We combine these results with time scale information from U-series plagioclase age dating. Apparent crystal residence times from the most evolved and therefore least hybridized rocks for the 1846/47 and 1932 eruptions of Volcan Quizapu are about 5000 and about 3000 yrs, respectively. Based on whole rock chemistry as well as textural and crystal-chemical data, both eruptions tapped the same reservoir and therefore should record similar crystal residence times. Instead, the discordance of these two ages can be explained by magma mixing as modeled above, if some young plagioclase derived from the andesitic recharge magma which triggered the 1846/47 AD eruption got mixed into the dacite remaining in the reservoir after eruption, thus lowering the apparent crystal residence time for magma that was evacuated from the reservoir in 1932.

  14. U-series data of recent volcanism at an Axial Volcanic Ridge (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Calsteren, P. W.; Thomas, L. E.; Jc024 Shipboard Party

    2010-12-01

    over the age of the AVR, or probably more appropriately, the time-span between to youngest and the oldest exposed rocks. Many indirect dating methods have been applied with inferred ages ranging from ˜10ky to 200ky. We1 applied the magnetic paleo-intensity method to infer an age of ˜12ky for the 45°N AVR. We will report U-series based age calculations for samples from the Dive 91 area. The samples were taken from a number of individual volcanoes and the simplest expectation would be that the youngest samples are from the AVR crest with older ages down the flanks. However, crustal magnetisation intensity can be taken as a proxy for age and this1,3 indicates a more complex pattern of young ages in the volcanic lineaments away from the crest. Indeed, visual observations of rocks at up to 1km from the crest would indicate that those are equally fresh. Indeed, Standish and Sims2 have shown that young eruption ages are broadly dispersed throughout the rift valley of the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge at a range much wider than covered by the area of Dive 91. Construction of new volcanic crust solely at the crest of the AVR may well be too simplistic.

  15. U-series, SrNdPb isotope and trace-element systematics across an active island arc-continent collision zone: Implications for element transfer at the slab-wedge interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogewerff, J. A.; Van Bergen, M. J.; Vroon, P. Z.; Hertogen, J.; Wordel, R.; Sneyers, A.; Nasution, A.; Varekamp, J. C.; Moens, H. L. E.; Mouchel, D.

    1997-03-01

    We present U-series, SrNdz.sbnd;Pb isotope and trace-element results of a regional study of geochemical systematics across an island arc-continent collision zone in the East Sunda Arc of Indonesia. Samples from four active volcanoes exhibit a striking compositional range from low-K tholeiitic to ultrapotassic, but all are characterised by high 87Sr/86Sr (0.7053-0.7067), radiogenic lead isotope ratios ( 206Pb/204Pb = 18.99-19.15), low ( 230Th) /( 232Thz) (0.66-0.85), and low 143Nd/144Nd (0.51255-0.51272), except for high 143Nd/144Nd (>0.51286) at the volcanic front. Low ( 230Th) /( 232Th) ratios are also found in terrigenous sediments in front of the arc, which, in combination with Srz.sbnd;Ndz.sbnd;Pb isotopic constraints, indicates that subducted continental material contributes to magma sources in this arc sector. The volcanoes close to the trench show a large excess of 238U over . 230Th (up to 80%) and of 226Ra over 230Th (up to 800%). In addition, they are enriched in elements thought to be mobile in hydrous fluids during slab-wedge transfer, such as Ba, Pb, and Sr. In contrast, Uz.sbnd;Thz.sbnd;Ra systematics are close to equilibrium in the volcanoes behind the front. Abundance patterns of incompatible trace elements in these rocks are similar to those of the terrigenous sediments, so that, in comparison with the arc-front lavas, they possess low Ba/La, Ba/Th, La/Th, Pb/Ce, and Zr/Nb. Higher concentration levels and less interelement fractionation form conspicuous differences with the front volcanics. Our combined isotopic and trace element data are consistent with three-component mixing whereby a slab-derived hydrous fluid and a siliceous melt are both added to the sub-arc mantle source. The hydrous fluid largely controls the input in the shallow part of the subduction zone, whereas the siliceous melt dominates the flux at deeper levels. Sedimentary material is considered to be the primary source of both. The large U-Th-Ra disequilibria at the front

  16. Decay-Series Disequilibria in a Chalk Aquifer : Characterisation of Water-Rock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, A.; Bourdon, B.; Pili, E.

    2003-12-01

    We have studied uranium-series disequilibria in a chalk aquifer and the unsaturated zone above it in order to characterise the time scales of radionuclide migration from the water recharge zone of the aquifer to the nearby river. Our field area is located in Champagne (France). The aquifer is characterized by a double porosity : matrix and fracture, providing both a fast and a slow pathways for water flow. We have collected both carbonate rocks and groundwater samples from boreholes and spring and river water from the same area. Rock/water interaction inside the aquifer induces dissolution and reprecipitation of carbonates, together with a mobilization of uranium, and (-recoil effect results in preferential mobilization of daughter nuclides. We have measured uranium and thorium isotopes for carbonates samples from the aquifer by TIMS and multi-collection ICP-MS. The fractionation of uranium and thorium isotopes is distinctive in the various parts of the aquifer. Rock samples from the saturated zone show a depletion in 234U with a (234U/238U) ratio ranging from 0.945 to 0.993 (ñ 0.005). This indicates that uranium 234U has been released by rock/water interaction over the last million year. Nevertheless, rock samples from the water table oscillation zone display a (234U/238U) activity ratio greater than 1 and range from 1.002 to 1.052 (ñ 0.005), suggesting uranium reprecipitation possibly by a redox front. (230Th/238U) ratios range from 1.25 to 1.59 (ñ 0.03) in both the saturated and vadose zone, whilst (230Th/232Th) ratios vary from 1.89 to 5.68 (ñ 0.05) with the highest values for the water table oscillation zone. The 238U-230Th system suggests the existence of a iron oxihydroxide and/or silicate phases which influence the redeposition and/or adsorption of elements inside the zone of water oscillation. Modelling is in progress in order to determine leaching rate of the radionuclides in the substratum together with the adsorption/desorption rate constants on

  17. Magmas, Mushes and Mobility: Thermal Histories of Magma Reservoirs from Combined U-Series and Diffusion Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, K. M.; Rubin, A. E.; Schrecengost, K.; Kent, A. J.; Huber, C.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal conditions of magma storage control many aspects of the dynamics of a magma reservoir system. For example, the temperature of magma storage directly relates to the crystallinity, and magmas stored at relatively low temperatures in a crystal mush (more than 40-50% crystalline) must be remobilized (e.g., by heating) before they can be erupted. A better understanding of the duration of magma storage at largely-liquid vs. largely-solid conditions is thus critical to understanding crustal magmatic processes such as magma mixing and for quantifying the hazard potential of a given volcano. Although mineral thermometry reflects the conditions of crystal growth or equilibration, these may not correspond to the thermal conditions of crystal storage. The duration of crystal storage at high temperatures can be quantified by comparing U-series crystal ages with the time scales over which disequilibrium trace-element profiles in the same crystals would be erased by diffusion. In the case of Mount Hood, OR, such a comparison for the two most recent eruptions shows that <12% of the total lifetime of plagioclase crystals (minimum 21 kyr) was spent at temperatures high enough that the magma would be easily mobilized. Partial data sets for other systems suggest such behavior is common, although the diffusion and U-series ages in these cases are from different samples and may not be directly comparable. We will present preliminary data combining U-series dating and diffusion timescales on the same samples for other volcanic systems (e.g., Lassen Volcanic Center, Mount St. Helens, Okataina Volcanic Center, New Zealand). Combining these data with numerical models offers additional insights into the controls on the conditions of storage. In addition, extension of this approach to combining U-Th ages with time scales of Li diffusion in zircon offers a promising new method to quantify thermal histories of silicic reservoir systems.

  18. Relatively Recent Volcanism on Oahu, Hawaii: New U-series and Paleomagnetic Age Constraints on the Hanauma Bay Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Jurado-Chichay, Z.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Koko Rift Zone (KRZ), eastern Oahu, is generally regarded as among the youngest volcanic features on the island. Previous workers have suggested that the 9 or 10 vents of this rift erupted near-simultaneously. However, K-Ar data in the literature (32-39 ka vs 320 ka) provide only general guidance on the youthfulness of these eruptions. We present new age constraints on KRZ volcanism using deposits of the phreatomagmatic eruption that produced Hanauma Bay (a popular snorkeling spot) and spatially associated lava flows. Numerous continuous basaltic ash units within the walls of Hanauma crater contain lithic fragments of well-preserved coral reef, beach rock, and marine mollusks, indicating that the eruption occurred in a near shore environment. 238U-234U-230Th dating of coral clasts in the deposit demonstrates that the eruption breached reef of MIS stage 7 age (200 +/- 30 ka), thereby ruling out the K-Ar age of 320 ka. U-series nuclides in "normal" MIS 7 coral lithics are indistinguishable from those in the island encircling Waianae Reef of the same age. However, U-series components in some originally aragonitic coral clasts were offset during the eruption when the rims recrystallized to calcite. 87Sr/86Sr, 234U/238U and Sr and U concentration indicate chemical mixing with host basaltic ash during this event, from which potential ages of the eruption can be constructed using isochron methods. More modeling of the data remains to be done but our preliminary estimate places the eruption at less than 100 ka. This result is consistent with new data on paleointensity and paleomagnetic secular variation within the lava flows exposed in or around the crater. This U-series dating approach should prove useful for eruptions in other locales where carbonate bioclast lithics are present in the deposits.

  19. Preliminary U-series disequilibrium and thermoluminescence ages of surficial deposits and paleosols associated with Quaternary faults, eastern Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Paces, J.B.; Menges, C.M.; Bush, C.A.; Futa, K.; Millard, H.T.; Maat, P.B.; Whitney, J.W.; Widmann, B.; Wesling, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Geochronological control is an essential component of paleoseismic evaluation of faults in the Yucca Mountain region. New U-series disequilibrium and thermoluminescence age estimates for pedogenic deposits that bracket surface-rupture events are presented from four sites exposing the Paintbrush Canyon, Bow Ridge and Stagecoach Road faults. Ages show an internal consistency with stratigraphic relationships as well as an overall concordancy between the two independent geochronometers. Age estimates are therefore interpreted to date depositional events or episodes of pedogenic carbonate mobility that can be used to establish a paleoseismic fault chronology. Ultimately, this type of chronological information will be used to evaluate seismic hazards at Yucca Mountain.

  20. Preliminary U-series disequilibrium and thermoluminescence ages of surficial deposits and paleosols associated with Quaternary fault, Eastern Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Paces, J.B.; Menges, C.M.; Bush, C.A.; Futa, K.; Millard, H.T.; Maat, P.B.; Whitney, J.W.; Widmann, B.; Wesling, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Geochronological control is an essential component of paleoseismic evaluation of faults in the Yucca Mountain region. New U-series disequilibrium and thermoluminescence age estimates for pedogenic deposits that bracket surface-rupture events are presented from four sites exposing the Paintbrush Canyon, Bow Ridge and Stagecoach Road faults. Ages show an internal consistency with stratigraphic relationships as well as an overall concordancy between the two independent geochronometers. Age estimates are therefore interpreted to date depositional events or episodes of pedogenic carbonate mobility that can be used to establish a paleoseismic fault chronology. Ultimately, this type of chronological information will be used to evaluate seismic hazards at Yucca Mountain.

  1. Measuring U-series Disequilibrium in Weathering Rinds to Study the Influence of Environmental Factors to Weathering Rates in Tropical Basse-Terre Island (French Guadeloupe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Ma, L.; Sak, P. B.; Gaillardet, J.; Chabaux, F. J.; Brantley, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical weathering is a critical process to global CO2 consumption, river/ocean chemistry, and nutrient import to biosphere. Weathering rinds experience minimal physical erosion and provide a well-constrained system to study the chemical weathering process. Here, we applied U-series disequilibrium dating method to study weathering advance rates on the wet side of Basse-Terre Island, French Guadeloupe, aiming to understand the role of the precipitation in controlling weathering rates and elucidate the behavior and immobilization mechanisms of U-series isotopes during rind formation. Six weathering clasts from 5 watersheds with mean annual precipitation varying from 2000 to 3000 mm/yr were measured for U-series isotope ratios and major element compositions on linear core-to-rind transects. One sample experienced complete core-to-rind transformation, while the rest clasts contain both rinds and unweathered cores. Our results show that the unweathered cores are under U-series secular equilibrium, while all the rind materials show significant U-series disequilibrium. For most rinds, linear core-to-rind increases of (230Th/232Th) activity ratios suggest a simple continuous U addition history. However, (234U/238U) and (238U/232Th) trends in several clasts show evidences of remobilization of Uranium besides the U addition, complicating the use of U-series dating method. The similarity between U/Th ratios and major elements trends like Fe, Al, P in some transects and the ongoing leaching experiments suggest that redox and organic colloids could control the mobilization of U-series isotopes in the rinds. Rind formation ages and weathering advance rate (0.07-0.29mm/kyr) were calculated for those rinds with a simple U-addition history. Our preliminary results show that local precipitation gradient significantly influenced the weathering advance rate, revealing the potential of estimating weathering advance rates at a large spatial scale using the U-series dating method.

  2. Internal [sup 238]U-series systematics of pumice from the November 13, 1985, eruption of Nevado de Ruiz, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, S.J.; Williams, S.N. ); Sturchio, N.C. ); Murrell, M.T. )

    1993-03-01

    High-precision mass spectrometer and alpha scintillation measurements of [sup 238]U-series nuclides were obtained for whole-rock pumice and constituent mineral and glass separates to help interpret the timing and nature of magmatic processes that led up to the 1985 eruption of Nevado de Ruiz volcano. Internal isochron diagrams for [sup 226]Ra/Ba vs. [sup 230]Th/Ba and [sup 230]Th/[sup 232]Th vs. [sup 238]U/[sup 232]Th show that data define linear arrays, indicating an average crystallization age of 6.1 [+-] 0.5 ka (Ra-Th isochron) and 7 [+-] 6 ka (Th-U isochron). Stratigraphic, petrographic geochemical, repose time, and eruption volume data for the Holocene eruptive sequence of Nevado del Ruiz indicate that significant changes occurred in the subvolcanic magma chamber between eruptions R9 ([approx]8.6 ka) and R8 ([approx]3.0 ka). This coincides with the average crystallization age derived from the U-series data and may represent the injection of a new batch (or batches) of mantle-derived magma into the subvolcanic magma chamber. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Mediterranean fluvial response to long-term Quaternary climate change: Improving chronologies by coupling OSL and U-series techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candy, Ian; Pope, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Many studies have attempted to understand the relationship between Late Quaternary climate change and Mediterranean river activity over the last 200,000 years (Macklin et al., 2002). The long-terrace records associated with most large river systems and the thick aggradation of fan sediments associated with smaller catchments in southern Europe and north Africa make the Mediterranean an ideal region to test this relationship. Such studies have been further enhanced by recent improvements in optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and U-series dating techniques which are widely applicable in this region. Despite the fact that combining these two techniques provides the best potential method for constructing high precision chronologies this has rarely been done. In this paper we discuss the problems and advantages of producing "coupled" chronologies with reference to examples from southern Spain and Crete. In both of these examples the use of U-series and OSL dating has allowed the age of terrace aggradation and terrace abandonment (incision) to be constrained, consequently our understanding of fluvial "response" is greatly improved. The paper concludes by discussing further problems in terms of constructing fluvial chronologies which need to be considered and the problems of understanding the climate history of the region in which the catchment is found. Macklin, M.G., Fuller, I.C., Lewin, J., Maas, G.S., Passmore, D.G., Rose, J., Woodward, J.C., Black, S., Hamlin, R.H.B., Rowan, J.S., 2002. Correlation of fluvial sequences in the Mediterranean basin over the last 200 ka and their relationship to climate change. Quaternary Science Reviews, 21, 1633 - 1641.

  4. Short-lived radioactivity and magma genesis.

    PubMed

    Gill, J; Condomines, M

    1992-09-01

    Short-lived decay products of uranium and thorium have half-lives and chemistries sensitive to the processes and time scales of magma genesis, including partial melting in the mantle and magmatic differentiation in the crust. Radioactive disequilibrium between (238)U, (230)Th, and (226)Ra is widespread in volcanic rocks. These disequilibria and the isotopic composition of thorium depend especially on the extent and rate of melting as well as the presence and composition of vapor during melting. The duration of mantle melting may be several hundred millennia, whereas ascent times are a few decades to thousands of years. Differentiation of most magmas commonly occurs within a few millennia, but felsic ones can be tens of millennia old upon eruption. PMID:17738278

  5. Coupling data from U-series and 10Be CRN to evaluate soil steady-state in the Betic Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonejans, Jerome; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Granet, Mathieu; Chabaux, François

    2015-04-01

    The regolith mantel is produced by weathering of bedrock through physical and biochemical processes. At the same time, the upper part of the regolith is eroded by gravity mass movements, water and wind erosion. Feedback's between production and erosion of soil material are important for soil development, and are essential to reach long-term steady-state in soil chemical and physical properties. Nowadays, long-term denudation rates of regolith can be quantified by using in-situ cosmogenic nuclides (CRN). If the soil thickness remains constant over sufficiently long time, soil production rates can be determined. However, the a priori assumption of long-term steady-state can be questionable in highly dynamic environments. In this study, we present analytical data from two independent isotopic techniques, in-situ cosmogenic nuclides and Uranium series disequilibrium. The disequilibrium of Uranium isotopes (238U, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra) is an alternative method that allows assessing soil formation rates through isotopic analysis of weathering products. Nine soil profiles were sampled in three different mountain ranges of the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain): Sierra Estancias, Filabres, Cabrera. All soils overly fractured mica schist and are very thin (< 60cm). In each soil profile, we sampled 4 to 6 depth slices in the soil profile, the soil-bedrock interface and (weathered) bedrock. Three of the nine soil profiles were sampled for U-series isotope measurements at EOST (University of Strasbourg). The surface denudation rates (CRN) are about the same in the Sierra Estancias and Filabres (26 ± 10 mm/ky) and increase up to 103 ± 47 mm/ky in the Sierra Cabrera. The spatial variation in soil denudation rates is in agreement with the variation in catchment-wide denudation rates presented by Bellin et al. (2014) which present the highest rates in the Sierra Cabrera (104-246mm/kyr). Moreover it roughly coincides with the pattern of long-term exhumation of the Betic Cordillera. Results

  6. U-Th-Ra in Amazon rivers: New insights on U-series fractionation during chemical weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosseto, A.; Bourdon, B.; Gaillardet, J.; Allegre, C. J.

    2002-12-01

    Seawater ({ 234} U/{ 238} U) has been proposed as a proxy for understanding past continental weathering conditions. Thus, it is crucial to constrain the parameters that control U-series fractionation during present day weathering in order to understand what they have recorded in the past. Additionally, U-series provide useful constraints for understanding chemical weathering as a function of environmental variables. We have analyzed { 238} U-{ 234} U-{ 230} Th-{ 226} Ra compositions in the dissolved phase (< 0.2μm) of Amazon river and major tributaries. Two groups can be distinguished within Amazon tributaries: river draining mainly the Andes and the Brazilian shield; and rivers dominated by dissolved organic material. The latter are characterized by the absence of { 238} U-{ 234} U fractionation and very high Th contents (> 80ng/l) whereas the former display { 234} U excess over { 238} U and lower Th contents (< 30ng/l). High Th concentrations for organic-rich waters are consistent with a previous study, which revealed the existence of strong complexes between Th and humic acids (Viers et al., 1997). The lack of { 234} U-{ 238} U disequilibrium in organic-rich waters suggests that dissolved organic matter may play a role on { 234} U-{ 238} U fractionation. However, as ({ 234} U/{ 238} U) ratio of the Amazon mainstream is dominated by Solim\\~{ o}es and Madeira compositions, dissolved organic matter is believed to have minor consequences on the ({ 234} U/{ 238} U) input to the ocean. { 232} Th/{ 238} U of the source material based on ({ 230} Th/{ 232} Th) ratios range, for some rivers, between 5.5 and 8.7, which is higher than the estimated value based on { 208} Pb-{ 206} Pb systematics in Amazon rivers (ca. 3.8; All\\`{ e}gre et al., 1996). This may be the result of past U-removal during previous weathering events over time-scales longer than the half-life of thorium-230 (75 ka). References: Viers J. et al. (1997) Chem. Geol., vol. 140, pp. 181-206 All\\`{ e

  7. The raised coral reef complex of the Kenyan coast: Tridacna gigas U-series dates and geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accordi, Giovanni; Brilli, Mauro; Carbone, Federico; Voltaggio, Mario

    2010-08-01

    The Kenyan coast is characterized by a raised fossil reef complex cut by a series of morphological terraces. Shallow subtidal coralgal facies containing Tridacna gigas shells are found at different heights along the coast. Alpha-spectrometric U-series methods were applied to 18 T. gigas samples from different locations along this reef complex with an elevation range from 0 to 15 m above present sea level to obtain chronological information. Apparent U-Th ages, based on the assumption of closed system behaviour, correspond to early marine isotope stage (MIS) 5 ( n = 17) and MIS 7 ( n = 1). However, initial 234U/ 238U activity ratios exhibit a wide range, in many cases much greater than present seawater, which is likely to be associated with diagenetic alteration and migration of U-series isotopes. For this reason, we attempted a form of open system isochron dating after separating the Tridacna samples into three different groups on the basis of current elevation and distribution along the coast. An 'isochron' age of 120 ± 4 ka (1 σ) was obtained for the higher elevation group, placed in the terraced central coastal area; another age, statistically undistinguishable from the previous one, of 118 ± 7 ka (1 σ) was obtained for the group confined along the northern coast. These two groups correspond to a transgressive-regressive cycle connected to the maximum sea level highstand during the MIS 5e. A third 'isochron' age of 100 ± 4 ka (1 σ) was obtained for the group confined along the southern coast, encompassing part of the isotopic substages MIS 5c and d. Based on these data, and on the ecology of T. gigas whose optimal present-day depth range can be considered of 3-10 m below sea level, a maximum tectonic coastal uplift rate of between, respectively, 0.12 and 0.18 mm a -1 was calculated for the period since formation of these shells, and then the paleobathymetry of Tridacna facies has been inferred.

  8. Extreme 210Pb-226Ra Disequilibria Observed in arc Lavas: Implications for the Time Scales of Magma Degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S.; Black, S.

    2003-12-01

    We have undertaken α -counting measurements of 210Pb activity in 39 arc lavas previously analysed by TIMS for U-Th-Ra and, more recently, U-Pa disequilibria from the Lesser Antilles, Tonga, Vanuatu, Philippines, Marianas, Sunda, Kamchatka and the Aleutians. The lavas were erupted between 1953 and 1999 and show extreme variation in 210Pb -226Ra disequilibria with age corrected (210Pb /226Ra) activity ratios ranging from 0.36 to 3.14. In detail, the majority (25) of the lavas analysed preserve 210Pb deficits with 17 having (210Pb /226Ra) < 0.9 and 7 (210Pb /226Ra) < 0.8 whilst 5 are below (210Pb /226Ra) = 0.6. Of the 14 lavas that have 210Pb excess, 6 have (210Pb /226Ra) > 1.2. Whereas 210Pb deficits are found across the compositional spectrum of lavas analysed (silica = 47-65 percent), (210Pb /226Ra) appears to increase with increasing silica in those lavas that have 210Pb excesses. The 210Pb deficits are most readily interpreted in terms of protracted magma degassing and the numerical model of Gauthier and Condomines 1999 (EPSL 172: 111-126) suggests that the typical duration of degassing is on the order of 10's of years but may reach 45 years in the case of the largest 210Pb deficits at Yasur in Vanuatu, Mt Mayon in the Philippines, Avachinsky in Kamchatka and Spurr, Redoubt and Shishaldin in the Aleutians. These estimates for the duration of degassing represent minimum time scales since they assume 100 percent efficient degassing of 222Rn and no magma replenishment during that period. Therefore, it appears that the majority of arc magmas undergo efficient and protracted degassing for decades prior to eruption. By contrast, there is no simple model for explaining the 210Pb excesses. Mass balance calculations indicate that plagioclase accumulation cannot account for the observed excesses. Instead, we suggest that inefficient gas release and/or sublimation of 210Pb produced by decay from 222Rn during gaseous transport through the magma may be responsible for the

  9. Uranium-series disequilibria in Vanuatu arc volcanic rocks: constraints on pre-eruptive processes in contrasting volcanic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, H. K.; Turner, S.; Reagan, M. K.; Girard, G.; Cronin, S. J.; Firth, C.

    2011-12-01

    Recent and present volcanism in the Vanuatu arc (South West Pacific Ocean) occurs at a variety of volcano types that exhibit a wide range of eruptive behaviour: from post-caldera lava-lake activity and lava flows at shield volcanoes (Ambrym), moderately explosive sub-plinian events and associated pyroclastic-flows and lava flows at stratovolcanoes (Lopevi), to persistent strombolian and vulcanian-style eruptions at scoria cones (Yasur). This precludes a generic model of magmatic and eruptive behaviour for the Vantuatu arc volcanoes and necessitates a detailed study of each system. Uranium-series disequilibria in volcanic rocks offer unique insights into pre-eruptive magmatic systems over process-relevant timescales e.g., 238U-230Th (380Ka), 230Th-226Ra (8Ka) and 226Ra-210Pb (100a). The short half-life of 210Pb (t1/2 = 22.6 years) and the volatile nature of the intermediate isotope, 222Rn, (intermediate between the 226Ra parent and 210Pb daughter) provide valuable information on magma transport, evolution and degassing over a timescale more pertinent to the processes leading up to volcanic eruptions. We present new Uranium-series isotope data (U-Th-Ra-210Pb) for young (< 100 years old) volcanic samples from Ambrym, Lopevi and Yasur volcanoes to investigate the timescales of magmatic evolution and degassing in the contrasting volcanic systems. 210Pb deficits ((210Pb/226Ra)0 < 1) in Ambrym and Yasur volcanic rocks suggest effective open-system magmatic degassing of 222Rn, consistent with the persistent lava-lakes/exposed magma and significant gas emissions observed at both volcanoes. Lopevi, on the other hand, largely displays excess 210Pb ((210Pb/226Ra)0 > 1) suggesting that 222Rn gas accumulation and fluxing preceding and/or during eruption (on a decadal timescale) is responsible for the more explosive-style of eruption witnessed at this volcano. Significant accumulation of recently crystallised plagioclase phenocrysts can also create 210Pb excesses in volcanic

  10. Clumped Isotope Values from the Doushantuo Formation of South China: Evaluation of Hydrothermal Influence, Disequilibria and Diagenetic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, I. S.; Zhu, M.; Lu, M.; Bristow, T.; Bonifacie, M.; Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation (635 - 551 Ma) of southern China is a phosphate-dolostone-black shale sequence following the Marinoan "Snowball Earth" episode that represents an important period in Earth history. It contains abundant phosphate-preserved microfossils, and extremely low carbon isotope values in the cap dolostone unit that have been interpreted to reflect formation in a methane seep environment [1]. Previous clumped isotope analysis of 13C-depleted carbonate veins from the basal Doushantuo samples have been interpreted to reflect hydrothermally-derived thermogenic methane oxidation [2], however recent work on modern and ancient cold seep samples suggests clumped isotope signatures in these environments are influenced by disequilibria effects [3] and are vulnerable to post-depositional diagenesis via internal reordering at temperatures exceeding ~ 100 - 120 ˚C [4]. Here we present initial data from the cap-carbonates overlying the Nantuo diamictite. Our analysis includes a variety of micro-facies from the cap-carbonate including pure calcite and micrite, with a range of carbonate carbon isotopic values. Data presented here will be used to attempt to determine if the samples exhibit disequilibria effects such as those observed in modern cold seep environments, as well as to evaluate the role of hydrothermal activity in the Doushantuo Formation. [1] Jiang, G., Kennedy, M.J., Christie-Blick, N., 2003. Stable isotope evidence for methane seeps in Neoproterozoic postglacial cap carbonates. Nature 426, 822-826. [2] Bristow, T.F., Bonifacie, M., Derkowski, A., Eiler, J.M., Grotzinger, J.P., 2011. A hydrothermal origin for isotopically anomalous cap dolostone cements from south China. Nature 474, 68-72. [3] Loyd, S., Sample, J.C., Orphan, V.J., Marlow, J., Eagle, R., Tripati, A.K., 2012. Clumped isotope analyses of cold seep carbonates: Insights into formation environment and mechanisms. Abstract B51G-0639 presented at 2012 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco

  11. Soil formation rates determined from Uranium-series isotope disequilibria in soil profiles from the southeastern Australian highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, P. O.; Dosseto, A.; Hesse, P. P.; Handley, H. K.

    2013-10-01

    The sustainability of soil resources is determined by the balance between the rates of production and removal of soils. Samples from four weathering profiles at Frogs Hollow in the upper catchment area of the Murrumbidgee River (southeastern Australia) were analyzed for their uranium-series (U-series) isotopic composition to estimate soil production rates. Sequential leaching was conducted on sample aliquots to assess how U-series nuclides are distributed between primary and secondary minerals. Soil is increasingly weathered from bottom to top which is evident from the decrease in (234U/238U) ratios and increase in relative quartz content with decreasing soil depth. One soil profile shows little variation in mineralogy and U-series geochemistry with depth, explained by the occurrence of already extensively weathered saprolite, so that further weathering has minimal effect on mineralogy and geochemistry. Al2O3 is mobilized from these soils, and hence a silicon-based weathering index treating Al2O3 as mobile is introduced, which increases with decreasing soil depth, in all profiles. Leached and unleached aliquots show similar mineralogy with slight variation in relative concentrations, whereas the elemental and isotopic composition of uranium and thorium show notable differences between leached and unleached samples. Unleached samples show systematic variations in uranium-series isotopic compositions with depth compared to leached samples. This is most likely explained by the mobilization of U and Th from the samples during leaching. Soil residence times are calculated by modeling U-series activity ratios for each profile separately. Inferred timescales vary up to 30 kyr for unleached aliquots from profile F1 to up to 12 kyr for both leached and unleached aliquots from profile F2. Muscovite content shows a linear relationship with U-series derived soil residence times. This relationship provides an alternative method to estimate residence timescales for profiles with

  12. TIMS U-series dating and stable isotopes of the last interglacial event in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, M.; Wasserburg, G.J.; Chen, J.H. ); Aharon, P. ); Zhu, Z.R.; Chappell, J. ); Bloom, A. )

    1993-06-01

    The extensive flight of uplifted reef terraces which occurs along the Vitiaz strait on the northern flank of the Huon Peninsula in PNG (Papua New Guinea) contains a particularly good record of sea level changes in the last 250 ky. The Huon terraces were the target of an international expedition which took place in July--August 1988. In particular, the authors searched for suitable samples for U-series dating in a reef complex designated as VII, which is correlated with the last interglacial episode and high sea level stand. This complex is composed of a barrier reef (VIIb), a lagoon, and a fringing reef (VIIa). Twelve corals from these terraces and two corals from the older reef complex VIII were selected for analysis. The petrography, oxygen and carbon isotope compositions, and magnesium and strontium concentrations were determined along with the concentrations and isotopic compositions of uranium and thorium. The simplest model for sea level height for terrace VII is a continuous rise between 134 and 118 ky. Alternatively, there may have been two periods of rapid sea level rise. In contrast, in the Bahamas, there is evidence that sea level remained rather constant over the time interval 132 to 120 ky. The absence of ages between 132 and 120 ky in PNG could be the result of changes in the local tectonic uplift rates during that time, or erosion that disrupted the continuous record. In any event, the authors find no basis for accepting a single brief time for the age of the last interglacial and applying this age as a precise chronometer for worldwide correlation, or as a test of climatic models. The older ages reported here precede the Milankovitch solar insolation peak at 128 ky, and the younger ages are [approximately]10 ky after this peak. If the present high-precision data are correct, then it will be necessary to reassess the validity of the Milankovitch theory of climatic changes. 76 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Crystallization history of rhyolites at Long Valley, California, inferred from combined U-series and Rb-Sr isotope systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Arnd; Davies, Gareth R.; Elliott, Tim

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we present 87Rb/ 86Sr and 230Th/ 238U isotope analyses of glasses and phenocrysts from postcaldera rhyolites erupted between 150 to 100 ka from the Long Valley magmatic system. Both isotope systems indicate complex magma evolution with preeruptive mineral crystallization and magma fractionation, followed by extended storage in a silicic magma reservoir. Glass analyses yield a Rb-Sr isochron of 257 ± 39 ka, which can be explained by a feldspar-fractionation event ˜150 ky before eruption. Individual feldspar-glass pairs confirm this age result. A mineral 230Th- 238U isochron in a low-silica rhyolite from the Deer Mountain Dome defines an age of 236 ± 1 ka, but the glass and whole rock do not lie on the isochron. U-Th fractionation of the rocks is controlled by the accessory minerals zircon and probably allanite, which crystallized at 250 ± 3 ka and 187 ± 9 ka, respectively. All major mineral phases contain accessory mineral phases; therefore, the mineral isochron represents a mixture of zircon and allanite populations. A precision of ±1 ka for the mixing array implies that the minor phases must have crystallized within this timescale. Longer periods of crystal growth would cause the mixing array to be less well defined. U-series data from other low- and high-silica rhyolites indicate younger accessory mineral crystallization events at ˜200 and 140 ka, probably related to the thermal evolution of the magma reservoir. These crystallization events are, however, only documented by the accessory minerals and had no further influence on bulk magma compositions. We interpret the indistinguishable age results from both isotope systems (˜250 ka) to record the fractionation of small magma batches by filter pressing from a much larger underlying magma volume, followed by physical isolation and extended storage at the top of the magma reservoir for up to 150 ky.

  14. Transport and exchange of U-series nuclides between suspended material, dissolved load and colloids in rivers draining basaltic terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A. E.; Burton, Kevin W.; Porcelli, Don; James, Rachael H.; van Calsteren, Peter; Gislason, Sigurður R.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents uranium and thorium concentrations and activity ratios for all riverine phases (bedload, suspended load, dissolved load and colloids) from basaltic terrains in Iceland and the Azores. Small basaltic islands, such as these, are thought to account for ~ 25% of CO2 consumed by global silicate weathering, and for ~ 45% of the flux of suspended material to the oceans. These data indicate that [U] and [Th] in the dissolved and colloidal fractions are strongly controlled by pH, and to a much lesser extent by levels of dissolved organic carbon (which are low in these environments). At high pH, basalt glass dissolution is enhanced, and secondary mineral formation (e.g. Fe-oxyhydroxides and allophane) is suppressed, resulting in high dissolved [U], and low colloidal [U] and [Th], indicating a direct chemical weathering control on elemental abundances. When the dissolved (234U/238U) activity ratio is >~1.3 (i.e. when physical weathering, groundwater contribution or soil formation are high), there is little isotope exchange between dissolved and colloidal fractions. At lower activity ratios, the dissolved load and colloids have indistinguishable activity ratios, suggesting that when chemical weathering rates are high, secondary clay formation is also high, and colloids rapidly adsorb dissolved U. Many of the suspended sediment samples have (234U/238U) activity ratios of > 1, which suggests that uptake of U onto the suspended load is important. Identical (230Th/232Th) in suspended, dissolved and colloidal samples suggests that Th, like U, is exchanged or sorbed rapidly between all riverine phases. This particle-reactivity, combined with poorly constrained contributions from groundwater and hydrothermal water, and short-term variations in input to soils (volcanic and glacial), suggests that U-series nuclides in riverine material from such basaltic terrains are unlikely to reflect steady state erosion processes.

  15. 238U 230Th disequilibria, magma petrogenesis, and flux rates beneath the depleted Tonga-Kermadec island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Simon; Hawkesworth, Chris; Rogers, Nick; Bartlett, Jessica; Worthington, Tim; Hergt, Janet; Pearce, Julian; Smith, Ian

    1997-11-01

    from the Louisville Ridge which comprise the lower 44 m of the sediment section intersected at DSDP site 204. These volcaniclastics are spatially restricted to the vicinity of the Louisville Ridge and provide a unique sediment tracer which can be used to show that it takes ˜4 Myr from the time of subduction to its first appearance in the arc lava signature. Component 4, the fluid contribution to the lava source is inferred to contribute ˜1 ppm Rb, 10 ppm Ba, 0.02 ppm U, 600 ppm K, 0.2 ppm Ph, and 30 ppm Sr. It has 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.7035 and 206Pb/ 204Pb = 18.5 and thus it is inferred to have been derived from dehydration of the subducting altered oceanic crust. UTh isotope disequilibria reflect the time since fluid release from the subducting slab and a reference line through the lowest ( 230Th/ 232Th) lavas constrains this to be 30,000-50,000 yr. The UTh and ThRa isotope systematics are decoupled, and it is suggested that ThRa isotope disequilibria record the time since partial melting and thus indicate rapid channelled magma ascent. Olivine gabbro xenoliths from Raoul are interpreted as cumulates to their host lavas with which they form zero age UTh isochrons indicating that minimal time was spent in magma chambers. The subduction signature is not observed in lavas from the backarc island of Niuafo'ou. These were derived from partial melting of fertile peridotite at 130-160 km depth with melt rates around 2 × 10 -4 kg m -3 yr -1.

  16. Coral indicators of past sea-level change: A global repository of U-series dated benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbert, Fiona D.; Rohling, Eelco J.; Dutton, Andrea; Williams, Felicity H.; Chutcharavan, Peter M.; Zhao, Cheng; Tamisiea, Mark E.

    2016-08-01

    Fossil corals provide valuable data for reconstructing past sea levels, as they are often well preserved in the fossil record and can be dated with U-series methods. Here we present a global and internally consistent database of Usbnd Th dated fossil coral sea-level indicators, including full consideration of all (known) associated uncertainties (both vertical and chronological). We include carefully determined taxon-specific depth distributions, rather than blanket depth uncertainty terms as used in most previous work. This is based on a synthesis of extensive modern ecological information on depth ranges. These ranges are found to be spatially variable (between ocean basins, between regions, and on sub-regional scales) because depth itself is not limiting - instead, depth distributions arise from complex physical, chemical, and biological interactions with coral-reef growth, distribution, and composition. One of the main causes for recognition of the greater depth-variability of coral taxa has been the routine inclusion of deep-diving and ROV surveys in coral ecological studies over the past few decades, which has broken through the "shallow-water" bias of early surveys by adding frequent observations on deeper occurrences (although more are needed). It is also clear from our assessment that coral habitat-depth distributions must be determined on the species level to reduce uncertainties in reconstructions of past sea levels, and that application to sea-level studies then requires these studies also to identify fossil corals to the species level. Samples identified only to the genus level give rise to wide uncertainties in habitat depth and, hence, sea level. Our database contains extensive metadata to assist evaluations of dating quality, as well as geomorphic and stratigraphic metadata. We demonstrate with examples how such metadata can help to evaluate sea-level reconstructions, for example by identifying outlier points. One example discusses the Last

  17. Using U-series isotopes to quantify regolith formation and chemical weathering rates along a climosequence associated with the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Chabaux, F. J.; Dere, A. L.; White, T.; Jin, L.; Brantley, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Regolith formation and chemical weathering are important Critical Zone processes and are responsible for soil development. Despite their fundamental importance, we still lack effective tools to quantify these processes. U-series isotopes offer a powerful geochronometer to quantify regolith production rates and weathering duration. This is largely due to improvements in analytical methods and mathematical approaches made over the last decade in measuring U-series isotopes and interpreting their fractionation during chemical weathering. Here, we present a systematic study of U-series isotopes (238U, 234U and 230Th) in shale-derived soils from five small watersheds in the eastern USA to understand the rates of regolith formation as a function of climate. The selected watersheds in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, and Puerto Rico are part of the shale transect established as part of the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory. We first measured U-series isotopes in six regolith profiles from two planar hill-slopes (north vs. south) within the Shale Hills CZO in central PA to evaluate the role of aspect on regolith formation in the small watershed. All regolith samples display significant U-series disequilibrium. These U-series disequilibrium values are explained by two processes acting on U-series isotopes during weathering: a loss of 234U, 238U, and 230Th during water-rock interactions and a gain from circulating soil water and/or downslope particle transport. Regolith production rates and weathering durations were calculated with a U-series isotope mass balance model. On the southern (shaded) slope, regolith production rates decrease systematically with increasing soil thickness and distance from the ridge: from ~44.5 m/Myr at the ridge top to ~15.0 m/Myr at the valley floor. Durations of chemical weathering within these profiles range from 6.7 kyr to 44.7 kyr, increasing from the ridge to the valley floor. The regolith profiles on the northern

  18. Short-lived decay series disequilibria in the natrocarbonatite lavas of Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania: constraints on the timing of magma genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, D. M.; Dawson, J. B.; Ivanovich, M.

    1991-08-01

    The 1988 natrocarbonatite lavas from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania have been analysed for 232Th, 230Th, 228Th, 238U, 228Ra/ 226Ra. These lavas are unique, in showing disequilibria between 228Th/ 232Th, and between 228Ra and 232Th. Aa and pahoehoe lavas have a mean ( 228Th 232Th) activity ratio of 5.5 ± 0.6 , and one lava has ( 228Ra/ 226Ra) = 0.11 ± 0.01 . The lavas have ( 230Th/ 238U) ˜ 0.1-0.2 , and [ UTh] weight ratios of 2.0-3.2. Late-stage samples, extruded from the lavas on cooling and interpreted as extreme fractionates of the original lavas are highly enriched in U and Ra relative to Th. These samples have measured [ UTh] weight ratios of 5.6-6.4, and a calculated ( 228Ra/ 232Th) activity ratio of 108 ± 5 . Disequilibria between 238U&z.sbnd; 230Th&z.sbnd; 226Ra are consistent with an origin by immiscibility of 4-22wt% natrocarbonatite from nephelinite magma. Disequilibria between 232Th&z.sbnd; 228Ra&z.sbnd; 228Th are consistent with either of two endmember models: (1) instantaneous separation of magma at depth, with eruption 20 ± 1 years later; (2) recharging of a steady-state magma chamber below Oldoinyo Lengai with a maximum volume of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 10 7 m 3 of carbonatite, and a mean magma residence time of 81 ± 9 years. The total time between natrocarbonatite generation and eruption is between 20 and 81 years.

  19. U-series and oxygen isotope chronology of the mid-Pleistocene Lake Amora (Dead Sea basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torfstein, Adi; Haase-Schramm, Alexandra; Waldmann, Nicolas; Kolodny, Yehoshua; Stein, Mordechai

    2009-05-01

    This study establishes for the first time the chronology and limnological history of Lake Amora (Dead Sea basin, Israel), whose deposits (the Amora Formation) comprise one of the longest exposed lacustrine records of the Pleistocene time. The Amora Formation consists of sequences of laminated primary aragonite and silty-detritus, Ca-sulfate minerals, halite and clastic units. This sedimentary sequence was uplifted and tilted by the rising Sedom salt diapir, exposing ˜320 m of sediments on the eastern flanks of Mt. Sedom (the Arubotaim Cave (AC) section). The chronology of the AC section is based on U-disequilibrium dating ( 230Th- 234U and 234U- 238U ages) combined with floating δ18O stratigraphy and paleomagnetic constraints. The determination of the 230Th- 234U ages required significant corrections to account for detrital Th and U. These corrections were performed on individual samples and on suites of samples from several stratigraphic horizons. The most reliable corrected ages were used to construct an age-elevation model that was further tuned to the oxygen isotope record of east Mediterranean foraminifers (based on the long-term similarity between the sea and lake oxygen isotope archives). The combined U-series- δ18O age-elevation model indicates that the (exposed) Amora sequence was deposited between ˜740 and 70 ka, covering seven glacial-interglacial cycles (Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 18 to 5). Taking the last glacial Lake Lisan and the Holocene Dead Sea lacustrine systems as analogs of the depositional-limnological environment of Lake Amora, the latter oscillated between wet (glacial) and more arid (interglacial) conditions, represented by sequences of primary evaporites (aragonite and gypsum that require enhanced supply of freshwater to the lakes) and clastic sediments, respectively. The lake evolved from a stage of rapid shifts between high and low-stand conditions during ˜740 to 550 ka to a sabkha-like environment that existed (at the AC site

  20. Rapid response of climatic conditions during the last glacial: evidence from U-series dated Irish speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fankhauser, A.; McDermott, F.; Fleitmann, D.; Hoffmann, D. L.

    2012-04-01

    Rapid climate change events (Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events) during the last glacial have been well documented in the Greenland ice cores (e.g. NGRIP), but their impact at lower latitudes is still not fully understood. In Ireland, few climate records older than the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) exist due to extensive glacial reworking. Exceptions are cave deposits in an environment protected from extensive glacial erosion. Speleothem deposition requires the presence of liquid water implying cave air temperatures above 0°C. As air temperature in shallow caves (<30m depth) is similar to the mean annual air temperature (MAAT) at the surface; speleothem deposition can only occur in the absence of permafrost or glaciation. In this study, intervals of speleothems deposition in Crag cave, South West Ireland have been determined by U-series-dating to constrain the timing of ice- and permafrost-free conditions prior to the LGM. Here we present evidence for episodic speleothem deposition between the Holocene and the last interglacial. Ninety eight U-Th dates indicate phases of speleothem deposition, interrupted by visible hiatuses e.g. at 131.5 ±0.6; 104.8 ±0.2; 83.9 ±0.3; 71.7 ±0.2; 65.2 ±0.2; 58.9 ±0.3; 47.1 ±0.1; 43.5 ±0.2; 40.0 ±0.1; 38.0 ±0.1; 32.1 ±0.1; 28.8 ±0.1; 27.8 ±0.1; 23.3 ±0.1; 12.5 ±0.2; 11.6 ±0.1; 8.5 ±0.4 ka. These depositional intervals in Crag cave speleothems show an overall synchronicity with Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events recorded in NGRIP. Furthermore, Heinrich events 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 are characterised by non-deposition. Measured δ18O values in Crag cave speleothems deposited during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5a are similar to the mean value for Holocene speleothems (δ18O = -3.26 ‰ VPDB). A trend to higher δ18O values during the glacial is interpreted to predominantly reflect changes in the ocean source region (ice volume effect). Observed δ13C values down to -10‰ (VPDB) indicate the presence of C3 vegetation above the

  1. A combined U-series, radiocarbon and stable isotope approach for constructing a Pleistocene lake hydrograph: an example from Surprise Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, D. E.; Weaver, K. L.; Harris, C.; Maher, K.

    2013-12-01

    Lake records and lake hydrographs provide an integrated record of the hydrologic conditions across a watershed. To provide useful constraints on past changes in climate, robust hydrographs require concordance among multiple geochronologic approaches as well as supporting geochemical and hydrologic evidence. Dating shoreline or near-shore lacustrine carbonates using U-series and radiocarbon methods is one approach for developing the age-elevation constraints to construct lake hydrographs. Geochemical analyses (e.g., stable isotopes, elemental ratios, U-series measurements) of modern waters and sediments, as well as the primary carbonate samples, can be used to assess the potential influence of open-system behavior, detrital Th corrections, or pedogenic overprinting on the calculated ages. Additionally, topographic analyses (e.g., basin pour point, shoreline elevations and sample locations) further constrain the spatial relevance and relationships between sample localities. To evaluate the timing and magnitude of the most recent late Pleistocene lake cycle in Surprise Valley, California, we analyzed 111 sub-samples from 22 laminated shoreline tufa samples using U-series disequilibrium geochronology, and pair these analyses with 15 radiocarbon ages. To further assess the radiocarbon and U-series ages, we measured the stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) and elemental (Sr/Ca) signatures of the tufa samples, and characterized the range of (234U/238U) observed in the modern waters and playas within the watershed. Topographic analysis verified that Lake Surprise is a closed, inward draining basin, and demonstrated lateral correspondence between samples from the four targeted shoreline sets. Multiple lines of evidence revealed that samples from the highest shorelines are likely from older, higher lake cycles and were influenced by variable amounts of open-system exchange or pedogenic overprinting. The measured U concentrations of ~300 to 1200 ng/g, with (238U/232Th) from ~3 to

  2. 10Be and U-series dating of late Quaternary landforms along the southern San Jacinto fault: Implications for temporal slip rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, K.; Oskin, M. E.; Fletcher, K.; Sharp, W. D.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    Robust age control on faulted landforms with well-constrained offsets is essential to documenting the heterogeneous behavior of a fault zone over time. However, showing late Quaternary temporal slip rate variation is often challenging due to the difficultly of obtaining reliable ages for Quaternary deposits. Exposure ages from cosmogenic isotopes can be significantly affected by surface processes, and U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate provides only minimum ages because carbonate accumulation occurs after deposition. Fortunately, the controlling factors for the resulting age uncertainties of each method are relatively independent from each other, so a combination of cosmogenic isotope and U-series dating may significantly improve the reliability of landform dating and yield more robust slip rate estimates. We present preliminary results of this dual-dating approach at 4 sites along the southern San Jacinto fault zone in California: 2 sites along the Coyote Creek fault, and 2 sites along the Clark fault. These results show age agreement between the two dating methods. Along the southern Clark fault, a 10Be depth profile model age of 34.5 ±6.6 ka and a U-series age of 33.2 ±1.1 ka were obtained for an offset Q2b fan surface, and a Q3b surface yielded a weighted mean 10Be surface exposure age of 5.9 ±1.5 ka, similar to an U-series age of 6.3 ±0.4 ka. Along the northern Coyote Creek fault, preliminary data indicate a 10Be surface exposure age of 11.3 ±3.4 ka and a U-series age of 11.7 ±1.8 ka for an offset Q3a surface, and a 10Be surface exposure age of 6.9 ±1.0 ka and a U-series age of 7.8 ± 0.9 ka for an offset Q3b surface. The remarkable consistency among ages from the two dating methods suggest that: (1) U-series ages of pedogenic carbonate clast rinds closely approach depositional ages of the host alluvium; (2) erosion may be negligible at the sampled sites; and (3) inherited 10Be has been accurately quantified (via depth profile) for the late

  3. The origin of the 'fluid' component and its implications for U-Th-Pa disequilibria in island arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzinelli, R.; Skora, S. E.; Blundy, J.; Elliott, T.

    2011-12-01

    observation has previously been explained by in-growth, mantle melting models. We have examined the Mariana arc case in detail and show it is difficult to replicate the combined 235U-231Pa-238U-230Th data in a self-consistent manner. In the light of the residual accessory phase model, however, it is apparent that during 'fluid' production the only likely host for the large pentavalent Pa ion is zircon. We thus suggest that the highly variable 235U-231Pa disequilibria of depleted arc lavas worldwide reflects the variable role of residual zircon in the subducted slab.

  4. 226Ra-230Th Disequilibria in Magmas from Llaima and Lonquimay Volcanoes, Chile: On the Roles and Rates of Subvolcanic Magmatic Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reubi, O.; Cooper, L. B.; Dungan, M. A.; Bourdon, B.

    2014-12-01

    226Ra excesses in mafic arc magmas are generally attributed to recent (< 8 kyr) addition of slab-fluid to the mantle wedge and/or mantle melting. Preservation of 226Ra-230Th disequilibria from such sources requires short crustal residence times (<< 8 kyr) for these magmas. The correlation between 226Ra excesses and 10Be/Be previously observed for magmas from the Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) contributed to the view that recent slab-fluid additions causes 226Ra excesses in arc magmas1. Our extensive dataset for Llaima and Lonquimay volcanoes (SVZ) shows variations in (226Ra/230Th) for each volcano, and in some cases within single eruptions. These variations span almost the entire SVZ range and question the pertinence of mantle-derived 226Ra-230Th disequilibria models. Llaima and Lonquimay volcanoes differ in terms of their petrology and magmatic evolution. Llaima magmas (51 to 55 wt% SiO2) are predominantly crystal-rich and carry conspicuous evidence for magma mixing and AFC processes. 238U and 231Pa excesses and incompatible trace element ratios are correlated and this can be accounted for by up to 20% assimilation of basement plutonic rocks2. Crustal contamination had a secondary influence on 226Ra-230Th disequilibria. Magmas with the highest AFC contribution have 226Ra-230Th close to equilibrium, implying that (226Ra-230Th) are mostly affected by either differentiation on time scales of ~8 kyr, or more likely, mixing with mush bodies several kyr old. Lonquimay magmas (52 to 64 wt% SiO2) are almost aphyric. Their evolution was controlled by fractional crystallization with limited crustal contamination. (226Ra-230Th) range from moderate 226Ra excesses to small deficits, and are negatively correlated with Ba/Th and MgO. These observations are difficult to reconcile with only slab-fluid addition and mantle melting. We posit that this (226Ra-230Th) range results from diffusive Ra-exchange between young recharge melts and an old crystal mush. A similar process

  5. A record of uranium-series transport at Nopal I, Sierra Pena Blanca, Mexico: Implications for natural uranium deposits and radioactive waste repositories

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Denton, J. S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Paviet, P.; Nunn, A. J.; Amato, R. S.; Hinrichs, K. A.

    2016-09-15

    Studies of uranium-series (U-series) disequilibria within and around ore deposits provide valuable information on the extent and timing of actinide mobility, via mineral-fluid interaction, over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Such information is useful in studies of analogs of high-level nuclear-waste repositories, as well as for mining and mineral extraction sites, locations of previous nuclear weapons testing, and legacy nuclear waste contamination. In this study we present isotope dilution mass spectrometry U-series measurements for fracture-fill materials (hematite, goethite, kaolinite, calcite, dolomite and quartz) from one such analog; the Nopal I uranium ore deposit situated at Peña Blanca inmore » the Chihuahua region of northern Mexico. The ore deposit is located in fractured, unsaturated volcanic tuff and fracture-fill materials from surface fractures as well as fractures in a vertical drill core have been analyzed. High uranium concentrations in the fracture-fill materials (between 12 and 7700 ppm) indicate uranium mobility and transport from the deposit. Furthermore, uranium concentrations generally decrease with horizontal distance away from the deposit but in this deposit there is no trend with depth below the surface.« less

  6. Long-term slip rates of the Elsinore-Laguna Salada fault, southern California, by U-series Dating of Pedogenic Carbonate in Progressively Offset Alluvial fan Remnants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, K. E.; Rockwell, T. K.; Sharp, W. D.

    2007-12-01

    The Elsinore-Laguna Salada (ELS) fault is one of the principal strands of the San Andreas fault system in southern California, however its seismic potential is often de-emphasized due to previous estimates of a low slip rate. Nevertheless, the fault zone has produced two historic earthquakes over M6, with the 1892 event estimated at >M7; thus further investigation of the long-term slip rate on the ELS fault is warranted. On the western slopes of the Coyote Mountains (CM), southwest Imperial Valley, a series of alluvial fans are progressively offset by the Elsinore fault. These fans can be correlated to their source drainages via distinctive clast assemblages, thereby defining measurable offsets on the fault. Dating of the CM fans (to compute slip rates), however, is challenging. Organic materials appropriate for C-14 dating are rare or absent in the arid, oxidizing environment. Cosmogenic surface exposure techniques are limited by the absence of suitable sample materials and are inapplicable to numerous buried fan remnants that are otherwise excellent strain markers. Pedogenic carbonate datable by U-series, however, occurs in CM soil profiles, ubiquitously developed in fan gravels, and is apparent in deposits as young as ~1 ka. In CM gravels 10's ka and older, carbonate forms continuous, dense, yellow coatings up to 3 mm thick on the undersides of clasts. Powdery white carbonate may completely engulf clasts, but is not dateable. Carefully selected samples of dense, innermost carbonate lamina weighing 10's of milligrams and analyzed by TIMS, are geochemically favorable for precise U-series dating (e.g., U = 1-1.5 ppm, median 238U/232Th ~ 7), and yield reproducible ages for coatings from the same microstratigraphic horizon (e.g., 48.2 ± 2.7 and 49.9 ± 2.2 ka), indicating that U-Th systems have remained closed and that inherited coatings, though present, have been avoided. Accordingly, U-series on pedogenic carbonate provides reliable minimum ages for deposition of

  7. Timing and warmth of the Last Interglacial period: new U-series evidence from Hawaii and Bermuda and a new fossil compilation for North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Steinke, Bree

    2002-07-01

    The timing and duration of the Last Interglacial period have been controversial, with some studies suggesting a relatively short duration that is orbitally forced and others suggesting a long duration that is at most only partly related to orbital forcing. New, high-precison thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) U-series ages of Last Interglacial corals from Hawaii and Bermuda test these competing hypotheses. Waimanalo Formation corals from slowly uplifting Oahu, Hawaii range in age from ˜134 to ˜113 ka, with most ages between ˜125 and ˜115 ka. Combined with published U-series ages from nearby Lanai, the data suggest a long Last Interglacial period that may have occurred from ˜136 to at least 115 ka. The results indicate that orbital forcing may not have been the only control on ice sheet growth and decay, because sea level would have been high at times of relatively low Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. On tectonically stable Bermuda, deposits from the ˜200 ka (penultimate interglacial period), ˜120 ka (peak Last Interglacial period) and ˜80 ka (late Last Interglacial period) high sea stands have been newly dated. Fossil corals on Bermuda are derived from patch reefs that likely were "catch-up" responses to sea level rise. It is expected that U-series ages of Last-Interglacial corals on Bermuda should overlap with, but not be as old as the range of corals on Oahu. Last-Interglacial corals on Bermuda give a range of ˜125-113 ka, which supports this hypothesis. A large number of emergent marine deposits on Hawaii, Bermuda and along coastal North America have now been dated to the Last Interglacial period. Both Oahu and Bermuda have marine invertebrate faunas with a number of extralimital southern species of mollusks, suggesting warmer-than-present waters during the Last Interglacial period. Warmer waters are also suggested for Last-Interglacial localities around most of North America, from Florida to Canada and Greenland and Baja California to

  8. Timing and warmth of the Last Interglacial period: New U-series evidence from Hawaii and Bermuda and a new fossil compilation for North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Steinke, B.

    2002-01-01

    The timing and duration of the Last Interglacial period have been controversial, with some studies suggesting a relatively short duration that is orbitally forced and others suggesting a long duration that is at most only partly related to orbital forcing. New, high-precison thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) U-series ages of Last Interglacial corals from Hawaii and Bermuda test these competing hypotheses. Waimanalo Formation corals from slowly uplifting Oahu, Hawaii range in age from ???134 to ???113 ka, with most ages between ???125 and ???115 ka. Combined with published U-series ages from nearby Lanai, the data suggest a long Last Interglacial period that may have occurred from ???136 to at least 115 ka. The results indicate that orbital forcing may not have been the only control on ice sheet growth and decay, because sea level would have been high at times of relatively low Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. On tectonically stable Bermuda, deposits from the ???200 ka (penultimate interglacial period), ???120 ka (peak Last Interglacial period) and ???80 ka (late Last Interglacial period) high sea stands have been newly dated. Fossil corals on Bermuda are derived from patch reefs that likely were "catch-up" responses to sea level rise. It is expected that U-series ages of Last-Interglacial corals on Bermuda should overlap with, but not be as old as the range of corals on Oahu. Last-Interglacial corals on Bermuda give a range of ???125-113 ka, which supports this hypothesis. A large number of emergent marine deposits on Hawaii, Bermuda and along coastal North America have now been dated to the Last Interglacial period. Both Oahu and Bermuda have marine invertebrate faunas with a number of extralimital southern species of mollusks, suggesting warmer-than-present waters during the Last Interglacial period. Warmer waters are also suggested for Last-Interglacial localities around most of North America, from Florida to Canada and Greenland and Baja

  9. Precise geochronology of phoscorites and carbonatites: - The critical role of U-series disequilibrium in age interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelin, Yuri; Zaitsev, Anatoly N.

    2002-07-01

    We present the results of a comparative study of several geochronometer minerals (baddeleyite, zircon, apatite, phlogopite and tetraferriphlogopite) and isotopic systems (U-Pb, Th-Pb and Rb-Sr) from phoscorites (magnetite-forsterite-apatite-calcite rocks) and carbonatites of the Kovdor ultramafic-alkaline-carbonatite massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia. Uranium, thorium and their decay products are extremely fractionated by minerals that crystallise from carbonatite and phoscorite magma. We obtain high-precision ages from different chronometers, compare their accuracy, and evaluate the role of geochronological pitfalls of initial radioactive disequilibrium, differential migration of radiogenic isotopes, and inaccurate decay constants. Apatite yielded concordant U-Th-Pb ages between 376 and 380 Ma. The accuracy of the apatite 238U- 206Pb ages is, however, compromised by uncertainty in the amount of radiogenic 206Pb produced from initial excess 230Th. The 235U- 207Pb ages are relatively imprecise due to large common Pb correction and the uncertainty in the initial Pb isotopic composition. The Th-Pb system yields a more precise age of 376.4 ± 0.6 Ma. Zircon from two carbonatite samples is characterised by moderate to low U contents, high Th contents, and very high Th/U ratios up to 9000. The 206Pb*/ 238U systems in the zircon are strongly affected by the presence of excess 206Pb*, produced by decay of initial 230Th. The 208Pb*/ 232Th ages of zircon from both carbonatite samples are uniform and yield a weighted average of 377.52 ± 0.94 Ma. Baddeleyite U-Pb analyses are 3 to 6% normally discordant and have variable 207Pb*/ 206Pb* apparent ages. Eleven alteration-free baddeleyite fractions from three samples with no evidence for Pb loss yield uniform 206Pb*/ 238U ages with a weighted average of 378.54±0.23 Ma (378.64 Ma after correction for initial 230Th deficiency), which we consider the best estimate for age of the phoscorite-carbonatite body of the Kovdor massif. The

  10. The chronology of hand stencils in European Palaeolithic rock art: implications of new U-series results from El Castillo Cave (Cantabria, Spain).

    PubMed

    García-Diez, Marcos; Garrido, Daniel; Hoffmann, Dirk; Pettitt, Paul; Pike, Alistair; Zilhão, Joao

    2015-07-20

    The hand stencils of European Paleolithic art tend to be considered of pre-Magdalenian age and scholars have generally assigned them to the Gravettian period. At El Castillo Cave, application of U-series dating to calcite accretions has established a minimum age of 37,290 years for underlying red hand stencils, implying execution in the earlier part of the Aurignacian if not beforehand. Together with the series of red disks, one of which has a minimum age of 40,800 years, these motifs lie at the base of the El Castillo parietal stratigraphy. The similarity in technique and colour support the notion that both kinds of artistic manifestations are synchronic and define an initial, non-figurative phase of European cave art. However, available data indicate that hand stencils continued to be painted subsequently. Currently, the youngest, reliably dated examples fall in the Late Gravettian, approximately 27,000 years ago. PMID:25615428

  11. Combined ESR/U-series chronology of Acheulian hominid-bearing layers at Trinchera Galería site, Atapuerca, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falguères, Christophe; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Bischoff, James L.; Pérez-González, Alfredo; Ortega, Ana Isabel; Ollé, Andreu; Quilles, Anita; Ghaleb, Bassam; Moreno, Davinia; Dolo, Jean-Michel; Shao, Qingfeng; Vallverdú, Josep; Carbonell, Eudald; María Bermúdez de Castro, Jose; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2013-01-01

    The Sierra de Atapuerca, northern Spain, is known from many prehistoric and palaeontological sites documenting human prehistory in Europe. Three major sites, Gran Dolina, Galería and Sima del Elefante, range in age from the oldest hominin of Western Europe dated to 1.1 to 1.3 Ma (millions of years ago) at Sima del Elefante to c.a. 0.2 Ma on the top of the Galería archaeological sequence. Recently, a chronology based on luminescence methods (Thermoluminescence [TL] and Infrared Stimulated Luminescence [IRSL]) applied to cave sediments was published for the Gran Dolina and Galería sites. The authors proposed for Galería an age of 450 ka (thousands of years ago) for the units lower GIII and GII, suggesting that the human occupation there is younger than the hominid remains of Sima de los Huesos (>530 ka) around 1 km away. In this paper, we present new results obtained by combined Electron Spin Resonance/Uranium-series (ESR/U-series) dating on 20 herbivorous teeth from different levels at the Galería site. They are in agreement with the TL results for the upper part of the stratigraphic sequence (GIV and GIIIb), in the range of between 200 and 250 ka. But for the GIIIa to GIIb levels, the TL ages become abruptly older by 200 ka while ESR ages remain relatively constant. Finally, the TL and ESR data agree in the lowest part of the section (GIIa); both fall in the range of around 350–450 ka. Our results suggest a different interpretation for the GII, GIII and GIV units of Galería and the upper part of Gran Dolina (TD10 and TD11) than obtained by TL. The ESR/U-series results are supported by a Bayesian analysis, which allows a better integration between stratigraphic information and radiometric data.

  12. Mass spectrometric U-series dating of Huanglong Cave in Hubei Province, Central China: evidence for early presence of modern humans in Eastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guanjun; Wu, Xianzhu; Wang, Qian; Tu, Hua; Feng, Yue-xing; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2013-08-01

    Most researchers believe that anatomically modern humans (AMH) first appeared in Africa 160-190 ka ago, and would not have reached eastern Asia until ∼50 ka ago. However, the credibility of these scenarios might have been compromised by a largely inaccurate and compressed chronological framework previously established for hominin fossils found in China. Recently there has been a growing body of evidence indicating the possible presence of AMH in eastern Asia ca. 100 ka ago or even earlier. Here we report high-precision mass spectrometric U-series dating of intercalated flowstone samples from Huanglong Cave, a recently discovered Late Pleistocene hominin site in northern Hubei Province, central China. Systematic excavations there have led to the in situ discovery of seven hominin teeth and dozens of stone and bone artifacts. The U-series dates on localized thin flowstone formations bracket the hominin specimens between 81 and 101 ka, currently the most narrow time span for all AMH beyond 45 ka in China, if the assignment of the hominin teeth to modern Homo sapiens holds. Alternatively this study provides further evidence for the early presence of an AMH morphology in China, through either independent evolution of local archaic populations or their assimilation with incoming AMH. Along with recent dating results for hominin samples from Homo erectus to AMH, a new extended and continuous timeline for Chinese hominin fossils is taking shape, which warrants a reconstruction of human evolution, especially the origins of modern humans in eastern Asia. PMID:23870460

  13. U-series dating of co-seismic gypsum and submarine paleoseismology of active faults in Northern Chile (23°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Gabriel; Palacios, Carlos; Reich, Martin; Luo, Shangde; Shen, Chuan-Chou; González, Gabriel; Wu, Yi-Chen

    2011-01-01

    The convergence of the Nazca and South American plates along the subduction margin of the central Andes results in large subduction earthquakes and tectonic activity along major fault systems. Despite its relevance, the paleoseismic record of this region is scarce, hampering our understanding about the relationship between the Andes building and earthquake occurrence. In this study, we used the U-series disequilibrium method to obtain absolute ages of paleoearthquake events associated with normal displacements along the active Mejillones and Salar del Carmen faults in the Coastal Range of the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. The 230Th- 234U disequilibrium ages in co-seismic gypsum salts sampled along the fault traces together with marine evidences indicate that earthquakes occurred at ca. 29.7 ± 1.7 ka, 11 ± 4 ka and 2.4 ± 0.8 ka. When coupled with paleoseismic marine and radiocarbon ( 14C) records in the nearby Mejillones Bay evidencing large dislocations along the Mejillones Fault, the geochronological dataset presented here is consistent with the notion that gypsum salts formed during large earthquakes as a result of co-seismic dilatancy pumping of saline waters along the major faults. Based on maximum observed cumulative vertical offsets in the studied faults, this phenomena could have occurred episodically at a rate in the order of 1:40 to 1:50 with respect to the very large subduction earthquakes during the latest Pleistocene-Holocene period. The results presented here reveal that the U-series disequilibrium method can be successfully applied to date the gypsum salts deposited along faults during seismic events, and therefore directly constrain the age of large paleoearthquakes in hyperarid and seismically active zones.

  14. New constraints on Quaternary sea level oscillations provided by U-series measurements of a submerged speleothem from the Italian coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, A.; Esat, T. M.; Desmarchelier, J. M.; Antonioli, F.; Lambeck, K.; McCulloch, M. T.

    2004-12-01

    Speleothems have become increasingly important as tools to place long paleoenvironmental records into a temporal context through the use of U-Th dating, which is one of the most precise and accurate geochronometers available for the late Quaternary. This investigation was designed to provide U-series ages for a stalagmite collected from a submerged cave on Argentarola Island to constrain the timing, duration, and magnitude of Quaternary sea-level highstands. Argentarola cave has been alternately submerged and subaerially exposed as evinced by the presence of marine encrustations of Serpulid calcite that alternate with dense, microcrystalline speleothem calcite that forms during subaerial exposure. As such, speleothems from Argentarola cave provide a unique archive of the relative height of Quaternary sea level oscillations along a portion of the Italian coastline that appears to have been tectonically stable on the time scales considered here. Moreover, the application of U-series dating to these speleothems can provide an estimate of the absolute timing and relative duration of Quaternary marine transgressions. We have studied a stalagmite that was collected 18 meters below present sea level. Preliminary results indicate speleothem growth during stage 8, in addition to stages 2, 6 and 7.2 that have previously been identified, and define marine layers that correspond to the Holocene transgression and highstands associated with marine isotope stages (MIS) 5, 7.1, and 7.3. Because few relative sea level (RSL) indicators exist for glacial cycles prior to the last interglacial, data from Argentarola speleothems provide important benchmarks for future RSL models and also provide an important test for existing models. Our data are generally in good agreement with RSL curves for this time period and indicate that the correlation between RSL and foraminiferal \\delta18O over the last glacial cycle is a robust predictive tool for RSL estimates extending back to the

  15. High-resolution mapping of uranium and other trace elements in recrystallized aragonite calcite speleothems from caves in the Pyrenees (France): Implication for U-series dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Richard; Maire, Richard; Devès, Guillaume; Quinif, Yves

    2005-09-01

    Aragonite and calcite speleothems were sampled in the cave of Pierre Saint-Martin (Pyrénées-Atlantiques, France). These speleothems contain significant amounts of uranium and strontium, which were measured spatially and chemically by nuclear microprobe analysis. Sr and U distributions are highly varied, with a marked contrast between aragonite and calcite because the aragonite concentrates Sr and U. On the other hand, Zn is preferentially located in calcite and in layers of organic matter trapped in CaCO 3. Sr contents ranged from 440 to 1100 μg/g in the calcite and 4900 to 18,500 μg/g in the aragonite. U concentrations show remarkably high values from 11 to 19 μg/g in the calcite and 89 to 350 μg/g in the aragonite. These U and Sr concentrations are amongst the highest measured in supergene speleothems deposited by infiltrating meteoric waters. X-ray absorption experiments with synchrotron radiation suggested that uranium was incorporated in its hexavalent oxidation state in both aragonite and calcite. Recrystallization from aragonite into calcite was indicated by micromorphological observations for some of the samples. This recrystallization process may explain the uranium loss in neogenic calcite deposits and consequently the opening of the geochemical system, which can lead to errors in age dating with the U-series dating method. Uranium loss in recrystallized calcite is one of the important aspects to be considered in U-series dating and more generally for U geochemical stability in CaCO 3.

  16. Measurement of radioactivity levels and assessment of radioactivity hazards of soil samples in Karaman, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Agar, O; Boztosun, I; Korkmaz, M E; Özmen, S F

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the levels of the natural and artificial radioactivity in soil samples collected from surrounding of Karaman in Turkey were measured. Activity concentrations of the concerned radionuclides were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium detector with a relative efficiency of 40 % at 1.332 MeV. The results obtained for the (238)U series ((226)Ra, (214)Pb and (214)Bi), (232)Th series ((228)Ac), (40)K and fission product (137)Cs are discussed. To evaluate the radiological hazard of radioactivity in samples, the radium equivalent activity (Raeq), the absorbed dose rate (D), the annual effective dose and the external (Hex) and internal hazard index (Hin) were calculated and presented in comparison with the data collected from different areas in the world and Turkey. PMID:24587487

  17. Properties of Natural Radiation and Radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2009-07-13

    Ubiquitous natural sources of radiation and radioactive material (naturally occurring radioactive material, NORM) have exposed humans throughout history. To these natural sources have been added technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) sources and human-made (anthropogenic) sources. This chapter describes the ubiquitous radiation sources that we call background, including primordial radionuclides such as 40K, 87Rb, the 232Th series, the 238U series, and the 235U series; cosmogenic radionuclides such as 3H and 14C; anthropogenic radionuclides such as 3H, 14C, 137Cs, 90Sr, and 129I; radiation from space; and radiation from technologically-enhanced concentrations of natural radionuclides, particularly the short-lived decay products of 222Rn ("radon") and 220Rn ("thoron") in indoor air. These sources produce radiation doses to people principally via external irradiation or internal irradiation following intakes by inhalation or ingestion. The effective doses from each are given, with a total of 3.11 mSv y-1 (311 mrem y-1) to the average US resident. Over 2.5 million US residents receive over 20 mSv y-1 (2 rem y-1), primarily due to indoor radon. Exposure to radiation from NORM and TENORM produces the largest fraction of ubiquitous background exposure to US residents, on the order of 2.78 mSv (278 mrem) or about 89%. This is roughly 45% of the average annual effective dose to a US resident of 6.2 mSv y-1 (620 mrem y-1) that includes medical (48%), consumer products and air travel (2%), and occupational and industrial (0.1%). Much of this chapter is based on National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report No. 160, "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States," for which the author chaired the subcommittee that wrote Chapter 3 on "Ubiquitous Background Radiation."

  18. Evaluating the reliability of Late Quaternary landform ages: Integrating 10Be cosmogenic surface exposure dating with U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate on alluvial and fluvial deposits, Sonoran desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, K.; Sharp, W. D.

    2015-12-01

    To assess the reliability of Quaternary age determinations of alluvial and fluvial deposits across the Sonoran Desert (Coachella Valley and Anza Borrego) in southern California, we applied both 10Be exposure age dating of surface clasts and U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate from subsurface clast-coatings to the same deposits. We consider agreement between dates from the two techniques to indicate reliable age estimates because each technique is subject to distinct assumptions and therefore their systematic uncertainties are largely independent. 10Be exposure dates should yield maximum ages when no correction is made for inheritance and post-depositional erosion is negligible. U-series dating, in contrast, provides minimum dates because pedogenic carbonate forms after deposition. Our results show that: (1) For deposits ca. 70 ka or younger, 10Be and U-series dates were generally concordant. We note, however, that in most cases U-series soil dates exceed 10Be exposure dates that are corrected for inheritance when using 10Be in modern alluvium. This suggests that 10Be concentrations of modern alluvium may exceed the 10Be acquired by late Pleistocene deposits during fluvial transport and hillslope residence (i.e., Pleistocene inherited 10Be). (2) For deposits older than ~70 ka, U-series dates are significantly younger than the 10Be dates. This implies that U-series dates in this region may significantly underestimate the depositional age of older alluvium, probably because of delayed onset of deposition, slow accumulation, or poor preservation of secondary carbonate in response to climatic controls. Thus, whenever possible, multiple dating methods should be applied to obtain reliable ages for late Quaternary deposits.

  19. High resolution analysis of uranium and thorium concentration as well as U-series isotope distributions in a Neanderthal tooth from Payre (Ardèche, France) using laser ablation ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, Rainer; Aubert, Maxime; Joannes-Boyau, Renaud; Moncel, Marie-Hélène

    2008-11-01

    We have mapped U ( 238U) and Th ( 232Th) elemental concentrations as well as U-series isotope distributions in a Neanderthal tooth from the Middle Palaeolithic site of Payre using laser ablation ICP-MS. The U-concentrations in an enamel section varied between 1 and 1500 ppb. The U-concentration maps show that U-migration through the external enamel surface is minute, the bulk of the uranium having migrated internally via the dentine into the enamel. The uranium migration and uptake is critically dependent on the mineralogical structure of the enamel. Increased U-concentrations are observed along lineaments, some of which are associated with cracks, and others may be related to intra-prismatic zones or structural weaknesses reaching from the dentine into the enamel. The uranium concentrations in the dentine vary between about 25,000 and 45,000 ppb. Our systematic mapping of U-concentration and U-series isotopes provides insight into the time domain of U-accumulation. Most of the uranium was accumulated in an early stage of burial, with some much later overprints. None of the uranium concentration and U-series profiles across the root of the tooth complied with a single stage diffusion-adsorption (D-A) model that is used for quality control in U-series dating of bones and teeth. Nevertheless, in the domains that yielded the oldest apparent U-series age estimates, U-leaching could be excluded. This means that the oldest apparent U-series ages of around 200 ka represent a minimum age for this Neanderthal specimen. This is in good agreement with independent age assessments (200-230 ka) for the archaeological layer, in which it was found. The Th elemental concentrations in the dental tissues were generally low (between about 1 and 20 ppb), and show little relationship with the nature of the tissue.

  20. Using U-series Isotopes To Determine Sources Of Pedogenic Carbonates: Comparison Of Natural And Agricultural Soils In The Semi-arid Southern New Mexico And Western Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyachoti, S. K.; Ma, L.; Borrok, D. M.; Jin, L.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Pedogenic carbonates commonly precipitate from infiltrating soil water in arid and semi-arid lands and are observed in soils of southern New Mexico and western Texas. These carbonates could form an impermeable layer in the soil horizons impairing water infiltration, thus affecting crop growth and yield. It is important to determine the source of C and Ca in these carbonates and to understand conditions favoring their formation, kinetics and precipitation rates. In this study, major elements and U-series isotopes in bulk calcic soils, and weak acid leachates and residues were measured from one irrigated alfalfa site in the Hueco basin near El Paso, TX and one natural shrubland site on the USDA Jornada experimental range in southern NM. The combined geochemical and isotopic results allow us to determine the formation ages of the carbonates; investigate the mobility of U, Th, and major elements in these soils; and infer for the effects of irrigation on carbonate formation in agricultural soils. Our results show distinctive U and Th isotope systems in the two soil profiles analyzed. For example, (234U/238U) ratios in the Jornada bulk soils decrease from ~1.01 to 0.96 towards the surface, consistent with a preferential loss of 234U over 238U during chemical weathering. At the Jornada site, (238U/232Th) ratios decrease while (230Th/238U) increase towards the surface, consistent with a general depletion of U and the immobility of Th in the natural soils. By contrast at the Alfalfa site, (234U/238U) ratios of bulk soils increase from ~ 0.97 to 1.02 towards the surface, suggesting an additional source of external uranium, most likely the irrigation water from Rio Grande which has a (234U/238U) ratio of ~ 1.5 near El Paso. The (238U/232Th) and (230Th/238U) ratios also imply leaching of U from shallower soils but precipitation in greater depths at Alfalfa site; suggests that partial dissolution and re-precipitation of younger carbonates occur. Calculated carbonate ages from U-series

  1. U-series disequilibrium in rear-arc volcanoes from the Northern Volcanic Zone in Ecuador; along-arc variation and implications for petrogenetic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, J. M.; Matthews, T. P.; Sims, K. W.; Escobar, R. D.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Waters, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    Ecuador has been the focus of several studies that document the across-arc geochemical variation in the Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ), and these studies have been useful in illustrating that from west to east, the lavas are higher in alkali and the fluid mobile elements. Of less focus has been the north to south along-arc variation that is illustrated by volcanoes including Sumaco, Pan de Azucar and El Reventador. Reventador is the northernmost volcano in the rear-arc of the NVZ and has been active since a renewed cycle of activity began in November 2002. Sumaco is located 30 km to the south and has been inactive since at least 1933, although no historic eruptions have been recorded for this volcano. Located between these two volcanoes is the inactive Pan de Azucar volcano, for which there exists no data on the eruptive history. The goal of this research is to document changes in geochemical variation from north to south in the rear-arc of Ecuador and to link this to a petrogenetic process or processes. During a 2010 expedition we collected samples from Sumaco and Reventador Volcanoes, and obtained samples from Pan de Azucar volcano from our colleagues at the IGEPN in Quito. Samples were analyzed for U-series isotopes in addition to major and trace elements. In terms of major and trace elements, El Reventador lavas are weakly alkaline and contain plagioclase, pyroxene and olivine as the major phases, whereas the Sumaco lavas are strongly alkaline and contain titanian augite and hauyne as major phases. The Pan de Azucar samples are compositionally intermediate between the two. Generally speaking, from north to south Ba/Nb decreases from a maximum of 150 at Reventador to 50 at Sumaco, whereas the La/Yb increases from 30 to 50. Other systematic N-S changes include decreasing Ba/Th, which is negatively correlated with Sr concentrations that range from 1000 (Reventador) to 4000 (Sumaco). This is consistent with lower fluid input from N-S that generates smaller degrees of

  2. Combined ESR/U-series chronology of Acheulian hominid-bearing layers at Trinchera Galería site, Atapuerca, Spain.

    PubMed

    Falguères, Christophe; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Bischoff, James L; Pérez-González, Alfredo; Ortega, Ana Isabel; Ollé, Andreu; Quiles, Anita; Ghaleb, Bassam; Moreno, Davinia; Dolo, Jean-Michel; Shao, Qingfeng; Vallverdú, Josep; Carbonell, Eudald; Bermúdez de Castro, Jose María; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2013-08-01

    The Sierra de Atapuerca, northern Spain, is known from many prehistoric and palaeontological sites documenting human prehistory in Europe. Three major sites, Gran Dolina, Galería and Sima del Elefante, range in age from the oldest hominin of Western Europe dated to 1.1 to 1.3 Ma (millions of years ago) at Sima del Elefante to c.a. 0.2 Ma on the top of the Galería archaeological sequence. Recently, a chronology based on luminescence methods (Thermoluminescence [TL] and Infrared Stimulated Luminescence [IRSL]) applied to cave sediments was published for the Gran Dolina and Galería sites. The authors proposed for Galería an age of 450 ka (thousands of years ago) for the units lower GIII and GII, suggesting that the human occupation there is younger than the hominid remains of Sima de los Huesos (>530 ka) around 1 km away. In this paper, we present new results obtained by combined Electron Spin Resonance/Uranium-series (ESR/U-series) dating on 20 herbivorous teeth from different levels at the Galería site. They are in agreement with the TL results for the upper part of the stratigraphic sequence (GIV and GIIIb), in the range of between 200 and 250 ka. But for the GIIIa to GIIb levels, the TL ages become abruptly older by 200 ka while ESR ages remain relatively constant. Finally, the TL and ESR data agree in the lowest part of the section (GIIa); both fall in the range of around 350-450 ka. Our results suggest a different interpretation for the GII, GIII and GIV units of Galería and the upper part of Gran Dolina (TD10 and TD11) than obtained by TL. The ESR/U-series results are supported by a Bayesian analysis, which allows a better integration between stratigraphic information and radiometric data. PMID:23830175

  3. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:26420096

  4. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:27620100

  5. Tracing pre-eruptive magma degassing using ( 210Pb/ 226Ra) disequilibria in the volcanic deposits of the 1980-1986 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlo, Kim; Turner, Simon; Blundy, Jon; Black, Stuart; Hawkesworth, Chris

    2006-09-01

    Disequilibria between 210Pb and 226Ra can be used to trace magma degassing, because the intermediate nuclides, particularly 222Rn, are volatile. Products of the 1980-1986 eruptions of Mount St. Helens have been analysed for ( 210Pb/ 226Ra). Both excesses and deficits of 210Pb are encountered suggesting rapid gas transfer. The time scale of diffuse, non-eruptive gas escape prior to 1980 as documented by 210Pb deficits is on the order of a decade using the model developed by Gauthier and Condomines (Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 172 (1999) 111-126) for a non-renewed magma chamber and efficient Rn removal. The time required to build-up 210Pb excess is much shorter (months) as can be observed from steady increases of ( 210Pb/ 226Ra) with time during 1980-1982. The formation of 210Pb excess requires both rapid gas transport through the magma and periodic blocking of gas escape routes. Superposed on this time trend is the natural variability of ( 210Pb/ 226Ra) in a single eruption caused by tapping magma from various depths. The two time scales of gas transport, to create both 210Pb deficits and 210Pb excesses, cannot be reconciled in a single event. Rather 210Pb deficits are associated with pre-eruptive diffuse degassing, while 210Pb excesses document the more vigorous degassing associated with eruption and recharge of the system.

  6. Direct U-series analysis of the Lezetxiki humerus reveals a Middle Pleistocene age for human remains in the Basque Country (northern Iberia).

    PubMed

    de-la-Rúa, Concepción; Altuna, Jesús; Hervella, Monserrat; Kinsley, Leslie; Grün, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    In 1964, a human humerus was found in a sedimentary deposit in Lezetxiki Cave (Basque Country, northern Iberia). The first studies on the stratigraphy, associated mammal faunal remains and lithic implements placed the deposits containing the humerus into the Riss glacial stage. Direct chronometric evidence has so far been missing, and the previous chronostratigraphic framework and faunal dating gave inconsistent results. Here we report laser ablation U-series analyses on the humerus yielding a minimum age of 164 ± 9 ka, corresponding to MIS 6. This is the only direct dating analysis of the Lezetxiki humerus and confirms a Middle Pleistocene age for this hominin fossil. Morphometric analyses suggest that the Lezetxiki humerus has close affinities to other Middle Pleistocene archaic hominins, such as those from La Sima de los Huesos at Atapuerca. This emphasizes the significance of the Lezetxiki fossil within the populations that predate the Neanderthals in south-western Europe. It is thus an important key fossil for the understanding of human evolution in Europe during the Middle Pleistocene, a time period when a great morphological diversity is observed but whose phylogenetic meaning is not yet fully understood. PMID:27086059

  7. Radioactivity Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Ronald J.

    1969-01-01

    Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

  8. Simulated Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  9. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  10. Beryllium Isotope and Combined Be and U-series Isotope Studies of Volcanic Arcs: Implications for Fluid and Melt Transport Through the Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. D.; Ryan, J. G.

    2004-12-01

    Beryllium isotope and combined studies of 10Be/9Be and U-series isotopes in volcanic arcs can 1) map transport of demonstrably slab derived elements through the mantle wedge; 2) certify the relationship of U series isotopes to slab derivation; 3) identify multiple stages in subduction modification of the mantle and constrain their timescales; and 4) speak to element partitioning into fluids and melts from the slab. In the Kurile, Aleutian and Bismarck arcs, 10Be/9Be ratios for lavas from behind the volcanic front are often comparable to, and sometimes greater than, those at the volcanic front, despite the longer path to rear-arc locations, along which 10Be is decaying in transit. Be/Zr ratios show a similar pattern of across-arc increase, without increases in enrichments of Mo and Sn, species which would be mobilized with Be if F-bearing fluids were present. The simplest interpretation is that sediment melting, and its contribution to the mantle wedge, is greater behind the front than at the volcanic front. Despite evidence for an increasing sediment melt contribution behind the front, volcanoes from the Kuriles contain progressively less B, Pb, As and Sb with increasing depth to the slab, indicating that fluid processes updip of about 180 km (beginning in the shallow forearc) strip these elements nearly quantitatively from the sedimentary portion of the downgoing slab. For studies published to date (Aleutians, Central America, S. Chile, Bismarck, Mariana) 10Be/9Be ratios are generally highest for samples plotting furthest from the 238U-230Th equiline (i.e. highest 238U/232Th, 230Th/232Th, or both). In lavas from the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of S. Chile (Sigmarsson et al., EPSL 2002), U excess (Uxs), Ra excess (Raxs) and 10Be/9Be are strongly correlated (r2=0.81-0.94). This argues that U enrichment and in some cases Ra enrichment in arc lavas is related to slab processes that are capable of mobilizing 10Be out of the sediment column, rather than reflecting only

  11. Sea-level history of the past two interglacial periods: New evidence from U-series dating of reef corals from south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Schumann, R.R.; Halley, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    As a future warm-climate analog, much attention has been directed to studies of the Last Interglacial period or marine isotope substage (MIS) 5.5, which occurred ???120,000 years ago. Nevertheless, there are still uncertainties with respect to its duration, warmth and magnitude of sea-level rise. Here we present new data from tectonically stable peninsular Florida and the Florida Keys that provide estimates of the timing and magnitude of sea-level rise during the Last Interglacial period. The Last Interglacial high sea stand in south Florida is recorded by the Key Largo Limestone, a fossil reef complex, and the Miami Limestone, an oolitic marine sediment. Thirty-five new, high-precision, uranium-series ages of fossil corals from the Key Largo Limestone indicate that sea level was significantly above present for at least 9000 years during the Last Interglacial period, and possibly longer. Ooids from the Miami Limestone show open-system histories with respect to U-series dating, but show a clear linear trend toward an age of ???120 ka, correlating this unit with the Last Interglacial corals of the Key Largo Limestone. Older fossil reefs at three localities in the Florida Keys have ages of ???200 ka and probably correlate to MIS 7. These reefs imply sea level near or slightly above present during the penultimate interglacial period. Elevation measurements of both the Key Largo Limestone and the Miami Limestone indicate that local (relative) sea level was at least 6.6 m, and possibly as much as 8.3 m higher than present during the Last Interglacial period. ?? 2010.

  12. High-precision U-series dating of corals from Western Australia and implications for the timing and duration of the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, C. H.; Esat, T. M.; McCulloch, M. T.; Lambeck, K.

    1995-10-01

    U-series ages using methods of thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) are reported for Last Interglacial fossil reefs along the stable coastal margin of Western Australia. Thorium isotope ratios were measured with superior precision using methods of charge collection. High levels of precision in the measurement of both uranium and thorium isotopes has reduced the age uncertainty due to analytical errors, excluding the uncertainty in the decay constants, by a factor of four over the precisions reported by many earlier TIMS workers. Uncertainties in δ234U(T), determined from both 230Th/ 238U and 234U/ 238U, are also significantly smaller than previously reported, allowing samples which have undergone diagenetic exchange of uranium and thorium to be more easily identified. Strict criteria were adopted to screen the new Western Australian data. Reliable ages range from 127 to 122 ka. Published TIMS observations from other localities have been assessed using the same strict criteria. When these are combined with glacio-hydro isostatic sea-level models they indicate that the Last Interglacial period occurred from at least 130 to 117 ka. However, these age constraints are largely determined from single data points and need to be verified with additional ages before considering them to be robust estimates for the timing of onset and termination of the Last Interglacial. Globally, the main episode of reef growth appears to be confined to a narrow interval occurring from 127 to 122 ka, in direct agreement with the narrow range in ages obtained from the Western Australian sites. This may indicate that the Last Interglacial was of short duration, extending from 127 to 122 ka only. Alternatively, this interval may reflect a major reef-building event in the middle of a longer duration (130-117 ka) interglacial interval.

  13. Origins of large-volume, compositionally zoned volcanic eruptions: New constraints from U-series isotopes and numerical thermal modeling for the 1912 Katmai-Novarupta eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, Simon; Sandiford, Mike; Reagan, Mark; Hawkesworth, Chris; Hildreth, Wes

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a combined U-series isotope and numerical modeling study of the 1912 Katmai-Novarupta eruption in Alaska. A stratigraphically constrained set of samples have compositions that range from basalt through basaltic andesite, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite. The major and trace element range can be modeled by 80–90% closed-system crystal fractionation over a temperature interval from 1279°C to 719°C at 100 MPa, with an implied volume of parental basalt of ∼65 km3. Numerical models suggest, for wall rock temperatures appropriate to this depth, that 90% of this volume of magma would cool and crystallize over this temperature interval within a few tens of kiloyears. However, the range in 87Sr/86Sr, (230Th/238U), and (226Ra/230Th) requires open-system processes. Assimilation of the host sediments can replicate the range of Sr isotopes. The variation of (226Ra/230Th) ratios in the basalt to andesite compositional range requires that these were generated less than several thousand years before eruption. Residence times for dacites are close to 8000 years, whereas the rhyolites appear to be 50–200 kyr old. Thus, the magmas that erupted within only 60 h had a wide range of crustal residence times. Nevertheless, they were emplaced in the same thermal regime and evolved along similar liquid lines of descent from parental magmas with similar compositions. The system was built progressively with multiple inputs providing both mass and heat, some of which led to thawing of older silicic material that provided much of the rhyolite.

  14. Sea-level history of the past two interglacial periods: new evidence from U-series dating of reef corals from south Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Schumann, R. Randall; Halley, Robert B.

    2011-03-01

    As a future warm-climate analog, much attention has been directed to studies of the Last Interglacial period or marine isotope substage (MIS) 5.5, which occurred ˜120,000 years ago. Nevertheless, there are still uncertainties with respect to its duration, warmth and magnitude of sea-level rise. Here we present new data from tectonically stable peninsular Florida and the Florida Keys that provide estimates of the timing and magnitude of sea-level rise during the Last Interglacial period. The Last Interglacial high sea stand in south Florida is recorded by the Key Largo Limestone, a fossil reef complex, and the Miami Limestone, an oolitic marine sediment. Thirty-five new, high-precision, uranium-series ages of fossil corals from the Key Largo Limestone indicate that sea level was significantly above present for at least 9000 years during the Last Interglacial period, and possibly longer. Ooids from the Miami Limestone show open-system histories with respect to U-series dating, but show a clear linear trend toward an age of ˜120 ka, correlating this unit with the Last Interglacial corals of the Key Largo Limestone. Older fossil reefs at three localities in the Florida Keys have ages of ˜200 ka and probably correlate to MIS 7. These reefs imply sea level near or slightly above present during the penultimate interglacial period. Elevation measurements of both the Key Largo Limestone and the Miami Limestone indicate that local (relative) sea level was at least 6.6 m, and possibly as much as 8.3 m higher than present during the Last Interglacial period.

  15. Na, K, Ca, Mg, and U-series in fossil bone and the proposal of a radial diffusion-adsorption model of uranium uptake.

    PubMed

    Cid, A S; Anjos, R M; Zamboni, C B; Cardoso, R; Muniz, M; Corona, A; Valladares, D L; Kovacs, L; Macario, K; Perea, D; Goso, C; Velasco, H

    2014-10-01

    Fossil bones are often the only materials available for chronological reconstruction of important archeological sites. However, since bone is an open system for uranium, it cannot be dated directly and therefore it is necessary to develop models for the U uptake. Hence, a radial diffusion-adsorption (RDA) model is described. Unlike the classic diffusion-adsorption (D-A) model, RDA uses a cylindrical geometry to describe the U uptake in fossil bones. The model was applied across a transverse section of a tibia of an extinct megamammal Macrauchenia patachonica from the La Paz Local Fauna, Montevideo State, Uruguay. Measurements of spatial distribution of Na, K, Ca, and Mg were also performed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Gamma-ray spectrometric U-series dating was applied to determine the age of the bone sample. From U concentration profile, it was possible to observe the occurrence of a relatively slow and continuous uranium uptake under constant conditions that had not yet reached equilibrium, since the uranium distribution is a ∪-shaped closed-system. Predictions of the RDA model were obtained for a specific geochemical scenario, indicating that the effective diffusion coefficient D/R in this fossil bone is (2.4 ± 0.6)10(-12) cm(2)s(-1). Mean values of Na, K, Ca, and Mg contents along the radial line of the fossil tibia are consistent with the expected behavior for spatial distributions of these mineral elements across a modern bone section. This result indicates that the fossil tibia may have its mineral structure preserved. PMID:24953228

  16. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  17. Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  18. Radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Hickox, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    This paper provides a review of literature published in 1995 on the subject of radioactive wastes. Topics covered include: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; decontamination and decommissioning; remedial actions and treatment; and environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides. 155 refs.

  19. ESR and U-series analyses of faunal material from Cuddie Springs, NSW, Australia: implications for the timing of the extinction of the Australian megafauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, Rainer; Eggins, Stephen; Aubert, Maxime; Spooner, Nigel; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Müller, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    The timing and cause of late Pleistocene faunal extinctions in Australia are subjects of a debate that has become polarised by two vigorously defended views. One contends that the late Pleistocene extinction was a short event caused by humans colonising the Australian continent, whereas the other promotes a gradual demise of the fauna, over a period of at least 10-20 ka, due to a combination of climatic changes and ecological pressures by humans. Cuddie Springs is central to this debate as it is the only site known in continental Australia where archaeological and megafauna remains co-occur. We have analysed more than 60 bones and teeth from the site by laser ablation ICP-MS to determine U, and Th concentrations and distributions, and those with sufficiently high U concentrations were analysed for U-series isotopes. Twenty-nine teeth were analysed by ESR. These new results, as well as previously published geochronological data, contradict the hypothesis that the clastic sediments of Stratigraphic Unit 6 (SU6) are in primary context with the faunal, archaeological and other materials found in SU6, and that all have ages consistent with the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) estimates of 30-36 ka. These young OSL results were used to argue for a relatively recent age of the extinct fauna. Our results imply that SU6 is either significantly older than the OSL results, or that a large fraction of the faunal material and the charcoal found in SU6 was derived from older, lateral deposits. Our U and Th laser ablation ICPMS results as well as the REE profiles reported by Trueman et al. [2008. Comparing rates of recystallisation and the potential for preservation of biomolecules from the distribution of trace elements in fossil bones. C.R. Palevol. General Paleontology (Taphonomy and Fossilization) 7, 145-158] contradict the interpretation of previously reported rare earth element compositions of bones, and the argument based thereon for the primary context of faunal

  20. Improved spatial resolution for U-series dating of opal at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA, using ion-microprobe and microdigestion methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, J.B.; Neymark, L.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Persing, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Two novel methods of in situ isotope analysis, ion microprobe and microdigestion, were used for 230Th/U and 234U/238U dating of finely laminated opal hemispheres formed in unsaturated felsic tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, proposed site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Both methods allow analysis of layers as many as several orders of magnitude thinner than standard methods using total hemisphere digestion that were reported previously. Average growth rates calculated from data at this improved spatial resolution verified that opal grew at extremely slow rates over the last million years. Growth rates of 0.58 and 0.69 mm/m.y. were obtained for the outer 305 and 740 ??m of two opal hemispheres analyzed by ion microprobe, and 0.68 mm/m.y. for the outer 22 ??m of one of these same hemispheres analyzed by sequential microdigestion. These Pleistocene growth rates are 2 to 10 times slower than those calculated for older secondary calcite and silica mineral coatings deposited over the last 5 to 10 m.y. dated by the U-Pb method and may reflect differences between Miocene and Pleistocene seepage flux. The microdigestion data also imply that opal growth rates may have varied over the last 40 k.y. These data are the first indication that growth rates and associated seepage in the proposed repository horizon may correlate with changes in late Pleistocene climate, involving faster growth during wetter, cooler climates (glacial maximum), slower growth during transition climates, and no growth during the most arid climate (modern). Data collected at this refined spatial scale may lead to a better understanding of the hydrologic variability expected within the thick unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain over the time scale of interest for radioactive waste isolation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Levels of sup 137 Cs and natural radioactivity in Saudi Arabian soil

    SciTech Connect

    Abulfarai, W.; Abdul-Majid, S. )

    1991-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, there was concern about contamination from the radioactive plume reaching Saudi Arabia. Cesium-137 concentration in the soil was measured to determine the degree of contamination from the accident. The concentrations of {sup 40}K, {sup 214}Bi, and {sup 228}Ac were determined as well. Bismuth-214 is a member of the {sup 238}U series, while {sup 228}Ac is from the {sup 238}Th series. Each of these isotopes emits several well-resolved photons of relatively high intensity per disintegration.

  2. On the Quality of ENSDF {gamma}-Ray Intensity Data for {gamma}-Ray Spectrometric Determination of Th and U and Their Decay Series Disequilibria, in the Assessment of the Radiation Dose Rate in Luminescence Dating of Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Corte, Frans de; Vandenberghe, Dimitri; Wispelaere, Antoine de

    2005-05-24

    In luminescence dating of sediments, one of the most interesting tools for the determination of the annual radiation dose is Ge {gamma}-ray spectrometry. Indeed, it yields information on both the content of the radioelements K, Th, and U, and on the occurrence - in geological times - of disequilibria in the Th and U decay series. In the present work, two methodological variants of the {gamma}-spectrometric analysis were tested, which largely depend on the quality of the nuclear decay data involved: (1) a parametric calibration of the sediment measurements, and (2) the correction for the heavy spectral interference of the 226Ra 186.2 keV peak by 235U at 185.7 keV. The performance of these methods was examined via the analysis of three Certified Reference Materials, with the introduction of {gamma}-ray intensity data originating from ENSDF. Relevant conclusions were drawn as to the accuracy of the data and their uncertainties quoted.

  3. On the limits of using combined U-series/ESR method to date fossil teeth from two Early Pleistocene archaeological sites of the Orce area (Guadix-Baza basin, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Mathieu; Falguères, Christophe; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Grün, Rainer; Shao, Qingfeng; Aubert, Maxime; Dolo, Jean-Michel; Agustí, Jordi; Martínez-Navarro, Bienvenido; Palmqvist, Paul; Toro-Moyano, Isidro

    2012-05-01

    The combined U-series/electron spin resonance (ESR) dating method was applied to nine teeth from two Early Pleistocene archaeological sites located in the Orce area (Guadix-Baza Basin, Southern Spain): Fuente Nueva-3 (FN-3) and Barranco León (BL). The combination of biostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy places both sites between the Olduvai and Jaramillo subchrons (1.78-1.07 Ma). Our results highlight the difficulty of dating such old sites and point out the limits of the combined U-series/ESR dating method based on the US model. We identified several sources of uncertainties that may lead to inaccurate age estimates. Seven samples could not be dated because the dental tissues had (230Th/234U) activity ratios higher than equilibrium, indicating that uranium had probably leached from these tissues. It was however possible to calculate numerical estimates for two of the teeth, both from FN-3. One yielded a Middle Pleistocene age that seems to be strongly underestimated; the other provided an age of 1.19 ± 0.21 Ma, in agreement with data obtained from independent methods. The latter result gives encouragement that there are samples that can be used for routine dating of old sites.

  4. RADIO-ACTIVE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Wanetick, S.

    1962-03-01

    ABS>ure the change in velocity of a moving object. The transducer includes a radioactive source having a collimated beam of radioactive particles, a shield which can block the passage of the radioactive beam, and a scintillation detector to measure the number of radioactive particles in the beam which are not blocked by the shield. The shield is operatively placed across the radioactive beam so that any motion normal to the beam will cause the shield to move in the opposite direction thereby allowing more radioactive particles to reach the detector. The number of particles detected indicates the acceleration. (AEC)

  5. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  6. Radioactive iodine uptake

    MedlinePlus

    ... the testing center so that the amount of radioactivity in the thyroid gland can be measured. This ... The amount of radioactivity is very small, and there have been no documented side effects. The amount of iodine used is less than ...

  7. Radioactive diagnostic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, A.; Aihara, M.; Matsuda, M.; Suzuki, A.; Tsuya, A.

    1984-02-07

    A radioactive diagnostic agent for renal cortex, adrenal cortex, myocardium, brain stem, spinal nerve, etc., which comprises as an essential component monoiodoacetic acid wherein the iodine atom is radioactive.

  8. Rapid Ascent of Aphyric Mantle Melts through the Overriding Crust in Subduction Zones: Evidence from Variable Uranium-Series Disequilibria, Amorphous Hydrous Alteration Microtextures in Crystal Rims, and Two-Pyroxene Pseudo-Decompression Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellmer, G. F.; Freymuth, H.; Hsieh, H. H.; Hwang, S. L.; Iizuka, Y.; Miller, C. A.; Rubin, K. H.; Sakamoto, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic hazard mitigation at subduction zones critically depends on knowledge of magma generation and ascent processes and timescales. Two diametrically opposite scenarios are presently debated: One paradigm is the generation of low-silica (basaltic) melts in the mantle wedge, followed by protracted sub-liquidus magma ascent and evolution through crystal growth and fractionation in crustal reservoirs, which are tapped during volcanic eruptions. In contrast, a diametrically opposite model favours the generation of higher silica melts in the mantle or in a lower crustal hot zone, followed by rapid decompression to the surface under super-liquidus conditions. In the latter case, crystals are picked up during magma ascent, and are in the process of dissolving. We present multiple lines of evidence that point to crystal uptake as the principal processes by which arc melts acquire their crystal cargo: (i) variable 234U-238U disequilibria in mineral separates; (ii) hydrous mineral rims with amorphous alteration textures; and (iii) two-pyroxene pseudo-decompression paths; cf. Zellmer et al. (2014a,b,c), doi: 10.1144/SP385.3 and 10.1144/SP385.9 and 10.1144/SP410.1. These observations point to a scarcity of true phenocrysts in many arc magmas, and thus to decompression of aphyric melts that take up their crystal cargo during ascent. The data imply that many hydrous wedge melts are more silica-rich than basalts and achieve super-liquidus conditions during rapid ascent from great depth.

  9. Porosity of the melting zone and variations in the solid mantle upwelling rate beneath Hawaii: Inferences from {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th-{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}U-{sup 231}Pa disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, K.W.W.; DePaolo, D.J.; Murrell, M.T.; Baldridge, W.S.; Goldstein, S.; Clague, D.; Jull, M.

    1999-12-01

    Measurements of {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th-{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}U-{sup 231}Pa disequilibria in a suite of tholeiitic-to-basanitic lavas provide estimates of porosity, solid mantle upwelling rate and melt transport times beneath Hawaii. The observation that ({sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U) {gt} 1 indicates that garnet is required as a residual phase in the magma sources for all of the lavas. Both chromatographic porous flow and dynamic melting of a garnet peridotite source can adequately explain the combined U-Th-Ra and U-Pa data for these Hawaiian basalts. For chromatographic porous flow, the calculated maximum porosity in the melting zone ranges from 0.3--3% for tholeiites and 0.1--1% for alkali basalts and basanites, and solid mantle upwelling rates range from 40 to 100 cm/yr for tholeiites and from 1 to 3 cm/yr for basanites. For dynamic melting, the escape or threshold porosity is 0.5--2% for tholeiites and 0.1--0.8% for alkali basalts and basanites, and solid mantle upwelling rates range from 10 to 30 cm/yr for tholeiites and from 0.1 to 1 cm/yr for basanites. Assuming a constant melt productivity, calculated total melt fractions range from 15% for the tholeiitic basalts to 3% for alkali basalts and basanites.

  10. A study of environmental radioactivity measurements for Cankiri, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kapdan, Enis; Taskin, Halim; Kam, Erol; Osmanlioglu, A Erdal; Karahan, Gursel; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2012-07-01

    This study is the first to assess the level of background radiation for the Cankiri province of Turkey. Indoor air radon concentrations were determined using Columbia Resin-39 nuclear track detectors and the average (222)Rn activity was found to be 44 Bq m(-3) (equivalent to an annual effective dose of 1.1 mSv). Measurements of gamma doses in outdoor air were performed using a portable plastic scintillation detector and the average gamma absorbed dose rate was found to be 8 μR h(-1) (corresponding to an annual effective dose of 87.7 μSv). Radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were measured through gamma-ray spectrometry and the average activities were determined as 17.7, 22.3, 357 and 4.1 Bq kg(-1) for the radionuclides (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, respectively. The average annual effective dose from the natural radioactivity sources ((238)U series, (232)Th series and (40)K) was calculated to be 44.4 μSv. Radioactivity levels of drinking water samples were carried out using a low-background proportional counter and the average gross alpha and beta activities were obtained as 0.25 and 0.26 Bq l(-1), respectively (equivalent to an annual effective dose of 184 μSv). The average radon concentrations in indoor air and the average radionuclide activities in soil were found to be lower than most Turkish cities while higher levels of outdoor gamma dose rate and water radioactivity were observed. The results of this study showed that the region's background radioactivity level differs considerably from the reported data for Turkish cities. PMID:22069234

  11. Radioactivity and food

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references.

  12. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  13. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  14. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  15. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  16. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  17. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Fred

    2012-11-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances.

  18. Radioactivity distribution in some Permian sediments from the Iratí and Corumbataí Formations of the Paraná Basin, Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Dionísio Uendro; Ribeiro, Fernando Brenha; Saad, Antonio Roberto; Nicolai, Silvia Helena de Araújo

    2004-01-01

    In the city of Limeira, southeastern Brazil, an important exposure of Permian sediments of the Paraná basin was revealed by an open pit mine that exploits limestone for production of soil correction compounds and raw materials for the ceramic industry. The radioactivity of these sediments was investigated in some detail and the results provided a general view of the vertical distributions of uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations and of the element ratios U/K, U/Th and Th/K. In general, the concentrations of the main natural radioactive elements are low, with uranium being enriched in some limestone and shale levels. In addition the results showed that the 238U series is in radioactive disequilibrium in many of the analyzed samples. Although the origin of the observed disequilibrium has not been investigated, the results suggest that it is due to weathering processes and water interaction with the rock matrix. PMID:14687638

  19. Formation of Pedogenic Carbonates in the Semi-arid Rio Grande Valley: Insights from Carbon, Major elements, and U-series isotopes in Natural and Agricultural Soils of Southern New Mexico and Western Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyachoti, S. K.; Ma, L.; Jin, L.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    Accumulation of pedogenic carbonates in arid and semi-arid soils affects soil porosity, water infiltration, and global carbon cycle. We investigate formation rates of these carbonates under different land uses in the semi-arid Rio Grande valley using mineralogy, concentrations of major elements (including C), and U-series isotopes. Our study sites include one alfalfa farm (Alfalfa) at El Paso, TX under frequent irrigation with saline water from the Rio Grande River, and one natural shrub field under natural rainfall conditions at the USDA Jornada Experimental Range (Jornada) in NM. Major minerals observed at Alfalfa and Jornada are calcite, quartz, and feldspars. Calcite/quartz ratios increase upward in the profile at Alfalfa, suggesting formation of carbonates in shallow soils. Consistently, total carbon increases toward the soil surface at Alfalfa, contributed by both soil organic carbon and soil inorganic carbon (pedogenic carbonates). Concentrations of major elements (e.g Ca, Mg, and Sr) also increase toward the surface at Alfalfa, suggesting surface addition. Alternating trends of enrichment and depletion are observed throughout the soil profiles. In contrast, calcite/quartz ratios decrease toward the surface at Jornada, indicative of leaching at shallow soils and redeposition of calcite at depth. This is in agreement with high soil inorganic carbon contents measured at depth. At Jornada however, the Ca, Mg and Sr concentrations decrease toward the surface, showing typical depletion profiles. (234U/238U) activity ratios in bulk soils increase upward at Alfalfa while at Jornada (234U/238U) ratios decrease toward the surface. (234U/238U) ratios at Alfalfa suggest surface addition of U onto shallow soils probably from irrigation water, which is known to have high (234U/238U) ratios. Jornada shows preferential loss of 234U upward. U-series disequilibrium in pedogenic carbonates enables calculation of their formation ages. At Alfalfa, carbonate ages range from 2

  20. 238U-230Th-226Ra disequilibria in dacite and plagioclase from the 2004-2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens: Chapter 36 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, Kari M.; Donnelly, Carrie T.

    2008-01-01

    230Th)/(232Th) measured for the 1980s reference suite. However, (230Th)/(232Th) for plagioclase separates for dome samples erupted during October and November 2004 are significantly different from corresponding whole-rock values, which suggests that a large fraction (>30 percent) of crystals in each sample are foreign to the host liquid. Furthermore, plagioclase in the two 2004 samples have U-series characteristics distinct from each other and from plagioclase in dacite erupted in 1982, indicating that (1) the current eruption must include a component of crystals (and potentially associated magma) that were not sampled by the 1980-86 eruption, and (2) dacite magmas erupted only a month apart in 2004 contain different populations of crystals, indicating that this foreign component is highly heterogeneous within the 2004-5 magma reservoir.

  1. Natural and man-made radioactivity in soils and plants around the research reactor of Inshass.

    PubMed

    Higgy, R H; Pimpl, M

    1998-12-01

    The specific radioactivities of the U-series, 232Th, 137Cs and 40K were measured in soil samples around the Inshass reactor in Cairo, using a gamma-ray spectrometer with a HpGe detector. The alpha activity of 238U, 234U and 235U was measured in the same soil samples by surface barrier detectors after radiochemical separation and the obtained results were compared with the specific activities determined by gamma-measurements. The alpha-activity of 238Pu, 239+240Pu, 241Am, 242Cm and 244Cm was measured after radiochemical separation by surface barrier detectors for both soil and plant samples. Then beta-activity of 241Pu was measured using liquid scintillation spectrometry. PMID:9776618

  2. Understanding radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  3. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  4. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, Stanley R.

    1985-01-01

    A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

  5. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  6. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  7. Fluid/rock Interaction History of a Faulted Rhyolite-Granite Contact Determined by Sr- Pb-Isotopes, Th/U-Disequilibria and Elemental Distributions (Eastern Rhine Graben Shoulder, SW-Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, T.; Mangini, A.; Kober, B.; Schleicher, A.; Warr, L. N.

    2003-04-01

    Major and trace element analyses allow to obtain information concerning the chemical changes induced by alteration. Differences are partly petrographic because the profile crosses the granite-rhyolite contact, but they are also due to different alteration levels induced by fluid circulation along the fault system which has drained the alteration processes. The granite-rhyolite contact constitutes the primary structure. Only the most incompatible elements (Si, Al, Zr, Hf) retain their original signatures and reflect a mixing between typical granite and rhyolite lithologies across the altered zones (cataclasite). The more mobile elements show a different composition within the altered zones (cataclasite) notably a high leaching of cations. The geochemical tracers also suggest at least one strong hydrothermal event with reducing conditions in the altered zones. The isotopic analyses delivered qualitative and temporal information. The use of several isotopic systems, Rb/Sr-, U/Pb-isotopes and Th/U disequilibria, reveals a complex history of polyphase fluid/rock interaction following the Permian volcanic extrusion, showing notable disturbances during the late Jurassic hydrothermal activities, the Tertiary rifting of the Rhine Graben and more recent Quaternary alteration. The granite zone of the sampling profile has underwent an event which set up a new Rb-Sr isotopic composition and reset the Rb/Sr system which originatly corresponded to the Carboniferous intrusion ages. The Rb-Sr data of the granite samples produce a whole rock isochron of 152 ± 5,7 Ma (2σ error) in good agreement with the well-known late Jurassic hydrothermal event (135--160 Ma). The rocks evolution lines for Pb support a Tertiary hydrothermal event (54 Ma ± 16; 1σ error), potentially connected with the development of the Rhine Graben. The profile samples have undergone uranium and thorium redistribution processes which have occurred within the last ˜10^6 years. The samples of the altered zones

  8. Biodegradation of radioactive animals

    SciTech Connect

    Party, N.; Party, E.; Wilkerson, A.

    1995-06-01

    The two most common disposal alternatives for animals contaminated with radioactive materials are incineration and burial. For most of the country burial has entailed shipping the carcasses to a commercial disposal facility at Barnwell, South Carolina, where it was landfilled along with other solid radioactive waste. Unfortunately, since 30 June 1994, this facility accepts waste generated by the states of the Southeast Compact only. Therefore, burial is no longer an option for most of the country`s generators and incineration is an option only for those institutions which have, or have access to, an incinerator that is permitted to burn radioactive materials and that accepts animal carcasses with de minimis levels of radioactive contaminants. Many institutions, especially those in congested urban areas where the public does not support incineration, do not have viable outlets for radioactive animal carcasses. Interim, on-site storage poses problems of its own. Biodegradation of animal carcasses with dermestid beetles is an inexpensive approach to this waste management problem. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Radioactivity in food crops

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  10. Radioactivity of Consumer Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek; Fulmer, Philip

    2006-11-01

    A variety of consumer products and household items contain varying amounts of radioactivity. Examples of these items include: FiestaWare and similar glazed china, salt substitute, bananas, brazil nuts, lantern mantles, smoke detectors and depression glass. Many of these items contain natural sources of radioactivity such as Uranium, Thorium, Radium and Potassium. A few contain man-made sources like Americium. This presentation will detail the sources and relative radioactivity of these items (including demonstrations). Further, measurements of the isotopic ratios of Uranium-235 and Uranium-238 in several pieces of china will be compared to historical uses of natural and depleted Uranium. Finally, the presenters will discuss radiation safety as it pertains to the use of these items.

  11. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  12. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, S.R.

    1984-05-30

    A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

  13. Detecting Illicit Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Joseph C.; Coursey, Bert; Carter, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Specialized instruments have been developed to detect the presence of illicit radioactive sources that may be used by terrorists in radiation dispersal devices, so-called ''dirty bombs'' or improvised nuclear devices. This article discusses developments in devices to detect and measure radiation.

  14. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  15. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  16. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  17. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  18. TABLE OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    For those chemical elements which have no stable nuclides with a terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on radioactive half-lives and relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest and importance have been evaluated and the recommended values and uncertainties are listed.

  19. Learning the mechanisms of chemical disequilibria.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Schuyler B; Alaghemandi, Mohammad; Green, Jason R

    2016-08-28

    When at equilibrium, large-scale systems obey thermodynamics because they have microscopic configurations that are typical. "Typical" states are a fraction of those possible with the majority of the probability. A more precise definition of typical states underlies the transmission, coding, and compression of information. However, this definition does not apply to natural systems that are transiently away from equilibrium. Here, we introduce a variational measure of typicality and apply it to atomistic simulations of a model for hydrogen oxidation. While a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and oxygen combusts, reactant molecules transform through a variety of ephemeral species en route to the product, water. Out of the exponentially growing number of possible sequences of chemical species, we find that greater than 95% of the probability concentrates in less than 1% of the possible sequences. Overall, these results extend the notion of typicality across the nonequilibrium regime and suggest that typical sequences are a route to learning mechanisms from experimental measurements. They also open up the possibility of constructing ensembles for computing the macroscopic observables of systems out of equilibrium. PMID:27586909

  20. Geophysical controls of chemical disequilibria in Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, S. D.; Hand, K. P.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2016-05-01

    The ocean in Jupiter's moon Europa may have redox balance similar to Earth's. On Earth, low-temperature hydration of crustal olivine produces substantial hydrogen, comparable to any potential flux from volcanic activity. Here we compare hydrogen and oxygen production rates of the Earth system with fluxes to Europa's ocean. Even without volcanic hydrothermal activity, water-rock alteration in Europa causes hydrogen fluxes 10 times smaller than Earth's. Europa's ocean may have become reducing for a brief epoch, for example, after a thermal-orbital resonance ˜2 Gyr after accretion. Estimated oxidant flux to Europa's ocean is comparable to estimated hydrogen fluxes. Europa's ice delivers oxidants to its ocean at the upper end of these estimates if its ice is geologically active, as evidence of geologic activity and subduction implies.

  1. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  2. Airborne radioactive contamination monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, C.R.; Adams, J.R.; Bounds, J.A.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-03-01

    Current technologies for the detection of airborne radioactive contamination do not provide real-time capability. Most of these techniques are based on the capture of particulate matter in air onto filters which are then processed in the laboratory; thus, the turnaround time for detection of contamination can be many days. To address this shortcoming, an effort is underway to adapt LRAD (Long-Range-Alpha-Detection) technology for real-time monitoring of airborne releases of alpa-emitting radionuclides. Alpha decays in air create ionization that can be subsequently collected on electrodes, producing a current that is proportional to the amount of radioactive material present. Using external fans on a pipe containing LRAD detectors, controlled samples of ambient air can be continuously tested for the presence of radioactive contamination. Current prototypes include a two-chamber model. Sampled air is drawn through a particulate filter and then through the first chamber, which uses an electrostatic filter at its entrance to remove ambient ionization. At its exit, ionization that occurred due to the presence of radon is collected and recorded. The air then passes through a length of pipe to allow some decay of short-lived radon species. A second chamber identical to the first monitors the remaining activity. Further development is necessary on air samples without the use of particulate filtering, both to distinguish ionization that can pass through the initial electrostatic filter on otherwise inert particulate matter from that produced through the decay of radioactive material and to separate both of these from the radon contribution. The end product could provide a sensitive, cost-effective, real-time method of determining the presence of airborne radioactive contamination.

  3. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.; McElroy, Jack L.; Mendel, John E.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

  4. International radioactive material recycling challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Greeves, John T.; Lieberman, James

    2007-07-01

    The paper explores current examples of successful International radioactive recycling programs and also explores operational regulatory and political challenges that need to be considered for expanding international recycling world-wide. Most countries regulations are fully consistent with the International Atomic Agency (IAEA) Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Material and the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. IAEA member States reported on the status of their efforts to control transboundary movement of radioactive material recently during the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management meeting in May 2006. (authors)

  5. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, Kenneth E.; Weeks, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

  6. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

    1997-08-12

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

  7. PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

    1961-11-14

    A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

  8. Table of radioactive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    As has been the custom in the past, the Commission publishes a table of relative atomic masses and halflives of selected radionuclides. The information contained in this table will enable the user to calculate the atomic weight for radioactive materials with a variety of isotopic compositions. The atomic masses have been taken from the 1984 Atomic Mass Table. Some of the halflives have already been documented.

  9. MARE: Mars Radioactivity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Lellis, A. M.; Capria, M. T.; Espinasse, S.; Magni, G.; Orosei, R.; Piccioni, G.; Federico, C.; Minelli, G.; Pauselli, C.; Scarpa, G.

    1999-09-01

    MARE is an experiment for the measurement of the beta and gamma radioactivity in space and in the Martian soil, both at the surface and in the subsurface. This will be accomplished by means of a dosimeter and a spectrometer. The radiation dose rate to which crews will be exposed is one of the hazards that has to be quantified before the human exploration of Mars may begin. Data for evaluating radioactivity levels at Martian surface are of great interest for environmental studies related to life in general. The dosimeter will be able to measure the beta and gamma radiation dose received, with a responsivity which is very close to that of a living organism. The dosimeter is based on thermo-luminescence pills which emit an optical signal proportional to the absorbed dose when heated. Radioactive elements ((40) K, (235) U, (238) U and (232) Th) can be used as a mean of tracing the evolution of a terrestrial planet. These radioactive elements are the source of the internal heat, which drives convection in the mantle. They have been redistributed in this process and they are now concentrated in the crust where they are accessible for study. Their different behavior during the fractionation process can be used as a mean to investigate the geochemical characteristic of Mars. The spectrometer, a scintillation radiation absorber system for single event counting, is capable of detecting gamma photons with energies between 200 KeV and 10 MeV. The detected events will be processed in such a way to allow the recognition of the spectral signature of different decay processes, and thus the identification and the measurement of the concentrations of different radionuclides in the Martian soil.

  10. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1953-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified in 13; two contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on 7 properties was not ascertained; and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and 9 are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities; the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontit. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint 9 only 4 of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951, the Majuba Hill mine, the Stalin's Present prospect, and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. Reserves of ore grade are small on all of these properties and probably cannot be developed commercially unless an ore-buying station is set up nearby. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  11. Natural radioactivity and radiological hazards assessment of bone-coal from a vanadium mine in central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Chen, Chao-Feng; Huang, Yi-Chao; Yue, Qi-Jian; Zhong, Chun-Ming; Tan, Cheng-Jun

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive utilization project of bone-coal in a vanadium mine was proposing in recent years in central China. Based on the analysis of 31 representative bone-coal samples from 9 boreholes at various depth drilled in planning initial minery, the average activity concentrations of 238U, 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were determined in the range of 196.4-653.3 Bq/kg, 200.2-564.4 Bq/kg, 9.4-64.6 Bq/kg and 71.5-345.4 Bq/kg, respectively. The major natural radionuclides were identified as U-series nuclides with the activity concentrations obviously higher than common coal. The estimated absorbed dose rates in the air varied between 107.1 and 310.5 nGy/h. The averaged external annual effective dose due to the radioactivity in the bone-coal was predicted as 0.37 mSv/a, and the main contribution is 87.5% for U-series. The radium equivalent activity, the external and internal indices of most of the samples were shown with high values of an unacceptable level, which indicated the bone-coal would carry a considerable radiation hazard to the workers and the local individuals. The hazard of radon inhalation should be focused during mining and following processes. Further radiological assessment should be carried out as the natural radioactivity in the bone-coal would be technically enriched during the combustion process of the bone-coal and utilization of the byproducts.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

  13. PERSPECTIVE: Fireworks and radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenecker, Katharina

    2009-09-01

    both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4]. A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin. Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure. Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6]. Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere. So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity? In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium. The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols

  14. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  15. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  16. Radioactive and magnetic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heye, D.; Beiersdorf, H.

    1979-01-01

    Age and growth pattern determination of manganese nodules were explored. Two methods are discussed: (1) measurement of the presence of radioactive iodine isotopes; which is effective only up to 3.105 years, and (2) measurements of magnetism. The growth rates of three nodules were determined. The surface of the nodule was recent, and the overall age of the nodule could be determined with accuracy of better than 30%. Measurement of paleomagnetic effect was attempted to determine wider age ranges, however, the measured sign changes could not be interpreted as paleomagnetic reversals.

  17. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  18. Material for radioactive protection

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.S.; Boyer, N.W.

    A boron containing burn resistant, low-level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source is described. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25 to 50%, coal tar in the range of 25 to 37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  19. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-09-15

    Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

  20. Simpler radioactive wastewater processing.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, José Canga; Luh, Volker

    2011-11-01

    José Canga Rodríguez, key account manager, Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences, EnviroChemie, and Volker Luh, CEO of EnviroDTS, describe the development, and recent successful application, of a new technology for dealing safely and effectively with the radioactive "wastewater" generated by patients who have undergone radiotherapy in nuclear medicine facilities. The BioChroma process provides what is reportedly not only a more flexible means than traditional "delay and decay" systems of dealing with this "by-product" of medical treatment, but also one that requires less plant space, affords less risk of leakage or cross-contamination, and is easier to install. PMID:22368885

  1. Numerical dating of a Late Quaternary spit-shoreline complex at the northern end of Silver Lake playa, Mojave Desert, California: A comparison of the applicability of radiocarbon, luminescence, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide, electron spin resonance, U-series and amino acid racemization methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Bright, Jordon; Finkel, R.C.; Jaiswal, M.K.; Kaufman, D.S.; Mahan, S.; Radtke, U.; Schneider, J.S.; Sharp, W.; Singhvi, A.K.; Warren, C.N.

    2007-01-01

    A Late Quaternary spit-shoreline complex on the northern shore of Pleistocene Lake Mojave of southeastern California, USA was studied with the goal of comparing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon, luminescence, electron spin resonance (ESR), terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide (TCN) surface exposure, amino acid racemization (AAR) and U-series dating methods. The pattern of ages obtained by the different methods illustrates the complexity of processes acting in the lakeshore environment and highlights the utility of a multi-method approach. TCN surface exposure ages (mostly ???20-30 ka) record the initial erosion of shoreline benches, whereas radiocarbon ages on shells (determined in this and previous studies) within the spit, supported by AAR data, record its construction at fluctuating lake levels from ???16 to 10 ka. Luminescence ages on spit sediment (???6-7 ka) and ESR ages on spit shells (???4 ka) are anomalously young relative to radiocarbon ages of shells within the same deposits. The significance of the surprisingly young luminescence ages is not clear. The younger ESR ages could be a consequence of post-mortem enrichment of U in the shells. High concentrations of detrital thorium in tufa coating spit gravels inhibited the use of single-sample U-series dating. Detailed comparisons such as this provide one of the few means of assessing the accuracy of Quaternary dating techniques. More such comparisons are needed. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  2. Levels of radioactivity in Qatar

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Thani, A.A.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Mohammed, K.

    1995-12-31

    The levels of natural and man-made radioactivity in soil and seabed were measured in Qatar to assess radiation exposure levels and to evaluate any radioactive contamination that may have reached the country from fallout or due to the Chernobyl accident radioactivity release. Qatar peninsula is located on the Arabian Gulf, 4500 km from Chernobyl, and has an area of {approximately}11,600 km{sup 2} and a population of {approximately}600,000.

  3. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Robert E.; Ziegler, Anton A.; Serino, David F.; Basnar, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

  4. Radioactivity in Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Interest in the problems due to the radioactive contamination of the environment has been frequently stimulated by rumors of an occurrence of severe contamination of lakes and rivers in areas of the Ural Mountains. Occasional evidence appearing in publications and provided by Soviet emigrants has been pieced together and seems to suggest that there is an ideal opportunity for groundwater geochemists and others to evaluate such major radioactivity in the environment. The reasons that such a study probably will not take place is that the contamination may have been caused for the most part by a nuclear explosion in a Soviet weapons plant.F. Parker, an environmental scientist at Vanderbilt University, in a study for the Department of Energy, deduced that a large explosion occurred in 1958 at a nuclear fuels reprocessing plant at Kyshtym in the Ural Mountains, according to a recent report (Science, July 8, 1983). The report refers to the original interpretations of Z. Medvedev, a Soviet geneticist, who concluded that nuclear fallout has contaminated a very extensive area around Kyshtym.

  5. Stefan Meyer: Pioneer of Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Wolfgang L.

    2001-03-01

    Stefan Meyer was one of the pioneers in radioactivity research and director of the Vienna Radium Institute, the first institution in the world devoted exclusively to radioactivity. I give here a biographical sketch of Meyer and of some of his colleagues and an overview of the research activities at the Radium Institute.

  6. Radioactive elements in stellar atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gopka, Vira; Yushchenko, Alexander; Goriely, Stephane; Shavrina, Angelina; Kang, Young Woon

    2006-07-12

    The identification of lines of radioactive elements (Tc, Pm and elements with 83radioactive decay of Th and U in the upper levels of stellar atmospheres, contamination of stellar atmosphere by recent SN explosion, and spallation reactions.

  7. Heavy fragment radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.B.

    1987-12-10

    This recently discovered mode of radioactive decay, like alpha decay and spontaneous fission, is believed to involve tunneling through the deformation-energy barrier between a very heavy nucleus and two separated fragments the sum of whose masses is less than the mass of the parent nucleus. In all known cases the heavier of the two fragments is close to doubly magic /sup 208/Pb, and the lighter fragment has even Z. Four isotopes of Ra are known to emit /sup 14/C nuclei; several isotopes of U as well as /sup 230/Th and /sup 231/Pa emit Ne nuclei; and /sup 234/U exhibits four hadronic decay modes: alpha decay, spontaneous fission, Ne decay and Mg decay.

  8. PERSPECTIVE: Fireworks and radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenecker, Katharina

    2009-09-01

    both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4]. A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin. Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure. Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6]. Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere. So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity? In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium. The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols

  9. Radioactive waste processing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

    1985-08-30

    Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

  10. Environmental radioactive intercomparison program and radioactive standards program

    SciTech Connect

    Dilbeck, G.

    1993-12-31

    The Environmental Radioactivity Intercomparison Program described herein provides quality assurance support for laboratories involved in analyzing public drinking water under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Regulations, and to the environmental radiation monitoring activities of various agencies. More than 300 federal and state nuclear facilities and private laboratories participate in some phase of the program. This presentation describes the Intercomparison Program studies and matrices involved, summarizes the precision and accuracy requirements of various radioactive analytes, and describes the traceability determinations involved with radioactive calibration standards distributed to the participants. A summary of program participants, sample and report distributions, and additional responsibilities of this program are discussed.

  11. Radioactive deposits in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Lovering, Tom G.

    1954-01-01

    Reconnaissance examination by Government geologists of many areas, mine properties, and prospects in California during the period between 1948 and 1953 has confirmed the presence of radioactive materials in place at more than 40 localities. Abnormal radioactivity at these localities is due to concentrations of primary and secondary uranium minerals, to radon gas, radium (?), and to thorium minerals. Of the known occurrences only three were thought to contain uranium oxide (uranitite or pitchblende), 4 contained uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals, 12 contained secondary uranium minerals, such as autunite, carnotite, and torbernite, one contained radon gas, 7 contained thorium minerals, and, at the remaining 16 localities, the source of the anomalous radiation was not positively determined. The occurrences in which uranium oxide has been tentatively identified include the Rathgeb mine (Calaveras County), the Yerih group of claims (San Bernardino County), and the Rainbow claim (Madera County). Occurrences of secondary uranium minerals are largely confined to the arid desert regions of south-eastern California including deposits in San Bernardino, Kern, Inyo, and Imperial Counties. Uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals have been reported from pegmatite and granitic rock in southeastern and eastern California. Thorium minerals have been found in vein deposits in eastern San Bernardino County and from pegmatites and granitic rocks in various parts of southeastern California; placer concentrations of thorium minerals are known from nearly all areas in the State that are underlain, in part, by plutonic crystalline rocks. The primary uranium minerals occur principally as minute accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, or with base-metal sulfide minerals in veins. Thorium minerals also occur as accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, in placer deposits derived from such rock, and, at Mountain Pass, in veins

  12. Automatic Searching Radioactive Sources by Airborne Radioactive Survey Using Multicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, H.; Eun, S. B.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Jung, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to prepare emergency situation lost a dangerous radioelement source in advance and to search a radioactive source automatically, we develop airborne radioelement survey system by multicopter. This multicopter radioelement survey system consists of a small portable customized BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) detector, video recording part, wireless connecting part to ground pilot, GPS, and several equipments for automatic flight. This system is possible to search flight by preprogramed lines. This radioactive detecting system are tested to find intentional hidden source, The performance of detecting a source is well proved with very low flight altitude in spite of depending on the magnitude of radioelement sources. The advantage of multicopter system, one of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle), is to avoid the potential of close access to a dangerous radioactive source by using fully automatic searching capability. In this paper, we introduce our multicopter system for detecting radioactive source and synthetic case history for demonstrating this system.

  13. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste - LLW, intermediate-level waste - ILW, high-level waste - HLW) are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  14. RADIOACTIVE CONCENTRATOR AND RADIATION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, L.P.

    1959-12-29

    A method is presented for forming a permeable ion exchange bed using Montmorillonite clay to absorb and adsorb radioactive ions from liquid radioactive wastes. A paste is formed of clay, water, and a material that fomns with clay a stable aggregate in the presence of water. The mixture is extruded into a volume of water to form clay rods. The rods may then be used to remove radioactive cations from liquid waste solutions. After use, the rods are removed from the solution and heated to a temperature of 750 to 1000 deg C to fix the ratioactive cations in the clay.

  15. SELF SINTERING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    DOEpatents

    McVay, T.N.; Johnson, J.R.; Struxness, E.G.; Morgan, K.Z.

    1959-12-29

    A method is described for disposal of radioactive liquid waste materials. The wastes are mixed with clays and fluxes to form a ceramic slip and disposed in a thermally insulated container in a layer. The temperature of the layer rises due to conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat boillng off the liquid to fomn a dry mass. The dry mass is then covered with thermal insulation, and the mass is self-sintered into a leach-resistant ceramic cake by further conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat.

  16. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  17. Radioactive Waste Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, P. A.; Atkins-Duffin, C. E.

    Issues related to the management of radioactive wastes are presented with specific emphasis on high-level wastes generated as a result of energy and materials production using nuclear reactors. The final disposition of these high-level wastes depends on which nuclear fuel cycle is pursued, and range from once-through burning of fuel in a light water reactor followed by direct disposal in a geologic repository to more advanced fuel cycles (AFCs) where the spent fuel is reprocessed or partitioned to recover the fissile material (primarily 235U and 239Pu) as well as the minor actinides (MAs) (neptunium, americium, and curium) and some long-lived fission products (e.g., 99Tc and 129I). In the latter fuel cycle, the fissile materials are recycled through a reactor to produce more energy, the short-lived fission products are vitrified and disposed of in a geologic repository, and the minor actinides and long-lived fission products are converted to less radiotoxic or otherwise stable nuclides by a process called transmutation. The advantages and disadvantages of the various fuel cycle options and the challenges to the management of nuclear wastes they represent are discussed.

  18. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  19. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2016-07-01

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  20. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Newman, Darrell F.; Ross, Wayne A.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

  1. Radioactive waste material melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

    1990-04-24

    An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

  2. Radioactivity of the Cooling Water

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wigner, E. P.

    1943-03-01

    The most important source of radioactivity at the exit manifold of the pile will be due to O{sup 19}, formed by neutron absorption of O{sup 18}. A recent measurement of Fermi and Weil permits to estimate that it will be safe to stay about 80 minutes daily close to the exit manifolds without any shield. Estimates are given for the radioactivities from other sources both in the neighborhood and farther away from the pile.

  3. Radioactive materials in recycled metals.

    PubMed

    Lubenau, J O; Yusko, J G

    1995-04-01

    In recent years, the metal recycling industry has become increasingly aware of an unwanted component in metal scrap--radioactive material. Worldwide, there have been 35 instances where radioactive sources were unintentionally smelted in the course of recycling metal scrap. In some cases contaminated metal consumer products were distributed internationally. In at least one case, serious radiation exposures of workers and the public occurred. Radioactive material appearing in metal scrap includes sources subject to licensing under the Atomic Energy Act and also naturally occurring radioactive material. U.S. mills that have smelted a radioactive source face costs resulting from decontamination, waste disposal, and lost profits that range from 7 to 23 million U.S. dollars for each event. To solve the problem, industry and the government have jointly undertaken initiatives to increase awareness of the problem within the metal recycling industry. Radiation monitoring of recycled metal scrap is being performed increasingly by mills and, to a lesser extent, by scrap processors. The monitoring does not, however, provide 100% protection. Improvements in regulatory oversight by the government could stimulate improved accounting and control of licensed sources. However, additional government effort in this area must be reconciled with competing priorities in radiation safety and budgetary constraints. The threat of radioactive material in recycled metal scrap will continue for the foreseeable future and, thus, poses regulatory policy challenges for both developed and developing nations. PMID:7883556

  4. Storage depot for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Szulinski, Milton J.

    1983-01-01

    Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

  5. 49 CFR 172.556 - RADIOACTIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE placard. 172.556 Section 172.556... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.556 RADIOACTIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... on the RADIOACTIVE placard must be white in the lower portion with a yellow triangle in the...

  6. 49 CFR 172.556 - RADIOACTIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE placard. 172.556 Section 172.556... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.556 RADIOACTIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... on the RADIOACTIVE placard must be white in the lower portion with a yellow triangle in the...

  7. 49 CFR 172.556 - RADIOACTIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE placard. 172.556 Section 172.556... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.556 RADIOACTIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... on the RADIOACTIVE placard must be white in the lower portion with a yellow triangle in the...

  8. 49 CFR 172.556 - RADIOACTIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE placard. 172.556 Section 172.556... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.556 RADIOACTIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... on the RADIOACTIVE placard must be white in the lower portion with a yellow triangle in the...

  9. 49 CFR 172.556 - RADIOACTIVE placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE placard. 172.556 Section 172.556... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.556 RADIOACTIVE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... on the RADIOACTIVE placard must be white in the lower portion with a yellow triangle in the...

  10. Endangered and Extinct Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leising, M. D.

    1993-07-01

    Gamma ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual nucleosynthesis events, via observations of short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring global galactic nucleosynthesis today with detections of longer-lived radioactivity. Many of the astrophysical issues addressed by these observations are precisely those that must be understood in order to interpret observations of extinct radioactivity in meteorites. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both 56Co [1] and 57Co [2] were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions. Live 26Al in the galaxy might come from Type II supernovae and their progenitors, and if this is eventually shown to be the case, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, the galactic Type II supernova rate, and even models of the chemical evolution of the galaxy [3]. Titanium-44 is produced primarily in the alpha-rich freezeout from nuclear statistical equilibrium, possibly in Type Ia [4] and almost certainly in Type II supernovae [5]. The galactic recurrence time of these events is comparable to the 44Ti lifetime, so we expect to be able to see at most a few otherwise unseen 44Ti remnants at any given time. No such remnants have been detected yet [6]. Very simple arguments lead to the expectation that about 4 x 10^-4 M(sub)solar mass of 44Ca are produced per century. The product of the supernova frequency times the 44Ti yield per event must equal this number. Even assuming that only the latest event would be seen, rates in excess of 2 century^-1 are ruled out at >=99% confidence by the gamma ray limits. Only rates less than 0.3 century^-1 are acceptable at >5% confidence, and this means that the yield per event must be >10^-3 M(sub)solar mass to produce the requisite 44Ca. Rates this low are incompatible with current estimates for Type II supernovae and yields this high are also very

  11. Radioactivity of sand, groundwater and wild plants in northeast Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Khaled A; Seddeek, Mostafa K; Nijim, Abdelkareem; Sharshar, Taher; Badran, Hussein M

    2011-12-01

    The radioactivity levels are poorly studied in non-coastal arid regions. For this reason, 38 locations covering an area of about 350 km(2) in northeast Sinai, Egypt, were investigated by γ-ray spectroscopy. Moderately significant correlations among (238)U, (234)Th, and (226)Ra isotopes and low significant correlations between the concentrations of (238)U-series and (232)Th in sand were obtained. No evidence of correlation was found between the concentrations of radioisotopes and pH, grain size, total organic matter content, bicarbonate or calcium carbonate concentrations of the sand samples. The mean values of soil-to-plant transfer factor were 0.15, 0.18, 1.52 and 0.74 for (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs, respectively. The range of concentrations of (226)Ra,( 232)Th, and (40)K in water samples collected from five wells were<0.4-0.16,<0.4-0.13, and<0.15-1.62 Bq l(-1), respectively. The mean absorbed dose rate in outdoor air at a height of 1 m above the ground surface for the sand samples was 19.4 nGy h(-1). The Ra(eq) activities of the sands are lower than the recommended maximum value of 370 Bq kg(-1) criterion limit for building materials. PMID:22092101

  12. Activity concentration of natural radioactive nuclides in nonmetallic industrial raw materials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Kazuki; Tabe, Hiroyuki; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-11-01

    Natural materials such as rock, ore, and clay, containing natural radioactive nuclides are widely used as industrial raw materials in Japan. If these are high concentrations, the workers who handle the material can be unknowingly exposed to radiation at a high level. In this study, about 80 nonmetallic natural materials frequently used as industrial raw materials in Japan were comprehensively collected from several industrial companies, and the activity concentrations of (238)U series, (232)Th series and (40)K in the materials was determined by ICP-MS (inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer) and gamma ray spectrum analyses. Effective doses to workers handling them were estimated by using methods for dose estimation given in the RP 122. We found the activity concentrations to be lower than the critical values defined by regulatory requirements as described in the IAEA Safety Guide. The maximum estimated effective dose to workers handling these materials was 0.16 mSv y(-1), which was lower than the reference level (1-20 mSv y(-1)) for existing situation given in the ICRP Publ.103. PMID:25046866

  13. Radioactive Nanomaterials for Multimodality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Daiqin; Dougherty, Casey A.; Yang, Dongzhi; Wu, Hongwei; Hong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging techniques, including primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), can provide quantitative information for a biological event in vivo with ultra-high sensitivity, however, the comparatively low spatial resolution is their major limitation in clinical application. By convergence of nuclear imaging with other imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging, the hybrid imaging platforms can overcome the limitations from each individual imaging technique. Possessing versatile chemical linking ability and good cargo-loading capacity, radioactive nanomaterials can serve as ideal imaging contrast agents. In this review, we provide a brief overview about current state-of-the-art applications of radioactive nanomaterials in the circumstances of multimodality imaging. We present strategies for incorporation of radioisotope(s) into nanomaterials along with applications of radioactive nanomaterials in multimodal imaging. Advantages and limitations of radioactive nanomaterials for multimodal imaging applications are discussed. Finally, a future perspective of possible radioactive nanomaterial utilization is presented for improving diagnosis and patient management in a variety of diseases. PMID:27227167

  14. Dynamics of melt generation beneath mid-ocean ridge axes: Theoretical analysis based on [sup 238]U-[sup 230]Th-[sup 226]Ra and [sup 235]U-[sup 231]Pa disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhenwei Qin )

    1993-04-01

    Although slow melting favors the generation of basaltic melt from a mantle matrix with large radioactive disequilibrium between two actinide nuclides (McKenzie, 1985a), it results in long residence time in a magma chamber, during which the disequilibrium may be removed. An equilibrium melting model modified after McKenzie (1985a) is presented here which suggests that, for a given actinide parent-daughter pair, there exists a specific melting rate at which disequilibrium between these two nuclides reaches its maximum. This melting rate depends on the decay constant of the daughter nuclide concerned and the magma chamber volume scaled to that of its source. For a given scaled chamber size, large radioactive disequilibrium between two actinide nuclides in basalts will be observed if the melting rate is such that the residence time of the magma in the chamber is comparable to the mean life of the daughter nuclide. With a chamber size 1% in volume of the melting source, the melting rates at which maximum disequilibrium in basalts is obtained are 10[sup [minus]7], 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]7], and 3 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] y[sup [minus]1], respectively for [sup 238]U-[sup 230]Th, [sup 235]U-[sup 231]Pa, and [sup 230]Th-[sup 226]Ra. This implies that, while large disequilibrium between [sup 238]U-[sup 230]Th and between [sup 235]U-[sup 231]Pa may occur together, large [sup 230]Th-[sup 226]Ra disequilibrium will not coexist with large [sup 238]U-[sup 230]Th disequilibrium, consistent with some observations. The active mantle melting zone which supplies melt to a ridge axis is inferred to be only about 10 km thick and 50 km wide. The fraction of melt present in such a mantle source at any time is about 0.01 and 0.04, respectively, if melting rate is 10[sup [minus]7] and 10[sup [minus]6] y[sup [minus]1]. The corresponding residence time of the residual melt in the matrix is 10[sup 5] and 4 [times] 10[sup 4] y. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Enhanced Radioactive Material Source Security.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Joseph G

    2016-02-01

    Requirements for additional security measures for sealed radioactive sources have evolved since they were first implemented after the terrorist events of 11 September 2001. This paper will describe the sequence of those measures, commencing with the early orders issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to the May 2013 adoption of 10 CFR Part 37, Physical Protections of Category 1 and Category 2 Quantities of Radioactive Material. Part 37 requirements will be discussed in detail, as the 37 NRC Agreement States, which regulate approximately 88% of the radioactive material licensees, will be required to enact by 19 March 2016. In addition to the Part 37 requirements, the paper will also highlight some of the other ongoing efforts of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative and the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors. PMID:26717170

  16. Sorting of solid radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.; Pecival, I.; Hejtman, J.; Wildman, J.; Cechak, T.

    1993-12-31

    In the nuclear power plants solid radioactive wastes are produced during regular operation and during small repairs. It is necessary to sort them into the highly contaminated wastes for which a special procedure for storage is necessary and waste that is not radioactive and can be stored in the environment under specific regulations. The aim of the project was to propose and to construct equipment, which is able to sort the waste with a high degree of reliability and to distinguish highly contaminated wastes from wastes which are less dangerous to the environment. The sensitivity of the detection system was tested by a mathematical model. The radioactive wastes from the primary part of the nuclear power plant can have three composition types. Details of the composition of the radioisotopes mixture are presented.

  17. Storage containers for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Groh, Edward F.; Cassidy, Dale A.; Dates, Leon R.

    1981-01-01

    A radioactive material storage system for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together, whereby the plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or

  18. Radioactive dating of the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John J.; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Truran, James W.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which an accurate determination of the age of the Galaxy, and thus a lower bound on the age of the universe, can be obtained from radioactive dating is discussed. Emphasis is given to the use of the long-lived radioactive nuclei Re-187, Th-232, U-238, and U-235. The nature of the production sites of these and other potential Galactic chronometers is examined along with their production ratios. Age determinations from models of nucleocosmochronology are reviewed and compared with age determination from stellar sources and age constraints form cosmological considerations.

  19. Storage containers for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

    1980-07-31

    A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

  20. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  1. Radioactivity and the Biology Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsey, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses minimum necessary nuclear fundamentals of radioactive isotopes such as levels of activity, specific activity and the use of carrier materials. Corrections that need to be taken into account in using an isotope to obtain a valid result are also described and statistics for a valid result are included. (BR)

  2. Mass measurement of radioactive isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2004-10-01

    The highest precision in mass measurements on short-lived radionuclides is obtained using trapping and cooling techniques. Here, the experimental storage ring (ESR) at GSI/Darmstadt and the tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN play an important role. Status and recent results on mass measurements of radioactive nuclides with ESR and ISOLTRAP are summarized.

  3. RadioActive101 Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brites, Maria José; Ravenscroft, Andrew; Dellow, James; Rainey, Colin; Jorge, Ana; Santos, Sílvio Correia; Rees, Angela; Auwärter, Andreas; Catalão, Daniel; Balica, Magda; Camilleri, Anthony F.

    2014-01-01

    In keeping with the overarching RadioActive101 (RA101) spirit and ethos, this report is the product of collaborative and joined-up thinking from within the European consortium spread across five countries. As such, it is not simply a single voice reporting on the experiences and knowledge gained during the project. Rather it is a range of…

  4. High-Level Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Howard C.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a method to calculate the amount of high-level radioactive waste by taking into consideration the following factors: the fission process that yields the waste, identification of the waste, the energy required to run a 1-GWe plant for one year, and the uranium mass required to produce that energy. Briefly discusses waste disposal and…

  5. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1990-09-30

    This report discusses the nuclear structure of the following isotopes as a result of radioactive decays: neutron-deficient iridium isotopes; neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; neutron-deficient gold isotopes; neutron-deficient mercury isotopes; neutron-deficient thallium isotopes; neutron-deficient lead isotopes; neutron-deficient promethium isotopes; and neutron-deficient samarium isotopes.

  6. Radioactive particles in dose assessments.

    PubMed

    Dale, P; Robertson, I; Toner, M

    2008-10-01

    Radioactive particles present a novel exposure pathway for members of the public. For typical assessments of potential doses received by members of the public, habit surveys and environmental monitoring combine to allow the assessment to occur. In these circumstances it is believed that the probability of encounter/consumption is certain. The potential detriment is assessed through sampling the use of environmental monitoring data and dose coefficients such as that in ICRP 60 [ICRP, 1990. 1990 Recommendations of the international commission on radiological protection. Publication 60. Annals of the ICRP 21 (1-3)]. However, radioactive particles often represent a hazard that is difficult to quantify and where the probability of encounter is less than certain as are the potential effects on health. Normal assessment methodologies through sampling and analysis are not appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive particles either prospectively or retrospectively. This paper details many of the issues that should be considered when undertaking an assessment of the risk to health posed by radioactive particles. PMID:18657886

  7. Electrodynamic radioactivity detector for microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T. L.; Davis, E. J.; Jenkins, R. W., Jr.; McRae, D. D.

    1989-03-01

    A new technique for the measurement of the radioactive decay of single microparticles has been demonstrated. Although the experiments were made with droplets of order 20 μm in diameter, microparticles in the range 0.1-100 μm can be accommodated. An electrodynamic balance and combination light-scattering photometer were used to measure the charge-loss rate and size of a charged microsphere suspended in a laser beam by superposed ac and dc electrical fields. The charged particle undergoes charge loss in the partially ionized gas atmosphere which results from radioactive decay of 14C-tagged compounds, and the rate of charge loss is proportional to the rate of decay here. The charge on a particle was determined by measuring the dc voltage necessary to stably suspend the particle against gravity while simultaneously determining the droplet size by light-scattering techniques. The parameters which affect the operation of the electrodynamic balance as a radioactivity detector are examined, and the limits of its sensitivity are explored. Radioactivity levels as low as 120 pCi have been measured, and it appears that by reducing the background contamination inside our balance activity levels on the order of 10 pCi can be detected. This new technique has application in the measurement of activity levels and source discrimination of natural and man-made aerosols and smokes and is also useful for studies involving specifically labeled radio-chemical probes.

  8. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  9. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  10. 46 CFR 147.100 - Radioactive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (NRC) under 10 CFR parts 30 and 34. (b) Stowage of radioactive materials must conform to the... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radioactive materials. 147.100 Section 147.100 Shipping... Stowage and Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.100 Radioactive materials....